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Sample records for advanced reactor designs

  1. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  2. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  3. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design

  4. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  5. Engineering design of advanced marine reactor MRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    JAERI has studied the design of an advanced marine reactor (named as MRX), which meets requirements of the enhancement of economy and reliability, by reflecting results and knowledge obtained from the development of N.S. Mutsu. The MRX with a power of 100 MWt is intended to be used for ship propulsion such as an ice-breaker, container cargo ship and so on. After completion of the conceptual design, the engineering design was performed in four year plan from FY 1993 to 1996. (1) Compactness, light-weightiness and simplicity of the reactor system are realized by adopting an integral-type PWR, i.e. by installing the steam generator, the pressurizer, and the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) inside the pressure vessel. Because of elimination of the primary coolant circulation pipes in the MRX, possibility of large-scale pipe break accidents can be eliminated. This contributes to improve the safety of the reactor system and to simplify the engineered safety systems. (2) The in-vessel type CRDM contributes not only to eliminate possibilities of rod ejection accidents, but also to make the reactor system compact. (3) The concept of water-filled containment where the reactor pressure vessel is immersed in the water is adopted. It can be of use for emergency core cooling system which maintains core flooding passively in case of a loss-of-coolant accident. The water-filled containment system also contributes essentially light-weightness of the reactor system since the water inside containment acts as a radiation shield and in consequence the secondary radiation shield can be eliminated. (4) Adoption of passive decay heat removal systems has contributed in a greater deal to simplification of the engineered safety systems and to enhancement of reliability of the systems. (5) Operability has been improved by simplification of the whole reactor system, by adoption of the passive safety systems, advanced automatic operation systems, and so on. (J.P.N.)

  6. Advanced simulation for fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This talk broadly reviews recent research aimed at applying advanced simulation techniques specifically to fast neutron reactors. By advanced simulation we generally refer to attempts to do more science-based simulation - that is, to numerically solve the three-dimensional governing physical equations on fine scales and observe and study the holistic phenomena that emerge. In this way simulation is treated more akin to a traditional physical experiment, and can can be used both separately and in conjunction with physical experiments to develop more accurate predictive theories on reactor behavior. Many existing fast reactor modeling tools were developed for last generation's computational resources. They were built by engineers and physicists with deep physical insight - insight that both shaped and was informed by existing theory, and was underpinned by a vast repository of experimental data. Their general approach was to develop models that were tailored to varying degrees to the details of the reactor design, using free model parameters that were subsequently calibrated to match existing experimental data. The resulting codes were thus extremely useful for their specific purpose but highly limited in their predictive capability (neutronics to a lesser degree). They tended to represent more the state-of-the-art in our understanding rather than tools of exploration and innovation. Recently, a number of researchers have attempted to study the feasibility of solving more fundamental governing equations on realistic, three-dimensional geometries for different fast reactor sub-domains. This includes solving the Navier-Stokes equations for single-phase sodium flow (Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddie Simulation, and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Equations) in the core, upper plenum, primary and intermediate loop, etc.; the non-homogenized transport equations at very fine group, angle, and energy discretization, and thermo-mechanical feedback based on

  7. ACR-1000TM - advanced Candu reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM- 1000 (ACR-1000TM) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6TM reactor. This evolutionary advancement is based on AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU structures, systems, components and materials, gained during 50 years of continuous construction, engineering and commissioning, as well as on the experience and feedback received from operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. These innovations improve economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The Canadian nuclear reactor design evolution that has reached today's stage represented by the ACR-1000, has a long history dating back to the early 1950's. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few other countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. The ACR design has been reviewed by domestic and international regulatory bodies, and has been given a positive regulatory opinion about its licensability. The Canadian regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) completed the Phase 1 and Phase 2 pre-project design reviews in December 2008 and August 2009, respectively, and concluded that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the ACR-1000 design in Canada. The final stage of the ACR-1000 design is currently underway and will be completed by fall of 2011, along with the final elements of the safety analyses and probabilistic safety analyses supporting the finalized design. The generic Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the ACR-1000 was completed in September 2009. The PSAR demonstrates ACR-1000 safety case and compliance with Canadian and international regulatory requirements and expectations. (authors)

  8. Advanced gas cooled reactors - Designing for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Stations recently completed at Heysham in Lancashire, England, and Torness in East Lothian, Scotland represent the current stage of development of the commercial AGR. Each power station has two reactor turbo-generator units designed for a total station output of 2x660 MW(e) gross although powers in excess of this have been achieved and it is currently intended to uprate this as far as possible. The design of both stations has been based on the successful operating AGRs at Hinkley Point and Hunterston which have now been in-service for almost 15 years, although minor changes were made to meet new safety requirements and to make improvements suggested by operating experience. The construction of these new AGRs has been to programme and within budget. Full commercial load for the first reactor at Torness was achieved in August 1988 with the other three reactors following over the subsequent 15 months. This paper summarises the safety principles and guidelines for the design of the reactors and discusses how some of the main features of the safety case meet these safety requirements. The paper also summarises the design problems which arose during the construction period and explains how these problems were solved with the minimum delay to programme

  9. Advanced Fast Reactor - 100 - Design Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Fast Reactor-100 (AFR-100) is a small modular sodium-cooled fast reactor with an electrical power output of 100MWe. The AFR-100 has a long-lived core that does not require refueling for 30 years. The concept contains various innovations such as a small compact modular core (both vented and non-vented fuel pins), advanced core shielding materials, a compact fuel handling system, advanced electromagnetic pumps, compact intermediate heat exchangers, and a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system. These advanced systems and components were adopted in order to reduce the overall size of the primary heat transport system (and therefore the overall commodities and cost), enhance safety, and to improve overall plant performance. This paper presents the summary results of a year-long study that culminated in the design of two primary heat transport configurations for the AFR-100. The paper describes those innovations and shows how they are integrated into the overall AFR-100 primary heat transport system design. (author)

  10. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    advanced fuel cycle; (2) To qualify the transuranics-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR; and (3) To support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The ABTR should also address the following additional objectives: (1) To incorporate and demonstrate innovative design concepts and features that may lead to significant improvements in cost, safety, efficiency, reliability, or other favorable characteristics that could promote public acceptance and future private sector investment in ABRs; (2) To demonstrate improved technologies for safeguards and security; and (3) To support development of the U.S. infrastructure for design, fabrication and construction, testing and deployment of systems, structures and components for the ABRs. Based on these objectives, a pre-conceptual design of a 250 MWt ABTR has been developed; it is documented in this report. In addition to meeting the primary and additional objectives listed above, the lessons learned from fast reactor programs in the U.S. and worldwide and the operating experience of more than a dozen fast reactors around the world, in particular the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II have been incorporated into the design of the ABTR to the extent possible.

  11. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  12. Design Study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) has been conducted. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR that is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel. International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) takes advantage of international experience and uses the design based on Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) as reference for FOA studies of DOE in the U.S., because Japan has conducted R and Ds for the JSFR incorporating thirteen technology enhancements expected to improve safety, enhance economics, and increase reactor reliability. ARR's goal is to generate electricity while consuming fuel containing transuranics and to be cost-competitive with LWRs of similar size. INRA proposes 3 evolutions of the ARR; ARR1, a 500 MWe demonstration plant, online in 2025; ARR2, a 1,000 MWe commercial plant, online in 2035; ARR3, a 1,500 MWe full-scale commercial plant, online in 2050. INRA believes the scale-up factor of two is acceptable increase from manufacturing and licensing points of view. Major features of the ARR1 are the following: The reactor core of 70 cm high is working for a burner of TRU. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.6 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop arrangement and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight doublewalled tube is used to improve reliability. The capital cost, the construction schedule and regulatory and licensing schedule are estimated. Furthermore, the technology readiness level and the technology development roadmap are studied and identified to be ready for commercial deployment. (author)

  13. Design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) has been conducted. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR that is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel. International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) takes advantage of international experience and uses the design based on Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) as reference for FOA studies of US DOE, because Japan has conducted R and Ds for the JSFR incorporating thirteen technology enhancements expected to improve safety, enhance economics, and increase reactor reliability. The targets of the ARR are to generate electricity while consuming fuel containing transuranics and to attain cost competitiveness with the similar sized LWRs. INRA proposes 3 evolutions of the ARR; ARR1, a 500 MWe demonstration plant, online in 2025; ARR2, a 1,000 MWe commercial plant, online in 2035; ARR3, a 1,500 MWe full-scale commercial plant, online in 2050. INRA believes the scale-up factor of two is acceptable increase from manufacturing and licensing points of view. Major features of the ARR1 are the following: The reactor core is 70cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is approximately 32%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.6 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh.Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop arrangement and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The ARR1 is co-located with a recycling facility. The overall plant facility arrangement is planned assuming to be constructed and installed in an inland area. The plant consists of a reactor building (including reactor auxiliary facilities and electrical/control systems), a turbine building, and a recycling building. The volume of the reactor building will be approximately 180,000 m3. The capital cost for the ARR1 and the ARR2 are

  14. Advanced reactors: the case for metric design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author argues that DOE should insist that all design specifications for advanced reactors be in the International System of Units (SI) in accordance with the Metric Conversion Act of 1975. Despite a lack of leadership from the federal government, industry has had to move toward conversion in order to compete on world markets. The US is the only major country without a scheduled conversion program. SI avoids the disadvantages of ambiguous names, non-coherent units, multiple units for the same quantity, multiple definitions, as well as barriers to international exchange and marketing and problems in comparing safety and code parameters. With a first step by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should add the same requirements to reactor licensing guidelines. 4 references

  15. Systemization of Design and Analysis Technology for Advanced Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is performed to establish the base for the license application of the original technology by systemization and enhancement of the technology that is indispensable for the design and analysis of the advanced reactors including integral reactors. Technical reports and topical reports are prepared for this purpose on some important design/analysis methodology; design and analysis computer programs, structural integrity evaluation of main components and structures, digital I and C systems and man-machine interface design. PPS design concept is complemented reflecting typical safety analysis results. And test plans and requirements are developed for the verification of the advanced reactor technology. Moreover, studies are performed to draw up plans to apply to current or advanced power reactors the original technologies or base technologies such as patents, computer programs, test results, design concepts of the systems and components of the advanced reactors. Finally, pending issues are studied of the advanced reactors to improve the economics and technology realization

  16. Advanced tokamak concepts and reactor designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described, some examples

  17. Novelties in design and construction of the advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced pressurized water reactors (APWR), advanced boiling water reactors (ABWR), advanced liquid metal reactors (ALMR), and modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGR), as well as heavy water reactors (AHWR), are analyzed taking into account those characteristics which make them less complex, but safer than their current homologous ones. This fact simplifies their construction which reduces completion periods and costs, increasing safety and protection of the plants. It is demonstrated how the accumulated operational experience allows to find more standardized designs with some enhancement in the material and component technology and thus achieve also a better use of computerized systems

  18. Preliminary design concept of an advanced integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor on the basis of PWR technology is being conceptually developed at KAERI. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts of the reactor to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway for confirming the technical adoption of those concepts to the reactor design. The power output of the reactor will be in the range of 100MWe to 600MWe which is relatively small compared to the existing loop type reactors. The detailed analysis to assure the design concepts is in progress. (author)

  19. Relevant thermal hydraulic aspects of advanced reactors design: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report provides an overview on the relevant thermalhydraulic aspects of advanced reactor designs (e.g. ABWR, AP600, SBWR, EPR, ABB 80+, PIUS, etc.). Since all of the advanced reactor concepts are at the design stage, the information and data available in the open literature are still very limited. Some characteristics of advanced reactor designs are provided together with selected phenomena identification and ranking tables. Specific needs for thermalhydraulic codes together with the list of relevant and important thermalhydraulic phenomena for advanced reactor designs are summarized with the purpose of providing some guidance in development of research plans for considering further code development and assessment needs and for the planning of experimental programs

  20. Preliminary design concepts of an advanced integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor on the basis of PWR technology is being conceptually developed at KAERI. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts of the reactor to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway for confirming the technical adoption of those concepts to the rector design. The power output of the reactor will be in the range of 100MWe to 600MWe which is relatively small compared to the existing loop type reactors. The detailed analysis to assure the design concepts is in progress. (author). 3 figs, 1 tab

  1. Conceptual design of the advanced marine reactor MRX

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Design studies on the advanced marine reactors have been done continuously since 1983 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in order to develop attractive marine reactors for the next generation. At present, two marine reactor concepts are being formulated. One is 100 MWt MRX (Marine Reactor X) for an icebreaker and the other is 300 kWe DRX (Deep-sea Reactor X) for a deep-sea research vessel. They are characterized by an integral type pressurized water reactor (PWR) built-in type control rod drive mechanisms, a water-filled container and a passive decay heat removal system, which realize highly passive safe and compact reactors. This paper is a detailed report including all major results of the MRX design study.

  2. Advanced designs of VVER reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of VVER reactors, current challenges and approaches to the challenges are highlighted. The VVER-1200 reactor of 3+ generation for AES-2006 units are under construction at the Leningrad 2 nuclear power plant (LNPP-2). The main parameters are listed and details are presented of the vessel, steam generator, and improved fuel. The issue of the NPP safety is discussed. Additional topics include the MIR-1200 reactor unit, VVER-600, and VVER-SCP (Generation 4). (P.A.)

  3. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  4. Conceptual design of the advanced marine reactor MRX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies on the advanced marine reactors have been done continuously since 1983 at JAERI in order to develop attractive marine reactors for the next generation. At present, two marine reactor concepts are being formulated. One is 100 MWt MRX (Marine Reactor X) for an icebreaker and the other is 300 kWe DRX (Deep-sea Reactor X) for a deep-sea research vessel. They are characterized by an integral type PWR, built-in type control rod drive mechanisms, a water-filled container and a passive decay heat removal system, which realize highly passive safe and compact reactors. This paper is a detailed report including all major results of the MRX design study. (author)

  5. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Kim, H. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, J. S.; Ryu, J. S

    2004-12-01

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system.

  6. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system

  7. Fusion reactor design towards radwaste minimum with advanced shield material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed to minimize the radioactive waste of the reactor. The main point of the concept is to clear massive structural components located outside the neutron shield from regulatory control. The concept requires some reinforcement of shielding with an advanced shield material such as a metal hydride, detriation, and tailoring of a detrimental element from the superconductor. Our assessment confirmed a large impact of the concept on radwaste reduction, in that it reduces the radwaste fraction of a fusion reactor A-SSTR2 from 92 wt.% to 17 wt.%. (author)

  8. Neutronic challenges of advanced boiling water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of Boiling Water Reactor technology has been under investigation at the Center for Advance Nuclear Energy Systems at MIT. The advanced concepts under study provide economic incentives through enabling further power uprates (i.e. increasing vessel power density) or better fuel cycle uranium utilization. The challenges in modeling of three advanced concepts with focus on neutronics are presented. First, the Helical Cruciform Fuel rod has been used in some Russian reactors, and studied at MIT for uprating the power in LWRs through increased heat transfer area per unit core volume. The HCF design requires high fidelity 3D tools to assess its reactor physics behavior as well as thermal and fuel performance. Second, an advanced core design, the BWR-HD, was found to promise 65% higher power density over existing BWRs, while using current licensing tools and existing technology. Its larger assembly size requires stronger coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics compared to the current practice. Third is the reduced moderation BWRs, which had been proposed in Japan to enable breeding and burning of fuel as an alternative to sodium fast reactors. Such technology suffers from stronger sensitivity of its neutronics to the void fraction than the traditional BWRs, thus requiring exact modeling of the core conditions such as bypass voiding, to correctly characterize its performance. (author)

  9. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  10. The core design of the advanced power reactor plus (APR+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advance Power Reactor Plus (APR+), a pressurized water reactor and an improved nuclear power reactor based on the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) in Korea, has been developed with 18-month cycle operation strategy from its initial core. The APR+ core power is 4290 MWth which corresponds to a 1500 MWe class nuclear power plant. The reactor core consists of 257 fuel assemblies. Comparing with APR1400 core design, 16 fuel assemblies are added. Its cycle length is expected about 450 EFPD directly from initial core, although most of previous other plants had been started according to their annual or 15-month cycle operation schedule at their initial core and gone to 18-month after third - fourth cycle. In order to reduce the peaking power, fuel pin configurations of the assembly, are optimized by using some low enriched fuel pins and gadolinia bearings. APR+ core has been met the requirements as well as the above cycle length requirement; 1) peaking factor, 2) Negative MTC(Moderator Temperature Coefficient), 3) sufficient shutdown margin, 4) convergent Xenon stability Index. The maximum rod burnup and the discharge fuel assembly burnup are also satisfied those of the limit. It is expected to acquire the standard design approval by the end of 2012 by the Korean nuclear regulatory. (authors)

  11. Design Requirements of an Advanced HANARO Reactor Core Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced HANARO Reactor (AHR) is an open-tank-type and generates thermal power of 20 MW and is under conceptual design phase for developing it. The thermal power is including a core fission heat, a temporary stored fuel heat in the pool, a pump heat and a neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor. In order to remove the heat load, the reactor core cooling system is composed of a primary cooling system, a primary cooling water purification system and a reflector cooling system. The primary cooling system must remove the heat load including the core fission heat, the temporary stored fuel heat in the pool and the pump heat. The purification system must maintain the quality of the primary cooling water. And the reflector cooling system must remove the neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor and maintain the quality of the reflector. In this study, the design requirement of each system has been carried out using a design methodology of the HANARO within a permissible range of safety. And those requirements are written by english intend to use design data for exporting the research reactor

  12. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design... the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis...

  13. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Balanced Design of Safety Systems of CAREM Advanced Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Plants must meet the performance that the market and the population demand in order to be part of the electricity supply industry.It is related mainly with the results of reactor's economy and safety.New advances in the methodology developed for reactor economic optimization analyzing its safety at an early engineering stage, aiming at balancing these important features of the design, are presented in this work.In particular, the coupling that appears when dimensioning the Emergency Injection System, the Residual Heat Removal System and the containment height of CAREM reactor is described.The new models appended to the computer code that embodies the methodology to balance de designs are shown.Finally the results obtained with the optimizations when applying it are presented.Furthermore, a criterion to establish the maximal diameter for acceptable breaks in RPV's penetrations arises from this work.The application of the methodology and the computer code developed turns out to prove the advantages they provide to reactor design so that the plants are properly balanced and optimized

  15. Reactor scram events in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor concept developed by Asea Brown Boveri. A unique feature of PIUS is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. Los Alamos supported the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's preapplication review of the PIUS reactor. Baseline calculations of the PIUS design were performed for active and passive reactor scrams using TRAC-PF1/MOD2. Additional sensitivity studies examined flow blockage and boron dilution events to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept for low-probability combination events following active-system scrams

  16. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  17. Advanced Neutron Source reactor control and plant protection systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the reactor control and plant protection systems' conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Data Systems and the Reactor Instrumentation and Control System of the ANS are planned as an integrated digital system with a hierarchical, distributed control structure of qualified redundant subsystems and a hybrid digital/analog protection system to achieve the necessary fast response for critical parameters. Data networks transfer information between systems for control, display, and recording. Protection is accomplished by the rapid insertion of negative reactivity with control rods or other reactivity mechanisms to shut down the fission process and reduce heat generation in the fuel. The shutdown system is designed for high functional reliability by use of conservative design features and a high degree of redundance and independence to guard against single failures. Two independent reactivity control systems of different design principles are provided, and each system has multiple independent rods or subsystems to provide appropriate margin for malfunctions such as stuck rods or other single failures. Each system is capable of maintaining the reactor in a cold shutdown condition independently of the functioning of the other system. A highly reliable, redundant channel control system is used not only to achieve high availability of the reactor, but also to reduce challenges to the protection system by maintaining important plant parameters within appropriate limits. The control system has a number of contingency features to maintain acceptable, off-normal conditions in spite of limited control or plant component failures thereby further reducing protection system challenges

  18. Advanced CANDU reactor technology: competitive design for the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed the design for a new generation of CANDU nuclear power plants, the Advance CANDU Reactor or ACR. The ACR combines a set of underlying enabling technologies with well-established successful CANDU features in an optimized design with significantly lower costs. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, an optimized core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. The basic design for the complete reference ACR power plant has now been completed. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference ACR-700 power plant design. The progress of the ACR design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with the enhancement of design margins. AECL expects the detailed design and testing of ACR to be complete and pre-project licensing evaluation carried out to enable regulatory endorsement in key markets by the middle of the decade. (authors)

  19. Design approach to the development of an advanced HANARO research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experiences of the HANARO construction and operation, a project to design an advanced research reactor was launched in 2003 to prepare for the future needs of a research reactor. Many improvements identified during the HANARO operation and utilization will be incorporated into the design of the advanced research reactor. This paper deals with the basic principles of the design approach and the preliminary design features of the reactor under study

  20. Training reactor deployment. Advanced experimental course on designing new reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU) operating its training nuclear reactor VR1, in cooperation with the North West University of South Africa (NWU), is applying for accreditation of the experimental training course ''Advanced experimental course on designing the new reactor core'' that will guide the students, young nuclear engineering professionals, through designing, calculating, approval, and assembling a new nuclear reactor core. Students, young professionals from the South African nuclear industry, face the situation when a new nuclear reactor core is to be build from scratch. Several reactor core design options are pre-calculated. The selected design is re-calculated by the students, the result is then scrutinized by the regulator and, once all the analysis is approved, physical dismantling of the current core and assembling of the new core is done by the students, under a close supervision of the CTU staff. Finally the reactor is made critical with the new core. The presentation focuses on practical issues of such a course, desired reactor features and namely pedagogical and safety aspects. (orig.)

  1. Physics design of advanced heavy water reactor utilising thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being developed in India with the aim of utilising thorium for power generation. AHWR is a vertical pressure tube type reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. It has been optimised for the thorium cycle. The main design objective is to be self-sustaining in 233U with most of the power from the thorium fuel using plutonium as the external fissile feed. It incorporates several advanced safety features namely, heat removal through natural circulation and a negative void coefficient of reactivity. The reactor has been designed to produce 750 MW(th) at a discharge burnup of 20,000 MWd/H(e). The physics design of AHWR has followed an evolutionary path ranging from a seed and blanket concept to a simplified composite cluster to achieve a good thermal hydraulic coupling. We have designed a composite cluster using both kinds of fuel namely, (Th-UO2 and (Th-Pu)O2. With plutonium seed, negative void coefficient can be achieved by making the spectrum harder. This was done by using a pyrocarbon scatterer in the moderator. The void coefficient strongly depends on plutonium. As plutonium burns very rapidly, it is not possible to achieve uniformly negative void coefficient with burnup in this cluster. Alternatively, burnable poison can be used within the cluster to achieve negative void coefficient taking advantage of the flux redistribution and change in spectrum upon voiding. Here, it is possible to achieve almost constant void reactivity with burnup resulting in a good thermal hydraulic coupling. The cluster design presently incorporates a central burnable absorber region. Boiling light water coolant requires that the core power distribution be optimised with thermal hydraulic parameters. The peaking factors inside the cluster should be low so as to have significant margin in operational conditions and to avoid burnout in accident conditions. The variation of reactivity from cold clean to hot operating has

  2. Advanced reactor design and safety objectives. The heavy water reactor perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development objectives of advanced heavy water reactors (AHWRs) should be guided by the requirements of the operating utilities. The paper provides a summary of the major requirements for future nuclear reactors from CANDU operating station owners based on the various studies and plans prepared. Most of the specific technical requirements for AHWR systems are based on systematic reviews of current operating CANDU stations. Hence these requirements represent those for the evolutionary development of AHWR systems, factoring in the considerable operating experiences of the CANDU stations. The requirements for the new HWR designs can be summarized under economic objectives, safety objectives, operational objectives and other utility requirements. 2 refs

  3. Qualification of the reactor physics toolset for the design and analysis of the advanced CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualification of reactor physics toolset for Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) applications is described in this paper. The qualification process follows AECL standard code validation methodology. The ACR nuclear design incorporates certain features that challenge the physics code-suite capabilities. The physics codes were first assessed, and development work required to meet these challenges was undertaken. A Validation Matrix Document was prepared to identify the physics phenomena that could arise during postulated accident events, and specify the experimental data required for code validation. Key issues related to physics modelling and code validation are also discussed. (author)

  4. Design of the reactor vessel inspection robot for the advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in an advanced nuclear reactor. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a mock non-hostile environment and shown to perform as expected, as detailed in this report

  5. Design features of Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) which is to achieve the improvement of the safety and economical efficiency has been developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) with the support from industries and research institutes. The steam generator for APR 1400 is an evolutionary type from System 80+, which is the recirculating U-tube heat exchanger with integral economizer. Compared to the System 80+ steam generator, it is focused on the improved design features, operating and design conditions of APR 1400 steam generator. Especially, from the operation experience of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) steam generator, the lessons-learned measures are incorporated to prevent the tube wear caused by flow-induced vibration (FIV). The concepts for the preventive design features against FIV are categorized to two fields; flow distribution and dynamic response characteristics. From the standpoint of flow distribution characteristics, the egg-crate flow distribution plate (EFDP) is installed to prevent the local excessive flow loaded on the most susceptible tube to wear. The parametric study is performed to select the optimum design with the efficient mitigation of local excessive flow. ATHOS3 Mod-01 is used and partly modified to analyze the flow field of the APR 1400 steam generator. In addition, the upper tube bundle support is designed to eliminate the presence of tube with a low natural frequency. Based on the improved upper tube bundle support, the modal analysis is performed and compared with that of System 80+. Using the results of flow distribution and modal analysis, the two mechanisms of flow-induced vibration are investigated; fluid-elastic instability (FEI) and random turbulence excitation (RTE). (authors)

  6. Consideration of severe accidents in design of advanced WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe accident related requirements formulated in General Regulations for Nuclear Power Plant Safety (OPB-88), in Nuclear Safety Regulations for Nuclear Power Stations' Reactor Plants (PBYa RU AS-89) and in other NPP nuclear and radiation guides of the Russian Gosatomnadzor are analyzed. In accordance with these guides analyses of beyond design basis accidents should be performed in the reactor plant design. Categorization of beyond design basis accidents leading to severe accidents should be made on occurrence probability and severity of consequences. Engineered features and measures intended for severe accident management should be provided in reactor plant design. Requirements for severe accident analyses and for development of measures for severe accident management are determined. Design philosophy and proposed engineered measures for mitigation of severe accidents and decrease of radiation releases are demonstrated using examples of large, WWER-1000 (V-392), and medium size WWER-640 (V-407) reactor plant designs. Mitigation of severe accidents and decrease of radiation releases are supposed to be conducted on basis of consistent realization of the defense in depth concept relating to application of a system of barriers on the path of spreading of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials to the environment and a set of engineered measures protecting these barriers and retaining their effectiveness. Status of fulfilled by OKB Gidropress and other Russian organizations experimental and analytical investigations of severe accident phenomena supporting design decisions and severe accident management procedures is described. Status of the works on retention of core melt inside the WWER-640 reactor vessel is also characterized

  7. Achievements and prospects for advanced reactor design and fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of Nuclear Energy relies on the complementary optimization of reactors for NPPs and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. This is an apparent contradiction if we look in the so large effort made worldwide for developing advance reactors for power plants alone. The vision that focus the optimization effort in reactors and in the other side and separated in the associated fuel cycle jeopardizes the final results of an optimized nuclear system. The control of the primary source of energy is a key question and the technology involved and its control the main issue to be considered when the evaluation of advanced nuclear systems are under consideration. However the main reason of this situation is that reactors for NPP is still been costly, inefficient compared with other energy converters and increasingly complex to accomplish safety requirements. The maturity of nuclear technology and the present NPP are the background for the evolutionary concepts of reactors while the response to economy, safety, waste generation and management and proliferation resistance are the drivers for innovative concepts. Most traditional technology holders and NPP vendors have evolutionary LWR and HWR systems and participate directly or indirectly in innovative projects for future applications including fast reactors. EPR, AP 1000, KSNP, ABWR, WWER-600, ACR-700 and AHWR are examples of this fact. Example of continuous effort in fast reactors development are MONJU reactor, CEFR, FBTR and the emblematic Superphenix. Both reactors and nuclear fuel cycles should evolve throughout a breakthrough process if the energy demand mainly becomes large in developing countries. This may require a different approach that the one that drives the past 50 years mainly because the modules should be optimized for quite different electricity markets. Small and Medium Power Reactors like SMART, CAREM, IRIS, PBMR and HTGRs, enrichment processes optimized to be economics for small capacity production

  8. On the physics design of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The AHWR is a 920 MWth, vertical pressure tube type thorium-based reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. The prime objective is to produce power utilizing thorium available abundantly in India from a relatively simple system with enhanced safety level. It is endowed with several innovative safety features such as negative coolant void reactivity, heat removal through natural circulation and passive containment cooling. The development of reactor design has drawn heavily on the experience generated through design and operation of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in India. It was an opportunity to develop a reactor system using thorium-based fuel and gain some valuable experience. A non-proliferative thorium/U-233 based closed fuel cycle is chosen for AHWR. Plutonium discharged from PHWRs is used as the fissile seed fuel with thorium for the generation of U-233 and then as a top-up fuel in the equilibrium core along with self-sustaining U-233 in the thorium matrix. The physics design has several challenges in achieving negative void reactivity, spatial core control, on-line fuelling and minimization of inventory of plutonium fuel. It is difficult to achieve negative coolant void coefficient in a heavy water moderated pressure tube type reactor. For this a multi-pronged approach involving pitch reduction, heterogeneous cluster design and use of mild absorbers is chosen. Plutonium bearing fuel is located separately in the outer region of the cluster with self-sustaining U-233 bearing fuel in the inner region of the cluster. A small amount of mild absorber is located in the centre of the cluster. The void coefficient varies with burnup and it is a challenge to have it negative throughout the core. The state of nuclear data for the elements of interest and type of neutron spectrum in the reactor puts heavy demand on the calculation models and validation of reactivity coefficients to ensure

  9. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  10. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation

  11. Structural and piping issues in the design certification of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the design certification of structures and piping for evolutionary and passive advanced light water reactors. Advanced reactor designs are based on a set of assumed site-related parameters that are selected to envelop a majority of potential nuclear power plant sites. Multiple time histories are used as the seismic design basis in order to cover the majority of potential sites in the US. Additionally, design are established to ensure that surface motions at a particular site will not exceed the enveloped standard design surface motions. State-of-the-art soil-structure interaction (SSI) analyses have been performed for the advanced reactors, which include structure-to-structure interaction for all seismic Category 1 structures. Advanced technology has been utilized to exclude the dynamic effects of pipe rupture from structural design by demonstrating that the probability of pipe rupture is extremely low. For piping design, the advanced reactor vendors have developed design acceptance criteria (DAC) which provides the piping design analysis methods, design procedures, and acceptance criteria. In SECY-93-087 the NRC staff recommended that the Commission approve the approach to eliminate the OBE from the design of structures and piping in advanced reactors and provided guidance which identifies the necessary changes to existing seismic design criteria. The supplemental criteria address fatigue, seismic anchor motion, and piping stress limits when the OBE is eliminated

  12. Advanced reactor design and safety objectives - The heavy water reactor perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a summary of the major requirements for future nuclear reactors from CANDU operating station owners based on the various studies and plans prepared. Most of the specific technical requirements for Advanced Heavy Water reactor Systems are based on systematic reviews of current operating CANDU stations to identify opportunities for generic improvements in reliability, operability, maintainability and to address emerging licensing or safety issues. Hence these requirements represent those for the evolutionary development of the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor systems factoring in the considerable operating experience of the CANDU stations. This evolutionary approach to the development of advanced heavy water reactors will be consistent with a philosophy of minimizing the risk to future reactor owners whose requirements are for a reliable, low cost unit

  13. Advanced fusion reactor design using remountable HTc SC magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed using remountable high critical temperature (HTc) superconducting (SC) magnet. There are two advantages using this system. First one is that the magnet system can be composed by parts, which means it easy to replace the damaged magnet module. The second one is that it becomes possible to access the reactor first wall easily. In order to realize this system, we have performed experiments using HTc SC tape. The experimental results indicate that the resistance of the jointed region becomes about 60 μΩ, which shows the feasibility of this concept. Using this system the remountable first wall system also has the feasibility based on thermomechanical analysis. (author)

  14. Design features of BREST reactors and experimental work to advance the concept of BREST reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle design features of BREST-300 (300 MWe) and BREST-1200 (1200 MWe) lead.cooled fast reactors are presented in this paper. Several experimental works have been performed or under way in order to justify lead-cooled reactor design concepts. BREST reactor designs of different outputs have been developed using the same principles. In conjunction with the increased output and the implement of inherent safety concept, a number of new solutions, which may be applied to the BREST-300 reactor design too, have been considered in the BREST-1200 reactor design. The new design features adopted in the BREST-1200 reactor design include: pool-type reactor design not requiring metal vessel, hence, not limiting reactor power; new handling system allowing to reduce central hall and building dimensions as a whole; emergency cooling system using field pipes, immersed directly in lead, which may be used to cool down reactor under normal conditions; by--pass line incorporated in coolant loop allowing to refuse the actively actuating valve initiated in pumps shut down. (author)

  15. Status of advanced light water cooled reactor designs 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report, which is significantly more comprehensive than the previously one, addresses the rationale and basic motivations that lead to a continuing development of nuclear technology, provides an overview of the world status of current LWRs, describes the present market situations, and identifies desired characteristics for future plants. The report also provides a detailed description of utility requirements that largely govern today's nuclear development efforts, the situation with regard to enhanced safety objectives, a country wise description of the development activities, and a technical description of the various reactor designs in a consistent format. The reactor designs are presented in two categories: (1) evolutionary concepts that are expected to be commercially available soon; and (2) innovative designs. The report addresses the main technical characteristics of each concept without assessing or evaluating them from a particular point of view (e.g. safety or economics). Additionally, the report identifies basic reference documents that can provide further information for detailed evaluations. The report closes with an outlook on future energy policy developments

  16. Validation of BWR advanced core and fuel nuclear designs with power reactor measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power reactor measurements have been important in validating the reliability, performance characteristics and economics of BWR advanced core and fuel designs. Such measurements go beyond the data obtainable from normal reactor operation and provide detailed benchmark data necessary to verify design and licensing computer design and simulation models. In some cases, such as in the validation of the performance of zirconium barrier pellet-cladding-interaction (PCI) resistant cladding, the BWR power reactor measurements have subjected the advanced fuel design to operating conditions more severe than normal operating conditions, thereby providing nuclear-thermal-mechanical-corrosion performance data for accelerated or extended conditions of operation. In some cases destructive measurements have been carried out on BWR power reactor fuel to provide microscopic and macroscopic data of importance in validating design and licensing analysis methods. There is not uniform agreement among core and fuel designers on the needs for special power reactor core and fuel measurements for validation of advanced designs. The General Electric approach has been to error on the side of extensive, detailed measurements so as to assure reliable performance licensing and economic design and predictive capability. This paper is a summary of some of the validative power reactor measurements that have been carried out on advanced BWR core and fuel designs. Some comparisons of predictions with the data are summarized

  17. Preliminary Study for Conceptual Design of Advanced Long Life Small Modular Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Taewoo; Choe, Jiwon; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T. K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2015-05-15

    As one of the non-water coolant Small-Modular Reactor (SMR) core concepts for use in the mid- to long-term, ANL has proposed a 100 MWe Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) targeting a small grid, transportable from pre-licensed factories to the remote plant site for affordable supply. Various breed-and-burn core concepts have been proposed to extend the reactor cycle length, which includes CANDLE with a cigar-type depletion strategy, TerraPower reactors with fuel shuffling for effective breeding, et al. UNIST has also proposed an ultra-long cycle fast reactor (UCFR) core concept having the power rating of 1000 MWe. By adopting the breed-and-burn strategies, the UCFR core can maintain criticality for a targeting reactor lifetime of 60 years without refueling. The objective of this project is to develop an advanced long-life SMR core concept by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. A conceptual design of long life small modular fast reactor is under development by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. The feasibility of the long-life fast reactor concepts was reviewed to obtain the core design guidelines and the reactor design requirements of long life small modular fast reactor were proposed in this study.

  18. Preliminary Study for Conceptual Design of Advanced Long Life Small Modular Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the non-water coolant Small-Modular Reactor (SMR) core concepts for use in the mid- to long-term, ANL has proposed a 100 MWe Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) targeting a small grid, transportable from pre-licensed factories to the remote plant site for affordable supply. Various breed-and-burn core concepts have been proposed to extend the reactor cycle length, which includes CANDLE with a cigar-type depletion strategy, TerraPower reactors with fuel shuffling for effective breeding, et al. UNIST has also proposed an ultra-long cycle fast reactor (UCFR) core concept having the power rating of 1000 MWe. By adopting the breed-and-burn strategies, the UCFR core can maintain criticality for a targeting reactor lifetime of 60 years without refueling. The objective of this project is to develop an advanced long-life SMR core concept by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. A conceptual design of long life small modular fast reactor is under development by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. The feasibility of the long-life fast reactor concepts was reviewed to obtain the core design guidelines and the reactor design requirements of long life small modular fast reactor were proposed in this study

  19. Evaluation of trial design studies for an advanced marine reactor, (7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed the numerical evaluation of shielding design for three advanced marine reactors (semi-integral PWR, integral PWR and self-pressurized PWR) under operational condition and hypothetical accident. Common calculational procedure and shielding material ingredient over the three reactors have been adopted for fair evaluation. (author)

  20. Human factors regulation in response to advanced reactor design trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the direction being taken in the Canadian regulatory program to guide the incorporation of human factors principles, knowledge, information, and methods in activities such as those that address the design and implementation of the advanced control room (ACR) in nuclear power plants. Within the current activity in the international nuclear industry aimed at the development of ACR concepts, the steps that are being taken to develop design review guidelines for ACRs, such as the work sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission are filling an identified important need. The salient feature of most ACR projects is the increased use of digital technology for the analysis, synthesis, management, and display of information. The greatly increased functionality of the devices that can be introduced during such projects allows changes to be made at the design and implementation stages that are not necessarily based on prior function allocation or task analyses

  1. Integral design concepts of advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the sub-programme on non-electrical applications of advanced reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing a worldwide forum for exchange of information on integral reactor concepts. Two Technical Committee meetings were held in 1994 and 1995 on the subject where state-of-the-art developments were presented. Efforts are continuing for the development of advanced nuclear reactors of both evolutionary and innovative design, for electricity, co-generation and heat applications. While single purpose reactors for electricity generation may require small and medium sizes under certain conditions, reactors for heat applications and co-generation would be necessary in the small and medium range and need to be located closer to the load centres. The integral design approach to the development of advanced light water reactors has received special attention over the past few years. Several designs are in the detailed design stage, some are under construction, one prototype is in operation. A need has been felt for guidance on a number of issues, ranging from design objectives to the assessment methodology needed to show how integral designs can meet these objectives, and also to identify their advantages and problem areas. The technical document addresses the current status of the design, safety and operational issues of integral reactors and recommends areas for future development

  2. Advanced reactor licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1986 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy Statement on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) and two Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). As a result of these interactions certain safety issues associated with these advanced reactor designs have been identified as key to the licensability of the designs as proposed by DOE. The major issues in this regard are: (1) selection and treatment of accident scenarios; (2) selection of siting source term; (3) performance and reliability of reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems; (4) need for conventional containment; (5) need for conventional emergency evacuation; (6) role of the operator; (7) treatment of balance of plant; and (8) modular approach. This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the above issues in more detail and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  3. Design guide on instrumentation and control system for an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Ki; Jung, H. S.; Choi, Y. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Park, C

    2004-12-01

    Instrumentation and control system is to regulate reactor power automatically and to perform protective functions to shut down the reactor safely in case of an accident threatening the reactor safety. If the protective action would not be properly activated, an abnormal situation might be connected to a significant radiation hazard, even though a research reactor is maintained at low pressure and low temperature condition. For this reason, the reactor protection system for the advanced research reactor will be designed as per the safety design requirements for nuclear power generating stations. System classification are suggested based on the HANARO concept. Considering an international growing tendency toward nuclear safety enhancement and supplement of the existing one, a revised classification system will be applied to the components, structures and systems for the advanced research reactor. The reactor protection system is classified to the safety class and the others are non-safety grade. Based on the HANARO experience, the design guide aims at the improvement of reliability of safety and achievement of automatic control and signal processing by digitalization. To satisfy functional diversity requirement, the first shutdown system adopts a concept of control rod with a stepping motor while the second shutdown system uses D{sub 2}O dump system. The first shutdown system will use a PLC-type digital logic processor but the second shutdown system will use a conventional relay logic for the concept of equipment diversity. The reactor protective function for the advanced research reactor has a higher reliability by using two different shutdown mechanism. Although most of the instrumentation systems, except the reactor protection system are classified to non-safety grade, some systems like reactor regulation system or engineered safety feature actuation system selectively adopts the safety design requirements in order to ensure the safety-related function. All of the

  4. Conceptual design of second safety system for an advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent IAEA recommends that at least one automatic shutdown system shall be incorporated in the design of research reactor, and a second independent shutdown system shall be considered and may be required, depending on the characteristics of the reactor. It would be required to reflect the strengthening of IAEA's safety policy to developing project of an advanced research reactor which was based on the experiences in HANARO construction and operation. The reflector dump system for an advanced research reactor is required for safety system diversity. The safety system shuts the reactor down to a safe sub-critical state by dropping hafnium control absorber rods into the reactor core and by dumping the inner annular volume of the D2O reflector tank into the dump tank

  5. Conceptual design of second safety system for an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sang Ik; Park, Y. C.; Cho, Y. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ryu, J. S.; Park, C

    2005-01-01

    In recent IAEA recommends that at least one automatic shutdown system shall be incorporated in the design of research reactor, and a second independent shutdown system shall be considered and may be required, depending on the characteristics of the reactor. It would be required to reflect the strengthening of IAEA's safety policy to developing project of an advanced research reactor which was based on the experiences in HANARO construction and operation. The reflector dump system for an advanced research reactor is required for safety system diversity. The safety system shuts the reactor down to a safe sub-critical state by dropping hafnium control absorber rods into the reactor core and by dumping the inner annular volume of the D{sub 2}O reflector tank into the dump tank.

  6. Safety aspects of the US advanced LMR [liquid metal reactor] design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cornerstones of the United States Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program sponsored by the Department of Energy are: the plant design program at General Electric based on the PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module) concept, and the Integral Fast Reactor program (IFR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The goal of the US program is to produce a standard, commercial ALMR, including the associated fuel cycle. This paper discusses the US regulatory framework for design of an ALMR, safety aspects of the IFR program at ANL, the IFR fuel cycle and actinide recycle, and the ALMR plant design program at GE. 6 refs., 5 figs

  7. A Preliminary Calculation of Annular Core Design for a High-flux Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of research reactors in operation over the world become old and the number of research reactors is expected to be reduced around 1/3 within a next decade. So it may be necessary to prepare in advance for the future demands of research reactors with a high performance. Therefore, based on the HANARO experiences through design to operation, a concept development of an improved research reactor is under doing. In this paper, 10 MW conceptual annular core is proposed and its basic characteristics were analyzed as a preliminary step

  8. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take

  9. Advanced-power-reactor design concepts and performance characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, H. W.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Springborn, R. H.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1974-01-01

    Five reactor cooling concepts which allow continued reactor operation following a single rupture of the coolant system are presented for application with the APR. These concepts incorporate convective cooling, double containment, or heat pipes to ensure operation after a coolant line rupture. Based on an evaluation of several control system concepts, a molybdenum clad, beryllium oxide sliding reflector located outside the pressure vessel is recommended.

  10. Benchmark analysis for the design of piping systems in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To satisfy the need for the verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three piping benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. A summary description of each problem and some sample results are included

  11. Proceedings of DAE-BRNS theme meeting on advances in reactor physics: design, analysis and operation of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor Physics forms a very vital part of Nuclear Engineering. It often initiates and contributes to new reactor concepts and designs. Reactor physics starts with nuclear physics aspects in the form of nuclear data required for analysis and interacts intensively with engineering aspects of design. Apart from design, physics aspects of operation, safety analysis, fuel management, fuel cycle studies etc are areas in which contributions are demanded from reactor physics. Efficient, economic and safe operation of any nuclear reactor requires good understanding of the physics aspects, in terms of operating regimes, available control and safety margins all the time. Due to such a central role, regulatory aspects of reactor physics are also important. For these tasks efficient and accurate modeling and computation tools are vital. The theoretical computations require experimental validation, which again requires special capabilities in nuclear detectors, electronics and analysis. The discussions in this theme meeting are on the recent advancements in reactor physics with reference to design, safety and operation. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. Evaluation of the trial design studies for an advanced marine reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trial design of three type reactors, semi-integrated, integrated and integrated (self-pressurized) type, was carried out in order to clarify the reactor type for the advanced marine reactor that would be developed for its realization in future and in order to extract its research and development theme. The trial design was carried and finished as for the three type reactors in same specifications in order to improve the following characteristics, small in size, light in weight, high in safety and reliability, and economic. In this report, a comparison and review of the following items are described as for the above three type reactors, (1) specifications, (2) shielding, (3) refueling, (4) in-service inspection, (5) analysis of the transients and accidents, (6) piping systems, (7) control systems, (8) dynamic analysis, (9) overall comparison, (10) research and development theme and theme for study in future. (author)

  13. Conceptual designs of advanced fast reactor. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Technical Committee meeting (TCM) was held on Conceptual Designs of Advanced Fast Power Reactors to review the lessons learned from the construction and operation of demonstration and near-commercial size plants. This TCM focused on design and development of advanced fast reactors and identified methodologies to evaluate the economic competitiveness and reliability of advanced projects. The Member States which participated in the TCM were at different stages of LMFR development. The Russian Federation, Japan and India had prototype and/or experimental LMFRs and continue with mature R and D programmes. China, the Republic of Korea and Brazil were at the beginning of LMFR development. Therefore the aims of the TCM were to obtain technical descriptions of different design approaches for experimental, prototype, demonstration and commercial LMFRs, and to describe the engineering judgements made in developing the design approaches. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Design features facilitating the decommissioning of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the advanced gas-cooled reactors is discussed as is the proposed decommissioning plan for delayed decommissioning. The special features which assist in decommissioning are presented. As a result of the study a catalogue of design features which will facilitate decommissioning is given. In addition to the catalogue of design features, the radioactive inventory 10 years after shutdown and 100 years after shutdown has been calculated. From this a provisional operator dose from activities associated with decommissioning has been assessed

  15. Design Concept of Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Related R&D in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-il Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Korea imports about 97% of its energy resources due to a lack of available energy resources. In this status, the role of nuclear power in electricity generation is expected to become more important in future years. In particular, a fast reactor system is one of the most promising reactor types for electricity generation, because it can utilize efficiently uranium resources and reduce radioactive waste. Acknowledging the importance of a fast reactor in a future energy policy, the long-term advanced SFR development plan was authorized by KAEC in 2008 and updated in 2011 which will be carried out toward the construction of an advanced SFR prototype plant by 2028. Based upon the experiences gained during the development of the conceptual designs for KALIMER, KAERI recently developed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR design concepts of TRU burner that can better meet the generation IV technology goals. The current status of nuclear power and SFR design technology development program in Korea will be discussed. The developments of design concepts including core, fuel, fluid system, mechanical structure, and safety evaluation have been performed. In addition, the advanced SFR technologies necessary for its commercialization and the basic key technologies have been developed including a large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test facility, super-critical Brayton cycle system, under-sodium viewing techniques, metal fuel development, and developments of codes, and validations are described as R&D activities.

  16. Progress in development and design aspects of advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was to provide an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss technology developments and design work for advanced water cooled reactors, safety approaches and features of current water cooled reactors and to identify, understand and describe advanced features for safety and operational improvements. The TCM was attended by 92 participants representing 18 countries and two international organizations and included 40 presentations by authors of 14 countries and one international organization. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these presentations. Refs, figs, tabs

  17. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic design analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This reactor will be a user facility with the major objective of providing the highest continuous neutron beam intensities of any reactor in the world. Additional objectives for the facility include providing materials irradiation facilities and isotope production facilities as good as, or better than, those in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. To achieve these objectives, the reactor design uses highly subcooled heavy water as both coolant and moderator. Two separate core halves of 67.6-L total volume operate at an average power density of 4.5 MW(t)/L, and the coolant flows upward through the core at 25 m/s. Operating pressure is 3.1 MPa at the core inlet with a 1.4-MPa pressure drop through the core region. Finally, in order to make the resources available for experimentation, the fuel is designed to provide a 17-d fuel cycle with an additional 4 d planned in each cycle for the refueling process. This report examines the codes and models used to develop the thermal-hydraulic design for ANS, as well as the correlations and physical data; evaluates thermal-hydraulic uncertainties; reports on thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis; describes experimentation in support of the ANS reactor design and safety analysis; and provides an overview of the experimental plan

  18. Design and layout decisions for refuelling system of advanced fast neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience in operation of BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 power units, as well as development of refuelling systems for BN-800 power unit, allows developing of refuelling system for BN-1200 advanced reactor of new generation. The refuelling system was developed on the basis of possible technical decisions aimed at improvement of safety and technical-and-economic indices. Structural layout of BN-1200 reactor refuelling system is given. Main differences in BN-1200 reactor refuelling system as compared with BN-800 reactor are given. Design features of refuelling equipment are: - BN-1200 reactor has a split large rotating plug to allow transporting of its components by railway with subsequent assembling at site; - the refuelling box is fabricated in the form of sectional parallelepiped to allow transporting of its components by railway with subsequent assembling at site; - one 'direct' refuelling mechanism and one cantilever' refuelling mechanism are used to refuel rarely replaced protection assemblies that allows reducing of overall dimensions of rotating plugs; - the vertical elevator is arranged on the oval plug installed on the reactor cover. The upper structure with elevator drive rotates together with the elevator plug under rotary drive located on the oval plug. The vertical elevator allows sufficient reduction of refuelling box; - the refuelling machine runs on straight-line rails. The vertical elevator, gas gate valve on reactor refuelling channel, non-use of spent FA drum and enhanced radiation protection on the column of refuelling box machine allows reduction of specific materials consumption of BN-1200 reactor refuelling system by more than 10 times as compared with BN-800 reactor. To verify refuelling equipment operability the following experiments are planned: - mastering of gripper design for 'direct' refuelling mechanism and refuelling machine; - mastering of 'cantilever' for refuelling mechanism; - mastering of fresh FA conveyor design. As for the

  19. Safety design features for current UK advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power stations planned for Heysham II and Torness will each have twin 660 MW(e) Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR) based on the design of those which have been operating at Hinkley Point 'B' and Hunterston 'B' since 1976. This paper has described the way in which the shutdown and cooling systems for the Heysham II and Torness AGRs have been selected in order to meet current UK safety requirements. Fault tree analyses have been used to identify the credible fault sequences, the probabilities of which have been calculated. By this means the relative importance of the various protective systems has been established and redundancy and reliability requirements identified. This systematic approach has led to a balanced design giving protection over the complete spectrum of fault sequences. Current safety requirements for thermal reactors in the UK and particular requirements in the design of the Heysham II and Torness reactors are discussed

  20. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team

  1. Summary of the Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) Phase 2 Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark Raymond [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an end-of-year summary reflecting the progress and status of proposed regulatory design criteria for advanced non-LWR designs in accordance with the Level 3 milestone in M3AT-15IN2001017 in work package AT-15IN200101. These criteria have been designated as ARDC, and they provide guidance to future applicants for addressing the GDC that are currently applied specifically to LWR designs. The report provides a summary of Phase 2 activities related to the various tasks associated with ARDC development and the subsequent development of example adaptations of ARDC for Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) and modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs.

  2. Advanced Test Reactor In-Canal Ultrasonic Scanner: Experiment Design and Initial Results on Irradiated Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Wachs; J. M. Wight; D. T. Clark; J. M. Williams; S. C. Taylor; D. J. Utterbeck; G. L. Hawkes; G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek; N. C. Craft

    2008-09-01

    An irradiation test device has been developed to support testing of prototypic scale plate type fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor. The experiment hardware and operating conditions were optimized to provide the irradiation conditions necessary to conduct performance and qualification tests on research reactor type fuels for the RERTR program. The device was designed to allow disassembly and reassembly in the ATR spent fuel canal so that interim inspections could be performed on the fuel plates. An ultrasonic scanner was developed to perform dimensional and transmission inspections during these interim investigations. Example results from the AFIP-2 experiment are presented.

  3. Driving forces shaping advanced reactor designs: Near-term and long-term prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper explores the forces which have driven and which in the opinion of the author should be driving advanced reactor development programs. Four general driving forces are identified: cost, safety, environmental concerns, and non-proliferation concerns. It is suggested that the primary driving forces should be cost and safety concerns. It is suggested that advanced reactors need to demonstrate the following characteristics: (a) A design which explicitly accounts for severe accidents, including severe external events (not necessarily limited to contemporary design basis events) and which results in a frequency of severe core damage substantially lower than in current plants. The goal for the frequency of severe core damage should reflect a reasonable assurance that a severe core damage accident will not occur during the operating lifetime of a fleet' of such plants. (b) A design which explicitly accounts for severe accidents in terms of accident mitigation, resulting in a very low conditional likelihood of a substantial fission product release given a severe accident. (c) A design which utilizes near-passive and passive concepts (whose safety and reliability are demonstrable by experiment and/or full-scale test) for both accident prevention and accident mitigation to the maximum extent feasible. (d) A design which allows f a suitably long time between refueling outages, with a balance struck between refueling outage duration and refueling outage frequency so as to maximize availability and capacity factor. (e) A design which emphasizes modular construction and exceptional quality control. (f) A design which de emphasizes the importance of maintenance and human reliability more generally to assure that safety functions are performed with acceptable reliability, and to assure that passive safety characteristics are not compromised by design, manufacturing, or installation defects. It is further suggested that key factors in gaining public acceptance are the early

  4. Preliminary Design of a Reflector Dump System for an Advanced HANARO Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the IAEA has recommended that at least one automatic shutdown system shall be incorporated in the design of a research reactor, and a second independent shutdown system shall be considered and may be required, depending on the characteristics of the reactor. According to the recommend, it would be required to reflect the strengthening of the IAEA's safety policy for developing a project of an AHRR (Advanced HANARO Research Reactor) which is based on the experiences in HANARO construction and operation. The reflector dump system for an AHRR is required for safety system diversity. It is considered that the safety system of an AHRR shuts the reactor down to a safe sub-critical state by dropping hafnium control absorber rods into the reactor core and by dumping the volume of the D2O reflector tank into the dump tank. This paper summarizes the preliminary design on the heavy water dump system which may be considered as a second safety system for a new research reactor

  5. Conceptual Design of Primary Cooling System for an Advanced HANARO Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced HANARO Reactor (AHR) is an open-tank-type and generates a thermal power of 20 MW and is under conceptual design phase for developing it. The thermal power is including a core fission heat, a temporary stored fuel heat in the pool, a pump heat and a neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor. In order to remove the heat load, the reactor cooling system is composed of a primary cooling system, a primary cooling water purification system and a reflector cooling system. The primary cooling system must remove the heat load including the core fission heat, the temporary stored fuel heat in the pool and the pump heat. The purification system must maintain the quality of the primary cooling water. And the reflector cooling system must remove the neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor and maintain the quality of the reflector. Through this study, the conceptual design of the primary cooling system has been established including design requirements, performance requirements, design restrictions, system descriptions and system operation to maintain the system function. And preliminary design requirement of the primary cooling system has been established in based on the conceptual design

  6. Experimental software design of neutron texture diffractometer at China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental software of the neutron texture diffractometer at China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) was designed. Based on the principle of texture measurement by neutron diffraction and the motion control and data acquisition system of the diffractometer, the functions needed for texture measurement were proposed. Then the flow charts of these functions were described in detail and realized by Python language in Linux system. The experimental software for CARR neutron texture diffractometer has been successfully accomplished. (authors)

  7. ICONE-4: Proceedings. Volume 2: Advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for this conference are contained in 5 volumes. This volume is divided into the following areas: advanced reactor requirements; advanced reactor design and analysis; arrangement and construction; specific reactor designs; demonstration testing; safety systems and analysis; component demonstration testing; advanced reactor containment design; licensing topics and updates; accelerator applications and spallation sources; and advanced reactor development. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  8. The key design features of the Indian advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 235 MWe Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a vertical, pressure tube type, boiling light water cooled reactor. The three key specific features of design of the AHWR, having a large impact on its viability, safety and economics, relate to its reactor physics, coolant channel, and passive safety features. The reactor physics design is tuned for maximising use of thorium based fuel, and achieving a slightly negative void coefficient of reactivity. The fulfilment of these requirements has been possible through use of PuO2-ThO2 MOX, and ThO2 -U233O2 MOX in different pins of the same fuel cluster, and use of a heterogeneous moderator consisting of pyrolytic carbon and heavy water in 80%-20% volume ratio. The coolant channels of AHWR are designed for easy replaceability of pressure tubes, during normal maintenance shutdowns. The removal of pressure tube along with bottom end-fitting, using rolled joint detachment technology, can be done in AHWR coolant channels without disturbing the top end-fitting, tail pipe and feeder connections, and all other appendages of the coolant channel. The AHWR incorporates several passive safety features. These include core heat removal through natural circulation, direct injection of Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS) water in fuel, passive systems for containment cooling and isolation, and availability of a large inventory of borated water in overhead Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) to facilitate sustenance of core decay heat removal, ECCS injection, and containment cooling for three days without invoking any active systems or operator action. Incorporation of these features has been done together with considerable design simplifications, and elimination of several reactor grade equipment. A rigorous evaluation of feasibility of AHWR design concept has been completed. The economy enhancing aspects of its key design features are expected to compensate for relative complexity of the thorium fuel cycle activities required to

  9. Advanced calculational methods for power reactors and LWR core design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Specialists Meeting on Advanced Calculational Methods for Power Reactors, held in Cadarache, France, 10-14 September 1990, was to provide a forum for reviewing and discussing selected core physics of water cooled reactors (including high convertors). New methods of advanced calculation for advanced fuels and complex geometries of next generation reactors with a high level of accuracy were discussed and the importance of supercomputing and on-line monitoring was also acknowledged. The meeting was attended by about 60 participants from 20 countries who presented 30 papers. The Technical Committee Meeting on LWR Core Design Parameters, held in Rez, former Czechoslovakia, 7-11 October 1991, provided an opportunity for participants to exchange their experience on reactor physics aspects of benchmark calculations of various lattices, methods for core parameter calculations, core monitoring and in-core fuel management. At the Workshop there were further discussions related to the benchmark problems, homogenization techniques and cross-section representations. Thirty-five papers were presented by about 43 participants from 19 countries. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the mentioned papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Large-break loss-of-coolant accidents in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor concept developed by Asea Brown Boveri. A unique feature of PIUS is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. Los Alamos is supporting the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's preapplication review of the PIUS reactor. Baseline calculations of the PIUS Supplement design were performed for a large-break loss-of-coolant (LBLOCA) initiator using TRAC-PF1/MOD2. Additional sensitivity studies examined flow blockage and boron dilution events to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept for low-probability combination events following an LBLOCA

  11. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-07-29

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  12. A CFD Modeling Study for the Design of an Advanced HANARO Reactor Core Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong-Hark; Chae, Hee-Teak; Park, Cheol; Kim, Heo-Nil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    AHR(Advanced HANARO Reactor) based on HANARO has been under a conceptually designed with new ideas to implement new findings, which have been revealed from twelve years operation of HANARO. For example, a perforated structure to reduce the FIV(Flow Induced Vibration) of a fuel assembly has been considered to install. And a change of dual outlets to a single outlet has also been investigated to promote the accessibility and to work easily in the reactor pool. Those investigations have been conducted by the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method, which can provide us with an good understanding of three dimensional flow fields influenced by design changes without an experiment. In this study a CFD modeling study for an AHR core structure design is described.

  13. A CFD Modeling Study for the Design of an Advanced HANARO Reactor Core Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AHR(Advanced HANARO Reactor) based on HANARO has been under a conceptually designed with new ideas to implement new findings, which have been revealed from twelve years operation of HANARO. For example, a perforated structure to reduce the FIV(Flow Induced Vibration) of a fuel assembly has been considered to install. And a change of dual outlets to a single outlet has also been investigated to promote the accessibility and to work easily in the reactor pool. Those investigations have been conducted by the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method, which can provide us with an good understanding of three dimensional flow fields influenced by design changes without an experiment. In this study a CFD modeling study for an AHR core structure design is described

  14. A level playing field: Obtaining consistent cost estimates for advanced reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rules and guidelines for developing cost estimates are given which provide a means for presenting cost estimates for advanced concepts on a consistent and equitable basis. For advanced reactor designs, the scope of a cost estimate includes the plant capital cost, the operating and maintenance cost, the fuel cycle cost, and the cost of decommissioning. Each element is subdivided as is necessary to provide a common reporting format for all power plant concepts. The total generation cost is taken to be a suitable choice for a summary figure of merit. To test the application of the rules and guidelines as well as developing reference costs for current technologies, several different sized coal and pressurized water reactor plant cost estimates have been prepared

  15. A study of the advancement of a reactor core design environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the years from 2002 to 2004 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and Yonden Engineering Corporation, Japan, to develop an advanced reactor core design environment based on a communication method for controlling a reactor core code system efficiently from PCs in a distributed network. The advanced reactor core design environment is realized by using Microsoft Visual Basic and communication software based on the IFE product SoftwareBus. The project has been carried out based on the fact that a computer-aided design system has been under development at Yonden Engineering Corporation in order to perform efficiently fuel replacement calculation by Yonden's reactor design code system. In this system, the structure is such that the physics calculation code system runs on UNIX workstations (in parallel) performing the calculations, while the Man-Machine Interface for controlling the calculation programs run on PCs in a distributed network. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general communication tool (IFE's SoftwareBus) has been used for realizing communication of the n-pair n-node between the reactor core design code system and the PC applications. Further, a method of improvement in the speed of the optimal pattern calculation has been implemented by assigning each examination pattern to two or more computers distributed in the network and assigning the next pattern calculation to the computer, where the calculation has ended or has the lowest workload. The high-speed technology of the pattern survey by network distributed processing is based on SoftwareBus. The reactor core design code system is developed in FORTRAN running on a UNIX workstation (Solaris). The PC applications have been developed by using Microsoft Visual Basic on Windows 2000 platform. The first step of the verification and validation process was carried out in March

  16. Considerations for advanced reactor design based on EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term success of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) provides several insights into fundamental characteristics and design features of a nuclear generating station that enhance safety, operability, and maintainability. Some of these same characteristics, together with other features, offer the potential for operational lifetimes well beyond the current licensing time frame, and improved reliability that could potentially reduce amortized capital costs as well as overall operation and maintenance costs if incorporated into advanced plant designs. These features and characteristics are described and the associated benefits are discussed

  17. US advanced liquid metal reactor design and safety enhancements through teamwork with the NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a cost effective approach to providing electricity needs of the United States in the early 21st century through an integrated Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor System (ALMRS). The concept incorporates innovative design and passive safety features to achieve favourable safety and economics simultaneously. The synergistic components of the ALMRS, under development by the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE), are described. A key aspect of the programme is continuing interaction with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) toward standard design certification. This interaction, and the results to date, are also addressed. (author)

  18. Economical opportunities on advanced conventional island design for the European pressurized water reactor (EPR) based on Konvoi design. Annex 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design of the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) has been finalized by the end of 1998. In parallel with these efforts, the German utilities group contracted the Siemens AG Power generation Group (KWU) to develop an advanced and optimized conventional island for the EPR. The main objectives for improving the conventional island design were determined on the basis of experience of the Konvoi series plants and advanced fossil plants. This paper describes the innovations introduced to the conventional island and presents the reasons for the resultant cost reductions. (author)

  19. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  20. Design of the cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, P.; Zhang, Hongxia; Bao, W.; Schneidewind, A.; Link, P.; Grünwald, A. T. D.; Georgii, R.; Hao, L. J.; Liu, Y. T.

    2016-06-01

    The design of the first cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor is presented. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations using neutron ray-tracing program McStas, the parameters of major neutron optics in this instrument are optimized. The neutron flux at sample position is estimated to be 5.6 ×107 n/cm2/s at neutron incident energy Ei=5 meV when the reactor operates normally at the designed 60 MW power. The performances of several neutron supermirror polarizing devices are compared and their critical parameters are optimized for this spectrometer. The polarization analysis will be realized with a flexible switch from the unpolarized experimental mode.

  1. A design assessment of tritium removal systems for the mirror advanced reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the available processes for removing tritium from light water, and selects the most appropriate process for recovering tritium from the various tritiated water streams identified in the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). A simplified flowsheet is shown for the process and the main process parameters are identified. Previous experience is utilized to predict direct capital costs and power requirement for the Tritiated Water Removal Unit (TWRU). A number of possibilities are discussed for lowering the cost of the TWRU. An estimate is made of the direct capital cost for the Air Detritiation System that has already been selected as the reference design by MARS personnel. The leakage from the MARS coolant loop is estimated, based on the experience obtained with Ontario Hydro's coolant systems. Design targets are identified for tritium levels in the reactor hall atmosphere and in water and air emissions. Tritium levels are predicted for these and are assessed against the previously identified targets

  2. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  3. Evaluation of Advanced Thermohydraulic System Codes for Design and Safety Analysis of Integral Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept, which incorporates the nuclear steam supply systems within the reactor vessel, is one of the innovative reactor types with high potential for near term deployment. An International Collaborative Standard Problem (ICSP) on Integral PWR Design, Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermohydraulic Coupling of Primary System and Containment during Accidents was established in 2010. Oregon State University, which made available the use of its experimental facility built to demonstrate the feasibility of the Multi-application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design, and sixteen institutes from seven Member States participated in this ICSP. The objective of the ICSP is to assess computer codes for reactor system design and safety analysis. This objective is achieved through the production of experimental data and computer code simulation of experiments. A loss of feedwater transient with subsequent automatic depressurization system blowdown and long term cooling was selected as the reference event since many different modes of natural circulation phenomena, including the coupling of primary system, high pressure containment and cooling pool are expected to occur during this transient. The power maneuvering transient is also tested to examine the stability of natural circulation during the single and two phase conditions. The ICSP was conducted in three phases: pre-test (with designed initial and boundary conditions established before the experiment was conducted), blind (with real initial and boundary conditions after the experiment was conducted) and open simulation (after the observation of real experimental data). Most advanced thermohydraulic system analysis codes such as TRACE, RELAPS and MARS have been assessed against experiments conducted at the MASLWR test facility. The ICSP has provided all participants with the opportunity to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their system codes in the transient

  4. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost.

  5. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost

  6. Comparative sodium void effects for different advanced liquid metal reactor fuel and core designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of metal-, oxide-, and nitride-fueled advanced liquid metal reactor cores was performed to investigate the calculated differences in sodium void reactivity, and to determine the relationship between sodium void reactivity and burnup reactivity swing using the three fuel types. The results of this analysis indicate that nitride fuel has the least positive sodium void reactivity for any given burnup reactivity swing. Thus, it appears that a good design compromise between transient overpower and loss of flow response is obtained using nitride fuel. Additional studies were made to understand these and other nitride advantages. (author)

  7. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  8. Small-break loss-of-coolant accidents in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyack, B.E.; Steiner, J.L.; Harmony, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor developed by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). A unique feature of the PIUS concept is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is normally controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. ABB submitted the PIUS design to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for preapplication review, and Los Alamos supported the NRC`s review effort. Baseline analyses of small-break initiators at two locations were performed with the system neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis code TRAC-PF1/MOD2. In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept to severe off-normal conditions having a very low probability of occurrence.

  9. Sodium effects on mechanical performance and consideration in high temperature structural design for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium environmental effects are key limiting factors in the high temperature structural design of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. A guideline is needed to incorporate environmental effects in the ASME design rules to improve the performance reliability over long operating times. This paper summarizes the influence of sodium exposure on mechanical performance of selected austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels. Focus is on Type 316SS and mod.9Cr-1Mo. The sodium effects were evaluated by comparing the mechanical properties data in air and sodium. Carburization and decarburization were found to be the key factors that determine the tensile and creep properties of the steels. A beneficial effect of sodium exposure on fatigue life was observed under fully reversed cyclic loading in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic/martensitic steels. However, when hold time was applied during cyclic loading, the fatigue life was significantly reduced. Based on the mechanical performance of the steels in sodium, consideration of sodium effects in high temperature structural design of advanced fast reactors is discussed.

  10. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  11. Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+trademark Design Certification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MWt (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment

  12. Maintenance Cycle Extension in the IRIS Advanced Light Water Reactor Plant Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New nuclear power generation in the United States will be realized only if the economic performance can be made competitive with other methods of electrical power generation. The economic performance of a nuclear power plant can be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described that can be used to resolve, in the design phase, maintenance-related operating cycle length barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the International Reactor, Innovative and Secure (IRIS) design. IRIS is an advanced light water nuclear power plant that is being designed to maximize this on-line generating time by increasing the operating cycle length. This is consequently a maintenance strategy paper using the IRIS plant as the example.Potential IRIS operating cycle length maintenance-related barriers, determined by modification of an earlier operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant cycle length analysis to account for differences between the design of IRIS and this operating PWR, are presented. The proposed methodology to resolve these maintenance-related barriers by the design process is described. The results of applying the methodology to two potential IRIS cycle length barriers, relief valve testing and emergency heat removal system testing, are presented

  13. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 52 - Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) of 10 CFR 50.34—Post-Accident Sampling for Boron, Chloride, and Dissolved Gases; and 3. Paragraph (f... design feature in the generic DCD are governed by the requirements in 10 CFR 50.109. Generic changes that... design certification for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design, in accordance with 10...

  14. Advanced materials for nuclear reactor systems: Alloys by design to overcome past limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced materials have the potential to improve reactor performance via increased safety margins, design flexibility, and fast reactor economics and overcome traditional limitations. Increased strength and creep resistance can give greater design margins leading to improved safety margins, longer lifetimes, and higher operating temperatures, thus enabling greater flexibility. Improved mechanical performance may also help reduce the plant capital cost for new reactors both by reducing the required commodities (with concomitant reductions in welding, quality assurance and fabrication costs) and through design simplifications. However, successful implementation requires considerable development and licensing effort. Modern materials science tools such as computational thermodynamics and multiscale radiation damage computational models in conjunction with rapid science-guided experimental validation may offer the potential for a dramatic reduction in the time period to develop and qualify structural materials. There are many requirements for all nuclear reactor structural materials, regardless of the exact design or purpose. All requirements for a materials use in an advanced fast reactor system must be considered and carefully weighed. These factors may include material availability and cost, ease of fabrication and joining, long-term stability, mechanical performance, thermal properties, neutronics, corrosion and compatibility performance, radiation tolerance, and code qualification status. Only through careful evaluation of all factors and a thorough trade analysis will the most promising candidate materials be chosen for further development. It is important to note that there is no ideal material that is best for each of the considerations listed. Indeed, all candidate materials have advantages and limitations. The most promising alloys, which allow the best performance, are also the least technically mature and will require the most substantial effort. These

  15. Design of GA thermochemical water-splitting process for the Mirror Advanced Reactor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA interfaced the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle to the Mirror Advanced Reactor System (MARS). The results of this effort follow as one section and part of a second section to be included in the MARS final report. This section describes the process and its interface to the reactor. The capital and operating costs for the hydrogen plant are described

  16. ORIGEN-ARP Cross-Section Libraries for Magnox, Advanced Gas-Cooled, and VVER Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, BD

    2004-03-10

    Cross-section libraries for the ORIGEN-ARP system were extended to include four non-U.S. reactor types: the Magnox reactor, the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor, the VVER-440, and the VVER-1000. Typical design and operational parameters for these four reactor types were determined by an examination of a variety of published information sources. Burnup simulation models of the reactors were then developed using the SAS2H sequence from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory SCALE code system. In turn, these models were used to prepare the burnup-dependent cross-section libraries suitable for use with ORIGEN-ARP. The reactor designs together with the development of the SAS2H models are described, and a small number of validation results using spent-fuel assay data are reported.

  17. Maintenance based design and equipment reliability for AECL's advanced CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe how the elements of AECL's Maintenance Based Design will enable the Advanced CANDU Reactor to sustain high equipment reliability and capacity factors over the 60-year design life of the plant. The elements of Maintenance Based Design are; 1-Design Reliable Systems,Structures and Components (SSCs); 2-Select and Procure Reliable Components; 3-Incorporate Monitoring Capabilities and Facilities for SSCs; 4-Develop Maintenance Strategies and Programs for SSCs; 5-Apply Lessons Learned From Previous Plants; 6-Incorporate Maintainability and Event Free Features in the Design; 7-Provide Enhanced Maintenance Management Information and Tools to the Customer; 8-Optimize Chemistry and Materials in the Design. All these elements will be discussed with a detailed focus on the following; Design Reliable SSCs Using the techniques outlined in INPO AP-913, Equipment Reliability Process Description, each CANDU system that has caused any station past unavailability is analyzed as part of the ACR design in order to identify the critical components and any Single Points of Vulnerability (SPVs). All SPVs are then analyzed further in order to determine if they can be practically designed out or otherwise mitigated by the design. Developing Maintenance Strategies and Programs for SSCs Equipment degradation begins as soon as a component is manufactured and accelerates during initial commissioning and eventual operation. In order to sustain high levels of equipment reliability a maintenance strategy must be developed during the design phase and be ready for implementation before the start of commissioning. This maintenance strategy is developed for all critical components using the techniques of INPO AP-913 and other best industry practices. The strategy can be expanded and customized in conjunction with a future owner. Specific examples from the current ACR-1000 design will be used to show how these elements are being implemented.

  18. Development of calculational procedures for the neutron physics design of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Center Karlsruhe has been involved with the development of Light Water Tight Lattice Reactors (LWTLR) since more than ten years. A considerable amount of thermohydraulic and nuclear physics code development has been performed during this time. The present paper describes the main aspects of the neutron physics calculational tools. From the neutron physics point of view, two different tasks have to be adapted for LWTLR calculations: determination of mean cross sections sets within the hexagonal fuel assemblies (FA); determination of the characteristics of LWR cores with hexagonal FA. All developments for the neutron physics design of LWTLR have been performed within the established system for Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) calculations at KfK, KAPROS, using a various number of available options for FBR work. The present status of the calculational tools for LWTLR-investigations will be described, especially the features of a newly developed KAPROS procedure ARCOSI: Advanced Reactor COre SImulator, including: Preparation of the ARCOSI library HXSLIB, containing burnup dependent cross section sets for FA with control rod positions containing control rod material or waterholes and with borated water in the moderator region of the pin cells. Also, data for different coolant densities and pin cell temperatures may be processed; Simulation of equilibrium core calculations, including critical reactivity search by waterboration control and simple FA management. Three-dimensional full core calculations are performed with the KAPROS version of the hexagonal nodal code HEXNOD, developed by Wagner, KWU; Powerful interfaces for interactive graphical analysis of results. (author). 37 refs, 12 figs

  19. Single-earthquake design for piping systems in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appendix A to Part 100 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 100) requires, in part, that all structures, systems, and components of the nuclear power plant necessary for continued operation without undue risk to the health and safety of the public shall be designed to remain functional and within applicable stress and deformation limits when subject to an operating basis earthquake (OBE). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is proposing changes to Appendix A to Part 100 to redefine the OBE at a level such that its purpose can be satisfied without the need to perform explicit response analyses. Consequently, only the safe-shutdown earthquake (SSE) would be required for the seismic design of safety-related structures, systems and components. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the proposed changes to existing seismic design criteria that the NRC staff has found acceptable for implementing the proposed rule change in the design of safety-related piping systems in the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) lead plant. These criteria apply only to the ALWR lead plant design and are not intended to replace the seismic design criteria approved by the Commission in the licensing bases of currently operating facilities. Although the guidelines described herein have been proposed for use as a pilot program for implementing the proposed rule change specifically for the ALWR lead plant, the NRC staff expects that these guidelines will also be applied to other ALWRs

  20. Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burger, J.; Hunger, P. M.; Wegst, U. G. K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models

  1. Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO2) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models. Preliminary results

  2. Advances in global development and deployment of small modular reactors and incorporating lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident into the designs of engineered safety features of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has been facilitating the Member States in incorporating the lessons-learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident into the designs of engineered safety features of advanced reactors, including small modular reactors. An extended assessment is required to address challenges for advancing reactor safety in the new evolving generation of SMR plants to preserve the historic lessons in safety, through: assuring the diversity in emergency core cooling systems following loss of onsite AC power; ensuring diversity in reactor depressurization following a transient or accident; confirming independence in reactor trip and safety systems for sensors, power supplies and actuation systems, and finally diversity in maintaining containment integrity following a severe accident

  3. One-dimensional TRAC calculations of main steam line break events for the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor developed by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB). A unique feature of the PIUS concept is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. As part of the preapplication and eventual design certification process, advanced reactor applicants are required to submit neutronic and thermal-hydraulic safety analyses over a sufficient range of normal operation, transient conditions, and specified accident sequences. Los Alamos is supporting the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's preapplication review of the PIUS reactor. A fully one-dimensional model of the PIUS reactor has been developed for the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, TRACPF1/MOD2. Early in 1992, ABB submitted a Supplemental Information Package describing recent design modifications. An important feature of the PIUS Supplement design was the addition of an active scram system that will function for most transient and accident conditions. A one-dimensional Transient Reactor Analysis Code baseline calculation of the PIUS Supplement design were performed for a break in the main steam line at the outlet nozzle of the loop 3 steam generator. Sensitivity studies were performed to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept to severe off-normal conditions following a main steam line break. The sensitivity study results provide insights into the robustness of the design

  4. Design and layout decision for refueling system of advanced fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Describes fast neutron reactor refueling features, BN-1200 power unit general data, its refueling system design concepts, individual refueling equipment purpose and designs, and required experimental studies to create it. Refueling equipment characteristics for BN-800 and BN-1200 reactors are compared. (author)

  5. The Conceptual Design for Tubular Fuel Assemblies of an Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Research Reactor(ARR) is being designed by KAERI since 2002. The final goal of the project is to develop a new and unique research reactor model which is superior in safety and economical aspects. In this work, the conceptual design for tubular fuel assemblies was carried out to enhance the previous model. The shape optimization of the cross section of the top guide was performed, and the swaging procedure in connecting fuel plates and stiffeners was developed. Moreover to reflect changes in number and size of fuel plates, related parts of the standard and the reduced fuel assemblies were redesigned. The top guide should suppress the vibration of the fuel assembly due to coolant and resist against material failures owing to fatigue and yield. In order to gain these design requirements, we have optimized the section profile of the top guide. To confirm manufacturing aspects, the swaging procedure was developed and its performance was tested. The results of tangential tensile test and axial compression test guaranteed that the fixing state between fuel plates and stiffeners is firm enough to hold each other. In addition, due to changes in number and size of fuel plates, the outer cross section of the fuel assembly was expanded and the diameter of the spacer tube was reduced. Reflecting these design changes, top/bottom guide, top guide cover, spring, spring cover, and receptacle were readjusted. Based on the technical experiences on the design and operation of the HANARO, the standard and the reduced fuel assemblies will be verified by performing various tests and analysis

  6. Design and manufacture of neutron time of flight spectrometer on China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold or thermal neutron energy spectra on China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) could be directly measured by neutron time of flight spectrometer. Spectrometer structure and selected parameters of its key components were introduced. The impact of chopper slit and flux limit slit on neutron counts and pulse width was analyzed. The formulas of neutron counts and pulse width which were dependent on neutron wavelength were acquired. According to neutron energy spectrum measurement requirement for high fluence rate neutron beam, low-sensitivity detector, detector flux limit slit and multi-channel scaler for data acquisition were selected. These would ensure that the count loss rate was less than 0.5%. Electronics framework of detection system was designed and the total resolution time was 22.15-29.46 μs. (authors)

  7. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  8. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  9. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  10. Investigation of Classification and Design Requirements for Digital Software for Advanced Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the digital technology is being developed drastically, it is being applied to various industrial instrumentation and control (I and C) fields. In the nuclear power plants, I and C systems are also being installed by digital systems replacing their corresponding analog systems installed previously. There had been I and C systems constructed by analog technology especially for the reactor protection system in the research reactor HANARO. Parallel to the pace of the current trend for digital technology, it is desirable that all I and C systems including the safety critical and non-safety systems in an advanced research reactor is to be installed based on the computer based system. There are many attractable features in using digital systems against existing analog systems in that the digital system has a superior performance for a function and it is more flexible than the analog system. And any fruit gained from the newly developed digital technology can be easily incorporated into the existing digital system and hence, the performance improvement of a computer based system can be implemented conveniently and promptly. Moreover, the capability of high integrity in electronic circuits reduces the electronic components needed to construct the processing device and makes the electronic board simple, and this fact reveals that the hardware failure itself are unlikely to occur in the electronic device other than some electric problems. Balanced the fact mentioned above are the roles and related issues of the software loaded on the digital integrated hardware. Some defects in the course of software development might induce a severe damage on the computer system and plant systems and therefore it is obvious that comprehensive and deep considerations are to be placed on the development of the software in the design of I and C system for use in an advanced research reactor. The work investigates the domestic and international standards on the classifications of digital

  11. Investigation of Classification and Design Requirements for Digital Software for Advanced Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gee Young; Jung, H. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Park, C

    2005-06-15

    As the digital technology is being developed drastically, it is being applied to various industrial instrumentation and control (I and C) fields. In the nuclear power plants, I and C systems are also being installed by digital systems replacing their corresponding analog systems installed previously. There had been I and C systems constructed by analog technology especially for the reactor protection system in the research reactor HANARO. Parallel to the pace of the current trend for digital technology, it is desirable that all I and C systems including the safety critical and non-safety systems in an advanced research reactor is to be installed based on the computer based system. There are many attractable features in using digital systems against existing analog systems in that the digital system has a superior performance for a function and it is more flexible than the analog system. And any fruit gained from the newly developed digital technology can be easily incorporated into the existing digital system and hence, the performance improvement of a computer based system can be implemented conveniently and promptly. Moreover, the capability of high integrity in electronic circuits reduces the electronic components needed to construct the processing device and makes the electronic board simple, and this fact reveals that the hardware failure itself are unlikely to occur in the electronic device other than some electric problems. Balanced the fact mentioned above are the roles and related issues of the software loaded on the digital integrated hardware. Some defects in the course of software development might induce a severe damage on the computer system and plant systems and therefore it is obvious that comprehensive and deep considerations are to be placed on the development of the software in the design of I and C system for use in an advanced research reactor. The work investigates the domestic and international standards on the classifications of digital

  12. An advanced CANDU reactor with supercritical water coolant: conceptual design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is studying an advanced CANDU reactor concept, with supercritical steam as coolant. The coolant, being a high density gas, at a pressure above 22 MPa and temperatures above 370 deg C, does not encounter the two-phase region with its associated fuel-dryout and flow-instability problems. Increased coolant temperature leads directly to increased plant thermodynamic efficiency, thereby reducing unit energy cost through reduced specific capital cost and reduced fueling cost. The reduced coolant in-core density leads to sufficiently reduced void reactivity, so that light water becomes a coolant option. The use of supercritical water coolant also opens up the possibility of enhanced safety with a natural circulation primary flow, taking advantage of the gas expansion coefficient. To preserve neutron economy, especially at high coolant temperatures, a fuel channel that is currently being developed has a pressure tube that is thermally insulated from high-temperature coolant and is in contact with the cold heavy-water moderator. Two stages of development of a supercritical-cooled CANDU reactor were identified. The first uses conventional or near-conventional zirconium-alloy fuel cladding with coolant core-mean temperatures near 400 deg C, and the second uses advanced high-temperature fuel cladding at coolant core-mean temperatures near 500 deg C. A first-stage cost reduction of 20% from the CANDU 6 design is estimated as a result of improved thermodynamic efficiency. A large change in coolant density across the core leads to a factor 3 or 4 reduction in heavy-water inventory and a corresponding reduction in coolant void reactivity. The latter leads to improved fuel burnup and reduced demands on the safety shutdown systems. (author)

  13. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal Liquefaction Reactor Design: April 5, 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, D.; Lukas, J.; Schoen, P.

    2013-11-01

    This report provides detailed reactor designs and capital costs, and operating cost estimates for the hydrothermal liquefaction reactor system, used for biomass-to-biofuels conversion, under development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Five cases were developed and the costs associated with all cases ranged from $22 MM/year - $47 MM/year.

  14. Detailed flux calculations for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed MCNP model of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor has been developed. All reactor components inside the reflector tank were included, and all components were highly segmented. Neutron and photon multigroup flux spectra have been calculated for each segment in the model, and thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios were determined for each component segment. Axial profiles of the spectra are provided for all components of the reactor. Individual segment statistical uncertainties were limited wherever possible, and the group fluxes for all important reflector components have a standard deviation below 10%

  15. Off-design temperature effects on nuclear fuel pins for an advanced space-power-reactor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory out-of-reactor investigation was made of the effects of short-time temperature excursions above the nominal operating temperature of 990 C on the compatibility of advanced nuclear space-power reactor fuel pin materials. This information is required for formulating a reliable reactor safety analysis and designing an emergency core cooling system. Simulated uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pins, clad with tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) showed no compatibility problems after heating for 8 hours at 2400 C. At 2520 C and above, reactions occurred in 1 hour or less. Under these conditions free uranium formed, redistributed, and attacked the cladding.

  16. Advances in PHWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances by AECL in improved performance, cost reduction and safety improvement of CANDU reactors are described. Topics include: computer-aided design tools, up-front licensing, site utilization, plant life management, construction techniques, plant control, safety-critical software, advanced fuels, human-machine interface, heat sinks, radiation protection, feedback to design, emergency core cooling and probabilistic safety assessment

  17. Providing the Basis for Innovative Improvements in Advanced LWR Reactor Passive Safety Systems Design: An Educational R and D Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project characterizes typical two-phase stratified flow conditions in advanced water reactor horizontal pipe sections, following activation of passive cooling systems. It provides (1) a means to educate nuclear engineering students regarding the importance of two-phase stratified flow in passive cooling systems to the safety of advanced reactor systems and (2) describes the experimental apparatus and process to measure key parameters essential to consider when designing passive emergency core cooling flow paths that may encounter this flow regime. Based on data collected, the state of analysis capabilities can be determined regarding stratified flow in advanced reactor systems and the best paths forward can be identified to ensure that the nuclear industry can properly characterize two-phase stratified flow in passive emergency core cooling systems

  18. New fission reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of critical challenges to the expanded or continued use of nuclear power have developed. These can be categorized as: regulatory restrictions and complications; negative public attitudes; plant complexity; plant life, operations, and maintenance; uncertain load growth, financing; waste management. Solutions to these challenges through advanced reactor design centre around four key technical responses. Passive safety systems are being introduced which use the laws of physics to provide emergency reactor coding, control and shutdown thus eliminating the possibility of human error. Modular construction promises cuts in costs and construction time by shifting the major part of component manufacture from the site to the factory. Standardization also cuts capital costs and in addition operations and repair costs and expedites reactor licensing. Improvements to the fuel cycle include improved fuel types, designs and fabrication, and the reprocessing of and recycling spent fuel back into energy production, thus extending uranium resources and offering a partial solution to the problem of waste disposal. Examples of evolutionary and advanced water-cooled reactors, modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and advanced liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors which are being developed round the world are presented. (author)

  19. Advanced and Innovative Reactor Concept Designs, Associated Objectives and Driving Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced and innovative options for fast reactors are presented through a short selection of recent publications at international conferences. Driving forces and major trends are analysed to give a comprehensive overview of the various existing projects and supportive R and D. (author)

  20. Precise Nuclear Data Measurements Possible with the NIFFTE fissionTPC for Advanced Reactor Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towell, Rusty; Niffte Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) Collaboration has applied the proven technology of Time Projection Chambers (TPC) to the task of precisely measuring fission cross sections. With the NIFFTE fission TPC, precise measurements have been made during the last year at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from both U-235 and Pu-239 targets. The exquisite tracking capabilities of this device allow the full reconstruction of charged particles produced by neutron beam induced fissions from a thin central target. The wealth of information gained from this approach will allow systematics to be controlled at the level of 1%. The fissionTPC performance will be presented. These results are critical to the development of advanced uranium-fueled reactors. However, there are clear advantages to developing thorium-fueled reactors such as Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactors over uranium-fueled reactors. These advantages include improved reactor safety, minimizing radioactive waste, improved reactor efficiency, and enhanced proliferation resistance. The potential for using the fissionTPC to measure needed cross sections important to the development of thorium-fueled reactors will also be discussed.

  1. On an optimized neutron shielding for an advanced molten salt fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molten salt reactor technology has gained renewed interest. In contrast to the historic molten salt reactors, the current projects are based on designing a molten salt fast reactor. Thus the shielding becomes significantly more challenging than in historic concepts. One very interesting and innovative result of the most recent EURATOM project on molten salt reactors – EVOL – is the fluid flow optimized design of the inner core vessel using curved blanket walls. The developed structure leads to a very uniform flow distribution. The design avoids all core internal structures. On the basis of this new geometry a model for neutron physics calculation is presented and applied for a shielding optimization. Based on these results an optimized shielding strategy is developed for the molten salt fast reactor to keep the fluence in the safety related outer vessel below expected limit values. A lifetime of 80 years can be assured, but the size of the core/blanket system has to be significantly increased and will finally be comparable to a sodium cooled fast reactor. The HELIOS results are verified against Monte-Carlo calculations with very satisfactory agreement for a deep penetration problem. (author)

  2. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  3. Directions in advanced reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful nuclear power plant concepts must simultaneously performance in terms of both safety and economics. To be attractive to both electric utility companies and the public, such plants must produce economical electric energy consistent with a level of safety which is acceptable to both the public and the plant owner. Programs for reactor development worldwide can be classified according to whether the reactor concept pursues improved safety or improved economic performance as the primary objective. When improved safety is the primary goal, safety enters the solution of the design problem as a constraint which restricts the set of allowed solutions. Conversely, when improved economic performance is the primary goal, it is allowed to be pursued only to an extent which is compatible with stringent safety requirements. The three major reactor coolants under consideration for future advanced reactor use are water, helium and sodium. Reactor development programs focuses upon safety and upon economics using each coolant are being pursued worldwide. These programs are discussed

  4. Fuel for advanced CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor system has proven itself to be a world leader in terms of station availability and low total unit energy cost. In 1985 for example, four of the top ten reactor units in the world were CANDU reactors operating in South Korea and Canada. This excellent operating record requires an equivalent performance record of the low-cost, natural uranium fuel. Future CANDU reactors will be an evolution of the present design. Engineering work is under way to refine the existing CANDU 600 and to incorporate state-of-the-art technology, reducing the capital cost and construction schedule. In addition, a smaller CANDU 300 plant has been designed using proven CANDU 600 technology and components but with an innovative new plant layout that makes it cost competitive with coal fired plants. For the long term, work on advanced fuel cycles and major system improvements is underway ensuring that CANDU plants will stay competitive well into the next century

  5. Creep-fatigue damage rules for advanced fast reactor design. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, following the recommendations of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors, convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Creep-Fatigue Damage Rules to be used in Fast Reactor Design. The objective of the meeting was to review developments in design rules for creep-fatigue conditions and to identify any areas in which further work would be desirable. The meeting was hosted by AEA Technology, Risley, and held in Manchester, United Kingdom, 11-13 June 1996. It was attended by experts from the European Commission, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United Kingdom. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Analysis of advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core designs with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the large majority of nuclear power plants are operated with thermal-neutron spectra and need regular fuel loading of enriched uranium. According to the identified conventional uranium resources and their current consumption rate, only about 100 years’ nuclear fuel supply is foreseen. A reactor operated with a fast-neutron spectrum, on the other hand, can induce self-sustaining, or even breeding, conditions for its inventory of fissile material, which effectively allow it, after the initial loading, to be refueled using simply natural or depleted uranium. This implies a much more efficient use of uranium resources. Moreover, minor actinides become fissionable in a fast-neutron spectrum, enabling full closure of the fuel cycle and leading to a minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is one of the most promising candidates to meet the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) declared goals. In comparison to other Generation IV systems, there is considerable design experience related to the SFR, and also more than 300 reactor years of practical operation. As a fast-neutron-spectrum system, the long-term operation of an SFR core in a closed fuel cycle will lead to an equilibrium state, where both reactivity and fuel mass flow stabilize. Although the SFR has many advantageous characteristics, it has one dominating neutronics drawback: there is generally a positive reactivity effect when sodium coolant is removed from the core. This so-called sodium void effect becomes even stronger in the equilibrium closed fuel cycle. The goal of the present doctoral research is to improve the safety characteristics of advanced SFR core designs, in particular, from the viewpoint of the positive sodium void reactivity effect. In this context, particular importance has been given to the dynamic core behavior under a hypothetical unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) accident scenario, in which sodium boiling occurs. The proposed

  7. Core design and fuel cycle of advanced fast reactor with sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A perspective sodium reactor is under development in Russia nowadays. Initially, power level of 1800 MW (el.) was considered for this reactor. However, owing to many reasons, in particular, for transportability of the main plant by railway, the reactor power was later reduced to 1200 MW (el.). At the same time the base of the concept for the choice of the core parameters remained the same as for the 1800 MW power, including the following: - low core specific power resulting in a decrease of the fuel lifetime and, consequently, a smaller annual consumption of fuel elements; - enhancement of inherent self-protection: ensuring the sodium void reactivity effect (SVR) close to zero and a minimum reactivity margin for burnup; - ensuring the reactor operation in different patterns of the closed fuel cycle organization: the use of plutonium from thermal reactor with and without MA for the first loading, recycling the own plutonium with/without breeding, burnup of own MA, etc. Basic characteristics of the core of BN-1200 reactor approved for the current phase of designing have been reported. (author)

  8. Turning points in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems

  9. Turning points in reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  10. 76 FR 78096 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... are specifically designed to ensure that the reactor can be shutdown and decay heat can be removed..., 2009 (74 FR 62829). On June 12, 2009 (74 FR 28112), the NRC amended its regulations to require... proposed rule in the Federal Register on January 20, 2011 (76 FR 3540). The public comment period for...

  11. Methodology for the Integration of Safety in the Optimization of the Advanced Reactors Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a new methodology has been developed and implemented for taking into account the safety levels of the reactor in a design optimization process, by using Design Maps.They represent a new technique for comparing critical variables in case an accidental sequenced happened, with limit values set by the design criteria.So a good balance is achieved, without allowing the economic performance search to cause a too risky reactor, and guaranteeing the competitiveness of it in spite of the safety costs.Up to the moment, there is no design tool able to accomplish this task in an integrated way.A computational tool based on this methodology has been implemented.These tool specially programmed routines allow carrying out the mentioned tasks

  12. Licensing design basis source term update for the Evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the technical basis for a licensing source term update for the Evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) which will make the source term more physically realistic. While TID [Technical Information Document] 14844 and related regulatory guidance have served the industry well, much has been learned about source term over the last 30 years, and the ALWR Requirements Document provides an opportunity to incorporate this experience by updating the licensing source term. Further, the source term update will provide an improved basis for evolutionary ALWR accident mitigation design. Results of this work indicate that the fission product release magnitude to containment is slightly less than TID 14844 for noble gas, iodine, and semi and low volatiles, but somewhat higher for cesium and tellurium. Release timing is delayed by one hour or more after the accident initiation. The chemical form of iodine is largely aerosol with significantly less organic iodine compared to regulatory guidance which specifies mostly elemental and a relatively large fraction of organic. Containment spray aerosol removal rate was determined to be significantly higher than specified in regulatory guidance. Finally, BWR suppression pool decontamination factor was determined to be less effective than allowed by regulatory guidance early in the accident (due to the delayed release noted above) and more effective than that allowed by regulatory guidance later in the accident. It is recognized by the ALWR program that the source term update could be taken further in the direction of a physically-based source term. 47 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  14. Progress in design, research and development and testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting covered the following topics: Developments in design of safety-related heat removal components and systems for advanced water cooled reactors; status of test programmes on heat removal components and systems of new designs; range of validity and extrapolation of test results for the qualification of design/licensing computer models and codes for advanced water cooled reactors; future needs and trends in testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Tests of heat removal safety systems have been conducted by various groups supporting the design, testing and certification of advanced water cooled reactors. The Technical Committee concluded that the reported test results generally confirm the predicted performance features of the advanced designs. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Design features of advanced sodium cooled fast reactors with emphasis on economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: New incentives have recently been given by French authorities to promote the development of advanced fast reactors and fuel re-cycle options. Priority is given to Sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) on which a significant experience exists. The objective of current R and D program carried out in tight collaboration between CEA, AREVA and EDF is to propose SFR concept(s) including innovative technologies and assess the associated industrial viability by 2012. The objective is also to propose the specification of a prototype that would qualify whole or part of the most promising selected options. An overall specification was established by EDF for future Commercial SFR. The target for such SFR will be the same as contemporary LWR as regards availability factor, design life expectancy, maintenance, safety and electricity generation cost (investment + operation + fuel cycle). In addition, outstanding performances as regards energy resources sustainability are requested. The risk on investment must also be reduced, through adequate inspection and repair capabilities, and through a satisfactory public acceptance. Specific Proliferation Resistance and Plant Protection measures are also requested. The present paper will give an overview of R and D orientations and efforts made to increase the SFR attractiveness, in line with preceding objectives: - Enhanced safety is expected to be obtained by prevention and mitigation of severe accidents and a low vulnerability to external events and aggressions (use of a robust containment). The objectives are: - To prevent core damage by making an extensive use of the lines of defence approach, focusing on the design of a core with favourable reactivity coefficients, minimizing risks associated with sodium and diversifying and enhancing reliability of safety systems. - To mitigate consequences of core damage by making provisions against energetic criticality sequences resulting from core melt down and by ensuring a safe

  16. AREVA NP's advanced Thermal Hydraulic Methods for Reactor Core and Fuel Assembly Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of the Thermal Hydraulic (TH) analysis of reactor core and fuel assembly design is the determination of pressure loss and critical heat flux (CHF). Especially the description of the latter effect requires the modeling of a large variety of physical phenomena starting with single phase quantities like turbulence or fluid-wall friction, two phase quantities like void distributions, heat transfer between fuel rod and fluid and ultimately the CHF mechanism itself. Additional complexity is added by the fact that the relevant geometric scales which have to be resolved, cover a wide range from the length of the fuel assembly (∼ 4000 mm), over the typical dimensions of sub-channel cross sections and the vanes on the spacer grids (∼ 10 mm) down to the microscopic scales set by bubble sizes and boundary layers (mm to sub mm). Due to the above described situation the necessary TH quantities are often determined by measurements. The main advantage of this technique is that measurements are widely accepted and trusted if the geometry and flow conditions are sufficiently close to real reactor conditions. The main disadvantage of experiments is that they are expensive both with respect to time and money; especially in high pressure tests they give only limited access to the test object. Consequently there is a strong interest to develop computer codes with the goal of minimizing the need of experiments, and hence, speeding up and reducing costs of fuel assembly and core design. Today most of the design work is based on sub-channel codes, originally developed in the 70's; they provide an effective description of the TH in fuel assemblies by regarding the fuel assembly as a system of communicating channels (the volume enclosed by four fuel rods = one sub-channel). Further development of these codes is one main focus of AREVA NP's Thermal Hydraulic method and code development strategy. To focus the know-how and resources existing in the different regions of

  17. Physics design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor A-SSTR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on design studies on the fusion power reactor such as the DEMO reactor SSTR, the compact power reactor A-SSTR and the DREAM reactor with a high environmental safety and high availability, a new concept of compact and economic fusion power reactor (A-SSTR2) with high safety and high availability is proposed. Employing high temperature superconductor, the toroidal filed coils supplies the maximum field of 23T on conductor which corresponds to 11T at the magnetic axis. A-SSTR2 (Rp=6.2m, ap=1.5m, Ip=12MA) has a fusion power of 4GW with βN=4. For an easy maintenance and for an enough support against a strong electromagnetic force on coils, a poloidal coils system has no center solenoid coils and consists of 6 coils located on top and bottom of the machine. Physics studies on the plasma equilibrium, controllability of the configuration, the plasma initiation and non-inductive current ramp-up, fusion power controllability and the diverter have shown the validity of the A-SSTR2 concept. (author)

  18. Balancing human and technical reliability in the design of advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Human factors exigencies are often overseen during the early design phases of NPP. ► Optimization of reactors safety is only based on technical reliability considerations. ► The search for more technical reliability often leads to more system complexity. ► System complexity is a major contributor to the operator's poor performance. ► Our method enables to assess plant complexity and it's impact on human performance. - Abstract: The strong influence of human factors (HF) on the safety of nuclear facilities is nowadays recognised and the designers are now enforced to consider HF requirements in the design of new facilities. Yet, this consideration of human factors requirements is still more or less restricted to the latest phases of the projects, essentially for the design of human-system interfaces (HSI's) and control rooms, although the design options influencing at most the human performance in operation are indeed fixed during the very early phases of the new reactors projects. The main reason of this late consideration of HF is that there exist few methods and models for anticipating the influence of fundamental design options on the future performance of operation teams. This paper describes a set of new tools permitting (i) determination of the impact of the fundamental process design options on the future activity of the operation teams and (ii) assessment of the influence of these operational constraints on teams performance. These tools are intended to guide the design of future 4th generation (GEN4) reactors, within the frame of a global risk-informed design approach, considering technical and human reliability exigencies in a balanced way.

  19. Simulation research and optimal design for digital power regulating system of China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on SimPort simulation platform of nuclear power plant, a simulation model for Digital Power Regulating System (DPRS) of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) was established. By simulating the transient state of DPRS using this model, the adjusting parameters for the digital PID controller were determined. According to the features of the driving mechanism, the effects of the driving accuracy of the control rod and the displacement delay between electromagnetic coil and armature upon system stability and the regulating performance were analyzed, furthermore, their stability limit values were obtained respectively. The research results of this paper have some engineering practical value. (authors)

  20. Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Design for Water Cooled Reactors. Proceedings of a Technical Committee Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economics of current nuclear power plants have improved through increased fuel burnup and longer fuel cycles, i.e. increasing the effective time that fuel remains in the reactor core and the amount of energy it generates. Efficient consumption of fissile material in the fuel element before it is discharged from the reactor means that less fuel is required over the reactor's life cycle, which results in lower amounts of fresh fuel, lower spent fuel storage costs, and less waste for ultimate disposal. Better utilization of fissile nuclear materials, as well as more flexible power manoeuvring, place challenging operational demands on materials used in reactor components, and first of all, on fuel and cladding materials. It entails increased attention to measures ensuring desired in-pile fuel performance parameters that require adequate improvements in fuel material properties and fuel rod designs. These are the main reasons that motivated the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWG-FPT) to recommend the organization of a Technical Committee Meeting on Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Designs for Power Reactors. The proposal was supported by the IAEA TWGs on Advanced Technologies for Light and Heavy Water-Cooled Reactors (TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), and the meeting was held at the invitation of the Government of Switzerland at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, from 23 to 26 November 2009. This was the third IAEA meeting on these subjects (the first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan, and the second in 2003 in Brussels, Belgium), which reflects the continuous interest in the above issues among Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to review the current status in the development of fuel pellet materials and to explore recent improvements in fuel rod designs for light and heavy water cooled power reactors. The meeting was attended by 45 specialists representing fuel vendors, nuclear utilities, research and development

  1. Advanced fuel pellet materials and designs for water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technological advances attempted in doping of fuel pellets with the primary objective of obtaining larger grains. While most of the papers gave an account of the experimental studies on addition of various dopants in different fuel materials, some of them outlined the behaviour of such pellets at sintering process. Papers dealing with 'Fission gas release from fuel pellets under high burnup conditions were presented in Session 3. Session 4 was devoted to the evolution of fuel pellet structure and thermal properties at high burnup. Session 5 was dealing with fuel pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) being a complex phenomenon that may lead to cladding failure and subsequent release of fission products into the reactor coolant. Research efforts to understand better the PCI phenomenon and minimize it with design solutions are considered necessary

  2. Design measures for prevention and mitigation of severe accidents at advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with the current nuclear energy systems. New generations of nuclear power plants are being developed, building upon this background of experience. During the last decade, requirements for equipment specifically intended to minimize releases of radioactive material to the environment in the event of a core melt accident have been introduced, and designs for new plants include measures for preventing and mitigating a range of severe accident scenarios. The IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Impact of Severe Accidents on Plant Design and Layout of Advanced Water Cooled Reactors was jointly organized by the Department of Nuclear Energy and the Department of Nuclear Safety to review measures which are being incorporated into advanced water cooled reactor designs for preventing and mitigating severe accidents, the status of experimental and analytical investigations of severe accident phenomena and challenges which support design decisions and accident management procedures, and to understand the impact of explicitly addressing severe accidents on the cost of nuclear power plants. This publication is intended to provide an objective source of information on this topic. It includes 14 papers presented at the Technical Committee meeting held in Vienna between 21-25 October 1996. It also includes a Summary and Findings of the Working Groups. The papers were grouped in three sections. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  3. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Advanced Core Design And Fuel Management For Pebble-Bed Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans D. Gougar; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; William K. Terry

    2004-10-01

    A method for designing and optimizing recirculating pebble-bed reactor cores is presented. At the heart of the method is a new reactor physics computer code, PEBBED, which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the asymptotic (equilibrium) fuel cycle. This core state is shown to be unique for a given core geometry, power level, discharge burnup, and fuel circulation policy. Fuel circulation in the pebble-bed can be described in terms of a few well?defined parameters and expressed as a recirculation matrix. The implementation of a few heat?transfer relations suitable for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors allows for the rapid estimation of thermal properties critical for safe operation. Thus, modeling and design optimization of a given pebble-bed core can be performed quickly and efficiently via the manipulation of a limited number key parameters. Automation of the optimization process is achieved by manipulation of these parameters using a genetic algorithm. The end result is an economical, passively safe, proliferation-resistant nuclear power plant.

  5. Visual numerical steering in 3D AGENT code system for advanced nuclear reactor modeling and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Numerical steering framework developed for deterministic neutron transport code AGENT to speed up the solution. ► Resulting speed up is on the order of 50%. ► Use of the steering framework is demonstrated modeling a TRIGA reactor. ► Numerical steering framework showed to be well suited for the deterministic neutron transport methods. - Abstract: The AGENT simulation system is used for detailed three-dimensional modeling of neutron transport and corresponding properties of nuclear reactors of any design. Numerical solution to the neutron transport equation in the AGENT system is based on the Method of Characteristics (MOCs) and the theory of R-functions. The latter of which is used for accurately describing current and future heterogeneous lattices of reactor core configurations. The AGENT code has been extensively verified to assure a high degree of accuracy for predicting neutron three-dimensional point-wise flux spatial distributions, power peaking factors, reaction rates, and eigenvalues. In this paper, a new AGENT code feature, a computational steering, is presented. This new feature provides a novel way for using deterministic codes for fast evaluation of reactor core parameters, at no loss to accuracy. The computational steering framework as developed at the Technische Universität München is smoothly integrated into the AGENT solver. This framework allows for an arbitrary interruption of AGENT simulation, allowing the solver to restart with updated parameters. One possible use of this is to accelerate the convergence of the final values resulting in significantly reduced simulation times. Using this computational steering in the AGENT system, coarse MOC resolution parameters can initially be selected and later update them – while the simulation is actively running – into fine resolution parameters. The utility of the steering framework is demonstrated using the geometry of a research reactor at the University of Utah: this new

  6. A level playing field-obtaining consistent cost estimates for advanced reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A level playing field in sports is necessary to avoid a situation in which a team has an unfair advantage over its competition. Similarly, rules and guidelines for developing cost estimates can be established which, in effect, provide a level playing field whereby cost estimates for advanced power plant concepts can be presented on a consistent and equitable basis. As an example, consider the capital costs shown in Table 1. Both sets of cost are for the exact same power plant; Estimate 1 is expressed in constant dollars while Estimate 2 is presented in nominal or as-spent dollars. As shown, the costs in Table 1 are not directly comparable. Similar problems can be introduced as a result of differing assumptions in any number of parameters including the scope of the cost estimate, inflation/escalation and interest rates, contingency costs, and site location. Of course, the motivation for having consistent cost estimates is to permit comparison among various concepts. As the U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work on several advanced reactor concepts in which expected cost is a key evaluation parameter, the emphasis in this particular endeavor has been in promoting the comparability of advanced reactor cost estimates among themselves and to existing power plant types. To continue with the analogy, the idea is to lay out the playing field and the rules of the contest such that each team participates in the match on an equal basis with the final score being solely determined by the inherent strengths and abilities of the teams. A description of the playing field and some of the more important rules will now be provided

  7. Design of condensation heat exchanger for the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System) of APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Condensation heat exchanger for the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System) was designed. ► The requirement of the heat removal rate and the prevention of water hammer phenomena were considered. ► The proposed design of the heat exchanger satisfied the requirement of the passive heat removal system. - Abstract: The APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus), a next generation nuclear power plant in Korea, has adopted the PAFS (Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System) on the secondary system of the steam generator (SG) as an advanced safety feature. It is intended to replace the conventional auxiliary feedwater system, which consists of active components for the SG in a passive way. It removes decay heat from the reactor core by cooling down the secondary system of the SG using a condensation heat exchanger installed in the PCCT (Passive Condensation Cooling Tank). The objective of this study is to design a condensation heat exchanger for the PAFS and to evaluate the cooling performance for the proposed design using the thermal hydraulic system analysis code, MARS (Multi-dimensional Analysis for Reactor Safety). Requirements such as the heat removal capacity and the prevention of water hammer were preferentially considered to determine the design parameters of the heat exchanger tube. The MARS code analysis result showed that the proposed design of the PAFS heat exchanger is able to cool down the required amount of decay heat. The distribution of a liquid volume fraction and flow regime predicted by the MARS code shows that the proposed design of the heat exchanger excludes the water hammer inside the tube. Estimation of a two-phase flow pressure drop indicates that the pressure drop inside the tube is negligible compared to the total pressure drop in the PAFS. From the MARS code analysis, it is concluded that the proposed design of the condensation heat exchanger in the PAFS satisfies the overall criteria for the performance of the passive heat removal

  8. High accuracy modeling for advanced nuclear reactor core designs using Monte Carlo based coupled calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espel, Federico Puente

    The main objective of this PhD research is to develop a high accuracy modeling tool using a Monte Carlo based coupled system. The presented research comprises the development of models to include the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Presently, deterministic codes based on the diffusion approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation, coupled with channel-based (or sub-channel based) thermal-hydraulic codes, carry out the three-dimensional (3-D) reactor core calculations of the Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These deterministic codes utilize nuclear homogenized data (normally over large spatial zones, consisting of fuel assembly or parts of fuel assembly, and in the best case, over small spatial zones, consisting of pin cell), which is functionalized in terms of thermal-hydraulic feedback parameters (in the form of off-line pre-generated cross-section libraries). High accuracy modeling is required for advanced nuclear reactor core designs that present increased geometry complexity and material heterogeneity. Such high-fidelity methods take advantage of the recent progress in computation technology and coupled neutron transport solutions with thermal-hydraulic feedback models on pin or even on sub-pin level (in terms of spatial scale). The continuous energy Monte Carlo method is well suited for solving such core environments with the detailed representation of the complicated 3-D problem. The major advantages of the Monte Carlo method over the deterministic methods are the continuous energy treatment and the exact 3-D geometry modeling. However, the Monte Carlo method involves vast computational time. The interest in Monte Carlo methods has increased thanks to the improvements of the capabilities of high performance computers. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods

  9. Water chemistry control to meet the advanced design and operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The road maps on R and D plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems in Japan have been proposed along with promotion of R and D related water chemistry improvement for the advanced application of light water reactors (LWRs). The technical trends were divided into four categories, dose rate reduction, structural integrity, fuel integrity and radioactive waste reduction, and latest technical break through for each category was shown for the advanced application of LWRs. At the same time, the technical break through and the latest movements for regulation of water chemistry were introduced for each of major organizations related to nuclear engineering in the world. The conclusions were summarized as follows; 1. Water chemistry improvements might contribute to achieve the advanced application of LWRs, while water chemistry should be often changed to achieve the advanced application of LWRs. 2. Only one solution for water chemistry control was not obtained for achieving the advanced application of LWRs, but miscellaneous solutions were possible for achieving one. Optimal water chemistry control was desired for having the good practices for satisfying multi-targets at the same time and it was much affected by the plant unique systems and operational history. 3. That meant it was difficult to determine water chemistry regulation targets for achieving application of LWRs but it was necessary to prepare suitable guideline for good achievement of application of LWRs. That meant the guideline should be recommendation for good practice in the plant. 4. The water chemistry guide line should be modified along with progress of plant operation and water chemistry and related technologies. (author)

  10. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  11. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  12. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR section 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design

  13. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  14. An advanced frequency-domain code for boiling water reactor (BWR) stability analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-phase flow instability is of interest for the design and operation of many industrial systems such as boiling water reactors (BWRs), chemical reactors, and steam generators. In case of BWRs, the flow instabilities are coupled to the power instabilities via neutronic-thermal hydraulic feedbacks. Since these instabilities produce also local pressure oscillations, the coolant flashing plays a very important role at low pressure. Many frequency-domain codes have been used for two-phase flow stability analysis of thermal hydraulic industrial systems with particular emphasis to BWRs. Some were ignoring the effect of the local pressure, or the effect of 3D power oscillations, and many were not able to deal with the neutronics-thermal hydraulics problems considering the entire core and all its fuel assemblies. The new frequency domain tool uses the best available nuclear, thermal hydraulic, algebraic and control theory methods for simulating BWRs and analyzing their stability in either off-line or on-line fashion. The novel code takes all necessary information from plant files via an interface, solves and integrates, for all reactor fuel assemblies divided into a number of segments, the thermal-hydraulic non-homogenous non-equilibrium coupled linear differential equations, and solves the 3D, two-energy-group diffusion equations for the entire core (with spatial expansion of the neutron fluxes in Legendre polynomials).It is important to note that the neutronics equations written in terms of flux harmonics for a discretized system (nodal-modal equations) generate a set of large sparse matrices. The eigenvalue problem associated to the discretized core statics equations is solved by the implementation of the implicit restarted Arnoldi method (IRAM) with implicit shifted QR mechanism. The results of the steady state are then used for the calculation of the local transfer functions and system transfer matrices. The later are large-dense and complex matrices, (their size

  15. Secondary Heat Exchanger Design and Comparison for Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush; Michael McKellar; Michael Patterson; Eung Soo Kim

    2012-06-01

    The goals of next generation nuclear reactors, such as the high temperature gas-cooled reactor and advance high temperature reactor (AHTR), are to increase energy efficiency in the production of electricity and provide high temperature heat for industrial processes. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process heat transport system. The need for efficiency, compactness, and safety challenge the boundaries of existing heat exchanger technology, giving rise to the following study. Various studies have been performed in attempts to update the secondary heat exchanger that is downstream of the primary heat exchanger, mostly because its performance is strongly tied to the ability to employ more efficient conversion cycles, such as the Rankine super critical and subcritical cycles. This study considers two different types of heat exchangers—helical coiled heat exchanger and printed circuit heat exchanger—as possible options for the AHTR secondary heat exchangers with the following three different options: (1) A single heat exchanger transfers all the heat (3,400 MW(t)) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants; (2) Two heat exchangers share heat to transfer total heat of 3,400 MW(t) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants, each exchanger transfers 1,700 MW(t) with a parallel configuration; and (3) Three heat exchangers share heat to transfer total heat of 3,400 MW(t) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants. Each heat exchanger transfers 1,130 MW(t) with a parallel configuration. A preliminary cost comparison will be provided for all different cases along with challenges and recommendations.

  16. Simulation research and optimal design for digital power regulating system of China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on SimPort simulation platform of nuclear power plant, a simulation model for Digital Power Regulating System (DPRS) of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) was established. The transient state of DPRS was simulation studied using this model. According to the characteristics of the driving mechanism of the control rods, the effects of the driving precision of the control rod and its displacement delay upon the system stability were analyzed. Considering the process requirements of CARR and the function characteristic of DRPS, the adjusting parameters for the digital PID controller and the stability limits of the driving mechanism of the control rods were obtained. The sampling period of the digital PID controller is 100 ms and its proportion gain is 300. The stability limit of the driving precision of the control rod is 0.4 mm. The stability limit of displacement delay between electromagnetic coil and armature is 6.0 mm. (authors)

  17. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author)

  18. Design of A Vibration and Stress Measurement System for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 Reactor Vessel Internals Comprehensive Vibration Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC), Regulatory Guide 1.20, the reactor vessel internals comprehensive vibration assessment program (RVI CVAP) has been developed for an Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR1400). The purpose of the RVI CVAP is to verify the structural integrity of the reactor internals to flow-induced loads prior to commercial operation. The APR1400 RVI CVAP consists of four programs (analysis, measurement, inspection, and assessment). Thoughtful preparation is essential to the measurement program, because data acquisition must be performed only once. The optimized design of a vibration and stress measurement system for the RVI CVAP is essential to verify the integrity of the APR1400 RVI. We successfully designed a vibration and stress measurement system for the APR1400 RVI CVAP based on the design materials, the hydraulic and structural analysis results, and performance tests of transducers in an extreme environment. The measurement system designed in this paper will be utilized for the APR1400 RVI CVAP as part of the first construction project in Korea

  19. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  20. Conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) based on an advanced scenario of plasma operation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is being developed at JAERI as a next-generation tokamak following JT-60 has the major purpose of realizing a self-ignited, long-burning DT plasma and demonstrating engineering feasibility. The paper emphasizes the advanced scenario of FER plasma operation and control and the advantage in engineering design made possible by the scenario. The FER concept is discussed, which is based on quasi-steady-state operation by a lower-hybrid-wave current drive or steady-state operation by three candidate radiofrequency waves, impurity control by a cold and dense divertor plasma and vertical position control of a highly elongated plasma. (author)

  1. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  2. One-dimensional TRAC calculations of a pump-trip scram for the PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, J.L.; Lime, J.F.; Elson, J.S.; Stumpf, H.J.; Boyack, B.E.

    1993-06-01

    One dimensional TRAC transient calculations of the process inherent ultimate safety (PIUS) advanced reactor design were performed for a pump-trip SCRAM. The TRAC calculations showed that the reactor power response and shutdown were in qualitative agreement with the one-dimensional analyses presented in the PIUS Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID) submitted by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for preapplication safety review. The PSID analyses were performed with the ABB-developed RIGEL code. The TRAC-calculated phenomena and trends were also similar to those calculated with another one-dimensional PIUS model, the Brookhaven National Laboratory developed PIPA code. A TRAC pump-trip SCRAM transient has also been calculated with a TRAC model containing a multi-dimensional representation of the PIUS intemal flow structures and core region. The results obtained using the TRAC fully one-dimensional PIUS model are compared to the RIGEL, PIPA, and TRAC multi-dimensional results.

  3. One-dimensional TRAC calculations of a pump-trip scram for the PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One dimensional TRAC transient calculations of the process inherent ultimate safety (PIUS) advanced reactor design were performed for a pump-trip SCRAM. The TRAC calculations showed that the reactor power response and shutdown were in qualitative agreement with the one-dimensional analyses presented in the PIUS Preliminary Safety Information Document (PSID) submitted by Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for preapplication safety review. The PSID analyses were performed with the ABB-developed RIGEL code. The TRAC-calculated phenomena and trends were also similar to those calculated with another one-dimensional PIUS model, the Brookhaven National Laboratory developed PIPA code. A TRAC pump-trip SCRAM transient has also been calculated with a TRAC model containing a multi-dimensional representation of the PIUS intemal flow structures and core region. The results obtained using the TRAC fully one-dimensional PIUS model are compared to the RIGEL, PIPA, and TRAC multi-dimensional results

  4. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+trademark design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994 - September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems

  5. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1996 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

  6. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+trademark design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995 - September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1996 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems

  7. Use of the modular modeling system in the design of the Penn State advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular Modeling System (MMS), developed by Babcock and Wilcox under a contract from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is a computer code designed for the simulation of nuclear and fossil power plants. MMS uses preprogrammed modules to present specific power plant components and allows for the interconnection of these modules in a wide variety of configurations to model present and future plant configurations. MMS requires the use of a simulation language to translate and execute the plant model. The Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ASCL), a general purpose simulation language by Mitchell and Gauthier, was used in conjunction with MMS for the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) studies at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU). For the past year, the Nuclear Engineering Department at PSU, under a contract from the Department of Energy (DOE), has been involved in the conceptual design and evaluation of a reconfigured Ultra-Safe ALWR. The underlying design philosophy was that the large amounts of energy stored in a reactor at shutdown could be used in such a way as to ensure safe plant shutdown, even if all AC power to the plant is lost. A secondary shutdown turbine was employed to recover energy to power the initial cooldown of the plant until natural circulation can develop and dissipate the remaining decay heat in the core. Primary system pressure is no longer controlled using a conventional pressurizer. Instead a modified let-down injection system connected to an inside containment atmospheric tank controls pressure

  8. Status of advanced technologies for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future development of the CANDU reactor is a continuation of a successful series of reactors, the most recent of which are nine CANDU 6 Mk 1* units and four Darlington units. There are three projects underway that continue the development of the CANDU reactor. These new design projects flow from the original reactor designs and are a natural progression of the CANDU 6 Mk 1, two units of which are operating successfully in Canada, one each in Argentina and Korea, with five more being built in Rumania. These new design projects are known as: CANDU 6 Mk 2, an improved version of CANDU 6 Mk 1; CANDU 3, a small, advanced version of the CANDU 6 Mk 1; CANDU 6 Mk 3, a series of advanced CANDU reactors. A short description of modified versions of CANDU reactors is given in this paper. 5 figs

  9. The EU power plant conceptual study - neutronic design analyses for near term and advanced reactor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A power plant conceptual study (PPCS) has been conducted in the framework of the European fusion programme with the main objective to demonstrate the safety and environmental advantages and the economic viability of fusion power. Power plant models with limited (''near term concepts'') and advanced plasma physics and technological extrapolations (''advanced concepts'') were considered. Two near term plant models were selected, one employing a water cooled lithium-lead (WCLL), and the other one a helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket. Two variants were also considered for the advanced power plant models, one adopting a liquid metal blanket with a self-cooled lithium-lead breeder zone and a helium cooled steel structure (''dual coolant lithium lead'', DCLL), and the other one a self-cooled lithium-lead (SCLL) blanket with SiCf/SiC composite as structural material. This report provides a detailed documentation of the neutronics design analyses performed as part of the PPCS study for both the near term and advanced power plant models. Main issues are the assessment of the tritium breeding capability, the evaluation of the nuclear power generation and its spatial distribution, and the assessment and optimisation of the shielding performance. The analyses were based on three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNP code using suitable torus sector models developed for the different PPCS plant variants. (orig.)

  10. Reactor physics methods, models, and applications used to support the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, J.C.; Worley, B.A.; Renier, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wemple, C.A.; Jahshan, S.N.; Ryskammp, J.M. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the neutronics analysis performed during 1991 and 1992 in support of characterization of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The methods used in the analysis, parametric studies, and key results supporting the design and safety evaluations of the conceptual design are presented. The analysis approach used during the conceptual design phase followed the same approach used in early ANS evaluations: (1) a strong reliance on Monte Carlo theory for beginning-of-cycle reactor performance calculations and (2) a reliance on few-group diffusion theory for reactor fuel cycle analysis and for evaluation of reactor performance at specific time steps over the fuel cycle. The Monte Carlo analysis was carried out using the MCNP continuous-energy code, and the few- group diffusion theory calculations were performed using the VENTURE and PDQ code systems. The MCNP code was used primarily for its capability to model the reflector components in realistic geometries as well as the inherent circumvention of cross-section processing requirements and use of energy-collapsed cross sections. The MCNP code was used for evaluations of reflector component reactivity effects and of heat loads in these components. The code was also used as a benchmark comparison against the diffusion-theory estimates of key reactor parameters such as region fluxes, control rod worths, reactivity coefficients, and material worths. The VENTURE and PDQ codes were used to provide independent evaluations of burnup effects, power distributions, and small perturbation worths. The performance and safety calculations performed over the subject time period are summarized, and key results are provided. The key results include flux and power distributions over the fuel cycle, silicon production rates, fuel burnup rates, component reactivities, control rod worths, component heat loads, shutdown reactivity margins, reactivity coefficients, and isotope production rates.

  11. Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, G.L.

    2005-10-03

    This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

  12. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  13. Advanced Test Reactor Safety Basis Upgrade Lessons Learned Relative to Design Basis Verification and Safety Basis Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The reactor also provides other irradiation services such as radioisotope production. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). An audit conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (DOE OA) raised concerns that design conditions at the ATR were not adequately analyzed in the safety analysis and that legacy design basis management practices had the potential to further impact safe operation of the facility.1 The concerns identified by the audit team, and issues raised during additional reviews performed by ATR safety analysts, were evaluated through the unreviewed safety question process resulting in shutdown of the ATR for more than three months while these concerns were resolved. Past management of the ATR safety basis, relative to facility design basis management and change control, led to concerns that discrepancies in the safety basis may have developed. Although not required by DOE orders or regulations, not performing design basis verification in conjunction with development of the 10 CFR 830 Subpart B upgraded safety basis allowed these potential weaknesses to be carried forward. Configuration management and a clear definition of the existing facility design basis have a direct relation to developing and maintaining a high quality safety basis which properly identifies and mitigates all hazards and postulated accident conditions. These relations and the impact of past safety basis management practices have been reviewed in order to identify lessons learned from the safety basis upgrade process and appropriate actions to resolve possible concerns with respect to the current ATR safety

  14. Advanced and innovative reactor concept designs, associated objectives and driving forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before deployment on an industrial and commercial basis, innovative components features and designs have to be developed and qualified: For the general design, the loop concept is investigated in Japan while other countries focus on the pool concept. Simplification of design will be needed to meet economical objectives. As for the fuel, oxide fuel has more feedback experience, but metal fuel is studied mainly because of its performances with regards to the breeding ratio as well as with regards to possibly simpler manufacturing process. Carbide fuel is also under consideration because of its high density, its high fusion temperature and good thermal conductivity. Fuel development should take into account manufacturing processes (remote handling in case of minor actinide presence), behaviour under irradiation in normal and accidental conditions, and compatibility with treatment processes. Safety, especially behaviour under severe accidental conditions should be a field of major progress. Re-criticality should be well mastered. In support of safety, in service inspection and repair has to be improved to cope with the issues of sodium opacity and temperature of cold shutdown. Energy conversion leads to the study of steam generators more resistant with regards to water-sodium reaction, or to the use of supercritical CO2 enabling higher yields. Treatment and recycling are part of the system; hydro-metallurgical processes have reached an industrial level, and are being further investigated for additional improvements regarding minor actinide separation and non proliferation. Pyro-metallurgical processes are considered for metal fuels. Proliferation resistance, like safety, should offer high guarantee levels in order to meet sustainable development targets. Apart from national R and D programs that support all new projects, there exist international collaboration structures: - The Generation IV International Forum (GIF), which aims at performing R and D on 4th generation

  15. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  16. Advances in implosion physics, alternative targets design, and neutron effects on heavy ion fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of a new radiation transport (RT) solver with an existing multimaterial fluid dynamics code (ARWEN) using Adaptive Mesh Refinement named DAFNE, has been completed. In addition, improvements were made to ARWEN in order to work properly with the RT code, and to make it user-friendlier, including new treatment of Equations of State, and graphical tools for visualization. The evaluation of the code has been performed, comparing it with other existing RT codes (including the one used in DAFNE, but in the single-grid version). These comparisons consist in problems with real input parameters (mainly opacities and geometry parameters). Important advances in Atomic Physics, Opacity calculations and NLTE atomic physics calculations, with participation in significant experiments in this area, have been obtained. Early published calculations showed that a DTx fuel with a small tritium initial content (xe and to enhance radiation losses, reducing the plasma temperature, Ti. The neutron activation of all natural elements in First Structural Wall (FSW) component of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactor for waste management, and the analysis of activation of target debris in NIF-type facilities has been completed. Using an original efficient modeling for pulse activation, the FSW behavior in inertial fusion has been studied. A radiological dose library coupled to the ACAB code is being generated for assessing impact of environmental releases, and atmospheric dispersion analysis from HIF reactors indicate the uncertainty in tritium release parameters. The first recognition of recombination barriers in SiC, modify the understanding of the calculation of displacement per atom, dpa, to quantify the collisional damage. An important analysis has been the confirmation, using Molecular Dynamics (MD) with an astonishing agreement, of the experimental evidence of low-temperature amorphization by damage accumulation in SiC, which could modify extensively its viability as a

  17. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff's review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff's review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE's application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design

  18. Analytical chemistry requirements for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for more than five decades. Newer advanced reactors now being built have simpler designs which reduce capital cost. The greatest departure from most designs now in operation is that many incorporate passive or inherent safety features which require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. India is developing the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) in its plan to utilise thorium in nuclear power program

  19. Technical meeting on advanced fuel pellet materials and fuel rod designs for water cooled reactors. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy Water-Cooled Reactors (TWGLWR and TWGHWR) with a proposal to hold it at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. The purpose of the meeting is to provide an overview on the status and perspective of fuel pellet materials development and recent improvements in fuel rod designs for light and heavy water cooled power reactors. The meeting will cover both light and heavy water reactor fuels with the following main objectives: - Consideration of modern technological and design tools enabling reliable performance of fuels and rod columns in current and planned operational environments; - Analysis of high burnup fuel structure and properties, including RIM effects, thermal behaviour, fission gas release, PCI and PCMI; - Discussion on specific features of MOX fuel, as well as perspectives on advanced fuels like Vibro-pack, Thorium fuel and others. Each of the papers in this book of abstracts has been indexed separately

  20. Conceptual design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor (A-SSTR2) - Compact and safety oriented commercial power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the last decade JAERI reactor design studies, the advanced commercial reactor concept (A-SSTR2) which meets both economical and environmental requirements has been proposed. The A-SSTR2 is a compact power reactor (Rp=6.2m, ap=1.5m, Ip=12MA) with a high fusion power (Pf=4GW) and a net thermal efficiency of 51%. The machine configuration is simplified by eliminating a center solenoid (CS) coil system. SiC/SiC composite for blanket structure material, helium gas cooling with pressure of 10MPa and outlet temperature of 900 deg. C, and TiH2 for bulk shield material are introduced. For the toroidal field (TF) coil, a high temperature (TC) superconducting wire made of bismuth with the maximum field of 23T and the critical current density of 1000A/mm2 at a temperature of 20K is applied. In spite of the CS-less configuration, a computer simulation gives a satisfactory plasma equilibria, plasma initiation process and current ramp up scenario. (author)

  1. Design, development and testing of 25 NB size Accumulator Isolation Passive Valve (AIPV) for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR), Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) is one of the engineered safety system provided to mitigate the consequences of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in the event of a break in the pressure boundary of Main Heat Transport (MHT) circuit. High Pressure Injection System of ECCS, is designed to provide coolant injection from advanced accumulators directly into the core for 15 minutes after LOCA. The injection pipe between each accumulator and ECCS header has a newly developed passive valve called Accumulator Isolation Passive Valve (AIPV). During normal reactor operation the MHT pressure will be 70 bar and accumulator pressure will be 55 bar. With rupture of large pipe, when the MHT system pressure falls down below 50 bar, the AIPV located between the accumulators and the ECC Headers, will open to provide coolant to the core. The AIPV is a self-acting type of valve requiring no external energy, i.e.neither air nor electric supply for its actuation. The AIPV serves not only as a passive isolation device but also as a flow control device. It is a non-standard, high pressure and high temperature valve and not manufactured by the valve industry worldwide. In the process of design and development of a 200 NB prototype AIPV for AHWR, a 25 NB size AIPV was designed and developed and successfully tested at Integral Test Loop (ITL). During several experiments carried out at ITL the functional capabilities of AIPV has been proved. The in-situ calibration and testing of AIPV in the plant without removing the same has also been established. This report deals with the role of AIPV in ECCS of AHWR, its design basis, tests performed at simulated conditions and test results with analysis. (author)

  2. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapter 1, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  3. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapters 2--13, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  4. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  5. Use of the modular modeling system in the design of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study involves the design and subsequent transient analysis of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR). The performance of the PSU ALWR is evaluated during small step changes in power and a turbine trip from full power without scram. The Modular Modeling System (MMS), developed by Babcock and Wilcox under a contract from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is a computer code designed for the simulation of nuclear and fossil power plants. MMS uses preprogrammed modules to represent specific power plant components such as pipes, pumps, steam generators, and a nuclear reactor. These components can then be connected in any manner the user desires providing certain simple interconnection rules are followed. In this study, MMS is used to develop computer models of both the PSU ALWR and a conventional PWR operating at the same power level. These models are then subjected to the transients mentioned above to evaluate the ability of the letdown-injection system to maintain primary system pressure. The transient response of the PSU ALWR and conventional PWR MMS models were compared to each other and whenever possible to actual plant transient data. 14 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  7. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  8. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase 1 effort was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) Reactor concept. Unlike...

  9. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) reactor to efficiently extract oxygen from lunar regolith. Unlike state-of-the-art carbothermal...

  10. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors IAEA safety

  11. Advanced Fission Reactor Program objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of an advanced fission reactor program should be to develop an economically attractive, safe, proliferation-resistant fission reactor. To achieve this objective, an aggressive and broad-based research and development program is needed. Preliminary work at Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that a reasonable goal for a research program would be a reactor combining as many as possible of the following features: (1) initial loading of uranium enriched to less than 15% uranium 235, (2) no handling of fuel for the full 30-year nominal core life, (3) inherent safety ensured by core physics, and (4) utilization of natural uranium at least 5 times as efficiently as light water reactors

  12. Comparative study on level-2 PSA modeling for an advanced pressurized water reactor during basic design phase in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerning the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the containment response and the source term characteristics under hypothetical core damage accidents, during the basic design phase of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR), a level-2 PSA modeling was developed. In the present paper, a comparative study on the modeling was performed to obtain insights related to safety adequacy and vulnerability of the APWR basic design with some severe accident prevention/mitigation features (structures, systems, and components). The features consist of containment structure based on enhanced design pressure, improved cavity configuration, hydrogen mitigation system, cavity flooding system with both active and passive spillways, emergency containment spray backup system, and safety depressurization and vent system. The level-2 PSA modeling was implemented by reflecting limited results obtained from the level-1 PSA, the deterministic severe accident analysis, and the deterministic containment ultimate pressure capacity analysis using the above features. In spite of the limitation of the level-2 PSA modeling during the basic design phase, it is found that the quantitative safety of the APWR basic design was enhanced to the extent that containment failure frequency (CFF) and conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) meet CFF goal and containment performance goal, respectively. Additionally, compared with the level-2 PSA modeling results of the APWR and those of other plants, the qualitative level of safety was identified with respect to the basic design aspects vulnerable to source term release sequences. Finally, to reduce severe accident vulnerability, it was recommended that actions for lowering containment heat removal loss leading to the late failure be developed and effort for reducing the direct release of fission product due to the SGTR-induced containment bypass be made

  13. Layout design of advanced control room of pressurized water reactor NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design function of MCR is to guarantee the safety of NPP operation, reduce the operation pressure of operators. The diversity of DCS platform, digital HMI, back-up panels and the different control place for MCR/SCR should be carefully considered in the design of MCR. Due to the different standards and regulations are adopted by the Suppliers, the layout designs of control rooms are quite different. The Suppliers' national standards and regulations also should be considered in the design and procurement of MCR, especially the requirements in Chinese standards and regulations should be considered. (authors)

  14. The Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program is a forward-looking program designed to produce viable nuclear generating system candidates to meet the very real, and perhaps imminent, need for new power generation capacity in the U. S. and around the world. The ALRR Program is an opportunity to move ahead with confidence, to confront problems today which must be confronted if the U. S. electrical utilities are to continue to meet their commitment to provide safe, reliable, economical electrical power to the nation in the years ahead. Light water reactor technology is today playing a vital role in the production of electricity to meet the world's needs. At present about 13% of the world's electricity is supplied by nuclear power plants, most of those light water reactors. Nevertheless, there is a clear need for expanded use of nuclear generation. Here in Korea and elsewhere in Asia, demand for electricity has continued to increase at a very high rate. In the United States demand growth has been more moderate, but a large number of existing stations will be ready for replacement in the next two decades, and all countries face the problem of dwindling fuel supplies and growing environmental impact of fossil-fired power plants. Despite the evident need for expanded nuclear generation capacity in the United States, there have been no new plants ordered in the past ten years and at present there are no immediate prospects for new plant orders. Concerns about safety, the high cost of recent nuclear stations, and the current excess of electrical generation capacity in the United States, have combined to interrupt completely the growth of this vital power supply system

  15. Iris reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  16. Detailed heat load calculations at the beginning, middle, and end of cycle for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a world-class research reactor and experimental center for neutron research, presently being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The reactor consists of a 330-MW(f) highly enriched uranium core, which is cooled, moderated, and reflected with heavy water. When completed, it will be the preeminent ultrahigh neutron flux reactor in the world, with facilities for research programs in biology, materials science, chemistry, fundamental and nuclear physics, and analytical chemistry. Irradiation facilities are provided for a variety of isotope production capabilities, as well as materials irradiation. The ANS reactor design, at the time of this report, has completed the conceptual design phase and entered the advanced conceptual design phase. This report is part of an effort to fully document the analysis methods and results for the conceptual design. It details the methods used to perform heat load calculations on the ANS reactor design, describes the model used, and gives the resulting heat loads in all components of the reactor, in both a differential (by segment) and integral (by component) fashion. These heat load data are provided at three times within the ANS fuel cycle - at beginning (0 days), middle (8.5 days), and end (17 days) of cycle. The remainder of the report is dedicated to this description. In Chapter 2, some necessary background on the reactor design is provided. Chapters 3 and 4 give details of the depletion methods used and revisions to previous MCNP models. Chapter 5 analyzes the results of these calculations, and Chapter 6 provides a summary and conclusions

  17. Relative safeguards risks of advanced reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to develop a procedure to quantitatively assess the risk to diversion of the nuclear material in the fuel cycle for seven advanced reactor design concepts (LWR-Pu, LMFBR, HTGR, GCFR, MSBR, LWBR, HWR). Each stage in each of the seven reactor fuel cycles is evaluated and the result of the evaluation is a comparison among the various fuel cycles. This method of evaluation is used to determine the stages in a nuclear reactor fuel cycle that are most susceptible to diversion; it also gives an indication of what factors contribute to that susceptibility

  18. Performance of operating and advanced light water reactor designs. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power can provide security of energy supply, stable energy costs, and can contribute to greenhouse gas reduction. To fully realize these benefits, a continued and strong focus must be maintained on means for assuring the economic competitiveness of nuclear power relative to alternatives. Over the past several years, considerable improvements have been achieved in nuclear plant performance. Worldwide, the average energy availability factor has increased from 66 per cent in 1980 to 81 per cent in 1999, with some utilities achieving significantly higher values. This is being achieved through integrated programmes including personnel training and quality assurance, improvements in plant system and component design and plant operation, by various means to reduce outage duration for maintenance and refuelling and other scheduled shutdowns, and by reducing the number of forced outages. Application of technical means for achieving high performance of nuclear power plants is an important element for assuring their economic competitiveness. For the current plants, proper management includes development and application of better technologies for inspection, maintenance and repair. For future plants, the opportunity exists during the design phase to incorporate design features and technologies for achieving high performance. This IAEA Technical Committee meeting (TCM) provided a forum for information exchange on design features and technologies incorporated into LWR plants commissioned within the last 15-20 years, and into evolutionary LWR designs still under development, for achieving performance improvements with due regard to stringent safety requirements and objectives. It also addressed on-going technology development expected to achieve further improvements and/or significant cost reductions. The TCM was attended by 32 participants from 14 Member States: Argentina, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico

  19. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. Comparison of best estimate methods for judging design margins of advanced water-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a IAEA technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the Technical Committee Meeting on Significance of design and Operational Margins for advanced Water Cooled Reactor Systems were: to provide an international forum for presentation and discussion of recent results on best estimate methods for judging design margins of mentioned reactors; to identify and describe the technical features of best estimate methods for predicting margins and to provide input for a status report on a comparison of best estimate methods for assessing margins in different countries and organisations. Participants from thirteen countries presented fifteen papers describing their methods, state of art and experiences. Each of those is presented here by a separate abstract

  1. Steam condensation model onto horizontal finned tubes: first approximation to the containment cooling system of advanced reactors European Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    European designs of advanced reactors, such as EPR pr SWR 1000, have considered the use of innovative passive safety systems to preserve containment integrity even in the case of a hypothetical accident. These systems consist of several units of bundles of quasi-horizontal finned tubes. Steam released into the containment atmosphere condenses onto these structures, which are internally cooled by water under natural circulation regime. The energy absorbed by the coolant is then discharged into a pool which acts as a heat sink for at least three days. This paper presents the work carried out under the auspices of European Union within the CONGA project to simulate steam condensation onto the above mentioned quasi-horizontal finned tubes. To date calculation methodologies have been pearly reviewed and and an approximation (''Nusselt type'') has been accepted to be the most suitable for safety studies, because of its mechanistic nature and its compatibility with current safety computation tools. Two versions of this approach have been properly adapted and subsequently implemented into independent codes for their validation. An experimental database built up from the open literature allowed to point out models accuracy, showing error well within the experimental uncertainly margin. Therefore, condensate film resistance to heat transfer has been modelled satisfactorily. Nevertheless, further work remains to be done to account for the effects of noncondensable gas presence and aerosol deposition onto heat transfer surfaces. (Author) 22 refs

  2. Engineering design of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor decommissioning machine and robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the background to the Decommissioning System and the stages through which it was developed before arriving at the final concept. Included is the steel materials radioactive inventory which gives radioactivity and weight of steel materials to be size reduced and handled by the System. A detailed description of the decommissioning machine and handling system is given. It describes how the problem of radiation shine where manipulator platform service lines pass through the floor shield was overcome by careful design. Key dates of important stages in the supply of the system are included. (author)

  3. Development Program of the Advanced HANARO Reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development program of an advanced HANARO (AHR) reactor started in Korea to keep abreast of the increasing future demand, from both home and abroad, for research activities. This paper provides a review of the status of research reactors in Korea, the operating experience of the HANARO, the design principles and preliminary features of an advanced HANARO reactor, and the specific strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program. The design principles were established in order to design a new multi-purpose research reactor that is safe, economically competitive and technically feasible. These include the adaptation of the HANARO design concept, its operating experience, a high ratio of flux to power, a high degree of safety, improved economic efficiency, improved operability and maintainability, increased space and expandability, and ALARA design optimization. The strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program considers items such as providing a digital advanced HANARO reactor in cyber space, a method for the improving the design quality and economy of research reactors by using Computer Integrated Engineering, and more effective advertising using diverse virtual reality. This development program will be useful for promoting the understanding of and interest in the operating HANARO as well as an advanced HANARO reactor under development in Korea. It will provide very useful information to a country that may need a research reactor in the near future for the promotion of public health, bio-technology, drug design, pharmacology, material processing, and the development of new materials. (author)

  4. System-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Kori nuclear power plant unit 1, the first nuclear power plant unit ever dedicated in Korea, began commercial operations with a generating capacity of 587 MW in 1978, much research and development has been conducted in the nuclear industry. In the middle 1980s, the Korean standard nuclear power plant (KSNP) was first developed under the 'nuclear power promotion plan' promulgated by the government with reference to system 80 of ABBCE of the USA. Applying indigenously accumulated technologies and up-to-date design standards from both home and abroad, the initial KSNP project began with the construction of the Younggwang NPP units No. 3 and 4. In addition, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) designed and constructed a high performance multipurpose research reactor based on experience in the operation of previous reactors and accumulated nuclear technology. Timed with completion of construction in April 1995, the reactor was named HANARO (high-flux advanced neutron application reactor), which, in Korean means, 'uniqueness'. In the middle of the 1990s, research and development was launched related to small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) to promote the utilization of nuclear energy. SMRs are under development worldwide for various purposes such as district heating, seawater desalination, nuclear ship propulsion, as well as electricity production. Generally, modern SMRs for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production, and reduced capital costs. Many SMRs also have advantages of reactor safety and economics by implementing advanced design concepts and technology. Since 1997, KAERI has been developing the system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART), an advanced integral pressurized water reactor (PWR). The SMART is a promising, advanced SMR and has an integral type reactor with a rated thermal power of 330 MW. All major primary components, such as reactor core, steam generator (SG), main

  5. A methodological study on organizing an intelligent CAD/CAE system for conceptual design of advanced nuclear reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to shorten the time span of design work and enhance both consistency and rationality of design products, the authors are now investigating an intelligent CAD/CAE system to support cooperative works by many specialists by adopting object-oriented approach. In this paper, the cognitive aspect of design activities of specialists in the conceptual design phase of nuclear reactors is discussed. The activities of the specialists in their design analysis process are highly knowledge-based and goal-oriented. The characteristics of the activities are 1) hierarchization of design goal into sub-goals, 2) prioritization of design sub-goals and step-by-step practise of design analysis, and 3) abstraction of real-world space structure into more simplified space structure to cope with theoretical treatment. Based on these consideration, a conceptual design model of specialists' activities composed of attribute modeling and design expertise knowledge base is proposed. The 'principle of functional independence' proposed by Sue is applied to bridge between the attribute modeling and design expertise knowledge base. The intelligent CAD/CAE system is now under development by focusing on the conceptual design of a space power reactor core utilizing thermo-ionic fuel elements as direct thermo-to-electric conversion. A program to calculate thermo-hydraulics of reactor core and thermo-ionic power generation has been developed. An interface has been also developed in order to communicate with the specialists at JAERI by E-mail concerning the interactive calculation between our calculation and the neutronics calculation of reactor core. (orig.)

  6. Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

  7. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  8. Development of demonstration advanced thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the advanced thermal demonstration reactor with 600 MWe output was started in 1975. In order to make the compact core, 648 fuel assemblies, each comprising 36 fuel rods, were used, and the mean channel output was increased by 20% as compared with the prototype reactor. The heavy water dumping mechanism for the calandria was abolished. Advanced thermal reactors are suitable to burn plutonium, since the control rod worth does not change, the void reactivity coefficient of coolant shifts to the negative side, and the harmful influence of high order plutonium is small. The void reactivity coefficient is nearly zero, the fluctuation of output in relation to pressure disturbance is small, and the local output change of fuel by the operation of control rods is small, therefore, the operation following load change is relatively easy. The coolant recirculation system is of independent loop construction dividing the core into two, and steam and water are separated in respective steam drums. At present, the rationalizing design is in progress by the leadership of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. The outline of the demonstration reactor, the reactor construction, the nuclear-thermal-hydraulic characteristics and the output control characteristics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  9. Development of Korea advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear power plants should not only have the features of improved safety and economic competitiveness but also provide a means to resolve spent fuel storage problems by minimizing volume of high level wastes. It is widely believed that liquid metal reactors (LMRs) have the highest potential of meeting these requirements. In this context, the LMR development program was launched as a national long-term R and D program in 1992, with a target to introduce a commercial LMR around 2030. Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER), a 150 MWe pool-type sodium cooled prototype reactor, is currently under the conceptual design study with the target schedule to complete its construction by the mid-2010s. This paper summarizes the KALIMER development program and major technical features of the reactor system. (author)

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  12. Data management and communication networks for man-machine interface system in Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor : Its functionality and design requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Kyung Ho; Park, Gun Ok; Suh, Sang Moon; Kim, Jang Yeol; Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The DAta management and COmmunication NETworks(DACONET), which it is designed as a subsystem for Man-Machine Interface System of Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor (KALIMER MMIS) and advanced design concept is approached, is described. The DACONET has its roles of providing the real-time data transmission and communication paths between MMIS systems, providing the quality data for protection, monitoring and control of KALIMER and logging the static and dynamic behavioral data during KALIMER operation. The DACONET is characterized as the distributed real-time system architecture with high performance. Future direction, in which advanced technology is being continually applied to Man-Machine Interface System development of Nuclear Power Plants, will be considered for designing data management and communication networks of KALIMER MMIS. 9 refs., 1 fig. (Author)

  13. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  14. Development of advanced nuclear reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several advanced reactor designs have been so far developed in Russia. The AES-91 and AES-92 plants with the VVER-1000 reactors have been developed at the beginning of 1990. However, the former design has been built in China and the latest which is certified meeting European Utility Requirements is being built in India. Moreover, the model VVER-1500 reactor with 50-60 MWd/t burn-up and an enhanced safety was being developed by Gidropress about 2005, excepting to be completed in 2007. But, this schedule has slipped in favor of development of the AES-2006 power plant incorporating a third-generation standardized VVER-1200 reactor of 1170 MWe. This is an evolutionary development of the well-proven VVER-1000 reactor in the AES-92 plant, with longer life, greater power and efficiency and its lead units are being built at Novovoronezh II, to start operation in 2012-13. Based on Atomenergoproekt declaration, the AES-2006 conforms to both Russian standards and European Utility Requirements. The most important features of the AES-2006 design are mentioned as: a design based on the passive safety systems, double containment, longer plant service life of 50 years with a capacity factor of 92%, longer irreplaceable components service life of 60 years, a 28.6% lower amount of concrete and metal, shorter construction time of 54 months, a Core Damage Frequency of 1x10-7/ year and lower liquid and solid wastes by 70% and 80% respectively. The presented paper includes a comparative analysis of technological and safety features, economic parameters and environmental impact of the AES-2006 design versus the other western advanced reactors. Since the Bushehr phase II NPP and several other NPPs are planning in Iran, such analysis would be of a great importance

  15. Advanced fuel cycles for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current natural uranium-fuelled CANDU system is a world leader, both in terms of overall performance and uranium utilization. Moreover, the CANDU reactor is capable of using many different advanced fuel cycles, with improved uranium utilization relative to the natural uranium one-through cycle. This versatility would enable CANDU to maintain its competitive edge in uranium utilization as improvements are made by the competition. Several CANDU fuel cycles are symbiotic with LWRs, providing an economical vehicle for the recycle of uranium and/or plutonium from discharges LWR fuel. The slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel cycle is economically attractive now, and this economic benefit will increase with anticipated increases in the cost of natural uranium, and decreases in the cost of fuel enrichment. The CANFLEX fuel bundle, an advanced 43-element design, will ensure that the full benefits of SEU, and other advanced fuel cycles, can be achieved in the CANDU reactor. 25 refs

  16. General description of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a boiling light water cooled, heavy water moderated and vertical pressure tube type reactor with its design optimised for utilisation of thorium for power generation. The core consists of (Th-U233 )O2 and (Th-Pu)O2 fuel with a discharge burn up of 20,000 MWd/Te. This reactor incorporates several features to simplify the design, which eliminate certain systems and components. AHWR design is also optimised for easy replaceability of coolant channels, facilitation of in-service inspection and maintenance and ease of erection. The AHWR design also incorporates several passive systems for performing safety-related functions in the event of an accident. In case of LOCA, emergency coolant is injected through 4 accumulators of 260 m3 capacity directly into the core. Gravity driven water pool of capacity 6000 m3 serves to cool the core for 3 days without operator's intervention. Core submergence, passive containment isolation and passive containment cooling are the added features in AHWR. The paper describes the various process systems, core and fuel design, primary components and safety concepts of AHWR. Plant layout and technical data are also presented. The conceptual design of the reactor has been completed, and the detailed design and development is scheduled for completion in the year 2002. (author)

  17. Role of advanced reactors in further nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the national long-term nuclear R and D program launched in 1992, an endeavor has been made in Korea to develop advanced nuclear reactor systems with significantly enhanced safety and economics from those of the current generation nuclear power plants. The advanced PWR nuclear reactor systems under development in Korea include 1300 MWe Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), 330 MWt Integral Type System Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART) for nuclear cogeneration, and 330 MWe Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER) in addition to the evolutionary enhancement of the 1000 MWt KSNPP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant). Three point design philosophy has been adopted for the development of the advanced reactors in Korea : enhancements on safety, economics and public acceptance of nuclear power. To enhance the safety of the advanced reactor systems, a strategy has been adopted to employ advanced design features as well as the passive safety design features. Economically viable design concepts also have been implemented in the evolutionary KSNPP, KNGR, and the SMART development. Economic competitiveness against the fossil plants also has been set as a major objective of the ALWR development program in Korea. These safer and more economical advanced reactors will better promote the public acceptance of the commercial use of the nuclear power and thus could be utilized to meet the forecasted national energy need in the early 21st century. International cooperation in the areas of ALWR development as well as improving public acceptance of the nuclear power is required. (author)

  18. Data management and communication networks for Man-Machine Interface System in Korea Advanced Liquid MEtal Reactor : its functionality and design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DAta management and Communication NETworks(DACONET), which it is designed as a subsystem for Man-Machine Interface System of Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor(KALIMER MMIS) and advanced design concept is approached, is described. The DACONET has its roles of providing the real-time data transmission and communication paths between MMIS systems, providing the quality data for protection, monitoring and control of KALIMER and logging the static and dynamic behavioral data during KALIMER operation. The DACONET is characterized as the distributed real-time system architecture with high performance. Future direction, in which advanced technology is being continually applied to Man-Machine Interface System development and communication networks of KALIMER MMIS

  19. Fuel rod bundles proposed for advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper aims to be a general presentation for fuel bundles to be used in Advanced Pressure Tube Nuclear Reactors (APTNR). The characteristics of such a nuclear reactor resemble those of known advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors like: Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACRTM-1000, pertaining to AECL) and Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). We have also developed a fuel bundle proposal which will be referred as ASEU-43 (Advanced Slightly Enriched Uranium with 43 rods). The ASEU-43 main design along with a few neutronic and thermalhydraulic characteristics are presented in the paper versus similar ones from INR Pitesti SEU-43 and CANDU-37 standard fuel bundles. General remarks regarding the advantages of each fuel bundle and their suitability to be burned in an APTNR reactor are also revealed. (authors)

  20. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  1. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  2. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  3. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  4. Advanced fuels for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In addition to traditional fast reactor fuels that contain Uranium and Plutonium, the advanced fast reactor fuels are likely to include the minor actinides [Neptunium (Np), Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm)]. Such fuels are also referred to as transmutation fuels. The goal of transmutation fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a traditional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. Oxide, metal, nitride, and carbide fuels are candidates under consideration for this application, based on historical knowledge of fast reactor fuel development and specific fuel tests currently being conducted in international transmutation fuel development programs. Early fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high density and potential for breeder operation. The focus of pressurized water reactor development on oxide fuel and the subsequent adoption by the commercial nuclear power industry, however, along with early issues with low burnup potential of metal fuel (now resolved), led later fast reactor development programs to favor oxide fuels. Carbide and nitride fuels have also been investigated but are at a much lower state of development than metal and oxide fuels, with limited large scale reactor irradiation experience. Experience with both metal and oxide fuels has established that either fuel type will meet performance and reliability goals for a plutonium fueled fast spectrum test reactor, both demonstrating burnup capability of up to 20 at.% under normal operating conditions, when clad with modified austenitic or ferritic martensitic stainless steel alloys. Both metal and oxide fuels have been shown to exhibit sufficient margin to failure under transient conditions for successful reactor operation. Summary of selected fuel material properties taken are provided in the paper. The main challenge for the development of transmutation fast reactor

  5. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication technology of the U3Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U3Si2 dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U3Si2 fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 ∼ 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The γ-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U3Si2. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano-plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49

  6. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  7. Advanced CANDU reactor, evolution and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the ACRTM (Advanced CANDU(1) ReactorTM) to meet today's market challenges. It is a light water tube type pressurized water reactor and is the latest evolution of CANDU technology. The design was launched to be cost-competitive with other generating sources, while building on the unique safety and operational advantages of the CANDU design. The ACR is an evolutionary design that retains the proven CANDU features delivered at Qinshan Phase III, while incorporating a set of innovative features and proven state-of-the-art technologies that have emerged from AECL's ongoing Research, Development and Demonstration programs. This approach ensures that key design parameters are well supported by existing reactor experience and R and D. The result is a design that delivers a new threshold in safety, performance and economics while retaining ample design margin. AECL has developed the enabling technologies and components for the ACR design, and has applied them to two plant sizes, ACR-700 and ACR-1000. The ACR integrates hallmark characteristics of traditional CANDU plants (e.g. horizontal pressure tubes, on power fuelling, automated reactor control systems, and dual independent shutdown systems), new innovations (e.g. state-of-the- art control room, extensive use of modular construction techniques, smaller reactor core, enriched uranium fuel), and certain PWR features (e.g. light water coolant, negative void reactivity). The ACR is designed for a high capacity factor and low operation and maintenance costs. It fully exploits the construction techniques that contributed to the impressive schedule accomplishments at Qinshan Phase III and therefore features a very short construction schedule, 40 months construction schedule (First Concrete to Fuel Loading ) for the first unit with improvements to 36 months for later units. The ACR is a true Gen-III plus product with a broad application. It has been proven to be an ideal

  8. A Joint Report on PSA for New and Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to new and advanced nuclear reactors. As far as advanced reactors are concerned, the objectives were to characterize the ability of current PSA technology to address key questions regarding the development, acceptance and licensing of advanced reactor designs, to characterize the potential value of advanced PSA methods and tools for application to advanced reactors, and to develop recommendations for any needed developments regarding PSA for these reactors. As far as the design and commissioning of new nuclear power plants is concerned, the objectives were to identify and characterize current practices regarding the role of PSA, to identify key technical issues regarding PSA, lessons learned and issues requiring further work; to develop recommendations regarding the use of PSA, and to identify future international cooperative work on the identified issues. In order to reach these objectives, questionnaires had been sent to participating countries and organisations

  9. An Advanced Integrated Diffusion/Transport Method for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Very-High-Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this research is to develop an integrated diffusion/transport (IDT) method to substantially improve the accuracy of nodal diffusion methods for the design and analysis of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Because of the presence of control rods in the reflector regions in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR-VHTR), traditional nodal diffusion methods do not accurately model these regions, within which diffusion theory breaks down in the vicinity of high neutron absorption and steep flux gradients. The IDT method uses a local transport solver based on a new incident flux response expansion method in the controlled nodes. Diffusion theory is used in the rest of the core. This approach improves the accuracy of the core solution by generating transport solutions of controlled nodes while maintaining computational efficiency by using diffusion solutions in nodes where such a treatment is sufficient. The transport method is initially developed and coupled to the reformulated 3-D nodal diffusion model in the CYNOD code for PBR core design and fuel cycle analysis. This method is also extended to the prismatic VHTR. The new method accurately captures transport effects in highly heterogeneous regions with steep flux gradients. The calculations of these nodes with transport theory avoid errors associated with spatial homogenization commonly used in diffusion methods in reactor core simulators

  10. An Advanced Integrated Diffusion/Transport Method for the Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Very-High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzad Rahnema; Dingkang Zhang; Abderrafi Ougouag; Frederick Gleicher

    2011-04-04

    The main objective of this research is to develop an integrated diffusion/transport (IDT) method to substantially improve the accuracy of nodal diffusion methods for the design and analysis of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). Because of the presence of control rods in the reflector regions in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR-VHTR), traditional nodal diffusion methods do not accurately model these regions, within which diffusion theory breaks down in the vicinity of high neutron absorption and steep flux gradients. The IDT method uses a local transport solver based on a new incident flux response expansion method in the controlled nodes. Diffusion theory is used in the rest of the core. This approach improves the accuracy of the core solution by generating transport solutions of controlled nodes while maintaining computational efficiency by using diffusion solutions in nodes where such a treatment is sufficient. The transport method is initially developed and coupled to the reformulated 3-D nodal diffusion model in the CYNOD code for PBR core design and fuel cycle analysis. This method is also extended to the prismatic VHTR. The new method accurately captures transport effects in highly heterogeneous regions with steep flux gradients. The calculations of these nodes with transport theory avoid errors associated with spatial homogenization commonly used in diffusion methods in reactor core simulators

  11. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  12. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  13. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  14. Advanced methods in teaching reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for (nuclear power plant) operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software.

  15. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  16. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  17. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  18. Advanced nuclear reactor systems - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilisation as its mainstay for its sustainable growth. The current levels of deployment of nuclear energy in India need to be multiplied nearly hundred fold to reach levels of electricity generation that would facilitate the country to achieve energy independence as well as a developed status. The Indian thorium based nuclear energy systems are being developed to achieve sustainability in respect of fuel resource along with enhanced safety and reduced waste generation. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and its variants have been designed to meet these objectives. The Indian High Temperature Reactor programme also envisages use of thorium-based fuel with advanced levels of passive safety features. (author)

  19. Fast reactors and advanced light water reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: The importance of nuclear energy, as a realistic option to solve the issues of the depletion of energy resources and the global environment, has been re-acknowledged worldwide. In response to this international movement, the papers compiling the most recent findings in the fields of fast reactors (FR) and advanced light water reactors (LWR) were gathered and published in this special issue. This special issue compiles six articles, most of which are very meticulously performed studies of the multi year development of design and assessment methods for large sodium-cooled FRs (SFRs), and two are related to the fuel cycle options that are leading to a greater understanding on the efficient utilization of energy resources. The Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is addressed in two manuscripts. H. Yamano et al. reviewed the current design which adopts a number of innovative technologies in order to achieve economic competitiveness, enhanced reliability, and safety. Their safety assessments of both design basis accidents and severe accidents indicate that the devised JSFR satisfies well their risk target. T. Takeda et al. discussed the improvement of the modeling accuracy for the detailed calculation of JSFR's features in three areas: neutronics, fuel materials, and thermal hydraulics. The verification studies which partly use the measured data from the prototype FBR Monju are also described. Two of these manuscripts deal with those aspects of advanced design of SFR that have hitherto not been explored in great depth. The paper by G. Palmiotti et al. explored the possibility of using the sensitivity methodologies in the reactor physics field. A review of the methods used is provided, and several examples illustrate the success of the methodology in reactor physics. A new application as the improvement of nuclear basic parameters using integral experiments is also described. F. Baque et al. reviewed the evolution of the in

  20. LBB application in the US operating and advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichman, K.; Tsao, J.; Mayfield, M.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory application of leak before break (LBB) for operating and advanced reactors in the U.S. is described. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the application of LBB for six piping systems in operating reactors: reactor coolant system primary loop piping, pressurizer surge, safety injection accumulator, residual heat removal, safety injection, and reactor coolant loop bypass. The LBB concept has also been applied in the design of advanced light water reactors. LBB applications, and regulatory considerations, for pressurized water reactors and advanced light water reactors are summarized in this paper. Technology development for LBB performed by the NRC and the International Piping Integrity Research Group is also briefly summarized.

  1. Safety of research reactors (Design and Operation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct a comprehensive up-to-date literature review on the current status of safety of research reactor both in design and operation providing the future trends in safety of research reactors. Data and technical information of variety selected historical research reactors were thoroughly reviewed and evaluated, furthermore illustrations of the material of fuel, control rods, shielding, moderators and coolants used were discussed. Insight study of some historical research reactors was carried with considering sample cases such as Chicago Pile-1, F-1 reactor, Chalk River Laboratories,. The National Research Experimental Reactor and others. The current status of research reactors and their geographical distribution, reactor category and utilization is also covered. Examples of some recent advanced reactors were studied like safety barriers of HANARO of Korea including safety doors of the hall and building entrance and finger print identification which prevent the reactor from sabotage. On the basis of the results of this research, it is apparent that a high quality of safety of nuclear reactors can be attained by achieving enough robust construction, designing components of high levels of efficiency, replacing the compounds of the reactor in order to avoid corrosion and degradation with age, coupled with experienced scientists and technical staffs to operate nuclear research facilities.(Author)

  2. Goals and requirements for advanced reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic problems and public concerns about safety have lead to a reassessment of current nuclear power plant designs and the development of improved designs or new reactor concepts to better meet the needs of United States utilities. This paper presents a set of goals and requirements, developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), to provide a means for evaluating the relative merits of alternate advanced reactor concepts. This set of requirements and goals is intended to be independent of any particular reactor concept, and is predicated on the assumption that nuclear power cannot become viable option until the public is favorable to the use of nuclear power for electric power generation in the United States. Under this assumption, the top level requirements defined for new reactor concepts are (1) public acceptability, (2) acceptable investment risk, (3) competitive life cycle costs, and (4) early deployment. Each of these requirements is supported by several related lower level requirements and design goals that are necessary or desirable to meet the top level requirements

  3. Neutronics methods, models, and applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the advanced neutron source reactor three-element core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the methods and models used to perform neutronics analyses on the Advanced Neutron Source reactor three-element core design is presented. The applications of the neutral particle Monte Carlo code MCNP are detailed, as well as the expansion of the static role of MCNP to analysis of fuel cycle depletion calculations. Results to date of these applications are presented also. A summary of the calculations not yet performed is also given to provide a open-quotes to-doclose quotes list if the project is resurrected

  4. Advanced light and heavy water reactors for improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26-29 November 1984 the Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna the Technical Committee and Workshop on Advanced Light and Heavy Water Reactor Technology in order to provide an opportunity to review and discuss the current status and recent development in the lay-out and design of advanced water reactor and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from 16 nations and 2 international organizations presenting 25 papers. The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Advanced light water reactor programmes (6 papers); Advanced light water design, technology and physics (12 papers); Advanced heavy water reactors (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  5. Philosophy of future ready thorium reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to modest uranium reserves and abundant thorium resources, thorium fuel cycle and thorium based reactors are very important to India. Over a period of time India has developed expertise in all aspects of thorium utilisation starting from mining, metal extraction, fuel fabrication, irradiation in reactors, reprocessing, and recycling the recovered 233U. In-line with the maturing of these technologies, development of innovative and advanced reactors is being pursued. India is developing technologies for thorium based reactors in many configurations, from light water cooled designs to high temperature liquid metal and molten salt cooled options. A research reactor, KAMINI, based on 233U was commissioned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) in Kalpakkam in 1996. This is the only reactor in the world currently operating with 233U based fuel. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) aims at technology development for industrial scale thorium utilisation. Thorium is also planned to be used in the High Temperature Reactors, which hold promise of producing hydrogen as an alternate energy carrier for transport applications, thus ensuring long term energy security. For long-term sustainability, it is envisaged to take full advantage of the unique characteristics of 233U - thorium fuel cycle, through development and deployment of advanced nuclear energy systems, such as molten salt breeder reactors and accelerator-driven sub-critical systems

  6. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  7. Advanced integral reactor (SMART) for nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, severe fresh water shortages are occurring in some regional areas of the Republic of Korea and the problem is expected to spread throughout the country within a decade unless appropriate and timely countermeasures are taken. Of these, nuclear sea water desalination is receiving much attention because the Republic of Korea has a firmly established nuclear environment and abundant sea water resources. In addition, nuclear plants provide cleaner energy than fossil plants, which is another important beneficial factor for countries as crowded as ours. With a view to applying nuclear desalination, development of SMART (system integrated modular advanced reactor) was initiated and is currently in progress. SMART is being developed as a 330 MW(th) integral reactor with passive safety features. The design of SMART is aimed at combining the firmly established commercial reactor design with new advanced technologies. This has led to the use of industry proven Korea optimized fuel assembly (KOFA) based fuels, while radically new technologies such as a self-pressurizing pressurizer, helical once-through steam generators and a new control concept are being developed. The current development status of SMART and its application to nuclear desalination are presented. (author)

  8. Advanced test reactor. Testing capabilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plants for the NSUF. (author)

  9. Conceptual design of multipurpose compact research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design of the high-performance and low-cost multipurpose compact research reactor which will be expected to construct in the nuclear power plant introduction countries, started from 2010 in JAEA and nuclear-related companies in Japan. The aims of this conceptual design are to achieve highly safe reactor, economical design, high availability factor and advanced irradiation utilization. One of the basic reactor concept was determined as swimming pool type, thermal power of 10MW and water cooled and moderated reactor with plate type fuel element same as the JMTR. It is expected that the research reactors are used for human resource development, progress of the science and technology, expansion of industry use, lifetime extension of LWRs and so on. (author)

  10. Generic small modular reactor plant design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Baum, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    This report gives an overview of expected design characteristics, concepts, and procedures for small modular reactors. The purpose of this report is to provide those who are interested in reducing the cost and improving the safety of advanced nuclear power plants with a generic design that possesses enough detail in a non-sensitive manner to give merit to their conclusions. The report is focused on light water reactor technology, but does add details on what could be different in a more advanced design (see Appendix). Numerous reactor and facility concepts were used for inspiration (documented in the bibliography). The final design described here is conceptual and does not reflect any proposed concept or sub-systems, thus any details given here are only relevant within this report. This report does not include any design or engineering calculations.

  11. Design certification program of the simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Electric (GE), the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and utilities are undertaking a cooperative program to enable advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs to be certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). GE is seeking to certify two advanced plants; the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). Both plants use advanced features that build on proven BWR technology

  12. RELAP5 model for advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic transients, three-element-core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to utilize reduced enrichment fuel, the three-element-core design has been proposed. The proposed core configuration consists of inner, middle, and outer elements, with the middle element offset axially beneath the inner and outer elements, which are axially aligned. The three-element-core RELAP5 model assumes that the reactor hardware is changed only within the core region, so that the loop piping, heat exchangers, and pumps remain as assumed for the two-element-core configuration. However, the total flow rate through the core is greater and the pressure drop across the core is less so that the primary coolant pumps and heat exchangers are operating at a different point in their performance curves. This report describes the new RELAP5 input for the core components

  13. Advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the advanced gas-cooled reactor system, Hunterston ''B'' power station, which is a development of the earlier natural uranium Magnox type reactor. Data of construction, capital cost, operating performance, reactor safety and also the list of future developments are given

  14. Designing a reactor for the next generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced reactor concept being developed under a cooperative program involving the U.S. Government, the utilities and the nuclear industry. The design utilizes basic High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) features of ceramic fuel, helium coolant, and a graphite moderator. The specific size and configuration is selected to utilize the inherent materials characteristics associated with these standard features to develop a passively safe design which provides a higher margin of safety and investment protection than current generation reactors. The MHTGR which is now into the preliminary design phase meets regulatory and new, more challenging user requirements. This paper outlines the requirements, describes the design and the current status, shows how the design meets the requirements, and looks at potential future deployment from the vendor's perspective

  15. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  16. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  17. Removal heat extraction systems in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two main problems generally attributed to the electricity generation by nuclear power are the security of the facility and the radioactivity of the nuclear wastes, in a way that the only tasks of the European Commission on this matter are to make sure a high level of security in the facilities, as well as an adequate fuel and waste management. In this paper we discuss about the main lines in which the CIEMAT and the Polytechnic University of Valencia are working relative to the study of the passive working systems of the advanced designs reactors. (Author) 24 refs

  18. Advanced power reactors with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of nuclear safety is the protection of individuals, society and environment against radiological hazards from accidental releases of radioactive materials contained in nuclear reactors. Hereto, these materials are enclosed by several successive barriers and the barriers protected against mishaps and accidents by a multi-level system of safety precautions. The evolution of reactor technology continuously improves this concept and its implementation. At a world-wide scale, several advanced reactor concepts are currently being considered, some of them already at a design stage. Essential safety objectives include both further strengthening the prevention of accidents and improving the containment of fission products should an accident occur. The proposed solutions differ considerably with regard to technical principles, plant size and time scales considered for industrial application. Two typical approaches can be distinguished: The first approach basically aims at an evolution of power reactors currently in use, taking into account the findings from safety research and from operation of current plants. This approach makes maximum use of proven technology and operating experience but may nevertheless include new safety features. The corresponding designs are often termed 'large evolutionary'. The second approach consists in more fundamental changes compared to present designs, often with strong emphasis on specific passive features protecting the fuel and fuel cladding barriers. Owing to the nature and capability of those passive features such 'innovative designs' are mostly smaller in power output. The paper describes the basic objectives of such developments and illustrates important technical concepts focusing on next generation plants, i.e. designs to be available for industrial application until the end of this decade. 1 tab. (author)

  19. Advanced Recycling Reactor with Minor Actinide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) with minor actinide fuel has been studied. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR proposed by the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) for FOA study sponsored by DOE of the United States of America (U.S.). Although the basic reactor concept is technically mature, it is not suitable for commercial use due to the need to reduce capital costs. As a result of INRA's extensive experience, it is anticipated that a non-commercial ARR1 will be viable and meet U.S. requirements by 2025. Commercial Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) operations are expected to be feasible in competition with LWRs by 2050, based on construction of ARR2 in 2035. The ARR based on the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel that is selected because of much experience of SFRs in the world. Major features of key technology enhancements incorporated into the ARR are the following: Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop system and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The reactor core of the ARR1 is 70 cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is 31.6%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.65 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. According to survey of more effective TRU burning core, the oxide fuel core containing high TRU (MA 15%, Pu 35% average) with moderate pins of 12% arranged driver fuel assemblies can decrease TRU conversion ratio to 0.33 and improve TRU burning capability to 67 kg/TWeh. The moderator can enhance TRU burning, while increasing the Doppler effect and reducing the positive sodium void effect. High TRU fraction promotes TRU burning by curbing plutonium production. High Am fraction and Am blanket promote Am transmutation. The ARR1 consists of a reactor building (including

  20. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  1. Design of a multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of a research reactor is essential in any endeavor to improve the execution of a nuclear programme, since it is a very versatile tool which can make a decisive contribution to a country's scientific and technological development. Because of their design, however, many existing research reactors are poorly adapted to certain uses. In some nuclear research centres, especially in the advanced countries, changes have been made in the original designs or new research prototypes have been designed for specific purposes. These modifications have proven very costly and therefore beyond the reach of developing countries. For this reason, what the research institutes in such countries need is a single sufficiently versatile nuclear plant capable of meeting the requirements of a nuclear research programme at a reasonable cost. This is precisely what a multipurpose reactor does. The Mexican National Nuclear Research Institute (ININ) plans to design and build a multipurpose research reactor capable at the same time of being used for the development of reactor design skills and for testing nuclear materials and fuels, for radioisotopes production, for nuclear power studies and basic scientific research, for specialized training, and so on. For this design work on the ININ Multipurpose Research Reactor, collaborative relations have been established with various international organizations possessing experience in nuclear reactor design: Atomehnergoeksport of the USSR: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL); General Atomics (GA) of the USA; and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

  2. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  3. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Cahalan, J. E.; Deitrich, L. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Grandy, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-15

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  4. A review of the DOE/ARSAP core melt progression program supporting design certification for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important element of the safety approach for AP600 is in-vessel retention (IVR). System design features are provided which enable the reactor cavity to be flooded in the event of a core melt accident. The ARSAP is performing work demonstrating that core melt materials would be retained and cooled within the vessel by means of this cavity flooding, and that ex-vessel threats to the containment are thereby avoided. This paper address in-vessel melt progression analyses being performed by ARSAP which are providing input to IVR-related issues such as in-vessel steam explosion and melt stream impingement/vessel wall ablation (the issue of melt coolability in the vessel lower head, by virtue of external water cooling, is not sensitive to details of core melt progression and has been handled separately). This paper also reviews the in-vessel core melt progression database as well as results from the TMI-2 accident which are the foundation of the current analyses for AP600. (author). 15 refs

  5. ASME Material Challenges for Advanced Reactor Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the material Challenges associated with Advanced Reactor Concept (ARC) such as the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). ACR are the next generation concepts focusing on power production and providing thermal energy for industrial applications. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The heat exchanger required for AHTR is subjected to a unique set of conditions that bring with them several design challenges not encountered in standard heat exchangers. The corrosive molten salts, especially at higher temperatures, require materials throughout the system to avoid corrosion, and adverse high-temperature effects such as creep. Given the very high steam generator pressure of the supercritical steam cycle, it is anticipated that water tube and molten salt shell steam generators heat exchanger will be used. In this paper, the ASME Section III and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section VIII requirements (acceptance criteria) are discussed. Also, the ASME material acceptance criteria (ASME Section II, Part D) for high temperature environment are presented. Finally, lack of ASME acceptance criteria for thermal design and analysis are discussed.

  6. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  7. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO2) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  8. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  9. Shielding design to obtain compact marine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaji, Akio; Sako, Kiyoshi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment)

    1994-06-01

    The marine reactors equipped in previously constructed nuclear ships are in need of the secondary shield which is installed outside the containment vessel. Most of the weight and volume of the reactor plants are occupied by this secondary shield. An advanced marine reactor called MRX (Marine Reactor X) has been designed to obtain a more compact and lightweight marine reactor with enhanced safety. The MRX is a new type of marine reactor which is an integral PWR (The steam generator is installed in the pressure vessel.) with adopting a water-filled containment vessel and a new shielding design method of no installation of the secondary shield. As a result, MRX is considerably lighter in weight and more compact in size as compared with the reactors equipped in previously constructed nuclear ships. For instance, the plant weight and volume of the containment vessel of MRX are about 50% and 70% of those of the Nuclear Ship MUTSU, in spite of the power of MRX is 2.8 times as large as the MUTSU's reactor. The shielding design calculation was made using the ANISN, DOT3.5, QAD-CGGP2 and ORIGEN codes. The computational accuracy was confirmed by experimental analyses. (author).

  10. Studies on nuclear reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    this thesis presents two studies for safety aspects in nuclear reactor design. the fission process that occurs in the reactor core is the most important process for the harmful effect of produced radiation especially neutrons with different energies and gamma radiations for their strong penetrability . so studying the criticality of the fissile materials in the reactor is one of the most important safety aspects for the reactor design, the attenuation of the neutrons and gammas using suitable shielding materials with suitable thicknesses is the second study that is discussed in this thesis

  11. Advances in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Project is an important part of the German reactor safety research programme. It works on problems concerning safety and environemental risks of LWR reactors and reprocessing plants and investigates accident consequences. At the 1978 annual meeting, the core behaviour on cooling and reactivity disturbances was discussed, as well as release, retention, and possible radiological effects of radioactive pollutants. Among other subjects, fission product retention in LWR reactors and reprocessing plants were reported on as well as hypothetic core meltdown. (orig.)

  12. Hiberarchy of requirement analysis of reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the security and the margin of safety of nuclear power plant, the research on requirement analysis of digital reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant was developed. Based on the known technology, a requirement analysis report was performed. A kind of three-levels pyramidal hierarchy was adopted in the requirement analysis, and the design characteristics of the requirement analysis were described in the analysis report. This hiberarchy can directly illuminate the design characters and logical achievement of the requirement analysis for advanced pressurized water reactor digital protection system. (authors)

  13. ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) reference design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the ELMO Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) study is the evaluation of the EBT confinement concept as the basis for development of a commercial fusion power reactor. A multidisciplinary, self-consistent treatment of EBT reactor scaling and design has been completed and a reference design (EBTR-48) has been developed. This design, based on a realistic plasma model and relatively conservative engineering parameters (i.e., 1 MW/m2 neutron wall loading and a 7.3 T maximum toroidal field), is a steady state, ignited-mode system with high plasma power density and aspect ratio. The total thermal power of EBTR-48, exclusive of blanket multiplication, is 4000 MW; the design is based on a standard module and the design power level for a particular plant is determined by the number of modules used. Several design variants have been investigated in detail to illustrate the effect of near-term and advanced technologies and to illustrate the design freedom offered by devices with low field and high aspect ratio. The high aspect ratio simplifies many aspects of the design, most notably those associated with remote maintenance, accessibility, and repair. It appears that a commercially successful EBTR could be constructed with only slight advances in existing technology, if the present understanding of the physics can be extrapolated to the reactor regime and does not differ markedly from the model developed for this study

  14. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  15. A Compilation of Boiling Water Reactor Operational Experience for the United Kingdom's Office for Nuclear Regulation's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Generic Design Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liao, Huafei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    United States nuclear power plant Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under law as required by 10 CFR 50.72 and 50.73 were evaluated for reliance to the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive – Office for Nuclear Regulation’s (ONR) general design assessment of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design. An NRC compendium of LERs, compiled by Idaho National Laboratory over the time period January 1, 2000 through March 31, 2014, were sorted by BWR safety system and sorted into two categories: those events leading to a SCRAM, and those events which constituted a safety system failure. The LERs were then evaluated as to the relevance of the operational experience to the ABWR design.

  16. Thermal hydraulic R and D of Chinese advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese government sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced reactors, both small modular reactors and larger systems. These advanced reactors encompass innovative reactor concepts, such as CAP1400 - Chinese large advanced passive pressurized water reactor, Hualong one - Chinese large advanced active and passive pressurized water reactor, ACP100 - Chinese small modular reactor, SCWR- R and D of super critical water-cooled reactor in China, CLEAR - Chinese lead-cooled fast reactor, TMSR - Chinese Thorium molten-salt reactor. The thermal hydraulic R and D of those reactors are summarised. (J.P.N.)

  17. Methods for studying fuel management in advanced gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods used for studying fuel and absorber management problems in AGRs are described. The basis of the method is the use of ARGOSY lattice data in reactor calculations performed at successive time steps. These reactor calculations may be quite crude but for advanced design calculations a detailed channel-by-channel representation of the whole core is required. The main emphasis of the paper is in describing such an advanced approach - the ODYSSEUS-6 code. This code evaluates reactor power distributions as a function of time and uses the information to select refuelling moves and determine controller positions. (author)

  18. Actinide transmutation in the advanced liquid metal reactor (ALMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor loaded with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behaviour throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  19. Advanced SFR Concept Design Studies at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced SFR design concepts have been developed which satisfy the Gen IV technology goals at KAERI. Two types of reactor core were developed for breakeven and TRU burner and both cores do not have blankets to enhance proliferation resistance. The Advanced SFR is a pool-type reactor that improves system safety through slow system transients. The heat transport system adopts two double wall tube Steam Generators and a passive Residual Heat Removal System PDRC. To secure the economic competitiveness of an SFR, the diameter of the reactor vessel of the Advanced SFR is designed to be 14.5 m, which is a very compact size compared to other designs. Also, various R and D activities have been performed in order to prepare some analysis tools and to support the development of design concepts. (author)

  20. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study engineering overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) was the first comprehensive conceptual design of a commercial tandem mirror reactor with thermal barriers. The design exploited the inherent attractive features of a tandem mirror: steady state operation, linear central cell, simple high performance blankets, low first wall heat fluxes, natural impurity diversion by the halo plasma, no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, and direct conversion of the charged particle power lost out the ends. The study introduced new design concepts in high field magnets, neutral beams, ECRH systems, drift pumping, direct conversion, lithium-lead blankets and plant safety. The MARS design would produce 1200 MWsub(e) net and more than 1500 MWsub(e) gross from only 2600 MW of fusion power. This high efficiency is achieved through a combination of blanket design and direct conversion. Special emphasis was placed on fusion's potential for inherent safety, lower activation and simpler disposal of radioactive waste as compared with fission. The blanket has a very low tritium inventory, cannot melt in loss-of-coolant and/or loss-of-flow accidents and can be disposed of as low level waste subject to near-surface burial. MARS would produce busbar electricity at about 7 cents per kilowatthour (constant 1983 dollars). This value is near the upper end of the cost range for new generation capability being installed in the late 1980's. Significant cost reductions can be gained by further improvements in the engineering designs combined with a simplified end cell. The largest cost reductions from engineering can be attained through redesigned magnets, heat transport system and electrical system. The combination of engineering and physics improvements are projected to lower the cost of electricity by about 40% without sacrificing the environmental, safety and maintainability attributes of MARS. This work is now being pursued in the MINIMARS study. (orig.)

  1. Optimizing advanced liquid metal reactors for burning actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the process to design an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) for burning the transuranic part of nuclear waste is discussed. The influence of design parameters on ALMR burner performance is studied and the results are incorporated in a design schedule for optimizing ALMRs for burning transuranics. This schedule is used to design a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR burner to burn as much as possible transurancis. The two designs burn equally well. (orig.)

  2. Fuel behavior in advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rod behavior of advanced pressurized water reactors under steady state conditions has been investigated in this study. System-80+ and Westinghouse Vantage-5 fuels have been considered as advanced pressurized water reactor fuels to be analyzed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of ditferent models and the effect of selected design parameters on the overall fuel behavior. FRAPCON-II computer code has been used for the analyses. Different modelling options of FRAPCON-II have also been considered in these analyses. Analyses have been performed in two main parts. In the first part, effects of operating conditions on fuel behavior have been investigated. First, fuel rod response under normal operating conditions has been analyzed. Then, fuel rod response to different fuel ratings has been calculated. In the second part, in order to estimate the effect of design parameters on fuel behavior, parametric analyses have been performed. In this part, the effects of initial gap thickness, as fabricated fuel density, and initial fill gas pressure on fuel behavior have been analyzed. The computations showed that both of the fuel rods used in this study operate within the safety limits. However, FRAPCON-II modelling options have been resulted in different behavior due to their modelling characteristics. Hence, with the absence of experimental data, it is difficult to make assesment for the best fuel parameters. It is also difficult to estimate error associated with the results. To improve the performance of the code, it is necessary to develop better experimental correlations for material properties in order to analyze the eftect ot considerably different design parameters rather than nominal rod parameters

  3. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  4. Conceptual design of RFC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A parametic analysis and a preliminary conceptual design for RFC reactor (including cusp field) with and without alpha particle heating are described. Steady state operations can be obtained for various RF ponderomotive potential in cases of alpha particle heating. (author)

  5. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  6. Advanced Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) Reactor and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Hadley, Neal M.; Dahl, Roger W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Miller, Lee; Medlen, Amber

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of a second generation Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) reactor is currently underway as part of NASA's Atmosphere Revitalization Resource Recovery effort. By recovering up to 75% of the hydrogen currently lost as methane in the Sabatier reactor effluent, the PPA helps to minimize life support resupply costs for extended duration missions. To date, second generation PPA development has demonstrated significant technology advancements over the first generation device by doubling the methane processing rate while, at the same time, more than halving the required power. One development area of particular interest to NASA system engineers is fouling of the PPA reactor with carbonaceous products. As a mitigation plan, NASA MSFC has explored the feasibility of using an oxidative plasma based upon metabolic CO2 to regenerate the reactor window and gas inlet ports. The results and implications of this testing are addressed along with the advanced PPA reactor development.

  7. Loss of feed water analyses of advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. Passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power level with no primary coolant pumps. The case analysed in this paper is the loss of feedwater to steam drum which results in decrease in heat removal from core. This also causes increase in reactor pressure. Further consequences depend upon various protective and engineered safeguard systems like relief system, reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator. Analysis has been done using code RELAP5/MOD3.2. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, qualities and flow in different part of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. (author)

  8. WWER reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. The details of WWER reactor pressure vessel design, as used in the PWR type reactors of the former USSR are given in chapter 4. General design concepts are given as well as specific material requirements. Safety concepts and lifetime assurance are discussed briefly

  9. Elements of reactor system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the first commercial nuclear power plants were designed, each plant was treated as a new design problem. However, it became apparent that the full design effort was far too lengthy and costly to be undertaken for each order. The reactor system vendors have therefore developed a series of essentially standard reactor designs. A utility customer is offered that standard design which most closely meets his requirements. Only minor modification are made in order to meet particular local requirements. The reactor design effort for such a plant is generally limited to (a) a verification that the standard system proposed will meet the required specifications and (b) a revision of the safety analysis to take into consideration the features of the particular site. Standard system designs are usually revised on a regular basis to take advantage of new developments and operational experience. It has become customary to refer to the reactor core and entire primary system as the ''nuclear steam supply system''. In the United States, when a reactor vendor supplies a system to a public utility, it is generally only the ''nuclear steam supply system'' and specific auxiliaries which are supplied. The reactor vendor will specify the general requirements of the steam cycle, vapor container and auxiliary systems and safety systems which are not vendor supplied. The detailed design of these systems, as well as the complete structural and electrical design, is normally handled by the utility or an architect-engineer engaged by the utility. The safety analysis is usually conducted by the reactor vendor. As more experience with nuclear systems is gained, it is likely that the larger utilities will assume an expanded role in the design process

  10. Key issues in european reactor seismic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper focuses on the main problems which have arisen in FBR design in Europe due to seismic conditions. Its first part, derived from the final report of a CEC-Belgonucleaire study contract, clarifies how ''real'' is the seismic problem for each site. Then, the second and main part deals with the studies carried out in the european countries on the relevant subjects, typical of FBRs or related to specific needs of single FBRs: these studies, for which contributions were provided by ENEA, CEA, NNC and INTERATOM, concern mainly the numerical and experimental analysis of the core, the reactor vessel, the shut-down system and the reactor building of FBRs under construction or in advanced design phase. Attention is also paid to the studies started for future purposes, the feed-backs on the design due to seismic conditions, and the instructions for future reactors

  11. Advanced Thermal Hydraulics Design of Commercial SFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe pool type sodium cooled fast reactor, which is in an advanced stage of construction in India. As a follow-up to PFBR, six commercial sodium cooled fast reactors (Commercial SFR) of similar capacity are to be constructed, wherein the focus is improved economy and enhanced safety. These reactors are envisaged to have twin-unit concept. Design and construction experiences from PFBR provided the motivation to achieve an optimum design for the Commercial SFR with significant design changes. Some of the changes include, (i) provision of four primary pipes per primary sodium pump, (ii) inner vessel with single torus, (iii) dome shaped roof slab supported on reactor vault, (iv) machined thick plate rotating plugs, (v) reduced main vessel diameter with narrow-gap cooling baffles and (vi) safety vessel integrated with reactor vault. Advanced computational fluid dynamic studies have been performed towards thermal hydraulic design of these components. This paper covers thermal hydraulic design validation of the chosen options, including hot pool thermal hydraulics, influence of control plug shape on pool hydraulics, flow requirement for main vessel cooling, safety analysis of primary pipe rupture event and thermal management top shield and reactor vault. (author)

  12. Jules Horowitz reactor, basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the shutdown of the SILOE reactor in 1997, the OSIRIS reactor has ensured the needs regarding technological irradiation at CEA including those of its industrial partners and customers. The Jules Horowitz Reactor will replace it. It has the ambition to provide the necessary nuclear data and maintain a fission research capacity in Europe after 2010. This capacity should be service-oriented. It will be established in Cadarache. The Jules Horowitz reactor will also: represent a significant step in term of performances and experimental capabilities; be designed with a high flexibility, in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and be able to accommodate future requirements; reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. This paper will present the main functionalities and the design options resulting from the 'preliminary design' studies. (author)

  13. Jules Horowitz Reactor, basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the shutdown of the SILOE reactor in 1997, the OSIRIS reactor has ensured the needs regarding technological irradiation at CEA including those of its industrial partners and customers. The Jules Horowitz Reactor will replace it. It has the ambition to provide the necessary nuclear data and maintain a fission research capacity in Europe after 2010. This capacity should be service-oriented. It will be established in Cadarache. The Jules Horowitz reactor will also: - represent a significant step in term of performances and experimental capabilities, - be designed with a high flexibility, in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and be able to accommodate future requirements, - reach a high level of safety, according to the best current practice. This paper will present the main functionalities and the design options resulting from the 'preliminary design' studies. (authors)

  14. TRAC analysis of an 80% pump-side, cold-leg, large-break loss-of-coolant accident for the Westinghouse AP600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An updated TRAC 80% pump-side, cold-leg, large-break (LB) loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been calculated for the Westinghouse AP600 advanced reactor design. The updated calculation incorporates major code error corrections, model corrections, and plant design changes. The break size and location were calculated by Westinghouse to be the most severe LBLOCA for the AP600 design. The LBLOCA transient was calculated to 280 s, which is the time of in-containment refueling water-storage-tank injection. All fuel rods were quenched completely by 240 s. Peak cladding temperatures (PCTs) were well below the licensing limit of 1,478 K (2,200 F) but were very near the cladding oxidation temperature of 1,200 K (1,700 F). Transient event times and PCTs for the TRAC calculation were in reasonable agreement with those calculated by Westinghouse using their WCOBRA/TRAC code. However, there were significant differences in the detailed phenomena calculated by the two codes, particularly during the blowdown and refill periods. The reasons for these differences are still being investigated

  15. Development of essential system technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hwang, Y. D.; Cho, B. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    Basic design of SMART adopts the new advanced technologies which were not applied in the existing 1000MWe PWR. However, the R and D experience on these advanced essential technologies is lacking in domestic nuclear industry. Recently, a research on these advanced technologies has been performed as a part of the mid-and-long term nuclear R and D program, but the research was limited only for the small scale fundamental study. The research on these essential technologies such as helically coiled tube steam generator, self pressurizer, core cooling by natural circulation required for the development of integral reactor SMART have not been conducted in full scale. This project, therefore, was performed for the development of analysis models and methodologies, system analysis and thermal hydraulic experiments on the essential technologies to be applied to the 300MWe capacity of integral reactor SMART and the advanced passive reactor expected to be developed in near future with the emphasis on experimental investigation. (author)

  16. Development of essential system technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic design of SMART adopts the new advanced technologies which were not applied in the existing 1000MWe PWR. However, the R and D experience on these advanced essential technologies is lacking in domestic nuclear industry. Recently, a research on these advanced technologies has been performed as a part of the mid-and-long term nuclear R and D program, but the research was limited only for the small scale fundamental study. The research on these essential technologies such as helically coiled tube steam generator, self pressurizer, core cooling by natural circulation required for the development of integral reactor SMART have not been conducted in full scale. This project, therefore, was performed for the development of analysis models and methodologies, system analysis and thermal hydraulic experiments on the essential technologies to be applied to the 300MWe capacity of integral reactor SMART and the advanced passive reactor expected to be developed in near future with the emphasis on experimental investigation. (author)

  17. Models for transient analyses in advanced test reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Several strategies are developed worldwide to respond to the world’s increasing demand for electricity. Modern nuclear facilities are under construction or in the planning phase. In parallel, advanced nuclear reactor concepts are being developed to achieve sustainability, minimize waste, and ensure uranium resources. To optimize the performance of components (fuels and structures) of these systems, significant efforts are under way to design new Material Test Reactors facilities in Europe whi...

  18. Advances in safety engineering for LWR type reactors (retrofitting, re-engineering, EPR, SWR 1000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes the activities of the Siemens company in the field of advanced LWR type reactor engineering and the company's commitments in international projects for the retrofitting and engineered safety improvements of reactor stations in countries of the former Soviet Union. The advances in reactor engineering and the novel design concepts are explained. (orig./CB)

  19. Advanced Reactor Development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States, three technologies are employed for the new generation of advanced reactors. These technologies are Advanced Light Water Reactors (A LWRs) for the 1990s and beyond, the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (M HTGR) for commercial use after the turn of the century, and Liquid Metal Reactors (LWRs) to provide energy production and to convert reactor fission waste to a more manageable waste product. Each technology contributes to the energy solution. Light Water Reactors For The 1990s And Beyond--The U. S. Program The economic and national security of the United States requires a diversified energy supply base built primarily upon adequate, domestic resources that are relatively free from international pressures. Nuclear energy is a vital component of this supply and is essential to meet current and future national energy demands. It is a safe, economically continues to contribute to national energy stability, and strength. The Light Water Reactor (LWR) has been a major and successful contributor to the electrical generating needs of many nations throughout the world. It is being counted upon in the United States as a key to revitalizing nuclear energy option in the 1990s. In recent years, DOE joined with the industry to ensure the availability and future viability of the LWR option. This national program has the participation of the Nation's utility industry, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and several of the major reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers. Separate but coordinated parts of this program are managed by EPRI and DOE

  20. Space reactor preliminary mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis was performed on the SABRE reactor space power system to determine the effect of the number and size of heat pipes on the design parameters of the nuclear subsystem. Small numbers of thin walled heat pipes were found to give a lower subsystem mass, but excessive fuel swelling resulted. The SP-100 preliminary design uses 120 heat pipes because of acceptable fuel swelling and a minimum nuclear subsystem mass of 1875 kg. Salient features of the reactor preliminary design are: individual fuel modules, ZrO2 block core mounts, bolted collar fuel module restraints, and a BeO central plug

  1. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  2. Optical design considerations for laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plan for the development of commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants is discussed, emphasizing the utilization of the unique features of laser fusion to arrive at conceptual designs for reactors and optical systems which minimize the need for advanced materials and techniques requiring expensive test facilities. A conceptual design for a liquid lithium fall reactor is described which successfully deals with the hostile x-ray and neutron environment and promises to last the 30 year plant lifetime. Schemes for protecting the final focusing optics are described which are both compatible with this reactor system and show promise of surviving a full year in order to minimize costly downtime. Damage mechanisms and protection techniques are discussed, and a recommendation is made for a high f-number metal mirror final focusing system

  3. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-01-12

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FETF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This revision reflects the 19 Oct 1999 baseline.

  4. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWEN, W.W.

    1999-11-08

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This document reflects the 1 Oct 1999 baseline.

  5. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  6. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Advanced reactor concepts and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for some consistency in the terms used to describe the evolution of methods for ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors has been identified by the IAEA. This is timely since there appears to be a danger that the precision of many valuable words is being diluted and that a new jargon may appear that will confuse rather than aid the communication of important but possibly diverse philosophies and concepts. Among the difficulties faced by the nuclear industry is promoting and gaining a widespread understanding of the risks actually posed by nuclear reactors. In view of the importance of communication to both the public and to the technical community generally, the starting point for the definition of terms must be with dictionary meanings and common technical usage. The nuclear engineering community should use such words in conformance with the whole technical world. This paper addresses many of the issues suggested in the invitation to meet and also poses some additional issues for consideration. Some examples are the role of the operator in either enhancing or degrading safety and how the meaning or interpretation of the word 'safety' can be expected to change during the next few decades. It is advantageous to use criteria against which technologies and ongoing operating performance can be judged provided that the criteria are generic and not specific to particular reactor concepts. Some thoughts are offered on the need to frame the criteria carefully so that innovative solutions and concepts are fostered, not stifled

  8. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  9. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  10. Advancement of light water reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese technology of light water reactors is based on the technology imported from abroad around 1970, and the experience has been accumulated by the construction, operation and repair of light water reactors as well as the countermeasures to various troubles, moreover, the improvement and standardization of light water reactors have been promoted. As the result, recently the high capacity ratio has been attained, and the LWR technology has firmly taken root in Japan. The Subcommittee for the Advancement of Light Water Reactor Technology of the Advisory Committee for Energy has examined the subjects of technical development and the way the development should be in order to decide the strategy to advance LWR technology, and drawn up the interim report. The change of situation around the LWRs in Japan and the necessity to advance the technology, the target of advancing LWR technology and the subjects of the technical development, the system for the technical development and the securement of fund, and international cooperation are reported. The subjects of development are the pursuit of higher reliability and economic efficiency, the extension of plant life, the improvement of repairability and the reduction of radiation exposure, the improvement of operational capability, the reduction of wastes, the techniques for reactor decommissioning and the diversified location. (Kako, I.)

  11. Design of Photocatalytic Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Motegh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Photocatalysis is a photochemical reaction induced by photon–absorption of a solid material, a "photocatalyst", that remains unchanged during the reaction. Photocatalysis has a wide variety of applications, e.g., degrading contaminants in aqueous solutions and in air, oxidizing liquid hydrocarbons, and reducing carbon dioxide into valuable hydrocarbons. It has been successfully applied at lab scale and many advancements are achieved with respect to photocatalyst development and the effect of ...

  12. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) being developed at JAERI as a next generation tokamak to JT-60 has a major mission of realizing a self-ignited long-burning DT plasma and demonstrating engineering feasibility. During FY82 and FY83 a comprehensive and intensive conceptual design study has been conducted for a pulsed operation FER as a reference option which employs a conventional inductive current drive and a double-null divertor. In parallel with the reference design, studies have been carried out to evaluate advanced reactor concepts such as quasi-steady state operation and steady state operation based on RF current drive and pumped limiter, and comparative studies for single-null divertor/pumped limiter. This report presents major results obtained primarily from FY83 design studies, while the results of FY82 design studies are described in previous references (JAERI-M 83-213--216). (author)

  13. Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Emily Catherine

    2009-04-01

    With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

  14. Advanced Multiphysics Modeling of Fast Reactor Fuel Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of fast reactor fuel thermo-mechanical performance using fuel performance codes is a key aspect of advanced fast reactors designs. Those fuel performance codes capture the multiphysics nature of fuel behavior during irradiation where different, mostly interdependent, phenomena are taking place. Existing fuel performance codes do not fully capture those interdependencies and present the different phenomena through de-coupled models. Recent developments in multiphysics simulation capabilities and availability of advanced computing platforms led to advancements in simulation of nuclear fuel behavior. This paper presents current experiences in applying different multiphysics simulation platforms to evaluation of fast reactors metallic fuel behavior. Full 3D finite element simulation platforms that include capabilities to fully couple key fuel behavior models are discussed. Issues associated with coupling metallic fuels phenomena, such as fission gas models and constituent distribution models, with thermo-mechanical finite element platforms, as well as different coupling schemes are also discussed. (author)

  15. Metal fire implications for advanced reactors. Part 1, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public safety and acceptance is extremely important for the nuclear power renaissance to get started. The Advanced Burner Reactor and other potential designs utilize liquid sodium as a primary coolant which provides distinct challenges to the nuclear power industry. Fire is a dominant contributor to total nuclear plant risk events for current generation nuclear power plants. Utilizing past experience to develop suitable safety systems and procedures will minimize the chance of sodium leaks and the associated consequences in the next generation. An advanced understanding of metal fire behavior in regards to the new designs will benefit both science and industry. This report presents an extensive literature review that captures past experiences, new advanced reactor designs, and the current state-of-knowledge related to liquid sodium combustion behavior

  16. Metal fire implications for advanced reactors. Part 1, literature review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Radel, Ross F.; Hewson, John C.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-10-01

    Public safety and acceptance is extremely important for the nuclear power renaissance to get started. The Advanced Burner Reactor and other potential designs utilize liquid sodium as a primary coolant which provides distinct challenges to the nuclear power industry. Fire is a dominant contributor to total nuclear plant risk events for current generation nuclear power plants. Utilizing past experience to develop suitable safety systems and procedures will minimize the chance of sodium leaks and the associated consequences in the next generation. An advanced understanding of metal fire behavior in regards to the new designs will benefit both science and industry. This report presents an extensive literature review that captures past experiences, new advanced reactor designs, and the current state-of-knowledge related to liquid sodium combustion behavior.

  17. Identification of improvements of advanced light water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this report is to identify the improvement of reactor developments with respect to reactor safety. This includes the collection of non-proprietary information on the description of the advanced design characteristics, especially summary design descriptions and general publications. This documentation is not intended to include a safety evaluation of the advanced concepts; however, it is structured in such a way that it can serve as a basis for a future safety evaluation. This is taken into account in the structure of the information regarding the distinction of the various concepts with respect to their 'advancement' and the classification of design characteristics according to some basic safety aspects. The overall description concentrates on those features which are relevant to safety. Other aspects, such as economy, operational features, maintenance, the construction period, etc...are not considered explicitly in this report

  18. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected. (author)

  19. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected

  20. Trial visualization of fast reactor design knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In design problems of large-scale systems like fast breeder reactors, inter-relations among design specifications are very important where a selected specification option is transferred to other specification selections as a premise to be taken account in engineering judgments. These inter-relations are also important in design case studies with the hypothetical adoption of rejected design options for the evaluation of deviation propagations among design specifications. Some of these rejected options have potential worth for future reconsideration by some circumstance changes (e.g., advanced simulations to exclude needs for mock-up tests, etc.), to contribute to flexibility in system designs. In this study, a computer software is built to visualize a design problem structure by representing engineering knowledge nodes on individual specification selections along with inter-relations of design specifications, to validate the knowledge representation method and to derive open problems. (author)

  1. An analysis of uncertainty and of dependence on season of year of ingestion population dose arising from design basis accidents in advanced thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a detailed study of ingestion collective dose from five limiting PWR design basis releases are presented, the PWR being chosen as being typical of an advanced thermal reactor for which source terms are readily available. The ingestion collective dose was calculated for a range of wind direction/weather scenarios for releases from a typical U.K. rural and a U.K. semi-urban site and scenarios identified where the ingestion pathway was of potential significance. The dependence of the ingestion collective dose for these cases on the season of year when the release occurs was investigated. An analysis was carried out of the uncertainty in the ''worst case'' ingestion calculations arising from uncertainties in foodchain input parameters. An efficient but comprehensive set of dynamic foodchain computer models was produced and the literature surveyed to produce probability distribution functions (PDF's) for all relevant independent input data items. These were used to produce output PDF's for food contamination levels and for ingestion collective dose from the five releases. Finally, the study has highlighted several areas central to ingestion collective dose assessments where the available data are inadequate. This led to the formulation of a set of future research requirements which will need to be met both to obtain a better fundamental understanding of foodchain transfer and to reduce uncertainties in ingestion collective dose assessments. (author)

  2. Series lecture on advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems concerning fusion reactors are presented and discussed in this series lecture. At first, the D-T tokamak is explained. The breeding of tritium and the radioactive property of tritium are discussed. The hybrid reactor is explained as an example of the direct use of neutrons. Some advanced fuel reactions are proposed. It is necessary to make physics consideration for burning advanced fuel in reactors. The rate of energy production and the energy loss are important things. The bremsstrahlung radiation and impurity radiation are explained. The simple estimation of the synchrotron radiation was performed. The numerical results were compared with a more detailed calculation of Taimor, and the agreement was quite good. The calculation of ion and electron temperature was made. The idea to use the energy more efficiently is that one can take X-ray or neutrons, and pass them through a first wall of a reactor into a second region where they heat the material. A method to convert high temperature into useful energy is the third problem of this lecture. The device was invented by A. Hertzberg. The lifetime of the reactor depends on the efficiency of energy recovery. The idea of using spin polarized nuclei has come up. The spin polarization gives a chance to achieve a large multiplication factor. The advanced fuel which looks easiest to make go is D plus He-3. The idea of multipole is presented to reduce the magnetic field inside plasma, and discussed. Two other topics are explained. (Kato, T.)

  3. Neutronic design of small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small reactors design is one of the main activities of AREVA TA. At the time, AREVA TA main projects are oriented towards research reactors and reactors for military naval propulsion. Due to differences in the physics and performances to meet, each kind of small reactor leads to specific modelling needs. Many computing tools have been developed in order to successfully carry out these projects. These schemes are mainly based on the use of TRIPOLI, MCNP, APOLLO2 and CRONOS2 codes. In that framework, a multi-purpose pre/post processing tool named CHARM is being developed by AREVA NP in partnership with AREVA TA in order to integrate small reactors specification. CHARM is used to elaborate APOLLO2 input data while various dedicated tools are used to automatically generate TRIPOLI and MNCP input data. These 3D numerical models need a very accurate spatial description to perform specific calculations. As an example, for the JHR design, after calculating 3D burn up by APOLLO2/MOC models, the data is fed back into a TRIPOLI model used for safety analyses. This paper presents our methodology for the small core design and 3 examples: 1) The calculation scheme for the JHR (Jules Horowitz Reactor) neutronic studies. These design studies are a recent illustration of combined use of both deterministic and probabilistic codes, 2) The use of CHARM, with the modelling of a JHR core. The purpose of CHARM- V2, based on Open Cascade Technology, is to provide a pre/post processing tool for APOLLO2/MOC, TRIPOLI4 and MCNP solvers, 3) The depletion Monte Carlo calculation of a MTR core. (author)

  4. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  5. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  6. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  7. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor thermal analysis of fuel plate defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor designed to provide the highest continuous neutron beam intensity of any reactor in the world. The present technology for determining safe operations were developed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These techniques are conservative and provide confidence in the safe operation of HFIR. However, the more intense requirements of ANSR necessitate the development of more accurate, but still conservative, techniques. This report details the development of a Local Analysis Technique (LAT) that provides an appropriate approach. Application of the LAT to two ANSR core designs are presented. New theories of the thermal and nuclear behavior of the U3Si2 fuel are utilized. The implications of lower fuel enrichment and of modifying the inspection procedures are also discussed. Development of the computer codes that enable the automate execution of the LAT is included

  8. Development of numerical procedure for thermal hydraulic design of nuclear reactors with advanced two-fluid model (1). Improvement of numerical stability of advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-fluid model is still useful to simulate two-phase flow in large domain such as rod bundles. However, two-fluid model include a lot of constitutive equations, and the two-fluid model has problems that the results of analyses depend on accuracy of constitutive equations. To solve these problems, we have been developing an advanced two-fluid model. In this model, an interface tracking method is combined with the two-fluid model to predict large interface structure behavior without any constitutive equations, and constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets are only required. In this study, we modified the advanced two-fluid model to improve the stability of the numerical simulation and reduce the computational time. In this paper, we describe the modification performed in this study and the numerical results of two-phase flow in various flow conditions are shown. (author)

  9. Mirror advanced reactor study (MARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The agenda for the meeting is as follows: (1) basic Tandem Mirror approach, (2) baseline design, (3) transition and Yin-Yang coils, (4) drift pump physics, (5) drift pump coil, (6) Fokker-Planck analysis, (7) ignition-alpha pumping, (8) neutral beam status, (9) axicell layout, (10) axicell radiation levels, (11) ICRH system, (12) central cell cost optimization, (13) central cell coil design, (14) gridless direct converter, (15) direct converter directions, (16) end cell structure, (17) corrosion-double wall HX, (18) central cell maintenance, (19) radioactivity, (20) PbLi blanket design, and (21) MARS schedule

  10. Advanced heavy water reactor pressure tube-easy replaceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 300 MWe vertical pressure tube type reactor. A coolant channel consists of pressure tube, made of Zr-2.5 % Nb, which is separated from cold calandria tube using garter spring spacers. The principal function of pressure tube is to support and locate the fuel assembly and allows light water coolant through fuel assembly by natural circulation. Since AHWR is designed for life of 100 years, it necessitates the replacement of pressure tubes during service life. Easy replaceability of pressure tube, along with surveillance requirements, has major bearing on the design of coolant channel assembly. The several systems and tools have been conceptualised to cater the needs for easy and quick replacement of a pressure tube during reactor shut down. This paper gives the highlights of the innovative design features of coolant channel, preliminary design and pre-requisites for replacement, and experimental programme for demonstration of easy replaceability. (author)

  11. Advanced medical accelerator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design of an advanced medical facility dedicated to charged particle radiotherapy and other biomedical applications of relativistic heavy ions. Project status is reviewed and some technical aspects discussed. Clinical standards of reliability are regarded as essential features of this facility. Particular emphasis is therefore placed on the control system and on the use of technology which will maximize operational efficiency. The accelerator will produce a variety of heavy ion beams from helium to argon with intensities sufficient to provide delivered dose rates of several hundred rad/minute over large, uniform fields. The technical components consist of a linac injector with multiple PIG ion sources, a synchrotron and a versatile beam delivery system. An overview is given of both design philosophy and selected accelerator subsystems. Finally, a plan of the facility is described

  12. Design features of Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Electric Power Corporation initiated a Korean Next Generation Reactor(KNGR) Development Program which is managed by KEPCO under the direction of Korean government. Various organizations of Korean nuclear industry are participating in this project including national licensing organization, research institutes, reactor vendor, and A/E etc. The phase I was two year program from 1992 to 1994 and major activities were the development of top tier design requirements and design concept for the next generation nuclear power plants in Korea. The program was finished at the end of 1994 as planned. Externally type pressurized water reactor with a capacity of 4000MWth has been selected as a basic configuration and for the safety goal of the KNGR, the core damage and containment failure frequency were targeted to be less than 10-5/RY and 10-6/RY respectively as a minimum requirement. The economic goal of the KNGR was set to achieve 20% cost advantage compared to the coal. Other performance and design goals were also set so as to achieve the enhanced safety and economic goal. The advanced design features such as 4 train safety injection system, direct vessel injection, inside containment refueling water storage tank and advanced control room using advanced I and C technology, etc. will be incorporated into the KNGR and severe accident prevention and mitigation would be achieved by the design of enhanced safety system, provisions for the safety depressurization systems and mitigation facilities for low pressure core melt ejection, etc. Also introduced will be some passive design features to enhance the level of safety of the KNGR

  13. Advanced sodium fast reactor unit concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents status of development for 1200 MW power unit with sodium fast reactor for commercial construction in the Russian Federation. General characteristics of the reactor plant (RP) and power unit as well as goals that shall be achieved because of design development are described. The power unit design is based on technical decisions, which have been partially proven during sodium reactor operation in Russia and partially have been validated by R and D work for BN-800 RP. At the same time, new technical decisions are applied that improve safety and technical-and-economic indices. To validate them, the corresponding R and D work shall be performed. It is planned to construct the pilot power unit in 2020 and to put into operation the next commercial power units of this type using plutonium generated in the thermal reactors. (author)

  14. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  15. Design improvements in TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been many design improvements to TRIGA reactor hardware in the past twelve years. One of the more important and most obvious improvements has been in the area of reactor instrumentation. The low profile, completely transistorized Mark III console was a great step forward in a low maintenance, high reliability instrumentation system. Other design improvements include the lazy susan specimen pickup assembly; the specimen container; an empty stainless steel fuel element which can be filled with samples and can be located anywhere in the core; the flexible fuel handling tool; a new fuel measuring tool design; the shock absorber on the adjustable transient rod drive; new testing and evaluation procedures on the thermocouples and other

  16. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  17. Role of advanced reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Availability of energy is an important prerequisite for socio-economic development in all parts of the world. Nuclear energy is an essentially unlimited energy resource with the potential to provide energy in the form of electricity, district heat and process heat under environmentally acceptable conditions. However, this potential will be realized only if nuclear power plants can meet the challenges of national safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide a tremendous amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. This experience forms a sound basis for further improvements. Nuclear programmes in Member States are addressing the development of advanced reactors which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability and improved safety. The IAEA, as a global international governmental organization dealing with nuclear power, promotes international information exchange and international co-operation between all countries with their own advanced nuclear power programmes and offers assistance to countries with an interest in exploratory or research programmes. The paper gives an overview about trends in advanced reactor development programmes in Member States and the possible application of advanced reactors for electricity generation and heat production. (author)

  18. Design guide for category V reactors transient reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirements of Category V reactor structures, components, and systems

  19. Seismic Design of Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case the requirement of design is against natural phenomena, it is important to grasp the detailed characteristics of the natural phenomena for the proper design, and as the grasp is more strict and accurate, the design of high adaptability or durability to the requirement can be done. The aseismatic design of nuclear reactors is similar to it, and the decision of the magnitude of supposed earthquakes is important. The aseismatic design of nuclear power stations in Japan has been carried out in conformity with the national guideline for examining the aseismatic design. The aseismatic design of nuclear reactors is carried out in the order of the survey of geological features, ground and earthquakes, the determination of the input magnitude and characteristics of earthquakes, the formation of simulated earthquake waves, the analysis of the response of buildings and structures to earthquakes, and structural analysis. The decision of input earthquakes is done by the detailed historical earthquake data based on local features and the survey of geological features and ground. The determination of earthquake input, the analysis of earthquake response and structural analysis, and the other features of the aseismatic design are explained. (K.I.)

  20. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  1. Advanced SFR concept design studies at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Advanced SFR design concepts have been proposed and evaluated against the design requirements to satisfy the Gen IV technology goals. Two types of conceptual core designs, Breakeven and TRU burner cores were developed. Breakeven core is 1,200 MWe and does not have blankets to enhance the proliferation resistance. According to the current study, TRU burning rate increases linearly with the rated core powers from 600 MWe to 1,200 MWe. Considering 1) the realistic size of an SFR demonstration reactor for the long-term R and D plan with the goal of a demonstration SFR construction by 2028, and 2) the availability of a KALIMER-600 reactor system design that was developed in the last R and D phase, a TRU burner of 600 MWe was selected. The heat transport system of Advanced SFR was designed to be a pool type to enhance system safety through slow system transients, where primary sodium is contained in a reactor vessel. The heat transport system is composed of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS), Intermediate Heat Transport System (IHTS), Steam Generating System (SGS) and Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS). The heat transport system was established through trade studies in order to enhance the safety and to improve the economics and performance of the KALIMER-600 design. Trade studies were performed for the number of IHTS loops, the number of PHTS pumps, Steam Generator (SG) design concepts, energy conversion system concepts, cover gas operation methods, and an improved concept of safety-graded passive decay heat removal system. From the study, the heat transport system of Advanced SFR has design features such as two IHTS loops, a Rankine cycle energy conversion system, two double-wall straight tube type SGs, and a passive decay heat removal system. In order to secure the economic competitiveness of an SFR, several concepts were implemented in the mechanical structural design without losing the reactor safety level. The material of reactor vessel and internal

  2. An innovative approach to nuclear reactor design certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Electric has proposed that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) consider adding an Appendix to 10CFR50 that would specifically address NRC Safety Review and Design Certification of advanced reactors through use of an experience building test program. The proposal was made in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored review of the General Electric advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) concept, Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM). This paper provides a description of the proposed new 10CFR50 Appendix. It also provides the basis for the proposed new approach to Design Certification and outlines the plans that are in place for further review and consideration by the NRC

  3. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  4. Qualification issues for advanced light-water reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying the I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light-water reactor. The template was then used to suggest a methodology for the qualification of microprocessor-based protection systems. The methodology identifies standards/regulatory guides (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems. This approach addresses in part issues raised in NRC policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards. as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  5. Replacement of the Advanced Test Reactor control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control room for the Advanced Test Reactor has been replaced to provide modern equipment utilizing current standards and meeting the current human factors requirements. The control room was designed in the early 1960 era and had not been significantly upgraded since the initial installation. The replacement did not change any of the safety circuits or equipment but did result in replacement of some of the recorders that display information from the safety systems. The replacement was completed in concert with the replacement of the control room simulator which provided important feedback on the design. The design successfully incorporates computer-based systems into the display of the plant variables. This improved design provides the operator with more information in a more usable form than was provided by the original design. The replacement was successfully completed within the scheduled time thereby minimizing the down time for the reactor

  6. Economics of advanced light water reactors - Recent update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes recently updated analyses of the economic prospects of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) during the decade of the 1990s. United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) has performed engineering economic analyses related to ALWRs over the last 5 yr using both target economics and detailed cost-estimating methodologies. It has been found through such cost comparisons that properly designed and constructed ALWRs should cost less than the target cost figures listed above and significantly less than the pressurized water reactor better experience reference LWR plant cost

  7. Design guide for category IV reactors: liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirements of liquid metal cooled fast reactor (Category IV reactor) structures, components, and systems

  8. Incorporating outage management principles into the advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States there are 110 light water reactor (LWR) plants currently in operation, with a total generating capacity of 102 580 MW(electric). These plants include 37 boiling water reactor (BWR) and 73 pressurized water reactor (PWR) units. Since 1980, more than 40 nuclear power plants have entered service in the United States. However, no new plants have been ordered by utilities and owners groups since 1978. There will come a time in the not-too-distant future that new, large electricity generating units will be needed to supply expected increases in base-load capacity. Will the new advanced LWR (ALWR) designs be able to pass muster and be chosen to help meet that need? With outage management at operating plants improving every year, what can the ALWR designs offer that has not already been incorporated?

  9. Advancing the CANDU reactor: From generation to generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emphasizing safety, reliability and economics, the CANDU reactor development strategy is one of continuous improvement, offering value and assured support to customers worldwide. The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-1000) generation, designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), meets the new economic expectation for low-cost power generation with high capacity factors. The ACR is designed to meet customer needs for reduced capital cost, shorter construction schedule, high plant capacity factor, low operating cost, increased operating life, simple component replacement, enhanced safety features, and low environmental impact. The ACR-1000 design evolved from the internationally successful medium-sized pressure tube reactor (PTR) CANDU 6 and incorporates operational feedback from eight utilities that operate 31 CANDU units. This technical paper provides a brief description of the main features of the ACR-1000, and its major role in the development path of the generations of the pressure tube reactor concept. The motivation, philosophy and design approach being taken for future generation of CANDU pressure tube reactors are described

  10. Liquid sloshing in gravity driven water pool of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor - pool liquid under design seismic load and slosh control studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloshing phenomenon is well understood in regular cylindrical and rectangular liquid tanks subjected to earthquake. However, seismic behaviour of water in complex geometry such as a sectored annular tank, e.g., Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) which is located in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) need to be investigated in detail in the view of safety significance. Initially, for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) procedure, square and four sectored square tanks are taken. Slosh height and liquid pressure are calculated over time through theoretical and experimental procedures. Results from theoretical and experimental approaches are compared with CFD results and found to be in agreement. The present work has two main objectives. The first one is to investigate the sloshing behaviour in an un-baffled and baffled three dimensional single sector of GDWP of AHWR under sinusoidal excitation. Other one is to study the sloshing in GDWP water using simulated seismic load along the three orthogonal directions. This simulated seismic load is generated from design basis floor response spectrum data (FRS) of AHWR building. For this, the annular tank is modelled along with water and numerical simulation is carried out. The sinusoidal and earthquake excitations are applied as acceleration force along with gravity. For the earthquake case, acceleration-time history is generated compatible to the design FRS of AHWR building. The free surface is captured by Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique and the fluid domain is solved by finite volume method while the structural domain is solved by finite element approach. Un-baffled and baffled tank configurations are compared to show the reduction in wave height under excitation. The interaction between the fluid and pool wall deformation is simulated using a partitioned fluid-structure coupling. In the earthquake case, a user subroutine function is developed to convert FRS in to time history of acceleration in three directions

  11. Russian RBMK reactor design information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document concerns the systems, design, and operations of the graphite-moderated, boiling, water-cooled, channel-type (RBMK) reactors located in the former Soviet Union (FSU). The Russian Academy of Sciences Nuclear Safety Institute (NSI) in Moscow, Russia, researched specific technical questions that were formulated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and provided detailed technical answers to those questions. The Russian response was prepared in English by NSI in a question-and-answer format. This report presents the results of that technical exchange in the context they were received from the NSI organization. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is generating this document to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) community in responding to requests from FSU states, which are seeking Western technological and financial assistance to improve the safety systems of the Russian-designed reactors. This report expands upon information that was previously available to the United States through bilateral information exchanges, international nuclear society meetings, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reactor safety programs, and Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) reports. The response to the PNL questions have not been edited or reviewed for technical consistency or accuracy by PNL staff or other US organizations, but are provided for use by the DOE community in the form they were received

  12. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  13. Advanced-fuel reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of deuterium-based fuels offers the potential advantages of greater flexibility in blanket design, significantly reduced tritium inventory, potential reduction in radioactivity level, and utilization of an inexhaustible fuel supply. The conventional DT-fueled Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) designs are reviewed, and the recent extension of these devices to advanced-fuel (catalyzed-DD) operation is presented. Attractive and economically competitive DD/RFPR systems are identified having power densities and plasma parameters comparable to the DT systems. Converting an RFP reactor from DT to DD primarily requires increasing the magnetic field levels a factor of two, still requiring only modest magnet coil fields (less than or equal to 4 T). When compared to the mainline tokamak, the unique advantages of the RFP (e.g., high beta, low fields at the coils, high ohmic-heating power densities, unrestricted aspect ratio) are particularly apparent for the utilization of advanced fuels

  14. Conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) have been performed. The FER has an objective of achieving selfignition and demonstrating engineering feasibility as a next generation tokamak to JT-60. Various concepts of the FER have been considered. The reference design is based on a double-null divertor. Optional design studies with some attractive features based on advanced concepts such as pumped limiter and RF current drive have been carried out. Key design parameters are; fusion power of 440 MW, average neutron wall loading of 1MW/m2, major radius of 5.5m, plasma minor radius of 1.1m, plasma elongation of 1.5, plasma current of 5.3MA, toroidal beta of 4%, toroidal field on plasma axis of 5.7T and tritium breeding ratio of above unity

  15. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  16. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the technical and fuel cycle aspects of advanced (non-light water reactor [LWR]) reactors with the market and production aspects of SMRs. This requires the collection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple unrelated and potentially high-uncertainty data sets from a wide range of data sources. Further, the nature of both economic and nuclear technology analysis requires at least a minor attempt at prediction and prognostication, and the far-term horizon for deployment of advanced nuclear systems introduces more uncertainty. Energy market uncertainty, especially the electricity market, is the result of the integration of commodity prices, demand fluctuation, and generation competition, as easily seen in deregulated markets. Depending on current or projected values for any of these factors, the economic attractiveness of any power plant construction project can change yearly or quarterly. For long-lead construction projects such as nuclear power plants, this uncertainty generates an implied and inherent risk for potential nuclear power plant owners and operators. The uncertainty in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle costs is in some respects better understood and quantified than the energy market uncertainty. The LWR-based fuel cycle has a long commercial history to use as its basis for cost estimation, and the current activities in LWR construction provide a reliable baseline for estimates for similar efforts. However, for advanced systems, the estimates and their associated uncertainties are based on forward-looking assumptions for performance after the system has been built and has achieved commercial operation

  17. Design codes for gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants have been under development for about 30 years and experimental and prototype plants have been operated. The main line of development has been electricity generation based on the steam cycle. In addition the potential for high primary coolant temperature has resulted in research and development programmes for advanced applications including the direct cycle gas turbine and process heat applications. In order to compare results of the design techniques of various countries for high temperature reactor components, the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Design Codes for Gas-Cooled Reactor Components. The Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the USSR participated in this Co-ordinated Research Programme. Within the frame of this CRP a benchmark problem was established for the design of the hot steam header of the steam generator of an HTGR for electricity generation. This report presents the results of that effort. The publication also contains 5 reports presented by the participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  19. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  20. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  1. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status of national programmes, the progress achieved since the last meeting held in June 1988 in the field of advanced technologies and design trends for existing and future water cooled reactors. 24 specialists from 14 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting and 12 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  3. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  4. 20% inlet header break analysis of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. A passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power levels, with no primary coolant pumps. Loss of coolant due to failure of inlet header results in depressurization of primary heat transport (PHT) system and containment pressure rise. Depressurization activates various protective and engineered safety systems like reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator, limiting the consequences of the event. This paper discusses the thermal hydraulic transient analysis for evaluating the safety of the reactor, following 20% inlet header break using RELAP5/MOD3.2. For the analysis, the system is discretized appropriately to simulate possible flow reversal in one of the core paths during the transient. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, steam quality and flow in different parts of the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. Flow and energy discharges into the containment are also estimated for use in containment analysis. (author)

  5. Design study on sodium-cooled large-scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Phase 1 of the 'Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (F/S)', an advanced loop type reactor has been selected as a promising concept of sodium-cooled large-scale reactor, which has a possibility to fulfill the design requirements of the F/S. In Phase 2 of the F/S, it is planed to precede a preliminary conceptual design of a sodium-cooled large-scale reactor based on the design of the advanced loop type reactor. Through the design study, it is intended to construct such a plant concept that can show its attraction and competitiveness as a commercialized reactor. This report summarizes the results of the design study on the sodium-cooled large-scale reactor performed in JFY2001, which is the first year of Phase 2. In the JFY2001 design study, a plant concept has been constructed based on the design of the advanced loop type reactor, and fundamental specifications of main systems and components have been set. Furthermore, critical subjects related to safety, structural integrity, thermal hydraulics, operability, maintainability and economy have been examined and evaluated. As a result of this study, the plant concept of the sodium-cooled large-scale reactor has been constructed, which has a prospect to satisfy the economic goal (construction cost: less than 200,000yens/kWe, etc.) and has a prospect to solve the critical subjects. From now on, reflecting the results of elemental experiments, the preliminary conceptual design of this plant will be preceded toward the selection for narrowing down candidate concepts at the end of Phase 2. (author)

  6. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  7. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  8. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems

  9. Major NSSS design features of the Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet national needs for increasing electric power generation in the Republic of Korea in the 2000s, the Korean nuclear development group (KNDG) is developing a standardized evolutionary advanced light water reactor (ALWR), the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR). It is an advanced version of the successful Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) design, which meets utility needs for safety enhancement, performance improvement and ease of operation and maintenance. The KNGR design starts fro the proven design concept of the currently operating KSNPs with uprated power and advanced design features required by the utility. The KNGR design is currently in the final stage of the basic design, and the paper describes the major nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design features of the KNGR together with introduction of the KNGR development program. (author)

  10. Perspective of nuclear energy and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear energy growth will be the result of the contributions of every single plant being constructed or projected at present as it is connected to the grid. As per IAEA, there exists presently 34 nuclear power plants under construction 81 with the necessary permits and funding and 223 proposed, which are plants seriously pursuing permits and financing. This means that in a few decades the number of nuclear power plants in operation will have doubled. This growth rate is characterised by the incorporation of new countries to the nuclear club and the gradually increasing importance of Asian countries. During this expansive phase, generation III and III+designs are or will be used. These designs incorporate the experience from operating plants, and introduce innovations on rationalization design efficiency and safety, with emphasis on passive safety features. In a posterior phase, generation IV designs, presently under development, will be employed. Generation IV consists of several types of reactors (fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, etc), which will improve further sustain ability, economy, safety and reliability concepts. The described situation seems to lead to a renaissance of the nuclear energy to levels hardly thinkable several years ago. (Author)

  11. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  12. Outline of advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) is based on construction and operational experience in Japan, USA and Europe. It was developed jointly by the BWR supplieres, General Electric, Hitachi, and Toshiba, as the next generation BWR for Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. provided leadership and guidance in developing the ABWR, and in combination with five other Japanese electric power companies. The major objectives in developing the ABWR are: 1. Enhanced plant operability, maneuverability and daily load-following capability; 2. Increased plant safety and operating margins; 3. Improved plant availability and capacity factor; 4. Reduced occupational radiation exposure; 5. Reduced radwaste volume, and 6. Reduced plant capital and operating costs. (Liu)

  13. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs

  14. Russian-American venture designs new reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russian and American nuclear energy experts have completed a joint design study of a small, low-cost and demonstrably accident-proof reactor that they say could revolutionize the way conventional reactors are designed, marketed and operated. The joint design is helium-cooled and graphite-moderated and has a power density of 3 MWt/cubic meter, which is significantly less than the standard American reactor. A prototype of this design should be operating in Chelyabinsk by June 1996

  15. Development of mechanical design technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While Korean nuclear reactor strategy seems to remain focused on the large capacity power generation, it is expected that demand of small and medium size reactor will arise for multi-purpose application such as small capacity power generation, co-generation and sea water desalination. With this in mind, an integral reactor SMART is under development. Design concepts, system layout and types of equipment of integral reactor are significantly different from those of loop type reactor. Conceptual design development of mechanical structures of integral reactor SMART is completed through the first stage of the project. Efforts were endeavored for the establishment of design basis and evaluation of applicable codes and standards. Design and functional requirements of major structural components were set up, and three dimensional structural modelling of SMART reactor vessel assembly was prepared. Also, maintenance and repair scheme as well as preliminary fabricability evaluation were carried out. Since small integral reactor technology includes sensitive technologies and know-how's, it is hard to achieve systematic and comprehensive technology transfer from nuclear-advanced countries. Thus, it is necessary to develop the related design technology and to verify the adopted methodologies through test and experiments in order to assure the structural integrity of reactor system. (author)

  16. Development of mechanical design technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Keun Bae; Choi, Suhn; Kim, Kang Soo; Kim, Tae Wan; Jeong, Kyeong Hoon; Lee, Gyu Mahn

    1999-03-01

    While Korean nuclear reactor strategy seems to remain focused on the large capacity power generation, it is expected that demand of small and medium size reactor will arise for multi-purpose application such as small capacity power generation, co-generation and sea water desalination. With this in mind, an integral reactor SMART is under development. Design concepts, system layout and types of equipment of integral reactor are significantly different from those of loop type reactor. Conceptual design development of mechanical structures of integral reactor SMART is completed through the first stage of the project. Efforts were endeavored for the establishment of design basis and evaluation of applicable codes and standards. Design and functional requirements of major structural components were setup, and three dimensional structural modelling of SMART reactor vessel assembly was prepared. Also, maintenance and repair scheme as well as preliminary fabricability evaluation were carried out. Since small integral reactor technology includes sensitive technologies and know-how's, it is hard to achieve systematic and comprehensive technology transfer from nuclear-advanced countries. Thus, it is necessary to develop the related design technology and to verify the adopted methodologies through test and experiments in order to assure the structural integrity of reactor system. (author)

  17. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) liquid-metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) presents the final results of a preapplication design review for the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) liquid metal reactor (Project 673). The SAFR conceptual design was submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ''Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (51 FR 24643 which provides for the early Commission review and interaction). The standard SAFR plant design consists of four identical reactor modules, referred to as ''paks,'' each with a thermal output rating of 900 MWt, coupled with four steam turbine-generator sets. The total electrical output was held to be 1400 MWe. This SER represents the NRC staff's preliminary technical evaluation of the safety features in the SAFR design. It must be recognized that final conclusions in all matters discussed in this SER require approval by the Commission. During the NRC staff review of the SAFR conceptual design, DOE terminated work on this design in September 1988. This SER documents the work done to that date and no additional work is planned for the SAFR

  18. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  19. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience with

  20. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86 FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of the reactor configuration/structure design for the fusion experimental reactor (FER) performed in FY 1986. The design was intended to meet the physical and engineering mission of the next step device which was decided by the subcommittee on the next step device of the nuclear fusion council. The objectives of the design study in FY 1986 are to advance and optimize the design concept of the last year because the recommendation of the subcommittee was basically the same as the design philosophy of the last year. Six candidate reactor configurations which correspond to options C ∼ D presented by the subcommittee were extensively examined. Consequently, ACS reactor (Advanced Option-C with Single Null Divertor) was selected as the reference configuration from viewpoints of technical risks and cost performance. Regarding the reactor structure, the following items were investigated intensively: minimization of reactor size, protection of first wall against plasma disruption, simplification of shield structure, reactor configuration which enables optimum arrangement of poloidal field coils. (author)

  1. Argentinean integrated small reactor design and scale economy analysis of integrated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design of CAREM, which is Argentinean integrated small reactor project and the scale economy analysis results of integrated reactor. CAREM project consists on the development, design and construction of a small nuclear power plant. CAREM is an advanced reactor conceived with new generation design solutions and standing on the large experience accumulated in the safe operation of Light Water Reactors. The CAREM is an indirect cycle reactor with some distinctive and characteristic features that greatly simplify the reactor and also contribute to a highly level of safety: integrated primary cooling system, self pressurized, primary cooling by natural circulation and safety system relying on passive features. For a fully doupled economic evaluation of integrated reactors done by IREP (Integrated Reactor Evaluation Program) code transferred to IAEA, CAREM have been used as a reference point. The results shows that integrated reactors become competitive with power larger than 200MWe with Argentinean cheapest electricity option. Due to reactor pressure vessel construction limit, low pressure drop steam generator are used to reach power output of 200MWe for natural circulation. For forced circulation, 300MWe can be achieved. (author)

  2. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a ''critical path'' for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain ''minimum'' levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial ''first step'' in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by

  3. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne Leland [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  4. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  5. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  6. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  7. Using Advanced Fuel Bundles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the exit fuel burnup in CANDU reactors was a long-time challenge for both bundle designers and performance analysts. Therefore, the 43-element design together with several fuel compositions was studied, in the aim of assessing new reliable, economic and proliferation-resistant solutions. Recovered Uranium (RU) fuel is intended to be used in CANDU reactors, given the important amount of slightly enriched Uranium (~0.96% w/o U235) that might be provided by the spent LWR fuel recovery plants. Though this fuel has a far too small U235 enrichment to be used in LWR's, it can be still used to fuel CANDU reactors. Plutonium based mixtures are also considered, with both natural and depleted Uranium, either for peacefully using the military grade dispositioned Plutonium or for better using Plutonium from LWR reprocessing plants. The proposed Thorium-LEU mixtures are intended to reduce the Uranium consumption per produced MW. The positive void reactivity is a major concern of any CANDU safety assessment, therefore reducing it was also a task for the present analysis. Using the 43-element bundle with a certain amount of burnable poison (e.g. Dysprosium) dissolved in the 8 innermost elements may lead to significantly reducing the void reactivity. The expected outcomes of these design improvements are: higher exit burnup, smooth/uniform radial bundle power distribution and reduced void reactivity. Since the improved fuel bundles are intended to be loaded in existing CANDU reactors, we found interesting to estimate the local reactivity effects of a mechanical control absorber (MCA) on the surrounding fuel cells. Cell parameters and neutron flux distributions, as well as macroscopic cross-sections were estimated using the transport code DRAGON and a 172-group updated nuclear data library. (author)

  8. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  9. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MWth, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS

  10. Conceptual Design Study of JSFR (2) - Reactor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several innovative technologies are adopted in the JSFR design to meet the high level requirements for economic competitiveness in the design requirements. The cost-down approaches for JSFR are as follows. In order to reduce the amount of structural materials, the diameter of the reactor vessel shall be minimized and the reactor internal structures shall be simplified. The reduction of the reactor vessel diameter is achieved by adopting a advanced refueling system and the hot reactor vessel with high temperature wall. The flow velocity in the reactor upper plenum increases because the diameter of the reactor vessel is decreased. As the result, the coolant flow field in reactor upper plenum is severe. The optimization of the coolant flow field in the reactor upper plenum was carried out for prevention the cover gas entrainment and the vortex cavitations at the hot leg intake. In addition, structural integrities for seismic loadings and thermal loadings were evaluated because the design seismic loading was highly increased and the vessel wall is directly exposed to the thermal transients of the upper plenum. This paper describes the characteristics and the results of the design study of the reactor system. (author)

  11. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  12. Evolutionary/advanced light water reactor data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition is examining options for placing fissile materials that were produced for fabrication of weapons, and now are deemed to be surplus, into a condition that is substantially irreversible and makes its use in weapons inherently more difficult. The principal fissile materials subject to this disposition activity are plutonium and uranium containing substantial fractions of plutonium-239 uranium-235. The data in this report, prepared as technical input to the fissile material disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) deal only with the disposition of plutonium that contains well over 80% plutonium-239. In fact, the data were developed on the basis of weapon-grade plutonium which contains, typically, 93.6% plutonium-239 and 5.9% plutonium-240 as the principal isotopes. One of the options for disposition of weapon-grade plutonium being considered is the power reactor alternative. Plutonium would be fabricated into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and fissioned (''burned'') in a reactor to produce electric power. The MOX fuel will contain dioxides of uranium and plutonium with less than 7% weapon-grade plutonium and uranium that has about 0.2% uranium-235. The disposition mission could, for example, be carried out in existing power reactors, of which there are over 100 in the United States. Alternatively, new LWRs could be constructed especially for disposition of plutonium. These would be of the latest US design(s) incorporating numerous design simplifications and safety enhancements. These ''evolutionary'' or ''advanced'' designs would offer not only technological advances, but also flexibility in siting and the option of either government or private (e.g., utility) ownership. The new reactor designs can accommodate somewhat higher plutonium throughputs. This data report deals solely with the ''evolutionary'' LWR alternative

  13. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Program quarterly report, April--June 1977. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-11-01

    Information is presented concerning accident energetics; core debris behavior; sodium containment and structural integrity; research for elevated temperature design criteria; fuel motion detection; ACPR fuel motion system; and advanced reactor safety research assessment.

  14. SIR - small is safe [in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint USA-UK venture has been initiated to design a small nuclear reactor which offers low capital cost, greater flexibility and a potentially lower environmental impact. Called Safe Integral Reactor (SIR), the lead unit could be built in the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority's (UKAEA's) Winfrith site if the design is accepted by the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). This article describes the 320 MWe reactor unit that is the basis of the design being developed. (author)

  15. A multipurpose research reactor design using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) is one of the most recently built advanced neutron research facilities. It is a 20 megawatt open-pool reactor fueled with low enriched uranium and cooled by forced light water. The core is located inside a chimney, surrounded by heavy water as reflector. This paper describes modeling and simulation of the RRR using MCNP. Three changes in the core design are also suggested and simulated. Neutron flux distribution and k(eff) for each model is calculated and compared with those of the original model. Model A is the original RRR design. It is modeled as close as possible to the original design for benchmark and comparison purposes. In the second model (Model B), a vertical square cavity is added in the center of the core, thus providing an irradiation channel with high harder-spectrum neutron flux. A simulation shows that a fast flux as high as 3.0*1014 n/cm2.s is available in a cavity whose area is 64 cm2 while minimally disturbing the rest of the core. The original central cross-shaped control blade is split into four smaller pieces and moved to outer regions. In the third model (Model C), control blades are placed asymmetrically, leading to higher thermal flux in some locations in the reflector, which can be used, for example, for cold neutron source. In the last model (Model D), the control blades never occupy the central part of the core leading to a flux trap and higher harder-spectrum flux around z-equals-0 plane in the central cavity. Individual or combination of these changes may be incorporated in future research reactor designs

  16. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellarators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transport behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  17. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellerators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transort behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  18. Pre-licensing of the Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) developed the Advanced CANDU Reactor-700 (ACR-700) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. As further advancement of the ACR design, AECL is currently developing the ACR-1000 for the Canadian and international market. The ACR-1000 is aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current generation of operating nuclear plants, while achieving shorter construction schedule, high plant capacity factor, improved operations and maintenance, increased operating life, and enhanced safety features. The reference ACR-1000 plant design is based on an integrated two-unit plant, using enriched fuel and light-water coolant, with each unit having a nominal gross electrical output of 1165 MWe. The ACR-1000 design has evolved from AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the experience and feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The CANDU system is ideally suited to this evolutionary approach since the modular fuel channel reactor design can be modified, through a series of incremental changes in the reactor core design, to increase the power output and improve the overall safety, economics, and performance. The safety enhancements made in ACR-1000 encompass improved safety margins, performance and reliability of safety related systems. In particular, the use of the CANFLEX-ACR fuel bundle, with lower linear rating and higher critical heat flux, provides increased operating and safety margins. Safety features draw from those of the existing CANDU plants (e.g., the two

  19. Reactor core design of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and existing fossil fired gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original design features of this system are the reactor core design based on a newly proposed refueling scheme named sandwich shuffling, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an innovative coolant flow scheme and a horizontally installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refueling for 2 years. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200,000 yen (1667 US$)/kW e, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 yen (3.3 US cents)/kW h. This paper describes the original design features focusing on the reactor core design and the in-core structure design, including the innovative coolant flow scheme for cooling the RPV. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

  20. Recent progress in stellarator reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stellarator/Torsatron/Heliotron (S/T/H) class of toroidal magnetic fusion reactor designs continues to offer a distinct and in several ways superior approach to eventual commercial competitiveness. Although no major, integrated conceptual reactor design activity is presently underway, a number of international research efforts suggest avenues for the substantial improvement of the S/T/H reactor embodiment, which derive from recent experimental and theoretical progress and are responsive to current trends in fusion-reactor projection to set the stage for a third generation of designs. Recent S/T/H reactor design activity is reviewed and the impact of the changing technical and programmatic context on the direction of future S/T/H reactor design studies is outlined

  1. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  2. Absorber materials, control rods and designs of shutdown systems for advanced liquid metal fast reactors. Proceeding of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five specialists from France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhsan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Georgia (observer) attended the meeting. The meeting had seven sessions. The main topics of discussions were: Status of control rod designs for fast reactors and experience with operation; properties and behaviour of absorber materials for control rods; results of post-irradiation examination of absorber materials, and mechanisms affecting their properties and behaviour; design of a backup reactivity shutdown system utilizing passive mechanisms: Curie point electromagnetic mechanism; enhancement of thermal expansion of absorber rdo drive lines; hydraulically suspended control rods; gas expansion modules in the core; and the possibility of optimizing the reactivity coefficients and the efficiency of Pu burning by using absorber and moderator materials in the core. A total of 23 papers were presented, and a technical tour of the IPPE also took place. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  4. The status of facilities at China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60 MW research reactor, so called China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR,) was built in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), located in the southwest of Beijing and about 37 kilometers away from the central city. CARR is a tank-in-pool inverse neutron trap type reactor using D2O reflector, the designed optimal undisturbed thermal neutron flux is 8×1014 n⋅cm-2⋅s-1. A liquid D2 cold source will be equipped and the installation will be finished at the end of 2015. As a multipurpose research reactor, its main applications include neutron scattering, neutron activation analysis, isotope production, silicon doping, fuel element test, fundamental nuclear physics and so on. On March 13rd, 2012 CARR realized the 72 h stable operation with the full power. And the official operation license is expected to be issued at the beginning of next year. Cooperating with the internal and international users in the first phase ten instruments complete construction and are under commissioning, which are High Resolution Powder Diffractometer, High Intensity Powder Diffractometer, Residual Stress Diffractometer, Texture Diffractometer, Four Circle Diffractometer, Reflectometer, Small Angle Neutron Scattering, two Thermal Triple Axis Spectrometers and Isotope Separator On-Line instrument . In the second phase 7 instruments were approved and are under construction now. Although the operation license was not issued, the reactor was permitted to do the testing run several times and some results were obtained during the instrument commissioning.

  5. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  6. Conceptual Design of a Nuclear Reactor Dedicated for Desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many advantages of nuclear desalination, the nuclear safety issues still remain a perennial problem today. To respond to such needs, the development of a desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor with maximized safety features was proposed. From the feasibility study, the desalination-dedicated reactor was found to be a good solution for meeting future water demand during the winter season in some countries like UAE by decoupling water and electricity supply. The economic analysis results indicated that under certain conditions, the desalination-dedicated reactor can produce freshwater at lower cost than the target nuclear cogeneration reactor using steam extraction technologies. A conceptual design of the desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor is in progress. The design features of the desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor could significantly enhance safety, reliability, and simplicity, and facilitate the extensive use of innovative passive safety systems. These maximized safety features of desalination-dedicated reactor could provide advanced capabilities for passive reactor shutdown and residual heat removal, and eventually prevent radioactivity release into the environment. The conceptual design achieved will provide a foothold for the future commercialization of the desalination-dedicated nuclear reactor and eventually help to address both a serious water crisis and nuclear safety issues

  7. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  9. Proceedings of the GCNEP-IAEA course on natural circulation phenomena and passive safety systems in advanced water cooled reactors. V.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status and prospect, economics, advanced designs and applications of reactors in operation and construction, safety of advanced water cooled reactors is discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. Status of advanced containment systems for next generation water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present IAEA status report is intended to provide information on the current status and development of containment systems of the next generation reactors for electricity production and, particularly, to highlight features which may be considered advanced, i.e. which present improved performance with evolutionary or innovative design solutions or new design approaches. The objectives of the present status report are: To present, on a concise and consistent basis, selected containment designs currently being developed in the world; to review and compare new approaches to the design bases for the containments, in order to identify common trends, that may eventually lead to greater worldwide consensus, to identify, list and compare existing design objectives for advanced containments, related to safety, availability, maintainability, plant life, decommissioning, economics, etc.; to describe the general approaches adopted in different advanced containments to cope with various identified challenges, both those included in the current design bases and those related to new events considered in the design; to briefly identify recent achievements and future needs for new or improved computer codes, standards, experimental research, prototype testing, etc. related to containment systems; to describe the outstanding features of some containments or specific solutions proposed by different parties and which are generally interesting to the international scientific community. 36 refs, 27 figs, 1 tab

  11. Cermet-fueled reactors for advanced space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermet-fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high-performance advanced space power systems. The cermet consists of a hexagonal matrix of a refractory metal and a ceramic fuel, with multiple tubular flow channels. The high performance characteristics of the fuel matrix come from its high strength at elevated temperatures and its high thermal conductivity. The cermet fuel concept evolved in the 1960s with the objective of developing a reactor design that could be used for a wide range of mobile power generating sytems, including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests for the cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric as part of the 710 Project (General Electric 1966), and by Argonne National Laboratory in the Direct Nuclear Rocket Program (1965). Development programs for cermet fuel are currently under way at Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The high temperature qualification tests from the 1960s have provided a base for the incorporation of cermet fuel in advanced space applications. The status of the cermet fuel development activities and descriptions of the key features of the cermet-fueled reactor design are summarized in this paper

  12. The advanced liquid metal reactor actinide recycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current U.S. National Energy Strategy includes four key goals for nuclear policy: enhance safety and design standards, reduce economic risk, reduce regulatory risk, and establish an effective high-level nuclear waste program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Actinide Recycle System is consistent with these objectives. The system has the ability to fulfill multiple missions with the same basic design concept. In addition to providing an option for long-term energy security, the system can be effectively utilized for recycling of actinides in light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel, provide waste management flexibility, including the reduction in the waste quantity and storage time and utilization of the available energy potential of LWR spent fuel. The actinide recycle system is comprised of (1) a compact liquid metal (sodium) cooled reactor system with optimized passive safety characteristics, and (2) pyrometallurgical metal fuel cycle presently under development of Argonne National Laboratory. The waste reduction of LWR spent fuel is accomplished by transmutation or fissioning of the longer-lived transuranic isotopes to shorter-lived fission products in the reactor. In this presentation the economical and environmental incentive of the actinide recycle system is addressed and the status of development including licensing aspects is described. 3 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  13. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  14. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions

  15. Applications of the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the technique of neutron scattering was pioneered at the X-10 graphite reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory about 50 years ago, it was used to study certain important, but fairly esoteric, properties of crystals. From this modest beginning, neutron scattering has become a major tool in every branch of science, from the astrophysics of the early universe to human biology, and in many important industrial and engineering applications. In a typical modern research reactor it is not unusual to find one instrument studying new polymeric materials, while its neighbor is measuring residual stress in a jet turbine, sometimes with the jet operating. Most of this development has taken place outside of the United States, primarily in Western Europe, Japan and Russia, and it is generally recognized that we are a decade behind our competitors in this important field. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), planned to become operational as a user-facility at Oak Ridge at the end of this decade, will regain our leadership in neutron-based research and will be a major center for attracting new students into science. This paper discusses some of the research and development applications of the ANS, with an emphasis on applied materials science and engineering

  16. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  17. Extrap conceptual fusion reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has recently been initiated to asses the fusion reactor potential of the Extrap concept. A reactor model is defined that fulfills certain economic and environmental criteria. This model is applied to Extrap and a reference reactor is outlined. The design is optimized by varying parameters subject to both physics and engineering constraints. Several design options are examined and key engineering issues are identified and addressed. Some preliminary results and conclusions of this work are summarized. (authors)

  18. Status of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual design studies of the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) have been conducted at JAERI in line with a long-range plan for fusion reactor development laid out in the long-term program of the Atomic Energy Commission issued in 1982. The FER succeeding the tokamak device JT-60 is a tokamak reactor with a major mission of realizing a self-ignited long-burning DT plasma and demonstrating engineering feasibility. The paper describes recent developments of the FER design concept

  19. Development of a computer program of fast calculation for the pre design of advanced nuclear fuel 10 x 10 for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) a methodology is developed to optimize the design of cells 10x10 of assemble fuels for reactors of water in boil or BWR. It was proposed a lineal calculation formula based on a coefficients matrix (of the change reason of the relative power due to changes in the enrichment of U-235) for estimate the relative powers by pin of a cell. With this it was developed the computer program of fast calculation named PreDiCeldas. The one which by means of a simple search algorithm allows to minimize the relative power peak maximum of cell or LPPF. This is achieved varying the distribution of U-235 inside the cell, maintaining in turn fixed its average enrichment. The accuracy in the estimation of the relative powers for pin is of the order from 1.9% when comparing it with results of the 'best estimate' HELIOS code. With the PreDiCeldas it was possible, at one minimum time of calculation, to re-design a reference cell diminishing the LPPF, to the beginning of the life, of 1.44 to a value of 1.31. With the cell design with low LPPF is sought to even design cycles but extensive that those reached at the moment in the BWR of the Laguna Verde Central. (Author)

  20. Advances in Process Intensification through Multifunctional Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Evans, Lindsay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Sciences and Engineering Center; Miller, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Sciences and Engineering Center; Cooper, Marcia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetic Components Realization Center; Torczynski, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pena, Donovan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walt [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center

    2011-02-01

    This project was designed to advance the art of process intensification leading to a new generation of multifunctional chemical reactors utilizing pulse flow. Experimental testing was performed in order to fully characterize the hydrodynamic operating regimes associated with pulse flow for implementation in commercial applications. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operated a pilot-scale multifunctional reactor experiment for operation with and investigation of pulse flow operation. Validation-quality data sets of the fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics were acquired and shared with Chemical Research and Licensing (CR&L). Experiments in a two-phase air-water system examined the effects of bead diameter in the packing, and viscosity. Pressure signals were used to detect pulsing. Three-phase experiments used immiscible organic and aqueous liquids, and air or nitrogen as the gas phase. Hydrodynamic studies of flow regimes and holdup were performed for different types of packing, and mass transfer measurements were performed for a woven packing. These studies substantiated the improvements in mass transfer anticipated for pulse flow in multifunctional reactors for the acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation process. CR&L developed packings for this alkylation process, utilizing their alkylation process pilot facilities in Pasadena, TX. These packings were evaluated in the pilot-scale multifunctional reactor experiments established by Sandia to develop a more fundamental understanding of their role in process intensification. Lummus utilized the alkylation technology developed by CR&L to design and optimize the full commercial process utilizing multifunctional reactors containing the packings developed by CR&L and evaluated by Sandia. This hydrodynamic information has been developed for multifunctional chemical reactors utilizing pulse flow, for the acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation process, and is now accessible for use in

  1. Research and development on the application of advanced control technologies to advanced nuclear reactor systems: A US national perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control system designs for nuclear power plants are becoming more advanced through the use of digital technology and automation. This evolution is taking place because of: (1) the limitations in analog based control system performance and maintenance and availability and (2) the promise of significant improvement in plant operation and availability due to advances in digital and other control technologies. Digital retrofits of control systems in US nuclear plants are occurring now. Designs of control and protection systems for advanced LWRs are based on digital technology. The use of small inexpensive, fast, large-capacity computers in these designs is the first step of an evolutionary process described in this paper. Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, GE Nuclear Energy and several universities are performing research and development in the application of advances in control theory, software engineering, advanced computer architectures, artificial intelligence, and man-machine interface analysis to control system design. The target plant concept for the work described in this paper is the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module reactor (PRISM), an advanced modular liquid metal reactor concept. This and other reactor designs which provide strong passive responses to operational upsets or accidents afford good opportunities to apply these advances in control technology. 18 refs., 5 figs

  2. Design analysis of the upgraded TREAT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TREAT reactor, fueled by a dilute dispersion of fully enriched UO2 in graphite, has been a premier transient testing facility since 1959. A major Upgrade of the reactor is in progress to enhance its transient testing capability in support of the LMFBR safety program. The TREAT Upgrade (TU) reactor features a modified central zone of the core with higher fissile loadings of the same fuel, clad in Inconel to allow operation at higher temperatures. The demanding functional requirements on the reactor necessitated the use of unique features in the core design which, in turn, presented major calculational complexities in the analysis. Special design methods had to be used in many cases to treat these complexities. The addition of an improved Reactor Control System, a safety grade Plant Protection System and an enhanced Coolant/Filtration System produces a reactor that can meet the functional requirements on the reactor in a safe manner

  3. Advanced robotic remote handling system for reactor dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced robotic remote handling system equipped with a multi-functional amphibious manipulator has been developed and used to dismantle a portion of radioactive reactor internals of an experimental boiling water reactor in the program of reactor decommissioning technology development carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. (author)

  4. Safety features and research needs of westinghouse advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three Westinghouse advanced reactors - AP600, AP1000 and IRIS - are at different levels of readiness. AP600 has received a Design Certification, its larger size version AP1000 is currently in the design certification process and IRIS has just completed its conceptual design and will initiate soon a licensing pre-application. The safety features of the passive designs AP600/AP1000 are presented, followed by the features of the more revolutionary IRIS, a small size modular integral reactor. A discussion of the IRIS safety by design approach is given. The AP600/AP1000 design certification is backed by completed testing and development which is summarized, together with a research program currently in progress which will extend AP600 severe accident test data to AP1000 conditions. While IRIS will of course rely on applicable AP600/1000 data, a very extensive testing campaign is being planned to address all the unique aspects of its design. Finally, IRIS plans to use a risk-informed approach in its licensing process. (authors)

  5. Numerical study on seismic response of the reactor coolant pump in Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An artificial accelerogram of the specified SSE is generated. • A dynamic FE model of the RCP in AP1000 (with gyroscopic and FSI effects) is developed. • The displacement, force, moment and stress in the RCP during the earthquake are summarized. - Abstract: The reactor coolant pump in the Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor is a kind of nuclear canned-motor pump. The pump is classified as Seismic Category I, which must function normally during the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. When the nuclear power plant is located in seismically active region, the seismic response of the reactor coolant pump may become very important for the safety assessment of the whole nuclear power plant. In this article, an artificial accelerogram is generated. The response spectrum of the artificial accelerogram fits well with the design acceleration spectrum of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. By applying the finite element modeling method, the dynamic finite element models of the rotor and stator in the reactor coolant pump are created separately. The rotor and stator are coupled by the journal bearings and the annular flow between the rotor and stator. Then the whole dynamic model of the reactor coolant pump is developed. Time domain analysis which uses the improved state-space Newmark method of a direct time integration scheme is carried out to investigate the response of the reactor coolant pump under the horizontal seismic load. The results show that the reactor coolant pump responds differently in the direction of the seismic load and in the perpendicular direction. During the Safe Shutdown Earthquake, the displacement response, the shear force, the moment and the journal bearing reaction forces in the reactor coolant pump are analyzed

  6. Numerical study on seismic response of the reactor coolant pump in Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Cheng, E-mail: 0100209064@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhen-Qiang, Yao, E-mail: zqyaosjtu@gmail.com; Ya-bo, Xue; Hong, Shen

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • An artificial accelerogram of the specified SSE is generated. • A dynamic FE model of the RCP in AP1000 (with gyroscopic and FSI effects) is developed. • The displacement, force, moment and stress in the RCP during the earthquake are summarized. - Abstract: The reactor coolant pump in the Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor is a kind of nuclear canned-motor pump. The pump is classified as Seismic Category I, which must function normally during the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. When the nuclear power plant is located in seismically active region, the seismic response of the reactor coolant pump may become very important for the safety assessment of the whole nuclear power plant. In this article, an artificial accelerogram is generated. The response spectrum of the artificial accelerogram fits well with the design acceleration spectrum of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. By applying the finite element modeling method, the dynamic finite element models of the rotor and stator in the reactor coolant pump are created separately. The rotor and stator are coupled by the journal bearings and the annular flow between the rotor and stator. Then the whole dynamic model of the reactor coolant pump is developed. Time domain analysis which uses the improved state-space Newmark method of a direct time integration scheme is carried out to investigate the response of the reactor coolant pump under the horizontal seismic load. The results show that the reactor coolant pump responds differently in the direction of the seismic load and in the perpendicular direction. During the Safe Shutdown Earthquake, the displacement response, the shear force, the moment and the journal bearing reaction forces in the reactor coolant pump are analyzed.

  7. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  8. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS

  9. Development in UK commercial fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the CDFR commercial demonstration fast reactor which should be put into operation early in the 90-ties is described. Basic elements of the reactor components are considered. The choice of the integrated primary coolant circuit, and design of intermediate heat exchangers, sodium pumps and charging machines is substantiated. The reactor power is 1320 MW(e), or 3300 MW(t). The sodium temperature at the reactor inlet is 370 deg C, at its outlet 540 deg C. Linear loading per fuel element length is 40 W/mm. The conclusion is drawn that the described design of the demonstration reactor fully corresonds to requirements of a full-scale commercial NPP with a fast reactor

  10. Recycled uranium: An advanced fuel for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of recycled uranium (RU) fuel offers significant benefits to CANDU reactor operators particularly if used in conjunction with advanced fuel bundle designs that have enhanced performance characteristics. Furthermore, these benefits can be realised using existing fuel production technologies and practices and with almost negligible change to fuel receipt and handling procedures at the reactor. The paper will demonstrate that the supply of RU as a ceramic-grade UO2 powder will increasingly become available as a secure option to virgin natural uranium and slightly enriched uranium(SEU). In the context of RU use in Canadian CANDU reactors, existing national and international transport regulations and arrangements adequately allow all material movements between the reprocessor, RU powder supplier, Canadian CANDU fuel manufacturer and Canadian CANDU reactor operator. Studies have been undertaken of the impact on personnel dose during fuel manufacturing operations from the increased specific activity of the RU compared to natural uranium. These studies have shown that this impact can be readily minimised without significant cost penalty to the acceptable levels recognised in modem standards for fuel manufacturing operations. The successful and extensive use of RU, arising from spent Magnox fuel, in British Energy's Advanced Gas-Cooled reactors is cited as relevant practical commercial scale experience. The CANFLEX fuel bundle design has been developed by AECL (Canada) and KAERI (Korea) to facilitate the achievement of higher bum-ups and greater fuel performance margins necessary if the full economic potential of advanced CANDU fuel cycles are to be achieved. The manufacture of a CANFLEX fuel bundle containing RU pellets derived from irradiated PWR fuel reprocessed in the THORP plant of BNFL is described. This provided a very practical verification of dose modelling calculations and also demonstrated that the increase of external activity is unlikely to require any

  11. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer’s physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user’s technical needs. The current NSUF partners are

  12. Digital control application for the advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is a 1300 MWe class Nuclear Power Plant whose design studies and demonstration tests are being performed by the three manufacturers, General Electric, Toshiba and Hitachi, under requirement specifications from the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The goals are to apply new technology to the BWR in order to achieve enhanced operational efficiencies, improved safety measures and cost reductions. In the plant instrumentation and control areas, traditional analog control equipment and wire cables will be replaced by distributed digital microprocessor based control units communicating with each other and the control room over fiber optic multiplexed data buses

  13. ALWR - VTT's technology programme on advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1998, VTT Energy launched a four year research programme 'Advanced Light Water Reactors' (ALWR). The research programme strives to intensify co operation between different Finnish organisations as well as to make better use of international R and D efforts on ALWR concepts. Some projects of the programme focus on use of new computational tools for the design and safety analysis of ALWRs. Improved computer simulation methods and models are necessary for the analysis of passive safety systems. Some projects address development and assessment of new technical solutions in ALWR. The projects are carried out in close co operation with the Finnish power companies and are often part of reactor vendors international development programmes. Another key element of the programme is training of new nuclear experts and providing possibilities for continuing education of the current staff. (author)

  14. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the engineering conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is to be built as a next generation tokamak machine. This design covers overall reactor systems including MHD equilibrium analysis, mechanical configuration of reactor, divertor, pumped limiter, first wall/breeding blanket/shield, toroidal field magnet, poloidal field magnet, cryostat, electromagnetic analysis, vacuum system, power handling and conversion, NBI, RF heating device, tritium system, neutronics, maintenance, cooling system and layout of facilities. The engineering comparison of a divertor with pumped limiters and safety analysis of reactor systems are also conducted. (author)

  15. BN800: The advanced sodium cooled fast reactor plant based on close fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the advanced countries with actually fastest reactor technology, Russia has always taken a leading role in the forefront of the development of fast reactor technology. After successful operation of BN600 fast reactor nuclear power station with a capacity of six hundred thousand kilowatts of electric power for nearly 30 years, and after a few decades of several design optimization improved and completed on its basis, it is finally decided to build Unit 4 of Beloyarsk nuclear power station (BN800 fast reactor power station). The BN800 fast reactor nuclear power station is considered to be the project of the world's most advanced fast reactor nuclear power being put into implementation. The fast reactor technology in China has been developed for decades. With the Chinese pilot fast reactor to be put into operation soon, the Chinese model fast reactor power station has been put on the agenda. Meanwhile, the closed fuel cycle development strategy with fast reactor as key aspect has given rise to the concern of experts and decision-making level in relevant areas. Based on the experiences accumulated in many years in dealing the Sino-Russian cooperation in fast reactor technology, with reference to the latest Russian published and authoritative literatures regarding BN800 fast reactor nuclear power station, the author compiled this article into a comprehensive introduction for reference by leaders and experts dealing in the related fields of nuclear fuel cycle strategy and fast reactor technology development researches, etc. (authors)

  16. Feasibility study of advanced fuel burning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been conducted to determine both physics, engineering and economic aspects of fusion power reactors based on magnetic confinement and on burning advanced fuels (AFs). DT burning Tokamaks are taken as reference concept. We show that the attractive features of advanced fuels, in particular of neutronlean proton-based AFs, can be combined, in appropriately designed AF reactors (high beta), with power densities comparable to or even higher than those achievable in DT Tokamaks. Moreover we identify physical requirements which would assure Q values well above unity. As an example a semi-open confinement scheme is analyzed based on a self-consistent plasma calculation. We find that a mirror, even if only ''semi-open'' as a result of strong diamagnetism, can barely be expected to achieve high Q values. Therefore confinement schemes such as compact tori, multipole surmacs etc. may be required to burn AFs. We conclude that the economics of AF reactors, as determined by the nuclear boiler power density, may be superior to that of DT-rectors if low recirculating power fractions can be obtained by appropriate plasma tayloring (high fractional transfer of fusion power to ions required). A more detailed investigation is suggested for proton-based fuel cycles. (orig.)

  17. Development and assessment of advanced reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced core protection system for a pressurized water reactor, Reactor Core Protection System (RCOPS), was developed by adopting a high performance hardware platform and optimal system configuration. The functional algorithms of the core protection system were also improved to enhance the plant availability by reducing unnecessary reactor trips and increasing operational margin. The RCOPS consists of four independent safety channels providing a two-out-of-four trip logic. The reliability analysis using the reliability block diagram method showed the unavailability of the RCOPS to be lower than the conventional system. The failure mode and effects analysis demonstrated that the RCOPS does not lose its intended safety functions for most failures. New algorithms for the RCOPS functional design were implemented in order to avoid unnecessary reactor trips by providing auxiliary pre-trip alarms and signal validation logic for the control rod position. The new algorithms in the RCOPS were verified by comparing the RCOPS calculations with reference results. The new thermal margin algorithm for the RCOPS was expected to increase the operational margin to the limit for Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) by approximately 1%. (author)

  18. Safety aspects of designs for future light water reactors (evolutionary reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this document is to describe the major innovations of proposed designs of future light water reactors, to describe specific safety characteristics and safety analysis methodologies, and to give a general overview of the most important safety aspects related to future reactors. The reactors considered in this report are limited to those intended for fixed station electrical power production, excluding most revolutionary concepts. More in depth discussion is devoted to those designs that are in a more advanced state of completion and have been more extensively described and analysed in the open literature. Other designs will be briefly described, as evidence of the large spectrum of new proposals. Some designs are similar; others implement unique features and require specific discussion (not all aspects of designs with unique features are fully discussed in this document). 131 refs, 22 figs

  19. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

    2004-03-30

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this

  20. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from ∼ ±40% at beginning of life to ∼ ±10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this case, a self

  1. Basic design decisions for advanced AST-type NHRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the AST-500 reference design decisions and of the experience gained in the RF during the pilot NDHPs development and construction, the advanced NHR AST-500M has been developed recently by OKB Mechanical Engineering, as well as a whole series of heating and co-generation reactor plants of various unit power. All the designs represent enhanced safety reactor plants meeting the contemporary national requirements and international recommendations for nuclear plants of the new generation. The main objectives for the advanced NHR development are considered. New design decisions and engineering improvements are described briefly. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs

  2. Feedback experience of sodium cooled fast reactors in the world and application to the design of advanced reactors; Bilan de l'experience de fonctionnement des rapides a sodium dans le monde et application a la conception des futurs reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidez, J.; Martin, L. [CEA Valrho, Site de Marcoule (DCP), 30 (France)

    2007-05-15

    18 fast reactors using sodium or sodium-potassium (for 2 reactors) as coolant, operated or operate in the world. They represent a valid feedback experience of 385 cumulated operation years. The analysis of the availability rates shows that these reactors share a common pattern: when they began to operate they faced technological difficulties (due to their prototype role) and then as problems were solved they gradually became more robust. The Russian reactor BN-600 is a good example: it got problems at steam generator level and with fuel but now its availability rate nears 80 per cent. The problems that occurred in fast reactors are: -) water-sodium reactions due to leaks in steam generators, -) the blindly handling under sodium of fuel elements, -) the leaks of sodium in the facility, -) the presence of air and impurities in the primary cooling system, -) cladding failures, -) the use of the austenitic steel 321 and of 15-D3 steel (they were prone to crack). These problems were solved through successive improvements, these improvements represent a precious asset for the design of advanced reactors. (A.C.)

  3. Assessment of United States industry structural codes and standards for application to advanced nuclear power reactors: Appendices. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout its history, the USNRC has remained committed to the use of industry consensus standards for the design, construction, and licensing of commercial nuclear power facilities. The existing industry standards are based on the current class of light water reactors and as such may not adequately address design and construction features of the next generation of Advanced Light Water Reactors and other types of Advanced Reactors. As part of their on-going commitment to industry standards, the USNRC commissioned this study to evaluate US industry structural standards for application to Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactors. The initial review effort included (1) the review and study of the relevant reactor design basis documentation for eight Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactor Designs, (2) the review of the USNRCs design requirements for advanced reactors, (3) the review of the latest revisions of the relevant industry consensus structural standards, and (4) the identification of the need for changes to these standards. The results of these studies were used to develop recommended changes to industry consensus structural standards which will be used in the construction of Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactors. Over seventy sets of proposed standard changes were recommended and the need for the development of four new structural standards was identified. In addition to the recommended standard changes, several other sets of information and data were extracted for use by USNRC in other on-going programs. This information included (1) detailed observations on the response of structures and distribution system supports to the recent Northridge, California (1994) and Kobe, Japan (1995) earthquakes, (2) comparison of versions of certain standards cited in the standard review plan to the most current versions, and (3) comparison of the seismic and wind design basis for all the subject reactor designs

  4. Assessment of United States industry structural codes and standards for application to advanced nuclear power reactors: Final report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout its history, the USNRC has remained committed to the use of industry consensus standards for the design, construction, and licensing of commercial nuclear power facilities. The existing industry standards are based on the current class of light water reactors and as such may not adequately address design and construction features of the next generation of Advanced Light Water Reactors and other types of Advanced Reactors. As part of their on-going commitment to industry standards, the USNRC commissioned this study to evaluate US industry structural standards for application to Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactors. The initial review effort included: (1) the review and study of the relevant reactor design basis documentation for eight Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactor Designs, (2) the review of the USNRCs design requirements for advanced reactors, (3) the review of the latest revisions of the relevant industry consensus structural standards, and (4) the identification of the need for changes to these standards. The results of these studies were used to develop recommended changes to industry consensus structural standards which will be used in the construction of Advanced Light Water Reactors and Advanced Reactors. Over seventy sets of proposed standard changes were recommended and the need for the development of four new structural standards was identified. In addition to the recommended standard changes, several other sets of information and data were extracted for use by USNRC in other ongoing programs. This information included: (1) detailed observations on the response of structures and distribution system supports to the recent Northridge, California (1994) and Kobe, Japan (1995) earthquakes, (2) comparison of versions of certain standards cited in the standard review plan to the most current versions, and (3) comparison of the seismic and wind design basis for all the subject reactor designs

  5. Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) spent fuel pool conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia that has been safely operated and maintained since 1982. In order to enhance technical capabilities and competencies especially in nuclear reactor engineering a feasibility study on RTP power upgrading was proposed to serve future needs for advance nuclear science and technology in the country with the capability of designing and develop reactor system. The need of a Spent Fuel Pool begins with the discharge of spent fuel elements from RTP for temporary storage that includes all activities related to the storage of fuel until it is either sent for reprocessed or sent for final disposal. To support RTP power upgrading there will be major RTP systems replacement such as reactor components and a new temporary storage pool for fuel elements. The spent fuel pool is needed for temporarily store the irradiated fuel elements to accommodate a new reactor core structure. Spent fuel management has always been one of the most important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and considered among the most common problems to all countries with nuclear reactors. The output of this paper will provide sufficient information to show the Spent Fuel Pool can be design and build with the adequate and reasonable safety assurance to support newly upgraded TRIGA PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor. (author)

  6. Computer code qualification program for the Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) has developed and implemented a Software Quality Assurance program (SQA) to ensure that its analytical, scientific and design computer codes meet the required standards for software used in safety analyses. This paper provides an overview of the computer programs used in Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) safety analysis, and assessment of their applicability in the safety analyses of the ACR design. An outline of the incremental validation program, and an overview of the experimental program in support of the code validation are also presented. An outline of the SQA program used to qualify these computer codes is also briefly presented. To provide context to the differences in the SQA with respect to current CANDUs, the paper also provides an overview of the ACR design features that have an impact on the computer code qualification. (author)

  7. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual Design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) of which the objective will be to realize self-ignition with D-T reaction is reported. Mechanical Configurations of FER are characterized with a noncircular plasma and a double-null divertor. The primary aim of design studies is to demonstrate fissibility of reactor structures as compact and simple as possible with removable torus sectors. The structures of each component such as a first-wall, blanket, shielding, divertor, magnet and so on have been designed. It is also discussed about essential reactor plant system requirements. In addition to the above, a brief concept of a steady-state reactor based on RF current drive is also discussed. The main aim, in this time, is to examine physical studies of a possible RF steady-state reactor. (author)

  8. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  9. Development of the CGN's reactor design software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from 1990's, CGN has been actively involved in the introduction, digestion, absorption and re-innovation of reactor design software, and is gradually establishing a software R and D system with CGN's characteristics. This paper briefly introduces the software introduction history and its application status in CGN, and summarizes the independent reactor software R and D system of CGN. (authors)

  10. Designing improvements into Latin American reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four nuclear reactors in operation in Latin America, a further six are under construction, and two new reactor-types are being designed. The operating reactors and those under construction reflect six different sources of technology and all these projects have suffered from protracted construction times due to lack of capital. However, in some cases the delay has provided an opportunity for improved safety measures to be incorporated. At a topical meeting of the Latin American Section of the ANS, held in Rio de Janeiro last June and reported here, safety aspects of the 12 reactors were discussed by authors from four countries. (author)

  11. Alternative approaches to fusion. [reactor design and reactor physics for Tokamak fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The limitations of the Tokamak fusion reactor concept are discussed and various other fusion reactor concepts are considered that employ the containment of thermonuclear plasmas by magnetic fields (i.e., stellarators). Progress made in the containment of plasmas in toroidal devices is reported. Reactor design concepts are illustrated. The possibility of using fusion reactors as a power source in interplanetary space travel and electric power plants is briefly examined.

  12. The use of nuclear energy for district heating. The branch program of activities. NIKIET design efforts on the advanced nuclear co-generation plant with VK-300 reactor, the Ruta nuclear heating plant and small power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: District heating is among the top priorities of the state economic and energy policy of Russia and is the largest and expanding sector of the national power industry. The nuclear sources of energy are regarded as the promising option for this sector of the power industry. The branch program of activities which is being implemented is intended for developing the policy and program of nuclear district heating. The priority task is to provide co-generated heat from the NPPs and nuclear co-generation plants to the amount of 30 mln Gcal/year by 2020 as specified in the Energy Policy of Russia for the period until 2020. NIKIET named after N.A. Dollezhal has been developing the special purpose reactor facilities for the power units of the nuclear co-generation plants and nuclear heating plants. The detailed design of the power unit with the simplified passive boiling water reactor VK-300 has been developed for the nuclear co-generation plant (NCP) intended to be deployed in the large-scale power industry. It has been demonstrated that NCP with VK-300 reactor is competitive with respect to the operating and advanced fossil thermal co-generation plants. It is envisaged to construct the four-unit first of-the-kind NCP with VK-300 reactor in Arkhangelsk region. The nuclear heating plant based on the pool RUTA reactors operating under atmospheric pressure is being developed for the small towns. It is planned to construct the pilot plant of such kind on the site of RF State Research Center FEI, Obninsk. In the frame of conversion of the defense-oriented works NIKIET has developed the UNITHERM reactor facility for a small NPP to be located in the distant and difficult-to access regions of Russia. To provide heat and electricity to the small communities, meteorological observatories, lighthouses and radio navigation stations in a reliable and safe way, it is possible to use non-attended small nuclear power plants based on the self-regulating water-water reactor and

  13. Probabilistic analysis for the Babcock and Wilcox advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) design employs design features that will provide enhanced safety, reliability, and design margin over the current generation of commercial nuclear power plants. This paper presents a probabilistic analysis performed to provide early feedback to the designers to enhance the reliability of these systems. Feedback from the probabilistic analysis was used to improve the system design by incorporating the insights gained. The calculated core melt frequency for the ALWR design was better than the design targets since most of the features that dominate the risk profile in conventional pressurized water reactors (PWRs) were eliminated in the redesign for the ALWR

  14. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  15. Developing a Comprehensive Software Suite for Advanced Reactor Performance and Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an introduction to the reactor analysis capabilities of the nuclear power reactor simulation tools that are being developed as part of the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Toolkit. The NEAMS Toolkit is an integrated suite of multiphysics simulation tools that leverage high performance computing to reduce uncertainty in the prediction of the performance and safety of advanced reactor and fuel designs. The toolkit effort is composed of two major components, the fuels product line, which provides tools for fuel performance analysis, and the reactor product line, which provides tools for reactor performance and safety analysis. This paper presents an overview of the NEAMS reactor product line development effort. (author)

  16. BWR 90: The ABB advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB has two evolutionary advanced fight water reactors available today - the BWR 90 boiling water reactor and the System 80+ pressurised water reactor. The BWR 90 is based on the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the BWR 75 plants. The operation experience of the six plants of this advanced design has been very good. The average annual energy availability is above 90%, and the total power generation costs have been low. In the development of BWR 90 specific changes were introduced to the reference design, to adapt to technological progress, new safety requirements and to achieve cost savings. The thermal power rating of BWR 90 is 3800 MWth (providing a nominal 1374 MWe net), slightly higher dim that of the reference plant ABB Atom has taken advantage of margins gained using a new generation of its SVEA fuel to attain this power rating without major design modifications. The BWR 90 design was completed and offered to the TVO utility in Finland in 1991, as one of the contenders for the fifth Finnish nuclear power plant project. Thus, the design is available today for deployment in new plant projects. Utility views were incorporated through co-operation with the Finnish utility TVO, owner and operator of the two Olkiluoto plants of BWR 75 design. A review against the European Utility Requirement (EUR) set of requirements has been performed, since the design, in 1997, was selected by the EUR Steering Committee to be the first BWR to be evaluated against the EUR documents. The work is scheduled for completion in 1998. It will be the subject of an 'EUR Volume 3 Subset for BWR 90' document. ABB is continuing its BWR development work with the 'evolutionary' design BWR 90+. The primary design goal is to develop the BWR as a competitive option for the anticipated revival of the market for new nuclear plants beyond the turn of the century, as well as feeding ideas and inputs to the continuous modernisation efforts at operating plants. The development is

  17. TARA tandem mirror reactor design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A point design is presented for a tandem mirror reactor based upon a TARA plug configuration in which a potential plug for center cell ions is created in an axisymmetric cell adjacent to the center cell. We will incorporate the same center cell as the MARS design, allowing a direct comparison of the different plug configurations. The study will include a magnet design that satisfied the reactor criteria for circular flux surfaces at the center cell plasma edge, stability against ballooning, trapped particle and interchange modes, and zero net parallel currents. We will also present a self-consistent power balance of the reactor, and compare the reactor's energy amplification factor Q and technological requirements with the MARS design

  18. Modified-open fuel cycle performance with breed-and-burn advanced reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in fast reactor designs enable significant increase in the uranium utilization in an advanced fuel cycle. The category of fast reactors, collectively termed breed-and-burn reactor concepts, can use a large amount of depleted uranium as fuel without requiring enrichment with the exception of the initial core critical loading. Among those advanced concepts, some are foreseen to operate within a once-through fuel cycle such as the Traveling Wave Reactor, CANDLE reactor or Ultra-Long Life Fast Reactor, while others are intended to operate within a modified-open fuel cycle, such as the Breed-and-Burn reactor and the Energy Multiplier Module. This study assesses and compares the performance of the latter category of breed-and-burn reactors at equilibrium state. It is found that the two reactor concepts operating within a modified-open fuel cycle can significantly improve the sustainability and security of the nuclear fuel cycle by decreasing the uranium resources and enrichment requirements even further than the breed-and-burn core concepts operating within the once-through fuel cycle. Their waste characteristics per unit of energy are also found to be favorable, compared to that of currently operating PWRs. However, a number of feasibility issues need to be addressed in order to enable deployment of these breed-and-burn reactor concepts. (author)

  19. Advances in new WWER designs to improve operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic operational indices of WWER-type reactors show their competitiveness in all the countries where these reactors operate. Advanced WWERs being designed and constructed now have the improved characteristics of economical efficiency and are more convenient for operation and maintenance. Many technical solutions aimed at improvement of the operational performance are implemented in the design of WWER-1000/V-392 and WWER-640/V-407, and these reactors are the important basis for the nuclear power expansion in Russia. Some of these solutions are considered in the present paper. (author)

  20. Seismic design of reactors in NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurosaki, Akira [Mitsui Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kuchiya, Masao; Yasuda, Naomitsu; Kitanaka, Tsutomu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Sakuraba, Koichi; Izawa, Naoki; Takeshita, Isao

    1997-03-01

    Basic concept and calculation method for the seismic design of the main equipment of the reactors in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) are described with actual calculation examples. The present paper is published to help the seismic design of the equipment and application of the authorization for the design and constructing of facilities. (author)

  1. Seismic design of reactors in NUCEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic concept and calculation method for the seismic design of the main equipment of the reactors in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility) are described with actual calculation examples. The present paper is published to help the seismic design of the equipment and application of the authorization for the design and constructing of facilities. (author)

  2. Flow blockage analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor was designed to provide a research tool with capabilities beyond those of any existing reactors. One portion of its state-of-the-art design required high-speed fluid flow through narrow channels between the fuel plates in the core. Experience with previous reactors has shown that fuel plate damage can occur when debris becomes lodged at the entrance to these channels. Such debris disrupts the fluid flow to the plate surfaces and can prevent adequate cooling of the fuel. Preliminary ANS designs addressed this issue by providing an unheated entrance length for each fuel plate so that any flow disruption would recover, thus providing adequate heat removal from the downstream, heated portions of the fuel plates. As part of the safety analysis, the adequacy of this unheated entrance length was assessed using both analytical models and experimental measurements. The Flow Blockage Test Facility (FBTF) was designed and built to conduct experiments in an environment closely matching the ANS channel geometry. The FBTF permitted careful measurements of both heat transfer and hydraulic parameters. In addition to these experimental efforts, a thin, rectangular channel was modeled using the Fluent computational fluid dynamics computer code. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data to benchmark the hydrodynamics of the model. After this comparison, the model was extended to include those elements of the safety analysis that were difficult to measure experimentally. These elements included the high wall heat flux pattern and variable fluid properties. The results were used to determine the relationship between potential blockage sizes and the unheated entrance length required

  3. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  4. Fast reactor designs: Commercial size fast reactors (unforeseen events)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter contains detailed design data and main operational data on the following commercial fast reactors (unforeseen events): Super-Phenix-1; Super-Phenix-2; SNR-2; BN-800; DFBR; CDFR; EFR; BN-1600; BN-1800; BREST-1200; JSFR-1500

  5. Advanced neutron source reactor probabilistic flow blockage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phase I Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor identified core flow blockage as the most likely internal event leading to fuel damage. The flow blockage event frequency used in the original ANS PRA was based primarily on the flow blockage work done for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) PRA. This report examines potential flow blockage scenarios and calculates an estimate of the likelihood of debris-induced fuel damage. The bulk of the report is based specifically on the conceptual design of ANS with a 93%-enriched, two-element core; insights to the impact of the proposed three-element core are examined in Sect. 5. In addition to providing a probability (uncertainty) distribution for the likelihood of core flow blockage, this ongoing effort will serve to indicate potential areas of concern to be focused on in the preliminary design for elimination or mitigation. It will also serve as a loose-parts management tool

  6. Cooling of concrete structure in advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovative nuclear power plants are being designed by incorporation of passive systems to the extent possible for enhancing the safety by elimination of active components. BARC has designed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) incorporating several passive systems to facilitate the fulfillment of safety functions of the reactor during normal operation, residual heat removal, emergency core cooling, confinement of radioactivity etc. In addition to these passive systems, an innovative passive technology is being developed to protect, the concrete structure in high temperature zone (V1-volume). Passive Concrete Cooling System (PConCS) uses the principle of natural circulation to provide cooling outside the insulation cabinet encompassing high temperature piping. Cooling water is circulated from overhead GDWP in cooling pipes fixed over corrugated plate on outer surface of insulation cabinet and maintains low temperature of concrete structure. Modular construction of insulation cabinet and cooling pipes external to the concrete surface simplifies the design, construction and refurbishment if required. The paper describes the details of passive technology for concrete cooling. (author)

  7. Potential applications of robotics in advanced liquid-metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) design includes a range of robots and automation devices. They extend from stationary robots that are a part of the current design to more exotic concepts with mobile, autonomous units, which may become part of the design. Development of robotic application requirements is enhanced by using computer models of work spaces in three dimensions. The primary goals of the more autonomous machines are to: (1) extent and/or enhance one's capabilities in a hazardous environment; some tasks could encounter high temperatures (up to 800 degree F), high radiation (fields up to several hundred thousand roentgens per hour), rooms filled with inert gas and/or sodium aerosol, or combinations of these; (2) reduce operating and maintenance cost through inservice inspection (ISI) of various parts of the reactor, through consideration of as-low-as-reasonably achievable radiation levels, and through automation of some maintenance/processing operations. This paper discusses some applications in the fuel cycle, in refueling operations, and in inspection

  8. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) Project finished the B stage commissioning and resolved the relative technical problems. Meanwhile, the acceptance items and the cold neutron source were carrying out.

  9. Evaluation of the trial studies for a advanced marine reactor, (8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI carried out the trial design of three type reactors (semi-integrated type, integrated type, and self pressurized integrated type) in order to clarity reactor type of advanced marine reactor for the best practical use in future and to extract its research and development theme. This report presents the comparison and estimation of these three type reactors from economical view point. Economical comparison carried out with next items for estimating the operating cost of ships powered by these three type reactors. (1) cost of reactor plants. (2) cost of fuel processing. (3) fuel cycle cost. As a result, it is cleared that the operating cost is the lowest in the ship powered by the integrated type reactor. (author)

  10. Advanced nuclear plant design options to cope with external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the stagnation period of nuclear power apparently coming to an end, there is a renewed interest in many Member States in the development and application of nuclear power plants (NPPs) with advanced reactors. Decisions on the construction of several NPPs with evolutionary light water reactors have been made (e.g. EPR Finland for Finland and France) and more are under consideration. There is a noticeable progress in the development and demonstration of innovative high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, in China, South Africa and Japan. The Generation IV International Forum has defined the International Near Term Deployment programme and, for a more distant perspective, six innovative nuclear energy systems have been selected and certain R and D started by several participating countries. National efforts on design and technology development for NPPs with advanced reactors, both evolutionary and innovative, are ongoing in many Member States. Advanced NPPs have an opportunity to be built at many sites around the world, with very broad siting conditions. There are special concerns that safety of these advanced reactors may be challenged by external events following new scenarios and failure modes, different from those well known for the currently operated reactors. Therefore, the engineering community identified the need to assess the proposed design configurations in relation to external scenarios at the earliest stages of the design development. It appears that an early design optimization in relation to external events is a necessary requirement to achieve safe and economical advanced nuclear power plants. Reflecting on these developments, the IAEA has planned the preparation of a report to define design options for protection from external event impacts in NPPs with evolutionary and innovative reactors. The objective of this publication is to present the state-of-the-art in design approaches for the protection of NPPs with evolutionary and innovative

  11. Thermohydraulic and constructional boundary conditions of an advanced PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages and special features of an advanced PWR reactor (FDWR) have been systematically investigated for several years by the Department of Space Flight and Reactor Technology of the University of Brunswick (LRR-TUBS). The FDWR will have a homogeneous core, i.e. the fuel elements will consist of fuel rods of the same size and enrichment. (orig./GL)

  12. Advanced CANDU reactor development: a customer-driven program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) product development program is well under way. The development approach for the ACR is to ensure that all activities supporting readiness for the first ACR project are carded out in parallel, as parts of an integrated whole. In this way design engineering, licensing, development and testing, supply chain planning, construct ability and module strategy, and planning for commissioning and operations, all work in synergy with one another. Careful schedule management :ensures that program focus stays on critical path priorities.'This paper provides an overview of the program, with an emphasis on integration to ensure maximum project readiness, This program management approach is important now that AECL is participating as the reactor vendor in Dominion Energy's DOE-sponsored Combined Construction/Operating License (COL) program. Dominion Energy selected the ACR-700 as their reference reactor technology for purposes of demonstrating the COL process. AECL's development of the ACR is unique in that pre-licensing activities are being carded out parallel in the USA and Canada, via independent, but well-communicated programs. In the short term, these programs are major drivers of ACR development. The ACR design approach has been to optimize to achieve major design objectives: capital cost reduction, robust design with ample margins, proveness by using evolutionary change from existing :reference plants, design for ease :of operability. The ACR development program maintains these design objectives for each of the program elements: Design: .Carefully selected design innovations based on the SEU fuel/light water coolant:/heavy water moderator approach. Emphasis on lessons-learned review from operating experience and customer feedback Licensing: .Safety case based on strengths of existing CANDU plus benefits of optimised design Development and Test: Choice of materials, conditions to enable incremental testing building on existing CANDU and LWR

  13. Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Steven Prescott; Tony Koonce

    2014-04-01

    A key area of the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) strategy is the development of methodologies and tools that will be used to predict the safety, security, safeguards, performance, and deployment viability of SMRs. The goal of the SMR PRA activity will be to develop quantitative methods and tools and the associated analysis framework for assessing a variety of risks. Development and implementation of SMR-focused safety assessment methods may require new analytic methods or adaptation of traditional methods to the advanced design and operational features of SMRs. We will need to move beyond the current limitations such as static, logic-based models in order to provide more integrated, scenario-based models based upon predictive modeling which are tied to causal factors. The development of SMR-specific safety models for margin determination will provide a safety case that describes potential accidents, design options (including postulated controls), and supports licensing activities by providing a technical basis for the safety envelope. This report documents the progress that was made to implement the PRA framework, specifically by way of demonstration of an advanced 3D approach to representing, quantifying and understanding flooding risks to a nuclear power plant.

  14. Design and safety of a small integral reactor (SMART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced integral PWR with a rated thermal power of 330 MW has been developed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the seawater desalination and electricity generation. The conceptual design of SMART (System-Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) with a desalination system was completed in March 1999. The basic design for the integrated nuclear desalination system is currently underway and will continue until 2002. In the basic design phase, industries including the Korea Heavy Industry and Construction Company (KHIC) and the Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc. (KOPEC) are participating. The licensing application for design certification is planned after the completion of the basic design. The concept of a nuclear desalination plant with the SMART is developed to supply 40,000 tons of fresh water per day and 90 MW of electricity to an area with approximate population of 100,000 or an industrialized complex. To meet this goal, highly advanced design features enhancing the safety, reliability, performance, and operability are introduced in the SMART design. The safety of SMART is based on the inherent safety characteristics of the reactor. Innovative safety systems based on passive safety concepts are implemented to enhance inherent safety characteristics. The preliminary safety analyses for the SMART conceptual design have been performed and the results demonstrated that the key safety parameters of the limiting design base events do not violate the safety limits. (author)

  15. Innovative designs of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world development scenarios predict at least a 2.5 time increase in the global consumption of primary energy in the first half of the twenty-first century. Much of this growth can be provided by the nuclear power which possesses important advantages over other energy technologies. However, the large deployment of nuclear sources may take place only when the new generation of reactors appears on the market and will be free of the shortcomings found in the existing nuclear power installations. The public will be more inclined to accept nuclear plants that have better economics; higher safety; more efficient management of the radioactive waste; lower risk of nuclear weapons proliferation, and provided that the focus is made on the energy option free of ∇e2 generation. Currently, the future of nuclear power is trusted to the technology based on fast reactors and closed fuel cycle. The latter implies reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel of the nuclear plants and re-use of plutonium produced in power reactors

  16. Design challenges for sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is of vital importance for commercialized fast reactor to achieve component design with excellent integrity and economics. In the phase II of feasibility study till 2005, a system design for commercialized fast reactor for sodium cooling was achieved. For economical impr