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Sample records for advanced radiotherapy research

  1. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry

  2. INL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Venhuizen

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2004. Topics covered include boron analysis in biological samples, computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and collaborative dosimetry studies at the RA-1 facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  3. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    2003-05-23

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

  4. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report for 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Venhuizen

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

  5. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications

  6. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, James R.

    2002-04-30

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  7. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  8. A Review of Radiotherapy-Induced Late Effects Research After Advanced-Technology Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne D Newhauser

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The number of incident cancers and long-term cancer survivors is expected to increase substantially for at least a decade. Advanced-technology radiotherapies, e.g., using beams of protons and photons, offer dosimetric advantages that theoretically yield better outcomes. In general evidence from controlled clinical trials epidemiology studies are lacking. To conduct these studies, new research methods and infrastructure will be needed. In the paper, we review several key research methods of relevance to late effects after advanced-technology proton-beam and photon-beam radiotherapies. In particular, we focus on the determination of exposures to therapeutic and stray radiation and related uncertainties, with discussion of recent advances in exposure calculation methods, uncertainties, in-silico studies, computing infrastructure, electronic medical records, and risk visualization. We identify six key areas of methodology and infrastructure that will be needed to conduct future outcome studies of radiation late effects.

  9. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research. (topical review)

  10. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  11. Advances in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is in the midst of a rebirth largely driven by the use of computers for treatment planning and beam delivery. The first edge of this renaissance was the advent of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT). This was enabled by the widespread availability and utilization of three-dimensional imaging such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance scanning, themselves products of the computer revolution. For the first time this allowed radiation oncologists to segment and visualize the tumor in association with it neighboring sensitive soft-tissue structures. Software tools to visualize the beam paths through the body enabled the beam directions and beam shapes to be manually optimized. Simultaneously, improved dose calculations utilizing the CT images of the patient anatomy produced more accurate distributions of dose. The dose was delivered with custom-shaped blocks or recently collimators with multiple leaves that allow complex shaped fields to be delivered without the need for block fabrication. In the last couple of decades new treatment delivery methodologies have emerged. The first has been stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which is the purview of neurosurgeons (who call it SRS) as well as radiation oncologists (who usually call it SRT). SRS and SRT are premised on multiple beams focusing on one location typically with circular aperture collimators but increasingly with fields shaped by multi-leaved collimators. Often only a single treatment session (the usual for SRS) is used when the treatment volume is small, but for larger lesions several treatment sessions, or fractions, are used (most often for SRT) to allow for normal tissue repair. The new equipment market for SRS and SRT is about 10% of the total for radiation therapy. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the latest treatment methodology and its adoption has been extremely rapid, particularly in the United States. IMRT uses

  12. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  13. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xin WANG; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-01-01

    At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescrip...

  14. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  15. Advances of Precise Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin WANG

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available At present lung tumor radiation therapy has entered the accurate radiotherapy era. Precise radiotherapy includes intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT. During the process of implementing precise radiotherapy, these problems should be fully considered to ensure executing precise radiotherapy accurately: patient positioning, controlling of the lung tumor motion, selecting of image techniques, PTV margin, dose prescription and reporting, arrangement of beams, controlling of dose volume and treatment delivering.

  16. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases

  17. Accelerated radiotherapy for advanced laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugen, Hedda; Mercke, Claes [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Johansson, Karl-Axel [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiophysics; Ejnell, Hasse; Edstroem, Staffan [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a single institution's outcome for patients with advanced laryngeal cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy (RT). Fifty-eight patients with advanced laryngeal cancer were treated with curative intent with accelerated RT during the period 1990-1998. Patients received radiotherapy alone or with induction chemotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC) probabilities were both 49% for T3 and 75% for T4 tumors. The 5-year disease-free survival probability was 46% and 68% and overall survival probability was 30% and 39% for T3 and T4 tumors respectively. No significant statistical difference in outcome was found, either between T3 and T4 tumors, or between patients who received induction chemotherapy and those who did not. The treatment results for advanced laryngeal cancer at this institution were comparable to those reported in the literature. The results for T3 and T4 were similar. T4 classification alone should not be an exclusion criterion for larynx preservation. Overall survival was poor, partly because of a high incidence of deaths from intercurrent diseases.

  18. Development of Advanced Multi-Modality Radiation Treatment Planning Software for Neutron Radiotherapy and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigg, D; Wessol, D; Wemple, C; Harkin, G; Hartmann-Siantar, C

    2002-08-20

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has long been active in development of advanced Monte-Carlo based computational dosimetry and treatment planning methods and software for advanced radiotherapy, with a particular focus on Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Fast-Neutron Therapy. The most recent INEEL software system of this type is known as SERA, Simulation Environment for Radiotherapy Applications. As a logical next step in the development of modern radiotherapy planning tools to support the most advanced research, INEEL and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the developers of the PEREGRTNE computational engine for radiotherapy treatment planning applications, have recently launched a new project to collaborate in the development of a ''next-generation'' multi-modality treatment planning software system that will be useful for all modern forms of radiotherapy.

  19. The place radiotherapy alone with respect to surgery and radiotherapy in locally advanced vulva cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author report a study which aimed at evaluating the place or radiotherapy associated with surgery and of radiotherapy without surgery when taking into care locally advanced vulva cancers. The study is based on 46 cases. After 24 months, different aspects, such as recurrence and survival, have been assessed. It appears that there is no survival difference without recurrences between both sets. Short communication

  20. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  1. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, J. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Alonso, C. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Llanos, M. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lacasta, A. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Fuentes, J. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Mendoza, L.A. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Badia, J.M. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Delgado, E. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Ojeda, B. [Dept. of Oncology, Hospital de La Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    Radiotherapy has been standard therapy for locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is being studied to improve responses and survival. We report a phase II study in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer (FIGO stages III and IV A) using chemotherapy with bleomycin, methotrexate and cisplatin (BMP) followed by radical radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients, 31 in stage III and 4 in stage IV A, 3 complete responses (CR) and 22 partial responses (PR) were achieved after chemotherapy treatment. Thirty-one patients completed radiotherapy; 19 achieved CR and 4 PR. Five-year actuarial survival for the entire group was 45% (95% confidence interval, 37-53%) with a median survival of 56 months. Patients with CR had a significantly better survival: The 5-year actuarial survival was 74% (95% CI, 59-89%). Recurrence developed at 4 to 19 patients. The most frequent side-effects were nausea and vomiting. Myelosuppression and impaired renal function also occurred. There was no evidence of radiotherapy toxicity enhancement. The stage and Karnofsky index were significant prognostic factors. It is concluded that MBP chemotherapy in advanced cervical cancer is effective and, followed by radiotherapy, allows a good control of this tumor. The group of patients with complete response have a low rate of recurrences and a long survival chance. (orig.).

  2. Train medical physicist-urgent need for advanced radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Japanese advanced charged particle therapy for cancer that places fewer physical burdens on patients is leading the world and stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have been implemented also as a high precision radiotherapy. For the further advancement and dissemination of the therapy, training and qualification of medical physicists has become more needed. Cancer professional train course plan has been performed at many universities in Japan partly to train medical physicists. This special issue consists of seven relevant articles from experts of academia. Medical physicists have been qualified by the Japan Radiological Society, but should have national qualification such as to carry out the R and D of therapy equipment. This has been supported by many academia such as the Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (JASTRO) but not by the Japan Association of Radiological Technologists (JART). (T. Tanaka)

  3. Advances in conformal radiotherapy 3-D CRT and IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It tries on IMRT and 3-D conformal radiotherapy. Advanced imaging, planning and delivery tools such as 3D TPS, ITP and IMRT, allow the creation of highly conformal dose distributions. The treatment is only as good as the ability to know where the target and the sensitive structures are at all times. Margins to the target volume should account for uncertainties in localization, for patient repositioning and immobilization, and for organ motion

  4. Recent advancements in toxicity prediction following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, J D; Fargeas, A; Dréan, G; Simon, A; Acosta, O; de Crevoisier, R

    2015-01-01

    In external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer limiting toxicities for dose escalation are bladder and rectum toxicities. Normal tissue complication probability models aim at quantifying the risk of developping adverse events following radiotherapy. These models, originally proposed in the context of uniform irradiation, have evolved to implementations based on the state-of-the-art classification methods which are trained using empirical data. Recently, the use of image processing techniques combined with population analysis methods has led to a new generation of models to understand the risk of normal tissue complications following radiotherapy. This paper overviews those methods in the case of prostate cancer radiation therapy and propose some lines of future research. PMID:26737471

  5. Radiotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy in advanced Ewing's tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Ewing's tumors are sensitive to radio- and chemotherapy. Patients with multifocal disease suffer a poor prognosis. Patients presenting primary bone marrow involvement or bone metastases at diagnosis herald a 3-year disease-free survival below 15%. The European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) has established the following indications for high-dose therapy in advanced Ewing's tumors: Patients with primary multifocal bone disease, patients with early (<2 years after diagnosis) or multifocal relapse. Patients and Method: As of 1987, 83 patients have been treated in the EICESS group, 39 of them at the transplant center in Duesseldorf, who have been analyzed here. All individuals received 4 courses of induction chemotherapy with EVAJA and stem cell collection after course 3 and 4. Consolidation radiotherapy of the involved bone compartments was administered in a hyperfractionated regimen 2 times 1.6 Gy per day, up to 22.4 Gy simultaneously to course 5 and 22.4 Gy to course 6 of chemotherapy. The myeloablative chemotherapy consisted of melphalan and etoposide (ME) in combination with 12 Gy TBI (Hyper-ME) oder Double-ME with whole lung irradiation up to 18 Gy (without TBI). Results: The survival probability at 40 months was 31% (44% DOD; 15% DOC). Pelvic infiltration did not reach prognostic relevance in this cohort. Radiotherapy encompassed 75% of the bone marrow at maximum (average 20%). Engraftment was not affected by radiotherapy. Conclusion: High-dose chemotherapy can improve outcome in poor prognostic advanced Ewing's tumors. The disease itself remains the main problem. The expected engraftment problems after intensive radiotherapy in large volumes of bone marrow can be overcome by stem cell reinfusion. (orig.)

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Selek, Uğur; Bölükbaşı, Yasemin; Welsh, James W.; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage confor...

  7. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Icro Meattini; Sara Cecchini; Vanessa Di Cataldo; Calogero Saieva; Giulio Francolini; Vieri Scotti; Pierluigi Bonomo; Monica Mangoni; Daniela Greto; Jacopo Nori; Lorenzo Orzalesi; Donato Casella; Roberta Simoncini; Massimiliano Fambrini; Simonetta Bianchi

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (r...

  8. CERR: A computational environment for radiotherapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A software environment is described, called the computational environment for radiotherapy research (CERR, pronounced 'sir'). CERR partially addresses four broad needs in treatment planning research: (a) it provides a convenient and powerful software environment to develop and prototype treatment planning concepts, (b) it serves as a software integration environment to combine treatment planning software written in multiple languages (MATLAB, FORTRAN, C/C++, JAVA, etc.), together with treatment plan information (computed tomography scans, outlined structures, dose distributions, digital films, etc.), (c) it provides the ability to extract treatment plans from disparate planning systems using the widely available AAPM/RTOG archiving mechanism, and (d) it provides a convenient and powerful tool for sharing and reproducing treatment planning research results. The functional components currently being distributed, including source code, include: (1) an import program which converts the widely available AAPM/RTOG treatment planning format into a MATLAB cell-array data object, facilitating manipulation; (2) viewers which display axial, coronal, and sagittal computed tomography images, structure contours, digital films, and isodose lines or dose colorwash, (3) a suite of contouring tools to edit and/or create anatomical structures, (4) dose-volume and dose-surface histogram calculation and display tools, and (5) various predefined commands. CERR allows the user to retrieve any AAPM/RTOG key word information about the treatment plan archive. The code is relatively self-describing, because it relies on MATLAB structure field name definitions based on the AAPM/RTOG standard. New structure field names can be added dynamically or permanently. New components of arbitrary data type can be stored and accessed without disturbing system operation. CERR has been applied to aid research in dose-volume-outcome modeling, Monte Carlo dose calculation, and treatment planning optimization

  9. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  10. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  11. Accelerated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to present the reasons for introducing concomitant boost accelerated radiotherapy (CBAR) and its practical aspects at advanced head and neck carcinomas (HNC). Accelerated clonogenic repopulation of the tumor during radiotherapy necessitates its termination within the shortest possible term. The differentiated effect of the fractionated dose on both early and late response of tissues requires the use of several smaller daily fractions with an interval between exceeding six hours during all the time of radiotherapy or a part of it. If there is no data about earlier kinetics of the tumor cells, schemes with total dose 69-72 Gy are given preference. The practical aspects of CBAR also are presented: 1. specificity of the clinical target volume (ICRU 50) considering the requirements for beam and fields; 2. irradiation techniques most frequently used and 3. the method of patient immobilization. The characteristic features of CBAR are also discussed: 1. The primary tumor and its subclinical diffusion are irradiated in standard fields or in such with exclusion of the spinal cord at dose up to 54 in 30 fractions for 5.5 weeks. During the first two days, two daily fractions at six-hours interval are delivered with partial exclusion of the spinal cord. The primary tumor is given during the last 2.5 weeks up to total dose 69-72 Gy with a second daily fraction of 1.5 Gy six hours after the first one; 2. The current concepts for spinal cord radiation tolerance and very high risk of transverse myelitis in some accelerated radiotherapeutical schemes are also discussed. The therapeutic approach described is based on the experience got from the conventional fractionation; 3. Without neglecting enhanced acute toxicity CBAR is recommended as a well tolerated radiotherapeutical method

  12. Proceedings of the International Conference on Modern Radiotherapy. Advances and Challenges in Radiation Protection of Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    concluded with a roundtable discussion on patient information. All the available presentations, documents and posters are compiled in this document which starts with a report summarising the presentations and the main findings from the conference. 40 presentations (slides) are compiled in this document: 1 - Advances in external radiotherapy (M. Brada, Institute of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden Hospital UK); 2 - Advances in brachytherapy (D. Peiffert, Alexis Vautrin center, Nancy); 3 - The impact of new technologies on the risk of accident (R. Almaberti, HAS); 4 - What is a side effect, a complication or an accident in radiotherapy? (P. Scalliet, University hospital St Luc, Belgium); 5 - The range of radiosensitivity in the human population: hyper- and hypo- sensitivity (S. Bouffler, HPA UK) 6 - Radiation-induced sequelae: toward an individual profile (D. Azria, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France); 7 - Evaluation and management of secondary cancer risk in modern Radiation Therapy: elaboration of an ICRP/ICRU publication (J.M. Cosset, Curie Institute - ICRP); 8 - Cardiovascular risks in radiotherapy (K. Trott, University College London Institute UK); 9 - Risk acceptability in radiotherapy (F. Mettler, New Mexico Health Care System, US); 10 - Lessons learned from accidents in conventional external radiotherapy (O. Holmberg, IAEA); 11 - Lessons learned from accidental exposures in modern external radiotherapy (P. Ortiz Lopez, ICRP); 12 - Lessons learned from accidents in brachytherapy (L. Pinillos-Ashton, National Cancer Institute, Peru); 13 - Lessons learned from French accidents (S. Derreumaux, IRSN); 14-15 - WHO Radiotherapy risk profile (M. Barton, New South Wales Univ., Australia; D. Noble); 16 - Methods of risk analysis applied to radiotherapy (M.L. Ramirez, FORO/CSN, Spain); 17 - Radiation safety issues linked to the omnipresence of computers (JC. Rosenwald, SFPM); 18 - From Airline Safety Management System to Security in Radiotherapy:a French experience (E. Lartigau, INCa); 19

  13. Radiotherapy of the cephalic segment in patients with advanced neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the treatment results have significantly improved for several pediatric malignant neoplasms, particularly Wilms's tumor, lymphomas and leukemia, in the last decade, the prognosis of the INSS, stage 4 neuroblastoma over one year one old patients remains poor. Even for the more advanced centers, using the more aggressive treatment schedules, such as bone marrow transplantation, the probability of a 2 year progression free interval varies from 6 to 50% and at 3 to 6 years, from 13 to 54%. Thereby, at least, 46 to 94% of these patients are expected to die due to the merciless neoplasm progression. The hypothesis here to be tested is regarding the impact of the cephalic irradiation on the outcome of stage 4 patients with skull metastasis at diagnosis. The end point was to establish, under the NEURO-III-85 protocol chemotherapy schedule, the possible benefit of this radiotherapy in preventing the cephalic recurrence, and its reflex on these patients total and diseases free survival. These results disclosed that the cephalic segment irradiation may prevent recurrences at this site. Unfortunately, the decrease in the cranial recurrence frequency did not affect either the disease free interval, or the total survival. The conclusion was that cephalic irradiation have the potential of avoiding these recurrences, without modifying the final outcome. This modality of radiotherapy must be reevaluated under more effective systemic treatments. (author)

  14. Hypofractionated ablative radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    The role of radiation in locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is controversial. Randomized trials evaluating standard doses of chemoradiation have not shown a significant benefit from the use of consolidative radiation. Results from non-randomized studies of 3–5-fraction stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have been similar to standard chemoradiation, but with less toxicity and a shorter treatment time. Doses of SBRT have been reduced to subablative levels for the sake of tolerability. The benefit of both options is unclear. In contrast, ablative doses can be delivered using an SBRT technique in 15–28 fractions. The keys to the delivery of ablative doses are computed tomography (CT) image guidance and respiratory gating. Higher doses have resulted in encouraging long-term survival results. In this review, we present a comprehensive solution to achieving ablative doses for selected patients with pancreatic tumors by using a combination of classical, modern and novel concepts of radiotherapy: fractionation, CT image guidance, respiratory gating, intentional dose heterogeneity, and simultaneous integrated protection. PMID:27029741

  15. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for radiotherapy research is exemplified by the 100,000 cancer patients who will fail treatment locally and/or regionally annually for the next several years but who would benefit from better local treatment modalities. Theoretically, all of the areas of investigation discussed in this projection paper have the potential to significantly improve local-regional treatment of cancer by radiotherapy alone or in combination with other modalities. In many of the areas of investigation discussed in this paper encouraging results have been obtained in cellular and animal tumor studies and in limited studies in humans as well. In the not too distant future the number of patients who would benefit from better local control may increase by tens of thousands if developments in chemotherapy and/or immunotherapy provide a means to eradicate disseminated microscopic foci of cancer. Thus the efforts to improve local-regional control take on even greater significance

  16. Clinical research of teeth damage from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze various factors inducing teeth damage from radiotherapy and the preventive and treatment methods. Methods: One hundred cases of patients treated by radiotherapy were divided into two groups. In group one there were 60 cases whose teeth were irradiated during treatment; in group two there were 40 cases whose teeth were not irradiated during treatment. Results: The caries incidence was 60% for group one and 15% for group two (P<0.01). By auto-control in 15 patients, the caries incidence on the sick side was obviously higher than that of the healthy side. Hundred percent caries incidence was found in 6 cases who received a dosage of 70 Gy. Conclusion: The authors believe that radiation damage to the teeth is associated with the following factors: 1. The dosage and location of irradiation are closely related to caries incidence; 2. The active dentinoblasts are very sensitive to radiation; 3. Damage to the salivary glands from radiotherapy can result in reduction of salvia and pH value, leading to a high growth rate of Streptococcus mutans. Following preventive measures could be considered in future cases: to apply a caries prevention coating or protective dental crown and TPS, to adjust the dose and time of irradiation, to select conformal radiotherapy technique. The key points for protecting the teeth and salivary gland from caries and damage are protection of the proliferation ability of pulp cells, anti-inflammation, promotion of microcirculation, and strengthening body resistance

  17. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  18. Palliative radiotherapy for advanced malignancies in a changing oncologic landscape: guiding principles and practice implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joshua A; Simone, Charles B

    2014-07-01

    Radiotherapy can provide safe, cost-effective, efficient palliation of various symptoms of advanced cancer with minimal side effects. Radiotherapy can palliate pain related to bone metastases and growing visceral metastases or primary cancers, neurologic symptoms related to brain and spine metastases, other symptoms including cough and dyspnea from advanced cancers in the lung, bleeding from various internal and external tumors, and obstructive symptoms. Palliative radiotherapy should be offered in the context of a multidisciplinary oncology team including medical oncologists, palliative care clinicians and various surgical and interventional subspecialists. The prescription of radiotherapy should balance the convenience and fewer side effects associated with short, hypofractionated courses of radiotherapy with the potential greater durability associated with longer courses of radiotherapy in patients with more prolonged life expectancies. The judicious use of advanced techniques in radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), may be warranted in select patients, and they can potentially improve symptom control and durability but are associated with increased technical and economic costs. PMID:25841695

  19. The place radiotherapy alone with respect to surgery and radiotherapy in locally advanced vulva cancers; Place de la radiotherapie seule par rapport a la chirurgie et la radiotherapie dans les cancers vulvaires localement evolues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansouri, S.; Naim, A.; Moukhlissi, M.; Tawfik, N.; Bouchbika, Z.; Benchekroun, N.; Jouhadi, H.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A. [Centre de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier universitaire, Ibn-Rochd, Casablanca (Morocco)

    2011-10-15

    The author report a study which aimed at evaluating the place or radiotherapy associated with surgery and of radiotherapy without surgery when taking into care locally advanced vulva cancers. The study is based on 46 cases. After 24 months, different aspects, such as recurrence and survival, have been assessed. It appears that there is no survival difference without recurrences between both sets. Short communication

  20. A randomized trial comparing radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy with Geftinib in locally advance oral cavity cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemo radiation is the current standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer, but in our set-up, all patients cannot be admitted for chemotherapy or cannot tolerate chemo radiation, or do not want surgery and/or surgery is not possible. The present study was planned to compare the efficacy of concomitantly administered Gefitinib with radiation therapy and radiation alone in locally advanced oral cavity cancer that are not fit or able to tolerate concurrent chemotherapy. Material and Methods: This was a single center, nonstratified, single blind, nonplacebo-controlled, parallel group intervention study with imbalanced randomization performed at our institute. Adult patients aged 40-65 years, male or female, irrespective of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR status, Karnofsky scale score more than 70, biopsy-proven SCC, locally advance oral cavity cancer, normal hematology parameters, renal function and liver function tests for normal before recruitment were enrolled in the study. Exclusion criteria were patients who were previously treated with either chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT. Arm1 include only RT, whereas arm 2 includes Gefitinib with RT. Results: Sixty patients were included in the study, 30 in each arm. In Gefitinib plus RT arm, complete response was seen in 18 patients (60%, in only RT arm, complete response was seen in 10 patients (33.33%. There was no significant difference in acute toxicities and late toxicities. Conclusion: This study shows significant response to treatment and improvement in the Gefitinib plus RT as compared with RT alone. However, the findings of this study need to be confirmed by a study with a larger group of patients and a longer period of follow-up.

  1. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Story ... Photo courtesy of NIH Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research Story Landis, Ph.D., has been Director of ...

  2. Status and advances of p53-gene therapy and radiotherapy in malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer treatment is one of the most important fields in medical research. All strategies such as radio-therapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and gene-based therapy have their own advantages and disadvantages. Nowadays, a novel method which combined p53-gene therapy with radiotherapy plays an important role in the field of cancer research. This review summarized the current state of combined therapies of p53-gene therapy and radiotherapy, possible mechanism and recent progress. (authors)

  3. Prognostic factors in the treatment of locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with radiotherapy and arterial infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognostic factors in the treatment of local advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with radiotherapy, transcatheter arterial embolization and arterial infusion. The treatment effects of radiotherapy and combination modality therapy for the local advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were retrospectively reviewed. Three hundred and fifty-six patients of HCC (187 recurrent cases after surgical resection) were treated by: radiotherapy only ; bi-therapeutic method: hepatic artery ligation (HAL) and/or hepatic artery embolization (HAE) plus radiotherapy; and tri-therapeutic method (bi-therapeutic method plus hepatic artery infusion) from 1975 to 1996. Kaplan-Meier method has been used to evaluate the survival rates. There were no significant differences among these three treatment groups in the symptom relied rate, but the mean relief time period was much shorter in radiotherapy alone group (2.5 vs 44 months, P 0.05). There were evident differences in five-year survivals among these three treatment groups: 0 % for radiotherapy alone, 22.8 % for bi-therapeutic method and 38.8 % for tri-therapeutic method (P < 0.01). The prognosis was influenced by Okuda classification. Non-resectable local advanced HCC can be treated by the combination modality therapy, including radiotherapy, with a quite high cure rate. Radiotherapy alone can relief the symptoms. (authors)

  4. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review highlights developments over the past decade in radiotherapy and attempts to summarize the state of the art in the management of the major diseases in which radiotherapy has a meaningful role. The equipment, radiobiology of radiotherapy and carcinoma of the lung, breast and intestines are highlighted

  5. Postmastectomy radiotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meattini, Icro; Cecchini, Sara; Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Saieva, Calogero; Francolini, Giulio; Scotti, Vieri; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mangoni, Monica; Greto, Daniela; Nori, Jacopo; Orzalesi, Lorenzo; Casella, Donato; Simoncini, Roberta; Fambrini, Massimiliano; Bianchi, Simonetta; Livi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC) treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6%) underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4%) did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2-16) for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR) was 3.3 years (range 0.7-12.4). The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥ 4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51-16.52; P = 0.035), extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37-3.46; P = 0.009), and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36-0.90; P = 0.003). Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P = 0.015). Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy. PMID:25045694

  6. Impact of involved field radiotherapy in partial response after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy for advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Whether salvage therapy in patients with advanced aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in partial remission (PR) should consist of radiotherapy or autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) is debatable. We evaluated the impact of radiotherapy on outcome in PR patients treated in four successive European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer trials for aggressive NHL. Patients and Methods: Records of 974 patients (1980-1999) were reviewed regarding initial response, final outcome, and type and timing of salvage treatment. After 8 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy, 227 NHL patients were in PR and treated: 114 received involved field radiotherapy, 16 ASCT, 93 second-line chemotherapy, and 4 were operated. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) after radiotherapy were estimated (Kaplan-Meier method) and compared with other treatments (log-rank). Impact on survival was evaluated by multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model). Results: The median PFS in PR patients was 4.2 years and 48% remained progression-free at 5 years. Half of the PR patients converted to a complete remission. After conversion, survival was comparable to patients directly in complete remission. Radiotherapy resulted in better OS and PFS compared with other treatments, especially in patients with low to intermediate International Prognostic Index score, bulky disease, or nodal disease only. Correction by multivariate analysis for prognostic factors such as stage, bulky disease, and number of extranodal locations showed that radiotherapy was clearly the most significant factor affecting both OS and PFS. Conclusion: This retrospective analysis demonstrates that radiotherapy can be effective for patients in PR after fully dosed chemotherapy; assessment in a randomized trial (radiotherapy vs. ASCT) is justified

  7. Feasibility of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced sinonasal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: Twenty-two patients with sinonasal adenocarcinoma were treated with CIRT. CIRT was the primary treatment for 16 patients. Four patients received CIRT for local recurrence after surgery and two for residual tumour after surgery or chemotherapy. At the start of CIRT, 1 patient had T-classification (T) 2 disease, 2 had T3 disease, 5 had T4a disease, and 14 had T4b disease. Fourteen patients were treated with 57.6 Gy equivalent (GyE)/16 fractions, and 8, with 64.0 GyE/16 fractions. Results: The median follow-up period was 43 months for all patients. The 3-year local control and loco-regional control rates for all patients were 76.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 56.7–97.1%) and 61.3% (95% CI = 38.5–84.1%), respectively. The 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival rates were 59.1% (95% CI = 38.6–79.6%) and 65.6% (95% CI = 44.9–86.3%), respectively. Acute reactions of grade 3 of the skin and mucosa were observed in 2 and 4 patients, respectively. Late reactions included lateral visual loss (5 patients), mucosal ulceration (1 patient), and brain necrosis with clinical symptoms (1 patient). In the 5 patients who developed visual loss, the optic nerve was close to the tumour. Conclusions: CIRT was effective and generally safe for locally advanced sinonasal adenocarcinoma

  8. Advances in neutron scattering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of the Supplement to Journal of the Physical Society of Japan collects invited and contributed papers from the first International Symposium on Advanced Science Research (ASR-2000) 'Advances in Neutron Scattering Research'. The 182 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Icro Meattini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC is widely used in locally advanced breast cancer (BC treatment. The role of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT after NAC is strongly debated. The aim of our analysis was to identify major prognostic factors in a single-center series, with emphasis on PMRT. From 1997 to 2011, 170 patients were treated with NAC and mastectomy at our center; 98 cases (57.6% underwent PMRT and 72 cases (42.4% did not receive radiation. At a median follow-up period of 7.7 years (range 2–16 for the whole cohort, median time to locoregional recurrence (LRR was 3.3 years (range 0.7–12.4. The 5-year and 10-year actuarial LRR rate were 14.5% and 15.9%, respectively. At the multivariate analysis the factors that significantly correlated with survival outcome were ≥4 positive nodes (HR 5.0, 1.51–16.52; P=0.035, extracapsular extension (HR 2.18, 1.37–3.46; P=0.009, and estrogen receptor positive disease (HR 0.57, 0.36–0.90; P=0.003. Concerning LRR according to use of radiation, PMRT reduced LRR for patient with clinical T3 staged disease (P=0.015. Our experience confirmed the impact of pathological nodal involvement on survival outcome. PMRT was found to improve local control in patients presenting with clinical T3 tumors, regardless of the response to chemotherapy.

  10. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A phase II trial was designed to evaluate the toxicity and outcome of patients with locally advanced cervix cancer treated with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (AHFX). Methods and Materials: In this prospective trial, AHFX doses of 1.25 Gy were administered twice daily at least 6 hours apart to a total pelvic dose of 57.5 Gy. A booster dose was then administered via either low-dose rate brachytherapy or external beam therapy to a smaller volume. All patients were accrued and treated at Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute (PMCI) between 1986 until April 1991. Results: Sixty-one eligible patients were enrolled in this protocol; 2 (3.2%) had Stage IIB; 42 (68.9%) had Stage III; 8 (13.1%) had Stage IV and 9 (14.8%) had recurrent cervical cancer. Fifty-two patients (85%) completed the planned external beam without a treatment break. Thirty patients had acute toxicity that required regular medication. One patient died of acute treatment related toxicity. Fifty-five patients received booster therapy: 45 with intrauterine brachytherapy, 6 with interstitial brachytherapy, and 4 with external beam. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 6 years. Overall 5-year survival is 27% and 5-year relapse free survival is 36%. Nineteen patients died with pelvic disease and the actuarial local control rate was 66%. There were 8 severe late complications observed in 7 patients. Seven required surgical intervention (an actuarial rate of 27%). Five patients also required total hip replacement. Conclusions: The local control rate was favorable compared with other series that have used standard fractionation, although overall survival remained similar. The severe late complication rate was high for this protocol and higher than similar protocols reported in the literature

  11. Quality of life assessment with different radiotherapy schedules in palliative management of advanced carcinoma esophagus: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaveta Mehta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To investigate the quality of life (QOL of patients with advanced carcinoma esophagus treated with different palliative radiation schedules. Methods: Sixty-two consecutive patients with inoperable, non-metastatic carcinoma of the esophagus were randomly allocated to Arm-A (external radiotherapy 30 Gy/10 fractions + brachytherapy 12 Gy/two sessions, Arm-B (external radiotherapy 30 Gy /10 fractions and Arm-C (external radiotherapy 20Gy /five fractions. The QOL was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaire at presentation, after treatment and at 3 months follow-up. Results: The mean QOL score improved, in arm-A from 38 to 52 after treatment and 56 at 3 months, in arm-B from 30 to 44 after treatment and 55 at 3 months and in arm-C from 24 to 40 after treatment but decreased to 37 at 3 months. Improvement in dysphagia scores at the first follow-up was 46.1% in arm-A, 25.0% in arm-B and 22.6% in arm-C. The difference was maintained at 3 months, with maximum improvement in arm-A (57.6%. No significant differences were found between the three arms with regard to complications and additional procedures needed for relief of dysphagia. Conclusion: In comparison with external radiotherapy alone, external radiotherapy with intraluminal brachytherapy has shown a trend toward better QOL and consistent dysphagia relief without significant difference in adverse effects.

  12. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm3), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  13. Outcome of 289 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 289 patients who were treated either by radiotherapy alone (168 patients) or radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (121 patients) from Dec. 1999 to Dec. 2002 were entered into the database for analysis. Pathological types: squamous cancer (152), adenocarcinoma(74), squamoadenocarcinoma(2) and other types (2). 24 showed cancer unclassificable and 35 were diagnosed without pathological proof. Stages: 74 had III A and 215 III B stage disease. Among the 121 patients treated with combined modality, 24 were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, 78 radiotherapy after chemotherapy(C + R), and 19 radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy(R + C). In patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy or C + R, 38 received consolidation chemotherapy after induction treatment. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival, and the median survival were: 45% , 16% , 8%, and 16.2 months for all patients; 57%, 27%, 11%, and 21.7 months for stage IIIA; 41%, 12%, 7%, and 15.3 months for IIIB. By logrank test, clinical stage, KPS performance, tumor volume, hemoglobin level before treatment, consolidation chemotherapy, radiation dose, and response to treatment showed statistically dramatic impact on overall survival. The overall survival rate and median survival time were slightly higher in the combined group than in the radiotherapy alone group, but the difference is statistically insignificant. In Cox multivariable regression, stage and consolidation chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors; KPS performance, radiation dose, and response to treatment were at the margin of statistical significance. Esophagitis and pneumonitis of Grade II or higher were 24% and 8%, respectively. Failure sites included in the thorax(41%), outside of thorax(48%), and both in and outside the thorax(11%). There was no difference between the

  14. Quo Vadis Radiotherapy? Technological Advances and the Rising Problems in Cancer Management

    OpenAIRE

    Barry J Allen; Eva Bezak; Loredana G. Marcu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions t...

  15. Research advances in geriatric depression

    OpenAIRE

    Alexopoulos, George S.; KELLY JR., ROBERT E.

    2009-01-01

    Technical advances have facilitated the exploration of factors related to geriatric depression and have helped generate novel biological and psychosocial treatment approaches. This review summarizes the main advancements in epidemiology, clinical presentation and course, genetics, and other areas of biological research. Treatment interventions outlined in this paper include electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, magnetic seizure therapy, vagus nerve stimulati...

  16. Prostaglandin inhibitor and radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is the usual mode of treatment for unresectable head and neck cancer. To improve cure rates, extend survival, and reduce morbidity, we use accelerated hyperfractionation radiotherapy and an adjuvant drug to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis. In this study, 19 patients received 300 rad/day of radiotherapy in two equally divided doses to a total dose averaging 6,200 rad. Either indomethacin, 25 mg, or placebo was given four times a day in a double-blind fashion during therapy. Radiation mucositis was graded as 0 to 4+; pain, nutritional status, and tumor status were monitored daily and recorded biweekly. Evaluation of the data showed delayed mucositis in the experimental group for grades 1 to 3, with a significant difference at grade 3 compared with controls. The significance of a long-term comparison of cure rates would be doubtful considering the heterogeneity of the primary sites and regional disease in this group coupled with the small size of our study

  17. Precision Radiotherapy for Small Animal Research

    OpenAIRE

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Ford, Eric; Wong, John; KAZANZIDES, PETER

    2008-01-01

    Preclinical research using well characterized small animal models has provided tremendous benefits to medical research, enabling low cost, large scale trials with high statistical significance of observed effects. The goal of the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is to make those models available for the development and evaluation of novel radiation therapies. SARRP demonstrates the capabilities of delivering high resolution, sub-millimeter, optimally planned conformal radiatio...

  18. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  19. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  20. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  1. IMRT, IGRT, SBRT - Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, JL

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 4 years, IMRT, IGRT, SBRT: Advances in the Treatment Planning and Delivery of Radiotherapy has become a standard reference in the field. During this time, however, significant progress in high-precision technologies for the planning and delivery of radiotherapy in cancer treatment has called for a second edition to include these new developments. Thoroughly updated and extended, this new edition offers a comprehensive guide and overview of these new technologies and the many clinical treatment programs that bring them into practical use. Advances in intensity-modulated radiothera

  2. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars;

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  3. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R and D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R and D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC

  4. Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is focussed on the actual knowledge on the clinical radiotherapy and radio-oncology. Besides fundamental and general contributions specific organ systems are treated in detail. The book contains the following contributions: Basic principles, radiobiological fundamentals, physical background, radiation pathology, basics and technique of brachytherapy, methodology and technique of the stereotactic radiosurgery, whole-body irradiation, operative radiotherapy, hadron therapy, hpyerthermia, combined radio-chemo-therapy, biometric clinical studies, intensity modulated radiotherapy, side effects, oncological diagnostics; central nervous system and sense organs, head-neck carcinomas, breast cancer, thorax organs, esophagus carcinoma, stomach carcinoma, pancreas carcinoma, heptabiliary cancer and liver metastases, rectal carcinomas, kidney and urinary tract, prostate carcinoma, testicular carcinoma, female pelvis, lymphatic system carcinomas, soft tissue carcinoma, skin cancer, bone metastases, pediatric tumors, nonmalignant diseases, emergency in radio-oncology, supporting therapy, palliative therapy

  5. Translational research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Belardelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  6. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia for treatment of primary locally advanced cervix cancer: results in 378 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franckena, M.; Lutgens, L.C.; Koper, P.C.; Kleynen, C.E.; Steen-Banasik, E.M. van der; Jobsen, J.J.; Leer, J.W.H.; Creutzberg, C.L.; Dielwart, M.F.; Norden, Y. Van; Canters, R.A.; Rhoon, G.C. van; Zee, J. van der

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report response rate, pelvic tumor control, survival, and late toxicity after treatment with combined radiotherapy and hyperthermia (RHT) for patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (LACC) and compare the results with other published series. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 1996 to

  7. Adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin/UFT) after radiotherapy for locallu advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cancer, 40 patients, previously untreated (6 with stage III and 34 with stage IV; 26 with resectable, 10 with unresectable and 4 patients with inoperable) were treated with radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin /tegafur-uracil (UFT)) at our outpatient clinic. The primary site was identified in the larynx or hypopharynx in 15, oral cavity or oropharynx in 11, sinuses in 6, nasopharynx in 4, unknown primary in 3, and parotis in 1 patient. Treatment consisted of 6 courses of Nedaplatin 80 mg/m2 repeated at 4 weeks intervals, and one-year oral administration of UFTE 400mg/day, after radiotherapy. Toxicities included leukopenia (grade 3, 20.5%, grade 4, 2.6%), thrombocytopenia (grade 3, 7.7%). There was one death due to gastric ulcer. Twenty-five patients (62.5%) received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy. Two-year overall survival rate was 100% for stage III and 61.1% for stage IV. Over the same period, the progression-free survival rate was 83.3% for stage III and 46.1% for stage IV. 85.7% of complete response (CR) (12/14 patients) and 63.6% of partial response (PR) (14/22 patients) to radiotherapy showed that the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy. If the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy, the two-year progression free survival rate was not different between 81.8% for CR to radiotherapy and 81.3% for PR. The rate of distant failure was 2.5%, which was lower than that citedin previous reports. This adjuvant chemotherapy regimen is tolerable at outpatient clinics and might suppress distant metastasis after radiotherapy. (author)

  8. Combined modality treatment including intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Treatment of locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer usually has a high local recurrence rate and poor survival. Promising results have been reported by combined external radiotherapy, extensive surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT). Methods: One hundred fifteen patients with locally advanced rectal cancers fixed to the pelvic wall or locally recurrent rectal cancers underwent preoperative external radiotherapy with 46-50 Gy. Six to 8 weeks later radical pelvic surgery was attempted, and was combined with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (15-20 Gy) in 66 patients. The patients were followed closely to evaluate complication rate, local and distant recurrence rate and survival. Results: Surgery with no macroscopic tumour remaining was obtained in 65% of the patients with no postoperative deaths. Pelvic infection was the major complication (21%). Although the observation time is short (3-60 months), the local recurrence rate seems low (22%) and survival seems promising (about 60% at 4 years) in patients with complete tumour resection, in contrast to patients with residual tumour (none living at 4 years). Conclusions: The combined modality treatment with preoperative external radiotherapy and extensive pelvic surgery with IORT is sufficiently promising to start a randomized trial on the clinical value of IORT as a boost treatment in the multidisciplinary approach to this disease

  9. Treatment results of preoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and nine patients with advanced head and neck cancers (oral cavity: 50, oropharynx: 11, hypopharynx: 18, larynx: 30) received preoperative radiotherapy from 1987 through 1997 in our institute. The median age was 66 years (20-83). Almost all patients had advanced disease (stage II: 17, III: 34, IV: 58). The median dose of preoperative radiotherapy was 40 Gy (20-50). Seventy patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time was 30 months. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates of all patients were 66% and 56%, respectively. The 5-year locoregional and distant failure rates were 36% and 10%, respectively. The locoregional failure rate of oral cavity cancer (54%) was worse than those of other sites (13-28%) (p=0.0015). The locoregional failure rates of oral cavity cancers according to clinical stage were 59% (II), 57% (III) and 48% (IV), respectively. Incidentally those of other sites were 0% (II), 16% (III) and 30% (IV), respectively. Thirty-eight patients had major complication after surgery. The locoregional failure rates of preoperative radiotherapy following surgery for oral cavity cancers of all stages and other sites of stage IV were high. Preoperative radiotherapy should be stopped and postoperative radiotherapy for these patients should be considered. (author)

  10. Erectile function following external beam radiotherapy for clinically organ-confined or locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (XRT) has been a standard treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. However, preservation of erectile function following XRT is controversial. In this study, the influence of XRT on erectile function of patients with clinically organ-confined or locally advanced prostate cancer was retrospectively evaluated. The study included 34 of 84 patients with organ-confined or locally advanced prostate cancer who underwent XRT between 1995 and 2002. Erectile function following radiotherapy was assessed by a simple mailed questionnaire that was constructed for the study. To determine the predictive factors for erectile dysfunction following radiotherapy, data were analyzed by multivariate analysis with the Cox proportional hazards model. The modality of XRT was the only factor to independently predict erectile dysfunction following XRT. The maintenance rates of erectile function were 47.6% at 1 year and 19% at 3 years in patients who received the 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, which were significantly higher than in those who received conventional radiotherapy (P=0.026). XRT significantly reduced the maintenance rate of erectile function during the follow-up period, with the rate being 19% at 3 years in patients who received 3-dimensional conformal radiation. The XRT modality was involved in the reduction of erectile function. These results suggest that erectile dysfunction is a possible adverse event following XRT. (author)

  11. Advanced research in data privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Torra, Vicenç

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the research work on data privacy and privacy enhancing technologies carried by the participants of the ARES project. ARES (Advanced Research in Privacy an Security, CSD2007-00004) has been one of the most important research projects funded by the Spanish Government in the fields of computer security and privacy. It is part of the now extinct CONSOLIDER INGENIO 2010 program, a highly competitive program which aimed to advance knowledge and open new research lines among top Spanish research groups. The project started in 2007 and will finish this 2014. Composed by 6 research groups from 6 different institutions, it has gathered an important number of researchers during its lifetime. Among the work produced by the ARES project, one specific work package has been related to privacy. This books gathers works produced by members of the project related to data privacy and privacy enhancing technologies. The presented works not only summarize important research carried in the proje...

  12. Nedaplatin and 5-fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted a pilot study of nedaplatin+5-fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with radiotherapy for 29 patients with primary advanced (stage IV) esophageal cancer. A complete remission (CR) was obtained in 4 (14%) and a partial response in 13 patients (response rate: 59%). The median survival time and one-year survival rate were 238 days and 34.5%, respectively. Of the 29 patients, 24 (83%) completed the treatment schedule and toxicity of stomatitis and the like was infrequent. In conclusion, these results suggest that the efficacy of nedaplatin+5-FU combined with radiotherapy might not differ from that of cisplatin+5-FU combined with radiotherapy. Clearly, the usefulness of this combined therapy needs to be assessed in multicenter phase III trials. (author)

  13. Selected advances in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several findings emanating from materials research that should have a beneficial impact on technological advancement in the future are described. The report deals with the GRAPHNOL, a new class of high-temperature brazing alloy for joining refractory components, gel-sphere-pac process for manufacture of nuclear fuel, and noble-metal fuel cladding for service in radioisotope thermoelectric generators designed to provide auxiliary power aboard spacecraft for planetary exploration

  14. Palliative radiotherapy in asymptomatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable, non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1983 and 1990, 332 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were referred to short-time, split-course palliative thoracic radiotherapy. The group consisted of patients with locally advanced (IIIo), unresectable cancer, not suitable for curative radiotherapy, asymptomatic or having only minimal symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The therapeutic plan involved two series of irradiation. Tumor dose delivered in each series was 20 Gy given in five daily fractions over five treatment days. There were four weeks interval between series. Of 332 patients initially qualified to thoracic radiotherapy only 170 patients received the treatment; the other 162 patients were not irradiated because of treatment refusal or logistic problems concerning therapy. They made the control group of the study, receiving the best possible symptomatic care. Twelve-month survivals in the radiotherapy and control groups were 32.4% and 9.3%, respectively; 24-month survivals 11.2% and 0%, respectively. Improvement of survival after palliative thoracic radiotherapy was observed only in patients with clinical stage IIIA and Karnofsky's performance status (KPS) ≥ 70. (orig.)

  15. Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery – A comparative effectiveness research study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective outcome study was to validate the effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy in breast conserving therapy (BCT) and to evaluate possible causes for omission of radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery (BCS) in a non-trial population. Methods: Data were provided by the population-based Munich Cancer Registry. The study included epidemiological data of 30.811 patients diagnosed with breast cancer from 1998 to 2012. The effect of omitting radiotherapy was analysed using Kaplan–Meier-estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression. Variables predicting omission of radiotherapy were analysed using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Use of postoperative radiotherapy after BCS was associated with significant improvements in local control and survival. 10-year loco-regional recurrence-free-survival was 90.8% with postoperative radiotherapy vs. 77.6% with surgery alone (p < 0.001). 10-year overall survival rates were 55.2% with surgery alone vs. 82.2% following postoperative radiotherapy (p < 0.001). Variables predicting omission of postoperative radiotherapy included advanced age (women ⩾80 years; OR: 0.082; 95% CI: 0.071–0.094, p < 0.001). Conclusions: This study shows a decrease in local control and a survival disadvantage if postoperative radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery is omitted in an unselected cohort of primary breast cancer patients. Due to its epidemiological nature, it cannot answer the question in whom postoperative radiotherapy can be safely omitted

  16. Acute and long-term toxicity following radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, JH; Pras, E; Willemse, PHB; de Vries, EGE

    2003-01-01

    Randomised studies in locally advanced cervical cancer patients showed that cisplatin should be given concurrently with radiotherapy, because of a better long-term survival compared to radiotherapy alone. This increases the relevance of treatment related toxicity. This review summarises the acute an

  17. Advances in stem cell research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@In 1998, biologists Thomson and Gearhart successfully derived stem cells from human embryos. One year later, several researchers discovered that adult stem cells still retain the ability to be differentiated into unrelated types of cells. Advances in stem cell research open a promising direction for applied medical science. Moreover, it may also force scientists to reconsider the fundamental theory about how cells grow up. Stem cell research was considered by Science as the top of the ten breakthroughs of science of the year[1]. This paper gives a survey of recent advances in stem cell research. 1 Overview In the 1980s, embryonic stem cell and/or embryonic germ cell line (ES cell line, EG cell line) of multifarious mammalian animals, especially those of non-human pri-mates, had been established. In 1998, Thomson and Shamblott obtained ES, EG cell lines from human blasto-cysts and gonad ridges of early human embryos, respec-tively. Their research brought up an ethical debate about whether human embryos can be used as experimental materials. It was not appeased until 1999 when research-ers discovered that stem cells from adults still retain the ability to become different kinds of tissue cells. For in-stance, brain cells can become blood cells[2], and cells from bone marrow can become cells in liver. Scientists believe, for a long time, that cells can only be developed from early pluripotent embryo cells; the differentiation potential of stem cells from mature tissues is restricted to only one of the cell types of the tissue where stem cells are obtained. Recent stem cell researches, however, sub-verted the traditional view of stem cells. These discoveries made scientists speed ahead with the work on adult stem cells, hoping to discover whether their promise will rival that of ES cells.

  18. Radiotherapy combined with cetuximab for locally advanced head and neck cancer: Results and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. - To describe the clinical results and tolerance of the combined treatment with radiotherapy and cetuximab for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and methods. - From August 2006 and October 2010, 36 patients with advanced squamous cell head and neck carcinoma were treated with radiotherapy (70 Gy/35 fractions) and cetuximab (400 mg/m2 one week before radiotherapy, following by 250 mg/m2 once weekly, until week 7 of radiotherapy). Tolerance was evaluated every week. All patients were examined every 3 months the first 3 years after therapy, and then every year. Results. - The median follow-up was 14 months. The majority of patients were male (31 out of 36). Mean age was 59 years. The tumours sites were: oral cavity (n 8); oropharynx (n = 15); hypopharynx (n = 5); larynx (n = 8). Ninety percent of tumors were T3 or T4, and 45% were N2 or N3. Complete response was seen in 74% of patients, partial response in 17% and no response in 9% of patients. The overall survival was 44.4%. Relapse occurred in six patients. Anaphylactic reaction during the first infusion of cetuximab was observed in one patient. One patient developed severe aplasia after 48 Gy and 5 weeks of cetuximab, and died of sepsis. Eighty percent of patients presented acne, 16 patients developed a mucositis grade 2-3 and 23 patients a grade 2 skin reaction. Conclusion. - The concomitant use of cetuximab and radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma is well tolerated in this group of patients. The results seem comparable to those in the literature. (authors)

  19. Radioprotectors in radiotherapy - advances in the potential application of phytochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szejk, Magdalena; Kołodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Żbikowska, Halina Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, in addition to chemotherapy, is currently the primary method of cancer treatment based on destruction of malignant cells by ionizing radiation. Unfortunately, it also affects normal cells, which is associated with negative consequences for a patient. Radioprotectors are compounds used to prevent/protect the non-tumor cells from the harmful effects of radiation. To play their role these compounds should meet several criteria; among others, they should significantly protect normal cells from radiation without changing the tumor cell radiosensitivity. In general, agents used to alter normal tissue toxicity from radiation can be broadly divided into three categories based on timing of delivery in relation to radiation: chemical radioprotectors, mitigators, and treatment. These groups include a diverse range of synthetic compounds in terms of their structure and protective mechanisms. The aminoradiothiol amifostine is the only radioprotectant approved in clinical application. However, its use is limited due to toxicity concerns (it may cause hypotension). Natural compounds, derived from plants, meet all criteria of the ideal radioprotector. They exert their protective actions against adverse effects of ionizing radiation by several mechanisms. Plant compounds that show radioprotective activity include flavonoids and phenolic acids, stilbenes, lycopene, alkaloids, peptides, polysaccharides, and phytohormones. Garlic, green tea, apples, citrus, and ginger are examples of constituents of the human diet that contain radioprotective substances. PMID:27356603

  20. Radiotherapy in combination with simultaneous intra-arterial chemotherapy (RADPLAT) in patients with advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particular challenge for both laryngologists and oncologists is presented by the fact that treatment of patients in advanced stages of cancer disease, in whom either combined therapy (surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy) or radiotherapy alone have been applied, is associated with highly dissatisfying results. Clinical trials exploring the application of chemotherapy combined with simultaneous radiotherapy are arousing greater interest. This is because the results of recently published randomised prospective studies and meta analyses show improved loco-regional results of this treatment strategy, which in turn improves overall survival. Cytostatic drugs used in conjunction with radiotherapy have many functions but, above all, their purpose is to intensify the effects of irradiation which, in such treatment schemes, is the leading method. One of the basic factors limiting the application of such strategies is the problem of how to limit the toxicity from one side, while administering a sufficiently high dose of cytostatics, and to continue without any gaps the course of radiation from the other. A problem associated with combined therapy is how to ensure the highest concentration of cytostatics is in the malignant tumour. The need to break through both of these limiting factors has become the subject of intensive research. One of the possible solutions to these problems is the simultaneous application of irradiation in combination with selective intra-arterial chemotherapy. To date, final results are still unavailable from phase III clinical trials which are investigating this treatment method. Presented in this paper are the advantages and disadvantages in the treatment strategy called the RADPLAT programme. The RADPLAT programme is characterised by great local effects, somewhat lesser regional effects and still lesser effects in the treatment of micro-metastases. Research is continuing, in order to find methods for the improvement of treatment results, with a view

  1. Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: How Can it Benefit from Advancing Technology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kron

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There have been significant technological and technical advances in radiotherapy over the last 20 years. This paper presents the pertinent advances and examines their application in contemporary breast cancer (BC radiotherapy, particularly for reducing the long-term toxicity, using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy, and management of breathing motion. These modern technologies and techniques enable precise delivery of a highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the target volume in real-time, to optimise tumour control, and minimise treatment toxicity. They have been used for the treatment of BC in selected centres around the world. Although there is insufficient high-level evidence to support their routine application in BC at present, implementation of these technologies has been shown to be feasible, and could result in clinically meaningful long-term benefits for selected patients with BC.

  2. Remote afterloading high dose-rate intracavity radiotherapy for advanced maxillary cancer. Treatment with individual appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven advanced maxillary cancers, 5 squamous cell carcinomas, and 2 adenoid cystic carcinomas were treated with remote afterloading high dose-rate intracavity radiotherapy. For treatment, we fabricated individual dental acrylic appliances for the postoperative area of the oral cavity. Because the appliance was specially matched to the remaining maxillary structures, radiation doses to the treated area were easily reproduced without distress to the patient. However, minor or major complications (moderate or severe mucositis and osteoradionecrosis) were observed in all patients. In this study, the number of patients was too small to assess the significance of this treatment. Nevertheless, with improvements, we think that remote afterloading high dose-rate intracavity radiotherapy with a dental acrylic appliance will soon be used to treat advanced maxillary carcinoma. (author)

  3. Phase I trial of concomitant hyperfractionated radiotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Allal, Abdelkarim Said; Zwahlen, Daniel; Becker, Minerva; Dulguerov, Pavel; Mach, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose of docetaxel when administered concomitantly with radical hyperfractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  4. Clinical Outcome of Palliative Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Symptomatic Gastric Cancer in the Modern Era

    OpenAIRE

    Tey, Jeremy; Choo, Bok Ai; Leong, Cheng Nang; Loy, En Yun; Wong, Lea Choung; Lim, Keith; Lu, Jiade Jay; Koh, Wee Yao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of patients with symptomatic locally advanced/recurrent gastric cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) using modern 3-dimensional conformal techniques. We retrospectively reviewed patients who had palliative RT for index symptoms of gastric bleeding, pain, and obstruction. Study endpoints included symptom response, median survival, and treatment toxicity. Of 115 patients with median age of 77 years, 78 (67.8%) patients had metastati...

  5. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Hsing-Lung; Chang Ying-Nan; Lin Yaoh-Shiang; Lin Chun-Shu; Su Yu-Fu; Chen Chang-Ming; Jen Yee-Min; Huang Wen-Yen; Lin Kuen-Tze; Chang Li-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate wer...

  6. Evaluation of salivary function by sialoscintigraphy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer patients after intensity modulated radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    T. L. Chuang; Y.F. Wang; C H Tsai; J E Chiu; Lee, M. S.; W Y Chiou; Lin, H Y; W T Tsai; S K Hung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the salivary gland function changes by sialoscintigraphy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials And Methods: Salivary function was assessed by sialoscintigraphy. Quantitative sialoscintigraphy was performed in 24 NPC patients prior to and after IMRT. Results were categorized in four groups according to the duration of treatment. The sialoscintigraphy parameters were examined. Results: Sialo...

  7. The results of accelerated radiotherapy and concomitant cisplatin administration in advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accelerated radiotherapy and concomitant infusion of cisplatin in low doses was evaluated in 15 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oral part of pharynx. Clinical complete response was seen in 6 of 15 patients (40%) and 4 patients (26.6%) were alive 12 months with no evidence of disease, of all group of 15 patients 9 (60%) were alive 12 months after treatment. (author)

  8. Advanced head and neck cancer: Long-term results of chemo-radiotherapy, complications and induction of second malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Munker, Reinhold; Purmale, L.; Aydemir, Ü.; Reitmeier, M.; Pohlmann, H.; Schorer, H.; Hartenstein, R.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Chemo-radiotherapy is superior to radiotherapy alone in the treatment of advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. The long-term treatment results, the induction of second malignant tumors, and other long-term toxicities are not well defined. Patients and Methods: 100 consecutive patients with advanced head and neck cancer who were treated at our center were studied. Treatment results, survival, the occurrence of late complications, and second malignant tumors (SMT) were investig...

  9. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  10. Quo Vadis Radiotherapy? Technological Advances and the Rising Problems in Cancer Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Despite the latest technological advances in radiotherapy, cancer control is still challenging for several tumour sites. The survival rates for the most deadly cancers, such as ovarian and pancreatic, have not changed over the last decades. The solution to the problem lies in the change of focus: from local treatment to systemic therapy. The aim of this paper is to present the current status as well as the gaps in radiotherapy and, at the same time, to look into potential solutions to improve cancer control and survival. Methods. The currently available advanced radiotherapy treatment techniques have been analysed and their cost-effectiveness discussed. The problem of systemic disease management was specifically targeted. Results. Clinical studies show limited benefit in cancer control from hadron therapy. However, targeted therapies together with molecular imaging could improve treatment outcome for several tumour sites while controlling the systemic disease. Conclusion. The advances in photon therapy continue to be competitive with the much more expensive hadron therapy. To justify the cost effectiveness of proton/heavy ion therapy, there is a need for phase III randomised clinical trials. Furthermore, the success of systemic disease management lies in the fusion between radiation oncology technology and microbiology.

  11. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  12. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  13. Comparison of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and sequential chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Prospective comparison was done on concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and sequential chemo-radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate three different regimens of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy. Methods: Ninety-six such patients were randomized into four groups: 1. sequential chemo-radiotherapy group received two cycles of induction chemotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin on D 1-3, 29-31 and 100 mg/m2 of etoposide on D 1-3, 29-31 before conventional radiotherapy, 2. concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 1 received 100 mg/m2 etoposide on D 1-3 and DDP 40 mg/m2 on D 1-3, D 29-31, iv. drip, 3. concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 2 received concurrent chemotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of paclitaxel every Monday during conventional radiotherapy, 4. concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 3 received concurrent chemotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of paclitaxel every Monday during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. All patients were irradiated with 2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week, to a total dose of 60 -64 Gy. They all received two cycles of consolidation themotherapy with 40 mg/m2 of cisplatin on D 1-3 and 100 mg/m2 of etoposide on D 1-3. Results: The overall response rate was 67%, 71%, 71% and 79% for sequential chemo-radiotherapy group, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 1, 2 and 3, respectively. There was a significant difference between the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy and sequential chemo-radiotherapy(P0.05) also was the difference of toxicity (P>0.05), but the severe toxicity of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy groups 1 and 2 were higher than the sequential chemo-radio-therapy group and concurrent chemo-radiotherapy group 3. Conclusions: Better locoregional progression-free survival and overall survival of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer could be achieved by concurrent chemo-radiotherapy as compared with sequential chemo-radiotherapy though at the expense of in- crease in toxicity. With the combination of

  14. The new advances in radiotherapy technique challenges of quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What is Quality Assurance (QA)? This is all those planned and systematic actions necessary to provide confidence that a product or service will satisfy given requirements for quality. ISO 9000. It is the overall process which is supported by quality control activities. While, quality control describes the actual mechanisms and procedures by which one can assure quality. Consequences for radiotherapy A good acceptance testing and commissioning program is fundamental for any QA activities QA applies to both physical and clinical aspects of the treatment Treatment records must be kept of all relevant aspects of the treatment - including -Session and Summary Record information -Records all treatment parameters -Dose Calculations -Dose Measurements Particular emphasis is placed on QA of dosimetry A QA system itself and its outcomes must be critically reviewed. External audits are recommended to verify that the checks are not only done but that they also achieve what they are supposed to do Every good system requires an independent look at times A Comprehensive QA Program typically comprises Quality Assurance Committee, Policies and Procedures Manual, Quality Assurance team, Quality audit, Resources Introduction,..OBI in general. The On-Board Imager system is designed to correct for motion and setup errors of patients undergoing radiation therapy. It provides three imaging modes: Two-dimensional 2-D radiographic acquisition, Fluoroscopic image acquisition, and Three-dimensional 3-D cone-beam computed tomography CBCT acquisition. The fluoroscopic images are used to verify the gating thresholds of the respiratory gating system to account for intra-fraction i.e. respiratory motion. The radiographic images manage inter-fractional motion and setup errors. Using the 2D2DMatch and 3D3DMatch analysis tools a user can register the acquired kV or CBCT images with their associated reference image like DRR or planning CT for CBCT. Couch corrections are then downloaded to the linear

  15. Induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the efficacy and toxicities of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: From Oct. 1997 to Nov. 2000, 77 patients with histologically proven locally advanced NPC, staged according to the Fuzhou stage classification, were retrospectively studied. Before radical radio- therapy, the patients received 1-3 cycles cisplatin(PDD) 20 mg/m2 on Days 1-3 and fluorouracil(5-Fu) 500 nag/ma on Days 1-3 repeated every two weeks. Sixty-two patients also received calcium folinate (CF) 100 mg/m2 on Days 1-3. Two to four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy was given 21 days after the completion of radiotherapy. All patients received radical radiotherapy by 60 Co to the nasopharynx and neck with a total dose of 64-78 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction over 7.0-7. 5 weeks to the primary site. The dose to the lymph nodes was 60-68 Gy. After-loading radiotherapy was given to the residual disease in 1 patient (20 Gy in 2 fractions). Results: The median follow-up was 60 months (ranged from 3 to 103 months). The 5-year overall urvival rate (OS), disease-free survival rate (DFS), relapse-free survival rate (RFS) and distant metastasis-free survival rate (DMSF) were 68%, 58%, 81% and 75%. The patients who received more than 3 cycles of chemotherapy or not had no significant effects on the OS (χ2=0.05, P=0.831). The incidence of grade 3 or 4 acute side-effects of radiotherapy was vomiting 1%, leukopenia 3%, mucositis 23% and skin reaction 5%, all of which eventually resolved. The most frequent late toxicities were hearing impairment (51% ). Patients with more than 3 cycles chemotherapy were more likely to have late hearing loss (z=2.06, P=0.039). Only one patient had radiation-induced brain damage. Conclusions: Induction chemo- therapy, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma would result in a comparable outcome, but may

  16. Adjuvant radiotherapy for pathologically advanced prostate cancer a randomized clinical trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian, M.; Thompson, J.R.; Catherine, M.; Tangen, P.H.; Paradelo, J.; Scott Lucia, M.; Miller, G.; Troyer, D.; Messing, E.; Forman, J.; Chin, J.; Swanson, G.; Canby-Hagino, E.; Crawford, E.D

    2008-01-15

    Context - Despite a stage-shift to earlier cancer stages and lower tumor volumes for prostate cancer, pathologically advanced disease is detected at radical prostatectomy in 38% to 52% of patients. However, the optimal management of these patients after radical prostatectomy is unknown. Objective - To determine whether adjuvant radiotherapy improves metastasis-free survival in patients with stage pT3 NO MO prostate cancer. Design, Setting, and Patients - Randomized, prospective, multi-institutional, US clinical trial with enrollment between August 15, 1988, and January 1, 1997 (with database frozen for statistical analysis on September 21, 2005). Patients were 425 men with pathologically advanced prostate cancer who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Intervention - Men were randomly assigned to receive 60 to 64 Gy of external beam radiotherapy delivered to the prostatic fossa (n = 214) or usual care plus observation (n = 211). Main Outcome Measures - Primary outcome was metastasis-free survival, defined as time to first occurrence of metastatic disease or death due to any cause. Secondary outcomes included prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse, recurrence-free survival, overall survival, freedom from hormonal therapy, and postoperative complications. Results - Among the 425 men, median follow-up was 10.6 years (inter-quartile range, 9.2-12.7 years). For metastasis-free survival,76 (35.5%) of 214 men in the adjuvant radiotherapy group were diagnosed with metastatic disease or died (median metastasis-free estimate, 14.7 years), compared with 91 (43.1%) of 211 (median metastasis-free estimate, 13.2 years) of those in the observation group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.55-1.02; P = .06). There were no significant between-group differences for overall survival (71 deaths, median survival of 14.7 years for radiotherapy vs 83 deaths, median survival of 13.8 years for observation; HR, 0.80; 95% Cl, 0.58-1.09; P =.16). PSA relapse (median PSA relapse-free survival

  17. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy should not be a standard approach for locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This study cites all known literature on the subject in the English language. Articles were selected for analysis by MEDLINE and CANCERLINE computer searches. In Phase II trials, the response rates of some selective series were analyzed. However, This article will specially emphasize the result of all Phase III randomized trials. Results: Several investigators did obtain promising results from Phase II trials of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mostly cisplatin-based combinations, followed by radiotherapy. However, most Phase III trials failed to demonstrate any benefit in terms of loco-regional relapse and/or survival by up-front chemotherapy. Conclusion: The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy remains to be defined, and the search for more active new agents must be continued. The neoadjuvant setting is still experimental and could not be recommended as a standard treatment at the present

  18. Superselective intraarterial chemotherapy and concurrent radiotherapy in advanced tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We clarified the efficacy of superselective intraarterial concurrent chemoradiotherapy (IA-CRT) for preserving organs in locally advanced squamous cell tongue carcinoma. Subjects most of whom had subtotal glossectomy indications, numbered 20 with untreated T2 (4 pts) T3 (11 pts), or T4 (5 pts) carcinoma and undergoing 60 to 70 Gy of irradiation (median total dose: 66 Gy) concurrently with 2 cycles of 5FU chemotherapy in 1000 mg/m2, continuous 120-hour infusion, and 60 mg/m2 of cisplatin was delivered to the lingual artery using the Seldinger technique via the femoral artery. In acute toxicity exceeding than grade 3, mucositis (13 pts) was more serious than leucopenia (4 pts), anemia (1 pt), or diarrhea (1 pt) of the 20, 19 underwent scheduled treatment. Response was good at 95% for local regions and 79% for cervical lymphnodes. Three-year overall survival (OS) was 61% and progression-free survival (PFS) 49% in median follow-up at 35 months (range: 9 to 75 months). A statistically difference existed in three-year OS and PFS: 82-60% for T2-3 and 33% and 0% for T4. Two subjects (T3, T4) underwent received down staging surgery in which half of the tongue was removed with neck dissection, and 1 underwent selective neck dissection alone to preserve the primary site. One was found to have no residual tumor. One underwent postoperative contralateral neck dissection. These three subjects remain alive without recurrence postoperatively. Failure patterns occurred in two subjects with local recurrence and two with post-IA-CRT regional lymphnode recurrence without salvage surgery. All without post-IA-CRT recurrence with or without surgery maintained quality of life (QOL) in swallowing and articulation. IA-CRT can be thus an alternative in treating, T3 to T4 tongue in subjects refusing surgery. (author)

  19. Hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy followed by radical surgery in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeller, U. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine, Vivantes Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Biertz, I.; Tribius, S.; Alberti, W. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Univ. Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Flinzberg, S.; Schmelzle, R. [Dept. of Dental, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Univ. Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the outcome of hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy and subsequent planned primary tumor resection and radical neck dissection in locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity. Patients and Methods: this retrospective analysis evaluates 126 subsequent patients who were treated between 1988 and 1997 for locally advanced tumors of the oral cavity (with extension into the oropharynx in 17 patients), 34 (27%) AJCC stage III and 92 (73%) stage IV. Primary tumor and nodal metastases were irradiated with 1.4 Gy bid to a median total dose of 72.8 Gy (range 58.8-75.6 Gy). Then, planned radical surgery of the primary site according to the initial tumor extent and cervical nodes was performed. Median follow-up of living patients was 6 years (range 1-11 years). Results: 4 weeks after radiotherapy, 14 patients (11%) had complete tumor remission, 92 (73%) partial remission, 15 (12%) no change, and five (4%) progressive disease. Complete resection was achieved in 117 (93%) patients (nine incomplete resections). 5-year locoregional control rate was 62 {+-} 9%, overall survival 36 {+-} 9%. Surgery-related morbidity occurred in 42 patients (33%; mainly delayed wound healing and fistulae), overall severe treatment-related morbidity in 46 patients (36%). 24/84 relapse-free patients (29%) required a percutaneous gastrostomy or nasal tube {>=} 1 year after therapy. Conclusion: in this study, the outcome of combined curative radiotherapy and planned surgery of the primary tumor and neck nodes was comparable to reported results of hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without salvage surgery of the neck nodes with respect to locoregional control and overall survival. Planned surgery carries a substantial risk of morbidity and seems to offer no benefit in comparison to salvage surgery of the neck nodes only. Therefore, salvage surgery is preferred. (orig.)

  20. 32 CFR 37.1210 - Advanced research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advanced research. 37.1210 Section 37.1210... research. Research that creates new technology or demonstrates the viability of applying existing technology to new products and processes in a general way. Advanced research is most closely analogous...

  1. Biologically Weighted Quantities in Radiotherapy: an EMRP Joint Research Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabus Hans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Funded within the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP [1], the joint research project “Biologically weighted quantities in radiotherapy” (BioQuaRT [2] aims to develop measurement and simulation techniques for determining the physical properties of ionising particle tracks on different length scales (about 2 nm to 10 μm, and to investigate the correlation of these track structure characteristics with the biological effects of radiation at the cellular level. Work package 1 develops micro-calorimeter prototypes for the direct measurement of lineal energy and will characterise their response for different ion beams by experiment and modelling. Work package 2 develops techniques to measure particle track structure on different length scales in the nanometre range as well as a measurement device integrating a silicon microdosimeter and a nanodosimeter. Work package 3 investigates the indirect effects of radiation based on probes for quantifying particular radical and reactive oxygen species (ROS. Work package 4 focuses on the biological aspects of radiation damage and will produce data on initial DNA damage and late effects for radiotherapy beams of different qualities. Work package 5 provides evaluated data sets of DNA cross-sections and develops a multi-scale model to address microscopic and nanometric track structure properties. The project consortium includes three linked researchers holding so-called Researcher Excellence Grants, who carry out ancillary investigations such as developing and benchmarking a new biophysical model for induction of early radiation damage and developing methods for the translation of quantities derived from particle track structure to clinical applications in ion beam therapy.

  2. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of ≥10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL

  3. Results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and thalidomide for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and thalidomide in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Between 1999 and 2003, 121 patients (mean age, 54.4±12.4 years; range, 20-81 years) with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and thalidomide. Radiation was delivered in 1.5 Gy fractions twice daily for 5 days a week, for a total dose of 45-75 Gy. Mean treatment volume was 429.52±408.50 cm3 (range, 26.89-2284.82 cm3). Thalidomide was given concomitantly: 200 mg/day in 109 patients, 300 mg/day in 8 patients and 400 mg/day in 4 patients. Treatment responses, survival rates and factors affecting survival were analyzed. Treatment responses were observed in 61% of the patients. Liver cirrhosis (P=0.001) and tumor size (P=0.001) significantly affected the tumor responses. Overall survival at 6, 12 and 24 months was 84.8, 60.0 and 44.6%, respectively. On univariate analysis, liver cirrhosis (P=0.003), Karnofsky performance status (P=0.007), tumor size (P<0.001), portal vein tumor thrombosis (P<0.001) and alpha-fetoprotein level (P=0.003) were shown to significantly affect survival. On multivariate analysis, only thrombosis (P=0.039) and alpha-fetoprotein level (P=0.006) were shown to be factors affecting survival. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with thalidomide seems to be effective in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. (author)

  4. Sequencing chemotherapy and radiotherapy in locoregional advanced breast cancer patients after mastectomy – a retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combined chemo- and radiotherapy are established in breast cancer treatment. Chemotherapy is recommended prior to radiotherapy but decisive data on the optimal sequence are rare. This retrospective analysis aimed to assess the role of sequencing in patients after mastectomy because of advanced locoregional disease. A total of 212 eligible patients had a stage III breast cancer and had adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after mastectomy and axillary dissection between 1996 and 2004. According to concerted multi-modality treatment strategies 86 patients were treated sequentially (chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy) (SEQgroup), 70 patients had a sandwich treatment (SW-group) and 56 patients had simultaneous chemoradiation (SIM-group) during that time period. Radiotherapy comprised the thoracic wall and/or regional lymph nodes. The total dose was 45–50.4 Gray. As simultaneous chemoradiation CMF was given in 95.4% of patients while in sequential or sandwich application in 86% and 87.1% of patients an anthracycline-based chemotherapy was given. Concerning the parameters nodal involvement, lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular spread and extension of the irradiated region the three treatment groups were significantly imbalanced. The other parameters, e.g. age, pathological tumor stage, grading and receptor status were homogeneously distributed. Looking on those two groups with an equally effective chemotherapy (EC, FEC), the SEQ- and SW-group, the sole imbalance was the extension of LVI (57.1 vs. 25.6%, p < 0.0001). 5-year overall- and disease free survival were 53.2%/56%, 38.1%/32% and 64.2%/50%, for the sequential, sandwich and simultaneous regime, respectively, which differed significantly in the univariate analysis (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, log-rank test). Also the 5-year locoregional or distant recurrence free survival showed no significant differences according to the sequence of chemo- and radiotherapy. In the multivariate analyses the sequence had no

  5. Combined Chemoradiotherapy vs Radiotherapy Alone for Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyeon Ju; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Chul Soo; Kim, Re Hwe; Kim, Sung Rok [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Purpose : The traditional approach with surgery and/or radiotherapy(RT) for advanced head and neck cancer provides anticipated cure rates of 10-65% depending on stages and sites. Recently, combined modality with chemotherapy have been extensively investigated in attempts to improve survival and local control. We retrospectively analysed our experience of 31 patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials : From November 1983 to October 1994, 31 patients with Stage II and IV squamous cell head and neck cancer were treated with RT. Sixteen patients were treated with RT alone. and 15 patients were treated with combined RT plus chemotherapy. All patients were treated with 4-MV LINAC and radiation dose ranged from 5000 cGy to 7760 cGy(median 7010 cGy). In combined group. 7 patients were treated with cis-platin plus 5-FU, 2 patients were treated with methotrexate plus leucovorin plus 5-FU plus cisplatin or carboplatin, and 6 patients were treated with cisplatin as a radiosensitizer. Results : Median follow up period was 16 months (range 4-134 months). The major responses (CR+PR) were noted in 10 patient (66.6%) of the RT alone group and 14 patient (93.3%) of the chemoradiation group. There was no statistical difference in CR rate between the two groups. The overall survival rates at 5 years were 23.4% in the radiation alone group. 23.5% in the chemoradiation group. Disease-free survival rates at 3 year were 44.5% in the radiation alone group. 40% in the chemoradiation group. There was no statistical differences in overall survival rates and disease free survival rates between the two groups. Local recurrences occurred in 71.5% of the radiation alone group. 72.7% of the chemoradiation group and distant metastasis occurred in 14.4% of radiation alone group. 9.1% of the chemoradiation group. The frequencies of complications were comparable in both groups except hematologic toxicity. Conclusion : Total response rates in the combined chemotherapy and

  6. The Role of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Portal Vein Thrombosis from Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the role of radiotherapy for the treatment of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 70 patients that had been diagnosed with HCC and were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for the PVT. The radiation dose ranged from 40 Gy to 60 Gy (median dose: 48 Gy) and the biological effective dose (BED) ranged from 31.3 Gy to 78.0 Gy10 (median dose: 61.6 Gy10). Response was determined by measuring the extent of the PVT on a CT image at 0, 1 and 3 months after completion of the radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 9 months. Results: The response rate was 47.1% (33 patients), with two patients (2.9%) showing a complete response, 31 patients (44.3%) showing a partial response, and 35 patients (50%) showing stable disease or no response. The 1-year progression-free survival rate was 60%, and the median progression-free survival time was 17 months. The median overall survival time was 11 months, the median survival time in the responders was 15 months and in the nonresponders was 8 months (p=0.032). Four patients (5.7%) had transient liver function impairment during treatment. Radiation induced liver disease (RILD) was observed in only one patient (1.4%). Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of PVT from advanced HCC was a relatively effective and safe method

  7. Treatment results of different radiotherapy for 763 patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of different radiotherapy protocols in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. Methods: From 1976 to 2006, 763 patients with stage III cervical cancer (722 with squamous cell carcinoma and 41 with adenocarcinoma) were treated by radiotherapy in our hospital. 113 patients were treated by two-field whole pelvic irradiation in conventional fractionation plus brachytherapy (CF group), 44 by four-field whole pelvic irradiation in accelerated hyperfractionation plus brachytherapy (AHF group), and 606 by concomitant four-field unconventional fractionation radiotherapy and brachytherapy( FRT group). Sixty-one patients were treated by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Among 350 patients who had complete data, the shore-term efficacy and toxicities were compared. Results: For patients in CF, AHF and FRT groups, the 3-year overall survival rates (OS) were 65.7%, 66.8% and 44.3%, respectively (P=0.000), and the 5-year OS were 65.7%, 66.8% and 36.3%, respectively (P=0.000). The 10-year OS were 43.3% and 31.9% in CF and FRT groups(P=0.200). For squamous cell carcinoma,the OS was higher of patients with chemotherapy than those without. In 350 patients who had complete data, the local control rates of CF, AHF and FRT groups were 83.0%, 93.2% and 86.1%, respectively (χ2=2.70, P =0.259); AHF group had the lowest side effect rate, especially skin reaction (9.1%, χ2=20.25, P= 0.002); CF group had the lowest acute bone marrow suppression rate (χ2=25.95, P=0.000); for squamous cell carcinoma, the OS was higher in patients with chemotherapy than those without; the acute bone marrow and intestinal toxicities were more in patients with chemotherapy than those without. Conclusions: CF and AHF groups have similar 5-year OS of patients with advanced cervical cancer. AHF group has less toxicities, shorter treatment course and a trend of better local control. Concurrent chemoradiation could improve survival and local control of the patients with

  8. Locally advanced cervix cancer: chemotherapy prior to definitive surgery or radiotherapy. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary or neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy has potential advantages for locally advanced cervix cancer. It can down stage a cancer and allow definitive local therapy to be technically possible (surgery), or potentially more effective (radiotherapy). It can also eradicate subclinical systemic metastases. This report reviews a single institution's experience of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive local therapy for cervix cancer over a 13-year period. One hundred and six patients were treated with this intent. The patients were analysed for their response to chemotherapy, treatment received, survival, relapse and toxicity. The chemotherapy was feasible and the majority of patients had a complete or partial response (58.5%). Eight patients did not proceed to local treatment. Forty-six patients had definitive surgery and 52 had definitive radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival was 27% and the majority of patients died with disease. The first site of relapse was usually in the pelvis (46.2%). Late complications that required ongoing medical therapy (n = 6) or surgical intervention (n = 2) were recorded in eight patients (7.5%). On univariate analysis stage (P= 0.04), tumour size (P = 0.01), lymph node status (P=0.003), response to chemotherapy (P = 0.045) and treatment (P = 0.003) were all significant predictors of survival. On multivariate analysis, tumour size (P < 0.0001) and nodal status (P = 0.02) were significant predictors of survival. Despite the impressive responses to chemotherapy of advanced cervix cancer, there is evidence from randomized trials that it does not improve or compromise survival prior to radiotherapy. As its role prior to surgery remains unclear, it should not be used in this setting outside a prospective randomized trial. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. Circulating lymphocyte is an important determinant of the effectiveness of preoperative radiotherapy in advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used as the initial treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (RC) in the neoadjuvant setting, factors determining clinical response have not been adequately defined. In order to find other factors possibly related with radiosensitivity, we evaluated the relationships between circulating blood cell counts and RT effects. In 179 cases with advanced RC, we retrospectively examined hemoglobin (Hb) levels and counts of white blood cells (WBC), platelets and WBC subsets before and after RT and investigated their associations with the complete response (CR) rate together with other clinicopathological factors. The ratio of lymphocytes in WBC taken before RT was significantly greater in 15 CR cases as compared with those in non-CR cases. Patients with high lymphocyte percentages (25.7%) showed better outcome than the counterparts. Conversely, the ratio of neutrophiles was reduced in CR cases. The lymphocyte ratio showed an independent association with CR with multivariate analysis, and tended to be maintained at relatively high levels in CR cases. In RC patients, peripheral blood lymphocytes have a significant impact on the CR rate in response to RT. Lymphocyte-mediated immune reactions are supposed to have positive roles on clinical response in radiotherapy for RC

  10. Phase-II study on stereotactic radiotherapy of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Sengeløv, Lisa;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis and are not amenable for surgery. Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) may be an alternative treatment for patients with locally advanced disease. The effect of SRT was investigated...... (NC) or progression (PD) after treatment. Six patients had local tumour progression, but only one patient had an isolated local failure without simultaneous distant metastasis. Median time to local or distant progression was 4.8 months. Median survival time was 5.7 months and only 5% were alive 1 year...... after treatment. Acute toxicity reported 14 days after treatment was pronounced. There was a significant deterioration of performance status (P=0.008), more nausea (P=0.001) and more pain (P=0.008) after 14 days compared with base-line. However, 8 of 12 patients (66%) improved in performance status...

  11. Fast neutron radiotherapy for advanced malignant tumors of the paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiotherapy of advanced and low grade tumors of the internal nose and paranasal sinuses is still a problem. The results of neutron therapy of 20 patients with advanced and low grade tumors are presented. These patients were treated between July 1977 and October 1988. The mean age of patients is 53 years. Ten patients had adenoid cystic carcinomas, three patients squamous cell carcinomas, one patient a mucinous cell carcinoma, two patients a low grade adenocarcinoma and four patients low grade sarcomas. Mean follow-up is 16 months. Local control could be achieved in eleven cases. The results show that adenoid cystic carcinomas, low grade adenocarcinomas and sarcomas benefit from neutron therapy. (orig.)

  12. Technological problems in the use of research fast reactors for radiotherapy of patients with malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss the technological problems associated with the use of fast neutrons in radiotherapy of cancer patients and outline the approaches to the solution of these problems. The state of the art is assessed. Physical and radiobiologial prerequisites for the use of fast reactors for radiotherapy of patients with malignant tumors are analyzed. Results of clinic used of BR-10 reactor at the Medical Radiology Research Center, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, are presented. Experimental and clinical findings indicate that the results of radiotherapy may be appreaciably improved if a novel perspective source of fast neutrons, a nuclear reactor, is used

  13. Hypofractionated palliative radiotherapy in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer: CMC vellore experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikat Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A novel, short duration, palliative radiotherapy schedule for inoperable head and neck cancer was evaluated in terms of palliation of cancer-related symptoms and acute toxicities. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six patients with inoperable head and neck cancer were included in the study (2010-2012. All patients received 40 Gy in 10 fractions (equivalent dose: 49.8 Gy in conventional fractionation with 2 fractions per week. Treatment-related toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (Head and Neck, FACT H and N quality of life (QOL tool was administered before starting and at the completion of radiotherapy. Mean value before and after treatment was compared (paired t-test, P = 0.05, two-tailed for significance. Results: Thirty-three patients (male: 29, female: 4, mean age: 57.8 ± 9.7 years were included in the analysis (three patients discontinued treatment due to socioeconomic reasons. All patients had advanced inoperable head and neck cancers (27% IVA, 61% IVB, 9% IVC, TNM stage and 3% recurrent disease. Distressing pain at primary site (42%, dysphagia (18%, neck swelling (30%, and hoarseness (10% were common presentations. Incidence of grade III mucositis and dermatitis and pain was 18%, 3%, and 24%, respectively. Planned radiotherapy without any interruptions was completed by 73% patients. QOL assessment showed improvement in social well-being (17.4 vs. 20.01, P = 0.03, but no significant change was observed in head and neck specific score (25.1 vs. 25.0, P = NS after treatment. Reduction of pain was observed in 88% patients and 60% patients had improvement of performance status. Median overall survival of the cohort was 7 months. Conclusions: The study shows that this short duration palliative radiotherapy schedule is a clinically viable option for advanced inoperable head and neck cancer to achieve significant palliation of the main presenting symptoms like

  14. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication technology of the U3Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U3Si2 dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U3Si2 fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 ∼ 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The γ-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U3Si2. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano-plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49

  15. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  16. Recent Advances (in Diabetes Research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call to Congress The Cost of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest ...

  17. RESEARCH CENTRIFUGE- ADVANCED TOOL SEPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan Ashwini; Prof. B.V. Jain; Dr Surajj Sarode

    2015-01-01

    A centrifuge is a critical piece of equipment for the laboratory. Purpose of this study was to study research centrifuge in detail, its applications, uses in different branches and silent features. Their are two types of research centrifuge study here revolutionary research centrifuge and microprocessor research centrifuge. A centrifuge is a device that separates particles from a solution through use of a rotor. In biology, the particles are usually cells, sub cellular organelles, or large mo...

  18. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

  19. New Advances in Brain Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seita, Lori Perkins

    2002-01-01

    Recent findings in brain research suggest the implementation of contemporary instructional practices is in order for base practices. Incorporating best practice research is critical for students to be competitive in a global market. This article provides a brief overview of educational philosophy, recent findings on brain research and language…

  20. Compute Canada: Advancing Computational Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Performance Computing (HPC) is redefining the way that research is done. Compute Canada's HPC infrastructure provides a national platform that enables Canadian researchers to compete on an international scale, attracts top talent to Canadian universities and broadens the scope of research.

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the treatment outcomes of intensity-modulated radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) alone to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). From November 2001 to December 2009, 333 patients with pathologically diagnosed, locoregionally advanced NPC were treated by IMRT-SIB with or without weekly cisplatin concurrent chemotherapy at our institute. Among them, 62 patients received neo- or adjuvant chemotherapy or molecular target drugs were excluded from this analysis. There were 129 patients received IMRT-SIB alone, and 142 patients received IMRT-SIB with weekly cisplatin 30 mg/m2 for 7 weeks. The radiotherapy protocol was identical for each group. There were no significant differences in survival between CCRT and IMRT-SIB group in terms of gender, T/N classifications and concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The 5-year local control (LC), overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) for the entire group were 87.0%, 79.4%, 69.7 and 83.3%, respectively. The LC, OS, DFS and DMFS for CCRT and IMRT-SIB alone groups were 80.6% vs. 90.8% (P = 0.10), 71.7% vs. 83.2% (P = 0.201), 63.9% vs. 74.6% (P = 0.07), and 79.6% vs. 86.0% (P = 0.27), respectively. Compared to CCRT, IMRT-SIB alone had demonstrated similar disease LC, OS, DFS and DMFS in locoregionally advanced NPC. Careful radiation target volume design and simultaneous integrated boost may play a role that overrides the benefit from concurrent chemotherapy. Further investigation with randomized study is necessary to determine whether IMRT-SIB alone can achieve similar outcomes of concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  2. Therapists and researchers: advancing collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Ann F; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative partnerships between community-based clinicians and academic researchers have the potential to improve the relevance, utility, and feasibility of research, as well as the effectiveness of practice. Collaborative partnership research from a variety of fields can inform the development and maintenance of effective partnerships. In this paper we present a conceptual model of research-community practice partnership derived from literature across disciplines and then illustrate application of this model to one case example. The case example is a multi-year partnership between an interdisciplinary group of community-based psychotherapists and a team of mental health researchers. This partnership was initiated to support federally funded research on community-based outpatient mental health care for children with disruptive behavior problems, but it has evolved to drive and support new intervention studies with different clinical foci. Lessons learned from this partnership process will be shared and interpreted in the context of the presented research-practice partnership model. PMID:24224554

  3. Planned neck dissection after weekly docetaxel and concurrent radiotherapy for advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small oropharyngeal carcinomas with advanced neck metastases (stage N2 or greater) are common. Patients with small T with large N oropharyngeal carcinoma have high rates of local control but lower rates of regional control when treated with chemoradiotherapy. Clinical assessment after chemoradiotherapy cannot ensure the absence of neck disease. In the last 5 years, we have treated patients with T1-2 with N2-3 oropharyngeal carcinoma with weekly docetaxel radiotherapy followed by planned neck dissection (PND). Our objectives were to clarify the pathologically complete response (CR) rate of neck metastasis after weekly docetaxel radiotherapy, to identify the clinical predictor of residual neck disease, and to determine the mobidity of planned neck dissection. After chemoradiotherapy, all 12 patients had a complete response at the primary site. We conducted 15 neck dissections. Of these, 6 (40%) had positive nodes. The pathological CR rate of neck metastasis was 58.3%, whereas overall 2-year neck control rate was 91.7%. These findings lend support to the role of PND after chemoradiotherapy in N2-3 neck disease. After chemoradiotherapy, clinical parameters including TN status, feasibility of chemoradiotherapy, largest lymph node size or size reduction in MRI, did not identify patients with residual neck disease. We conducted selective neck dissection (SND) in 80% of patients. SND as PND appears to be appropriate in this group of patients because of the low incidence of complications. A further cohort study including the comparison of PND nonenforcement group is necessary to clarify the validity of the addition of PND in weekly docetaxel radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Summary report on first research coordination meeting on heavy charged-particle interaction data for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of the First Research Coordination Meeting on Heavy Charged-Particle Interaction Data for Radiotherapy. A programme to compile and evaluate charged-particle nuclear data for therapeutic applications was proposed. Detailed coordinated research proposals were also agreed. Technical discussions and the resulting work plan of the Coordinated Research Project are summarized, along with actions and deadlines. (author)

  5. Superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superselective arterial infusion for patients with advanced head and neck cancer has increasingly been applied in Japan. We analyzed our experiences and evaluated the efficacy and safety of this treatment. Forty-four patients, who were considered contraindicated for surgery or rejected radical surgery, received superselective intra-arterial infusion therapy of cisplatin (100-120 mg/m2/week) with simultaneous intravenous infusion of thiosulfate to neutralize cisplatin toxicity, and conventional concomitant extrabeam radiotherapy (65 Gy/26 f/6.5 weeks). During the median follow-up period of 17 months, 2-year progression-free survival rate of primary lesion was 66.9%, and that of patients with T4b diseases 57%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 52.4%. Although acute toxic effects were considered acceptable, severe toxic events occurred in some cases, namely, cranial nerve palsy, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia, sepsis, and osteoradionecrosis. We confirmed the high effectiveness of superselective arterial infusion and concomitant radiotherapy, which can concentrate the attack of decadose cisplatin on locoregional disease. Moreover, even patients with unresectable disease can be cured. We must clarify the treatment results and late side effects, and establish the indications for this treatment. (author)

  6. Combination chemotherapy for advanced diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in relapse following local radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven patients with advanced diffuse non-Ho-dgkin's lymphoma arising from head and neck in relapse following local radiotherapy were treated with C-MOPP or Adriamycin-based combination chemotherapy. Eight patients had diffuse lymphoma of large cell type, two diffuse lymphoma of medium-sized cell type and one pleomorphic type of lymphoma. Complete remission was obtained in 8 of 11 patients (72.7 %). Three of these had relapsed within two years after completion of combination chemotherapy; all of three expired at 27 months, 41 months and 48 months, respectively. On the other hand, three patients whose complete remission lasted beyond two years still survive 46 months, 48 months, and 66 months without recurrence. The main side-effects during induction chemotherapy was bone marrow suppression and its related infections. (author)

  7. Image-guided radiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NamPhongNguyen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer remains a challenge because of the head and neck complex anatomy and the tumor invasion to the adjacent organs and/or metastases to the cervical nodes. Postoperative irradiation or concurrent chemoradiation may lead to damage of radiosensitive structures such as the salivary glands, mandible, cochlea, larynx, and pharyngeal muscles. Xerostomia, osteoradionecrosis, deafness, hoarseness of the voice, dysphagia, and aspiration remain serious complications of head and neck irradiation and impair patient quality of life. Intensity-modulated and image-guided radiotherapy by virtue of steep dose gradient and daily imaging may allow for decreased radiation of the organs at risk for complication while preserving loco-regional control.

  8. Advancing Research on Undergraduate Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susan Rundell

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of "Journal of Research in Science Teaching" reflects conclusions and recommendations in the "Discipline-Based Education Research" (DBER) report and makes a substantial contribution to advancing the field. Research on undergraduate science learning is currently a loose affiliation of related fields. The…

  9. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  10. Advanced Energy Projects FY 1990 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report serves as a guide to prepare proposals and provides summaries of the research projects active in FY 1990, sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Division of Advanced Energy Projects, Department of Energy. (JF)

  11. Comparing treatment outcomes of different chemotherapy sequences during intensity modulated radiotherapy for advanced N-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xueming; Zeng, Lei; Chen, Chunyan; Huang, Ying; Han, Fei; Xiao, WeiWei; Liu, Shuai; Lu, Taixiang

    2013-01-01

    Background N-stage is related to distant metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We performed this study to compare the efficacy of different chemotherapy sequences in advanced N-stage (N2 and N3) NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods From 2001 to 2008, 198 advanced N-stage NPC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-three patients received IMRT alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was delivered to 72 patients, neoadjuvant chemo...

  12. Clinical evaluation of external beam radiotherapy combined with arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced oral tongue cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical results of external beam radiotherapy combined with arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced oral tongue cancer were analyzed. Forty patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma underwent these combined therapy in the period between 1985 and 1996. Subject include 17 males and 23 females. Ages ranged from 27 to 84; median age was 64.2. The size of primary lesion was classified as follows: T1: 2 cases, T2: 16 cases, T3: 21 cases, T4: 1 case. Sixteen patients were treated as radical therapy, 24 as preoperative therapy. Anti-cancer drugs used for arterial infusion were 5-FU (31 patients) or CBDCA (9 patients). For 16 radical cases, ten (62.5%) were CR (tumor disappeared). In 4 cases (25.0%), tumor volume was decreased above 50%, but in 2 (12.5%) any local effect could not be confirmed. For 24 pre-operative cases, Complete Response (CR) was observed only in 12.5% (3 patients). Partial Response (PR) was observed in 15 patients (62.5%), no change (NC) in 6 (25.0%). In 6 from 15 PR cases disappearance of viable atypical cells could be confirmed from histological examinations of resected tongue. In results local control rate (CR rate) for 24 pre-operative cases was 37.5% (9/24). Severe complications, for examples ulcerations of the tongue or exposure of the mandible could not be found in any cases. CR was observed in 19 patients (47.5%) out of 40, and severe late complications were noted in no patients. External beam radiotherapy combined with arterial infusion chemotherapy was effective for locally advanced cancer of anterior two-thirds of the tongue. (author)

  13. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy. Effect on outcome and toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, M.; Nevens, D.; Nuyts, S. [University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-03-15

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has rapidly become standard of care in the management of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, our aim was to retrospectively investigate the effect of the introducing IMRT on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Material and methods: A total of 245 patients with stage III and IV HNSCC treated with primary radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in this analysis: 135 patients were treated with 3DCRT, 110 patients with IMRT. Groups were compared for acute and late toxicity, locoregional control (LRC), and overall survival (OS). Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using a log-rank test. Acute toxicity was analyzed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and late toxicity was scored using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system. Results: Median follow-up was 35 months in the IMRT group and 68 months in the 3DCRT group. No significant differences were found in 3-year LRC and OS rates between the IMRT group and 3DCRT group. Significantly less acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was observed in the IMRT group (32% vs. 44%, p = 0.03). There was significantly less late xerostomia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (23% vs. 68%, p < 0.001). After 24 months, there was less dysphagia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group although differences failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The introduction of IMRT in the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced head and neck cancer significantly improved late toxicity without compromising tumor control compared to a parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  14. Nontraditional machining processes research advances

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Nontraditional machining employs processes that remove material by various methods involving thermal, electrical, chemical and mechanical energy or even combinations of these. Nontraditional Machining Processes covers recent research and development in techniques and processes which focus on achieving high accuracies and good surface finishes, parts machined without burrs or residual stresses especially with materials that cannot be machined by conventional methods. With applications to the automotive, aircraft and mould and die industries, Nontraditional Machining Processes explores different aspects and processes through dedicated chapters. The seven chapters explore recent research into a range of topics including laser assisted manufacturing, abrasive water jet milling and hybrid processes. Students and researchers will find the practical examples and new processes useful for both reference and for developing further processes. Industry professionals and materials engineers will also find Nontraditional M...

  15. Induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy in loco-regionally advanced epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of induction chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy for treatment of loco-regionally advanced epidermoid anal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients diagnosed during the period 1989-1994 with loco-regionally advanced cancer of the anal canal (PHITmax ≥ 4 cm or T4 or N+) were treated with induction chemotherapy consisting of one to three courses of carboplatin (300-375 mg/m2 i.v.) and 5-fluorouracil [5,000 mg/(m2 x 120 h) i.v.] followed by external beam irradiation ± surgery. Results: The toxicity of the chemotherapy was low. Twenty-nine patients were tumor free after the primary therapy. Kaplan-Meier analyses were made for overall survival, tumor-specific survival, freedom from recurrence, preservation of sphincter, and event-free survival. For these end points the 5-year data were 67, 85, 80, 69, and 51%, respectively. Conclusion: The results are promising but a well-designed randomized trial is needed to further elucidate the role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of loco-regionally advanced anal carcinoma

  16. Risk stratification of patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of cervix treated by radiotherapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To identify prognostic factors for local and distant relapse and perform risk stratification for patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 1031 patients with Stage IB-IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with full-course RT but without any chemotherapy were included for analysis. Of these, 311 patients with nonbulky Stage IB-IIA disease were designated the reference group and the other 720 patients were the study group. The associations of stage, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) level, hemoglobin level, age, cell differentiation, and pelvic lymph node status with treatment failure were evaluated. The independent prognostic factors were identified by multivariate analysis. The study group was further stratified into subgroups using combinations of these risk factors. Results: In the study group, independent risk factors for local relapse were advanced stage and age 2, and positive pelvic lymph nodes. The 5-year distant relapse-free survival rate was 83% for patients with bulky Stage IB-IIA and IIB disease, SCC-ag level 2, and positive lymph nodes. Conclusion: The risk of treatment failure in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients treated by RT alone can be more precisely predicted by risk stratification. A certain subgroup of patients had better control than the others. The benefit of treating these relatively low-risk patients with additional treatment such as concurrent chemotherapy should be further evaluated in prospective studies or meta-analyses

  17. Research advances in industrial engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book provides discussions and the exchange of information on principles, strategies, models, techniques, methodologies and applications of industrial engineering. It communicates the latest developments and research activity on industrial engineering and is useful for all those interested in the technological challenges in the field.

  18. Neoadjuvant androgen withdrawal prior to external radiotherapy for locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is unclear whether positive interactions between radiation and androgen withdrawal for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer is synergistic or additive. The present study aimed to clarify the significance of neoadjuvant androgen ablation prior to external radiotherapy in a human prostate LNCaP tumor model and in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Comparisons were made between the effect of castration prior to radiation on the growth of subcutaneous LNCaP tumors implanted into male nude mice and their serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and the results of castration or radiation alone. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven and locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate were treated with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog at least 3 months before, during, and after external radiation therapy with a total dose of 70 Gy. The toxicity and response to this therapy were evaluated. Treatment combining castration and radiation resulted in synergistic inhibition of LNCaP tumor growth and a significant delay in the emergence of androgen-independent recurrence as opposed to either treatment alone. The external radiotherapy was completed in 28 patients (96.6%), resulting in a reduction of serum PSA levels in all 28 patients to below 1.0 ng/mL. All patients were alive after a mean follow-up period of 34 months (range 11-53) with a 3-year PSA relapse-free survival rate of 83.7%. Among several factors examined, only the Gleason score was significantly associated with PSA relapse-free survival in univariate analysis, but not in multivariate analysis. Thirteen of 28 patients (46%) and 7 of 28 (25%) also showed at least one form of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity, respectively. Of these patients, 8 with gastrointestinal toxicities, and 1 with genitourinary toxicity, experienced acute complications higher than grade 3. The experimental findings objectively suggested the use of neoadjuvant androgen withdrawal prior

  19. Advances in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Project is an important part of the German reactor safety research programme. It works on problems concerning safety and environemental risks of LWR reactors and reprocessing plants and investigates accident consequences. At the 1978 annual meeting, the core behaviour on cooling and reactivity disturbances was discussed, as well as release, retention, and possible radiological effects of radioactive pollutants. Among other subjects, fission product retention in LWR reactors and reprocessing plants were reported on as well as hypothetic core meltdown. (orig.)

  20. Technical Note: DIRART- A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). Methods: DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. Results: DIRART provides a set of image processing/registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. Conclusions: By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research.

  1. Phase I study of oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 at escalating doses from 60 to 80 mg/m2/day. Results: Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. Three patients received S-1 at 60 mg/m2/day, 3 at 70 mg/m2/day, and 10 at 80 mg/m2/day. Though 1 patient at the final dose level (80 mg/m2/day) experienced a dose limiting toxicity (biliary infection with Grade 3 neutropenia), the MTD was not reached in this study. The most common toxicities were anorexia and leukocytopenia, with Grade 3 toxicity occurring in 31% and 6.3% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy was determined to be 80 mg/m2/day from Day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35 in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Oral S-1 and radiotherapy is well tolerated and feasible and should be further investigated

  2. Abdominal cancer during early childhood: A dosimetric comparison of proton beams to standard and advanced photon radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Evaluation of dosimetric benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques for the treatment of abdominal lesions during early childhood. Patients and methods: Treatment planning was performed for five Neuroblastoma (NBL) and four Wilms Tumor (WT) patients. Opposing fields (2F), photon intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMXT) and two proton techniques (passively scattered (PT) and scanned beams (IMPT)) were considered. Averaged dose-volume histograms, associated dosimetric parameters and a radiobiological model for the estimation of the therapy related carcinogenic effect were evaluated. Results: With respect to the 2F technique, both proton techniques enabled to reduce mean liver and kidney dose by 40-60%; Organ fractions irradiated at the level of the tolerance dose were reduced by 65% for kidneys and 75% for the liver in NBL patients and by additional 10% for WT patients. IMXT enabled to reduce parameters related to the steep high-dose gradient, e.g., V15Gy for the kidneys was reduced by a factor 2-3 compared to 2F. V12Gy was reduced by 40% in the liver. On the other side, the improvement of those parameters characterizing the low isodose domain was limited for IMXT. The risk for radiation-induced secondary cancer was doubled for IMXT and even more increased for PT if secondary neutrons were taken into account, while this risk remained the same or was reduced by IMPT with respect to 2F. Conclusions: Proton beams improved all dosimetric parameters for NBL and WT patients compared to photon techniques. This improvement was limited for IMXT mainly to parameters related to the steep high-dose gradient. Further research is needed to minimize uncertainties for secondary cancer estimations

  3. Advances in compact torus research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compact torus is a low aspect ratio, axisymmetric, closed magnetic field line configuration with no vessel wall or magnetic field coils linking the hole in the plasma toroid. This concept offers reactor advantages such as simplicity, high β, and the possibility of translation. Several methods have been used to generate compact toroids, including plasma guns, high energy particle rings, and field-reversed theta pinches. This document summarizes the results of recent work on compact toroids, presented at the first IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Compact Torus Research held in Sydney, Australia from 4 to 7 March 1985

  4. Traditional machining processes research advances

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book collects several examples of research in machining processes. Chapter 1 provides information on polycrystalline diamond tool material and its emerging applications. Chapter 2 is dedicated to the analysis of orthogonal cutting experiments using diamond-coated tools with force and temperature measurements. Chapter 3 describes the estimation of cutting forces and tool wear using modified mechanistic models in high performance turning. Chapter 4 contains information on cutting under gas shields for industrial applications. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the machinability of magnesium and its alloys. Chapter 6 provides information on grinding science. Finally, chapter 7 is dedicated to flexible integration of shape and functional modelling of machine tool spindles in a design framework.    

  5. Advances in personality theory and research.

    OpenAIRE

    Stelmack, R M

    1991-01-01

    This paper briefly describes important advances in personality research that have been achieved during the past 20 years in the development of a fundamental personality typology and in the determination of the heritability of personality traits. Research conducted at the University of Ottawa that has contributed to the exploration of the biological bases of the extraversion trait is summarized.

  6. Introduction: Recent advances in expertise research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikers, Remy; Paas, Fred

    2007-01-01

    During the 55th meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA, 2004) in San Diego, a symposium was organized on Recent Advances in Expertise Research. Most papers in this special issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology were presented in this symposium. The aim of this special issue is

  7. Radiotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy in advanced Ewing's tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pape, H.; Glag, M.; Gripp, S.; Wittkamp, M.; Schmitt, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Laws, H.J.; Kaik, B. van; Goebel, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Haematologie und Onkologie; Burdach, S. [Halle Univ. (Germany). Abt. Paediatrie; Juergens, H. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Hematologie und Onkologie

    1999-10-01

    Background: Ewing's tumors are sensitive to radio- and chemotherapy. Patients with multifocal disease suffer a poor prognosis. Patients presenting primary bone marrow involvement or bone metastases at diagnosis herald a 3-year disease-free survival below 15%. The European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) has established the following indications for high-dose therapy in advanced Ewing's tumors: Patients with primary multifocal bone disease, patients with early (<2 years after diagnosis) or multifocal relapse. Patients and Method: As of 1987, 83 patients have been treated in the EICESS group, 39 of them at the transplant center in Duesseldorf, who have been analyzed here. All individuals received 4 courses of induction chemotherapy with EVAJA and stem cell collection after course 3 and 4. Consolidation radiotherapy of the involved bone compartments was administered in a hyperfractionated regimen 2 times 1.6 Gy per day, up to 22.4 Gy simultaneously to course 5 and 22.4 Gy to course 6 of chemotherapy. The myeloablative chemotherapy consisted of melphalan and etoposide (ME) in combination with 12 Gy TBI (Hyper-ME) oder Double-ME with whole lung irradiation up to 18 Gy (without TBI). Results: The survival probability at 40 months was 31% (44% DOD; 15% DOC). Pelvic infiltration did not reach prognostic relevance in this cohort. Radiotherapy encompassed 75% of the bone marrow at maximum (average 20%). Engraftment was not affected by radiotherapy. Conclusion: High-dose chemotherapy can improve outcome in poor prognostic advanced Ewing's tumors. The disease itself remains the main problem. The expected engraftment problems after intensive radiotherapy in large volumes of bone marrow can be overcome by stem cell reinfusion. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Ewing-Tumoren sind radio- und chemosensibel. Im metastasierten Stadium ist die Prognose schlecht. Patienten mit Knochen- oder Knochenmarkinfiltration haben nach drei Jahren eine

  8. Combined radiotherapy with cis- or carboplatin in advanced head and neck tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the treatment results of 111 patients with stage T3-4, N0-3, M0, biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and oral cavity. All patients were treated by primary irradiation with 1.8 to 2 Gy per day for five days a week up to a target volume dose of 39,6 or 40 Gy. Simultaneously 20 mg/m2 cisplatin was given under hyperhydration and mannitol diuresis on days 1 to 5. In case of partial tumour regression radiotherapy was continued up to 70 Gy with another course of cisplatin. In case of minor response surgery was interposed followed by subsequent irradiation with 30 Gy and a second course of cisplatin. 67% of the patients showed an initial complete tumour involution and 27% a partial response. The five year actuarial survival rate with a minimum follow-up of two years is 47,6%. More than 96% of the long term survivors showed a complete response after the end of treatment. Carboplatin (CBDCA) is a second generation platinum analogon and has shown comparable antitumour activity but less nephro- and neurotoxicity than cisplatin in head and neck cancer. In order to determine the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous application of CBDCA and radiotherapy a phase I-II study is going on. Patients with advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck were separated into three groups which received 60 mg/m2, 70 mg/m2 and 80 mg/m2 CBDCA from days 1 to 5 and 28 to 32. Radiotherapy was administrated up to a target absorbed dose of 70 Gy, 5x2 Gy/week in shrinking field technique. The group which received 80 mg/m2 CBDCA reached the myelotoxicity limit so that subsequent patients were treated with 70 mg/m2. Among 30 patients who completed the treatment, 22 showed a complete (CR) and eight a partial remission (PR). (orig./MG)

  9. Combined treatment of advanced oropharyngeal cancer with external radiotherapy and three-step radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prognosis of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer remains grim due to poor locoregional tumour control. In the attempt to eradicate residual disease, various novel modalities have been tested, among which radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has shown some potential. We present a case of locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma successfully treated with a combination of various treatments including surgery, radio-chemotherapy and three-step RIT, with the avidin-biotin pretargeting system. A partial tumour response was achieved after surgery and radio-chemotherapy; persistent disease was documented at computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) and immunoscintigraphy (ISG) 10 weeks after the end of chemo-radiotherapy. The good correlation between the tracer localization in the scintigraphic images and residual mass visualized at CT suggested the application of three-step RIT using systemic administration of yttrium-90 (py) biotin. At present, 17 months after RIT, the patient is alive with no evidence of disease as documented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US. This is the first case of complete clinical remission of a head and neck carcinoma induced by combined treatment including pretargeted RIT with 90Y-biotin. (orig.)

  10. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for portal vein tumor thrombosis alone in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Hye Kim Dong Hyun; Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Won Taek; Heo, Jeong; Woo, Hyun Young [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We sought to evaluate the clinical outcomes of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed data on 46 patients who received 3D-CRT for PVTT alone between June 2002 and December 2011. Response was evaluated following the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Prognostic factors and 1-year survival rates were compared between responders and non-responders. Thirty-seven patients (80.4%) had category B Child-Pugh scores. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score was 2 in 20 patients. Thirty patients (65.2%) had main or bilateral PVTT. The median irradiation dose was 50 Gy (range, 35 to 60 Gy) and the daily median dose was 2 Gy (range, 2.0 to 2.5 Gy). PVTT response was classified as complete response in 3 patients (6.5%), partial response in 12 (26.1%), stable disease in 19 (41.3%), and progressive disease in 12 (26.1%). There were 2 cases of grade 3 toxicities during or 3 months after radiotherapy. Twelve patients in the responder group (15 patients) received at least 50 Gy irradiation, but about 84% of patients in the non-responder group received less than 50 Gy. The 1-year survival rate was 66.8% in responders and 27.4% in non-responders constituting a statistically significant difference (p = 0.008). Conformal radiotherapy for PVTT alone could be chosen as a palliative treatment modality in patients with unfavorable conditions (liver, patient, or tumor factors). However, more than 50 Gy of radiation may be required.

  11. A treatment planning comparison of four target volume contouring guidelines for locally advanced pancreatic cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Contouring of target volumes varies significantly in radiotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). There is a lack of consensus as to whether elective lymph nodes (eLN’s) should be included or not in the planning target volume (PTV). In the present study we analyzed the dosimetric coverage of the eLN’s and organs at risk (OAR) by comparing four different contouring guidelines. Methods and materials: PTVs were delineated with (Oxford and RTOG guidelines) or without (Michigan and SCALOP guidelines) including the eLNs in eleven patients with PDAC. eLNs included the peripancreatic, paraaortic, paracaval, celiac trunk, superior mesenteric and portal vein clinical target volumes (CTVs). A 3D-CRT plan (50.40 Gy in 28 fractions) was performed to analyze and compare the dosimetric coverage of all eLNs and OAR between the 4 contouring guidelines. Results: The size of Oxford and RTOG PTVs was comparable and significantly larger than the SCALOP and Michigan PTVs. Interestingly the eLNs received a significant amount of incidental dose irradiation by PTV-based plans that only aimed to treat the tumor without the eLNs. The dosimetric coverage of eLN presented a large variability according to the respective contouring methods. The difference in the size of the 4 PTVs was reflected to the dose distribution at the OAR. Conclusions: Our study provides important information regarding the impact of different contouring guidelines on the dose distribution to the eLNs and the OAR in patients with locally advanced PDAC treated with radiotherapy

  12. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer: a mono-institutional retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the role of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC), and the prognostic factors in the setting of multidisciplinary approach strategies. 63 patients with LAPC and MPC receiving IMRT in our institution were retrospectively identified. Information on patient baseline, treatment characteristics and overall survival (OS) time were collected. Data of pain relief and toxicity were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to investigate the prognostic factors. All patients received IMRT with a median dose of 46.0 Gy. The median OS for LAPC and MPC patients were 15.7 months and 8.0 months, respectively (p = 0.029). Symptomatic improvements were observed in the 44 patients with abdominal/back pain after radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), particularly in those with severe pain. Only 13.9% and 14.8% cases presented Grade ≥ 3 hematologic toxicities in RT and CCRT group, while no cases developed Grade ≥ 3 non-hematologic toxicities in both groups. Multivariate analysis indicated that tumors located in pancreas body/tail (HR 0.28, p = 0.008), pretreatment CA19-9 < 1000 U/mL (HR 0.36, p = 0.029) and concurrent chemotherapy (HR 0.37, p = 0.016) were independent favorable predictors for OS. CCRT further improved OS for LAPC and MPC with acceptable toxicities, and use of RT markedly alleviated pain. Tumors located in pancreas body/tail, pretreatment CA19-9 level of < 1000 U/mL and CCRT were associated with better OS. However, regional intra-arterial chemotherapy did not show any survival benefit in our study

  13. Multivariable normal-tissue complication modeling of acute esophageal toxicity in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated (chemo-)radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, R.; Dankers, F.; Troost, E.G.; Hoffman, A.L.; Heijden, E. van der; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The majority of normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for acute esophageal toxicity (AET) in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (AS-NSCLC) patients treated with (chemo-)radiotherapy are based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Due to d

  14. Introduction: Recent advances in expertise research.

    OpenAIRE

    Rikers, Remy; Paas, Fred

    2007-01-01

    During the 55th meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA, 2004) in San Diego, a symposium was organized on Recent Advances in Expertise Research. Most papers in this special issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology were presented in this symposium. The aim of this special issue is to provide a representative overview of recent developments and current directions in expertise research and to discuss their implications for theoretical and applied cognitive psychology, particu...

  15. Research of heavy ion radiotherapy based on formation of heterochromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied about mechanism of heavy ion radiotherapy based on formation of heterochromatin. Role of D-NHEJ or HRR pathway in the biological effect of heavy ion irradiation is not clear. XRCC4 is a core factor of D-NHEJ pathway. For the purpose of determining the role of D-NHEJ in the effect of heavy ion irradiation, we performed survival fraction assay using HCT116 XRCC4-/- cells. Surprisingly, linear energy transfer (LET) dependency of survival fraction assay of HCT116 XRCC4-/- cells lost clearly. Preliminary data of survival fraction assay using HCT116 XRCC4-/- rescued by XRCC4 plasmid showed recovery of LET dependency. We are going to do further analysis in detail. (author)

  16. Phase II study. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy with nitroglycerin in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Nitroglycerin, a nitric oxide donor agent, reduces the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and could be a normalizer of the tumor microenvironment. Both factors are associated with chemo-radio-resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the safety profile and efficacy of nitroglycerin administration with chemo-radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: This is a phase II trial of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with cisplatin and vinorelbine plus concurrent nitroglycerin with radiotherapy. A 25-mg NTG patch was administered to the patients for 5 days (1 day before and 4 days after chemotherapy induction and consolidation) and all day during chemo-radiotherapy. VEGF plasmatic level was determined before and after two cycles of chemotherapy. Results: Thirty-five patients were enrolled in this trial. Sixty-three percent of patients achieved an overall response after induction of chemotherapy, and 75% achieved an overall response after chemo-radiotherapy. The median progression-free survival was 13.5 months (95% CI, 8.8–18.2), and the median overall survival was 26.9 months (95% CI, 15.3–38.5). Reduction of VEGF level was associated with better OS. The toxicity profile related to nitroglycerin included headache (20%) and hypotension (2.9%). Conclusions: The addition of nitroglycerin to induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC has an acceptable toxicity profile and supports the possibility to add nitroglycerin to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A randomized trial is warranted to confirm these findings

  17. Experience with combination of docetaxel, cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin, fluorouracil, and docetaxel chemotherapy plus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Sixty patients with locoregionally advanced NPC were enrolled. Patients received IMRT plus three courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and two courses of adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of docetaxel (60 mg/m2/day on day 1), cisplatin (25 mg/m2/day on days 1-3), and 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2/day on days 1-3). The overall response rate to neoadjuvant chemotherapy was 89%. Three months after the completion of radiotherapy, 53 (93%) patients achieved complete regression, 3 (5%) achieved partial response (PR), and 1 experienced liver metastasis. However, among the 3 PR patients, 2 patients had no evidence of relapse in the follow-up. With a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-43), the 2-year estimated locoregional failure-free survival, distant failure-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival were 96.6, 93.3, 89.9, and 98.3%, respectively. Leukopenia was the main adverse effect in chemotherapy; 14 patients experienced grade 3 or grade 4 neutropenia, and 1 patient developed febrile neutropenia. The nonhematological adverse events included alopecia, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and diarrhea. The incidence of grade 3 acute radiotherapy-related mucositis was 28.3%; no grade 4 acute mucositis was observed. No grade 3 or grade 4 hematological toxicity occurred during radiotherapy. None of the patients had interrupted radiotherapy. The common late adverse effects included xerostomia and hearing impairment. Neoadjuvant-adjuvant chemotherapy using cisplatin, fluorouracil, plus docetaxel combined with IMRT was an effective and well-tolerated alternative for advanced NPC. (author)

  18. Therapeutic effects of gensenoside-Rg3 combined with radiotherapy on advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the efficacy and toxicity of gensenoside-Rg3 (Rg3) combined with radiotherapy on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at advanced stages (Ⅲ and Ⅴ). Methods: Sixty-three patients with stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ NSCLC were divided randomly into two groups:treatment group (n=35) treated with Rg3 combined with radiotherapy and control group (n=28) treated with radiotherapy alone. The efficacy and side effects were compared after the treatment. Results: The response rate (CR + PR) of the treatment group was 57.14%, significantly higher than that of the control group (32.14%, χ2 =3.91, P<0.05). The median survival time of the treatment group was 14.2 months, significantly longer than that of the control group (11.2 months, χ2=2.07, P<0.05). The one-year survival rate of the treatment group was 62.86%, significantly higher than that of the control group (39.29%, χ2=4.40, P<0.05). The incidence rates of side effects of the treatment group were all lower than those of the control group, but there were not significant difference. Conclusions: Gensenoside-Rg3 combined with radiotherapy is effective for advanced stage NSCLC, with attenuation and synergistic effects. (authors)

  19. Organ function and quality of life after transoral laser microsurgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olthoff, Arno; Hess, Clemens F. [Dept. of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Ewen, Andreas; Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Christiansen, Hans [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Roedel, Ralph; Steiner, Wolfgang [Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Univ. of Goettingen (Germany); Pradier, Olivier [Dept. of Cancerology, CHU Morvan, Brest (France)

    2009-05-15

    Background and purpose: transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) and adjuvant radiotherapy are an established therapy regimen for locally advanced laryngeal cancer at our institution. Aim of the present study was to assess value of quality of life (QoL) data with special regard to organ function under consideration of treatment efficacy in patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer treated with larynx-preserving TLM and adjuvant radiotherapy. Patients and methods: from 1994 to 2006, 39 patients (ten UICC stage III, 29 UICC stage IVA/B) with locally advanced laryngeal carcinomas were treated with TLM and adjuvant radiotherapy. Data concerning treatment efficacy, QoL (using the VHI [Voice Handicap Index], the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires) and organ function (respiration, deglutition, voice quality) were obtained for ten patients still alive after long-term follow-up. Correlations were determined using the Spearman rank test. Results: after a median follow-up of 80.8 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 46.8% and the locoregional control rate 76.5%, respectively. The larynx preservation rate was 89.7% for all patients and 100% for patients still alive after follow-up. Despite some verifiable problems in respiration, speech and swallowing, patients showed a subjectively good QoL. Conclusion: TLM and adjuvant radiotherapy is a curative option for patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer and an alternative to radical surgery. Even if functional deficits are unavoidable in the treatment of locally advanced laryngeal carcinomas, larynx preservation is associated with a subjectively good QoL. (orig.)

  20. European organization for research on treatment of cancer trials using radiotherapy with multiple fractions per day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decade (1976-1986), radiotherapy with altered fractionation schemes using multiple fractions per day (MFD) was the major field of the clinical research undertaken in the EORTC Cooperative Group of Radiotherapy. Some of its participating institutions (Portsmouth, Dijon, Leuven, Amsterdam, Rome) performed pilot studies in the midseventies in more than 400 patients. Then largely based upon the previous institutional experiences, EORTC-labelled phase II and III were activated: 1,678 patients have been entered in 8 trials during the period 1978-1987. In order to summarize these clinical experiments covering various fields of tumor pathology, radiotherapy schemes are divided according to the type of altered fractionation: pure hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation and mixed hyprfractionated and accelerated schemes

  1. Advances in structure research by diffraction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Brill, R

    1970-01-01

    Advances in Structure Research by Diffraction Methods reviews advances in the use of diffraction methods in structure research. Topics covered include the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, with emphasis on Ewald waves in theory and experiment; dynamical theory of electron diffraction; small angle scattering; and molecular packing. This book is comprised of four chapters and begins with an overview of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, especially in terms of how it explains all the absorption and propagation properties of X-rays at the Bragg setting in a perfect crystal. The next

  2. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [' Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  3. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of ≤3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  4. Patterns of failure following total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation with or without a radiotherapy boost for advanced neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the patterns of failure and outcome of patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy, total body irradiation (TBI), and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for advanced/relapsed pediatric neuroblastoma, with emphasis on the impact of a radiotherapy boost to primary and metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: Between May 1986 and June 1993, 26 patients with advanced neuroblastoma underwent high-dose chemotherapy and TBI followed by BMT at our institution. The majority of patients were over the age of 2 years (73%) and were Stage IV at diagnosis (81%). Multiple metastatic sites were involved including bone (17), bone marrow (15), distant nodes (11), liver (5), lung (4) and brain (1). Twenty patients (77%) received cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg x 4 days) and TBI as consolidation therapy. TBI was delivered to a total dose of 12 Gy given in 2 Gy twice daily (b.i.d.) fractions over the 3 days preceding bone marrow infusion. A local radiotherapy boost of 8-24 Gy was given to 13 out of 26 patients (50%) to the primary and/or metastatic sites immediately prior to or following induction chemotherapy according to physician judgement. Sites not amenable to a radiotherapy boost included the bone marrow, diffuse/bilateral lung involvement, and multiple bone metastases (> four sites). Results: The actuarial overall survival of the 26 patients was 40.4% at 3 and 5 years, with a progression-free survival at 5 years of 38.5%. Six patients died of transplant-related toxicity (23%). The use of cyclophosphamide as high-dose consolidation chemotherapy was significantly better than other multidrug regimens used in terms of overall survival (p < 0.0001) and progression-free survival (p = 0.0004). The presence of liver involvement prior to BMT was a significant adverse prognostic factor by multivariate analysis. Of the 20 patients surviving the transplant, 10 (50%) underwent a local radiotherapy boost. The patterns of failure were as follows: 3 out of 10 'boost' patients

  5. Can pure accelerated radiotherapy given as six fractions weekly be an option in locally advanced carcinoma cervix: Results of a prospective randomized phase III trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Accelerated radiotherapy given as six fractions per week is an effective alternative to concomitant chemoradiation in locally advanced carcinoma cervix and has shown lesser toxicities in our study.

  6. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy for the locally advanced rectum cancer; Chimioradiotherapie concomitante dans le cancer du rectum localement evolue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haoui, M.; Aksil, N.; Boualga, K.; Moussaoui, D.; Ladj, O. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre anti-cancer, Blida (Algeria)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective study which aimed at assessing the use of a concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, its tolerance and its feasibility in the case of a locally advanced rectum cancer. Based on data obtained among 62 patients presenting a rectum cancer, they analyse the results in terms of tolerance (cases of leukopenia, anemia, diarrhea, radiodermatitis), of relapses, and survival. Toxicity is acceptable and the concomitant treatment renders the tumour operable in many cases. Short communication

  7. Proposed research on advanced accelerator concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes technical progress and accomplishments during the proposed three-year research on advanced accelerator concepts supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-88ER40465. A vigorous theoretical program has been pursued in critical problem areas related to advanced accelerator concepts and the basic equilibrium, stability, and radiation properties of intense charged particle beams. Broadly speaking, our research has made significant contributions in the following three major areas: Investigations of physics issues related to particle acceleration including two-beam accelerators and cyclotron resonance laser (CRL) accelerators; Investigations of RF sources including the free- electron lasers, cyclotron resonance masers, and relativistic magnetrons; Studies of coherent structures in electron plasmas and beams ranging from a low-density, nonrelativistic, pure electron plasma column to high-density, relativistic, non-neutral electron flow in a high-voltage diode. The remainder of this report presents theoretical and computational advances in these areas

  8. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumburg, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of molecular engineering is the `property directed' synthesis of large molecules and molecular assemblies. Synthetic expertise has advanced to a state which allows the assembly of supramolecules containing thousands of atoms using a `construction kit' of molecular building blocks. Expansion in the field is driven by the appearance of new building blocks and by an improved understanding of the rules for joining them in the design of nanometer-sized devices. Another aspect is the transition from supramolecules to materials. At present no single molecule (however large) has been demonstrated to function as a device, but this appears to be only a matter of time. In all of this research, which has a strongly multidisciplinary character, both existing and yet to be developed analytical techniques are and will remain indispensable. All this and more is discussed in Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials, which provides a masterly and up to date summary of one of the most challenging researc...

  9. Influence of surgical treatment and radiotherapy of the advanced intraoral cancers on complete blood count, body mass index, liver enzymes and leukocyte CD64 expression:

    OpenAIRE

    Didanovič, Vojislav; Dovšak, Tadej; Ihan Hren, Nataša; Ihan, Alojz; Kansky, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    Background. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of the surgery and radiotherapy of the advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma on the complete blood count, body mass index (BMI), acute inflam-matory response, liver enzymes and expression of the CD64 index on leukocytes in the peripheral blood. Patients and method. Venous blood was obtained from 16 patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas treated with radical surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Blood samples were c...

  10. AECL programs in advanced systems research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL program in advanced systems research is directed in the long term to securing the option of obtaining fissile fuel by electronuclear breeding (accelerator breeder or fusion breeder) and to providing a basis from which AECL might move into stand alone fusion energy if warranted. In the short term the program is directed to reaping benefits from electronuclear technology. This report outlines the main activities and research facilities in both the long-term and short-term subprograms

  11. Advanced energy projects FY 1992 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are beyond the scope of ongoing applied research or technology development programs. The Division provides a mechanism for converting basic research findings to applications that eventually could impact the Nation's energy economy. Technical topics include physical, chemical, materials, engineering, and biotechnologies. Projects can involve interdisciplinary approaches to solve energy-related problems. Projects are supported for a finite period of time, which is typically three years. Annual funding levels for projects are usually about $300,000 but can vary from approximately $50,000 to $500,000. It is expected that, following AEP support, each concept will be sufficiently developed and promising to attract further funding from other sources in order to realize its full potential. There were 39 research projects in the Division of Advanced Energy Projects during Fiscal Year 1992 (October 1, 1991 -- September 30, 1992). The abstracts of those projects are provided to introduce the overall program in Advanced Energy Projects. Further information on a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator, who is listed below the project title. Projects completed during FY 1992 are indicated

  12. Enhanced skin toxicity with concomitant cetuximab and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: When associated with radiotherapy the monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab might be exacerbate skin toxicity. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze acute dermatological toxicity in ten consecutive patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated from march 2008 to May 2009 according to Bonner protocol. Patients and methods: We have treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab ten patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or oral cavity, stage 3-4B and non metastatic. All our patients were 3D planned and scheduled for conventional fractionation 70 Gy/35 fractions over 47 days, five days weekly. Uninvolved neck received 50 Gy and gross nodal disease received 70 Gy as the primary tumor. Cetuximab was administered one week before radiotherapy at a loading dose of 400 mg per square meter of body surface area over 120 minutes, followed by weekly 60 minutes infusions at 250 mg per square meter for the duration of radiotherapy. Results: In eight patients (80%) grade 3 radiation dermatitis occurred as early as with 28 Gy at a median dose of 42 Gy (range 28-60 Gy). the median radiotherapy dose was 6 Gy with an overall treatment time of 57.7 days (range 41-70 days). were administered 78 cycles of cetuximab, one patient discontinued after five cycles due to infusion reactions. There was no correlation between toxicity and acne-like rash due to cetuximab. Conclusion: Our results albeit in disagreement with the original study are rather similar with the experience of other European centers that encounter grade 3-4 radiation dermatitis in 49% of their patients or Australian centers that reported 79% of same degree of toxicity. (authors)

  13. Enhanced skin toxicity with concomitant cetuximab and radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujor, L.; Grillo, I.M.; Pimentel, N. [Hospital Santa Maria, Radioterapia, Lisboa (Portugal); Macor, C.; Catarina, M. [Hospital Santa Maria, ORL, Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, L. [Hospital Santa Maria, Oncologia, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: When associated with radiotherapy the monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab might be exacerbate skin toxicity. The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze acute dermatological toxicity in ten consecutive patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated from march 2008 to May 2009 according to Bonner protocol. Patients and methods: We have treated with radiotherapy and cetuximab ten patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx or oral cavity, stage 3-4B and non metastatic. All our patients were 3D planned and scheduled for conventional fractionation 70 Gy/35 fractions over 47 days, five days weekly. Uninvolved neck received 50 Gy and gross nodal disease received 70 Gy as the primary tumor. Cetuximab was administered one week before radiotherapy at a loading dose of 400 mg per square meter of body surface area over 120 minutes, followed by weekly 60 minutes infusions at 250 mg per square meter for the duration of radiotherapy. Results: In eight patients (80%) grade 3 radiation dermatitis occurred as early as with 28 Gy at a median dose of 42 Gy (range 28-60 Gy). the median radiotherapy dose was 6 Gy with an overall treatment time of 57.7 days (range 41-70 days). were administered 78 cycles of cetuximab, one patient discontinued after five cycles due to infusion reactions. There was no correlation between toxicity and acne-like rash due to cetuximab. Conclusion: Our results albeit in disagreement with the original study are rather similar with the experience of other European centers that encounter grade 3-4 radiation dermatitis in 49% of their patients or Australian centers that reported 79% of same degree of toxicity. (authors)

  14. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hsing-Lung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Methods Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. Results The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788. The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2 and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3 were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. Conclusions IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential.

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for larynx preservation of advanced resectable hypopharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To analyze the rate of larynx preservation in patients of locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plus concurrent chemotherapy, and compare the results with patients treated with primary surgery. Between January 2003 and November 2007, 14 patients were treated with primary surgery and 33 patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using IMRT technique. Survival rate, larynx preservation rate were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate analysis was conducted for significant prognostic factors with Cox-regression method. The median follow-up was 19.4 months for all patients, and 25.8 months for those alive. The 5-year overall survival rate was 33% and 44% for primary surgery and definitive CCRT, respectively (p = 0.788). The 5-year functional larynx-preservation survival after IMRT was 40%. Acute toxicities were common, but usually tolerable. The rates of treatment-related mucositis (≥ grade 2) and pharyngitis (≥ grade 3) were higher in the CCRT group. For multivariate analysis, treatment response and cricoid cartilage invasion strongly correlated with survival. IMRT plus concurrent chemotherapy may preserve the larynx without compromising survival. Further studies on new effective therapeutic agents are essential

  16. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy in Advanced Hypofractionated Regimens for Prostate Cancer: From 20 to 16 Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Tohru [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi, E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Akakura, Koichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shimazaki, Jun [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Tsujii, Hirohiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the effects of differences in dose fractionation on late radiation toxicity and biochemical control in patients with prostate cancer treated with carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 740 prostate cancer patients who received C-ion RT between April 2000 and February 2009 were analyzed. Of those, 664 patients followed for at least 1 year were analyzed with regard to late radiation toxicity. Biochemical relapse-free (BRF) and overall survival (OS) rates in patient subgroups with each dose-fractionation were analyzed. Results: Only 1 case of grade 3 genitourinary (GU) morbidity was observed in 20 fractions, and none of the patients developed higher grade morbidities. The incidence of late GU toxicity in patients treated with 16 fractions was lower than that of patients treated with 20 fractions. The OS rate and BRF rate of the entire group at 5 years were 95.2% and 89.7%, respectively. The 5-year BRF rate of the patients treated with 16 fractions of C-ion RT (88.5%) was comparable to that of the patients treated with 20 fractions (90.2%). Conclusion: C-ion RT of 57.6 GyE (the physical C-ion dose [Gy] Multiplication-Sign RBE) in 16 fractions could offer an even lower incidence of genitourinary toxicity and comparable BRF rate than that in 20 fractions. Advancement in hypofractionation could be safely achieved with C-ion RT for prostate cancer.

  17. International data-sharing for radiotherapy research: An open-source based infrastructure for multicentric clinical data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive, multifactorial data sharing is a crucial prerequisite for current and future (radiotherapy) research. However, the cost, time and effort to achieve this are often a roadblock. We present an open-source based data-sharing infrastructure between two radiotherapy departments, allowing seamless exchange of de-identified, automatically translated clinical and biomedical treatment data

  18. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology. A bidirectional translational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  19. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  20. Retrospective analysis of therapy for locally advanced oral cancer. Radiotherapy alone and thermoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinomas (T3-4N0-3M0) treated with radiotherapy (RT) or hyperthermia (HT) combined with RT (HRT) were analyzed retrospectively. The RT group consisted of 31 patients (M/F- 27/4), and the HRT group consisted of 32 patients (M/F- 29/3). RT was performed using conventional fractionation (2 Gy delivered 5 times/week) for a total dose of 54-60 Gy with a 2 week split course after delivery of 36-40 Gy. Regional HT was performed using a Supertherm EP40 (40.68 MHz) capacitive heating device (Moscow, Russia), for 60-70 min 3 times a week for a total of 8-10 times. Average tumor temperatures were 42.7±0.2 deg C. RT was performed within 10-15 min after the end of HT. Complete response (CR) of primary tumors was achieved in 20 patients (62.5%) treated with HRT, and in 11 patients treated with RT alone (35.5%) (p<0.05). There was a median time to recurrence of 36 months in the HRT group compared to 9 months in the RT group (p<0.01). At the same time, the use of HT was associated with an increased incidence of radiation-induced mucositis. Median survival time for overall survival was better for the HRT group (48.0 months vs. 26 months for the RT group) (p<0.05). In addition, employment of HT did not influence the frequency of distant metastases. From this aspect, disease-free survival was not statistically different between the two therapeutic approaches. This study demonstrates that regional HT confers a significant local control and long-term survival benefit with an acceptable toxicity risk in patients with advanced oral cancer who are receiving RT. (author)

  1. Cispaltino in radiotherapy and treatment of cancer advanced cervical and high risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulltext: Uterine cervix cancer (CCU) is a frequent disease Uruguay, killing more than 100 women per year. The standard treatment CCU for patients with locoregionally advanced cataloged as (LRA), stages IIB-IVA and operated and in those patients with high risk factors relapse (AFR) was until 1999 the radiotherapy (RT) exclusive. in February that year the National Cancer Institute USA underwent a medical alert recommending the use of chemotherapy (CT) with concomitant RT (mainly cisplatin) in this group of patients. This alert was due to the publication of 5 randomized work showing an improvement in both the locoregional control and overall survival. In June 2000, both the RT Service ospital and Clinics in INDO, I modified the standard treatment of these patients by adding cisplatin 40mg/m2 weekly for the treatment of external RT. From that date until January 2003, 36 patients were included with CCU LRA or operated with AFR. the risk factors were: tumors larger than 4cm, parametrial invasion, lymph positive, involved margins, suboptimal surgery or deep infiltration stroma. 18 patients had stage IIIB or IV and of which 6 had failure obstructive acute renal (acute obstructive renal failure). Tolerance was acceptable, only one patient not tolerated treatment for severe leucopenia continuing exclusive RT; 68% had leukopenia grade - 2 and there was no increase in toxicity gastrointestinal or urinary. There were no treatment related deaths. When comparing historical results verified an improvement in complete answers to all stages primarily for advanced in the second period with the addition of cisplatin. Stage IB2-IIB: 52% (RT-CT) - 45% RT (historical) ns. Stage IIB: 22% (RT-CT) - 15% RT (historical) sl. In those patients with acute obstructive renal failure in any complete response was not achieved. Due to the short track differences still not tested for the surviving whole or survive disease-free

  2. Dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer by two phase I/II clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Between June 1995 and January 2000, 44 patients were treated with CIRT. Thirty patients had Stage IIIB disease, and 14 patients had Stage IVA disease. Median tumor size was 6.5 cm (range, 4.2-11.0 cm). The treatment consisted of 16 fractions of whole pelvic irradiation and 8 fractions of local boost. In the first study, the total dose ranged from 52.8 to 72.0 gray equivalents (GyE) (2.2-3.0 GyE per fraction). In the second study, the whole pelvic dose was fixed at 44.8 GyE, and an additional 24.0 or 28.0 GyE was given to the cervical tumor (total dose, 68.8 or 72.8 GyE). Results: No patient developed severe acute toxicity. In contrast, 8 patients developed major late gastrointestinal complications. The doses resulting in major complications were ≥60 GyE. All patients with major complications were surgically salvaged. The 5-year local control rate for patients in the first and second studies was 45% and 79%, respectively. When treated with ≥62.4 GyE, the local control was favorable even for the patients with stage IVA disease (69%) or for those with tumors ≥6.0 cm (64%). Conclusions: In CIRT for advanced cervical cancer, the dose to the intestines should be limited to <60 GyE to avoid major complications. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support continued investigation to confirm therapeutic efficacy

  3. Induction Gemcitabine and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Nonmetastatic Pancreas Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been used successfully to treat patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer. However, many patients develop metastatic disease soon after diagnosis and may receive little benefit from such therapy. We therefore retrospectively analyzed a planned strategy of initial chemotherapy with restaging and then treatment for those patients with no evidence of metastatic progression with SBRT. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients received gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m2 per week for 3 weeks then 1 week off) until tolerance, at least six cycles, or progression. Patients without metastases after two cycles were treated with SBRT (tolerance-based dose of 24–36 Gy in 3 fractions) between the third and fourth cycles without interrupting the chemotherapy cycles. Results: Eight of the 47 patients (17%) were found to have metastatic disease after two cycles of gemcitabine; the remaining 39 patients received SBRT. The median follow-up for survivors was 21 months (range, 6–36 months). The median overall survival for all patients who received SBRT was 20 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. The local control rate was 85% (33 of 39 patients); and 54% of patients (21 of 39) developed metastases. Late Grade III toxicities such as GI bleeding and obstruction were observed in 9% (3/39) of patients. Conclusion: For patients with locally advanced pancreas cancer, this strategy uses local therapy for those who are most likely to benefit from it and spares those patients with early metastatic progression from treatment. SBRT delivers such local therapy safely with minimal interruption to systemic chemotherapy, thereby potentially improving the outcome in these patients.

  4. A comparison of results by sequential and concurrent chemo radiotherapy in locally advanced carcinoma esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Bhandari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Many Trials using sequential and concurrent chemo radiotherapy have been done so far and has established the role of concurrent chemo radiotherapy in treatment of inoperable carcinoma esophagus. In this study, we have compared the results of concurrent chemo radiotherapy with sequential chemo radiotherapy. We have treated inoperable carcinoma esophagus in both the settings and present here the comparison of results in the two settings. Materials and Methods: There were 26 patients of carcinoma esophagus in sequential and 31 in concurrent chemo radiotherapy arm. In sequential arm methotrexate and Cisplatin followed by radiotherapy was given whereas in concurrent arm, Cisplatin was given once weekly along with radiotherapy. Results: The 2 year survival was 38% in sequential and35.5% in the concurrent setting and the median survival was 19.5 and 18 months respectively in the two arms.The toxicities in both the arms were comparable. P value of 0.4774 with confidence interval of 95% was obtained, which is not significant. Dysphagia was improved earlier in sequential than in the concurrent arm. Conclusion: As the results and toxicities in both the arms are almost similar with better symptom control, so larger randomized trials are required to assess the response and the use of methotrexate in sequential chemo radiotherapy can be further explored.

  5. Research Opportunities in Advanced Aerospace Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Bangert, Linda S.; Garber, Donald P.; Huebner, Lawrence D.; McKinley, Robert E.; Sutton, Kenneth; Swanson, Roy C., Jr.; Weinstein, Leonard

    2000-01-01

    This report is a review of a team effort that focuses on advanced aerospace concepts of the 21st Century. The paper emphasis advanced technologies, rather than cataloging every unusual aircraft that has ever been attempted. To dispel the myth that "aerodynamics is a mature science" an extensive list of "What we cannot do, or do not know" was enumerated. A zeit geist, a feeling for the spirit of the times, was developed, based on existing research goals. Technological drivers and the constraints that might influence these technological developments in a future society were also examined. The present status of aeronautics, space exploration, and non-aerospace applications, both military and commercial, including enabling technologies are discussed. A discussion of non-technological issues affecting advanced concepts research is presented. The benefit of using the study of advanced vehicles as a tool to uncover new directions for technology development is often necessary. An appendix is provided containing examples of advanced vehicle configurations currently of interest.

  6. Second Research Coordination Meeting on Heavy Charged-Particle Interaction Data for Radiotherapy. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) on Heavy Charged-Particle Interaction Data for Radiotherapy. The programme to compile and evaluate charged-particle nuclear data for therapeutic applications was reviewed. Technical discussions and the resulting work plan of the Coordinated Research Programme are summarized, along with planned actions and deadlines. Participants' reports at the 2nd RCM are also included in this report. (author)

  7. Advances in conformal radiotherapy using Monte Carlo Code to design new IMRT and IORT accelerators and interpret CT numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Wysocka-Rabin, A

    2013-01-01

    The introductory chapter of this monograph, which follows this Preface, provides an overview of radiotherapy and treatment planning. The main chapters that follow describe in detail three significant aspects of radiotherapy on which the author has focused her research efforts. Chapter 2 presents studies the author worked on at the German National Cancer Institute (DKFZ) in Heidelberg. These studies applied the Monte Carlo technique to investigate the feasibility of performing Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) by scanning with a narrow photon beam. This approach represents an alternative to techniques that generate beam modulation by absorption, such as MLC, individually-manufactured compensators, and special tomotherapy modulators. The technical realization of this concept required investigation of the influence of various design parameters on the final small photon beam. The photon beam to be scanned should have a diameter of approximately 5 mm at Source Surface Distance (SSD) distance, and the penumbr...

  8. Advance consent, critical interests and dementia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Although advance directives have become a familiar instrument within the context of treatment, there has been minimal support for their expansion into the context of research. In this paper I argue that the principle of precedent autonomy that grants a competent person the right to refuse life-sustaining treatment when later incompetent, also grants a competent person the right to consent to research that is greater than minimal risk. An examination of the principle of precedent autonomy reveals that a future-binding research decision is within the scope of a competent person's critical interests, if the decision is consistent with what the person believes gives her life intrinsic value. PMID:25118248

  9. Experience in treatment of patients with locally advanced or recurrent breast cancer. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of local control and breast conservation, intraarterial infusion chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy has been indicated in patients with locally advanced breast cancer both in primary and recurrent cases. The present series, evaluated during the past 4 years, consisted of 15 patients 35-83 years of age, with invasive ductal carcinoma, including 10 with primary breast cancer (stage IIIb: 1, IV: 9) and 5 with postoperative recurrence (stage IIIb: 2, IV: 3). Intraarterial chemotherapy is started, basically infusing ADM 50 mg, MMC 10 mg and CDDP 50 mg into the internal thoracic and/or subclavian artery 1-3 times, followed by reduction surgery (quadrantectomy: 4, wide resection: 2) and radiotherapy to the breast, supraclavicular, parasternal and cervical regions according to tumor extent. Local response after arterial infusion was CR: 2, PR: 10, NC: 3 (response rate: 73% ). The response rate of distant metastases after arterial infusion was 73%. Of 10 patients with primary breast cancer, recurrence was noted in 1. Breast conservation was successful in 8 of 10 patients. One of them, in stage IIIb, has survived for 4.5 years with no evidence of disease and with breast conservation. Five patients with postoperative recurrence showed CR with no recurrence after intraarterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Acute skin reaction occurred in 6 patients, and was especially frequent in patients with postoperative recurrence (4 of 5). According to these results, combined therapy affords breast conservation even in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, and improves patient's QOL in stage IV. (author)

  10. Combination of radiotherapy and selective chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced ovarian carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on 160 patients suffering from ovarian carcinomas the stages which were exactly determined by TNM classification. 32 patients had tumors of the stages T1-T3, 128 patients had tumors of the stage T4. All T3 subgroups showed favorable results after radical surgery and a postoperative combination of radiotherapy and selective cytostatic chemotherapy. The therapy plans including radiotherapy had more advantages than those without radiotherapy. Furthermore, the cytostatic treatment was more successful after a chemotherapy resistance test than after blind administration of cytostatic drugs. (orig.)

  11. Advanced energy projects FY 1997 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) program is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts that are high risk, in terms of scientific feasibility, yet have a realistic potential for a high technological payoff. The concepts supported by the AEP are typically at an early stage of scientific development. They often arise from advances in basic research and are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. Some are based on discoveries of new scientific phenomena or involve exploratory ideas that span multiple scientific and technical disciplines which do not fit into an existing DOE program area. In all cases, the objective is to support evaluation of the scientific or technical feasibility of the novel concepts involved. Following AEP support, it is expected that each concept will be sufficiently developed to attract further funding from other sources to realize its full potential. Projects that involve evolutionary research or technology development and demonstration are not supported by AEP. Furthermore, research projects more appropriate for another existing DOE research program are not encouraged. There were 65 projects in the AEP research portfolio during Fiscal Year 1997. Eigheen projects were initiated during that fiscal year. This document consists of short summaries of projects active in FY 1997. Further information of a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator.

  12. New advances in virtual plant research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Virtual plants are computer simulations of the growth, development and deployment of plants in a three-dimensional space. Over the past 20 years, significant pro-gress has been made in virtual plant modeling corresponding to the rapid advances in information technology. Virtual plant research has broad applications in agronomy, forestry, ecology, and remote sensing areas. In this review, we attempt to introduce the significance, modeling methodology, and main advances in virtual plant research and applications. The challenges associated with virtual plant modeling in agronomy applications, including the interaction mechanism between plant and environment and root system modeling, are also discussed. Insights into applications of virtual plants in agronomy are given in the areas of performing virtual experiments to accurately quantify the utilization of soil water and nutrients, to design crop ideotype on computers, and to improve crop planting.

  13. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  14. Beyond competence: advance directives in dementia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Karin Rolanda; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients' gradual loss of the capacity to consent. Patients with dementia are characterized by the fact that, at an earlier stage of their life, they were able to give their consent to participation in research. Therefore, the phase when patients are still competent to decide offers a valuable opportunity to authorize research, by using an advance research directive (ARD). Yet, the use of ARDs as an authorization for research participation remains controversial. In this paper we discuss the role of autonomous decision-making and the protection of incompetent research subjects. We will show why ARDs are a morally defensible basis for the inclusion of this population in biomedical research and that the use of ARDs is compatible with the protection of incompetent research subjects. PMID:26458366

  15. Intensity-Modulated Whole Abdominal Radiotherapy After Surgery and Carboplatin/Taxane Chemotherapy for Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and toxicity of consolidative intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) after surgery and chemotherapy in high-risk patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with optimally debulked ovarian cancer International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIIc were treated in a Phase I study with intensity-modulated WAR up to a total dose of 30 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions as consolidation therapy after adjuvant carboplatin/taxane chemotherapy. Treatment was delivered using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in a step-and-shoot technique (n = 3) or a helical tomotherapy technique (n = 7). The planning target volume included the entire peritoneal cavity and the pelvic and para-aortal node regions. Organs at risk were kidneys, liver, heart, vertebral bodies, and pelvic bones. Results: Intensity-modulated WAR resulted in an excellent coverage of the planning target volume and an effective sparing of the organs at risk. The treatment was well tolerated, and no severe Grade 4 acute side effects occurred. Common Toxicity Criteria Grade III toxicities were as follows: diarrhea (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 1), and leukopenia (n = 3). Radiotherapy could be completed by all the patients without any toxicity-related interruption. Median follow-up was 23 months, and 4 patients had tumor recurrence (intraperitoneal progression, n = 3; hepatic metastasis, n = 1). Small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The results of this Phase I study showed for the first time, to our knowledge, the clinical feasibility of intensity-modulated whole abdominal radiotherapy, which could offer a new therapeutic option for consolidation treatment of advanced ovarian carcinoma after adjuvant chemotherapy in selected subgroups of patients. We initiated a Phase II study to further evaluate the toxicity of this intensive multimodal treatment.

  16. Establishing a framework to implement 4D XCAT Phantom for 4D radiotherapy research

    OpenAIRE

    Panta, Raj K.; Paul Segars; Fang-Fang Yin; Jing Cai

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To establish a framework to implement the 4D integrated extended cardiac torso (XCAT) digital phantom for 4D radiotherapy (RT) research. Materials and Methods: A computer program was developed to facilitate the characterization and implementation of the 4D XCAT phantom. The program can (1) generate 4D XCAT images with customized parameter files; (2) review 4D XCAT images; (3) generate composite images from 4D XCAT images; (4) track motion of selected region-of-interested (ROI); (5) c...

  17. UZIG USGS research: Advances through interdisciplinary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J.R.; Andraski, B.J.; Rafael, M.-C.

    2009-01-01

    Because vadose zone research relates to diverse disciplines, applications, and modes of research, collaboration across traditional operational and topical divisions is especially likely to yield major advances in understanding. The Unsaturated Zone Interest Group (UZIG) is an informal organization sponsored by the USGS to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration in vadose or unsaturated zone hydrologic research across organizational boundaries. It includes both USGS and non-USGS scientists. Formed in 1987, the UZIG operates to promote communication, especially through periodic meetings with presentations, discussions, and fi eld trips. The 10th meeting of the UZIG at Los Alamos, NM, in August 2007 was jointly sponsored by the USGS and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Presentations at this meeting served as the initial basis for selecting papers for this special section of Vadose Zone Journal, the purpose of which is to present noteworthy cuting-edge unsaturated zone research promoted by, facilitated by, or presented in connection with the UZIG. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  18. Preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancers: a phase I-II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the toxicity, pathologic response rates, type of surgery, and oncologic results in a prospective Phase I-II trial using pure hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) preoperatively in locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 1997 and April 2000, 50 patients with T3-T4 or N1 rectal cancers were treated preoperatively with 50 Gy (45 Gy to the pelvis and a 5-Gy tumor boost) in 40 fractions of 1.25 Gy during 4 weeks. The pretreatment tumor stage as determined by CT and endorectal ultrasonography (80% of patients) included 1 Stage T2 (2%), 45 T3 (90%), and 4 T4 (8%). Nodal involvement (N1) was documented in 26 patients (52%). Surgery was performed at a median interval of 45 days (range 26-114 days) after RT completion. Seventeen patients who presented with pT4 or pN1 and/or pM1 received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy postoperatively. Results: All patients completed the RT schedule as planned. Severe acute toxicities included two Grade 3 skin reactions (4%) that did not require a break. The other acute toxicities were Grade 2 or less (skin, diarrhea, urinary, rectal tenesmus, and fatigue). A complete pathologic response was observed in 7 patients (14%), and microscopic residual cancer was found in 10 (20%). Of the 20 patients presenting with tumor located ≤6 cm from the anal verge, sphincter-saving surgery was performed in 14 (70%). At 3 years, the actuarial locoregional control rate was 90.5%, and the disease-free survival rate was 74.6%. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 4 patients (8%) presented with severe late complications (Grade 3-4) that might have been RT related (one rectovaginal fistula, two chronic perineal fistulas, and one bilateral ureteral stenosis). Conclusion: In locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative hyperfractionated RT to a total dose of 50 Gy is feasible, with acceptable acute and late toxicity and an objective downstaging effect. In view of these results, this schedule might be used as a

  19. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinser-Sierra Juan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC, 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT in patients with LABC. Methods One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC, or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC IV in four 21-day courses followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg, and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Results Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5% and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5% if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%. No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04. Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%. The toxicity profile was acceptable. Conclusion This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted.

  20. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite broad advances in multimodal treatment of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), 30 to 40% of patients develop loco-regional relapse. The aim of this study was to analyze in a retrospective manner the effectiveness of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRTh) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) in patients with LABC. One hundred twelve patients with LABC (stage IIB-IIIB) were treated with NCT (5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (FAC), or doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 (AC) IV in four 21-day courses) followed by CCRTh (60 Gy breast irradiation and weekly mitomycin 5 mg/m2, 5-fluorouracil 500 mg/m2, and dexamethasone 16 mg, or cisplatin 30 mg/m2, gemcitabine 100 mg/m2 and dexamethasone 16 mg), and 6–8 weeks later, surgery and two additional courses of FAC, AC, or paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 weekly for 12 weeks, and in case of estrogen-receptor positive patients, hormonal therapy. Stages IIB, IIIA and -B were 21.4, 42.9, and 35.7%, respectively. Pathological complete response (pCR) in the breast was 42% (95% CI, 33.2–50.5%) and, 29.5% (95% CI, 21.4–37.5%) if including both the breast and the axillary nodes. Multivariate analysis showed that the main determinant of pCR was negative estrogen-receptor status (HR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5–9; p = 0.016). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 76.9% (95% CI, 68.2–84.7%). No relationship between pCR and DFS was found. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the main DFS determinant was clinical stage (IIB and IIIA vs. IIIB, HR = 3.1; 95% CI, 1.02–9.74; p = 0.04). Only one patient had local recurrence. Five-year overall survival was 84.2% (95% CI, 75–93.2%). The toxicity profile was acceptable. This non-conventional multimodal treatment has good loco-regional control for LABC. Randomized clinical trials of preoperative CCRTh following chemotherapy, in patients with LABC are warranted

  1. Induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy in loco-regionally advanced epidermoid carcinoma of the anal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the treatment results of induction chemotherapy (IC) with carboplatin + 5-FU in combination with curatively intended external beam radiotherapy (RT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-two patients diagnosed during the period 1989 - 1994 with loco-regionally advanced cancer of the anal (PHI Tmax≥4 cm or T4 or N+) were treated with IC consisting of one to three courses of carboplatin (300 - 375 mg/m2 i.v.) and 5-fluorouracil [5,000 mg/(m2x120 h) i.v.] followed by RT ± surgery. Treatment results have been analyzed and retrospectively compared to those for 17 patients fulfilling the same disease criteria but treated according to the Swedish National Care Program for Anal Carcinoma during the period 1985 - 1991. Differences in proportions were tested with Fisher's exact test. Kaplan-Meier life table analysis and the Wilcoxon-Peto test statistic were used in the univariate analyses of longitudinal follow-up data. Cox regression analysis was used for the multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The IC regimen is well tolerated. The most common side effects are oral mucositis, gastro-intestinal symptoms with diarrhoea, haematological toxicity, and general fatigue. The treatment results appear promising. A greater proportion of the patients in the IC + RT group were tumor free at conclusion of the primary therapy ((30(32)) vs (10(17)); P = .02). Statistically significant differences in favor of the induction therapy regimen were also found in the Kaplan-Meier analyses for preservation of sphincter (65% vs 46% at 5 years; P = .02), for probability of survival with a preserved sphincter (52 % vs 33 % at 5 years, P = .02), and freedom from recurrence (76 % vs 35 % at 5 years; P = .003). No difference was found with respect to overall survival (66 % vs 59 % at 5 years, P = .8) and tumor specific survival (80 % vs 63 % at 5 years, P = .3). The multivariate Cox regression analyses yielded a significant result in favor of the new regimen with respect to risk for

  2. Advanced energy projects FY 1994 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The AEP also supports high-risk, exploratory concepts that do not readily fit into a program area but could have several applications that may span scientific disciplines or technical areas. Projects supported by the Division arise from unsolicited ideas and concepts submitted by researchers. The portfolio of projects is dynamic and reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation`s energy outlook. FY 1994 projects include the following topical areas: novel materials for energy technology; renewable and biodegradable materials; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; alternative energy sources; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries are given for 66 projects.

  3. Advanced energy projects FY 1994 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The AEP also supports high-risk, exploratory concepts that do not readily fit into a program area but could have several applications that may span scientific disciplines or technical areas. Projects supported by the Division arise from unsolicited ideas and concepts submitted by researchers. The portfolio of projects is dynamic and reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation's energy outlook. FY 1994 projects include the following topical areas: novel materials for energy technology; renewable and biodegradable materials; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; alternative energy sources; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries are given for 66 projects

  4. Advanced energy projects: FY 1987 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains brief summaries of all projects active in the Division of Advanced Energy Projects during Fiscal Year 1987 (October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987). The intent of this compilation is to provide a convenient means for quickly acquainting an interested reader with the program in Advanced Energy Projects. More detailed information on research activities in a particular project may be obtained by contacting directly the principal investigator. Some projects will have reached the end of their contract periods by the time this book appears, and will, therefore, no longer be active. Those cases in which work was completed in FY '87 are indicated by the footnote: Project completed. The annual funding level of each project is shown

  5. Cetuximab with radiotherapy in patients with loco-regionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck unsuitable or ineligible for concurrent platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy: Ready for routine clinical practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J P Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report outcomes of cetuximab concurrent with radiotherapy in advanced head-neck cancer unsuitable for platinum-based chemo-radiotherapy. Materials and Methods : Retrospective chart review of 37 patients treated with cetuximab and radiotherapy at a comprehensive cancer centre. Results : Median age of study cohort was 59 years. Thirty four (92% patients had advanced stage disease (stage III-IV. Reasons for ineligibility for platinum included impaired creatinine-clearance, old age, and/or co-morbidities. Thirty-two (86% patients completed planned radiotherapy without interruption; 29 (80% patients received ≥6 cycles of cetuximab. Fifteen patients (40.5% developed ≥grade 3 dermatitis; 9 patients (25% experienced ≥grade 3 mucositis. At a median follow-up of 16 months, the 2-year loco-regional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival was 35.5%, 29.5%, and 44.4% respectively. Stage grouping and severe dermatitis were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusions : Cetuximab concurrent with radiotherapy is a reasonable alternative in advanced head-neck cancer patients with acceptable compliance and outcomes, but higher skin toxicity.

  6. A multifaceted approach to radionuclide radiotherapy: The MURR [Missouri University Research Reactor] radioisotope program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal radionuclide radiotherapy of malignancies began with various forms of radium injections, solutions, and implants early in this century and achieved its most wide-spread success in the application of 131I iodide for the treatment of thyroid metastases. Implants such as 198Au and 192Ir, and colloids such as 32P chromic phosphate, have also proved useful, but the greatest utility would be found for radiotherapeutic drugs possessing the selectivity for other forms of cancer that radioiodine shows for thyroid carcinoma. The objective of tumor radiotherapy is the selective destruction of malignant cells by radiation while sparing normal tissue. Recent improvements in the guidance mechanisms of radiopharmaceuticals have made possible a third wave of radiotherapeutics that may revolutionize the treatment of malignancies. The basic guidance methods include direct placement (implants), anatomical-physiological deposition, chemical-physiological concentration, and immunochemical uptake. These new drugs are primarily based on reactor-produced beta emitters, because typical beta ranges of 1 to 10 mm are the most appropriate for radiotherapy. The Missouri University research reactor (MURR) Radioisotope Applications Group has been involved for 10 yr in collaborative research to bring about this new generation of cancer-fighting drugs and is currently producing isotopes for clinical trials of all these types of treatment

  7. Phase II Study of Oral S-1 and Concurrent Radiotherapy in Patients With Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that has demonstrated favorable antitumor activity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and efficacy of S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy in patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with histopathologically proven, unresectable, locally advanced pancreatic cancer were eligible. Radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8 Gy daily fractions to a total dose of 50.4 Gy over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at a dose of 80 mg/m2/day from day 1 to 14 and 22 to 35. Two weeks after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, maintenance chemotherapy with S-1 was administered for 28 days every 6 weeks until progression. Results: Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The most common Grade 3 toxicities during chemoradiotherapy were anorexia (24%) and nausea (12%). The overall response rate was 41% (95% confidence interval, 25%-58%) and overall disease control rate (partial response plus stable disease) was 97%. More than 50% decrease in serum CA 19-9 was seen in 27 of 29 evaluable patients (93%). The median progression-free survival was 8.7 months. The median overall survival and 1-year survival rate were 16.8 months and 70.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Oral S-1 and concurrent radiotherapy exerted a promising antitumor activity with acceptable toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. This combination therapy seems to be an attractive alternative to conventional chemoradiotherapy using 5-fluorouracil infusion.

  8. Short-course radiotherapy followed by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer – the RAPIDO trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current standard for most of the locally advanced rectal cancers is preoperative chemoradiotherapy, and, variably per institution, postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Short-course preoperative radiation with delayed surgery has been shown to induce tumour down-staging in both randomized and observational studies. The concept of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy has been proven successful in gastric cancer, hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer and is currently tested in primary colon cancer. Patients with rectal cancer with high risk features for local or systemic failure on magnetic resonance imaging are randomized to either a standard arm or an experimental arm. The standard arm consists of chemoradiation (1.8 Gy x 25 or 2 Gy x 25 with capecitabine) preoperatively, followed by selective postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy is optional and may be omitted by participating institutions. The experimental arm includes short-course radiotherapy (5 Gy x 5) followed by full-dose chemotherapy (capecitabine and oxaliplatin) in 6 cycles before surgery. In the experimental arm, no postoperative chemotherapy is prescribed. Surgery is performed according to TME principles in both study arms. The hypothesis is that short-course radiotherapy with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy increases disease-free and overall survival without compromising local control. Primary end-point is disease-free survival at 3 years. Secondary endpoints include overall survival, local control, toxicity profile, and treatment completion rate, rate of pathological complete response and microscopically radical resection, and quality of life. Following the advances in rectal cancer management, increased focus on survival rather than only on local control is now justified. In an experimental arm, short-course radiotherapy is combined with full-dose chemotherapy preoperatively, an alternative that offers advantages compared to concomitant chemoradiotherapy with or without postoperative

  9. Combined radiotherapy with cis- or carboplatin in advanced head and neck tumours. Kombinierte Radiotherapie mit Cis- oder Carboplatin bei fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, N.; Pape, H.; Schnabel, T.; Wurm, R.; Bannach, B.; Fuerst, G.; Schmitt, G. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie)

    1989-09-01

    This report reviews the treatment results of 111 patients with stage T3-4, N0-3, M0, biopsy proven squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and oral cavity. All patients were treated by primary irradiation with 1.8 to 2 Gy per day for five days a week up to a target volume dose of 39,6 or 40 Gy. Simultaneously 20 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin was given under hyperhydration and mannitol diuresis on days 1 to 5. In case of partial tumour regression radiotherapy was continued up to 70 Gy with another course of cisplatin. In case of minor response surgery was interposed followed by subsequent irradiation with 30 Gy and a second course of cisplatin. 67% of the patients showed an initial complete tumour involution and 27% a partial response. The five year actuarial survival rate with a minimum follow-up of two years is 47,6%. More than 96% of the long term survivors showed a complete response after the end of treatment. Carboplatin (CBDCA) is a second generation platinum analogon and has shown comparable antitumour activity but less nephro- and neurotoxicity than cisplatin in head and neck cancer. In order to determine the feasibility and efficacy of simultaneous application of CBDCA and radiotherapy a phase I-II study is going on. Patients with advanced squamous carcinoma of the head and neck were separated into three groups which received 60 mg/m{sup 2}, 70 mg/m{sup 2} and 80 mg/m{sup 2} CBDCA from days 1 to 5 and 28 to 32. Radiotherapy was administrated up to a target absorbed dose of 70 Gy, 5x2 Gy/week in shrinking field technique. The group which received 80 mg/m{sup 2} CBDCA reached the myelotoxicity limit so that subsequent patients were treated with 70 mg/m{sup 2}. Among 30 patients who completed the treatment, 22 showed a complete (CR) and eight a partial remission (PR). (orig./MG).

  10. Advanced moisture sensor research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholls, C.

    1989-11-01

    This report details the progress in the Phase I, proof of principle study for the DOE sponsored development of an advanced moisture sensor for use in non-paper drying applications. Under this program Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio Texas has developed a novel sensing system based on the technique of hydrogen transient nuclear magnetic resonance (HTNMR). The purpose of the sensor is to improve the efficiency of the drying process. Wide scale application of such efficiency improvements would not only save the consumers money but also reduce the energy consumption, and hence oil imports of the United States. 33 refs., 20 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    OpenAIRE

    Edhemovic Ibrahim; Oblak Irena; Anderluh Franc; Bracko Matej; Music Maja; Ocvirk Janja; Velenik Vaneja; Brecelj Erik; Kropivnik Mateja; Omejc Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Methods Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on ...

  12. Advanced carcinoma of the larynx: results of surgery and radiotherapy without induction chemotherapy (1980-1985): a multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Induction chemotherapy has been proposed in the case of advanced laryngeal cancer in order to preserve laryngeal function in those patients who are complete responders. To clarify the treatment policies, a retrospective multicentric analysis of 116 patients with advanced carcinoma of the larynx treated by radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was carried out in order to evaluate prognostic factors for local control and survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 1985, 116 patients with Stage III squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx underwent radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy with a curative intent. Treatments were very homogenous, and doses delivered were in the range of 50-65 Gy according to nodal involvement and surgical margins status. Results: The local recurrence rate and the local disease-free survival rate at 5 years were 22.5% and 76.3%, respectively. Actuarial survival at 5 years was 68.3% with 44 patients still alive with no evidence of disease (NED) with more than 5 years follow-up. For both overall survival and relapse-free survival, cervical node involvement with capsular rupture was found to be the only significant adverse pronostic factor in univariate and multivariate analysis. No other parameter was predictive either for local recurrence or for survival. Conclusions: Local prognosis and survival depend largely on nodal involvement and capsular rupture while increasing doses of radiation strategy is likely to reduce the risk of local and nodal recurrence. Preservation of functional larynx is certainly an important goal to achieve when treating advanced carcinoma of the larynx, provided that local failure rate and survival be similar. In the unique randomized study previously published in the literature comparing radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy to induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the local-regional failure rate was drastically increased in the chemotherapy arm. Other results from well

  13. Advance in clinical research of radiation-induced heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is one of common late side effects derived by thoracic radiotherapy. RIHD is often subclinical and there is an extremely long clinical latent period between radiation therapy and the first clinical presentation of radiation injury, and it did not cause clinical attention for a long time. Until the 1990s, epidemiologic investigations demonstrate that thoracic cancer radiotherapy increased rates of cardiac mortality, RIHD has partly offset the survival benefit provided by adjuvant RT. Radiotherapy techniques has undergone many improvements over the last decades, these improvements decreased both the volume and dose of radiation delivered to the heart, seem to have decreased the incidence of RIHD. Nonetheless, recent studies indicate that the problem of RIHD may persist. For instance, patients with Hodgkin's Disease, lung cancer, and esophageal may still receive either a high dose of radiation to a small part of the heart or a lower dose to the whole heart in radiotherapy. Therefore, long-term cardiac followup of these patients is essential. This article briefly review the clinical presentations, influence factors, prevention and managements, diagnosis and study advances of RIHD. (authors)

  14. SU-D-BRD-03: A Gateway for GPU Computing in Cancer Radiotherapy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has become increasingly important in radiotherapy. However, it is still difficult for general clinical researchers to access GPU codes developed by other researchers, and for developers to objectively benchmark their codes. Moreover, it is quite often to see repeated efforts spent on developing low-quality GPU codes. The goal of this project is to establish an infrastructure for testing GPU codes, cross comparing them, and facilitating code distributions in radiotherapy community. Methods: We developed a system called Gateway for GPU Computing in Cancer Radiotherapy Research (GCR2). A number of GPU codes developed by our group and other developers can be accessed via a web interface. To use the services, researchers first upload their test data or use the standard data provided by our system. Then they can select the GPU device on which the code will be executed. Our system offers all mainstream GPU hardware for code benchmarking purpose. After the code running is complete, the system automatically summarizes and displays the computing results. We also released a SDK to allow the developers to build their own algorithm implementation and submit their binary codes to the system. The submitted code is then systematically benchmarked using a variety of GPU hardware and representative data provided by our system. The developers can also compare their codes with others and generate benchmarking reports. Results: It is found that the developed system is fully functioning. Through a user-friendly web interface, researchers are able to test various GPU codes. Developers also benefit from this platform by comprehensively benchmarking their codes on various GPU platforms and representative clinical data sets. Conclusion: We have developed an open platform allowing the clinical researchers and developers to access the GPUs and GPU codes. This development will facilitate the utilization of GPU in radiation therapy field

  15. Role of Radiotherapy in Modern Treatment of Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kheng-Wei Yeoh; N. George Mikhaeel

    2011-01-01

    Hodgkin's Lymphoma was incurable until the advent of effective therapeutic radiation around the first half of the 20th century. As survival rates improved, the long-term toxicities from radiotherapy began to emerge. This together with the availability of effective chemotherapy has encouraged a combined modality approach for early-staged disease and the omission of radiotherapy in advanced-staged disease. The differing toxicities of radiotherapy and chemotherapy has promoted ongoing research t...

  16. Paediatric Photon and Proton Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Based on Advanced Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.

    the same group of patients, we found that although radiotherapy with protons instead of photons may provide several benefits in terms of reduced irradiated volumes of healthy tissue and lower doses to organs near the tumour, these benefits cannot be taken for granted. If proton therapy requires...... medication, and may have a considerable impact on the quality of life of the childhood cancer survivor. The major challenge in modern paediatric cancer therapy is therefore to reduce the incidence of treatment-related toxicities, while maintaining or improving the high cure-rates. In this thesis, we study...... slightly larger safety margins between tumour and radiation field in order to ensure proper target volume dose coverage and the same clinical accuracy as photon radiotherapy, the normal tissue dose-sparing benefits of proton radiotherapy may to some extent be lost....

  17. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report our experience with increased dose intensity-modulated radiation and concurrent systemic chemotherapy as definitive treatment of locally advanced esophageal cancer. We analyzed 27 consecutive patients with histologically proven esophageal cancer, who were treated with increased-dose IMRT as part of their definitive therapy. The majority of patients had T3/4 and/or N1 disease (93%). Squamous cell carcinoma was the dominating histology (81%). IMRT was delivered in step-and-shoot technique in all patients using an integrated boost concept. The boost volume was covered with total doses of 56-60 Gy (single dose 2-2.14 Gy), while regional nodal regions received 50.4 Gy (single dose 1.8 Gy) in 28 fractions. Concurrent systemic therapy was scheduled in all patients and administered in 26 (96%). 17 patients received additional adjuvant systemic therapy. Loco-regional control, progression-free and overall survival as well as acute and late toxicities were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, quality of life was prospectively assessed according to the EORTC QLQs (QLQ-OG25, QLQ-H&N35 and QLQ-C30). Radiotherapy was completed as planned in all but one patient (96%), and 21 patients received more than 80% of the planned concurrent systemic therapy. We observed ten locoregional failures, transferring into actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-locoregional control rates of 77%, 65% and 48%. Seven patients developed distant metastases, mainly to the lung (71%). The actuarial 1-, 2- and 3-year-disease free survival rates were 58%, 48% and 36%, and overall survival rates were 82%, 61% and 56%. The concept was well tolerated, both in the clinical objective examination and also according to the subjective answers to the QLQ questionnaire. 14 patients (52%) suffered from at least one acute CTC grade 3/4 toxicity, mostly hematological side effects or dysphagia. Severe late toxicities were reported in 6 patients (22%), mostly esophageal strictures and ulcerations. Severe side effects to

  18. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results

  19. Research on Advanced Thin Film Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldner, Ronald B. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2003-11-24

    During the past 7 years, the Tufts group has been carrying out research on advanced thin film batteries composed of a thin film LiCo02 cathode (positive electrode), a thin film LiPON (lithium phosphorous oxynitride) solid electrolyte, and a thin film graphitic carbon anode (negative electrode), under grant DE FG02-95ER14578. Prior to 1997, the research had been using an rfsputter deposition process for LiCoOi and LiPON and an electron beam evaporation or a controlled anode arc evaporation method for depositing the carbon layer. The pre-1997 work led to the deposition of a single layer cell that was successfully cycled for more than 400 times [1,2] and the research also led to the deposition of a monolithic double-cell 7 volt battery that was cycled for more than 15 times [3]. Since 1997, the research has been concerned primarily with developing a research-worthy and, possibly, a production-worthy, thin film deposition process, termed IBAD (ion beam assisted deposition) for depositing each ofthe electrodes and the electrolyte of a completely inorganic solid thin film battery. The main focus has been on depositing three materials - graphitic carbon as the negative electrode (anode), lithium cobalt oxide (nominally LiCoCb) as the positive electrode (cathode), and lithium phosphorus oxynitride (LiPON) as the electrolyte. Since 1998, carbon, LiCoOa, and LiPON films have been deposited using the IBAD process with the following results.

  20. Research opportunities at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility based on a low-emittance, 1.5-GeV electron storage ring with 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices and, initially, 24 bend-magnet ports. Undulators will provide high-brightness radiation at photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes to above 10 keV. Scheduled to begin operations as a US Department of Energy national user facility in the spring of 1993, the ALS will support an extensive research program in which soft x-ray and ultraviolet radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. Participating research teams to implement the initial scientific program have been selected. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  2. Advanced Energy Projects FY 1996 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects Division (AEP) is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific development and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The portfolio of projects is dynamic, but reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation`s energy posture. Topical areas presently receiving support include: alternative energy sources; innovative concepts for energy conversion and storage; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; biologically-based energy concepts; renewable and biodegradable materials; novel materials for energy technology; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries of the 70 projects currently being supported are presented. Appendices contain budget information and investigator and institutional indices.

  3. Geysers advanced direct contact condenser research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.; Bahning, T.; Bharathan, D.

    1997-12-31

    The first geothermal application of the Advanced Direct Contact Condenser (ADCC) technology developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now operational and is being tested at The Geysers Power Plant Unit 11. This major research effort is being supported through the combined efforts of NREL, The Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). NREL and PG&E have entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for a project to improve the direct-contact condenser performance at The Geysers Power Plant. This project is the first geothermal adaptation of an advanced condenser design developed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems. PG&E expects this technology to improve power plant performance and to help extend the life of the steam field by using steam more efficiently. In accordance with the CRADA, no money is transferred between the contracting parties. In this case the Department of Energy is funding NREL for their efforts in this project and PG&E is contributing funds in kind. Successful application of this technology at The Geysers will provide a basis for NREL to continue to develop this technology for other geothermal and fossil power plant systems.

  4. Phase I Trial of Preoperative Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy with Incorporated Boost and Oral Capecitabine in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the safety and efficacy of preoperative hypofractionated radiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and an incorporated boost with concurrent capecitabine in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The eligibility criteria included adenocarcinoma of the rectum, T3-T4 and/or N1-N2 disease, performance status 0 or 1, and age ≥18 years. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost were used to treat the whole pelvis to 45 Gy and the gross tumor volume plus 2 cm to 55 Gy in 25 treatments within 5 weeks. The study was designed to escalate the dose to the gross tumor volume in 5-Gy increments in 3-patient cohorts. Capecitabine was given orally 825 mg/m2 twice daily for 7 days each week during RT. The primary endpoint was the maximal tolerated radiation dose, and the secondary endpoints were the pathologic response and quality of life. Results: Eight patients completed RT at the initial dose level of 55 Gy. The study was discontinued because of toxicity-six Grade 3 toxicities occurred in 3 (38%) of 8 patients. All patients went on to definitive surgical resection, and no patient had a pathologically complete response. Conclusion: This regimen, using hypofractionated RT with an incorporated boost, had unacceptable toxicity despite using standard doses of capecitabine and IMRT. Additional research is needed to determine whether IMRT is able to reduce the side effects during and after pelvic RT with conventional dose fractionation

  5. Comparison of concomitant boost radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers: A phase III randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the toxicity and efficacy of concomitant boost radiotherapy alone against concurrent chemoradiation (conventional fractionation) in locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer in our patient population. Methods and materials: In this open-label, randomised trial, 216 patients with histologically proven Stage III–IVA oropharyngeal cancer were randomly assigned between June 2006 and December 2010 to receive either chemoradiation (CRT) to a dose of 66 Gy in 33 fractions over 6.5 weeks with concurrent cisplatin (100 mg/m2 on days 1, 22 and 43) or accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant boost (CBRT) to a dose of 67.5 Gy in 40 fractions over 5 weeks. The compliance, toxicity and quality of life were investigated. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared using log rank test. Results: The compliance to radiotherapy was superior in concomitant boost with lesser treatment interruptions (p = 0.004). Expected acute toxicities were significantly higher in CRT, except for grade 3/4 mucositis which was seen more in CBRT arm (39% and 55% in CRT and CBRT, respectively; p = 0.02). Late toxicities like Grade 3 xerostomia were significantly high in CRT arm than CBRT arm (33% versus 18%; p 2 cm had significantly better DFS with CRT (p = 0.05; HR-1.59, 95%CI-0.93–2.7). Conclusion: In selected patients of locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer, concomitant boost offers a better compliance, toxicity profile and quality of life with similar disease control, than chemoradiation

  6. Locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy plus concurrent weekly cisplatin with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Chan Woo; Keam, Bhum Suk; Heo, Dae Seog; Sung, Myung Whun; Won, Tae Bin; Wu, Hong Gyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The outcomes of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with/without neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) were evaluated. Eighty-three patients who underwent NCT followed by CCRT (49%) or CCRT with/without adjuvant chemotherapy (51%) were reviewed. To the gross tumor, 67.5 Gy was prescribed. Weekly cisplatin was used as concurrent chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 49.4 months, the 5-year local control, regional control, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 94.7%, 89.3%, 77.8%, 68.0%, and 81.8%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (p = 0.016) and N stage (p = 0.001) were negative factors for DMFS and DFS, respectively. Overall, NCT demonstrated no benefit and an increased risk of severe hematologic toxicity. However, compared to patients treated with CCRT alone, NCT showed potential of improving DMFS in stage IV patients. CCRT using IMRT resulted in excellent local control and survival outcome. Without evidence of survival benefit from phase III randomized trials, NCT should be carefully administered in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who are at high-risk of developing distant metastasis and radiotherapy-related mucositis. The results of ongoing trials are awaited.

  7. A phase II randomized trial comparing radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin or weekly paclitaxel in patients with advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a prospective comparison of weekly cisplatin to weekly paclitaxel as concurrent chemotherapy with standard radiotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between May 2000 and May 2004, 31 women with FIGO stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer or with postsurgical pelvic recurrence were enrolled into this phase II study and randomized to receive on a weekly basis either 40 mg/m2 Cisplatin (group I; 16 patients) or 50 mg/m2 paclitaxel (group II; 15 patients) concurrently with radiotherapy. Median total dose to point A was 74 Gy (range: 66-92 Gy) for group I and 66 Gy (range: 40-98 Gy) for group II. Median follow-up time was 46 months. Patient and tumor characteristics were similar in both groups. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles was also comparable with 87% and 80% of patients receiving at least 4 doses in groups I and II, respectively. Seven patients (44%) of group I and 8 patients (53%) of group II developed tumor recurrence. The Median Survival time was not reached for Group I and 53 months for group II. The proportion of patients surviving at 2 and 5 years was 78% and 54% for group I and 73% and 43% for group II respectively. This small prospective study shows that weekly paclitaxel does not provide any clinical advantage over weekly cisplatin for concurrent chemoradiation for advanced carcinoma of the cervix

  8. Development of phantom and methodology for 3D and 4D dose intercomparisons for advanced lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are few reported intercomparisons or audits of combinations of advanced radiotherapy methods, particularly for 4D treatments. As part of an evaluation of the implementation of advanced radiotherapy technology, a phantom and associated methods, initially developed for in-house commissioning and QA of 4D lung treatments, has been developed further with the aim of using it for end-to-end dose intercomparison of 4D treatment planning and delivery. The respiratory thorax phantom can house moving inserts with variable speed (breathing rate) and motion amplitude. In one set-up mode it contains a small ion chamber for point dose measurements, or alternatively it can hold strips of radiochromic film to measure dose distributions. Initial pilot and feasibility measurements have been carried out in one hospital to thoroughly test the methods and procedures before using it more widely across a range of hospitals and treatment systems. Overall, the results show good agreement between measured and calculated doses and distributions, supporting the use of the phantom and methodology for multi-centre intercomparisons. However, before wider use, refinements of the method and analysis are currently underway particularly for the film measurements

  9. Locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy plus concurrent weekly cisplatin with or without neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcomes of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with/without neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) were evaluated. Eighty-three patients who underwent NCT followed by CCRT (49%) or CCRT with/without adjuvant chemotherapy (51%) were reviewed. To the gross tumor, 67.5 Gy was prescribed. Weekly cisplatin was used as concurrent chemotherapy. With a median follow-up of 49.4 months, the 5-year local control, regional control, distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 94.7%, 89.3%, 77.8%, 68.0%, and 81.8%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (p = 0.016) and N stage (p = 0.001) were negative factors for DMFS and DFS, respectively. Overall, NCT demonstrated no benefit and an increased risk of severe hematologic toxicity. However, compared to patients treated with CCRT alone, NCT showed potential of improving DMFS in stage IV patients. CCRT using IMRT resulted in excellent local control and survival outcome. Without evidence of survival benefit from phase III randomized trials, NCT should be carefully administered in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who are at high-risk of developing distant metastasis and radiotherapy-related mucositis. The results of ongoing trials are awaited

  10. Radioisotope radiotherapy research and achievements at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) along with various other departments of the University of Missouri have been involved for many years in developing new means of internal radioisotopic therapy for cancer. These efforts have centered on methods of targeting radioisotopes such as brachytherapy, embolization of liver tumors with radioactive microspheres, small molecule-labeled chelate guidance for the treatment of bone cancer, and various means of radioimmunotherapy or labeled receptor agent targeting. All of this medical research and practical application of radioisotope therapy has been built on MURR's high neutron flux and outstanding reliability of operation, as well as MURR's flexibility in meeting the needs of researchers and the radiopharmaceutical industry. For many years MURR has produced Au-198 and Ir-192 wires for subsequent fabrication into brachytherapy sources for treatment of isolated tumors. An extension of this approach is embodied in Y-90 TheraSphere, which consists of Y-89-containing glass microspheres which are activated to contain Y-90 and injected in the blood supply of liver tumors. This approach leads to embolisation and very high radiation doses to tumor with minimal side effects, and is currently in use at six centers in the U.S. MURR has been instrumental in the development of bone agents such as Re-186 HEDP and Sm-153 Quadramet, the latter of which is now an approved drug for palliation of the pain from metastatic bone cancer. A related development is MURR's participation in trials using Ho-166 DOP to ablate diseased bone marrow in patients afflicted with multiple myeloma prior to reinfusion of cleansed, autologous marrow. This procedure has passed Phase I and II trials in the U.S., achieving approx. 50% complete remissions in multiple myeloma patients. MURR is currently upgrading its facilities to meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) requirements for Phase III of this

  11. Uni- and multivariate analysis of eight indications for post-operative radiotherapy and their significance for local-regional cure in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eighty consecutive patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with combined therapy of radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy. Indications for post-operative radiotherapy were pathological staging of the primary tumour (pT3 or pT4), poorly differentiated or undifferentiated carcinoma (G3, G4), tumour thickness, tumour invasion in the surrounding tissues with slender tumour strands and solitary tumour cells, perineural spread, lymphangio-invasive tumour growth, multiple positive neck nodes or extranodal spread, and microscopical irradicality of the surgical margins. The contribution for prognosis of these indications for post-operative radiotherapy were retrospectively calculated in univariate and multivariate analysis. Of all investigated parameters, the mode of tumour invasion and lymphangio-invasive growth were independent prognostic factors. If these unfavourable prognostic signs are present, post-operative radiotherapy has to be intensified to at least curative doses of 66 Gy or more to areas at risk. (author)

  12. REST advanced research topics and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, Erik; Alarcon, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This book serves as a starting point for people looking for a deeper principled understanding of REST, its applications, its limitations, and current research work in the area and as an architectural style. The authors focus on applying REST beyond Web applications (i.e., in enterprise environments), and in reusing established and well-understood design patterns. The book examines how RESTful systems can be designed and deployed, and what the results are in terms of benefits and challenges encountered in the process. This book is intended for information and service architects and designers who are interested in learning about REST, how it is applied, and how it is being advanced.

  13. New advances in gastrointestinal motility research

    CERN Document Server

    Pullan, A; Farrugia, G

    2013-01-01

    Research into gastrointestinal motility has received renewed interest in part due to recent advances in the techniques for measuring the structure and function of gastrointestinal cells, tissue and organs. The integration of this wealth of data into biophysically based computation models can aid in interpretation of experimental and clinical measurements and the refinement of measurement techniques. The contents of this book span multiple scales - from cell, tissue, organ, to whole body and is divided into four broad sections covering: i) gastrointestinal cellular activity and tissue structure; (ii) techniques for measuring, analyzing and visualizing high-resolution extra-cellular recordings; (iii) methods for sensing gastroelectrical activity using non-invasive bio-electro-magnetic fields and for modulating the underlying gastric electrical activity, and finally; (iv) methods for assessing manometric and videographic motility patterns and the application of these data for predicting the flow and mixing behav...

  14. Radical surgery and postoperative radiotherapy as combined treatment in rectal cancer. Final results of a phase III study of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is controversy whether adjuvant radiotherapy should be given before or after surgery for locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy substantially reduces local recurrence rates but may increase postoperative complications. In addition, patients found to have early cancers are treated unnecessarily. This study is a randomized trial of postoperative radiotherapy in patients who had a potentially curative resection for locally advanced rectal carcinoma. This trial failed to demonstrate any importance in overall survival or local control when postoperative irradiation was given following resection of locally advanced rectal carcinoma. (author)

  15. Combining advanced radiotherapy technologies to maximize safety and tumor control probability in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The goal of the current study was to investigate the tumor control probability (TCP) of advanced radiotherapy technologies for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate potential interplay effects between their applications. Materials and methods: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with conventionally fractionated doses of 66 Gy served as reference for 13 patients with stage III NSCLC. Isotoxic dose escalation relative to the corresponding 3D-CRT plans was performed for three technologies and their combinations: intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), IMRT with a simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB) of 10% to the gross tumor volume (GTV), and adaptive re-planning twice during the treatment course (ART). All analyses were based on accumulated dose distributions using deformable image registration of CT images, which were acquired weekly during the treatment course. Results: IMRT reduced the mean lung dose (MLD) by 5.6% ± 3.8% compared to 3D-CRT. ART resulted in lung sparing of 7.9% ± 4.8% and 9.2% ± 3.9% in 3D-CRT and IMRT planning, respectively. IMRT and ART escalated the irradiation dose by 6.6% ± 3.2% and 8.8% ± 6.3%, respectively, which was not statistically different. For the 7 patients with the largest GTVs, IMRT-SIB was superior to IMRT and ART with dose escalation of 11.9% ± 3.7%. The combination of ART, IMRT, and SIB achieved maximum dose escalation in all 13 patients by 17.1% ± 5.4% on average, which increased TCP from 19.9% ± 7.0 to 37.1% ± 10.1%. Adaptive re-planning was required to continuously conform the escalated and hypofractionated SIB doses to the shrinking tumor. Conclusion: Combining advanced radiotherapy technologies is considered as a safe and effective strategy to maximize local tumor control probability in stage III NSCLC. (orig.)

  16. Locoregionally advanced carcinoma of the oropharynx: conventional radiotherapy vs. accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy vs. concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy - a multicenter randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare conventional fractionation radiation therapy (RT), Arm A, vs. split-course accelerated hyperfractionated RT (S-AHF), Arm B, vs. conventional fractionation RT plus concomitant chemotherapy (CT), Arm C, in terms of survival and toxicity for advanced, unresectable epidermoid tumors of oropharynx. Methods and Materials: Between January 1993 and June 1998, 192 previously untreated patients affected with Stage III and IV oropharyngeal carcinoma (excluding T1N1 and T2N1) were accrued in a multicenter, randomized Phase III trial (ORO 93-01). For Arms A and C, 66-70 Gy in 33-35 fractions, 5 days a week, were administered in 6.5-7 weeks to tumor and positive nodes. In Arm B, the dose delivered to tumor and involved nodes was 64-67.2 Gy, giving 2 fractions of 1.6 Gy every day with an interfraction interval of at least 4 h and preferably 6 h, 5 days a week. At 38.4 Gy, a 2-week split was planned; after the split, RT was resumed with the same modality. In Arm C, CT regimen consisted of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CBDCA 75 mg/m2, Days 1-4; 5-FU 1,000 mg/m2 i.v. over 96 h, Days 1-4, recycling every 28 days (at 1st, 5th, and 9th week). Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival (p=0.129): 40% Arm A vs. 37% Arm B vs. 51% Arm C were alive at 24 months. Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of event-free survival (p=0.196): 20% for Arm A, 19% for Arm B, and 37% for Arm C were event free at 24 months. On the contrary, the 2-year disease-free survival was significantly different among the three arms (p = 0.022), with a superiority for Arm C. At 24 months, the proportion of patients without relapse was 42% for Arm C vs. 23% for Arm A and 20% for Arm B. Patients in Arm A less frequently developed G3+ acute mucositis than their counterparts in Arm B or C (14.7% vs. 40.3% vs. 44%). Regarding the CT-related acute toxicity, apart from 1 case of fatal nephrotoxicity, only hematologic G3+ (Grade 3 or

  17. Palliative radiotherapy. Ranking within an interdisciplinary treatment concept in case of advanced tumor disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many tumor-induced symptoms can be alleviated by suitable irradiation in a direct, effective and sparing manner. The clinical response amounts to 80% and is independent of tumor histology. Careful diagnosis and accurate localisation of the causes of symptoms as well as exact therapy planning and execution are required. Based on individual dose planning harmonising single dosis and total dosis, pin-pointed definition of target areas, and application of modern planning and irradiation techniques, palliative radiotherapy is able to achieve long-term improvement with neglectible side-effects, sometimes within only a few days or weeks. It is a valuable part of a consistant therapy concept that is tailored to the individual needs of a patient, by cooperative action of experts from a variety of medical disciplines, intended to optimize the quality of life of patients, and sometimes may exclude conventional radiotherapy. (orig./CB)

  18. A meta-analysis of hyperfractionated and accelerated radiotherapy and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens in unresected locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Former meta-analyses have shown a survival benefit for the addition of chemotherapy (CHX) to radiotherapy (RT) and to some extent also for the use of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) and accelerated radiation therapy (AFRT) in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck. However, the publication of new studies and the fact that many older studies that were included in these former meta-analyses used obsolete radiation doses, CHX schedules or study designs prompted us to carry out a new analysis using strict inclusion criteria. Randomised trials testing curatively intended RT (≥60 Gy in >4 weeks/>50 Gy in <4 weeks) on SCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, and larynx published as full paper or in abstract form between 1975 and 2003 were eligible. Trials comparing RT alone with concurrent or alternating chemoradiation (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cisplatin, carboplatin, mitomycin C) were analyzed according to the employed radiation schedule and the used CHX regimen. Studies comparing conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) with either HFRT or AFRT without CHX were separately examined. End point of the meta-analysis was overall survival. Thirty-two trials with a total of 10 225 patients were included into the meta-analysis. An overall survival benefit of 12.0 months was observed for the addition of simultaneous CHX to either CFRT or HFRT/AFRT (p < 0.001). Separate analyses by cytostatic drug indicate a prolongation of survival of 24.0 months, 16.8 months, 6.7 months, and 4.0 months, respectively, for the simultaneous administration of 5-FU, cisplatin-based, carboplatin-based, and mitomycin C-based CHX to RT (each p < 0.01). Whereas no significant gain in overall survival was observed for AFRT in comparison to CFRT, a substantial prolongation of median survival (14.2 months, p < 0.001) was seen for HFRT compared to CFRT (both without CHX). RT combined with simultaneous 5-FU, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin C as

  19. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  1. Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicity of Concurrent Paclitaxel and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To report the long-term outcomes and toxicity of a regimen of infusion paclitaxel delivered concurrently with radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 1999, 35 patients with nonmetastatic, Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with three cycles of paclitaxel as a 120-h continuous infusion beginning on Days 1, 21, and 42, concurrent with radiotherapy. The initial 16 patients received 105 mg/m2/cycle, and the subsequent 19 patients received 120 mg/m2/cycle. External beam radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70.2-72 Gy at five fractions weekly. Patients were followed to evaluate the disease outcomes and late toxicity of this regimen. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 56.5 months. The median survival was 56.5 months, and the median time to local recurrence was not reached. Of the 35 patients, 15 (43%) developed hypothyroidism. Of the 33 patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, 11 were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependent until death or their last follow-up visit. Also, 5 patients (14%) required a tracheostomy until death, and 3 (9%) developed a severe esophageal stricture. All evaluated long-term survivors exhibited salivary hypofunction. Fibrosis in the radiation field occurred in 24 patients (69%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 120-h infusion of paclitaxel provides long-term local control and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Xerostomia, hypothyroidism, esophageal and pharyngeal complications, and subcutaneous fibrosis were common long-term toxicities; however, the vast majority of toxicities were grade 1 or 2.

  2. A randomized study of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy with and without mitomycin C in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezzat, M.; Shouman, T.; Zaza, K.;

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally...... advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (1) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). Results: The 2-year overall...... survival (OS) of the whole group was 21%. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%, and 28% in CF, AF, and AF+MMC arms respectively (p<0.19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%, and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (p=0...

  3. Advances in European drought research efforts and related research networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallaksen, Lena; van Lanen, Henny

    2010-05-01

    catchment structure (i.e. presence of stores) in drought development is still limited. Climate change projections for Europe further indicate that drought is likely to become more frequent and more severe due to warmer northern winters and a warmer and dryer Mediterranean region. This presentation reviews current knowledge on the main climate drivers of drought in Europe, important land-surface feedback processes, drought propagation (meteorological to hydrological droughts), major historical events, spatial and temporal characteristics of drought, and methodologies for monitoring and forecasting. Recent and ongoing European drought research projects and networks are presented, focusing on their role in advancing our knowledge on drought within different research areas and hydroclimatological regions. Finally, some recommendations for further research are given, including the need for access to updated data across national boundaries. A joint interdisciplinary effort is suggested to advance our knowledge through a comprehensive assessment of recent major large-scale droughts in Europe.

  4. Radiotherapy of the cephalic segment in patients with advanced neuroblastoma; Radioterapia do segmento cefalico em pacientes portadores de neuroblastoma avancado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltman, Eduardo

    1995-07-01

    Although the treatment results have significantly improved for several pediatric malignant neoplasms, particularly Wilms's tumor, lymphomas and leukemia, in the last decade, the prognosis of the INSS, stage 4 neuroblastoma over one year one old patients remains poor. Even for the more advanced centers, using the more aggressive treatment schedules, such as bone marrow transplantation, the probability of a 2 year progression free interval varies from 6 to 50% and at 3 to 6 years, from 13 to 54%. Thereby, at least, 46 to 94% of these patients are expected to die due to the merciless neoplasm progression. The hypothesis here to be tested is regarding the impact of the cephalic irradiation on the outcome of stage 4 patients with skull metastasis at diagnosis. The end point was to establish, under the NEURO-III-85 protocol chemotherapy schedule, the possible benefit of this radiotherapy in preventing the cephalic recurrence, and its reflex on these patients total and diseases free survival. These results disclosed that the cephalic segment irradiation may prevent recurrences at this site. Unfortunately, the decrease in the cranial recurrence frequency did not affect either the disease free interval, or the total survival. The conclusion was that cephalic irradiation have the potential of avoiding these recurrences, without modifying the final outcome. This modality of radiotherapy must be reevaluated under more effective systemic treatments. (author)

  5. Eagleworks Laboratories: Advanced Propulsion Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold; March, Paul; Williams, Nehemiah; ONeill, William

    2011-01-01

    NASA/JSC is implementing an advanced propulsion physics laboratory, informally known as "Eagleworks", to pursue propulsion technologies necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system over the next 50 years, and enabling interstellar spaceflight by the end of the century. This work directly supports the "Breakthrough Propulsion" objectives detailed in the NASA OCT TA02 In-space Propulsion Roadmap, and aligns with the #10 Top Technical Challenge identified in the report. Since the work being pursued by this laboratory is applied scientific research in the areas of the quantum vacuum, gravitation, nature of space-time, and other fundamental physical phenomenon, high fidelity testing facilities are needed. The lab will first implement a low-thrust torsion pendulum (physics and engineering models can be explored and understood in the lab to allow scaling to power levels pertinent for human spaceflight, 400kW SEP human missions to Mars may become a possibility, and at power levels of 2MW, 1-year transit to Neptune may also be possible. Additionally, the lab is implementing a warp field interferometer that will be able to measure spacetime disturbances down to 150nm. Recent work published by White [1] [2] [3] suggests that it may be possible to engineer spacetime creating conditions similar to what drives the expansion of the cosmos. Although the expected magnitude of the effect would be tiny, it may be a "Chicago pile" moment for this area of physics.

  6. Advances in Mycotoxin Research: Public Health Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Ryu, Dojin

    2015-12-01

    Aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, deoxynivalenol, and zearalenone are of significant public health concern as they can cause serious adverse effects in different organs including the liver, kidney, and immune system in humans. These toxic secondary metabolites are produced by filamentous fungi mainly in the genus Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Fusarium. It is challenging to control the formation of mycotoxins due to the worldwide occurrence of these fungi in food and the environment. In addition to raw agricultural commodities, mycotoxins tend to remain in finished food products as they may not be destroyed by conventional processing techniques. Hence, much of our concern is directed to chronic health effects through long-term exposure to one or multiple mycotoxins from contaminated foods. Ideally risk assessment requires a comprehensive data, including toxicological and epidemiological studies as well as surveillance and exposure assessment. Setting of regulatory limits for mycotoxins is considered necessary to protect human health from mycotoxin exposure. Although advances in analytical techniques provide basic yet critical tool in regulation as well as all aspects of scientific research, it has been acknowledged that different forms of mycotoxins such as analogs and conjugated mycotoxins may constitute a significant source of dietary exposure. Further studies should be warranted to correlate mycotoxin exposure and human health possibly via identification and validation of suitable biomarkers. PMID:26565730

  7. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy

  8. SU-C-BRD-05: Implementation of Incident Learning in the Safety and Quality Management of Radiotherapy: The Primary Experience in a New Established Program with Advanced Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the implementation and effectiveness of incident learning for the safety and quality of radiotherapy in a new established radiotherapy program with advanced technology. Methods: Reference to the consensus recommendations by American Association of Physicist in Medicine, an incident learning system was specifically designed for reporting, investigating, and learning of individual radiotherapy incidents in a new established radiotherapy program, with 4D CBCT, Ultrasound guided radiotherapy, VMAT, gated treatment delivered on two new installed linacs. The incidents occurring in external beam radiotherapy from February, 2012 to January, 2014 were reported. Results: A total of 33 reports were analyzed, including 28 near misses and 5 incidents. Among them, 5 originated in imaging for planning, 25 in planning, 1 in plan transfer, 1 in commissioning and 1 in treatment delivery. Among them, three near misses originated in the safety barrier of the radiotherapy process. In terms of error type, 1 incident was classified as wrong patient, 7 near misses/incidents as wrong site, 6 as wrong laterality, 5 as wrong dose, 7 as wrong prescription, and 7 as suboptimal plan quality. 5 incidents were all classified as grade 1/2 of dosimetric severity, 1 as grade 0, and the other 4 as grade 1 of medical severity. For the causes/contributory factors, negligence, policy not followed, inadequate training, failure to develop an effective plan, and communication contributed to 19, 15, 12, 5 and 3 near misses/incidents, respectively. The average incident rate per 100 patients treated was 0.4; this rate fell to 0.28% in the second year from 0.56% in the first year. The rate of near miss fell to 1.24% from 2.22%. Conclusion: Effective incident learning can reduce the occurrence of near miss/incidents, enhance the culture of safety. Incident learning is an effective proactive method for improving the quality and safety of radiotherapy.

  9. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 1,000 mg/m2 gemcitabine can be administered using limited-field radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of concurrent use of full-dose gemcitabine (GEM) and radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Patient and Methods: 22 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were subjected to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (GEM 1,000 mg/m2 weekly, three times during 4 weeks). They received limited-field irradiation by three-dimensional radiotherapy planning. Results: Of the 22 patients, 16 (72%) completed the treatment (50 Gy irradiation and at least three times concurrent administration of 1 g/m2 GEM). One patient with unresectable tail cancer showed peritonitis carcinomatosa and both chemotherapy and radiotherapy had to be stopped. Dose reduction or omission of GEM was necessary in another four patients. In addition, radiotherapy was discontinued in one patient for fatigue. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was detected in eight patients (36%), and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity (anorexia) in one patient (5%). In total, the response rate amounted to 32% (seven partial responses), and the median survival time (MST) was 16 months. Among the twelve patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, nine underwent surgery and showed a survival rate of 78% at 1 year. Another 13 patients without surgery showed 14 months of MST. No regional lymph node failure has appeared so far. Conclusion: Limited-field radiotherapy enables the safe concurrent administration of 1,000 mg/m2 GEM

  10. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} gemcitabine can be administered using limited-field radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hideya [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Hospital Organization, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Nishiyama, Kinji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Eiichi [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ioka, Tatsuya; Uehara, Hiroyuki; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Nakaizumi, Akihiko [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Ohigashi, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Osamu [Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Surgery

    2007-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of concurrent use of full-dose gemcitabine (GEM) and radiotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. Patient and Methods: 22 patients with advanced pancreatic cancer were subjected to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (GEM 1,000 mg/m2 weekly, three times during 4 weeks). They received limited-field irradiation by three-dimensional radiotherapy planning. Results: Of the 22 patients, 16 (72%) completed the treatment (50 Gy irradiation and at least three times concurrent administration of 1 g/m{sup 2} GEM). One patient with unresectable tail cancer showed peritonitis carcinomatosa and both chemotherapy and radiotherapy had to be stopped. Dose reduction or omission of GEM was necessary in another four patients. In addition, radiotherapy was discontinued in one patient for fatigue. Grade 3 hematologic toxicity was detected in eight patients (36%), and grade 3 nonhematologic toxicity (anorexia) in one patient (5%). In total, the response rate amounted to 32% (seven partial responses), and the median survival time (MST) was 16 months. Among the twelve patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy, nine underwent surgery and showed a survival rate of 78% at 1 year. Another 13 patients without surgery showed 14 months of MST. No regional lymph node failure has appeared so far. Conclusion: Limited-field radiotherapy enables the safe concurrent administration of 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} GEM.

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Defining high-risk patients who may benefit before concurrent chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Jing Du; Ling-Long Tang; Lei Chen; Yan-Ping Mao; Rui Guo; Xu Liu; Ying Sun; Mu-Sheng Zeng; Tie-Bang Kang; Jian-Yong Shao; Ai-Hua Lin; Jun Ma

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a prognostic model for distant metastasis in patients with locally advanced NPC who accept concurrent chemotherapy combined with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (CCRT) to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). A total of 881 patients with newly-diagnosed, non-disseminated, biopsy-proven locoregionally advanced NPC were retrospectively reviewed; 411 (46.7%) accepted CCRT and 470 (53.3%) accepted NACT followed b...

  12. Combination of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with fractionated external beam radiotherapy for treatment of advanced symptomatic meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is the treatment of choice for irresectable meningioma. Due to the strong expression of somatostatin receptors, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used in advanced cases. We assessed the feasibility and tolerability of a combination of both treatment modalities in advanced symptomatic meningioma. 10 patients with irresectable meningioma were treated with PRRT (177Lu-DOTA0,Tyr3 octreotate or - DOTA0,Tyr3 octreotide) followed by external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). EBRT performed after PRRT was continued over 5–6 weeks in IMRT technique (median dose: 53.0 Gy). All patients were assessed morphologically and by positron emission tomography (PET) before therapy and were restaged after 3–6 months. Side effects were evaluated according to CTCAE 4.0. Median tumor dose achieved by PRRT was 7.2 Gy. During PRRT and EBRT, no side effects > CTCAE grade 2 were noted. All patients reported stabilization or improvement of tumor-associated symptoms, no morphologic tumor progression was observed in MR-imaging (median follow-up: 13.4 months). The median pre-therapeutic SUVmax in the meningiomas was 14.2 (range: 4.3–68.7). All patients with a second PET after combined PRRT + EBRT showed an increase in SUVmax (median: 37%; range: 15%–46%) to a median value of 23.7 (range: 8.0–119.0; 7 patients) while PET-estimated volume generally decreased to 81 ± 21% of the initial volume. The combination of PRRT and EBRT is feasible and well tolerated. This approach represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of recurring or progressive symptomatic meningioma, which should be further evaluated

  13. Comparing treatment outcomes of different chemotherapy sequences during intensity modulated radiotherapy for advanced N-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-stage is related to distant metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. We performed this study to compare the efficacy of different chemotherapy sequences in advanced N-stage (N2 and N3) NPC patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). From 2001 to 2008, 198 advanced N-stage NPC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-three patients received IMRT alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) was delivered to 72 patients, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) + CCRT to 82 patients and CCRT + adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) to 11 patients. The 5-year overall survival rate, recurrence-free survival rate, distant metastasis-free survival rate and progress-free survival rate were 47.7% and 73.1%(p<0.001), 74.5% and 91.3% (p = 0.004), 49.2% and 68.5% (p = 0.018), 37.5% and 63.8% (p<0.001) in IMRT alone and chemoradiotherapy group. Subgroup analyses indicated that there were no significant differences among the survival curves of CCRT, NACT + CCRT and CCRT + AC groups. The survival benefit mainly came from CCRT. However, there was only an improvement attendency in distant metastasis-free survival rate of CCRT group (p = 0.107) when compared with RT alone group, and NACT + CCRT could significantly improve distant metastasis-free survival (p = 0.017). For advanced N-stage NPC patients, NACT + CCRT might be a reasonable treatment strategy

  14. Locally Advanced Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Impact of Pre-Radiotherapy Hemoglobin Level and Interruptions During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Stage IV head and neck cancer patients carry a poor prognosis. Clear understanding of prognostic factors can help to optimize care for the individual patient. This study investigated 11 potential prognostic factors including pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level and interruptions during radiotherapy for overall survival (OS), metastases-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC) after radiochemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven factors were investigated in 153 patients receiving radiochemotherapy for Stage IV squamous cell head and neck cancer: age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), tumor site, grading, T stage, N stage, pre-radiotherapy hemoglobin level, surgery, chemotherapy type, and interruptions during radiotherapy >1 week. Results: On multivariate analysis, improved OS was associated with KPS 90-100 (relative risk [RR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.93; p = .012), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (RR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.01-3.53; p = .048), and no radiotherapy interruptions (RR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.15-5.78; p = .021). Improved LC was significantly associated with lower T stage (RR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.16-4.63; p = .013), hemoglobin ≥12 g/dL (RR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.92-9.09; p 1 week. It appears important to avoid anemia and radiotherapy interruptions to achieve the best treatment results

  15. Radiotherapy in cancer treatment: Present status, realizable clinical advances, and further development trends in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many decades of local cancer therapy have led to the present balance that 35% of all patients can be cured by local measures. Half of the successful cancer treatments are due to high-voltage therapy. With improved local measures, the near future might see a further increase in the cancer healing rate. Surgical treatment has probably reached its limits by now, but further developments in cancer radiotherapy and radiocurability are already in sight. With an optimum development of local cancer therapy, therapy might be successful in more than 50% of all cases. The superiority of radiotherapy with fast neutrons has been clinically proven, and it has become generally applicable by the introduction of neutron generators. Negative pions are extremely expensive and difficult to produce and biologically inferior to fast neutrons. Still, it is possible that they may be used in tumour therapy for a limited range of applications in rare and complex situations in tumour therapy. The application of so-called electron-affine substances of the nitroidimazole type has highly improved the radiocurability of many different tumours in animal experiments. (orig./MG)

  16. Radiotherapy as a key method for palliative treatment of advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy (RT) has a key role for reducing symptoms due to tumour progression. It is an important part of the palliative care planned for cancer patient. Nearly 50% of all RT treatment in the world has a palliative aim. Although, the Bulgarian RT equipment is old fashioned, it covers patients' needs. Local RT for bone metastases is equally effective in treatment regimes 1 x 8 Gy; 4-5 x 5-4 Gy; 10 x 3 or 20 x 2 Gy. The advantage of single fraction compared to longer treatment is a short treatment course and reirradiation option. It is suitable for high lethal risk patients (Karnovski 89Sr, 32P, 153Sa, 186Re offer a longer and better effect for multiple bone lesions.The radiobiological mechanisms of palliative RT on the tumour as macrophages and osteoclasts involvement, chemical mediators of pain are described. The paper aims to transfer the evidence based current knowledge into Bulgarian radiotherapy practice in order to modernize it in the field of palliative treatment

  17. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

    1999-01-28

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  18. A cost-effectiveness analysis of a preventive exercise program for patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) has become an indispensable organ, but not always function preserving treatment modality for advanced head and neck cancer. To prevent/limit the functional side effects of CCRT, special exercise programs are increasingly explored. This study presents cost-effectiveness analyses of a preventive (swallowing) exercise program (PREP) compared to usual care (UC) from a health care perspective. A Markov decision model of PREP versus UC was developed for CCRT in advanced head and neck cancer. Main outcome variables were tube dependency at one-year and number of post-CCRT hospital admission days. Primary outcome was costs per quality adjusted life years (cost/QALY), with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) as outcome parameter. The Expected Value of Perfect Information (EVPI) was calculated to obtain the value of further research. PREP resulted in less tube dependency (3% and 25%, respectively), and in fewer hospital admission days than UC (3.2 and 4.5 days respectively). Total costs for UC amounted to €41,986 and for PREP to €42,271. Quality adjusted life years for UC amounted to 0.68 and for PREP to 0.77. Based on costs per QALY, PREP has a higher probability of being cost-effective as long as the willingness to pay threshold for 1 additional QALY is at least €3,200/QALY. At the prevailing threshold of €20,000/QALY the probability for PREP being cost-effective compared to UC was 83%. The EVPI demonstrated potential value in undertaking additional research to reduce the existing decision uncertainty. Based on current evidence, PREP for CCRT in advanced head and neck cancer has the higher probability of being cost-effective when compared to UC. Moreover, the majority of sensitivity analyses produced ICERs that are well below the prevailing willingness to pay threshold for an additional QALY (range from dominance till €45,906/QALY)

  19. Long-Term Improvement in Treatment Outcome After Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Locoregionally Advanced Cervix Cancer: An Update of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The local failure rate in patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is 41-72% after radiotherapy (RT) alone, whereas local control is a prerequisite for cure. The Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial showed that combining RT with hyperthermia (HT) improved 3-year local control rates of 41-61%, as we reported earlier. In this study, we evaluate long-term results of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial after 12 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1996, a total of 114 women with locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma were randomly assigned to RT or RT + HT. The RT was applied to a median total dose of 68 Gy. The HT was given once weekly. The primary end point was local control. Secondary end points were overall survival and late toxicity. Results: At the 12-year follow-up, local control remained better in the RT + HT group (37% vs. 56%; p = 0.01). Survival was persistently better after 12 years: 20% (RT) and 37% (RT + HT; p = 0.03). World Health Organization (WHO) performance status was a significant prognostic factor for local control. The WHO performance status, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and tumor diameter were significant for survival. The benefit of HT remained significant after correction for these factors. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 3 or higher radiation-induced late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: For locoregionally advanced cervical cancer, the addition of HT to RT resulted in long-term major improvement in local control and survival without increasing late toxicity. This combined treatment should be considered for patients who are unfit to receive chemotherapy. For other patients, the optimal treatment strategy is the subject of ongoing research

  20. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving ≥95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving ≥5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%–30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 ± 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 ± 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 ± 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 ± 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 ± 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 ± 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving ≥20 Gy ranged from 23.6% ± 9.1% to 21.1% ± 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% ± 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 ± 139, 322 ± 20, and 387 ± 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a ∼20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different gantry speeds). Conclusion: RA

  1. Proceedings of the 6th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 6th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at JAERI-Kansai in Kyoto on November 4-5, 2004. The symposium has been held once a year since 1999, to promote the advanced photon research through speeches, information exchanges, discussion by researchers on the front line of advanced photon research in Japan and abroad, not only reports of latest research results and plans at Advanced Photon Research Center. The numbers of speeches were 16, including 5 invited speeches, and the numbers of poster presentations were 56, including the report of presentations and cooperative research and joint research performed in FY2003. The 56 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Proceedings of the first symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report consists of 76 contributed papers of the First Symposium on Advanced Photon Research, which was held at Keihanna Plaza and JAERI Advanced Photon Research Center in Kyoto on November 8-9, 1999. The numbers of oral presentations including a special invited talk and poster presentations were 14 and 68, respectively. (J.P.N.)

  3. Proceedings of the first symposium on advanced photon research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report consists of 76 contributed papers of the First Symposium on Advanced Photon Research, which was held at Keihanna Plaza and JAERI Advanced Photon Research Center in Kyoto on November 8-9, 1999. The numbers of oral presentations including a special invited talk and poster presentations were 14 and 68, respectively. (J.P.N.)

  4. Ethics, Professional Expectations, and Graduate Education: Advancing Research in Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2009-01-01

    The university is a social institution and as such has a social responsibility to advance knowledge through research that is ultimately meaningful and beneficial to society. As we seek to advance research and graduate education in kinesiology, we must accept ethical standards and professional expectations not only as an institutional value but as…

  5. The choice of optimal radiotherapy technique for locally advanced maxillary carcinoma using 3d treatment planning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mileusnić Dušan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the isodose distribution of three radiotherapy techniques for locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma and analyze the potential of three-dimensional (3D conformal radiotherapy planning in order to determine the optimal technique for target dose delivery, and spare uninvolved healthy tissue structures. Methods. Computed tomography (CT scans of fourteen patients with T3-T4, N0, M0 maxillary sinus carcinoma were acquired and transferred to 3D treatment planning system (3D-TPS. The target volume and uninvolved dose limiting structures were contoured on axial CT slices throughout the volume of interest combining three variants of treatment plans (techniques for each patient: 1. A conventional two-dimensional (2D treatment plan with classically shaped one anterior two lateral opposite fields and two types of 3D conformal radiotherapy plans were compared for each patient. 2. Three-dimensional standard (3D-S plan one anterior + two lateral opposite coplanar fields, which outlines were shaped with multileaf collimator (MLC according to geometric information based on 3D reconstruction of target volume and organs at risk as seen in the beam eye's view (BEV projection. 3. Three-dimensional non-standard (3D-NS plan: one anterior + two lateral noncoplanar fields, which outlines were shaped in the same manner as in 3D-S plans. The planning parameters for target volumes and the degree of neurooptic structures and parotid glands protection were evaluated for all three techniques. Comparison of plans and treatment techniques was assessed by isodose distribution, dose statistics and dose-volume histograms. Results. The most enhanced conformity of the dose delivered to the target volume was achieved with 3D-NS technique, and significant differences were found comparing 3D-NS vs. 2D (Dmax: p<0,05 Daver: p<0,01; Dmin: p<0,05; V90: p<0,05, and V95: p<0,01, as well as 3D-NS vs. 3D-S technique (Dmin: p<0,05; V90: p<0,05, and V95: p<0,01, while there

  6. Research advances of traffic medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正国; 蒋建新

    1999-01-01

    Objective:To briefly introduce the increase in the number of motor vehicles in our country and main research advances of traffic medicine.Methods:To collect the relative data issued by government and the papers pulished in the newspapers or medical journals,and analyze them with combination of our own research work. Results:1.The number of motor vehicles in our country in 1997 was 680.02 times more than that in 1951,and increases t 42.0932 million from 1.5887 million over the past two decades(1978-1997)since the reform and opening,with net increase of 40.5045 million,increasing about 25 times.During the same period,the number of motorcycles increased to 20.2221 million from 104.3 thousand,increasing about 193 times.There were 4.4 hundred million bicycles,accounting for one third or the total world wide,Over 30% to 50% of eople in cities used bicycles as their transport tool when they go out.2.In the 1990's (9190 to 1997),the number of motor vehicles increased 1.85 times,while road traffic accidents(RATs) only increased 0.22 times,the deaths and the injuries 0.5 and 0.23 times only,respectively,indicating that the increasing tendency of RTAs and casualties was controlled to some extent.3.The prople of 21 to 45 years old were dominant among all casualties.The sequence of deaths in order was pedestrians(26.5%),vehicle drivers(24.8%),passengers(24.3%),bicyclists(18.4%)and others (6.1%).4.Concerning the accident causes,human faults accounted for 92.9%,83.6% of RTAs wre due to the faults of motor vehicle drivers,and 1.5% of RTAs were due to driving after drinking with deaths occupying 2.9% of the total.5.Proneness to RTSs:6%-8% of motor vehical drivers had proneness to RTA,causing 35%-40% fo the totoal RTAs.6.Various bio-impact machines were developed.The maximum impact velocity could reach 324 km/h.They can be used to induce impact injuries on different animals,at different patterns and even on different regions of body.7.The inflicting mechanisms for cranioserebral and

  7. A comparison of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy in Chinese patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma: a multi-center study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the efficacy of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) over radiotherapy (RT) in Chinese patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Between January 2005 and January 2008, 192 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were included in the study: 96 in arm A (CCRT with 20 mg/m2 cisplatin for 5 days) and 96 in arm B (RT). The overall response rate was the primary endpoint. The secondary endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, and toxicity. The 5-year overall response rate was 67% and 53% for the CCRT and RT arms, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant, while the median overall survival was 68 months (range 3-85 months) and 61 months (range 4-83 months), respectively (P = 0.009). In addition, the median progression-free survival for CCRT was 62 months (range 3-83 months), whereas it was 51 months (range 4-81 months) for the RT arm (P = 0.025). The toxicity profile, both acute and late, was comparable in both arms. In summary, we demonstrate that CCRT was effective and better tolerated than RT alone in Chinese patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma.

  8. The effect of external beam radiotherapy volume on locoregional control in patients with locoregionally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated outcomes of patients treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for locoregionally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer and analyzed the effect of EBRT volume on locoregional control. This study included 23 patients with locoregionally advanced or recurrent nonanaplastic thyroid cancer who were treated with EBRT. Two different EBRT target volumes were executed as follows: 1) limited field (LF, n = 11) included the primary (involved lobe) or recurrent tumor bed and the positive nodal area; 2) elective field (EF, n = 12) included the primary (involved lobe) or recurrent tumor bed and the regional nodal areas in the cervical neck and upper mediastinum. Clinical parameters, such as gender, age, histologic type, recurrence, stage, thyroglobulin level, postoperative residuum, radioiodine treatment, and EBRT volume were analyzed to identify prognostic factors associated with locoregional control. There were no significant differences in the clinical parameter distributions between the LF and EF groups. In the LF group, six (55%) patients developed locoregional recurrence and three (27%) developed distant metastasis. In the EF group, one (8%) patient developed locoregional recurrence and one (8%) developed a distant metastasis. There was a significant difference in locoregional control rate at 5 years in the LF and EF groups (40% vs. 89%, p = 0.041). There were no significant differences in incidences of acute and late toxicities between two groups (p >0.05). EBRT with EF provided significantly better locoregional control than that of LF; however, further larger scaled studies are warranted

  9. Experience with combination of nimotuzumab and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai RP

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rui-ping Zhai, Hong-mei Ying, Fang-fang Kong, Cheng-run Du, Shuang Huang, Jun-jun Zhou, Chao-su Hu Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of using nimotuzumab in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the primary treatment of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Methods: Between December 2009 and December 2013, 38 newly diagnosed patients with stage III–IV nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated with IMRT and nimotuzumab concomitantly. The distribution of disease was stage III in 20 (52.6%, stage IV A in 9 (23.7%, and stage IV B in 9 (23.7%. All the patients received at least two cycles of cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by nimotuzumab 200 mg/week concurrently with IMRT. Acute and late radiation-related toxicities were graded according to the Acute and Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group.Results: With a median follow-up of 39.7 months (range, 13.3–66.5 months, the estimated 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, progression failure-free survival, and overall survival rates were 92.8%, 92.9%, 89.5%, 78.7%, and 87.5%, respectively. The median cycle for nimotuzumab addition was 6 weeks. Grade 3 radiation-induced mucositis accounted for 36.8% of treated people. No skin rash and infusion reaction were observed, distinctly from what is reported in cetuximab-treated patients.Conclusion: Nimotuzumab plus IMRT showed promising outcomes in terms of locoregional control and survival, without increasing the incidence of radiation-related toxicities for patients. Keywords: nasopharyngeal carcinoma, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, nimotuzumab

  10. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  11. Integrated Advanced Energy Systems Research at IIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid Arastoopour

    2010-09-30

    This report consists of Two research projects; Sustainable Buildings and Hydrogen Storage. Sustainable Building Part includes: Wind and the self powered built environment by professor P. Land and his research group and experimental and computational works by professor D. Rempfer and his research group. Hydrogen Storage part includes: Hydrogen Storage Using Mg-Mixed Metal Hydrides by professor H. Arastoopour and his research team and Carbon Nanostructure as Hydrogen Storage Material by professor J. Prakash and his research team.

  12. Long-term results of concurrent radiotherapy and UFT in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Definition and treatment options for locally advanced non-resectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) vary. Treatment options range from palliative chemotherapy to chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Several studies have shown that a number of patients become resectable after complementary treatment prior...

  13. Advanced imaging research and development at DARPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Nibir K.; Dat, Ravi

    2012-06-01

    Advances in imaging technology have huge impact on our daily lives. Innovations in optics, focal plane arrays (FPA), microelectronics and computation have revolutionized camera design. As a result, new approaches to camera design and low cost manufacturing is now possible. These advances are clearly evident in visible wavelength band due to pixel scaling, improvements in silicon material and CMOS technology. CMOS cameras are available in cell phones and many other consumer products. Advances in infrared imaging technology have been slow due to market volume and many technological barriers in detector materials, optics and fundamental limits imposed by the scaling laws of optics. There is of course much room for improvements in both, visible and infrared imaging technology. This paper highlights various technology development projects at DARPA to advance the imaging technology for both, visible and infrared. Challenges and potentials solutions are highlighted in areas related to wide field-of-view camera design, small pitch pixel, broadband and multiband detectors and focal plane arrays.

  14. Integrating Advance Research Directives into the European Legal Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andorno, Roberto; Gennet, Eloïse; Jongsma, Karin; Elger, Bernice

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of using advance directives to prospectively consent to research participation in the event of dementia remains largely unexplored in Europe. Moreover, the legal status of advance directives for research is unclear in the European regulations governing biomedical research. The article explores the place that advance research directives have in the current European legal framework, and considers the possibility of integrating them more explicitly into the existing regulations. Special focus is placed on issues regarding informed consent, the role of proxies, and the level of acceptable risks and burdens. PMID:27228684

  15. Preliminary results of proton radiotherapy at the proton medical research center, Tsukuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The well-defined dose distribution possible to achieve with proton beams makes it feasible to deliver high doses to the tumor while reducing doses to the adjacent normal tissues. Clinical studies at Proton Medical Research Center (PMRC), University of Tsukuba, have been conducted to investigate the efficacy of high-energy proton beams in the treatment of a wide variety of human malignancies, especially for deep-seated tumors. So far, of 444 patients who received proton radiotherapy, 367 were treated with curative intent. The number of patients treated per year has often increased and the rate of each affection has changed over time. For example, the patients with primary liver cancer and bladder cancer have increased remarkably while the number of patients with esophageal cancer and lung cancer have been almost constant, while patients with uterus cancer and malignant glioma have recently decreased. Concerning the results of our studies, excellent local control and survival results have been obtained at many tumor sites. Local control rate and overall survival rate of primary liver cancer at 5 years were 90% and 41%, respectively. Those of esophageal cancer were 81% and 49%, non-small cell lung cancer 90% and 20%, and bladder cancer 78% and 67%, respectively. Furthermore, probability of morbidity related to proton radiotherapy was quite low (6% of all patients with malignant tumors). These results strongly indicate the potential advantage of proton beams in the treatment of deep-seated tumors, especially primary liver cancer, esophageal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and bladder cancer. (author)

  16. Research | Integral geometry and advanced stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sabrina Tang; Plessis, Andrew du

    2015-01-01

    This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2014.......This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2014....

  17. Research | Integral geometry and advanced stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sabrina Tang; Plessis, Andrew du

    2014-01-01

    This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2013.......This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2013....

  18. Combined radiotherapy and preradiation chemotherapy with Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for advanced esophageal carcinoma, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients with untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus accompanying distant metastases who were treated by one to five cycles of chemotherapy consisting of Cisplatin and 120 hour infusion of 5-Fluorouracil were reported. Two patients showed complete response (CR), four partial response (PR), one minor response, and one no response. High response rate of 75% (6 of 8) was obtained. Radiation therapy was then administered to six of the patients. After definitive treatment, CR was obtained in four, and PR in two of the cases. However, relapses were noted in all four of the CR cases, with four at distant sites, and one locally. Five of the eight patients (62.5%) survived one year and two survived three years (25%). Two patients could not receive radiotherapy because of uncontrollable lung metastases or death from duodenal ulcer. Although the follow-up period is still short, the combined treatment of radiation and preradiation chemotherapy appears to be an effective treatment, and has made a major impact upon survival time in cases of disseminated esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  19. A dosimetric comparison of two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitapanarux, Imjai; Chomprasert, Kittisak; Nobnaop, Wannapa; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Tharavichitkul, Ekasit; Jakrabhandu, Somvilai; Onchan, Wimrak; Traisathit, Patrinee; Van Gestel, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the potential dosimetric benefits of a two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) protocol for patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). A total of 17 patients with locally advanced NPC treated with IMRT had a second computed tomography (CT) scan after 17 fractions in order to apply and continue the treatment with an adapted plan after 20 fractions. To simulate the situation without adaptation, a hybrid plan was generated by applying the optimization parameters of the original treatment plan to the anatomy of the second CT scan. The dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose statistics of the hybrid plan and the adapted plan were compared. The mean volume of the ipsilateral and contralateral parotid gland decreased by 6.1 cm(3) (30.5%) and 5.4 cm(3) (24.3%), respectively. Compared with the hybrid plan, the adapted plan provided a higher dose to the target volumes with better homogeneity, and a lower dose to the organs at risk (OARs). The Dmin of all planning target volumes (PTVs) increased. The Dmax of the spinal cord and brainstem were lower in 94% of the patients (1.6-5.9 Gy, P < 0.001 and 2.1-9.9 Gy, P < 0.001, respectively). The Dmean of the contralateral parotid decreased in 70% of the patients (range, 0.2-4.4 Gy). We could not find a relationship between dose variability and weight loss. Our two-phase adaptive IMRT protocol improves dosimetric results in terms of target volumes and OARs in patients with locally advanced NPC. PMID:25666189

  20. Pathologic response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoadjuvant stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has potential applicability in the management of borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In this series, we report the pathologic outcomes in the subset of patients who underwent surgery after neoadjuvant SBRT. Patients with borderline resectable or locally-advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma who were treated with SBRT followed by resection were included. Chemotherapy was to the discretion of the medical oncologist and preceded SBRT for most patients. Twelve patients met inclusion criteria. Most (92%) received neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and gemcitabine/capecitabine was most frequently utilized (n = 7). Most were treated with fractionated SBRT to 36 Gy/3 fractions (n = 7) and the remainder with single fraction to 24 Gy (n = 5). No grade 3+ acute toxicities attributable to SBRT were found. Two patients developed post-surgical vascular complications and one died secondary to this. The mean time to surgery after SBRT was 3.3 months. An R0 resection was performed in 92% of patients (n = 11/12). In 25% (n = 3/12) of patients, a complete pathologic response was achieved, and an additional 16.7% (n = 2/12) demonstrated <10% viable tumor cells. Kaplan-Meier estimated median progression free survival is 27.4 months. Overall survival is 92%, 64% and 51% at 1-, 2-, and 3-years. This study reports the pathologic response in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and SBRT for borderline resectable and locally-advanced pancreatic cancer. In our experience, 92% achieved an R0 resection and 41.7% of patients demonstrated either complete or extensive pathologic response to treatment. The results of a phase II study of this novel approach will be forthcoming

  1. Neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and surgery in patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal treatment of advanced maxillary sinus cancer has been challenging for several decades. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) for head and neck cancer has been controversial. We have analyzed the long-term outcome of neoadjuvant IAC followed by radiation therapy (RT) and surgery. Twenty-seven patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer were treated between 1989 and 2002. Five-fluorouracil (5-FU, 500 mg/m2) was infused intra-arterially, and followed by RT (total 50.4 Gy/28 fractions). A planned surgery was performed 3 to 4 weeks after completion of IAC and RT. At a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 12 to 169 months), the 5-year rates of overall survival in all patients were 63%. The 5-year rates of overall survival of stage T3/T4 patients were 70.0% and 58.8%, respectively. Seven of fourteen patients with disease recurrence had a local recurrence alone. The 5-year actuarial local control rates in patients with stage T3/T4, and in all patients were 20.0%, 32.3%, and 27.4%, respectively. Overall response rate after the completion of IAC and RT was 70.3%. During the follow-up, seven patients (25.9%) showed mild to moderate late complications. The tumor extent (i.e., the involvement of either orbit and/or base of skull) appeared to be related with local recurrence. Neoadjuvant IAC with 5-FU followed by RT and surgery may be effective to improve local tumor control in the patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer. However, local failure was still the major cause of death. Further investigations are required to determine the optimal treatment schedule, radiotherapy techniques and chemotherapy regimens.

  2. Neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and surgery in patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong Kan; Lee, Ju Hye; Kim, Dong Hyun; Park, Dahl; Cho, Kyu Sup; Kim, Dong Won [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Roh, Hwan Jung [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The optimal treatment of advanced maxillary sinus cancer has been challenging for several decades. Intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) for head and neck cancer has been controversial. We have analyzed the long-term outcome of neoadjuvant IAC followed by radiation therapy (RT) and surgery. Twenty-seven patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer were treated between 1989 and 2002. Five-fluorouracil (5-FU, 500 mg/m2) was infused intra-arterially, and followed by RT (total 50.4 Gy/28 fractions). A planned surgery was performed 3 to 4 weeks after completion of IAC and RT. At a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 12 to 169 months), the 5-year rates of overall survival in all patients were 63%. The 5-year rates of overall survival of stage T3/T4 patients were 70.0% and 58.8%, respectively. Seven of fourteen patients with disease recurrence had a local recurrence alone. The 5-year actuarial local control rates in patients with stage T3/T4, and in all patients were 20.0%, 32.3%, and 27.4%, respectively. Overall response rate after the completion of IAC and RT was 70.3%. During the follow-up, seven patients (25.9%) showed mild to moderate late complications. The tumor extent (i.e., the involvement of either orbit and/or base of skull) appeared to be related with local recurrence. Neoadjuvant IAC with 5-FU followed by RT and surgery may be effective to improve local tumor control in the patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer. However, local failure was still the major cause of death. Further investigations are required to determine the optimal treatment schedule, radiotherapy techniques and chemotherapy regimens.

  3. A retrospective study of the effectiveness of hemostatic radiotherapy with conventional fractionation in patients with advanced cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomoto S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of hemostatic radiotherapy (HRT in patients with advanced cancer. Eighteen patients with advanced cancer treated with HRT at the Fukuoka University and Kyushu Rosai Hospitals in Japan between July 2010 and February 2015 were retrospectively assessed. The hemostatic effect of tumor-related bleeding was assessed by the clinical course of bleeding, laboratory data, the endoscopic study, and the number of blood transfusion units (BTRUs for one month before and after HRT. The median follow-up time was 2.6 months (range, 0.7 to 36.2 months. The median age of the patients was 77 years (range, 51 to 93. The primary diseases with tumor-related bleeding included gastric cancer, urinary bladder cancer, gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. The median overall survival time was three months, and the one year survival rate was 22.9% of all patients. The HRT regimens ranged from 30 Gy in 10 fractions to 40 Gy in 20 fractions. In all patients, the anemia grade and the number of BTRUs decreased for 1 month after RT. The percentage of patients who were diagnosed as “successful” for hemostasis was 83% (15 of 18 patients. HRT is therefore strongly suggested as effective for the control of tumor-related bleeding in patients with advanced cancer. The optimal radiation doses and fractions are controversial; however, this treatment should be offered for patients with a poor life expectancy.

  4. Reducing the Risk of Xerostomia and Mandibular Osteoradionecrosis: The Potential Benefits of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Advanced Oral Cavity Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 ± 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 ± 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 ± 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 ± 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 ± 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 ± 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 ± 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 ± 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 ± 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 ± 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC.

  5. Reducing the risk of xerostomia and mandibular osteoradionecrosis: the potential benefits of intensity modulated radiotherapy in advanced oral cavity carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Merina; Hansen, Vibeke N; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity may be curative, but carries a risk of permanent damage to bone, salivary glands, and other soft tissues. We studied the potential of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to improve target volume coverage, and normal tissue sparing for advanced oral cavity carcinoma (OCC). Six patients with advanced OCC requiring bilateral irradiation to the oral cavity and neck were studied. Standard 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and inverse-planned IMRT dose distributions were compared by using dose-volume histograms. Doses to organs at risk, including spinal cord, parotid glands, and mandible, were assessed as surrogates of radiation toxicity. PTV1 mean dose was 60.8 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and 59.8 +/- 0.1 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.04). PTV1 dose range was 24.7 +/- 6 Gy for 3DCRT and 15.3 +/- 4 Gy for IMRT (p = 0.001). PTV2 mean dose was 54.5 +/- 0.8 Gy for 3DCRT and for IMRT was 54.2 +/- 0.2 Gy (p = 0.34). PTV2 dose range was improved by IMRT (7.8 +/- 3.2 Gy vs. 30.7 +/- 12.8 Gy, p = 0.006). Homogeneity index (HI) values for PTV2 were closer to unity using IMRT (p = 0.0003). Mean parotid doses were 25.6 +/- 2.7 Gy for IMRT and 42.0 +/- 8.8 Gy with 3DCRT (p = 0.002). The parotid V30 in all IMRT plans was <45%. The mandible V50, V55, and V60 were significantly lower for the IMRT plans. Maximum spinal cord and brain stem doses were similar for the 2 techniques. IMRT provided superior target volume dose homogeneity and sparing of organs at risk. The magnitude of reductions in dose to the salivary glands and mandible are likely to translate into reduced incidence of xerostomia and osteoradionecrosis for patients with OCC. PMID:19647632

  6. A clinical study of radiotherapy with CHFU for advanced and recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the usefulness of combination therapy with radiation and CHFU for advanced and recurrent breast cancer according to a clinical cotrolled multicenter trial from 1982 to 1984. One hundred cases were registered and 82 of them were availabe. Treatment sites were the lymph nodes, skin, bone and lung, and the overall response rate was 58% in CR and 19% in PR, while the duration of remission was 18 weeks in CR. Side effects were found in 10% of the patients. Combination therapy with radiation and HCFU may be useful in multimodal tretment for advanced recurrent breast cancer. (author)

  7. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  8. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shornikov, A.; Wenander, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  9. Locally advanced prostate cancer: combination of high-dose high-precision radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy%Locally advanced prostate cancer:combination of high-dose high-precision radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michel Bolla; René-Olivier Mirimanoff

    2014-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer entails a risk of local,regional and systemic relapse requiring the combination of a Ioco-regional treatment,namely external beam radiotherapy(EBRT) to control the pelvic-confined disease,combined with a systemic therapy,namely androgen-deprivation therapy(ADT),to potentiate irradiation and to destroy the infra-clinical androgen-dependant disease outside the irradiated volume.Many phases Ⅲ randomized trials have paved the way in establishing the indications of this combined approach,which requires a long term ADT(≥2 years) with LHRH agonists.The duration of ADT may be reduced to 6 months should there be a significant comorbidity,a reluctance from the patient or a poor tolerance.A multidisciplinary approach will enable physicians to tailor the treatment strategy and a close cooperation between the specialists and the general practitioners will be set up to prevent as much as possible the side-effects of ADT.

  10. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2014-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published fin...

  11. Beyond competence: advance directives in dementia research

    OpenAIRE

    Jongsma, Karin Rolanda; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients’ gradual loss of the capacity to consent. Patients with dementia are characterized by the fact that, at an earlier stage of their life, they were able to give their consent to participation in research. Therefore, the phase when patients are st...

  12. Advanced research in solar-energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luft, W.

    1983-01-01

    The Solar Energy Storage Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute is reviewed. The program provides research, systems analyses, and economic assessments of thermal and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Current activities include experimental research into very high temperature (above 800/sup 0/C) thermal energy storage and assessment of novel thermochemical energy storage and transport systems. The applications for such high-temperature storage are thermochemical processes, solar thermal-electric power generation, cogeneration of heat and electricity, industrial process heat, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems. The research results for five high-temperature thermal energy storage technologies and two thermochemical systems are described.

  13. Geometric uncertainties in voluntary deep inspiration breath hold radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Dueck, Jenny;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) increases lung volume and can potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer. We estimated geometric uncertainties in visually guided voluntary DIBH and derived the appropriate treatment margins for differe...

  14. Multimodal treatment utilizing intraoperative radiotherapy for advanced cancer of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multimodal treatment was consisted of intraoperative radiation, external radiation, by-pass operation, chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition if necessary to cover decreased oral-intake. Thirty-three cases were subjected to this therapy for 6 years. The stage of the tumors varied from a localized tumor in the pancreas to a huge tumor with multiple metastases, though the latter abandoned recently to be contraindication to this therapy. At laparotomy, a high energy electron beam was irradiated to the tumor with a dosage of 3,000 rad using a 20 MeV Betatron. The tumor was carefully prepared in order to avoid irradiating the duodenum and stomach. Choledochojejunostomy and gastrojejunostomy were performed in almost all of patients with cancer of head of pancreas. In some patients, external radiation was added with a dosage of 3,000 rad by linear X-ray. After radiotherapy, chemotherapy employing 5-FU or FT-207 was continued including. The survival time after this therapy was varied mainly according to the stages of the tumor. In patients with multiple metastasis to the liver or peritoneal dissemination, no remarkable effects were obtained by this therapy. On the otherhand, among 14 patients with localized tumor in the pancreas, 7 survived more than one year and the mean survival time of treated patients was nevershorter than that of patients who received resection of the tumor. Most of the treated patients could spend at home until their condition became critical, because by-pass operation could overcome jaundice or the duodenal stenosis and intraoperative radiation could palliate the pain of cancer of pancreas. Tumor effect of intraoperative radiation was confirmed by both of the second laporatomy for twice intraoperative radiation and laparatomy. (author)

  15. An advanced rectal carcinoma treated with radical radiotherapy using a proton beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyo, Yasushi; Koyama, Shohei; Kobayashi, S. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine) (and others)

    1991-07-01

    The authors present the case of a 72-year-old man admitted to hospital because of anal bleeding. A barium enema and subsequent endoscopic studies revealed a Borrmann type 3, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the rectum, with marked narrowing at the Rb to Ra region. On the basis of CT scans, a metastasis to the regional lymph nodes and the softer fatty tissue in the pelvic space was suspected. As surgery was contraindicated since an abnormal antibody against the erythrocytes was detected in the patient's blood, radical radiotherapy was pursued to cure the rectal cancer. Thus, a 250 MeV proton beam was administered to the primary lesion, and a total dose of 90 Gy was delivered in 28 fractions of 3 to 4 Gy daily over 64 days. In addition, X-ray therapy, using a 12 MV linear accelerator and a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy, was used for the treatment of a regional lymph node metastasis in the pelvic space. Three years and five months later, the patient died of an occlusive ileus of the rectum. On autopsy, the rectum revealed organized cicatricial fibrosis with marked stenosis. Further, the histological findings of the irradiated tumor cells showed massive fibrosis and hyalinized connective tissue. Vital cancer cells only were found in small parts of the primary rectal lesion, and the biological significance of these small clusters of vital tumor cells is discussed. Finally, neither a regional lymph node metastasis nor a distant metastasis, i.e., to the liver and/or lung, were observed. In conclusion, proton beam therapy was seen to have a beneficial effect on this rectal cancer and on the local control of the disease. (author).

  16. Special Education Research Advances Knowledge in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Research in special education has yielded beneficial outcomes for students with disabilities as well as typical achieving students. The authors provide examples of the valuable knowledge special education research has generated, including the elements of response to intervention (e.g., screening and progress monitoring), instructional practices…

  17. Advancing Administrative Supports for Research Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Korr, Wynne; White, Barbara; Vroom, Phyllis; Zabora, James; Middleton, Jane; Shank, Barbara; Schatz, Mona

    2008-01-01

    Research administrative supports must parallel and reinforce faculty initiatives in research grant procurement. This article features several types of developments that draw on presentations at the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work meetings. Key changes in social work programs are addressed, including the…

  18. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Jaworska

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  19. [Recent advances in strawberry transgenic research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yong-Hua; Zhang, Shang-Long

    2007-02-01

    Strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) is one of most important fruit crops cultivated widely in world. Genetic transformation has launched a new era in strawberry breeding and germplasm creativity. It offers a direct method of creating varieties that selectively targets gene or a few heterologous traits for introduction into the strawberry plant. Great advances have been made in strawberry genetic transformation in the past years. This paper reviews the recent progress in genetic transformation of strawberry on promoting resistance to viruses and fungi, insects, herbicides, stress and quality improvement. Problems and the prospects for application of genetic transformation in strawberry were discussed. PMID:17369168

  20. The feasibility and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound combined with low-dose external beam radiotherapy as supplemental therapy for advanced prostate cancer following hormonal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Rui-Yi; Wang, Guo-Min; Xu, Lei; ZHANG, BO-HENG; Xu, Ye-Qing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Chen, Bing

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with (+) low-dose external beam radiotherapy (LRT) as supplemental therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) following hormonal therapy (HT). Our definition of HIFU+LRT refers to treating primary tumour lesions with HIFU in place of reduced field boost irradiation to the prostate, while retaining four-field box irradiation to the pelvis in conventional-dose external beam r...

  1. PET/CT Staging Followed by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Improves Treatment Outcome of Locally Advanced Pharyngeal Carcinoma: a matched-pair comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Lütolf Urs M; Davis J Bernard; Glanzmann Christoph; Huguenin Pia; Seifert Burkhardt; Studer Gabriela; Rothschild Sacha; Hany Thomas F; Ciernik I Frank

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Impact of non-pharmacological innovations on cancer cure rates is difficult to assess. It remains unclear, whether outcome improves with 2- [18-F]-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and integrated computer tomography (PET/CT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for curative treatment of advanced pharyngeal carcinoma. Patients and methods Forty five patients with stage IVA oro- or hypopharyngeal carcinoma were staged with an integrated PET/CT and tre...

  2. High-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) with oral UFT/folinic acid and escalating doses of oxaliplatin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber Vestermark, Lene; Jensen, Helle A; Pfeiffer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Consensus is that patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) should receive long-term chemoradiotherapy (CRT) before surgery. With the intent to offer the patients intensified concomitant chemotherapy (CT) to improve outcome and to assess tolerability and toxicity of oxaliplatin (Ox) a...... phase I trial of high dose pelvic radiotherapy (RT), fixed dose of oral UFT/l-leucovorin and increasing doses of weekly Ox were performed....

  3. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  4. Quality Assurance Needs for Modern Image-Based Radiotherapy: Recommendations From 2007 Interorganizational Symposium on 'Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy: Challenges of Advanced Technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the consensus findings and recommendations emerging from 2007 Symposium, 'Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy: Challenges of Advanced Technology.' The Symposium was held in Dallas February 20-22, 2007. The 3-day program, which was sponsored jointly by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and National Cancer Institute (NCI), included >40 invited speakers from the radiation oncology and industrial engineering/human factor communities and attracted nearly 350 attendees, mostly medical physicists. A summary of the major findings follows. The current process of developing consensus recommendations for prescriptive quality assurance (QA) tests remains valid for many of the devices and software systems used in modern radiotherapy (RT), although for some technologies, QA guidance is incomplete or out of date. The current approach to QA does not seem feasible for image-based planning, image-guided therapies, or computer-controlled therapy. In these areas, additional scientific investigation and innovative approaches are needed to manage risk and mitigate errors, including a better balance between mitigating the risk of catastrophic error and maintaining treatment quality, complimenting the current device-centered QA perspective by a more process-centered approach, and broadening community participation in QA guidance formulation and implementation. Industrial engineers and human factor experts can make significant contributions toward advancing a broader, more process-oriented, risk-based formulation of RT QA. Healthcare administrators need to appropriately increase personnel and ancillary equipment resources, as well as capital resources, when new advanced technology RT modalities are implemented. The pace of formalizing clinical physics training must rapidly increase to provide an adequately trained physics workforce for advanced technology RT. The specific

  5. Toxicity and Efficacy of Concurrent Gemcitabine and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Christopher; Janjan, N; Evans, D; Wolff, R; Ballo, M; Milas, L; Mason, K; Charnsangavej, C; Pisters, P; Lee, J; Lenzi, R; Vauthey, J; Wong, A; Phan, T; Nguyen, Q; Abbruzzese, J

    2001-01-01

    Gemcitabine has been demonstrated to be a potentradiosensitizer in the laboratory and in the clinic (1-7)and has proven clinical systemic activity to pancreaticcancer. Responses to systemic gemcitabine inpatients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinomahave been documented in phase I, phase II, and phaseIII clinical settings (8,9). Moreover, a recent randomizedtrial of gemcitabine vs 5-FU as first-linetherapy in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinomademonstrated a modest median survivalbenefit (4.41 vs 5.65 mo,p= 0.0025) for those patientswho received gemcitabine compared to those whoreceived 5-FU (10). In addition, gemcitabine wasshown to improve cancer-related symptoms and performancestatus as assessed by a quantitative clinicalbenefit scale in both untreated and previouslytreated patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma ofthe pancreas (10,11). Based on these data, the FDAapproved gemcitabine as a first-line agent for patientswith advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. PMID:12754400

  6. Consensus and differences in primary radiotherapy for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in Switzerland. A survey on patterns of practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment option for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Despite high-level evidence from several randomized trials, risk group stratification and treatment recommendations vary due to contradictory or inconclusive data, particularly with regard to EBRT dose prescription and ADT duration. Our aim was to investigate current patterns of practice in primary EBRT for prostate cancer in Switzerland. Treatment recommendations on EBRT and ADT for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer were collected from 23 Swiss radiation oncology centers. Written recommendations were converted into center-specific decision trees, and analyzed for consensus and differences using a dedicated software tool. Additionally, specific radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques from the participating centers were assessed. The most commonly prescribed radiation dose was 78 Gy (range 70-80 Gy) across all risk groups. ADT was recommended for intermediate-risk patients for 6 months in over 80 % of the centers, and for high-risk patients for 2 or 3 years in over 90 % of centers. For recommendations on combined EBRT and ADT treatment, consensus levels did not exceed 39 % in any clinical scenario. Arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is implemented for routine prostate cancer radiotherapy by 96 % of the centers. Among Swiss radiation oncology centers, considerable ranges of radiotherapy dose and ADT duration are routinely offered for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. In the vast majority of cases, doses and durations are within the range of those described in current evidence-based guidelines. (orig.)

  7. Prospective randomized trial to compare accelerated (six fractions a week radiotherapy against concurrent chemoradiotherapy (using conventional fractionation in locally advanced head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT is currently considered to be the standard of care in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The optimum radiotherapy schedule for best local control and acceptable toxicity is not yet clear. We aimed at shortening of treatment time by using accelerated radiation, thereby comparing the disease response, loco-regional tumor control and tolerability of accelerated radiation (six fractions per week against CCRT in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Materials and Methods: We conducted the prospective randomized study for a period of 2 years from June 2011 to May 2013 in 133 untreated patients of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. Study group (66 patients received accelerated radiotherapy with 6 fractions per week (66Gy/33#/5½ weeks. Control group (67 patients received CCRT with 5 fractions per week radiation (66 Gy/33#/6½ weeks along with intravenous cisplatin 30 mg/m 2 weekly. Tumor control, survival, acute and late toxicities were assessed. Results: Median overall treatment time was 38 days and 45 days in the accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation arm, respectively. At a median follow up of 12 months, 41 patients (62.1% in the accelerated radiotherapy arm and 47 patients (70.1% in the CCRT arm were disease free (P = 0.402. Local disease control was comparable in both the arms. Acute toxicities were significantly higher in the CCRT arm as compared with accelerated radiotherapy arm. There was no difference in late toxicities between the two arms. Conclusion: We can achieve, same or near to the same local control, with lower toxicities with accelerated six fractions per week radiation compared with CCRT especially for Indian population.

  8. Helical tomotherapy: an innovative radiotherapy technique for the treatment of locally advanced oropharynx and inoperable oral cavity carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To report our initial clinical experience of helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of locally advanced oropharynx and inoperable oral cavity cancer. Between February 2008 and January 2011, 24 consecutive patients, 15 with oropharyngeal cancer and 9 with oral cavity cancer were treated with exclusive radiotherapy or concomitant chemoradiotherapy. Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in 30 fractions scheme was prescribed to all patients, using Helical Tomotherapy. Doses administered to primary tumor, oropharynx/oral cavity and positive lymph-nodes and negative lymph-nodes were 66–67.5 Gy, 60–63 Gy and 54 Gy, respectively. Complete response rate for the oropharynx and the oral cavity group was 86.7% and 77.8%, respectively. The 1 and 2-year Overall Survival (OS) and Disease Free Survival (DFS) rate for the oropharynx group was 92.9%, 85.1%, 92.9% and 77.4% respectively. For the oral cavity group, 1 and 2-year OS and DFS rates were 55.6%, 55.6%, 75% and 75%, respectively. No patient developed grade ≥3 mucositis, dysphagia or dermatitis. The maximum late-toxicity grade observed was 2, for all the variables examined. HT appears to achieve encouraging clinical outcomes in terms of response, survival and toxicity rates

  9. Upfront systemic chemotherapy and preoperative short-course radiotherapy with delayed surgery for locally advanced rectal cancer with distant metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choosing the most effective approach for treating rectal cancer with mesorectal fascia (MRF) involvement or closeness and synchronous distant metastases is a current clinical challenge. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if upfront systemic chemotherapy and short-course radiotherapy (RT) with delayed surgery enables R0 resection. Between March 2009 and October 2009, six patients were selected for upfront chemotherapy and short-course RT (5 × 5 Gy) with delayed surgery. The patients had locally advanced primary tumors with MRF involvement or closeness, as well as synchronous and potentially resectable distant metastases. Chemotherapy was administered to five patients between the end of the RT and surgery. All patients underwent total mesorectal excision (TME). The median patient age was 54 years (range 39-63). All primary and metastatic lesions were resected simultaneously. The median duration between short-course RT and surgery was 13 weeks (range, 7-18). R0 resection of rectal lesions was achieved in 5 patients. One patient, who had a very low-lying tumor, had an R1 resection. The median follow-up duration for all patients was 16.7 months (range, 15.5-23.5). One patient developed liver metastasis at 15.7 months. There have been no local recurrences or deaths. Upfront chemotherapy and short course RT with delayed surgery is a valuable alternative treatment approach for patients with MRF involvement or closeness of rectal cancer with distant metastases

  10. Adjuvant intravenous methotrexate or definitive radiotherapy alone for advanced squamous cancers of the oral cavity, oropharynx, supraglottic larynx or hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three hundred twenty-six patients with advanced head and neck cancers were randomized to receive definitive radiotherapy alone while 312 similar patients first received intravenous Methotrexate. No significant bias was demonstrated between the two patient populations. The number of annual deaths among the two randomized categories was essentially equal during the first 5 years. Nearly one-half occurred in the first year (146 for radiation alone and 143 in the chemotherapy plus irradiation groups). Median metastasis-free survival was between 12 to 13 months in both categories. The unadjusted 5 year survivals were in the 11 to 22% range for oral cavity, oropharynx, and supraglottic larynx and 3 to 9% for hypopharynx primaries. Although several variables did exert an impact upon survival, primary (T) and lymph node (N) stage seem to be of paramount importance and Methotrexate of minor consideration. Median and 5-year survivals within the various anatomic regions were consistently better when Methotrexate was given. However, these improvements were minimal and depended upon whether comparisons were performed on adjusted or unadjusted survival figures. In view of the modest benefits attained by using this Methotrexate regimen the authors suggest that other adjuvant programs be investigated and that this schedule not be adopted for routine clinical usage

  11. Clinico-pathological studies on the effects of preoperative hyperthermo-chemo-radiotherapy for advanced esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report clinico-pathological studies on the effect of preoperative hyperthermia and chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (HCR) for progress of the local curability of advanced esophageal carcinoma. The subjects of these studies were 17 patients who underwent subtotal esophagectomy after preoperative irradiation of 40 Gy from 1980 to 1989, of which 8 patients had HCR, 6 patients irradiation only (R), 3 patients both irradiation and chemotherapy (CR). The clinical response rate of the patients with R or CR was 33% (PR 3, MR 3, NC 3), and the histological effective (Ef3 or Ef2) rate was 56% (Ef3 1, Ef2 4, Ef1 4). The clinical response rate of the patients with HCR was 88% (PR 7, MR 1), and the histological effective rate was 100% (Ef3 1, Ef2 7). HCR was more effective than R or CR for the local lesion of esophageal carcinoma histopathologically (p<0.05). However, the survival rate of patients with HCR was similar to R and CR, respectively. These results suggest that further improvement of the heating methods and the methods of combining hyperthermia with irradiation and chemotherapy is needed. (author)

  12. Research opportunities to advance solar energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S

    2016-01-22

    Major developments, as well as remaining challenges and the associated research opportunities, are evaluated for three technologically distinct approaches to solar energy utilization: solar electricity, solar thermal, and solar fuels technologies. Much progress has been made, but research opportunities are still present for all approaches. Both evolutionary and revolutionary technology development, involving foundational research, applied research, learning by doing, demonstration projects, and deployment at scale will be needed to continue this technology-innovation ecosystem. Most of the approaches still offer the potential to provide much higher efficiencies, much lower costs, improved scalability, and new functionality, relative to the embodiments of solar energy-conversion systems that have been developed to date. PMID:26798020

  13. Advanced energy projects: FY 1988 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains: Program Description; Summaries of Projects Active in FY 1988; Sample Statement of Work; FY 1988 Program Data; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Projects; Investigator Index; and Institutional Index

  14. Advancing gut microbiome research using cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten OA

    2015-01-01

    Culture-independent approaches have driven the field of microbiome research and illuminated intricate relationships between the gut microbiota and human health. However, definitively associating phenotypes to specific strains or elucidating physiological interactions is challenging for metagenomic...... approaches. Recently a number of new approaches to gut microbiota cultivation have emerged through the integration of high-throughput phylogenetic mapping and new simplified cultivation methods. These methodologies are described along with their potential use within microbiome research. Deployment of novel...

  15. Advancement in LIDAR Data Collection: NASA's Experimental Airborne Advanced Research LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Kevin; Wright, C. Wayne; Noronha, Conan

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research LIDAR (EAARL) is a new developmental LIDAR designed to investigate and advance LIDAR techniques using a adaptive time resolved backscatter information for complex coastal research and monitoring applications. Information derived from such an advanced LIDAR system can potentially improve the ability of resource managers and policy makers to make better informed decisions. While there has been a large amount of research using LIDAR in coastal areas, most are limited in the amount of information captured from each laser pulse. The unique design of the EAARL instrument permits simultaneous acquisition of coastal environments which include subaerial bare earth topography, vegetation biomass, and bare earth beneath vegetated areas.

  16. Advancements in Research Synthesis Methods: From a Methodologically Inclusive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Harsh; Clarke, David

    2009-01-01

    The dominant literature on research synthesis methods has positivist and neo-positivist origins. In recent years, the landscape of research synthesis methods has changed rapidly to become inclusive. This article highlights methodologically inclusive advancements in research synthesis methods. Attention is drawn to insights from interpretive,…

  17. Strategy to Promote Active Learning of an Advanced Research Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Hilary J.; Dovey, Terence M.

    2013-01-01

    Research methods courses aim to equip students with the knowledge and skills required for research yet seldom include practical aspects of assessment. This reflective practitioner report describes and evaluates an innovative approach to teaching and assessing advanced qualitative research methods to final-year psychology undergraduate students. An…

  18. Clinical Practice Guidance for Radiotherapy Planning After Induction Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of induction chemotherapy (IC) for locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer is increasing. The response to IC often causes significant alterations in tumor volume and location and shifts in normal anatomy. Proper determination of the radiotherapy (RT) targets after IC becomes challenging, especially with the use of conformal and precision RT techniques. Therefore, a consensus conference was convened to discuss issues related to RT planning and coordination of care for patients receiving IC. Methods and Materials: Ten participants with special expertise in the various aspects of integration of IC and RT for the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer, including radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, and a medical physicist, participated. The individual members were assigned topics for focused, didactic presentations. Discussion was encouraged after each presentation, and recommendations were formulated. Results: Recommendations and guidelines emerged that emphasize up-front evaluation by all members of the head-and-neck management team, high-quality baseline and postinduction planning scans with the patient in the treatment position, the use of preinduction target volumes, and the use of full-dose RT, even in the face of a complete response. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach is strongly encouraged. Although these recommendations were provided primarily for patients treated with IC, many of these same principles apply to concurrent chemoradiotherapy without IC. A rapid response during RT is quite common, requiring the development of two or more plans in a sizeable fraction of patients, and suggesting the need for similar guidance in the rapidly evolving area of adaptive RT.

  19. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. (author)

  20. Neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hiroshi; Beppu, Naohito; Odawara, Soichi; Tanooka, Masao; Takada, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasue; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kimura, Fumihiko; Yanagi, Hidenori; Yamanaka, Naoki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety and feasibility of a novel protocol of neoadjuvant short-course hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (SC-HART) combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 56 patients with lower rectal cancer of cT3N1M0 (Stage III b) was treated with SC-HART followed by radical surgery, and were analyzed in the present study. SC-HART was performed with a dose of 2.5 Gy twice daily, with an interval of at least 6 hours between fractions, up to a total dose of 25 Gy (25 Gy in 10 fractions for 5 days) combined with S-1 for 10 days. Radical surgery was performed within three weeks following the end of the SC-HART. The median age was 64.6 (range, 39-85) years. The median follow-up term was 16.3 (range, 2-53) months. Of the 56 patients, 53 (94.4%) had no apparent adverse events before surgery; 55 (98.2%) completed the full course of neoadjuvant therapy, while one patient stopped chemotherapy because of Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (CTCAE v.3). The sphincter preservation rate was 94.6%. Downstaging was observed in 45 patients (80.4%). Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 43 patients (76.8%). The local control rate, disease-free survival rate and disease-specific survival rate were 100%, 91.1% and 100%, respectively. To conclude, SC-HART combined with S-1 for locally advanced rectal cancer was well tolerated and produced good short-term outcomes. SC-HART therefore appeared to have a good feasibility for use in further clinical trials. PMID:23658415

  1. Institute for Advanced Learning and Research receives Governor's Technology Award

    OpenAIRE

    Callaway, Curtis

    2006-01-01

    The Institute for Advanced Learning and Research (IALR) received a Governor's Technology Award on September 11 at the Commonwealth of Virginia Innovative Technology Symposium (COVITS) 2006 held in Roanoke.

  2. Research and development of advanced materials using ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Susumu [Nagasaki Inst. of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A wide range of research and development activities of advanced material synthesis using ion beams will be discussed, including ion beam applications to the state-of-the-art electronics from giant to nano electronics. (author)

  3. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) Project finished the B stage commissioning and resolved the relative technical problems. Meanwhile, the acceptance items and the cold neutron source were carrying out.

  4. Injector Research at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, John

    2003-04-01

    During the past several years, various techniques for improving the operational capabilities of high-brightness electron beam sources have been explored at the Advanced Photon Source. Areas of particular emphasis include novel methods of longitudinal phase space control, reduced emittance via blunt-needle cathodes, and alternate cavity geometries for improved source reliability and fabrication. To date most of this work has been computationally based, and a sampling of the results is presented. The APS injector test stand, now undergoing commissioning, will allow the experimental exploration of these and other aspects of high-brightness beam production and preservation. The capabilities of the test stand, along with an initial experimental schedule, will also be presented.

  5. Environmental research at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the importance of probing molecular-scale chemical and physical structure of environmental samples in their natural and often hydrated state, synchrotron radiation has been a powerful tool for environmental scientists for decades. Thus, the crucial role that a highly coherent and high-brightness hard X-ray source such as the Advance Photon Source (APS) can play in addressing many of the outstanding questions in molecular environmental science (MES) was recognized even before 'first light' at the facility. No single synchrotron-based technique or experimental approach can adequately address the tremendous temporal and spatial heterogeneities of the chemistry, physics, and biology of natural environmental samples. Thus, it is common at the APS that multiple X-ray techniques and experimental systems are employed to investigate environmental samples, often chosen for their ability to focus on solute species, plants, microbes, organics, interfacial species, or solids.

  6. Load research manual. Volume 3. Load research for advanced technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenburg, L.; Clarkson, G.; Grund, Jr., C.; Leo, J.; Asbury, J.; Brandon-Brown, F.; Derderian, H.; Mueller, R.; Swaroop, R.

    1980-11-01

    This three-volume manual presents technical guidelines for electric utility load research. Special attention is given to issues raised by the load data reporting requirements of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 and to problems faced by smaller utilities that are initiating load research programs. The manual includes guides to load research literature and glossaries of load research and statistical terms. In Volume 3, special load research procedures are presented for solar, wind, and cogeneration technologies.

  7. NOTE: MMCTP: a radiotherapy research environment for Monte Carlo and patient-specific treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A.; DeBlois, F.; Stroian, G.; Al-Yahya, K.; Heath, E.; Seuntjens, J.

    2007-07-01

    Radiotherapy research lacks a flexible computational research environment for Monte Carlo (MC) and patient-specific treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to develop a flexible software package on low-cost hardware with the aim of integrating new patient-specific treatment planning with MC dose calculations suitable for large-scale prospective and retrospective treatment planning studies. We designed the software package 'McGill Monte Carlo treatment planning' (MMCTP) for the research development of MC and patient-specific treatment planning. The MMCTP design consists of a graphical user interface (GUI), which runs on a simple workstation connected through standard secure-shell protocol to a cluster for lengthy MC calculations. Treatment planning information (e.g., images, structures, beam geometry properties and dose distributions) is converted into a convenient MMCTP local file storage format designated, the McGill RT format. MMCTP features include (a) DICOM_RT, RTOG and CADPlan CART format imports; (b) 2D and 3D visualization views for images, structure contours, and dose distributions; (c) contouring tools; (d) DVH analysis, and dose matrix comparison tools; (e) external beam editing; (f) MC transport calculation from beam source to patient geometry for photon and electron beams. The MC input files, which are prepared from the beam geometry properties and patient information (e.g., images and structure contours), are uploaded and run on a cluster using shell commands controlled from the MMCTP GUI. The visualization, dose matrix operation and DVH tools offer extensive options for plan analysis and comparison between MC plans and plans imported from commercial treatment planning systems. The MMCTP GUI provides a flexible research platform for the development of patient-specific MC treatment planning for photon and electron external beam radiation therapy. The impact of this tool lies in the fact that it allows for systematic, platform

  8. MMCTP: a radiotherapy research environment for Monte Carlo and patient-specific treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy research lacks a flexible computational research environment for Monte Carlo (MC) and patient-specific treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to develop a flexible software package on low-cost hardware with the aim of integrating new patient-specific treatment planning with MC dose calculations suitable for large-scale prospective and retrospective treatment planning studies. We designed the software package 'McGill Monte Carlo treatment planning' (MMCTP) for the research development of MC and patient-specific treatment planning. The MMCTP design consists of a graphical user interface (GUI), which runs on a simple workstation connected through standard secure-shell protocol to a cluster for lengthy MC calculations. Treatment planning information (e.g., images, structures, beam geometry properties and dose distributions) is converted into a convenient MMCTP local file storage format designated, the McGill RT format. MMCTP features include (a) DICOMRT, RTOG and CADPlan CART format imports; (b) 2D and 3D visualization views for images, structure contours, and dose distributions; (c) contouring tools; (d) DVH analysis, and dose matrix comparison tools; (e) external beam editing; (f) MC transport calculation from beam source to patient geometry for photon and electron beams. The MC input files, which are prepared from the beam geometry properties and patient information (e.g., images and structure contours), are uploaded and run on a cluster using shell commands controlled from the MMCTP GUI. The visualization, dose matrix operation and DVH tools offer extensive options for plan analysis and comparison between MC plans and plans imported from commercial treatment planning systems. The MMCTP GUI provides a flexible research platform for the development of patient-specific MC treatment planning for photon and electron external beam radiation therapy. The impact of this tool lies in the fact that it allows for systematic, platform-independent, large

  9. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHLEYER, TITUS; BUTLER, BRIAN S.; SONG, MEI; SPALLEK, HEIKO

    2013-01-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers’ need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators’ desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user’s primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems. PMID:24376309

  10. Educating Scientifically: Advances in Physics Education Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkelstein, Noah (University of Colorado)

    2007-05-16

    It is now fairly well documented that traditionally taught, large-scale introductory physics courses fail to teach our students the basics. In fact, often these same courses have been found to teach students things we do not want. Building on a tradition of research in physics, the physics education research community has been researching the effects of educational practice and reforms at the undergraduate level for many decades. From these efforts and those within the fields of education, cognitive science, and psychology we have learned a great deal about student learning and environments that support learning for an increasingly diverse population of students in the physics classroom. This talk will introduce some of the ideas from physics education research, discuss a variety of effective classroom practices/ surrounding educational structures, and begin to examine why these do (and do not) work. I will present both a survey of physics education research and some of the exciting theoretical and experimental developments emerging from the University of Colorado.

  11. Research advance in wood composites in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Wood composites can generally be classified in three parts: laminated composites, mixed composites and penetrated composites. Every part has its own characteristic and can be further divided. This paper introduces the history and the state of development of wood composites in China. The research about glue-laminated timber is rare and the industry hardly comes to being. A great of achievements have been obtained in mixed composites and it is well industrialized. Many studies on scrimber have been done and the Chinese researchers are looking for a feasible way to develop the scrimber industry in China. Chinese researchers also spent so much energy in studying wood plastic composites (WPC), but it has not been industrialized due to the high cost.

  12. Advanced energy projects; FY 1995 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The AEP Division supports projects to explore novel energy-related concepts which are typically at an early stage of scientific development, and high-risk, exploratory concepts. Topical areas presently receiving support are: novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, exploring uses of new scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. There were 46 research projects during FY 1995; ten were initiated during that fiscal year. The summaries are separated into grant and laboratory programs, and small business innovation research programs.

  13. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhemovic Ibrahim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC. Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Methods Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day, starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR. Results 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male. Twelve patients (19.7% had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1% T3N1, 2 patients (3.3% T2N2, 22 patients (36.1% T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2% T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11. Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%, proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5% and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%. Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%, and 42 patients (70% underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR was recorded in 8 patients (13.3% and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%. T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower.

  14. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy with late intensification in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether a course of hyperfractionated radiation therapy concomitant with escalated radiosensitizing platinum compounds can be administered with acceptable morbidity and achieve a high rate of loco-regional control for Stage III and IV head and neck cancer and whether the patients can be tumor free at the primary site after initial therapy and cured by the additional chemoradiation without radical resection of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III/IV head and neck cancer were treated in this multicenter Phase II Study with 1.8 Gy fraction radiotherapy for 2 weeks, with escalation to 1.2 Gy b.i.d. hyperfractionation to 46.8 Gy. Concomitant continuous infusion cisplatinum (CDDP) 20 mg per meter square on day 1 to 4 and 22 to 25 was given. Reassessment by biopsy of primary and nodes was done. Patients with a complete response continued with hyperfractionated radiotherapy to 75.6 Gy with simultaneous carboplatinum (Carbo), 25 mg per meter square b.i.d. for 12 consecutive treatment days. Patients with residual disease at 46.8 Gy required curative surgery. Seventy-four patients were treated at the three institutions; 20 were Stage III and 54 were Stage IV. All patients had daily mouth care, nutritional, and psychosocial support. Results: This regime was well tolerated. Eighty-five percent of toxicities were Grade 1 or 2 and there was only one Grade 4 hematologic toxicity. Late toxicities included xerostomia in 25 patients, dysplasia in 18, and mild speech impediment in 11. Biopsies of primary site were done after the first course of treatment in 59 patients. Neck dissections were performed in 35 patients. Forty-four of 59 (75%) primary sites and 16 of 35 (46%) lymph nodes had pathologically complete response (CR). Of the 74 patients, only 12 required surgical resection of the primary site. Thirty-five of the 50 node positive patients had neck dissections, 16 of these were CRs at surgery. At 4 years (median follow-up of 26

  15. Neoadjuvant capecitabine, radiotherapy, and bevacizumab (CRAB) in locally advanced rectal cancer: results of an open-label phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoperative capecitabine-based chemoradiation is a standard treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Here, we explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to capecitabine and concurrent radiotherapy for LARC. Patients with MRI-confirmed stage II/III rectal cancer received bevacizumab 5 mg/kg i.v. 2 weeks prior to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by bevacizumab 5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15 and 29, capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on Days 1-38, and concurrent radiotherapy 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day, 5 days/week for 5 weeks + three 1.8 Gy/day), starting on Day 1. Total mesorectal excision was scheduled 6-8 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Tumour regression grades (TRG) were evaluated on surgical specimens according to Dworak. The primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR). 61 patients were enrolled (median age 60 years [range 31-80], 64% male). Twelve patients (19.7%) had T3N0 tumours, 1 patient T2N1, 19 patients (31.1%) T3N1, 2 patients (3.3%) T2N2, 22 patients (36.1%) T3N2 and 5 patients (8.2%) T4N2. Median tumour distance from the anal verge was 6 cm (range 0-11). Grade 3 adverse events included dermatitis (n = 6, 9.8%), proteinuria (n = 4, 6.5%) and leucocytopenia (n = 3, 4.9%). Radical resection was achieved in 57 patients (95%), and 42 patients (70%) underwent sphincter-preserving surgery. TRG 4 (pCR) was recorded in 8 patients (13.3%) and TRG 3 in 9 patients (15.0%). T-, N- and overall downstaging rates were 45.2%, 73.8%, and 73.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiotherapy with bevacizumab and capecitabine. The observed adverse events of neoadjuvant treatment are comparable with those previously reported, but the pCR rate was lower

  16. Optimization of radiotherapy. Some notes on the principles and practice of optimization in cancer treatment and implications for clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods dominate cancer treatment--one, the traditional best practice, individualized treatment method and two, the a priori determined decision method of the interinstitutional, cooperative, clinical trial. In the first, choices are infinite and can be made at the time of treatment; in the second, choices are finite and are made in advance of treatment on a random basis. Neither method systematically selects, identifies, or formalizes the optimum level of effect in the treatment chosen. Of the two, it can be argued that the first, other things being equal, is more likely to select the optimum treatment. The determination of level of effect for the optimization of cancer treatment requires the generation of dose-response relationships for both benefit and risk and the introduction of benefit and risk considerations and judgements. The clinical trial, as presently constituted, doses not yield this kind of information, it being, generally, of the binary yes or no, better or worse type. The best practice, individualized treatment method can yield, when adequately documented, both a range of dose-response relationships and a variety of benefit and risk considerations. The presentation will be limited to a consideration of a single modality of cancer treatment, radiation therapy, but an analogy with other modalities of cancer treatment will be inferred. Criteria for optimization will be developed and graphic means for its identification and formalization will be demonstrated with examples taken from the radiotherapy literature. The general problem of optimization theory and practice will be discussed; the necessity for its exploration in relation to the increasing complexity of cancer treatment will be developed; and recommendations for clinical research will be made including a proposal for the support of clinics as an alternative to the support of programs

  17. Comparison of dose distribution between simplified IMRT and different curative radiotherapy plans for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the dose distribution of target volume and normal tissues with different treatment planning such as three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), Simplified intensity-modulated radiotherapy (sIMRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Methods: Fourteen patients with stage III NSCLC who underwent concurrent radio chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Five-field 3D-CRT, sIMRT and 5-field or 7-field IMRT plans were performed for each patient. The dose distributions of target volume and normal tissues, conformal index (CI), and heterogeneous index (HI) were analyzed using the dose-volume histogram for these techniques. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 30 fractions. The total monitor units (MU) were also analyzed to compare the execution time indirectly. Results: The CI for planning target volume (PTV) was superior with IMRT, sIMRT to 3DCRT. Conversely, the HI for PTV was 3DCRT > sIMRT > IMRT. sIMRT and IMRT can protect the organs at risk better than 3DCRT. The mean of total MU for 3DCRT5f, sIMRT, IMRT5f and IMRT7f was 476±23, 523±29, 764±51 and 793±44, respectively. Conclusions: Comparing with 3DCRT and IMRT, sIMRT was optimal for clinical practice. sIMRT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques can protect the lung and spinal cord well. (authors)

  18. Research advances in heavy metal biosorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosorption of heavy metal has wide applications. The mechanisms of heavy metal biosorption, including complexation, ion exchange, microprecipitation and oxidation reduction, are presented. Thermodynamics and dynamics of biosorption are also discussed. Key factors of influencing biosorption, such as pH values, coexistence ions and temperature are explained. The research directions are explored. (authors)

  19. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included.

  20. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-07-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  1. Advancing the Profession: Facilitating Critical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning & Leading with Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The field of educational technology is under external pressure to provide evidence of identifiable learning outcomes that can be attributed to technology. Leaders within the educational technology research community agree about the importance of such evidence. Each year, ISTE and the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE)…

  2. Advances in Design-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svihla, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Design-based research (DBR) is a core methodology of the Learning Sciences. Historically rooted as a movement away from the methods of experimental psychology, it is a means to develop "humble" theory that takes into account numerous contextual effects for understanding how and why a design supported learning. DBR involves iterative…

  3. Advances in Music-Reading Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdottir, Helga Rut

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to construct a comprehensive review of the research literature in the reading of western staff notation. Studies in music perception, music cognition, music education and music neurology are cited. The aim is to establish current knowledge in music-reading acquisition and what is needed for further progress in this…

  4. Preoperative radiotherapy followed by radical vulvectomy with inguinal lymphadenectomy for advanced vulvar carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotmensch, J.; Rubin, S.J.; Sutton, H.G.; Javaheri, G.; Halpern, H.J.; Schwartz, J.L.; Stewart, M.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Herbst, A.L. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-02-01

    A therapeutic alternative to exenteration for large locally advanced vulvar carcinoma involving the rectum, anus, or vagina is the use of preoperative radiation followed by radical surgery. Between 1980 and 1988, 13 patients with Stage III and 3 with Stage IV vulvar carcinoma involving the rectum/anus, urethra, or vagina were treated with 4000 rad to the vulva and 4500 rad to the inguinal and pelvic nodes followed by a radical vulvectomy and inguinal lymphadenectomy 4 weeks later. The overall 5 year cumulative survival was 45%. Twelve tumors regressed after radiation with 62.5% of the patients having visceral preservation while in 4 patients there was no major response to radiation and urinary or fecal diversion was required. Of the 6 recurrences 4 were central and 2 distant. Three patients with central recurrences had tumor within 1 cm of the vulvectomy margin. Complications included wet desquamation, inguinal wound separation, lymphedema, and urethral strictures. There were no operative deaths. It is concluded that the use of preoperative radiation followed by radical vulvectomy may be an alternative to pelvic exenteration in selected patients with advanced vulvar lesions.

  5. A DICOM based radiotherapy plan database for research collaboration and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, J.; Krogh, S.; Brink, C.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To create a central radiotherapy (RT) plan database for dose analysis and reporting, capable of calculating and presenting statistics on user defined patient groups. The goal is to facilitate multi-center research studies with easy and secure access to RT plans and statistics on protocol compliance. Methods: RT institutions are able to send data to the central database using DICOM communications on a secure computer network. The central system is composed of a number of DICOM servers, an SQL database and in-house developed software services to process the incoming data. A web site within the secure network allows the user to manage their submitted data. Results: The RT plan database has been developed in Microsoft .NET and users are able to send DICOM data between RT centers in Denmark. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) calculations performed by the system are comparable to those of conventional RT software. A permission system was implemented to ensure access control and easy, yet secure, data sharing across centers. The reports contain DVH statistics for structures in user defined patient groups. The system currently contains over 2200 patients in 14 collaborations. Conclusions: A central RT plan repository for use in multi-center trials and quality assurance was created. The system provides an attractive alternative to dummy runs by enabling continuous monitoring of protocol conformity and plan metrics in a trial.

  6. A DICOM based radiotherapy plan database for research collaboration and reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To create a central radiotherapy (RT) plan database for dose analysis and reporting, capable of calculating and presenting statistics on user defined patient groups. The goal is to facilitate multi-center research studies with easy and secure access to RT plans and statistics on protocol compliance. Methods: RT institutions are able to send data to the central database using DICOM communications on a secure computer network. The central system is composed of a number of DICOM servers, an SQL database and in-house developed software services to process the incoming data. A web site within the secure network allows the user to manage their submitted data. Results: The RT plan database has been developed in Microsoft .NET and users are able to send DICOM data between RT centers in Denmark. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) calculations performed by the system are comparable to those of conventional RT software. A permission system was implemented to ensure access control and easy, yet secure, data sharing across centers. The reports contain DVH statistics for structures in user defined patient groups. The system currently contains over 2200 patients in 14 collaborations. Conclusions: A central RT plan repository for use in multi-center trials and quality assurance was created. The system provides an attractive alternative to dummy runs by enabling continuous monitoring of protocol conformity and plan metrics in a trial.

  7. Advanced energy projects FY 1983 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Division supports exploratory research on novel concepts related to energy. The research is usually aimed at establishing the scientific feasibility of a concept and, where appropriate, also at estimating its economic viability. Because projects supported inevitably involve a high degree of risk, an indication of a high potential payoff is required. An immediate, specific application of the concept is not an absolute prerequisite for consideration; thus, for example, proposers of schemes leading to the development of x-ray lasers are not required to justify their proposals by discussing potential applications of such lasers. The concepts supported are typically at too early a stage of scientific verification to qualify for funding by DOE programs responsible for technology development. Where doubt exists, such programs are consulted, prior to proposal consideration by AEP, in order to establish their possible interest in the project

  8. Research advancements in palm oil nutrition*

    OpenAIRE

    May, Choo Yuen; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi

    2014-01-01

    Palm oil is the major oil produced, with annual world production in excess of 50 million tonnes. About 85% of global palm oil produced is used in food applications. Over the past three decades, research on nutritional benefits of palm oil have demonstrated the nutritional adequacy of palm oil and its products, and have resulted in transitions in the understanding these attributes. Numerous studies have demonstrated that palm oil was similar to unsaturated oils with regards to effects on blood...

  9. Advance and application of lake optics research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The mainstreams of lake optics research in recent decades include optical properties of lakewater,observation, transmission and calculation of underwater radiation, determination of absorption coefficient S of yellow substance, influence of UV-B radiation of lake primary productivity by bio-optical model. Major lake optics applications, such as calculation of lake primary productivity and chl-a, analysis of factors restricting eutrophication, and protection against lake eutrophication are summarized.

  10. Research in advance for FMD Novel Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Ding Yao-zhong; ma Li-na; Zhou Jian-hua; Chen Hao-tai; Zhang Jie; Zhang Liang; Liu Yong-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD), as a major global animal disease, affects millions of animals worldwide and remains the main sanitary barrier to the international and national trade of animals and animal products. Inactivated vaccination is the most effective measure for prevention of FMD at present, but fail to induce long-term protection and content new requires for production of FMD vaccines. As a number of Researchers hope to obtain satisfactory novel vaccines by new bio-technology...

  11. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  12. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthaiyan Shanmugam, Muniesh; Subhra Santra, Tuhin

    2016-01-01

    The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology. PMID:27490525

  13. Photon neutron mixed-beam radiotherapy of locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this article we present the results of mixed-beam, photon/neutron radiation therapy in 45 patients with locally advanced, bulky, or postoperative recurrent prostate cancer treated at the University of Chicago between 1978 and 1991. Survival, disease-free survival, local control, and long-term complications are analyzed in detail. Methods and Materials: Between 1978 and 1991, 45 patients with locally advanced (> 5 cm Stage B2, Stage C, or Stage D1) prostate cancer underwent mixed-beam (photon/neutron) radiation therapy. Forty percent of the treatment was delivered with neutron irradiation at either the University of Chicago or Fermilab. Sixty percent of treatment was delivered with photons at the University of Chicago. Initially, the whole pelvis was irradiated to 50 photon Gy equivalent. This was followed by a boost to the prostate for an additional 20 photon Gy equivalent. Results: The median follow-up for patients in this series is 72 months. The overall 5-year actuarial survival was 72%, and the 5-year disease-free survival was 45%. Thus far, 18 patients have died. Eleven patients have died from prostate cancer and 7 from other medical illness. Twenty-seven patients are alive, and 12 of these patients have recurrent and or metastatic disease. The local control rate was 89% (40 out of 45). Histologic material was available on 18 patients following treatment (i.e., prostate biopsy in 16 patients and autopsy in 2 patients) and was negative for carcinoma in 13 (72%). Significant Grade 3-5 complications occurred in 36% (16 out of 45) of the patients treated with mixed-beam radiation therapy and were related to dose and beam quality. Factors related to survival, disease-free survival, local control, and complications are analyzed. Conclusions: The survival and local control results of mixed-beam radiation therapy at the University of Chicago appear to be superior to those series using photon radiation in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma

  14. Advancing translational research with the Semantic Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall M Scott

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental goal of the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH "Roadmap" is to strengthen Translational Research, defined as the movement of discoveries in basic research to application at the clinical level. A significant barrier to translational research is the lack of uniformly structured data across related biomedical domains. The Semantic Web is an extension of the current Web that enables navigation and meaningful use of digital resources by automatic processes. It is based on common formats that support aggregation and integration of data drawn from diverse sources. A variety of technologies have been built on this foundation that, together, support identifying, representing, and reasoning across a wide range of biomedical data. The Semantic Web Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLSIG, set up within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium, was launched to explore the application of these technologies in a variety of areas. Subgroups focus on making biomedical data available in RDF, working with biomedical ontologies, prototyping clinical decision support systems, working on drug safety and efficacy communication, and supporting disease researchers navigating and annotating the large amount of potentially relevant literature. Results We present a scenario that shows the value of the information environment the Semantic Web can support for aiding neuroscience researchers. We then report on several projects by members of the HCLSIG, in the process illustrating the range of Semantic Web technologies that have applications in areas of biomedicine. Conclusion Semantic Web technologies present both promise and challenges. Current tools and standards are already adequate to implement components of the bench-to-bedside vision. On the other hand, these technologies are young. Gaps in standards and implementations still exist and adoption is limited by typical problems with early technology, such as the need

  15. Combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy using cisplatin of advanced esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 38 patients with esophageal carcinoma who were treated at the Department of Radiology, Tokushima University Hospital between 1983 and 1987, 13 (34 %) received a combination of radiation and chemotherapy of cisplatin-based combination regimens. Twelve patients with squamous cell carcinoma and one with adenocarcinoma were treated by a 6 MV linear accelerater. They received a cummulative dose ranging from 18 to 68 Gy (average dose : 50.5 Gy), in 2 Gy fractions. The response rate was 62 % (CR 1, PR 7). Two of the six patients with Stage III survived more than three years. Median survival time was 11.4 months for patients with Stage III and 4.7 months for Stage IV. Chemotherapy improved median survival duration for patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma but did not produce a significant improvement in survival, as reported in other recent series. (author)

  16. Prognostic Significance of p16 Expression in Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 126 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages Ib1–IVb cervical cancer treated with radiation. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was given to 108 patients. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from the paraffin-embedded diagnostic biopsy specimens. Immunoperoxidase staining was performed on the TMA and a p16 monoclonal antibody was utilized. IHC p16 extent was evaluated and scored in quartiles: 0 = no staining, 1 = 1–25% of cells staining, 2 = 26 to 50%, 3 = 51 to 75%, and 4 = 76 to 100%. Results: The p16 IHC score was 4 in 115 cases, 3 in 1, 2 in 3 and 0 in 7. There was no relationship between p16 score and tumor histology. Patients with p16-negative tumors were older (mean age at diagnosis 65 vs. 52 years for p16-positive tumors; p = 0.01). The 5-year cause-specific survivals were 33% for p16-negative cases (score = 0) compared with 63% for p16-positive cases (scores 1, 2, 3 or 4; p = 0.07). The 5-year recurrence-free survivals were 34% for those who were p16-negative vs. 57% for those who were p16-positive (p = 0.09). In addition, patients with p16-positive tumors (score > 0) were more likely to be complete metabolic responders as assessed by the 3-month posttherapy 18 [F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomograph compared with patients with p16-negative tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusion: p16 expression is predictive of improved survival outcome after chemoradiation therapy for advanced-stage invasive cervical carcinoma. Further testing will be needed to evaluate p16-negative cervical tumors.

  17. Expedience of conventional radiotherapy in locally advanced cervix cancer: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Bhagat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Analysis was done to assess the implications of total radiation treatment duration towards locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods: A comparative study was conducted in CNCI, Kolkata. A total of 38 patients were studied with interdigited brachyttherapy during the course of conventional teleradiotherapy and they were compared to a total of 39 patients with conventional sequential teletherapy and brachytherapy. Results: In the experimental arm all the patients had complete response to treatment whereas, 24 patients (85.7% in the conventional arm had complete response [ P = 0.08]. At the last follow up 28 patients (73.68% in the study arm and 17 patients (43.58% in the control arm were free of disease. The failure rate in the conventional control arm was significantly higher [ P = 0.035]. Test of proportion derived from data also showed that the proportion of patients with no evidence of disease at the time of last follow-up was significantly higher in the study arm compared to the control arm [ P < 0.05] and the proportion of patients with persistent disease was significantly less in the stuwdy arm compared to the control arm [ P < 0.05]. The probability of disease-free survival in percentage according to the curve at the time of median follow-up was approximately 70% for study arm and 60% for control arm [log-rank test, P = 0.2463]. Conclusion: we should hence minimize treatment time and avoid any planned or unplanned interruptions or delays by timely integration of external beam and intra-cavitary irradiation that may yield a better local control in locally advanced cervical cancer

  18. Randomized trial addressing risk features and time factors of surgery plus radiotherapy in advanced head-and-neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A multi-institutional, prospective, randomized trial was undertaken in patients with advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma to address (1) the validity of using pathologic risk features, established from a previous study, to determine the need for, and dose of, postoperative radiotherapy (PORT); (2) the impact of accelerating PORT using a concomitant boost schedule; and (3) the importance of the overall combined treatment duration on the treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: Of 288 consecutive patients with advanced disease registered preoperatively, 213 fulfilled the trial criteria and went on to receive therapy predicated on a set of pathologic risk features: no PORT for the low-risk group (n=31); 57.6 Gy during 6.5 weeks for the intermediate-risk group (n=31); and, by random assignment, 63 Gy during 5 weeks (n=76) or 7 weeks (n=75) for the high-risk group. Patients were irradiated with standard techniques appropriate to the site of disease and likely areas of spread. The study end points were locoregional control (LRC), survival, and morbidity. Results: Patients with low or intermediate risks had significantly higher LRC and survival rates than those with high-risk features (p=0.003 and p=0.0001, respectively), despite receiving no PORT or lower dose PORT, respectively. For high-risk patients, a trend toward higher LRC and survival rates was noted when PORT was delivered in 5 rather than 7 weeks. A prolonged interval between surgery and PORT in the 7-week schedule was associated with significantly lower LRC (p=0.03) and survival (p=0.01) rates. Consequently, the cumulative duration of combined therapy had a significant impact on the LRC (p=0.005) and survival (p=0.03) rates. A 2-week reduction in the PORT duration by using the concomitant boost technique did not increase the late treatment toxicity. Conclusions: This Phase III trial established the power of risk assessment using pathologic features in determining the need for, and dose of

  19. Advanced Research Workshop on Nonlinear Hyperbolic Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Serre, Denis; Raviart, Pierre-Arnaud

    1987-01-01

    The field of nonlinear hyperbolic problems has been expanding very fast over the past few years, and has applications - actual and potential - in aerodynamics, multifluid flows, combustion, detonics amongst other. The difficulties that arise in application are of theoretical as well as numerical nature. In fact, the papers in this volume of proceedings deal to a greater extent with theoretical problems emerging in the resolution of nonlinear hyperbolic systems than with numerical methods. The volume provides an excellent up-to-date review of the current research trends in this area.

  20. Research advances in allelopathy of Quercus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guang-de; Jia Li-ming; Li Xiao-wen

    2007-01-01

    The term allelopathy refers to biochemical interaction between all types of plants including microorganisms through production of chemical compounds that escape into the environment and exist widely in Quercus L. The development of investigations into types of allelochemicals,their compounding and spreading pathways,as well as expression of allelopathy in Quercus L. are reviewed in this paper:We have closely and systematically emphasized the functional mechanisms of allelopathy in forest plants for our next research project on allelopathy in Quercus L.

  1. Advances in Research of Garlic Virus Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Garlic virus infection is an important disease which affects garlic production,with the increasing years of planting,harm of virus is serious year by year,which seriously affect yield and quality of garlic.In order to know the garlic virus effectively,the paper reviewed the research situation of several important garlic virus in virus species,origin,distribution,host range,symptom,route of transmission,classification,genome and detection technique and the prevention technology of garlic viruses.At the same ...

  2. Research Advances of Atherosclerosis in Translational Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhuo-xin; DENG Rong; PI Min; YU Hai-bo

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD) are defined as a series of diseases caused by atherosclerosis (AS), including coronary heart disease (CHD), myocardial infarction (MI), stable or unstable angina pectoris, revascularization of coronary artery or other arteries, stroke, transient cerebral ischemic onset or atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. AS has common pathological basis with ASCVD as it is a general arterial regressive disease of human beings. With the industrialization progression, AS morbidity increases annually and it also leads to coronary atherosclerotic heart disease, cerebral stroke and peripheral artery stenosed occlusion or dilation, thus becoming the main cause for high disability and mortality. The main purpose of translational medicine is to break the intrinsic barrier between basic medicine with drug research and development as well as clinical and public healthcare, and establish a direct connection between them. It is also can rapidly transform basic research results to new clinical preventive and therapeutic methods. This study mainly reviewed AS from the aspect of translational medicine, aiming to provide a reliable basis for the prevention and treatment of AS.

  3. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Miao Cao,* Zhijiang Wang,* Yong He State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect “faulty wiring” or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, connectome, graph theory, functional connectivity, structural connectivity

  4. Research Advances of Atherosclerosis in Translational Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo-xin YANG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (ASCVD are defined as a series of diseases caused by atherosclerosis (AS, including coronary heart disease (CHD, myocardial infarction (MI, stable or unstable angina pectoris, revascularization of coronary artery or other arteries, stroke, transient cerebral ischemic onset or atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. AS has common pathological basis with ASCVD as it is a general arterial regressive disease of human beings. With the industrialization progression, AS morbidity increases annually and it also leads to coronary atherosclerotic heart disease, cerebral stroke and peripheral artery stenosed occlusion or dilation, thus becoming the main cause for high disability and mortality. The main purpose of translational medicine is to break the intrinsic barrier between basic medicine with drug research and development as well as clinical and public healthcare, and establish a direct connection between them. It is also can rapidly transform basic research results to new clinical preventive and therapeutic methods. This study mainly reviewed AS from the aspect of translational medicine, aiming to provide a reliable basis for the prevention and treatment of AS.

  5. FoCa: a modular treatment planning system for proton radiotherapy with research and educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Kondrla, M.; Shaindlin, A.; Carabe, A.

    2014-12-01

    FoCa is an in-house modular treatment planning system, developed entirely in MATLAB, which includes forward dose calculation of proton radiotherapy plans in both active and passive modalities as well as a generic optimization suite for inverse treatment planning. The software has a dual education and research purpose. From the educational point of view, it can be an invaluable teaching tool for educating medical physicists, showing the insights of a treatment planning system from a well-known and widely accessible software platform. From the research point of view, its current and potential uses range from the fast calculation of any physical, radiobiological or clinical quantity in a patient CT geometry, to the development of new treatment modalities not yet available in commercial treatment planning systems. The physical models in FoCa were compared with the commissioning data from our institution and show an excellent agreement in depth dose distributions and longitudinal and transversal fluence profiles for both passive scattering and active scanning modalities. 3D dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries were compared with a commercial treatment planning system, yielding a gamma-index pass rate of above 94% (using FoCa’s most accurate algorithm) for all cases considered. Finally, the inverse treatment planning suite was used to produce the first prototype of intensity-modulated, passive-scattered proton therapy, using 13 passive scattering proton fields and multi-leaf modulation to produce a concave dose distribution on a cylindrical solid water phantom without any field-specific compensator.

  6. FoCa: a modular treatment planning system for proton radiotherapy with research and educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FoCa is an in-house modular treatment planning system, developed entirely in MATLAB, which includes forward dose calculation of proton radiotherapy plans in both active and passive modalities as well as a generic optimization suite for inverse treatment planning. The software has a dual education and research purpose. From the educational point of view, it can be an invaluable teaching tool for educating medical physicists, showing the insights of a treatment planning system from a well-known and widely accessible software platform. From the research point of view, its current and potential uses range from the fast calculation of any physical, radiobiological or clinical quantity in a patient CT geometry, to the development of new treatment modalities not yet available in commercial treatment planning systems. The physical models in FoCa were compared with the commissioning data from our institution and show an excellent agreement in depth dose distributions and longitudinal and transversal fluence profiles for both passive scattering and active scanning modalities. 3D dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries were compared with a commercial treatment planning system, yielding a gamma-index pass rate of above 94% (using FoCa’s most accurate algorithm) for all cases considered. Finally, the inverse treatment planning suite was used to produce the first prototype of intensity-modulated, passive-scattered proton therapy, using 13 passive scattering proton fields and multi-leaf modulation to produce a concave dose distribution on a cylindrical solid water phantom without any field-specific compensator. (paper)

  7. idaho Accelerator Center Advanced Fuel Cycle Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Douglas; Dale, Dan

    2011-10-20

    The technical effort has been in two parts called; Materials Science and Instrumentation Development. The Materials Science technical program has been based on a series of research and development achievements in Positron-Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) for defect detection in structural materials. This work is of particular importance in nuclear power and its supporting systems as the work included detection of defects introduced by mechanical and thermal phenomena as well as those caused by irradiation damage. The second part of the program has focused on instrumentation development using active interrogation techniques supporting proliferation resistant recycling methodologies and nuclear material safeguards. This effort has also lead to basic physics studies of various phenomena relating to photo-fission. Highlights of accomplishments and facility improvement legacies in these areas over the program period include

  8. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future. PMID:26711276

  9. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms

  10. Sexual Objectification of Women: Advances to Theory and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Dawn M.; Moffitt, Lauren B.; Carr, Erika R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectification theory provides an important framework for understanding, researching, and intervening to improve women's lives in a sociocultural context that sexually objectifies the female body and equates a woman's worth with her body's appearance and sexual functions. The purpose of this Major Contribution is to advance theory, research,…

  11. Establishment of Research Infrastructure for National Advanced Radiation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, Il Hiun; Byun, Myung Woo; Jeong, Il Yun; and others

    2007-07-15

    Construction of fundamental analysis system for RT/RFT advancement and pilot scale laboratory/facility for industry support and Assembly/installation of 30 MeV cyclotron for RI production and research utilizing positron beam, and construction of /distribution system for industrial and medical purpose were carried out for fast settlement for research environment of ARTI (a Jeongeup branch of KAERI)

  12. Establishment of Research Infrastructure for National Advanced Radiation Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of fundamental analysis system for RT/RFT advancement and pilot scale laboratory/facility for industry support and Assembly/installation of 30 MeV cyclotron for RI production and research utilizing positron beam, and construction of /distribution system for industrial and medical purpose were carried out for fast settlement for research environment of ARTI (a Jeongeup branch of KAERI)

  13. Recent advances in aerosol research a bibliographical review

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, C N

    1964-01-01

    Recent Advances in Aerosol Research: A Bibliographical Review presents a bibliographic review of advances in aerosol research covering the period from the beginning of 1957 to the end of 1962. Topics covered include chemical reactions, combustion, coagulation and diffusion, and adhesion of particles. References on filtration, evaporation and condensation, nucleation and growth, and laminar flow and impingement are also included. This volume is comprised of 19 chapters and begins by citing research on acoustic, ultrasonic, and shock wave effects, along with adhesion of particles, chemical react

  14. NATO Advanced Research Institute on the Efficiency of Manufacturing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, C; French, D

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute (A.R. 1.) on "the efficiency of Manufacturing Systems" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programm~ Panel on Systems Science as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international co-operation. Advanced Research Institutes are organised for the purpose of bringing together experts in a particular field of interest to identify and make known the present state of knowledge in that area and, through informed debate, to make recommendations for directions for future research that would benefit the community at large. To this end two kinds of contribution were obtained by invitation. There were those papers which were about the current state of work in the area of manufacturing systems and its organisation; in addition three theme papers were presented to provide a stimulus to the discussion in terms of ways of thinking, both about the area and about the kind of research needed.

  15. Recent advances in vertebrate aging research 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austad, Steven

    2010-06-01

    Among the notable trends seen in this year's highlights in mammalian aging research is an awakening of interest in the assessment of age-related measures of mouse health in addition to the traditional focus on longevity. One finding of note is that overexpression of telomerase extended life and improved several indices of health in mice that had previously been genetically rendered cancer resistant. In another study, resveratrol supplementation led to amelioration of several degenerative conditions without affecting mouse lifespan. A primate dietary restriction (DR) study found that restriction led to major improvements in glucoregulatory status along with provocative but less striking effects on survival. Visceral fat removal in rats improved their survival, although not as dramatically as DR. An unexpected result showing the power of genetic background effects was that DR shortened the lifespan of long-lived mice bearing Prop1(df), whereas a previous report in a different background had found DR to extend the lifespan of Prop1(df) mice. Treatment with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, rapamycin, enhanced the survival of even elderly mice and improved their vaccine response. Genetic inhibition of a TOR target made female, but not male, mice live longer. This year saw the mTOR network firmly established as a major modulator of mammalian lifespan. PMID:20331443

  16. Diterpenes: Advances in Neurobiological Drug Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Torequl; da Silva, Claucenira Bandeira; de Alencar, Marcus Vinícius Oliveira Barros; Paz, Márcia Fernanda Correia Jardim; Almeida, Fernanda Regina de Castro; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    A significant number of studies have been performed with diterpene effect on the brain. Our study aims to make a systematic revision on them. The initial purpose of this review was to screen diterpenes with neurological activity, in particular those that have already been studied and published in different journals (databases until August 2015). The second purpose was to make an action-wise discussion as results viewed on them by taking into drug discovery and development account. Diterpenes considered in this review were selected on the basis of updated information on them and having sufficient information on their screenings. We identified several examples of diterpenes having an interest in further study. We have included the possible sources of them as observed in evidence, their known molecular neurobiological mechanisms, and the active constituents responsible for such activities with the doses and test systems. Results suggest diterpenes to have neurobiological activities like neuro-protection, anti-epileptic, anxiolytic, anti-Alzheimer's disease, anti-Parkinson's disease, anti-cerebral ischemia, anti-neuropathic pain, anti-neuro-inflammatory, and many more. In conclusion, diterpenes may be the prominent candidates in neurobiological drug research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27020718

  17. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Miao; Wang, Zhijiang; He, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect "faulty wiring" or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism) based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective. PMID:26604764

  18. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val; Alsner, Jan; Horsman, Michael Robert; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...... osteopontin measured by ELISA, tumour oxygenation status using pO(2) needle electrodes and tumour osteopontin, hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and carboxyanhydrase 9 (CA9) by immunohistochemistry. The primary treatment was radiotherapy and the hypoxic radiosensitizer nimorazole. Loco......-regional tumour control was evaluated at 5 years. RESULTS: All five markers showed inter-tumour variability. Inter-marker correlations were inconsistent. Only plasma osteopontin inversely correlated with median tumour pO(2), (p=0.02, r=0.28) and CA9 correlated with HIF-1alpha (p<0.01, r=0.45). In Kaplan...

  19. MVP expression in the prediction of clinical outcome of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the role of Major Vault Protein (MVP) in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients. 131 consecutive patients suffering from oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study. In the whole series, the mean follow-up for survivors was 123.11 ± 40.36 months. Patients in tumour stages I and II were referred to surgery; patients in stage III-IV to postoperative radiotherapy (mean dose = 62.13 ± 7.74 Gy in 1.8–2 Gy/fraction). MVP expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tumour tissue. MVP expression was positive in 112 patients (85.5%) and no relation was found with clinic pathological variables. MVP overexpression (those tumours with moderate or strong expression of the protein) was related to insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R) expression (P = 0.014). Tumour stage of the disease was the most important prognostic factor related to survival. Tumours overexpressing MVP and IGF-1R were strongly related to poor disease-free survival (P = 0.008, Exp(B) = 2.730, CI95% (1.302-5.724)) and cause-specific survival (P = 0.014, Exp(B) = 2.570, CI95% (1.215-5.437)) in patients achieving tumour stages III-IV, in multivariate analysis. MVP and IGF-1R expression were related in oral squamous cell carcinoma and conferred reduced long-term survival in patients suffering from advanced stages of the disease

  20. MVP expression in the prediction of clinical outcome of locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henríquez-Hernández Luis

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To explore the role of Major Vault Protein (MVP in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma patients. Subjects and Methods 131 consecutive patients suffering from oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma were included in the study. In the whole series, the mean follow-up for survivors was 123.11 ± 40.36 months. Patients in tumour stages I and II were referred to surgery; patients in stage III-IV to postoperative radiotherapy (mean dose = 62.13 ± 7.74 Gy in 1.8–2 Gy/fraction. MVP expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded tumour tissue. Results MVP expression was positive in 112 patients (85.5% and no relation was found with clinic pathological variables. MVP overexpression (those tumours with moderate or strong expression of the protein was related to insulin-like growth factor receptor-1 (IGF-1R expression (P = 0.014. Tumour stage of the disease was the most important prognostic factor related to survival. Tumours overexpressing MVP and IGF-1R were strongly related to poor disease-free survival (P = 0.008, Exp(B = 2.730, CI95% (1.302-5.724 and cause-specific survival (P = 0.014, Exp(B = 2.570, CI95% (1.215-5.437 in patients achieving tumour stages III-IV, in multivariate analysis. Conclusions MVP and IGF-1R expression were related in oral squamous cell carcinoma and conferred reduced long-term survival in patients suffering from advanced stages of the disease.

  1. Primary Tumor Site as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome for Definitive Radiotherapy of Advanced-Stage Oral Cavity Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of definitive radiotherapy (RT) for oral cavity cancers and to assess prognostic factors. Methods and Materials: Definitive RT was performed on 115 patients with oral cavity cancers at Stages III, IVA, and IVB, with a distribution of 6%, 47%, and 47%, respectively. The median dose of RT was 72Gy (range, 62-76Gy). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was administered to 95% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent salvage surgery after RT failure. Results: Eight-eight (76.5%) patients responded partially and 23 (20%) completely; of the patients who responded, 18% and 57%, respectively, experienced a durable effect of treatment. The 3-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, and progression-free survival were 22%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. The 3-year PFS rates based on the primary tumor sites were as follows: Group I (buccal, mouth floor, and gum) 51%, Group II (retromolar and hard palate) 18%, and Group III (tongue and lip) 6% (p < 0.0001). The 3-year progression-free survival was 41% for N0 patients and 19% for patients with N+ disease (p = 0.012). The T stage and RT technique did not affect survival. The patients who underwent salvage surgery demonstrated better 3-year overall survival and disease-specific survival (53% vs. 19%, p = 0.015 and 53% vs. 24%, p = 0.029, respectively). Subsite group, N+, and salvage surgery were the only significant prognostic factors for survival after multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The primary tumor site and neck stage are prognostic predictors in advanced-stage oral cancer patients who received radical RT. The primary tumor extension and RT technique did not influence survival.

  2. Concurrent image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy and chemotherapy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the experience of induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiationwith helical tomotherapy (HT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Between August 2006 and December 2009, 28 patients with pathological proven nonmetastatic NPC were enrolled. All patients were staged as IIB-IVB. Patients were first treated with 2 to 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy with EP-HDFL (Epirubicin, Cisplatin, 5-FU, and Leucovorin). After induction chemotherapy, weekly based PFL was administered concurrent with HT. Radiation consisted of 70 Gy to the planning target volumes of the primary tumor plus any positive nodal disease using 2 Gy per fraction. After completion of induction chemotherapy, the response rates for primary and nodal disease were 96.4% and 80.8%, respectively. With a median follow-up after 33 months (Range, 13-53 months), there have been 2 primary and 1 nodal relapse after completion of radiotherapy. The estimated 3-year progression-free rates for local, regional, locoregional and distant metastasis survival rate were 92.4%, 95.7%, 88.4%, and 78.0%, respectively. The estimated 3-year overall survival was 83.5%. Acute grade 3, 4 toxicities for xerostomia and dermatitis were only 3.6% and 10.7%, respectively. HT for locoregionally advanced NPC is feasible and effective in regard to locoregional control with high compliance, even after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. None of out-field or marginal failure noted in the current study confirms the potential benefits of treating NPC patients by image-guided radiation modality. A long-term follow-up study is needed to confirm these preliminary findings

  3. Patterns of relapse in locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : To define the clinical and pathological predictors of locoregional recurrence (LRR in locally advanced breast cancer (LABC patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 141 patients with stage II to stage III carcinoma breast treated at Department of Radiotherapy, PGIMER, Chandigarh from 1998-2002. Mean age of the patients was 46 years, 49% of patients were premenopausal and 51% were postmenopausal. The tumor stage was T2 in 18%; T3 in 61% and T4 in 26% of the patients. NACT regimen given was FAC (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin and cyclophosphamide in 85% and CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-Fu in 15% patients. Results : After NACT, surgery was possible in 95% patients. Conservative surgery was possible in 23% patients and mastectomy was done in 72% of patients. Pathological complete response (pCR was seen in 18% patients and pathological partial response (pPR in 69% of patients. Stable and progressive disease was seen in 6% and 7% of patients respectively. Adjuvant radiation therapy was given to 86% patients. Six percent patients developed progressive disease and 4% of patients did not turn up for radiation. Five year LRR was 6% and relapse free survival (RFS was 94%. Thirty-two (23% patients developed distant metastasis resulting in distant metastasis free survival of 77%. The factors that correlated positively with LRR on univariate analysis included tumor stage, stage and pathological nodal stage. However, on multivariate analysis, tumor stage and pathological nodal stage were significant. Factors that correlated for distant relapse were tumor stage, response to chemotherapy, type of surgery, extracapsular extension (ECE and tamoxifen therapy. On multivariate analysis only ECE was the significant factor that correlated with distant relapse free survival. Conclusion : Thus, tumor stage and pathological nodal stage remains the most important predictor of LRR

  4. Pharmacokinetic analysis and k-means clustering of DCEMR images for radiotherapy outcome prediction of advanced cervical cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. Pharmacokinetic analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (DCEMRI) allows for quantitative characterization of vascular properties of tumors. The aim of this study is twofold, first to determine if tumor regions with similar vascularization could be labeled by clustering methods, second to determine if the identified regions can be associated with local cancer relapse. Materials and methods. Eighty-one patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy underwent DCEMRI with Gd-DTPA prior to external beam radiotherapy. The median follow-up time after treatment was four years, in which nine patients had primary tumor relapse. By fitting a pharmacokinetic two-compartment model function to the temporal contrast enhancement in the tumor, two pharmacokinetic parameters, Ktrans and ue, were estimated voxel by voxel from the DCEMR-images. Intratumoral regions with similar vascularization were identified by k-means clustering of the two pharmacokinetic parameter estimates over all patients. The volume fraction of each cluster was used to evaluate the prognostic value of the clusters. Results. Three clusters provided a sufficient reduction of the cluster variance to label different vascular properties within the tumors. The corresponding median volume fraction of each cluster was 38%, 46% and 10%. The second cluster was significantly associated with primary tumor control in a log-rank survival test (p-value: 0.042), showing a decreased risk of treatment failure for patients with high volume fraction of voxels. Conclusions. Intratumoral regions showing similar vascular properties could successfully be labeled in three distinct clusters and the volume fraction of one cluster region was associated with primary tumor control

  5. Impact of hormonal treatment duration in combination with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinnarò Paola

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hormone therapy plus radiotherapy significantly decreases recurrences and mortality of patients affected by locally advanced prostate cancer. In order to determine if difference exists according to the hormonal treatment duration, a literature-based meta-analysis was performed. Methods Relative risks (RR were derived through a random-effect model. Differences in primary (biochemical failure, BF; cancer-specific survival, CSS, and secondary outcomes (overall survival, OS; local or distant recurrence, LR/DM were explored. Absolute differences (AD and the number needed to treat (NNT were calculated. Heterogeneity, a meta-regression for clinic-pathological predictors and a correlation test for surrogates were conducted. Results Five trials (3,424 patients were included. Patient population ranged from 267 to 1,521 patients. The longer hormonal treatment significantly improves BF (with significant heterogeneity with an absolute benefit of 10.1%, and a non significant trend in CSS. With regard to secondary end-points, the longer hormonal treatment significantly decrease both the LR and the DM with an absolute difference of 11.7% and 11.5%. Any significant difference in OS was observed. None of the three identified clinico-pathological predictors (median PSA, range 9.5-20.35, Gleason score 7-10, 27-55% patients/trial, and T3-4, 13-77% patients/trial, did significantly affect outcomes. At the meta-regression analysis a significant correlation between the overall treatment benefit in BF, CSS, OS, LR and DM, and the length of the treatment was found (p≤0.03. Conclusions Although with significant heterogeneity (reflecting different patient' risk stratifications, a longer hormonal treatment duration significantly decreases biochemical, local and distant recurrences, with a trend for longer cancer specific survival.

  6. Oxaliplatin and capecitabine concomitant with neoadjuvant radiotherapy and extended to the resting period in high risk locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.H.; Zeng, Z.F. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, X. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Thoracic Surgery, Guangzhou (China); An, X. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Medical Oncology, Guangzhou (China); Cai, M.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Pathology, Guangzhou (China); Chen, G.; Kong, L.H.; Lin, J.Z.; Wan, D.S.; Pan, Z.Z.; Ding, P.R. [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou (China); Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Departments of Colorectal Surgery, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    Conventional neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is suboptimal for systemic control in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve systemic control, we developed an alternative approach in which an intensified oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOX) chemotherapy regimen was administered concomitantly with radiation and extended to the resting period (consolidation chemotherapy) for high-risk LARC. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the short-term efficacy and toxicity of this strategy. Patients with high-risk LARC were treated with CRT. Two cycles of XELOX were administered concomitantly with radiation. Thereafter, an additional cycle of the same regimen was administered during the resting period after completion of CRT. Tumor response, toxicities and surgical complications were recorded. This study includes 36 patients treated with the above strategy. All patients completed the planned concurrent CRT. Because of grade 3 toxicities, 2 patients were unable to complete the additional chemotherapy. Grade 3 toxicities were leucopenia (2.8 %), diarrhea (2.8 %) and radiodermatitis (2.8 %). All patients underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME) and a sphincter-saving procedure was performed in 27 patients (75 %). There was no perioperative mortality. Postoperative complications developed in 7 patients (19.4 %). Pathologic complete regression (pCR),''nearly pCR'' (major regression), and moderate or minimal regression were achieved in 13 (36.1 %), 16 (44.4 %), and 7 patients (19.5 %), respectively. The preliminary results suggest that a XELOX regimen initially administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and then extended to the resting period in high-risk LARC patients is well tolerated. The strategy is highly effective in terms of pCR and nearly pCR rates, and thus warrants further investigation. (orig.)

  7. Locally advanced cervical cancer: Should intensity-modulated radiotherapy replace brachytherapy?; Complement d'irradiation dans le cancer du col de l'uterus localement evolue: curietherapie uterovaginale ou radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazeron, R.; Gilmore, J.; Khodari, W.; Dumas, I.; Haie-Meder, C. [Service de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Intensity-modulated conformal radiotherapy (IMRT) is booming as treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. This technique reduces the doses delivered to organs at risk and, by analogy to the irradiation of prostate cancer, opens the door to the possibility of dose escalation to levels close or similar to those achieved by brachytherapy. To date, several studies comparing IMRT with brachytherapy have been published, often methodologically flawed, concluding sometimes that both techniques are comparable. These results should be taken with extreme caution and should not overshadow the recent advances in brachytherapy with the use of 3D imaging and optimization. Preliminary works also showed that the combination of 3D optimized brachytherapy with IMRT could improve the management of the local disease especially for lesions poorly covered by intracavitary techniques. (authors)

  8. Clinical role of18F-FDG PET/CT-based simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy treatment plan-ning for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianshe Wang; Tianyou Tang Co-first author; Jing Xu; Andrew Z Wang; Liang Li; Junnian Zheng; Longzhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the long-term local control, overal survival, and late toxicities of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided dose escalation radio-therapy versus conventional radiotherapy in the concurrent chemoradiotherapy treatment of local y ad-vanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods A total of 48 patients with stage III–IVa NPC were recruited and randomly administered PET/CT-guided dose escalation chemoradiotherapy (group A) or conventional chemoradiotherapy (group B). The dose-escalation radiotherapy was performed using the simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy technique at prescribed doses of 77 gray (Gy) in 32 fractions (f) to the gross target volume (GTV): planning target volume (PTV) 1 received 64 Gy/32 f, while PTV2 received 54.4 Gy/32 f. Patients in group B received uniform-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy, PTV1 received 70 Gy/35 f and PTV2 received 58 Gy/29 f. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin [20 mg/m2 intravenous (IV) on days 1–4] and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 IV on days 1 and 8) administered during treatment weeks 1 and 4. Al patients received 2–4 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy of the same dose and drug regimen. Results The use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET/CT significantly reduced the treat-ment volume delineation of the GTV in 83.3% (20/24) of patients. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival rates of the two groups were 100% and 79.2%, respectively (P = 0.019). The 5-year disease free survival (DFS) rates were 95.8% and 75.0%, respectively (P = 0.018). The 5-year local progression-free survival and DFS rates were significantly dif erent. The 5-year overal survival (OS) rates were 95.8% and 79.2%, re-spectively. Dif erences in OS improvement were insignificant (P = 0.079). Late toxicities were similar in the two groups. The most common late toxicities of the two arms were grade 1–2 skin dystrophy, xerostomia, subcutaneous fibrosis, and

  9. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  10. Magnetized Target Fusion in Advanced Propulsion Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cylar, Rashad

    2003-01-01

    The Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) Propulsion lab at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has a program in place that has adopted to attempt to create a faster, lower cost and more reliable deep space transportation system. In this deep space travel the physics and development of high velocity plasma jets must be understood. The MTF Propulsion lab is also in attempt to open up the solar system for human exploration and commercial use. Fusion, as compared to fission, is just the opposite. Fusion involves the light atomic nuclei combination to produce denser nuclei. In the process, the energy is created by destroying the mass according to the distinguished equation: E = mc2 . Fusion energy development is being pursued worldwide as a very sustainable form of energy that is environmentally friendly. For the purposes of space exploration fusion reactions considered include the isotopes of hydrogen-deuterium (D2) and tritium (T3). Nuclei have an electrostatic repulsion between them and in order for the nuclei to fuse this repulsion must be overcome. One technique to bypass repulsion is to heat the nuclei to very high temperatures. The temperatures vary according to the type of reactions. For D-D reactions, one billion degrees Celsius is required, and for D-T reactions, one hundred million degrees is sufficient. There has to be energy input for useful output to be obtained form the fusion To make fusion propulsion practical, the mass, the volume, and the cost of the equipment to produce the reactions (generally called the reactor) need to be reduced by an order of magnitude or two from the state-of-the-art fusion machines. Innovations in fusion schemes are therefore required, especially for obtaining thrust for propulsive applications. Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is one of the innovative fusion concepts that have emerged over the last several years. MSFC is working with Los Alamos National Laboratory and other research groups in studying the

  11. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the Building America expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  12. Expert Meeting Report: Advanced Envelope Research for Factory Built Housing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, E.; Mullens, M.; Tompos, E.; Kessler, B.; Rath, P.

    2012-04-01

    This report provides information about the expert meeting on advanced envelope research for factory built housing, hosted by the ARIES Collaborative on October 11, 2011, in Phoenix, Arizona. The goals of this meeting were to provide a comprehensive solution to the use of three previously selected advanced alternatives for factory-built wall construction, assess each option focusing on major issues relating to viability and commercial potential, and determine additional steps are required to reach this potential.

  13. Advances in Arabidopsis research in China from 2006 to 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yan; ZUO JianRu; YANG WeiCai

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species, has a number of advantages over other plant species as an experimental organism due to many of its genetic and genomic features. The Chinese Arabidopsis community has made significant contributions to plant biology research in recent years[1,2]. In 2006, studies of plant biology in China received more attention than ever before, especially those pertaining to Arabidopsis research. Here we briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  14. Research on inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion of crystalline lens in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ming YANG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the range of inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion of crystalline lens in radiotherapy. Methods  The CT and MRI images of 17 patients were registered, and the profile of crystalline lens was delineated to determine the respective center coordinates, thus simulating and analyzing inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion of lens in radiotherapy. Results  Both left and right lens moved in different degree during both inter-or intra-fraction phase. The range of lens movement was larger in inter-fraction than in intra-fraction phase in all directions. Conclusion  When radiotherapy is given in the free state, considering the distance of lens movement alone in inter-and intra-fraction and without considering the setup error, the lens planning organs at risk should increase 1.5mm outside the lens boundary.

  15. Safe Anesthesia for Radiotherapy in Pediatric Oncology: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience, 2004-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of anesthesia-related complications in children undergoing radiotherapy and the associated risk factors. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively investigated the incidence and types of anesthesia-related complications and examined their association with age, weight, oncology diagnosis, type of anesthetic (propofol vs. propofol and adjuncts), total propofol dose, anesthetic duration, type of radiotherapy procedure (simulation vs. radiotherapy) and patient position (prone vs. supine). Results: Between July 2004 and June 2006, propofol was used in 3,833 procedures (3,611 radiotherapy sessions and 222 simulations) in 177 patients. Complications occurred during 49 anesthetic sessions (1.3%). On univariate analysis, four factors were significantly associated with the risk of complications: procedure duration (p <0.001), total propofol dose (p <0.001), use of adjunct agents (vs. propofol alone; p = 0.029), and simulation (vs. radiotherapy; p = 0.014). Patient position (prone vs. supine) was not significantly associated with the frequency of complications (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-1.53; p = 0.38). On multivariate analysis, the procedure duration (p <0.0001) and total propofol dose (p ≤0.03) were the most significant risk factors after adjustment for age, weight, anesthetic type, and procedure type. We found no evidence of the development of tolerance to propofol. Conclusion: The rate of anesthesia-related complications was low (1.3%) in our study. The significant risk factors were procedure duration, total propofol dose, the use of adjunct agents with propofol, and simulation (vs. radiotherapy)

  16. Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest terms, doctoral dissertation entitled "Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy" is part of the supporting research background in the development of the ambitious proton radiotherapy project currently under way at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krak\\'ow. Another broad motivation was the desire to become directly involved in research on a topical and challenging subject of possibly developing a therapy planning system for carbon beam radiotherapy, based in its radiobiological part on the Track Structure model developed by prof. Robert Katz over 50 years ago. Thus, the general aim of this work was, firstly, to recapitulate the Track Structure model and to propose an updated and complete formulation of this model by incorporating advances made by several authors who had contributed to its development in the past. Secondly, the updated and amended (if necessary) formulation of the model was presented in a form applicable for use in computer codes which would constitute the "radiobio...

  17. Physics of thin films advances in research and development

    CERN Document Server

    Hass, Georg; Vossen, John L

    2013-01-01

    Physics of Thin Films: Advances in Research and Development, Volume 12 reviews advances that have been made in research and development concerning the physics of thin films. This volume covers a wide range of preparative approaches, physics phenomena, and applications related to thin films. This book is comprised of four chapters and begins with a discussion on metal coatings and protective layers for front surface mirrors used at various angles of incidence from the ultraviolet to the far infrared. Thin-film materials and deposition conditions suitable for minimizing reflectance changes with

  18. Effect of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy and Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantini, Giovanna [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Tagliaferri, Luca, E-mail: luca.tagliaferri@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Balducci, Mario; Frascino, Vincenzo; Dinapoli, Nicola [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Di Gesu, Cinzia; Ippolito, Edy; Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Radiotherapy, John Paul II Center for High Technology Research and Education in Biomedical Sciences, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Catholic University, Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in prostate cancer patients treated with RT and long-term (>1 year) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and materials: Prostate cancer patients with high-risk features (Stage T3-T4 and/or Gleason score {>=}7 and/or prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL) who had undergone RT and long-term ADT were included in the present analysis. Patients with bowel inflammatory disease, colon diverticula, and colon diverticulitis were excluded from WPRT and treated with prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT). Patients were grouped according to nodal risk involvement as assessed by the Roach formula using different cutoff levels (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%). Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was analyzed in each group according to the RT type (WPRT or PORT). Results: A total of 358 patients treated between 1994 and 2007 were included in the analysis (46.9% with WPRT and 53.1% with PORT). The median duration of ADT was 24 months (range, 12-38). With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 20-150), the overall 4-year bDFS rate was 90.5%. The 4-year bDFS rate was similar between the patients who had undergone WPRT or PORT (90.4% vs. 90.5%; p = NS). However, in the group of patients with the greatest nodal risk (>30%), a significant bDFS improvement was recorded for the patients who had undergone WPRT (p = .03). No differences were seen in acute toxicity among the patients treated with WPRT or PORT. The late gastrointestinal toxicity was similar in patients treated with PORT or WPRT (p = NS). Conclusions: Our analysis has supported the use of WPRT in association with long-term ADT for patients with high-risk nodal involvement (>30%), although a definitive recommendation should be confirmed by a randomized trial.

  19. Effect of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy and Long-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) in prostate cancer patients treated with RT and long-term (>1 year) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and materials: Prostate cancer patients with high-risk features (Stage T3-T4 and/or Gleason score ≥7 and/or prostate-specific antigen level ≥20 ng/mL) who had undergone RT and long-term ADT were included in the present analysis. Patients with bowel inflammatory disease, colon diverticula, and colon diverticulitis were excluded from WPRT and treated with prostate-only radiotherapy (PORT). Patients were grouped according to nodal risk involvement as assessed by the Roach formula using different cutoff levels (15%, 20%, 25%, and 30%). Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was analyzed in each group according to the RT type (WPRT or PORT). Results: A total of 358 patients treated between 1994 and 2007 were included in the analysis (46.9% with WPRT and 53.1% with PORT). The median duration of ADT was 24 months (range, 12–38). With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 20–150), the overall 4-year bDFS rate was 90.5%. The 4-year bDFS rate was similar between the patients who had undergone WPRT or PORT (90.4% vs. 90.5%; p = NS). However, in the group of patients with the greatest nodal risk (>30%), a significant bDFS improvement was recorded for the patients who had undergone WPRT (p = .03). No differences were seen in acute toxicity among the patients treated with WPRT or PORT. The late gastrointestinal toxicity was similar in patients treated with PORT or WPRT (p = NS). Conclusions: Our analysis has supported the use of WPRT in association with long-term ADT for patients with high-risk nodal involvement (>30%), although a definitive recommendation should be confirmed by a randomized trial.

  20. Residual deficits in quality of life one year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Results of a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC) undergo life-changing treatments that can seriously affect quality of life (QoL). This prospective study examined the key QoL domains during the first year after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and identified predictors of these changes in order to improve patient outcomes. A consecutive series of patients with LAHNC completed the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire Core module (QLQ-C30) and the HNC-specific QLQ-HN35 before (t0) and at the end (t1) of definitive or adjuvant IMRT, then at 6-8 weeks (t2), 6 months (t3), and 1 year (t4) after IMRT. Patients (n = 111) completing questionnaires at all five time points were included (baseline response rate: 99 %; dropout rate between t0 and t4: 5 %). QoL deteriorated in all domains during IMRT and improved slowly during the first year thereafter. Many domains recovered to baseline values after 1 year but problems with smelling and tasting, dry mouth, and sticky saliva remained issues at this time. Increases in problems with sticky saliva were greater after 1 year in patients with definitive versus adjuvant IMRT (F = 3.5, P = 0.05). QoL in patients with LAHNC receiving IMRT takes approximately 1 year to return to baseline; some domains remain compromised after 1 year. Although IMRT aims to maintain function and QoL, patients experience long-term dry mouth and sticky saliva, particularly following definitive IMRT. Patients should be counseled at the start of therapy to reduce disappointment with the pace of recovery. (orig.)

  1. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced (Stage II and worse) head-and-neck cancer: Dosimetric and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric parameters of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced head-and-neck tumors (Stage II and above) and the effects on xerostomia. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the head and neck were consecutively treated with 3D-CRT using a one-point setup technique; 17 had larynx cancer, 12 oropharynx, 12 oral cavity, and 6 nasopharynx cancer; 2 had other sites of cancer. Of the 49 patients, 41 received postoperative RT and 8 definitive treatment. Also, 13 were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy before and during RT; in 6 cases, 5-fluorouracil was added. The follow-up time was 484-567 days (median, 530 days). Results: One-point setup can deliver 96% of the prescribed dose to the isocenter, to the whole planning target volume, including all node levels of the neck and without overdosages. The mean dose to the primary planning target volume was 49.54 ± 4.82 Gy (51.53 ± 5.47 Gy for larynx cases). The average dose to the contralateral parotid gland was approximately 38 Gy (30 Gy for larynx cases). The maximal dose to the spinal cord was 46 Gy. A Grade 0 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer xerostomia score corresponded to a mean dose of 30 Gy to one parotid gland. A lower xerostomia score with a lower mean parotid dose and longer follow-up seemed to give rise to a sort of functional recovery phenomenon. Conclusion: Three dimensional-CRT in head-and-neck cancers permits good coverage of the planning target volume with about 10-11 segments and one isocenter. With a mean dose of approximately 30 Gy to the contralateral parotid, we observed no or mild xerostomia

  2. Long-term results of low dose daily cisplatin chemotherapy used concurrently with modestly accelerated radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head neck cancer region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Concurrent single agent cisplatin (CDDP with radiotherapy (RT improves outcomes in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head neck (LA-SCCHN. CDDP at 100 mg/m 2 at 3 weekly intervals raise compliance, hospitalization, and supportive care issues. Low dose daily CDDP was delivered with RT to evaluate its compliance, long-term safety and efficacy. Patients and Methods: During the period of month between November 2005 and May 2007, 52 patients of stage III/IV LA-SCCHN were given with conventional RT in a phased manner (dose-70 Gy/35 fractions/6 weeks along with daily CDDP (6 mg/m 2 ; capped 10 mg-30 cycles over 6 weeks. No hospitalization or antiemetic cover was planned. Compliance, acute and late toxicity were recorded as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer grading system and survival outcomes were evaluated. Results : The median follow-up was 63 months. 43 (83% cases complied with RT schedule and >28 cycles of CDDP was administered in 38 (73% cases. Confluent mucositis was seen in 65%, Grade III/IV dysphagia in 67%; 77% required enteral feed and hospitalization in 15%. There were four treatment related deaths. At 5 years, the loco-regional control was 25% (median-11 months and the overall survival was 31% (median-11 months. The 5 years actuarial rates of late Grade III/IV toxicity was 24%. Late swallowing difficulty/aspiration were seen in 17%; xerostomia-40%; ototoxicity-6%; nephrotoxicity-4%; and no second malignancy. Conclusion: Low dose cisplatin with moderately accelerated RT schedule appears feasible and logistically suitable "out-patient" option without increasing long-term toxicity in LA-SCCHN cancer region.

  3. Problems and challenges in care for children undergoing radiotherapy- A research paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    for children undergoing radiotherapy and their parents, a paediatric radiographer may be one welcome solution to relieve the anxiety and stress during this difficult time in their lives. given the various factors, no one solution can be deemed ultimate in dealing with this complex situation. thus further efforts are needed to bring about workable solutions to this problem depending on the circumstances and situation

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin appears to improve locoregional control of advanced, resectable head and neck cancers: RTOG 88-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Despite aggressive surgery and postoperative radiation therapy, only 30% of patients who have advanced, potentially resectable carcinomas of the head and neck survive for 5 years. In the hope of improving this situation we studied the effect of postoperative radiotherapy delivered concurrently with cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Patients who had Stage IV tumors and/or involved surgical margins received 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks plus 100 mg/m2 of cisplatin on radiotherapy days 1, 23 and 43. Fifty-two patients participated in this trial and 51 were evaluated. Forty-three (84%) patients had pathologic T3 or T4 disease, 43 (84%) had Stage IV disease, and 27 (53%) had histologically involved surgical margins. Results: Severe and life-threatening toxicities occurred in 20% and 12% of patients, respectively; the most common drug-related toxicities were leukopenia, anemia, nausea, and vomiting. Seventeen patients (43%) remain alive with no evidence of disease. Four patients (8%) died with no evidence of neoplastic disease, and one patient has died of a second independent malignancy. By actuarial analysis at 3 years, 48% of patients are alive, 81% have locoregional control of disease, and 57% are free of distant metastases. Conclusions: Based on comparison with similar patients treated in a prior Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Intergroup trial (RTOG), we conclude that postoperative radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin may improve locoregional control rates and should be prospectively tested

  5. Radiotherapy with or without mitomycin c in the treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer: results of the IAEA multicentre randomised trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Single agent mitomycin c (MMC) has been shown to improve the outcome of radiotherapy in single institution trials. In order to confirm these findings in a broader worldwide setting, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated a multicentre trial randomising between radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus MMC. Material and methods: Patients with advanced head and neck cancer were treated with primary curative radiotherapy (66 Gy in 33 fractions with five fractions per week) ±a single injection (15 mg/m2) of MMC at the end of the first week of radiotherapy. Stratification parameters were tumour localization, T-stage, N-stage, and institution. A total of 558 patients were recruited in the trial from February 1996 to December 1999. Insufficient accrual and reporting led to the exclusion of three centres. The final study population consisted of 478 patients from seven centres. Patients had stage III (n=223) or stage IV (n=255) squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (n=230), oropharynx (n=140), hypopharynx (n=65) or larynx (n=43). Prognostic factors like age, gender, site, size, differentiation and stage were well balanced between the two arms. Results: The haematological side effects of MMC were very modest (<5% grade 3-4) and did not require any specific interventions. Furthermore, MMC did not enhance the incidence or severity of acute and late radiation side effects. Confluent mucositis and dry skin desquamation was common, occurring in 56% and 62% of patients, respectively. The overall 3-year primary locoregional tumour control, disease-specific and overall survival rates were 19, 36 and 30%, respectively. Gender, haemoglobin drop, tumour site, tumour and nodal stage were significant parameters for loco-regional tumour control. There was no significant effect of MMC on locoregional control or survival, except for the 161 N0 patients, where MMC resulted in a better loco-regional control (3-year estimate 16% vs. 29%, P=0

  6. Construction of databases: advances and significance in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Erping; Huang, Bingjie; Wang, Liming; Lin, Xiaoyu; Lin, Haotian

    2015-12-01

    Widely used in clinical research, the database is a new type of data management automation technology and the most efficient tool for data management. In this article, we first explain some basic concepts, such as the definition, classification, and establishment of databases. Afterward, the workflow for establishing databases, inputting data, verifying data, and managing databases is presented. Meanwhile, by discussing the application of databases in clinical research, we illuminate the important role of databases in clinical research practice. Lastly, we introduce the reanalysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cloud computing techniques, showing the most recent advancements of databases in clinical research. PMID:27215009

  7. Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU from September 18-21, 2011 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. It was built upon the overwhelming success of seven previous symposia hosted by JSU. [...

  8. Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU) from 16–19 September, 2012 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA. It was built upon the overwhelming success of seven previous symposia hosted by JSU.

  9. Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU) from September 18-21, 2011 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. It was built upon the overwhelming success of seven previous symposia hosted by JSU. [...

  10. Sixth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health highlights selected papers presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research organized by Jackson State University (JSU) from September 13−16, 2009 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA. The Symposium was built upon the overwhelming success of previous symposia hosted by JSU and co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) RCMI-Center...

  11. Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU from 16–19 September, 2012 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA. It was built upon the overwhelming success of seven previous symposia hosted by JSU.

  12. Seventh International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Seventh International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU) from September 12–15, 2010 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. It was built upon the overwhelming success of previous symposia hosted by JSU and co-sponsored by the National Institute...

  13. Editorial: Research on learning in informal contexts: advancing the field?

    OpenAIRE

    Dillon, Justin; Osborne, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Abstract None - it's the editorial. Here's the order of the papers: Researching Learning in Informal Contexts Editors: Justin Dillon & Jonathan Osborne Editorial: Research on Learning in Informal Contexts: Advancing the Field? Jonathan Osborne & Justin Dillon 1. Conversations about Science across Activities in Mexican-Descent Families Deborah Siegel, Jennifer Esterly, Maureen A. Callanan, Ramser Wright 2. The Value of `Dialogue Events? as Sites of Learnin...

  14. Utilizing the Common Criteria for Advanced Student Research Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thuy D.; Irvine, Cynthia E.

    2005-01-01

    In most computer science graduate programs, students must complete an advanced research project that demonstrates the students technical competence in both the theory and practice of the field. Information security is a specialization area of computer science whose research results have direct benefits to real world problems. The Common Criteria (CC) is an international standard for security evaluation of products. This paper describes the utilization of the CC paradigmatic framework for adva...

  15. Recent Advances in Cigarette Ignition Propensity Research and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Alpert, Hillel R; O’Connor, Richard J; Spalletta, Ron; Connolly, Gregory N

    2010-01-01

    Major U.S. cigarette companies for decades conducted research and development regarding cigarette ignition propensity which has continued beyond fire safety standards for cigarettes that have recently been legislated. This paper describes recent scientific advances and technological development based on a comprehensive review of the physical, chemical, and engineering sciences, public health, and trade literature, U.S. and international patents, and research in the tobacco industry document l...

  16. Advancing industrial marketing theory: The need for improved research

    OpenAIRE

    LaPlaca, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Industrial Marketing Management was the first journal devoted exclusively to advancing the science of industrial or business-to-business marketing. Prior to its launch in 1972, fewer than five percent of all articles published in marketing journals focused on industrial marketing1 while over half of the GDP in industrialized economies was due to B2B activities. Consumer marketing dominated academic research. With a new outlet for B2B research, the percentage of articles focusing on industrial...

  17. Proceedings of the 15th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on November 13 - 14, 2014. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. All the 23 papers are indexed individually (J.P.N.)

  18. Advanced Composite Structures At NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Eldred's presentation will discuss several NASA efforts to improve and expand the use of composite structures within aerospace vehicles. Topics will include an overview of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP), Space Launch System (SLS) applications, and Langley's ISAAC robotic composites research tool.

  19. Proceedings of the 11th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 11th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on June 24 - 25, 2010. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. The 29 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Proceedings of the 13th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto on November 15 - 16, 2012. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. (author)

  1. Proceedings of the 10th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on October 21 - 22, 2009. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. The 38 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Proceedings of the 9th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 9th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on July 31- August 1, 2008. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in The Symposium. The 25 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Tie-jun

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, all the commissioning for the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) had been finished and the diffraction pattern had been successfully obtained on the neutron scattering spectrometer. Meanwhile, the cold neutron source project and the acceptance items of CARR project had been carrying out.

  4. Daily etoposide and cisplatin during thoracic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: A phase I/II trial was performed to investigate the toxicity and potential efficacy of delivering two radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin and etoposide) on a daily basis during twice daily thoracic radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Patients were eligible for this trial if they had unresectable or incompletely resected biopsy-proven stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, patients with contralateral hilar or supraclavicular disease were excluded. Patients were required to have an ECOG performance status of 0-2 and ≤10% weight loss during the preceding three months. Thoracic radiation treatment (TRT) was delivered as accelerated hyperfractionated TRT with 150 cGy given twice daily beginning on a Monday. Patients received a two-week break between two courses of 3000 cGy (total dose:6000cGy). Patients received etoposide (25 mg/m2 po) on days 1-12 and cisplatin (3 mg/m2 IV) on days 1-5 and 8-12 of each course of TRT. Two weeks following the completion of TRT patients began two cycles (q 28d) of etoposide (25 mg/m2, po, d1-21) and cisplatin (50 mg/m2 IV, d1). Patients were seen in followup at 2 months following the completion of therapy and subsequently at 3 month intervals for the first year. Results: Seventeen patients were entered on the trial and the median followup was 11 months. Of the 17 patients, 13 had evaluable disease and 4 had measurable disease; 16 were deemed unresectable and one had an incomplete resection; 6 had squamous cell carcinomas and 11 had non-squamous cell carcinomas; 5 had primary tumors greater than 6 cm, 9 were 3-6 cm and 3 were <3 cm; 14 had less than 5% weight loss and 3 had 5-10% weight loss; 9 had stage IIIA disease and 8 had IIIB disease. The most common hematologic toxicity was leukopenias: 4 patients had grade 3 and 1 had grade 4 toxicity. No grade 3 or greater thrombocytopenia was observed. There were 6 grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities

  5. Accelerated versus conventional fractionated postoperative radiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer: Results of a multicenter Phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether, in the postoperative setting, accelerated fractionation (AF) radiotherapy (RT) yields a superior locoregional control rate compared with conventional fractionation (CF) RT in locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx. Methods and materials: Patients from four institutions with one or more high-risk features (pT4, positive resection margins, pN >1, perineural/lymphovascular invasion, extracapsular extension, subglottic extension) after surgery were randomly assigned to either RT with one daily session of 2 Gy up to 60 Gy in 6 weeks or AF. Accelerated fractionation consisted of a 'biphasic concomitant boost' schedule, with the boost delivered during the first and last weeks of treatment, to deliver 64 Gy in 5 weeks. Informed consent was obtained. The primary endpoint of the study was locoregional control. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. Results: From March 1994 to August 2000, 226 patients were randomized. At a median follow-up of 30.6 months (range, 0-110 months), 2-year locoregional control estimates were 80% ± 4% for CF and 78% ± 5% for AF (p = 0.52), and 2-year overall survival estimates were 67% ± 5% for CF and 64% ± 5% for AF (p = 0.84). The lack of difference in outcome between the two treatment arms was confirmed by multivariate analysis. However, interaction analysis with median values as cut-offs showed a trend for improved locoregional control for those patients who had a delay in starting RT and who were treated with AF compared with those with a similar delay but who were treated with CF (hazard ratio = 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.1). Fifty percent of patients treated with AF developed confluent mucositis, compared with only 27% of those treated with CF (p = 0.006). However, mucositis duration was not different between arms. Although preliminary, actuarial Grade 3+ late toxicity estimates at 2 years were 18% ± 4% and 27% ± 6% for CF and AF

  6. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruetten, Heidi, E-mail: h.rutten@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pop, Lucas A.M.; Janssens, Geert O.R.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Takes, Robert P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Knuijt, Simone [Department of Rehabilitation/Speech Pathology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rooijakkers, Antoinette F. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Berg, Manon van den [Department of Gastroenterology-Dietetics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Merkx, Matthias A. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Herpen, Carla M.L. van [Department of Medical Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  7. Long-Term Outcome and Morbidity After Treatment With Accelerated Radiotherapy and Weekly Cisplatin for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Results of a Multidisciplinary Late Morbidity Clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcome and morbidity after intensified treatment for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2003 and December 2007, 77 patients with Stage III to IV head-and-neck cancer were treated with curative intent. Treatment consisted of accelerated radiotherapy to a dose of 68 Gy and concurrent cisplatin. Long-term survivors were invited to a multidisciplinary outpatient clinic for a comprehensive assessment of late morbidity with special emphasis on dysphagia, including radiological evaluation of swallowing function in all patients. Results: Compliance with the treatment protocol was high, with 87% of the patients receiving at least five cycles of cisplatin and all but 1 patient completing the radiotherapy as planned. The 5-year actuarial disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 40% and 47%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence–free survival at 5 years was 61%. The 5-year actuarial rates of overall late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Grade 3 and Grade 4 toxicity were 52% and 25% respectively. Radiologic evaluation after a median follow-up of 44 months demonstrated impaired swallowing in 57% of the patients, including 23% with silent aspiration. Subjective assessment using a systematic scoring system indicated normalcy of diet in only 15.6% of the patients. Conclusion: This regimen of accelerated radiotherapy with weekly cisplatin produced favorable tumor control rates and survival rates while compliance was high. However, comprehensive assessment by a multidisciplinary team of medical and paramedical specialists revealed significant long-term morbidity in the majority of the patients, with dysphagia being a major concern.

  8. 77 FR 19744 - Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc., Advanced Viral Research Corp., Brantley Capital Corp., Brilliant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Technologies Corporation, 4C Controls, Inc., and 2-Track Global, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading March 29... information concerning the securities of Advanced BioPhotonics, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic... Research Corp. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended September 30, 2008....

  9. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  10. Recent Advances in Cigarette Ignition Propensity Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Hillel R; O'Connor, Richard J; Spalletta, Ron; Connolly, Gregory N

    2010-04-01

    Major U.S. cigarette companies for decades conducted research and development regarding cigarette ignition propensity which has continued beyond fire safety standards for cigarettes that have recently been legislated. This paper describes recent scientific advances and technological development based on a comprehensive review of the physical, chemical, and engineering sciences, public health, and trade literature, U.S. and international patents, and research in the tobacco industry document libraries.Advancements since the first implementation of standards have made been in: a) understanding the key parameters involved in cigarette smoldering combustion and ignition of substrates; b) developing new cigarette and paper wrapper designs to reduce ignition propensity, including banded and non-banded cigarette paper approaches, c) assessing toxicology, and d) measuring performance. While the implications of manufacturers' non-safety related aims are of concern, this research indicates possible alternative designs should experience with fire loss and existing technologies on the market suggest need for improvement. PMID:20495669

  11. Advanced techniques in neoadjuvant radiotherapy allow dose escalation without increased dose to the organs at risk. Planning study in esophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhrian, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marienhospital Herne (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bochum Univ., Herne (Germany). Universitaetsklinikum; Oechsner, M.; Kampfer, S.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuster, T. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology

    2013-04-15

    The goal of this work was to investigate the potential of advanced radiation techniques in dose escalation in the radiotherapy (RT) for the treatment of esophageal carcinoma. A total of 15 locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC) patients were selected for the present study. For all 15 patients, we created a 3D conformal RT plan (3D-45) with 45 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV1), which we usually use to employ in the neoadjuvant treatment of LAEC. Additionally, a 3D boost (as in the primary RT of LAEC) was calculated with 9 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy to the boost volume (PTV2) (Dmean) to a total dose of 54 Gy (3D-54 Gy), which we routinely use for the definitive treatment of LAEC. Three plans with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were then calculated for each patient: sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT-SIB), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT-SIB), and helical tomotherapy (HT-SIB). For the SIB plans, the requirement was that 95 % of the PTV1 receive {>=} 100 % of the prescription dose (45 Gy in fractions of 1.8 Gy, D95) and the PTV2 was dose escalated to 52.5 Gy in fractions of 2.1 Gy (D95). The median PTV2 dose for 3D-45, 3D-54, HT-SIB, VMAT-SIB, and IMRT-SIB was 45, 55, 54, 56, and 55 Gy, respectively. Therefore, the dose to PTV2 in the SIB plans was comparable to the 3D-54 plan. The lung dose in the SIB plans was in the range of the standard 3D-45, which is applied for neoadjuvant radiotherapy. The mean lung dose for the same plans was 13, 15, 12, 12, and 13 Gy, respectively. The V5 lung volumes were 71, 74, 79, 75, and 73 %, respectively. The V20 lung volumes were 20, 25, 16, 18, and 19 %, respectively. New treatment planning techniques enable higher doses to be delivered for neoadjuvant radiotherapy of LAEC without a significant increase in the delivered dose to the organs at risk. Clinical investigations are warranted to study the clinical safety and feasibility of applying higher doses through advanced

  12. Relevance of advanced nuclear fusion research: Breakthroughs and obstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    An in depth understanding of the collective modes that can be excited in a wide range of high-energy plasmas is necessary to advance nuclear fusion research in parallel with other fields that include space and astrophysics in particular. Important achievements are shown to have resulted from implementing programs based on this reality, maintaining a tight connection with different areas of investigations. This involves the undertaking of a plurality of experimental approaches aimed at understanding the physics of fusion burning plasmas. At present, the most advanced among these is the Ignitor experiment involving international cooperation, that is designed to investigate burning plasma regimes near ignition for the first time.

  13. Research and control of advanced schistosomiasis japonica in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Feng, Aicheng; Huang, Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Among the three main schistosomes (Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, and Schistosoma haematobium) known to infect humans, S. japonicum causes the most serious pathological lesions. In China, only schistosomiasis japonica is transmitted. From the 1950s, massive epidemiological investigations and active control measures for schistosomiasis japonica have been carried out. At the early stage of schistosomiasis control program, there were about 12 million schistosomiasis patients, and about 5% of schistosomiasis patients belong to advanced patients, which was 600,000. After more than a half century of active schistosomiasis control work, the schistosomiasis situation has been reduced markedly. The nearest epidemiological investigation showed that, by the end of 2012, there were still 240,000 schistosomiasis patients with the descent rate of 98% and 30,000 advanced patients with the descent rate of 95%. This paper reviews the rich experiences of advanced schistosomiasis research and control in China, including that the epidemiology researches confirm there is a family aggregation of advanced schistosomiasis and advanced schistosomiasis patients have no significance to the schistosomiasis transmission in transmission-interrupted areas but still are an infection source in endemic areas; pathogenic mechanism researches verify that genetic factors and immunoregulation play important roles in the disease developing process; ultrasound image examinations are used not only in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of advanced schistosomiasis but also in the guidance of treatment and evaluation of therapeutic effects and, furthermore, in the risk predictions of portal hypertension and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage; clinical practices demonstrate that praziquantel can be used in most of advanced schistosomiasis patients, and the therapy not only can interrupt the schistosomiasis transmission somewhat but also is favorable for liver fibrosis improvement; the

  14. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  15. Analysis of long-term survival in patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the prognostic factors of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) treated with three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT). Methods: In 106 patients with stage IIIa/IIIb NSCLC treated with 3DCRT from Nov 2000 to Mar 2004, 46 of them were treated with radiotherapy alone, 41 by concurrent chemoradiation, and 19 by sequential chemoradiation. The influence of related prognostic factors on survival was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The treatment outcome was analyzed by prognostic index model. Results: The 1-, 3- and 5- year overall survival rate was 50.0%, 22.2% and 15.5%, respectively, and the median survival time was 12 months. The univariate analysis showed that the following factors were significantly associated with the longer survival: female, good kamofsky performance status (KPS), squamous cell carcinoma, absence of supraclavicular lymph nodes, no smoking history, hemoglobin ≥130 g/L before treatment, N stage, the maximum diameter of tumor ≤5 cm, the volume of tumor ≤90 cm3, GTV ≤150 cm3 and the radiotherapy efficacy. However, multivariate analysis revealed that no smoking history, hemoglobin ≥130 g/L and GTV ≤150 cm3 were the independent risk factors for predicting the survival. Conclusions: Three dimensional conformal radiation therapy could be effective in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. No smoking history, hemoglobin ≥130 g/L and GTV ≤150 cm3 might be the independent risk factors for predicting the survival. Prognostic index model could improve the potential of multivariate analysis in predicting the survival of patients treated with radiotherapy for NSCLC. (authors)

  16. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  17. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB–IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m2, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3–4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154–0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m2 chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m2 regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  18. Gemcitabine concurrent with thoracic radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine/vinorelbine in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase I study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagel, B.; Piroth, M.; Pinkawa, M.; Fischedik, K.; Asadpour, B.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Eble, M.J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Reinartz, P.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Stanzel, S. [Inst. for Medical Statistics, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Breuer, C.; Skobel, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every 2 weeks to a concurrent radiotherapy administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radio-/chemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were observed and treated in accordance with a combined radio-/chemotherapy protocol. This included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m{sup 2}) at days 1, 8 and 22, 29, followed by concurrent radiotherapy including [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-(FDG-PET-) based target volume definition (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every 2 weeks at days 43, 57, and 71. The initial dose was 300 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of gemcitabine was increased by 100 mg/m{sup 2} until the MTD was realized. Three patients were enrolled for each dose level. Results: dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was identified for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2}, due to grade 2 esophagitis (next to grade 3) in all patients. 6 weeks after the completion of radio-/chemotherapy, most patients still presented treatment-induced esophagitis. In accordance with expected complications, such as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, the MTD was defined at this dose level, although no DLT grade 3 was reached. Conclusion: after induction chemotherapy, the MTD and frequency of gemcitabine in locally advanced NSCLC is 500 mg/m{sup 2} every 2 weeks during a maximum of 7 weeks of thoracic radiotherapy. (orig.)

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial of Weekly vs. Triweekly Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy Concurrent With Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.kr [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Moo; Kim, Kidong [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eui-Don [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare compliance, toxicity, and outcome of weekly and triweekly cisplatin administration concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In this open-label, randomized trial, 104 patients with histologically proven Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned by a computer-generated procedure to weekly (weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, six cycles) and triweekly (cisplatin 75 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks, three cycles) chemotherapy arms during concurrent radiotherapy. The difference of compliance and the toxicity profiles between the two arms were investigated, and the overall survival rate was analyzed after 5 years. Results: All patients tolerated both treatments very well, with a high completion rate of scheduled chemotherapy cycles. There was no statistically significant difference in compliance between the two arms (86.3% in the weekly arm, 92.5% in the triweekly arm, p > 0.05). Grade 3-4 neutropenia was more frequent in the weekly arm (39.2%) than in the triweekly arm (22.6%) (p = 0.03). The overall 5-year survival rate was significantly higher in the triweekly arm (88.7%) than in the weekly arm (66.5%) (hazard ratio 0.375; 95% confidence interval 0.154-0.914; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Triweekly cisplatin 75-mg/m{sup 2} chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy is more effective and feasible than the conventional weekly cisplatin 40-mg/m{sup 2} regimen and may be a strong candidate for the optimal cisplatin dose and dosing schedule in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

  20. Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells and Their Expression of EGFR/Phospho-EGFR During Combined Radiotherapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinhofer, Ingeborg, E-mail: ingeborg.tinhofer@charite.de [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Hristozova, Tsvetana; Stromberger, Carmen [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); KeilhoIz, Ulrich [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Budach, Volker [Translational Radiooncology Laboratory, Department of Radiooncology and Radiotherapy, Charite Campus Mitte, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: The numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their expression/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) during the course of combined chemo- or bioradiotherapy regimens as potential biomarkers of treatment efficacy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) were determined. Methods and Materials: Peripheral blood samples from SCCHN patients with locally advanced stage IVA/B disease who were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy or induction chemotherapy followed by bioradiation with cetuximab were included in this study. Using flow cytometry, the absolute number of CTCs per defined blood volume as well as their expression of EGFR and its phosphorylated form (pEGFR) during the course of treatment were assessed. Results: Before treatment, we detected {>=}1 CTC per 3.75 mL blood in 9 of 31 patients (29%). Basal expression of EGFR was detected in 100% and pEGFR in 55% of the CTC+ cases. The frequency of CTC detection was not influenced by induction chemotherapy. However, the number of CTC+ samples significantly increased after radiotherapy. This radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers was less pronounced when radiotherapy was combined with cetuximab compared to its combination with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. The former treatment regimen was also more effective in reducing pEGFR expression in CTCs. Conclusions: Definitive radiotherapy regimens of locally advanced SCCHN can increase the number of CTCs and might thus contribute to a systemic spread of tumor cells. Further studies are needed to evaluate the predictive value of the radiation-induced increase in CTC numbers and the persistent activation of the EGFR signalling pathway in individual CTC+ cases.

  1. Gemcitabine concurrent with thoracic radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine/vinorelbine in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every 2 weeks to a concurrent radiotherapy administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radio-/chemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were observed and treated in accordance with a combined radio-/chemotherapy protocol. This included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m2) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m2) at days 1, 8 and 22, 29, followed by concurrent radiotherapy including [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-(FDG-PET-) based target volume definition (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every 2 weeks at days 43, 57, and 71. The initial dose was 300 mg/m2. The dose of gemcitabine was increased by 100 mg/m2 until the MTD was realized. Three patients were enrolled for each dose level. Results: dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was identified for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m2, due to grade 2 esophagitis (next to grade 3) in all patients. 6 weeks after the completion of radio-/chemotherapy, most patients still presented treatment-induced esophagitis. In accordance with expected complications, such as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, the MTD was defined at this dose level, although no DLT grade 3 was reached. Conclusion: after induction chemotherapy, the MTD and frequency of gemcitabine in locally advanced NSCLC is 500 mg/m2 every 2 weeks during a maximum of 7 weeks of thoracic radiotherapy. (orig.)

  2. Transnationalism: A Framework for Advancing Nursing Research With Contemporary Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemberg, Marie-Anne S; Boutain, Doris M; Mohammed, Selina A

    2016-01-01

    This article advances nursing research by presenting transnationalism as a framework for inquiry with contemporary immigrants. Transnationalism occurs when immigrants maintain relationships that transcend the geographical borders of their origin and host countries. Immigrants use those relationships to experience health differently within concurrent socioeconomic, political, and cultural contexts than national situated populations. Nurse researchers are called upon to consider these trans-border relationships when exploring the health of contemporary immigrants. Such consideration is needed to develop relevant research designs, methods, analysis, and dissemination strategies. PMID:26836998

  3. Cooling of microelectronic and nanoelectronic equipment advances and emerging research

    CERN Document Server

    Iyengar, Madhusudan; Sammakia, Bahgat

    2014-01-01

    To celebrate Professor Avi Bar-Cohen's 65th birthday, this unique volume is a collection of recent advances and emerging research from various luminaries and experts in the field. Cutting-edge technologies and research related to thermal management and thermal packaging of micro- and nanoelectronics are covered, including enhanced heat transfer, heat sinks, liquid cooling, phase change materials, synthetic jets, computational heat transfer, electronics reliability, 3D packaging, thermoelectrics, data centers, and solid state lighting. This book can be used by researchers and practitioners of

  4. First Aviation System Technology Advanced Research (AvSTAR) Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denery, Dallas G. (Editor); Weathers, Del W. (Editor); Rosen, Robert (Technical Monitor); Edwards, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This Conference Proceedings documents the results of a two-day NASA/FAA/Industry workshop that was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, located at Moffett Field, CA, on September 21-22, 2000. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together a representative cross section of leaders in air traffic management, from industry. FAA, and academia, to assist in defining the requirements for a new research effort, referred to as AvSTAR Aviation Systems Technology Advanced Research). The Conference Proceedings includes the individual presentation, and summarizes the workshop discussions and recommendations.

  5. Rhetorical Strategies in Engineering Research Articles and Research Theses: Advanced Academic Literacy and Relations of Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsantoni, Dimitra

    2006-01-01

    Research articles and research theses constitute two key genres used by scientific communities for the dissemination and ratification of knowledge. Both genres are produced at advanced stages of individuals' enculturation in disciplinary communities present original research aim to persuade the academic community to accept new knowledge claims,…

  6. Quality of life as predictor of survival: A prospective study on patients treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy for advanced oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The relation between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and survival was investigated at baseline and 6 months in 80 patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal cancer after microvascular reconstructive surgery and (almost all) adjuvant radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Multivariate Cox regression analyses of overall and disease-specific survival were performed including sociodemographic (age, gender, marital status, comorbidity), and clinical (tumor stage and site, radical surgical, metastasis, radiotherapy) parameters, and HRQOL (EORTC QLQ-C30 global quality of life scale). Results: Before treatment, younger age and having a partner were predictors of disease-specific survival; younger age predicted overall survival. At 6 months post-treatment, disease-specific and overall survival was predicted by (deterioration of) global quality of life solely. Global health-related quality of life after treatment was mainly influenced by emotional functioning. Conclusion: Deterioration of global quality of life after treatment is an independent predictor of survival in patients with advanced oral or oropharyngeal cancer.

  7. Quality-of-Life-Adjusted Survival Analysis of Concurrent Chemo Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced (Nonmetastatic) Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess whether the benefits of adding cisplatin (CDDP) concurrent with radiotherapy, followed by adjuvant CDDP and fluorouracil, justifies the toxicity cost for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) using the quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicity (Q-TWiST) approach. Methods and Materials: One hundred seven patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and 111 with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CRT) were analyzed. The overall survival was divided into three health states: time on active treatment only, during which any subjective nonhematologic toxic event of grade > = 3 was reported; time without symptoms of disease relapse; or treatment and time following first disease RELapse. The relative advantage of CRT and RT was examined by conducting the analysis cumulatively at restriction times 3, 6, 24, 36, 48 months. Results: At 48 months, the improvement in disease-free survival was 14.4% for CRT, whereas that for overall survival was 18.9%. The differences in Q-TWiST were -0.4, -0.7, 0.1, 1.6, and 3.6 months at 3, 6, 24, 36, and 48 months, respectively, with positive differences favoring CRT. At 24 months, the difference in Q-TWiST began to favor CRT. At 36 months, CRT may be the preferred option from the patient's viewpoint if the time spent in the REL state is valued to be <0.83, with the value of perfect health being 1. Finally, Q-TWiST accumulated within 48 months indicated a significant advantage in quality-adjusted survival time for CRT (p = 0.020). Conclusion: Irrespective of how patients valued periods of toxicity and delayed disease progression, concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy offered NPC patients significantly more quality-adjusted survival than radiotherapy alone in the long term.

  8. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  9. Cost/Benefit Prioritization for Advanced Safeguards Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system level study utilizing commercially available ExtendTM software, has been initiated to perform cost/benefit analyses for advanced safeguards research and development. The methodology is focused on estimating standard error in the inventory difference (SEID) for reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities, for various proposed advanced safeguards measurement technologies. The inventory duration, and consequent number of inventories per year, is dictated by the detection of a significant quantity of special nuclear material (SNM). Detection is limited by the cumulative measurement uncertainty for the entire system. The cost of inventories is then compared with the cost of advanced instrumentation and/or process design changes. Current progress includes development of the methodology, future efforts will be focused on ascertaining estimated costs and performance. Case studies will be provided as examples of the methodology. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo calculations support organ sparing in Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Sibolt, Patrik; Larsen, Christina;

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Studies indicate that Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold (DIBH) is advantageous over Free-Breathing (FB) for locally advanced lung cancer radiotherapy. However, these studies were based on simplified dose calculation algorithms, potentially critical due to the heterogeneous nature...... of the lung region. Using detailed Monte-Carlo (MC) calculations, a comparative study of DIBH vs. FB was therefore designed. Material and methods: Eighteen locally advanced lung cancer patients underwent FB and DIBH CT imaging and treatment planning with the Anisotropic-Analytical-Algorithm (AAA......) for intensity-modulated-radio therapy or volumetric-modulated-arc-therapy using 66 Gy in 33 fractions. All plans were re-calculated with MC. Results: Relative to FB, the total lung volume increased 86.8% in DIBH, while the gross tumor volume decreased 14.8%. MC revealed equally under- and over...

  11. Locally advanced head and neck cancer treated with accelerated radiotherapy, the hypoxic modifier nimorazole and weekly cisplatin. Results from the DAHANCA 18 phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Jens; Toustrup, Kasper; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Primdahl, Hanne; Andersen, Lisbeth Juhler; Overgaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    150 oropharyngeal cancers. Of these, 112 (79%) were p16 pos and 29 (21%) were p16 neg. LRC for the p16 neg oropharyngeal cancers was poorer than for the p16 pos (74% vs. 91%; p = 0.02). Tube feeding during treatment was necessary for 146 (64%) patients. At 12 months this number was reduced to 6......%. CONCLUSION: The treatment was tolerable in this cohort of locally advanced HNSCC patients. Acute and late toxicity was comparable to similar studies of chemoradiotherapy, and the outcome superior to the data reported in the literature. This strongly indicates that RT of a......PURPOSE/OBJECTIVE: A phase II clinical trial evaluating the feasibility and outcome of treating locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with accelerated radiotherapy, the hypoxic modifier nimorazole and weekly cisplatin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 227 patients with...

  12. Phase I study evaluating the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with carbon ion radiotherapy: the PHOENIX-01 trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment options for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer include surgery, chemotherapy as well as radiotherapy. In many cases, surgical resection is not possible, and therefore treatment alternatives have to be performed. Chemoradiation has been established as a convincing treatment alternative for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 1.16 and 2.46 depending on the pancreatic cancer cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy showed promising results for patients with pancreatic cancer. The present PHOENIX-01 trial evaluates carbon ion radiotherapy using the active rasterscanning technique in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer in combination with weekly gemcitabine and adjuvant gemcitabine. Primary endpoint is toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall survival, progression-free survival and response. The physical and biological properties of the carbon ion beam promise to improve the therapeutic ratio in patients with pancreatic cancer: Due to the inverted dose profile dose deposition in the entry channel of the beam leads to sparing of normal tissue; the Bragg peak can be directed into the defined target volume, and the sharp dose fall-off thereafter again spares normal tissue behind the target volume. The higher RBE of carbon ions, which has been shown also for pancreatic cancer cell lines in the preclinical setting, is likely to contribute to an increase in local control, and perhaps in OS. Early data from Japanese centers have shown promising results. In conclusion, this is the first trial to evaluate actively delivered carbon

  13. Advanced dementia research in the nursing home: the CASCADE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Susan L; Kiely, Dan K; Jones, Richard N; Prigerson, Holly; Volicer, Ladislav; Teno, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growing number of persons with advanced dementia, and the need to improve their end-of-life care, few studies have addressed this important topic. The objectives of this report are to present the methodology established in the CASCADE (Choices, Attitudes, and Strategies for Care of Advanced Dementia at the End-of-Life) study, and to describe how challenges specific to this research were met. The CASCADE study is an ongoing, federally funded, 5-year prospective cohort study of nursing [nursing home (NH)] residents with advanced dementia and their health care proxies (HCPs) initiated in February 2003. Subjects were recruited from 15 facilities around Boston. The recruitment and data collection protocols are described. The demographic features, ownership, staffing, and quality of care of participant facilities are presented and compared to NHs nationwide. To date, 189 resident/HCP dyads have been enrolled. Baseline data are presented, demonstrating the success of the protocol in recruiting and repeatedly assessing NH residents with advanced dementia and their HCPs. Factors challenging and enabling implementation of the protocol are described. The CASCADE experience establishes the feasibility of conducting rigorous, multisite dementia NH research, and the described methodology serves as a detailed reference for subsequent CASCADE publications as results from the study emerge. PMID:16917187

  14. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer V. Therapy for locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, as well as local therapy in cases with synchronous distant metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Wilfried; Matuschek, Christiane; Boelke, Edwin [University Hospital, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, Marc D. [Helios Hospital, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, Frederick [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, Wulf; Souchon, Rainer; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2015-08-15

    The purpose of this work is to give practical guidelines for radiotherapy of locally advanced, inflammatory and metastatic breast cancer at first presentation. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locally advanced breast cancer'', ''inflammatory breast cancer'', ''breast cancer and synchronous metastases'', ''de novo stage IV and breast cancer'', and ''metastatic breast cancer'' and ''at first presentation'' restricted to ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guideline'' was performed and supplemented by using references of the respective publications. Based on the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, updated in 2012, this publication addresses indications, sequence to other therapies, target volumes, dose, and fractionation of radiotherapy. International and national guidelines are in agreement that locally advanced, at least if regarded primarily unresectable and inflammatory breast cancer should receive neoadjuvant systemic therapy first, followed by surgery and radiotherapy. If surgery is not amenable after systemic therapy, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice followed by surgery, if possible. Surgery and radiotherapy should be administered independent of response to neoadjuvant systemic treatment. In patients with a de novo diagnosis of breast cancer with synchronous distant metastases, surgery and radiotherapy result in considerably better locoregional tumor control. An improvement in survival has not been consistently proven, but may exist in subgroups of patients. Radiotherapy is an important part in the treatment of locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer that should be given to all patients regardless to the intensity and effect of

  15. Recent advances in research on Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna; Mirazimi, Ali; Köksal, Iftihar; Estrada-Pena, Augustin; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-03-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an expanding tick-borne hemorrhagic disease with increasing human and animal health impact. Immense knowledge was gained over the past 10 years mainly due to advances in molecular biology, but also driven by an increased global interest in CCHFV as an emerging/re-emerging zoonotic pathogen. In the present article, we discuss the advances in research with focus on CCHF ecology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, prophylaxis and treatment. Despite tremendous achievements, future activities have to concentrate on the development of vaccines and antivirals/therapeutics to combat CCHF. Vector studies need to continue for better public and animal health preparedness and response. We conclude with a roadmap for future research priorities. PMID:25453328

  16. Advances in Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjian SONG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic and recurrent tumors have been identified as the leading attribute to the lung cancer deaths. Cancer research has demonstrated the critical role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the metastatic spread of carcinomas and the recurrence of lung cancer. The rapid advancement of technology in targeted therapy resolves the embarrassing situation for those late-stage patients whose tumor tissues cannot be obtained. CTCs, as a substitute for the tumor tissues, represent a decisive tool to the cancer treatment strategy. Thus, CTCs exert a fundamental role in the early detection of micro-metastasis, assisting in diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of the recurrent tumors, and subsequently choosing an individualized approach for the therapeutic treatment. This article will review the advances, which have been made in the research area of CTCs with the aid of its applications in cancer therapy.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Jack A.; Micheletti, David A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH). Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletti, David A.; Baughman, Jack A.; Nelson, Gordon L.; Simmons, Gloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the activities, results, conclusions and recommendations of the Magnetohydrodynamics Accelerator Research Into Advanced Hypersonics (MARIAH) Project in which the use of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) technology is investigated for its applicability to augment hypersonic wind tunnels. The long range objective of this investigation is to advance the development of ground test facilities to support the development of hypervelocity flight vehicles. The MHD accelerator adds kinetic energy directly to the wind tunnel working fluid, thereby increasing its Mach number to hypervelocity levels. Several techniques for MHD augmentation, as well as other physical characteristics of the process are studied to enhance the overall performance of hypersonic wind tunnel design. Specific recommendations are presented to improve the effectiveness of ground test facilities. The work contained herein builds on nearly four decades of research and experimentation by the aeronautics ground test and evaluation community, both foreign and domestic.

  19. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% ± 10% to 73% ± 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared

  20. A Randomized Study of Accelerated Fractionation Radiotherapy with and Without Mitomycin C in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This single-institution study evaluates the feasibility of accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) with and without mitomycin C (MMC) in thc treatment of locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: Between May 1998 and October 2001, sixty patients with locally advanced stage III and IV of head and neck cancer were randomized into three treatment arms: (I) conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CF) (5 fractions per week); (2) accelerated fractionation radiotherapy (AF) (6 fractions per week); and (3) AF plus Mitomycin C (MMC). The 2-year overall survival (OS) of the whole group was 21 %. The OS according to treatment arm was 23%, 20%. and 28% in CF. AF. and AF+MMC arms respectively (ρ<0. 19). The 2-year loco-regional control (LC) rate was 22% for the whole group of patients. The LC was 10%, 25%. and 30% for the CF, AF, and AF+MMC respectively (ρ=0.27). The only significant parameters for OS and LC were performance status and pre-treatment hemoglobin level. Mucositis grades 3 and 4 occurred in 70% and 90% of the patients in the AF and AF+MMC arm respectively compared to 55% of patients in the CF arm (ρ=0.04). However the addition of MMC did not significantly increase the incidence or severity of mucositis between AF and AF+MMC (ρ=0.13). Hematological toxicity grades 3 and 4 were significantly higher after MMC (occurred in 40% of patients versus 10% and 5% in CF and AF arms respectively, ρ=0.04). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of grade 3 dryness of mouth (ρ=0.06). fibrosis (ρ=0.6). or lymphoedema (ρ=0.39) among the three arms. There was a trend for improvement of LC and OS rates with the use or AF and the addition of MMC to AF compared to CF radiotherapy. although the difference was not statistically significant. The small number of the patients in each treatment arm and the inclusion or multiple tumor sites may contribute to these statistically insignificant results. Accordingly we advise to continue

  1. Recent Advances in Research on Widow Spider Venoms and Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Shuai Yan; Xianchun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Widow spiders have received much attention due to the frequently reported human and animal injures caused by them. Elucidation of the molecular composition and action mechanism of the venoms and toxins has vast implications in the treatment of latrodectism and in the neurobiology and pharmaceutical research. In recent years, the studies of the widow spider venoms and the venom toxins, particularly the α-latrotoxin, have achieved many new advances; however, the mechanism of action of the venom...

  2. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  3. Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrieling, P. Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SNL/CA proposes the Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) facility to support customer-driven national security mission requirements while demonstrating a fiscally responsible approach to cost-control. SNL/CA realizes that due to the current backlog of capital projects in NNSA that following the normal Line Item process to procure capital funding is unlikely and therefore SNL/CA will be looking at all options including Alternative Financing.

  4. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 4 covers articles on single crystal compound semiconductors and complex polycrystalline materials. The book discusses narrow gap semiconductors and solid state batteries. The text then describes the advantages of hot-pressed microcrystalline compacts of oxygen-octahedra ferroelectrics over single crystal materials, as well as heterostructure junction lasers. Solid state physicists, materials scientists, electrical engineers, and graduate students studying the subjects being discussed will find the book invaluable.

  5. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 1 presents articles about junction electroluminescence; metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) physics; ion implantation in semiconductors; and electron transport through insulating thin films. The book describes the basic physics of carrier injection; energy transfer and recombination mechanisms; state of the art efficiencies; and future prospects for light emitting diodes. The text then discusses solid state spectroscopy, which is the pair spectra observed in gallium phosphide photoluminescence. The extensive studies

  6. NATO Advanced Research Institute on Health Services Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Werff, Albert; Hirsch, Gary; Barnard, Keith

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute on "Health Services Systems" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international cooperation. A special word is said in this respect supra by Pro­ fessor Checkland, Chairman of the Systems Science Panel. The Advanced Research Institute (ARI) was organized for the purpose of bringing together senior scientists to seek a consensus on the assessment of the present state of knowledge on the specific topic of "health services systems" and to present views and recom­ mendations for future health services research directions, which should be of value to both the scientific community and the people in charge of reorienting health services. The conference was structured so as to permit the assembly of a variety of complementary viewpoints through intensive group discussions to be the basis of this final report. Invitees were selected fr...

  7. 低剂量脾照射对局部晚期非小细胞肺癌放疗患者免疫系统的影响%The effects of low-dose splenic irradiation and radiotherapy on immune system of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liu; Hongsheng Yu; Qingjun Shang; Chao Yan; Peng Jiang; Xiang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of the research was to study the effects of low-dose splenic irradiation and radiotherapy on immune system of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods:Twelve cases of stage III NSCLC in Tumor Radiotherapy Center of our hospital (the Affiliated Hospital of Medical College Qingdao University, China) were collected from July 2011 to July 2012; all patients were under 75 years old with clear pathology, measurable lesions and good personal statement. They were randomly divided into combined treatment group (D1 + D2) and control group (D1). The control group (D1) only received radiotherapy to the chest; combined treatment group (D1 + D2) received low-dose splenic irradiation plus conventional dose irradiation. Flow cytometry was used to detect the peripheral blood T lymphocyte immune indexes of patients before, during and after the treatment, classification by five blood cell analyzer was used to determine white blood cells, neutrophils, hemoglobin and platelet count. The radiation induced toxicity including esophagitis, pneumonia and gastrointestinal reaction was observed, as well as the dose when it happened. Results:There was no significant difference in the ratio between two groups in cells CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+/CD8+ after radiotherapy (P > 0.05). There was no change in these indicators in combined treatment group after treatment (P > 0.05), but it decreased in control group (P 0.05), but the patients in combined treatment group seemed to tolerate high dose well (P < 0.05). Conclusion:Low-dose splenic irradiation combined with radiotherapy to the chest can alleviate the injury degree of acute radiation induced the toxicity of locally advanced NSCLC patients, through affect the patient's immune function.

  8. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  9. [Research advance in rare and endemic plant Tetraena mongolica Maxim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jiang-Hong; Liu, Guo-Hou

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, the research advance in rare and endemic plant Tetraena mongolica Maxim. was summarized from the aspects of morphology, anatomy, palynology, cytology, seed-coat micro-morphology, embryology, physiology, biology, ecology, genetic diversity, chemical constituents, endangered causes, and conservation approaches, and the further research directions were prospected. It was considered that population viability, idioplasm conservation and artificial renewal, molecular biology of ecological adaptability, and assessment of habitat suitability should be the main aspects for the future study of T. mongolica. PMID:18464654

  10. Recent advances in research on climate and human conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    A rapidly growing body of empirical, quantitative research examines whether rates of human conflict can be systematically altered by climatic changes. We discuss recent advances in this field, including Bayesian meta-analyses of the effect of temperature and rainfall on current and future large-scale conflicts, the impact of climate variables on gang violence and suicides in Mexico, and probabilistic projections of personal violence and property crime in the United States under RCP scenarios. Criticisms of this research field will also be explained and addressed.

  11. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  12. Advanced waste forms research and development. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities on advanced (alternatives to glass) nuclear waste forms are reported. The emphasis is on two phases of the work to give essential background information on supercalcine development. The first is a report of the data obtained in the study of cesium aluminosilicate for Cs and Ru fixation. Research on the compatibility of the phases formed in the complex oxide system made up of waste and additive cations is reported. The phase stability in a number of proposed formulations was determined

  13. Toxicity of cetuximab versus cisplatin concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSCC).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed acute toxicity with cetuximab and radiotherapy, comparing it with a matched cisplatin group. The cetuximab group experienced significantly more toxicity--grade ≥3 oral mucositis (p=0.014), skin dermatitis (p=0.0004), ≥10% weight loss (p=0.03), and enteral feeding requirement (p=0.05). This finding of enhanced toxicity is similar to recent publications.

  14. Advanced control research at the Pennsylvania State University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes several current control research projects at the Pennsylvania State University which have potential application for improving nuclear power plant operation. This research is grouped into 3 broad categories: (1) intelligent control including automated decision making, coordinating control, and reconfigurable control, (2) advanced algorithms using optimal, robust, fuzzy, and neural network control, and (3) distributed implementation with commercially available microprocessor-based controllers. These research activities encompass theoretical development coupled with experimental verification. Much of the early experimental verification and demonstration has been conducted using simulation experiments. However, current work is now beginning to include physical verification using the Penn State TRIGA nuclear research reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-11) power plant operated by the Argonne National Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  15. Consensus and differences in primary radiotherapy for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer in Switzerland. A survey on patterns of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Dal Pra, Alan [Inselspital Bern, Department of Radiation Oncology, Bern (Switzerland); Zilli, Thomas [Hopitaux Universitaires de Geneve, Department of Radiation Oncology, Geneva (Switzerland); Zwahlen, Daniel R. [Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chur (Switzerland); Papachristofilou, Alexandros [Universitaetsspital Basel, Department of Radiation Oncology, Basel (Switzerland); Herrera, Fernanda G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Matzinger, Oscar [Hopital Riviera-Chablais, Department of Radiation Oncology, Vevey (Switzerland); Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT), with or without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), is an established treatment option for nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Despite high-level evidence from several randomized trials, risk group stratification and treatment recommendations vary due to contradictory or inconclusive data, particularly with regard to EBRT dose prescription and ADT duration. Our aim was to investigate current patterns of practice in primary EBRT for prostate cancer in Switzerland. Treatment recommendations on EBRT and ADT for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer were collected from 23 Swiss radiation oncology centers. Written recommendations were converted into center-specific decision trees, and analyzed for consensus and differences using a dedicated software tool. Additionally, specific radiotherapy planning and delivery techniques from the participating centers were assessed. The most commonly prescribed radiation dose was 78 Gy (range 70-80 Gy) across all risk groups. ADT was recommended for intermediate-risk patients for 6 months in over 80 % of the centers, and for high-risk patients for 2 or 3 years in over 90 % of centers. For recommendations on combined EBRT and ADT treatment, consensus levels did not exceed 39 % in any clinical scenario. Arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is implemented for routine prostate cancer radiotherapy by 96 % of the centers. Among Swiss radiation oncology centers, considerable ranges of radiotherapy dose and ADT duration are routinely offered for localized and locally advanced prostate cancer. In the vast majority of cases, doses and durations are within the range of those described in current evidence-based guidelines. (orig.) [German] Die Radiotherapie (RT) ist als Monotherapie oder in Kombination mit einer Androgendeprivationstherapie (ADT) eine etablierte Behandlungsoption fuer das lokalisierte und lokal fortgeschrittene Prostatakarzinom. Trotz der guten Evidenzlage durch zahlreiche

  16. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.

  17. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 · 1019 · m-2 · s-1. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R ampersand D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R ampersand D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R ampersand D program will focus on the four objectives described

  18. The feasibility and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound combined with low-dose external beam radiotherapy as supplemental therapy for advanced prostate cancer following hormonal therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Yi Wu; Guo-Min Wang; Lei Xu; Bo-Heng Zhang; Ye-Qing Xu; Zhao-Chong Zeng; Bing Chen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with (+) low-dose external beam radiotherapy (LRT) as supplemental therapy for advanced prostate cancer (PCa) following hormonal therapy (HT). Our definition of HIFU+LRT refers to treating primary tumour lesions with HIFU in place of reduced field boost irradiation to the prostate, while retaining four-field box irradiation to the pelvis in conventional-dose external beam radiotherapy (CRT). We performed a prospective, controlled and non-randomized study on 120 patients with advanced PCa after HT who received HIFU, CRT, HIFU+LRT and HT alone, respectively. CT/MR imaging showed the primary tumours and pelvic lymph node metastases visibly shrank or even disappeared after HIFU+LRT treatment. There were significant differences among four groups with regard to overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) curves (P=0.018 and 0.015). Further comparison between each pair of groups suggested that the long-term DSS of the HIFU+LRT group was higher than those of the other three groups, but there was no significant difference between the HIFU+LRT group and the CRT group. Multivariable Cox's proportional hazard model showed that both HIFU+LRT and CRT were independently associated with DSS (P=0.001 and 0.035) and had protective effects with regard to the risk of death. Compared with CRT, HIFU+LRT significantly decreased incidences of radiation-related late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity grade ≥II. In conclusion, long-term survival of patients with advanced PCa benefited from strengthening local control of primary tumour and regional lymph node metastases after HT. As an alternative to CRT, HIFU+LRT showed good efficacy and better safety.

  19. Palliative chemotherapy followed by consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer not suitable for radical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hany Eldeeb; Philip Gamileri; Ghoi Mak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This is a retrospective study to assess the effectiveness of consolidation radiotherapy (CRT) following palliative chemotherapy in patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are not suitable for radical treatment. Methods: This study involved retrospective analysis of a prospective database of Northampton Oncology Centre from January 2005 to December 2010,63 patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC treated at the oncology centre were enrolled. Patients were either treated with high dose (39/36 Gy /13-12 fractions, group 1) or low dose (20 Gy / 5 fractions, group 2) CRT or those were not offered any CRT (group 3). Results: There was no significant difference between the three groups as regard age, sex, performance status, comorbidities or chemotherapy given. However there was a statistically significant difference as regard the stage P = 0.009 with more stage IV patients at group Ⅱ and Ⅲ compared to group l. The mean survival for the three groups was 27 months, 14 months &15 months, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement of survival in patients treated with high dose palliative CRT compared to the other two groups (P = 0.006). In multivariate analysis only the radiotherapy dose remains as the only statistical significant factor affecting the survival with hazard ratio 0.372 and confidence interval (0.147-0.726). Conclusion: Despite the limitation of our retrospective study, it is worth considering CRT approach for patients with advanced and metastatic NSCLC - not suitable for radical treatment - who have not progressed on chemotherapy.

  20. Long-Term Outcomes After Maximal Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for Locoregionally Recurrent or Locoregionally Advanced Primary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Choo, Richard, E-mail: choo.c@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Davis, Brian J.; Pisansky, Thomas M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Gunderson, Leonard L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Leibovich, Bradley C. [Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of a multimodality therapy combining maximal surgical resection and intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) for patients with locoregionally (LR) recurrent renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radical nephrectomy or LR advanced primary RCC. Methods and Materials: From 1989 through 2005, a total of 22 patients with LR recurrent (n = 19) or LR advanced primary (n = 3) RCC were treated with this multimodality approach. The median patient age was 63 years (range 46-78). Twenty-one patients (95%) received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with a median dose of 4,500 cGy (range, 4,140-5,500). Surgical resection was R0 (negative margins) in 5 patients (23%) and R1 (residual microscopic disease) in 17 patients (77%). The median IOERT dose delivered was 1,250 cGy (range, 1,000-2,000). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) and relapse patterns were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up for surviving patients was 9.9 years (range, 3.6-20 years). The OS and DFS at 1, 5, and 10 years were 91%, 40%, and 35% and 64%, 31%, and 31%, respectively. Central recurrence (within the IOERT field), LR relapse (tumor bed or regional lymph nodes), and distant metastases at 5 years were 9%, 27%, and 64%, respectively. Mortality within 30 days of surgery and IOERT was 0%. Five patients (23%) experienced acute or late National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI-CTCAE) Version 4 Grade 3 to 5 toxicities. Conclusions: In patients with LR recurrent or LR advanced primary RCC, a multimodality approach of perioperative EBRT, maximal surgical resection, and IOERT yielded encouraging results. This regimen warrants further investigation.

  1. Hypothyroidism as a Consequence of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Concurrent Taxane-Based Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To conduct a retrospective review of 168 consecutively treated locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LAHNC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/chemotherapy, to determine the rate and risk factors for developing hypothyroidism. Methods and Materials: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was delivered in 33 daily fractions to 69.3 Gy to gross disease and 56.1 Gy to clinically normal cervical nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of IMRT plans were used to determine radiation dose to thyroid and were compared with DVHs using conventional three-dimensional radiotherapy (3D-RT) in 10 of these same patients randomly selected for replanning and with DVHs of 16 patients in whom the thyroid was intentionally avoided during IMRT. Weekly paclitaxel (30 mg/m2) and carboplatin area under the curve-1 were given concurrently with IMRT. Results: Sixty-one of 128 evaluable patients (47.7%) developed hypothyroidism after a median of 1.08 years after IMRT (range, 2.4 months to 3.9 years). Age and volume of irradiated thyroid were associated with hypothyroidism development after IMRT. Compared with 3D-RT, IMRT with no thyroid dose constraints resulted in significantly higher minimum, maximum, and median dose (p < 0.0001) and percentage thyroid volume receiving 10, 20, and 60 Gy (p < 0.05). Compared with 3D-RT, IMRT with thyroid dose constraints resulted in lower median dose and percentage thyroid volume receiving 30, 40, and 50 Gy (p < 0.005) but higher minimum and maximum dose (p < 0.005). Conclusions: If not protected, IMRT for LAHNC can result in higher radiation to the thyroid than with conventional 3D-RT. Techniques to reduce dose and volume of radiation to thyroid tissue with IMRT are achievable and recommended.

  2. miR-21 expression and clinical outcome in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: exploratory analysis of the pancreatic cancer Erbitux, radiotherapy and UFT (PERU) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khurum; Cunningham, David; Peckitt, Clare; Barton, Sarah; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Rao, Sheela; Begum, Ruwaida; Thomas, Janet; Oates, Jacqui; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Fassan, Matteo; Braconi, Chiara; Chau, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with high mortality, and biomarker-driven treatment approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated safety and efficacy of a combination approach of chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) +/− cetuximab, and the prognostic role of miR-21 in patients with LAPC treated with a multimodality approach. Patients and Methods This was a randomised phase II trial in which patients with inoperable LAPC were offered gemcitabine and capecitabine (GEM-CAP) for 16 weeks. Patients with stable disease or response after GEM-CAP were randomised to capecitabine or UFT plus radiotherapy (RT) (A), or capecitabine or UFT plus cetuximab plus RT (B). The primary outcome of the study was overall survival (OS). Clinical outcome was compared according to baseline circulating miR-21 levels. Results 17 patients were enrolled and treated with GEM-CAP, with 13 patients achieving disease control and being randomised to arms A (n:7) and B (n:6). After a median follow-up of 61.2 months, median progression free survival (PFS) was 10.4 months and 12.7 months, median OS was 15.8 months and 22.0 months in arms A and B respectively (p > 0.05). Patients with high baseline plasma miR-21 had worse PFS (3.5 vs. 12.7 months; p:0.032) and OS (5.1 vs 15.3 months; p:0.5) compared to patients with low miR-21. Circulating miR-21 levels reflected miR-21 expression within the tissues. Conclusions Addition of Cetuximab to CRT following induction chemotherapy did not improve survival. High miR-21 baseline plasma expression was associated with poor clinical outcome in LAPC patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy. PMID:26862857

  3. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Chen, W; Kligerman, S; D’Souza, W; Suntharalingam, M; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tan, S [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Kim, G [Duke University, High Point, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features

  4. TU-C-12A-09: Modeling Pathologic Response of Locally Advanced Esophageal Cancer to Chemo-Radiotherapy Using Quantitative PET/CT Features, Clinical Parameters and Demographics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop predictive models using quantitative PET/CT features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Methods: This study included 20 patients who underwent tri-modality therapy (CRT + surgery) and had 18F-FDG PET/CT scans before initiation of CRT and 4-6 weeks after completion of CRT but prior to surgery. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (SUVmax, tumor diameter, etc.); (2) clinical parameters (TNM stage, histology, etc.) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, using cross-validations to avoid model over-fitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed via area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated via confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). Using spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications), significantly better than using conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone. For groups with a large number of tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher accuracy than the LR model. Conclusion: The SVM model using all features including

  5. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  7. Los Alamos NEP research in advanced plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research was initiated in advanced plasma thrusters that capitalizes on lab capabilities in plasma science and technology. The goal of the program was to examine the scaling issues of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance in support of NASA's MPD thruster development program. The objective was to address multi-megawatt, large scale, quasi-steady state MPD thruster performance. Results to date include a new quasi-steady state operating regime which was obtained at space exploration initiative relevant power levels, that enables direct coaxial gun-MPD comparisons of thruster physics and performance. The radiative losses are neglible. Operation with an applied axial magnetic field shows the same operational stability and exhaust plume uniformity benefits seen in MPD thrusters. Observed gun impedance is in close agreement with the magnetic Bernoulli model predictions. Spatial and temporal measurements of magnetic field, electric field, plasma density, electron temperature, and ion/neutral energy distribution are underway. Model applications to advanced mission logistics are also underway.

  8. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma: A Phase I/II dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion beams for the treatment of choroidal melanoma with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2006, 59 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical trial of carbon-ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiologic Sciences. The primary endpoint of this study was normal tissue morbidity, and secondary endpoints were local tumor control and patient survival. Of the 59 subjects enrolled, 57 were followed >6 months and analyzed. Results: Twenty-three patients (40%) developed neovascular glaucoma, and three underwent enucleation for eye pain due to elevated intraocular pressure. Incidence of neovascular glaucoma was dependent on tumor size and site. Five patients had died at analysis, three of distant metastasis and two of concurrent disease. All but one patient, who developed marginal recurrence, were controlled locally. Six patients developed distant metastasis, five in the liver and one in the lung. Three-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 88.2%, 84.8%, and 97.4%, respectively. No apparent dose-response relationship was observed in either tumor control or normal tissue morbidity at the dose range applied. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiotherapy can be applied to choroidal melanoma with an acceptable morbidity and sufficient antitumor effect, even with tumors of unfavorable size or site

  9. Sixth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health highlights selected papers presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research organized by Jackson State University (JSU from September 13−16, 2009 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA. The Symposium was built upon the overwhelming success of previous symposia hosted by JSU and co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, the U.S. Department of Education Title III Graduate Education Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the JSU Office of Academic Affairs, and the JSU Office of Research and Federal Relations. [...

  10. Seventh International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Seventh International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU from September 12–15, 2010 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. It was built upon the overwhelming success of previous symposia hosted by JSU and co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, the U.S. Department of Education Title III Graduate Education Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the JSU Office of Academic Affairs, and the JSU Office of Research and Federal Relations. [...

  11. Advances in mechanisms, robotics and design education and research

    CERN Document Server

    Schmiedeler, James; Sreenivasan, S; Su, Hai-Jun

    2013-01-01

    This book contains papers on a wide range of topics in the area of kinematics, mechanisms, robotics, and design, addressing new research advances and innovations in design education. The content is divided into  five main categories headed ‘Historical Perspectives’, ‘Kinematics and Mechanisms’, ‘Robotic Systems’, ‘Legged Locomotion’, and ‘Design Engineering Education’. Contributions take the form of survey articles, historical perspectives, commentaries on trends on education or research, original research contributions, and papers on design education.   This volume celebrates the achievements of Professor Kenneth Waldron who has made innumerable and invaluable contributions to these fields in the last fifty years. His leadership and his pioneering work have influenced thousands of people in this discipline.

  12. Assessment of Research Needs for Advanced Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1985-11-01

    The DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Working Group (AFCWG) was formed and asked to perform a scientific evaluation of the current status of fuel cells, with emphasis on identification of long-range research that may have a significant impact on the practical utilization of fuel cells in a variety of applications. The AFCWG held six meetings at locations throughout the country where fuel cell research and development are in progress, for presentations by experts on the status of fuel cell research and development efforts, as well as for inputs on research needs. Subsequent discussions by the AFCWG have resulted in the identification of priority research areas that should be explored over the long term in order to advance the design and performance of fuel cells of all types. Surveys describing the salient features of individual fuel cell types are presented in Chapters 2 to 6 and include elaborations of long-term research needs relating to the expeditious introduction of improved fuel cells. The Introduction and the Summary (Chapter 1) were prepared by AFCWG. They were repeatedly revised in response to comments and criticism. The present version represents the closest approach to a consensus that we were able to reach, which should not be interpreted to mean that each member of AFCWG endorses every statement and every unexpressed deletion. The Introduction and Summary always represent a majority view and, occasionally, a unanimous judgment. Chapters 2 to 6 provide background information and carry the names of identified authors. The identified authors of Chapters 2 to 6, rather than AFCWG as a whole, bear full responsibility for the scientific and technical contents of these chapters.

  13. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  14. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Suk Ho; Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, Ji Su [and others

    2000-04-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  15. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  16. Long-term results of a phase II trial of high-dose radiotherapy (60 Gy) and UFT/l-leucovorin in patients with non-resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestermark, Lene W; Jakobsen, Anders; Qvortrup, Camilla; Hansen, Flemming; Bisgaard, Claus; Baatrup, Gunnar; Rasmussen, Peter; Pfeiffer, Per

    2008-01-01

    Background. Preoperative radiochemotherapy is a cornerstone in patients with non- resectable locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To improve outcome (number of R0 resections and survival) high-dose radiotherapy (RT) was combined with oral UFT/l-leucovorin to allow tumour regression before radical...... UFT produces major regression in most patients with non-resectable LARC and thus a good chance of cure....

  17. A survey on staging and treatment in uterine cervical carcinoma in the Radiotherapy Cooperative Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment outcome of advanced stage uterine cervical carcinoma remains unsatisfactory. In order to elaborate a novel trial within The Radiotherapy Cooperative Group (RCG) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), we conducted a survey in 1997-1998 to determine the variability of pre-treatment assessment and treatment options. The variability of choosing surgery, defined radiation therapy techniques and chemotherapy are investigated, as well as the center's choices of future treatment strategies. Fifty two of 81 RCG centers from the RCG have participated in the survey. As one would expect, there is a large variation in the techniques used for pretreatment evaluation and treatment options. There is no 'standard' for reporting acute and late side effects. Chemotherapy is used neither systematically nor uniformly, and some centers continue to use neadjuvant chemotherapy modalities. Furthermore, the survey reveals that there is a strong demand for the reduction of overall treatment-time, for clinical investigation of novel combined modality treatment strategies, especially chemo-radiation therapy, and also for the use of new radiation sensitizers. We conclude that a more homogeneous approach to the pretreatment evaluation as well as treatment techniques is required in order to allow adequate quality control in any future trial of the RCG in the EORTC. (author)

  18. Method of advancing research and development of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization, FBRs are to be developed as the main of future nuclear power generation in Japan, and when the development is advanced, it is positivity aimed at building up the plutonium utilization system using FBRs superior to the uranium utilization system with LWRs. Also it was decided that it is necessary to exert incessant effort for the development of FBRs under the proper cooperation system of the government and people for a considerable long period, and as for the concrete development, hereafter, the deliberation is advanced by the expert subcommittee on FBR development project of the Atomic Energy Commission in succession. The subcommittee was founded in May, 1986, to carry out the deliberation on the long term promotion measures for the development of FBRs, the promotion measures for the research and development, the evaluation and examination of the basic specification of a demonstration FBR, the promotion measures for the international cooperation and other important matters related to the development of FBRs. The construction of the prototype FBR 'Monju' is in progress aiming at the criticality in 1992, and the start of construction of a demonstration FBR is expected in the latter half of 1990s. The situation around the development of FBRs, the fundamentals for promoting the research and development, and the subjects of the research and development are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. A Survey: Recent Advances and Future Trends in Honeypot Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Bringer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey on recent advances in honeypot research from a review of 80+ papers on honeypots and related topics mostly published after year 2005. This paper summarizes 60 papers that had significant contribution to the field. In reviewing the literature, it became apparent that the research can be broken down into five major areas:  new types of honeypots to cope with emergent new security threats,  utilizing honeypot output data to improve the accuracy in threat detections,  configuring honeypots to reduce the cost of maintaining honeypots as well as to improve the accuracy in threat detections,  counteracting honeypot detections by attackers, and  legal and ethical issues in using honeypots. Our literature reviews indicate that the advances in the first four areas reflect the recent changes in our networking environments, such as those in user demography and the ways those diverse users use new applications. Our literature reviews on legal and ethical issues in using honeypots reveals that there has not been widely accepted agreement on the legal and ethical issues about honeypots, which must be an important agenda in future honeypot research.

  20. Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    During the past century, environmental hazards have become a major concern, not only to public health professionals, but also to the society at large because of their tremendous health, socio-cultural and economic impacts. Various anthropogenic or natural factors have been implicated in the alteration of ecosystem integrity, as well as in the development of a wide variety of acute and/or chronic diseases in humans. It has also been demonstrated that many environmental agents, acting either independently or in combination with other toxins, may induce a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Understanding the role played by the environment in the etiology of human diseases is critical to designing cost-effective control/prevention measures. This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health includes the proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium provided an excellent opportunity to discuss the scientific advances in biomedical, environmental, and public health research that addresses global environmental health issues. PMID:27153079