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Sample records for advanced pressurised combustion

  1. Characterisation of fuels for advanced pressurised combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R; Hupa, M; Backman, P; Forssen, M; Karlsson, M; Kullberg, M; Sorvari, V; Uusikartano, T [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group; Nurk, M [Tallinskij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Tallinn (Estonia)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of the research was to determine a set of fuel characteristics which quantify the behaviour of a fuel in a typical pressurised combustor or gasifier environment, especially in hybrid processes such as second generation PFBC. One specific aspect was to cover a wide range of fuels, including several coal types and several grades of peat and biomasses: 7 types of coal, 2 types of peat, 2 types of wood, 2 types of black liquor, Estonian oil shale and Venezuelan Orimulsion were studied. The laboratory facilities used are a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor (PTGR), a pressurised grid heater (PGH) and an atmospheric entrained flow quartz tube reactor, with gas analysis, which can be operated as a fixed bed reactor. A major part of the work was related to fuel devolatilisation in the PGH and sequential devolatilisation and char gasification (with carbon dioxide or steam) in the PTGR. The final part of that work is reported here, with the combustion of Estonian oil shale at AFBC or PFBC conditions as additional subject. Devolatilisation of the fuels at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen while monitoring gaseous exhausts, followed by ultimate analysis of the chars has been reported earlier. Here, results on the analysis of the reduction of NO (with and without CO) on chars at atmospheric pressure in a fixed bed reactor are reported. Finally, a comparison is given between experimental results and direct numerical simulation with several computer codes, i.e. PyroSim, developed at TU Graz, Austria, and the codes Partikkeli, Pisara and Cogas, which were provided by VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae

  2. Plasma assisted measurements of alkali metal concentrations in pressurised combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R; Haeyrinen, V [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In this project the continuous alkali measurement method plasma excited alkali resonance line spectroscopy (PEARLS) was developed, tested and demonstrated in pressurised combustion facilities. The PEARLS method has been developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT). During 1994-1996 the PEARLS method was developed from the laboratory level to an industrial prototype. The alkali measuring instrument has been tested and used for regular measurements in four different pressurised combustion installations ranging up to industrial pilot scale. The installations are: (1) a pressurised entrained flow reactor (PEFR) at VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae, Finland (2) a pressurised fluidised bed combustion facility, called FRED, at DMT in Essen, Germany. (3) a 10 MW pressurised circulating fluidised bed combustion pilot plant at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy in Karhula, Finland (4) PFBC Research Facility at ABB Carbon in Finspaang, Sweden

  3. Gaseous emissions in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion. Analysis and summary of the pilot experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpela, T.; Hippinen, I.; Konkola, M.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of operating conditions on gaseous emissions in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion have been studied. The research objectives have been behaviour of sulphur absorbents and reduction of sulphur dioxide emissions, reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions, release of vapour-phase alkalimetals and carbon monoxide emissions. The sulphur capture capacities of calcium-based sorbents under PFBC conditions have been studied at a pressurised fluidised-bed reactor and at a pressurised thermogravimetric apparatus. The project has also connected results of the experimental PFBC at HUT/EVO. (author)

  4. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  5. Pressurised combustion of biomass-derived, low calorific value, fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J.; Hoppesteyn, P.D.J.; Hein, K.R.G. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology is participating in an EU-funded, international R + D project which is designed to aid European industry in addressing issues regarding pressurised combustion of biomass-derived, low calorific flue fuel gas. The objects of the project are: To design, manufacture and test a pressurised, high temperature gas turbine combustor for biomass derived LCV fuel gas; to develop a steady-state and dynamic model describing a combustor using biomass-derived, low calorific value fuel gases; to gather reliable experimental data on the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of the combustor; to study the steady-state and dynamic plant behaviour using a plant layout wich incorporates a model of a gas turbine suitable for operation on low calorific value fuel gas. (orig)

  6. Pressurised combustion of biomass-derived, low calorific value, fuel gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J; Hoppesteyn, P D.J.; Hein, K R.G. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    The Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology is participating in an EU-funded, international R + D project which is designed to aid European industry in addressing issues regarding pressurised combustion of biomass-derived, low calorific flue fuel gas. The objects of the project are: To design, manufacture and test a pressurised, high temperature gas turbine combustor for biomass derived LCV fuel gas; to develop a steady-state and dynamic model describing a combustor using biomass-derived, low calorific value fuel gases; to gather reliable experimental data on the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of the combustor; to study the steady-state and dynamic plant behaviour using a plant layout wich incorporates a model of a gas turbine suitable for operation on low calorific value fuel gas. (orig)

  7. Gaseous emissions in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion. Analysis and summary of the pilot experiments; Kaasumaiset paeaestoet paineistetussa leijukerrospoltossa. Koetulosten kaesittely ja yhteenveto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Hippinen, I.; Konkola, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    The influence of operating conditions on gaseous emissions in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion have been studied. The research objectives have been behaviour of sulphur absorbents and reduction of sulphur dioxide emissions, reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions, release of vapour-phase alkalimetals and carbon monoxide emissions. The sulphur capture capacities of calcium-based sorbents under PFBC conditions have been studied at a pressurised fluidised-bed reactor and at a pressurised thermogravimetric apparatus. The project has also connected results of the experimental PFBC at HUT/EVO. (author)

  8. Advanced coal combustion technologies and their environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozicevic, Maja; Feretic, Danilo; Tomsic, Zeljko

    1997-01-01

    Estimations of world energy reserves show that coal will remain the leading primary energy source for electricity production in the foreseeable future. In order to comply with ever stricter environmental regulations and to achieve efficient use of limited energy resources, advanced combustion technologies are being developed. The most promising are the pressurised fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). By injecting sorbent in the furnace, PFBC removes more than 90 percent of SO 2 in flue gases without additional emission control device. In addition, due to lower combustion temperature, NO x emissions are around 90 percent lower than those from pulverised coal (PC) plant. IGCC plant performance is even more environmentally expectable and its high efficiency is a result of a combined cycle usage. Technical, economic and environmental characteristics of mentioned combustion technologies will be presented in this paper. Comparison of PFBC, IGCC and PC power plants economics and air impact will also be given. (Author)

  9. Fuel elements for pressurised-gas reactors; Elements combustibles des piles a gaz sous pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J A; Englander, M; Gauthron, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The design and fabrication of fuel elements for the first CO{sub 2} pressurized reactors have induced to investigate: various cladding materials, natural uranium base fuels, canning processes. The main analogical tests used in connection with the fuel element study are described. These various tests have enabled, among others, the fabrication of the fuel element for the EL2 reactor. Lastly, future solutions for electrical power producing reactors are foreseen. (author)Fren. [French] L'etude et la realisation d'elements combustibles pour les premieres piles a CO{sub 2} sous pression ont conduit a examiner: les divers materiaux de gaine, les combustibles a base d'uranium naturel, les modes de gainage. Les principaux essais analogiques ayant servi au cours de l'etude de la cartouche sont decrits. Ces divers essais ont notamment permis la realisation de la cartouche de la pile EL2. Enfin sont envisagees les solutions futures pour les piles productrices d'energie electrique. (auteur)

  10. AP1000R pressurised water reactor project in china advances toward completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrop, G.

    2014-01-01

    The AP1000 R pressurised water reactor (PWR) project in China is the first deployment of its first-of-a-kind Generation III+ technology, making it one of most internationally important and industry-significant new build projects. The innovative AP1000 PWR design contains advanced passive safety and performance features that involve fewer active safety components than a traditional plant, thereby reducing the site footprint. The AP1000 reactor is the first and only Generation III+ nuclear power plant to be granted design certification by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and it has received an Interim Design Acceptance Confirmation from the Office for Nuclear Regulation and an Interim Statement of Design Acceptability from the Environment Agency in the United Kingdom. Construction and testing of dual AP1000 PWR units is currently in progress in each of two coastal sites in the People's Republic of China: Sanmen (Zhejiang Province) and Haiyang (Shandong Province). Since the initial contract award in 2007, the Westinghouse Consortium has worked in concert with the owners to construct the plants using innovative structural and mechanical modules. Uniquely designed plant components and essential instrumentation and control systems have been manufactured, delivered, and installed at the plants. Numerous personnel, including future reactor operators, have been trained at both the Sanmen and Haiyang sites, and technology transfer of technical documents and computer codes is well underway. The commercial operation dates are now nearing for Sanmen Unit 1 and Haiyang Unit 1, the first two units scheduled for completion. Consequently, these units are now in advanced stages of completion and present activities include planning and preparation for pre-operational testing, system turnover, and commissioning leading to fuel load, and eventual commercial operation. These activities are pioneering, in that they have never before been performed for a new build of

  11. Annual Report: Advanced Combustion (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey [NETL; Richards, George

    2012-09-30

    The Advanced Combustion Project addresses fundamental issues of fire-side and steam-side corrosion and materials performance in oxy-fuel combustion environments and provides an integrated approach into understanding the environmental and mechanical behavior such that environmental degradation can be ameliorated and long-term microstructural stability, and thus, mechanical performance can lead to longer lasting components and extended power plant life. The technical tasks of this effort are Oxy-combustion Environment Characterization, Alloy Modeling and Life Prediction, and Alloy Manufacturing and Process Development.

  12. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  13. National Jet Fuels Combustion Program – Area #3 : Advanced Combustion Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-31

    The goal of this study is to develop, conduct, and analyze advanced laser and optical measurements in the experimental combustors developed under ASCENT National Fuel Combustion Program to measure sensitivity to fuel properties. We conducted advanced...

  14. FY2014 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Combustion Engine research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  15. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) Technical Team is focused on removing technical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high-efficiency, emission-compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light-duty vehicle powertrains (i.e., passenger car, minivan, SUV, and pickup trucks).

  16. FY2016 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-07-01

    The Advanced Combustion Engine research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  17. FY2015 Advanced Combustion Engine Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gurpreet [Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Gravel, Roland M. [Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Howden, Kenneth C. [Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States); Breton, Leo [Vehicle Technologies Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-03-25

    The Advanced Combustion Engine research and development (R&D) subprogram within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  18. HERCULES Advanced Combustion Concepts Test Facility: Spray/Combustion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, K. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Labor fuer Aerothermochemie und Verbrennungssysteme, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This yearly report for 2004 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) at the Laboratory for Aero-thermochemistry and Combustion Systems at the Federal Institute of Technology ETH in Zurich, Switzerland, presents a review of work being done within the framework of HERCULES (High Efficiency R and D on Combustion with Ultra Low Emissions for Ships) - the international R and D project concerning new technologies for ships' diesels. The work involves the use and augmentation of simulation models. These are to be validated using experimental data. The report deals with the development of an experimental set-up that will simulate combustion in large two-stroke diesel engines and allow the generation of reference data. The main element of the test apparatus is a spray / combustion chamber with extensive possibilities for optical observation under variable flow conditions. The results of first simulations confirm concepts and shall help in further work on the project. The potential offered by high-speed camera systems was tested using the institute's existing HTDZ combustion chamber. Further work to be done is reviewed.

  19. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  20. Advanced Combustion and Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zigler, Brad

    2015-06-08

    Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, held June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It addresses technical barriers of inadequate data and predictive tools for fuel and lubricant effects on advanced combustion engines, with the strategy being through collaboration, develop techniques, tools, and data to quantify critical fuel physico-chemical effects to enable development of advanced combustion engines that use alternative fuels.

  1. Flow and Combustion in Advanced Gas Turbine Combustors

    CERN Document Server

    Janicka, Johannes; Schäfer, Michael; Heeger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    With regard to both the environmental sustainability and operating efficiency demands, modern combustion research has to face two main objectives, the optimization of combustion efficiency and the reduction of pollutants. This book reports on the combustion research activities carried out within the Collaborative Research Center (SFB) 568 “Flow and Combustion in Future Gas Turbine Combustion Chambers” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). This aimed at designing a completely integrated modeling and numerical simulation of the occurring very complex, coupled and interacting physico-chemical processes, such as turbulent heat and mass transport, single or multi-phase flows phenomena, chemical reactions/combustion and radiation, able to support the development of advanced gas turbine chamber concepts.

  2. Characterisation of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R.; Hupa, M.; Backman, P.; Karlsson, M.; Kullberg, M.; Sorvari, V. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Nurk, M. [Tallinn Univ. (Estonia)

    1996-12-01

    After 2 of the 3 years for this EU Joule 2 extension project, a rough comparison on the devolatilisation behaviour and char reactivity of 11 fossil fuels and 4 biofuels has been obtained. The experimental plan for 1995 has been completed, the laboratory facilities appeared to be well suited for the broad range of analyses presented here. A vast amount of devolatilisation tests in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure with gas analysis and char analysis gave a lot of information on the release of carbon, sulphur, nitrogen and also sodium, chloride and some other elements. Also first-order rate parameters could be determined. Solid pyrolysis yield measurements with the pressurised grid heater show a very good reproducibility except for the fuels with high carbonate content and those with very small char yield. Problems have to be solved considering lower heating rates and the use of folded grids. Fuel pyrolysis followed by gasification (with carbon dioxide or water as oxidising agent) at various temperatures and pressures shows that in general char solid yields and gasification reactivities are higher at elevated pressure. The design and construction of a pressurized single particle reactor, to be operational early 1996 is currently being negotiated. Numerical modelling of coal devolatilisation shows that even for atmospheric pressures the results differ significantly from experimental findings. (author)

  3. FY 1994 annual report. Advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    Researches on combustion in microgravity were conducted to develop combustion devices for advanced combustion techniques, and thereby to cope with the requirements for diversification of energy sources and abatement of environmental pollution by exhaust gases. This project was implemented under the research cooperation agreement with US's NASA, and the Japanese experts visited NASA's test facilities. NASA's Lewis Research Center has drop test facilities, of which the 2.2-sec drop test facilities are useful for researches by Japan. The cooperative research themes for combustion in microgravity selected include interactions between fuel droplets, high-pressure combustion of binary fuel sprays, and ignition and subsequent flame propagation in microgravity. An ignition test equipment, density field measurement equipment and flame propagation test equipment were constructed in Japan to conduct the combustion tests in microgravity for, e.g., combustion and evaporation of fuel droplets, combustion characteristics of liquid fuels mixed with solid particles, combustion of coal/oil mixture droplets, and estimating flammability limits. (NEDO)

  4. Advanced Fuels and Combustion Processes for Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    production from biomass steam reforming – Conduct a feasibility analysis of the proposed integrated process Energia Technologies - D. Nguyen & K. Parimi...strength foam material development by Ultramet – Combustion experiments performed U. Of Alabama – End-user input provided by Solar Turbines Major

  5. FY 2007 Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2007-12-01

    Advanced combustion engines have great potential for achieving dramatic energy efficiency improvements in light-duty vehicle applications, where it is suited to both conventional and hybrid- electric powertrain configurations. Light-duty vehicles with advanced combustion engines can compete directly with gasoline engine hybrid vehicles in terms of fuel economy and consumer-friendly driving characteristics; also, they are projected to have energy efficiencies that are competitive with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles when used in hybrid applications.Advanced engine technologies being researched and developed by the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program will also allow the use of hydrogen as a fuel in ICEs and will provide an energy-efficient interim hydrogen-based powertrain technology during the transition to hydrogen/fuelcell-powered transportation vehicles.

  6. Ash chemistry and behavior in advanced co-combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M; Skrifvars, B J [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Combustion Chemistry Research Group

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this LIEKKI 2 project is to report results achieved within the EU/JOULE/OPTEB project to the Finnish combustion research community through the LIEKKI program. The purpose of the EU/JOULE/OPTEB project is to find prediction methods for evaluating ash behavior, such as slagging, fouling and corrosion propensity, in full scale combustion systems through chemical or mineralogical analyses, intelligent laboratory tests and chemistry calculations. The project focuses on coals, coal mixtures and coal biomass mixtures fired in advanced combustion systems, such as fluidized bed boilers, pulverized fuel boilers with critical steam values etc. The project will make use of (1) advanced multi-component combustion equilibrium calculations, (2) ash sintering tendency laboratory tests and (3) chemical evaluations of slagging, fouling and corrosion measurements in full scale units. (orig.)

  7. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloiu, Valentin A. [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  8. Advanced Integrated Fuel/Combustion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    ineffective in the T63, even at concentrations up to 40 times the recommended value. Additive companies were informed about the performance of their...M. (1996): NASA RP- 1385. • Toepke, S. (1999): Boeing Company , Personal Correspondence. • Ulrich, G.D. (1971): Comb. Sci. Tech., Vol. 4, pp. 47-58...temperature (K) THC = total hydrocarbons UNICORN = UNsteady Ignition and COmbustion with ReactioNs V = reactor volume (mL) WSR = well-stirred reactor

  9. Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The objectives for this project are as follows: Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for compression ignition (CI), homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and reactivity-controlled compression-ignition (RCCI) engines; and Combine component models into surrogate fuel models to represent real transportation fuels. Use them to model low-temperature combustion strategies in HCCI, RCCI, and CI engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency.

  10. 1998 annual report of advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For the purpose of stabilizing energy supply, diversifying energy supply sources and reducing the worsening of global environment caused by combustion exhaust gases, advanced combustion technology was studied and the FY 1998 results were summarized. Following the previous year, the following were conducted: international research jointly with NASA, experiments using microgravity test facilities of Japan Space Utilization Promotion Center (JSUP), evaluation studies made by universities/national research institutes/private companies, etc. In the FY 1998 joint study, a total of 52 drop experiments were carried out on 4 themes using test facilities of Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC), and 100 experiments were conducted on one theme using test facilities of NASA. In the study using microgravity test facilities, the following were carried out: study of combustion and evaporation of fuel droplets, study of ignition/combustion of fuel droplets in the suspending state, study of combustion of spherical/cylinder state liquid fuels, study of high pressure combustion of binary fuel spray, study of interaction combustion of fuel droplets in the microgravity field, etc. (NEDO)

  11. Advancing the Limits of Dual Fuel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigsson, Fredrik

    2012-07-01

    There is a growing interest in alternative transport fuels. There are two underlying reasons for this interest; the desire to decrease the environmental impact of transports and the need to compensate for the declining availability of petroleum. In the light of both these factors the Diesel Dual Fuel, DDF, engine is an attractive concept. The primary fuel of the DDF engine is methane, which can be derived both from renewables and from fossil sources. Methane from organic waste; commonly referred to as biomethane, can provide a reduction in greenhouse gases unmatched by any other fuel. The DDF engine is from a combustion point of view a hybrid between the diesel and the otto engine and it shares characteristics with both. This work identifies the main challenges of DDF operation and suggests methods to overcome them. Injector tip temperature and pre-ignitions have been found to limit performance in addition to the restrictions known from literature such as knock and emissions of NO{sub x} and HC. HC emissions are especially challenging at light load where throttling is required to promote flame propagation. For this reason it is desired to increase the lean limit in the light load range in order to reduce pumping losses and increase efficiency. It is shown that the best results in this area are achieved by using early diesel injection to achieve HCCI/RCCI combustion where combustion phasing is controlled by the ratio between diesel and methane. However, even without committing to HCCI/RCCI combustion and the difficult control issues associated with it, substantial gains are accomplished by splitting the diesel injection into two and allocating most of the diesel fuel to the early injection. HCCI/RCCI and PPCI combustion can be used with great effect to reduce the emissions of unburned hydrocarbons at light load. At high load, the challenges that need to be overcome are mostly related to heat. Injector tip temperatures need to be observed since the cooling effect of

  12. Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy-Fuel Combustion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Clausen, Sønnik

    This report sums up the findings in PSO-project 010069, “Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy- Fuel Combustion Processes”. Three areas of optic diagnostics are covered in this work: - FTIR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a laboratory...... technique was an invaluable tool in the discussion of data obtained by gas analysis, and it allowed for estimation of combustion times in O2/CO2 where the high CO2 concentration prevents the use of the carbon mass balance for that purpose. During the project the data have been presented at a conference......, formed the basis of a publication and it is part of two PhD dissertations. The name of the conference the journal and the dissertations are listed below. - Joint Meeting of the Scandinavian-Nordic and French Sections of the Combustion Institute, Combustion of Char Particles under Oxy-Fuel Conditions...

  13. Advanced Diagnostics for High Pressure Spray Combustion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skeen, Scott A.; Manin, Julien Luc; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2014-06-01

    The development of accurate predictive engine simulations requires experimental data to both inform and validate the models, but very limited information is presently available about the chemical structure of high pressure spray flames under engine- relevant conditions. Probing such flames for chemical information using non- intrusive optical methods or intrusive sampling techniques, however, is challenging because of the physical and optical harshness of the environment. This work details two new diagnostics that have been developed and deployed to obtain quantitative species concentrations and soot volume fractions from a high-pressure combusting spray. A high-speed, high-pressure sampling system was developed to extract gaseous species (including soot precursor species) from within the flame for offline analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A high-speed multi-wavelength optical extinction diagnostic was also developed to quantify transient and quasi-steady soot processes. High-pressure sampling and offline characterization of gas-phase species formed following the pre-burn event was accomplished as well as characterization of gas-phase species present in the lift-off region of a high-pressure n-dodecane spray flame. For the initial samples discussed in this work several species were identified, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); however, quantitative mole fractions were not determined. Nevertheless, the diagnostic developed here does have this capability. Quantitative, time-resolved measurements of soot extinction were also accomplished and the novel use of multiple incident wavelengths proved valuable toward characterizing changes in soot optical properties within different regions of the spray flame.

  14. Advanced modeling of oxy-fuel combustion of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chungen Yin

    2011-01-15

    The main goal of this small-scale project is to investigate oxy-combustion of natural gas (NG) through advanced modeling, in which radiation, chemistry and mixing will be reasonably resolved. 1) A state-of-the-art review was given regarding the latest R and D achievements and status of oxy-fuel technology. The modeling and simulation status and achievements in the field of oxy-fuel combustion were also summarized; 2) A computer code in standard c++, using the exponential wide band model (EWBM) to evaluate the emissivity and absorptivity of any gas mixture at any condition, was developed and validated in detail against data in literature. A new, complete, and accurate WSGGM, applicable to both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion modeling and applicable to both gray and non-gray calculation, was successfully derived, by using the validated EWBM code as the reference mode. The new WSGGM was implemented in CFD modeling of two different oxy-fuel furnaces, through which its great, unique advantages over the currently most widely used WSGGM were demonstrated. 3) Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed for oxy-NG flame and air-NG flame, in which dissociation effects were considered to different degrees. Remarkable differences in oxy-fuel and air-fuel combustion were revealed, and main intermediate species that play key roles in oxy-fuel flames were identified. Different combustion mechanisms are compared, e.g., the most widely used 2-step global mechanism, refined 4-step global mechanism, a global mechanism developed for oxy-fuel using detailed chemical kinetic modeling (CHEMKIN) as reference. 4) Over 15 CFD simulations were done for oxy-NG combustion, in which radiation, chemistry, mixing, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and so on were thoroughly investigated. Among all the simulations, RANS combined with 2-step and refined 4-step mechanism, RANS combined with CHEMKIN-based new global mechanism for oxy-fuel modeling, and LES combined with different combustion

  15. Advanced radiant combustion system. Final report, September 1989--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.D.; Carswell, M.G.; Long, F.S.

    1996-09-01

    Results of the Advanced Radiant Combustion System (ARCS) project are presented in this report. This work was performed by Alzeta Corporation as prime contractor under a contract to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technologies as part of a larger DOE program entitled Research Program for Advanced Combustion Systems. The goals of the Alzeta ARCS project were to (a) Improve the high temperature performance characteristics of porous surface ceramic fiber burners, (b) Develop an Advanced Radiant Combustion System (ARCS) that combines combustion controls with an advanced radiant burner, and (c) Demonstrate the advanced burner and controls in an industrial application. Prior to the start of this project, Alzeta had developed and commercialized a porous surface radiant burner, the Pyrocore{trademark} burner. The product had been commercially available for approximately 5 years and had achieved commercial success in a number of applications ranging from small burners for commercial cooking equipment to large burners for low temperature industrial fluid heating applications. The burner was not recommended for use in applications with process temperatures above 1000{degrees}F, which prevented the burner from being used in intermediate to high temperature processes in the chemical and petroleum refining industries. The interest in increasing the maximum use temperature of the burner was motivated in part by a desire to expand the number of applications that could use the Pyrocore product, but also because many of the fluid sensitive heating applications of interest would benefit from the distributed flux characteristic of porous surface burners. Background information on porous surface radiant burners, and a discussion of advantages that would be provided by an improved product, are presented in Section 2.

  16. Novel approaches in advanced combustion characterization of fuels for advanced pressurized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, M.; Haemaelaeinen, J. [VTT Energy (Finland); Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    This project is a part of the EU Joule 2 (extension) programme. The objective of the research of Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) is to produce experimental results of the effects of pressure and other important parameters on the combustion of pulverized coals and their char derivates. The results can be utilized in modelling of pressurized combustion and in planning pilot-scale reactors. The coals to be studied are Polish hvb coal, French lignite (Gardanne), German anthracite (Niederberg) and German (Goettelbom) hvb coal. The samples are combusted in an electrically heated, pressurized entrained flow reactor (PEFR), where the experimental conditions are controlled with a high precision. The particle size of the fuel can vary between 100 and 300 {mu}m. The studied things are combustion rates, temperatures and sizes of burning single coal and char particles. The latter measurements are performed with a method developed by Tampere University of Technology, Finland. In some of the experiments, mass loss and elemental composition of the char residue are studied in more details as the function of time to find out the combustion mechanism. Combustion rate of pulverized (140-180 {mu}m) Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite were measured and compared with the data obtained earlier with Polish hvb coal at various pressures, gas temperatures, oxygen partial pressures and partial pressures of carbon dioxide in the second working period. In addition, particle temperatures were measured with anthracite. The experimental results were treated with multivariable partial least squares (PLS) method to find regression equation between the measured things and the experimental variables. (author)

  17. Advanced Combustion Numerics and Modeling - FY18 First Quarter Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitesides, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Killingsworth, N. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNenly, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Petitpas, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-05

    This project is focused on early stage research and development of numerical methods and models to improve advanced engine combustion concepts and systems. The current focus is on development of new mathematics and algorithms to reduce the time to solution for advanced combustion engine design using detailed fuel chemistry. The research is prioritized towards the most time-consuming workflow bottlenecks (computer and human) and accuracy gaps that slow ACS program members. Zero-RK, the fast and accurate chemical kinetics solver software developed in this project, is central to the research efforts and continues to be developed to address the current and emerging needs of the engine designers, engine modelers and fuel mechanism developers.

  18. PARs for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosler, J.; Sliter, G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress being made in the United States to introduce passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) technology as a cost-effective alternative to electric recombiners for controlling combustible gas produced in postulated accidents in both future Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) and certain U. S. operating nuclear plants. PARs catalytically recombine hydrogen and oxygen, gradually producing heat and water vapor. They have no moving parts and are self-starting and self-feeding, even under relatively cold and wet containment conditions. Buoyancy of the hot gases they create sets up natural convective flow that promotes mixing of combustible gases in a containment. In a non-inerted ALWR containment, two approaches each employing a combination of PARs and igniters are being considered to control hydrogen in design basis and severe accidents. In pre-inerted ALWRs, PARs alone control radiolytic oxygen produced in either accident type. The paper also discusses regulatory feedback regarding these combustible gas control approaches and describes a test program being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricite de France (EdF) to supplement the existing PAR test database with performance data under conditions of interest to U.S. plants. Preliminary findings from the EPRI/EdF PAR model test program are included. Successful completion of this test program and confirmatory tests being sponsored by the U. S. NRC are expected to pave the way for use of PARs in ALWRs and operating plants. (author)

  19. Exhaust gas recirculation for advanced diesel combustion cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, Usman; Zheng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of the incremental (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR. • Proposed one-step equations for transient/steady-state gas concentration estimation. • Defined an in-cylinder excess-air ratio to account for the recycled oxygen with EGR. • Demonstrated the use of intake oxygen as a reliable measure of EGR effectiveness. • Demonstrated the impact of engine load and intake pressure on EGR effectiveness. - Abstract: Modern diesel engines tend to utilize significantly large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and high intake pressures across the engine load range to meet NOx targets. At such high EGR rates, the combustion process and exhaust emissions tend to exhibit a marked sensitivity to small changes in the EGR quantity, resulting in unintended deviations from the desired engine performance characteristics (energy efficiency, emissions, stability). An accurate estimation of EGR and its effect on the intake dilution are, therefore, necessary to enable its application during transient engine operation or unstable combustion regimes. In this research, a detailed analysis that includes estimation of the transient (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required to reach the steady-state EGR operation has been carried out. One-step global equations to calculate the transient and steady-state gas concentrations in the intake and exhaust are proposed. The effects of engine load and intake pressure on EGR have been examined and explained in terms of intake charge dilution and in-cylinder excess-air ratio. The EGR analysis is validated against a wide range of empirical data that include low temperature combustion cycles, intake pressure and load sweeps. This research intends to not only formulate a clear understanding of EGR application for advanced diesel combustion but also to set forth guidelines for transient analysis of EGR

  20. Piezoelectric pump and pressurised circuit provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, Johannes; Wits, Wessel Willems

    2015-01-01

    A piezoelectric pump for use in a pressurised circuit is provided, comprising a pump chamber (5) with an inlet (6) provided with a one way inlet valve (7), for connection to a feeding line (8) of the pressurised circuit and an outlet (9) provided with a one way outlet valve (10), for connection to a

  1. Installations having pressurised fluid circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigg, S.; Grant, J.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to nuclear installations having pressurised coolant flow circuits. Breaches in such circuits may quickly result in much damage to the plant. Devices such as non-return valves, orifice plates, and automatically operated shut-off valves have been provided to prevent or reduce fluid flow through a breached pipe line, but such devices have several disadvantages; they may present large restrictions to normal flow of coolant, and may depend on the operation of ancillary equipment, with consequent delay in bringing them into operation in an emergency. Other expedients that have been adopted to prevent or reduce reverse flow through an upstream breach comprise various forms of hydraulic counter flow brakes. The arrangement described has at least one variable fluid brake comprising a fluidic device connected into a duct in the pressurised circuit, the device having an inlet, an outlet, a vortex chamber between the inlet and outlet, a control jet for introducing fluid into the vortex chamber, connections communicating the inlet and the outlet into one part of the circuit and the control jet into another region at a complementary pressure so that, in the event of a breach in the circuit in one region, fluid passes from the other region to enter the vortex chamber to stimulate pressure to create a flow restricting vortex in the chamber that reduces flow through the breach. The system finds particular application to stream generating pressure tube reactors, such as the steam generating heavy water reactor at UKAEA, Winfrith. (U.K.)

  2. Study of advanced rotary combustion engines for commuter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, M.; Jones, C.; Myers, D.

    1983-01-01

    Performance, weight, size, and maintenance data for advanced rotary aircraft engines suitable for comparative commuter aircraft system evaluation studies of alternate engine candidates are provided. These are turbocharged, turbocompounded, direct injected, stratified charge rotary engines. Hypothetical engines were defined (an RC4-74 at 895 kW and an RC6-87 at 1490 kW) based on the technologies and design approaches used in the highly advanced engine of a study of advanced general aviation rotary engines. The data covers the size range of shaft power from 597 kW (800 hp) to 1865 kW (2500 hp) and is in the form of drawings, tables, curves and written text. These include data on internal geometry and configuration, installation information, turbocharging and turbocompounding arrangements, design features and technologies, engine cooling, fuels, scaling for weight size BSFC and heat rejection for varying horsepower, engine operating and performance data, and TBO and maintenance requirements. The basic combustion system was developed and demonstrated; however the projected power densities and performance efficiencies require increases in engine internal pressures, thermal loading, and rotative speed.

  3. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram supporting the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future federal emissions regulations.

  4. Unraveling advanced compression ignition combustion using optical diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Zegers, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the expected upsurge of hybrid and electric cars in the coming decades, internal combustion will remain the main power supply for (long-distance) transport. Buses, trucks, ships and airplanes will still rely on combustion engines. Nevertheless, emission legislation is becoming more stringent and the oil price continues to rise. Consequently, there still exists a serious interest in new developments that may improve combustion efficiency and fuel flexibility, and reduce emissions; both...

  5. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1987-01-01

    Combustion, Second Edition focuses on the underlying principles of combustion and covers topics ranging from chemical thermodynamics and flame temperatures to chemical kinetics, detonation, ignition, and oxidation characteristics of fuels. Diffusion flames, flame phenomena in premixed combustible gases, and combustion of nonvolatile fuels are also discussed. This book consists of nine chapters and begins by introducing the reader to heats of reaction and formation, free energy and the equilibrium constants, and flame temperature calculations. The next chapter explores the rates of reactio

  6. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-12-01

    Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development (R&D) subprogram. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the VTP program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  7. Unraveling advanced compression ignition combustion using optical diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, R.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the expected upsurge of hybrid and electric cars in the coming decades, internal combustion will remain the main power supply for (long-distance) transport. Buses, trucks, ships and airplanes will still rely on combustion engines. Nevertheless, emission legislation is becoming more stringent

  8. Turbulent Combustion Modeling Advances, New Trends and Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Echekki, Tarek

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent combustion sits at the interface of two important nonlinear, multiscale phenomena: chemistry and turbulence. Its study is extremely timely in view of the need to develop new combustion technologies in order to address challenges associated with climate change, energy source uncertainty, and air pollution. Despite the fact that modeling of turbulent combustion is a subject that has been researched for a number of years, its complexity implies that key issues are still eluding, and a theoretical description that is accurate enough to make turbulent combustion models rigorous and quantitative for industrial use is still lacking. In this book, prominent experts review most of the available approaches in modeling turbulent combustion, with particular focus on the exploding increase in computational resources that has allowed the simulation of increasingly detailed phenomena. The relevant algorithms are presented, the theoretical methods are explained, and various application examples are given. The book ...

  9. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    2008-01-01

    Combustion Engineering, a topic generally taught at the upper undergraduate and graduate level in most mechanical engineering programs, and many chemical engineering programs, is the study of rapid energy and mass transfer usually through the common physical phenomena of flame oxidation. It covers the physics and chemistry of this process and the engineering applications-from the generation of power such as the internal combustion automobile engine to the gas turbine engine. Renewed concerns about energy efficiency and fuel costs, along with continued concerns over toxic and particulate emissions have kept the interest in this vital area of engineering high and brought about new developments in both fundamental knowledge of flame and combustion physics as well as new technologies for flame and fuel control. *New chapter on new combustion concepts and technologies, including discussion on nanotechnology as related to combustion, as well as microgravity combustion, microcombustion, and catalytic combustion-all ...

  10. FY1996 annual report on the advanced combustion science in microgravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Research was implemented continuously from the previous year on combustion equipment enabling advanced combustion technologies, by studying combustion in a microgravity field, for the purpose of preventing environmental pollution caused by diversification of energy sources and exhaust gasses. In joint studies with NASA, the themes of the previous year were continued, for which tests were conducted 37 times using Japanese drop test equipment and 131 times using NASA's. The evaluation and analysis of the experiments and test data by the microgravity test equipment were, in addition to the themes of the previous year, such that micro observation for ignition/combustion mechanism of fuel spray droplets was made, as well as studies on fuel droplets combustion by a laser diagnostic device, concerning combustion of fuel droplets and vaporization process, that flame spread on solid substances was researched in relation to combustion characteristics of high density fuels, and that mixed gas combustion on a solid surface was studied in connection with the research on flammability limits. Furthermore, a study on combustion technology for gas turbines was added for the purpose of studying an advanced combustor. (NEDO)

  11. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Advanced Combustion Engine Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gurpreet [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D subprogram supports the mission of the Vehicle Technologies Program by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) for passenger and commercial vehicles that meet future Federal emissions regulations. Dramatically improving the efficiency of ICEs and enabling their introduction in conventional as well as hybrid electric vehicles is the most promising and cost-effective approach to increasing vehicle fuel economy over the next 30 years.

  12. Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Glassman, Irvin

    1997-01-01

    This Third Edition of Glassman's classic text clearly defines the role of chemistry, physics, and fluid mechanics as applied to the complex topic of combustion. Glassman's insightful introductory text emphasizes underlying physical and chemical principles, and encompasses engine technology, fire safety, materials synthesis, detonation phenomena, hydrocarbon fuel oxidation mechanisms, and environmental considerations. Combustion has been rewritten to integrate the text, figures, and appendixes, detailing available combustion codes, making it not only an excellent introductory text but also an important reference source for professionals in the field. Key Features * Explains complex combustion phenomena with physical insight rather than extensive mathematics * Clarifies postulates in the text using extensive computational results in figures * Lists modern combustion programs indicating usage and availability * Relates combustion concepts to practical applications.

  13. Advanced diagnostics in oxy-fuel combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, J.; Clausen, Soennik; Degn Jensen, A. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. CHEC Research Centre, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Boeg Toftegaard, M. (DONG Energy Power, Hvidovre (Denmark))

    2012-07-01

    This report sums up the findings in PSO-project 010069, ''Advanced Diagnostics in Oxy-Fuel Combustion Processes''. Three areas of optic diagnostics are covered in this work: - FTIR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a 30 kW swirl burner. - IR measurements in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor. The results obtained in the swirl burner have proved the FTIR method as a valuable technique for gas phase temperature measurements. When its efficacy is evaluated against traditional thermocouple measurements, two cases, with and without probe beam stop, must however be treated separately. When the FTIR probe is operated with the purpose of gas phase concentration measurements the probe needs to operate with a beam stop mounted in front of it. With this beam stop in place it was shown that the measured gas phase temperature was affected by cooling, induced by the cooled beam stop. Hence, for a more accurate determination of gas phase temperatures the probe needed to operate without the beam stop. When this was the case, the FTIR probe showed superior to traditional temperature measurements using a thermocouple as it could measure the fast temperature fluctuations. With the beam stop in place the efficacy of the FTIR probe for gas temperature determination was comparable to the use of a traditional thermocouple. The evaluation of the FTIR technique regarding estimation of gas phase concentrations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and CO showed that the method is reliable though it cannot be stated as particularly accurate. The accuracy of the method is dependent on the similarity of the reference emission spectra of the gases with those obtained in the experiments, as the transmittance intensity is not a linear function of concentration. The length of the optical path also affects the steadiness of the measurements. The length of the optical path is difficult to adjust on the small scales that are the focus of this work. However

  14. Recent Advances In Science Support For Isolated Droplet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, F. L.; Kazakov, A.; Urban, B. D.; Kroenlein, K.

    2003-01-01

    In a joint program involving Prof. F.A. Williams of the University of California, San Diego and Dr. V. Nayagam of the National Center for Microgravity Research, the combustion characteristics of isolated liquid fuel droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, methanol, methanol-water, ethanol and ethanol-water having initial diameters between about 1 mm and 6 mm continues to be investigated. The objectives of the work are to improve fundamental knowledge of droplet combustion dynamics for pure fuels and fuel-water mixtures through microgravity experiments and theoretical analyses. The Princeton contributions support the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies through experiments and numerical modeling. UCSD contributions are described in a companion communication in this conference. The Princeton effort also addresses the analyses of Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC) experiments conducted with the above fuels and collaborative work with others who are investigating droplet combustion in the presence of steady convection. A thorough interpretation of droplet burning behavior for n-heptane and n-decane over a relatively wide range of conditions also involves the influences of sooting on the combustion behavior, and this particular aspect on isolated burning of droplets is under consideration in a collaborative program underway with Drexel University. This collaboration is addressed in another communication at this conference. The one-dimensional, time-dependent, numerical modeling approach that we have continued to evolve for analyzing isolated, quiescent droplet combustion data has been further applied to investigate several facets of isolated droplet burning of simple alcohols, n-heptane, and n-decane. Some of the new results are described below.

  15. Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

    2006-01-01

    Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program

  16. Pressurised water reactor in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Since the Three Mile Island accident there has been much debate about the safety considerations of Pressurised Water Reactors. Their development will continue throughout the world but it will be based upon the lessons learned from that unfortunate accident. In the United Kingdom there is a public enquiry discussing all aspects of the reactor. The papers given in this book provide an informed addition to the literature. The design, safety and licensing and construction of a pressurised water reactor system are discussed in detail. Considerations stemming from the Three Mile Island accident are presented

  17. Application of the Advanced Distillation Curve Method to Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engine Gasolines

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Jessica L.

    2015-07-16

    © This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2015 by the American Chemical Society. Incremental but fundamental changes are currently being made to fuel composition and combustion strategies to diversify energy feedstocks, decrease pollution, and increase engine efficiency. The increase in parameter space (by having many variables in play simultaneously) makes it difficult at best to propose strategic changes to engine and fuel design by use of conventional build-and-test methodology. To make changes in the most time- and cost-effective manner, it is imperative that new computational tools and surrogate fuels are developed. Currently, sets of fuels are being characterized by industry groups, such as the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) and other entities, so that researchers in different laboratories have access to fuels with consistent properties. In this work, six gasolines (FACE A, C, F, G, I, and J) are characterized by the advanced distillation curve (ADC) method to determine the composition and enthalpy of combustion in various distillate volume fractions. Tracking the composition and enthalpy of distillate fractions provides valuable information for determining structure property relationships, and moreover, it provides the basis for the development of equations of state that can describe the thermodynamic properties of these complex mixtures and lead to development of surrogate fuels composed of major hydrocarbon classes found in target fuels.

  18. Advancing grate-firing for greater environmental impacts and efficiency for decentralized biomass/wastes combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Li, Shuangshuang

    2017-01-01

    to well suit decentralized biomass and municipal/industrial wastes combustion. This paper discusses with concrete examples how to advance grate-firing for greater efficiency and environmental impacts, e.g., use of advanced secondary air system, flue gas recycling and optimized grate assembly, which...

  19. FY1995 annual report on the advanced combustion science in microgravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research was implemented continuously from the previous year on combustion equipment enabling advanced combustion technologies, by studying combustion in a microgravity field, for the purpose of preventing environmental pollution caused by diversification of energy sources and exhaust gasses. In joint studies with NASA, the 1995 themes were continued, for which tests were conducted 34 times using Japanese drop test equipment. Further, studies were added for flammability limits and flame dynamics of spherical flames in homogeneous and heterogeneous mixed fuels. The evaluation and analysis of the experiments and test data by the microgravity test equipment were such that laser ignitions of floating or fuel-oozing droplets, spherical/cylindrical combustion of liquid fuels, for example, were studied in regards to the combustion and vaporization process of fuel droplets, that high calorie fuel combustion in microgravitation field for example was investigated in relation to the combustion characteristics of high density fuels, that flame stability of lean premixed gasses for example was researched concerning flammability limit, and that NOx generation mechanism in liquid fuel combustion was looked into in connection with emission mechanisms of pollutant gaseous materials. (NEDO)

  20. Annual Report: DOE Advanced Combustion Systems & Fuels R&D; Light-Duty Diesel Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Despite compliance issues in previous years, automakers have demonstrated that the newest generation of diesel power trains are capable of meeting all federal and state regulations (EPA, 2016). Diesels continue to be a cost-effective, efficient, powerful propulsion source for many light- and medium-duty vehicle applications (Martec, 2016). Even modest reductions in the fuel consumption of light- and medium duty diesel vehicles in the U.S. will eliminate millions of tons of CO2 emissions per year. Continued improvement of diesel combustion systems will play an important role in reducing fleet fuel consumption, but these improvements will require an unprecedented scientific understanding of how changes in engine design and calibration affect the mixture preparation, combustion, and pollutant formation processes that take place inside the cylinder. The focus of this year’s research is to provide insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for improved thermal efficiency observed with a stepped-lip piston. Understanding how piston design can influence efficiency will help engineers develop and optimize new diesel combustion systems.

  1. Gasoline Ultra Efficient Fuel Vehicle with Advanced Low Temperature Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Confer, Keith [Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, Troy, MI (United States)

    2014-12-18

    The objective of this program was to develop, implement and demonstrate fuel consumption reduction technologies which are focused on reduction of friction and parasitic losses and on the improvement of thermal efficiency from in-cylinder combustion. The program was executed in two phases. The conclusion of each phase was marked by an on-vehicle technology demonstration. Phase I concentrated on short term goals to achieve technologies to reduce friction and parasitic losses. The duration of Phase I was approximately two years and the target fuel economy improvement over the baseline was 20% for the Phase I demonstration. Phase II was focused on the development and demonstration of a breakthrough low temperature combustion process called Gasoline Direct- Injection Compression Ignition (GDCI). The duration of Phase II was approximately four years and the targeted fuel economy improvement was 35% over the baseline for the Phase II demonstration vehicle. The targeted tailpipe emissions for this demonstration were Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards.

  2. Sandia and General Motors: Advancing Clean Combustion Engines with

    Science.gov (United States)

    , storage, and disposal. Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Safety Components and Systems Improving battery performance, economics, and safety for transportation. Batteries Sciences and Engineering Chemical Sciences Geosciences Fusion Energy Sciences Advanced Scientific Computing

  3. Integration of CFD codes and advanced combustion models for quantitative burnout determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javier Pallares; Inmaculada Arauzo; Alan Williams [University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain). Centre of Research for Energy Resources and Consumption (CIRCE)

    2007-10-15

    CFD codes and advanced kinetics combustion models are extensively used to predict coal burnout in large utility boilers. Modelling approaches based on CFD codes can accurately solve the fluid dynamics equations involved in the problem but this is usually achieved by including simple combustion models. On the other hand, advanced kinetics combustion models can give a detailed description of the coal combustion behaviour by using a simplified description of the flow field, this usually being obtained from a zone-method approach. Both approximations describe correctly general trends on coal burnout, but fail to predict quantitative values. In this paper a new methodology which takes advantage of both approximations is described. In the first instance CFD solutions were obtained of the combustion conditions in the furnace in the Lamarmora power plant (ASM Brescia, Italy) for a number of different conditions and for three coals. Then, these furnace conditions were used as inputs for a more detailed chemical combustion model to predict coal burnout. In this, devolatilization was modelled using a commercial macromolecular network pyrolysis model (FG-DVC). For char oxidation an intrinsic reactivity approach including thermal annealing, ash inhibition and maceral effects, was used. Results from the simulations were compared against plant experimental values, showing a reasonable agreement in trends and quantitative values. 28 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. FY1994 annual report on the advanced combustion science in microgravity field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Researches were implemented continuously from the previous year on combustion equipment which enables advanced combustion technologies by studying combustion in a microgravity field, for the purpose of preventing environmental pollution caused by diversification of energy sources and exhaust gasses. In joint studies with NASA, research was conducted at both ends concerning the interaction of fuel droplets in a microgravity field; namely, high pressure combustion of binary fuel sprays at NASA against interaction in high pressure spray combustion of binary fuel at Japan side, and ignition and flame spread in microgravity field at NASA against combustion characteristics of organic solid fuels at Japan side. In fiscal 1994, in addition to the test equipment built in the previous year, a fuel droplet combustion test device was manufactured, as were a gas sampling and analyzing device, particle speed measuring device, and laser induced fluorescence measuring device. The tests using these measuring devices and microgravity test equipment were carried out 112 times, thereby establishing the measuring method of flame structure which was an objective of the present year. (NEDO)

  5. Advancements in Development of Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical-looping combustion (CLC is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of greenhouse CO2. Extensive research has been performed on CLC in the last decade with respect to oxygen carrier development, reaction kinetics, reactor design, system efficiencies, and prototype testing. Transition metal oxides, such as Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn oxides, were reported as reactive species in the oxygen carrier particles. Ni-based oxygen carriers exhibited the best reactivity and stability during multiredox cycles. The performance of the oxygen carriers can be improved by changing preparation method or by making mixedoxides. The CLC has been demonstrated successfully in continuously operated prototype reactors based on interconnected fluidized-bed system in the size range of 0.3–50 kW. High fuel conversion rates and almost 100%  CO2 capture efficiencies were obtained. The CLC system with two interconnected fluidized-bed reactors was considered the most suitable reactor design. Development of oxygen carriers with excellent reactivity and stability is still one of the challenges for CLC in the near future. Experiences of building and operating the large-scale CLC systems are needed before this technology is used commercially. Chemical-looping reforming (CLR and chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH are novel chemical-looping techniques to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen deserving more attention and research.

  6. Surrogate fuel formulation for light naphtha combustion in advanced combustion engines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz

    2015-03-30

    Crude oil once recovered is further separated in to several distinct fractions to produce a range of energy and chemical products. One of the less processed fractions is light naphtha (LN), hence they are more economical to produce than their gasoline and diesel counterparts. Recent efforts have demonstrated usage of LN as transportation fuel for internal combustion engines with slight modifications. In this study, a multicomponent surrogate fuel has been developed for light naphtha fuel using a multi-variable nonlinear constrained optimization scheme. The surrogate, consisting of palette species n-pentane, 2-methylhexane, 2-methylbutane, n-heptane and toluene, was validated against the LN using ignition quality tester following ASTM D6890 methodology. Comparison of LN and the surrogate fuel demonstrated satisfactory agreement.

  7. Comparative Field Tests of Pressurised Rover Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, G. A.; Wood, N. B.; Clarke, J. D.; Piechochinski, S.; Bamsey, M.; Laing, J. H.

    The conceptual designs, interior layouts and operational performances of three pressurised rover prototypes - Aonia, ARES and Everest - were field tested during a recent simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. A human factors experiment, in which the same crew of three executed the same simulated science mission in each of the three vehicles, yielded comparative data on the capacity of each vehicle to safely and comfortably carry explorers away from the main base, enter and exit the vehicle in spacesuits, perform science tasks in the field, and manage geological and biological samples. As well as offering recommendations for design improvements for specific vehicles, the results suggest that a conventional Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) would not be suitable for analog field work; that a pressurised docking tunnel to the main habitat is essential; that better provisions for spacesuit storage are required; and that a crew consisting of one driver/navigator and two field science crew specialists may be optimal. From a field operations viewpoint, a recurring conflict between rover and habitat crews at the time of return to the habitat was observed. An analysis of these incidents leads to proposed refinements of operational protocols, specific crew training for rover returns and again points to the need for a pressurised docking tunnel. Sound field testing, circulating of results, and building the lessons learned into new vehicles is advocated as a way of producing ever higher fidelity rover analogues.

  8. Passive autocatalytic recombiners for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, U.; Sliter, G.

    2004-01-01

    A key aspect of the worldwide effort to develop advanced nuclear power plants is designing to address severe accident phenomena, including the generation of hydrogen during core melt progression (metal-water and core-concrete reactions). This design work not only resolves safety concerns with hydrogen, but also supports the development of a technical basis for simplification of off-site emergency planning. The dominant challenge to any emergency planning approach is a large, early containment failure due to pressure excursions. Among the potential contributors to large and rapid increases in containment pressure is hydrogen combustion. The more improbable a containment-threatening combustion becomes, the more appropriate the argument for significant emergency planning simplification. As discussed in this paper, catalytic recombiners provide a means to passively and reliably limit hydrogen combustion to a continuous oxidation process with virtually no potential for containment failure in passive advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). (author)

  9. Development of simultaneous hyperspectral coherent Raman imaging for advancing reduced emission combustion technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohlin, G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Overall aim and key objectives Advances in optical imaging techniques over the past decades have revolutionized our ability to study chemically reactive flows encountered in air-breathing combustion systems. Emerging technology for unravelling clean- and efficient

  10. Advances for laser ignition of internal combustion and rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.

    2011-01-01

    The scope of the PhD thesis presented here is the investigation of theoretical and practical aspects of laser-induced spark ignition and laser thermal ignition. Laser ignition systems are currently undergoing a rapidly development with growing intensity involving more and more research groups who mainly concentrate on the field of car and large combustion engines. This research is primarily driven by the engagement to meet the increasingly strict emission limits and by the intention to use the limited energy reserves more efficiently. For internal combustion engines, laser plasma-induced ignition will allow to combine the goals for legally required reductions of pollutant emissions and higher engine efficiencies. Also for rocket engines laser ignition turns out to be very attractive. A highly reliable ignition system like laser ignition would represent an option for introducing non-toxic propellants in order to replace highly toxic and carcinogenic hydrazine-based propellants commonly used in launch vehicle upper stages and satellites. The most important results on laser ignition and laser plasma generation, accomplished by the author and, in some respects, enriched by cooperation with colleagues are presented in the following. The emphasis of this thesis is placed on the following issues: - Two-color effects on laser plasma generation - Theoretical considerations about the focal volume concerning plasma generation - Plasma transmission experiments - Ignition experiments on laser-induced ignition - Ignition experiments on thermally-induced ignition - Feasibility study on laser ignition of rocket engines The purpose of the two-color laser plasma experiments is to investigate possible constructive interference effects of driving fields that are not monochromatic, but contain (second) harmonic radiation with respect to the goal of lowering the plasma generation threshold. Such effects have been found in a number of related processes, such as laser ablation or high

  11. Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandsburger, U.; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roe, L.A.

    1995-10-01

    During the second half of fiscal year 1995 progress was made in all three funded subject areas of the project as well as in a new area. Work in the area of mixing and combustion management through flow actuation was transferred into an enclosed facility. Jet mixing in a ducted co-flow was examined. The same jets were also subjected to a strong acoustic field established in the duct. Excitation of the jet with static spatial modes was shown to be effective even in the presence of co-flow and the acoustic field. Only when a wall is placed at the jet exit plane did the acoustic field dominate the jet dispersion (as expected due to reflective boundary conditions and the jet shear layer receptivity). This case is, however, not the most relevant to gas turbine combustors since it precludes co-flow. In the area of combustor testing, the design, fabrication, and assembly of a modular combustor test rig for project has been completed at the University of Arkansas. In the area of high temperature piezoceramic actuator materials development, Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} powders have been synthesized, and bulk samples and thick films sintered. These materials have a curie temperature of about 1400{degrees}C compared with 300{degrees}C for the commercially available PZT. While at room temperature the new materials show a piezoelectric constant (d{sub 33}) which is a factor of 100 lower than PZT, at high temperatures they can exhibit significant action. A new area of non-linear, neural-net based, controllers for mixing and combustion control has been added during the second contract year. This work is not funded by the contract. Significant progress was made in this area. Neural nets with up to 15 neurons in the hidden layer were trained with experimental data and also with data generated using linear stability theory. System ID was performed successfully. The network was then used to predict the behavior of jets excited at other modes not used for the training.

  12. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIME) is a modification of the basic PDRE concept, developed by Cambier (1998), which has the potential for performance improvements based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thrust augmentation. The PDRIME has the advantage of both low combustion chamber seeding pressure, per the PDRE concept, and efficient energy distribution in the system, per the rocket-induced MHD ejector (RIME) concept of Cole, et al. (1995). In the initial part of this thesis, we explore flow and performance characteristics of different configurations of the PDRIME, assuming quasi-one-dimensional transient flow and global representations of the effects of MHD phenomena on the gas dynamics. By utilizing high-order accurate solvers, we thus are able to investigate the fundamental physical processes associated with the PDRIME and PDRE concepts and identify potentially promising operating regimes. In the second part of this investigation, the detailed coupling of detonations and electric and magnetic fields are explored. First, a one-dimensional spark-ignited detonation with complex reaction kinetics is fully evaluated and the mechanisms for the different instabilities are analyzed. It is found that complex kinetics in addition to sufficient spatial resolution are required to be able to quantify high frequency as well as low frequency detonation instability modes. Armed with this quantitative understanding, we then examine the interaction of a propagating detonation and the applied MHD, both in one-dimensional and two

  13. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Pollutants from Combustion Formation and Impact on Atmospheric Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This volume is based on the lectures presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute: (ASI) «Pollutants Formation from Combustion. Formation Mechanisms and Impact on th th Atmospheric Chemistry» held in Maratea, Italy, from 13 to 26 september 1998. Preservation of the environment is of increasing concern in individual countries but also at continental or world scales. The structure of a NATO ASI which involve lecturers and participants of different nationalities was thought as especially well suited to address environmental issues. As combustion is known to substantially contribute to the damaging of the atmosphere, it was natural to concentrate the ASI program on reviewing the currently available knowledge of the formation mechanisms of the main pollutants liberated by combustion systems. In most situations, pollutants are present as trace components and their formation and removal is strongly conditioned by the chemical reactions initiated by fuel consumption. Therefore specific lectures were aimed at defi...

  15. Advanced technique for computing fuel combustion properties in pulverized-fuel fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R. (Vsesoyuznyi Teplotekhnicheskii Institut (Russian Federation))

    1992-03-01

    Reviews foreign technical reports on advanced techniques for computing fuel combustion properties in pulverized-fuel fired boilers and analyzes a technique developed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. (USA). Characteristics of 25 fuel types, including 19 grades of coal, are listed along with a diagram of an installation with a drop tube furnace. Characteristics include burn-out intensity curves obtained using thermogravimetric analysis for high-volatile bituminous, semi-bituminous and coking coal. The patented LFP-SKM mathematical model is used to model combustion of a particular fuel under given conditions. The model allows for fuel particle size, air surplus, load, flame height, and portion of air supplied as tertiary blast. Good agreement between computational and experimental data was observed. The method is employed in designing new boilers as well as converting operating boilers to alternative types of fuel. 3 refs.

  16. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R; Joutsenoja, T [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    A fibre-optic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurised reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverised coal particles at the pressurised entrained flow reactor of VTT Energy in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made in order to study the effects of oxygen concentration (3-30 vol%) and pressure (0.2-1.0 MPa) on the particle temperature. The fuels used in the experiments were Westerholt, Polish and Goettelborn hvb coals, Gardanne lignite and Niederberg anthracite. The initial nominal fuel particle size varied in the experiments from 70 to 250 ,{mu}m and the gas temperature was typically 1173 K. For the anthracite also the effects of gas temperature (1073-1423K) and CO{sub 2} concentration (6-80 vol%) were studied. In Orleans a fibreoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor of CNRS and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. The fuel in the experiments was pulverised Goettelborn char. The reliability of optical temperature measurement in this particular application was analysed. In Essen a fibre-optic pyrometric technique that is capable to measure bed and fuel particle temperatures was applied to an atmospheric fluidised bed reactor of DMT. The effects of oxygen concentration (3-8 vol%) and bed temperature (1123-1193 K) on the fuel particle temperature were studied. The fuels in these were Westerholt coal and char and EBV-coal. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belonged to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme (contract JOU2-CT93-0331). (orig.)

  17. Pyrometric fuel particle measurements in pressurised reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Joutsenoja, T. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    A fiberoptic two-colour pyrometric technique for fuel particle temperature and size measurement is modified and applied to three pressurized reactors of different type in Finland, Germany and France. A modification of the pyrometric method for simultaneous in situ measurement of the temperature and size of individual pulverized coal particles at the pressurized entrained flow reactor in Jyvaeskylae was developed and several series of measurements were made. In Orleans a fiberoptic pyrometric device was installed to a pressurised thermogravimetric reactor and the two-colour temperatures of fuel samples were measured. Some results of these measurements are presented. The project belongs to EU`s Joule 2 extension research programme. (author)

  18. International cooperative research project between NEDO and NASA on advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes an international cooperative research project between NEDO and NASA on advanced combustion science utilizing microgravity. In June, 1994, NEDO and NASA reached a basic agreement with each other about this cooperative R and D on combustion under microgravity conditions. In fiscal 2000, Japan proposed an experiment using the drop tower facilities and parabolic aircraft at NASA Glen Research Center and at JAMIC (Japan Microgravity Center). In other words, the proposals from Japan included experiments on combustion of droplets composed of diversified fuels under different burning conditions (vaporization), flame propagation in smoldering porous materials and dispersed particles under microgravity conditions, and control of interactive combustion of two droplets by acoustical and electrical perturbations. Additionally proposed were experiments on effect of low external air flow on solid material combustion under microgravity, and sooting and radiation effects on the burning of large droplets under microgravity conditions. This report gives an outline of the results of these five cooperative R and D projects. The experiments were conducted under ordinary normal gravity and microgravity conditions, with the results compared and examined mutually. (NEDO)

  19. Advanced Combustion Diagnostics and Control for Furnaces, Fired Heaters and Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tate, J. D.; Le, Linh D.; Knittel,Trevor; Cowie, Alan

    2010-03-20

    The objective of this project was to develop and apply enabling tools and methods towards advanced combustion diagnostics and control of fired-equipment in large-scale petrochemical manufacturing. There are a number of technology gaps and opportunities for combustion optimization, including technologies involving advanced in-situ measurements, modeling, and thermal imaging. These technologies intersect most of manufacturing and energy systems within the chemical industry. This project leveraged the success of a previous DOE funded project led by Dow, where we co-developed an in-situ tunable diode laser (TDL) analyzer platform (with Analytical Specialties Inc, now owned by Yokogawa Electric Corp.). The TDL platform has been tested and proven in a number of combustion processes within Dow and outside of Dow. The primary focus of this project was on combustion diagnostics and control applied towards furnaces, fired heaters and boilers. Special emphasis was placed on the development and application of in-situ measurements for O2, CO and methane since these combustion gases are key variables in optimizing and controlling combustion processes safely. Current best practice in the industry relies on measurements that suffer from serious performance gaps such as limited sampling volume (point measurements), poor precision and accuracy, and poor reliability. Phase I of the project addressed these gaps by adding improved measurement capabilities such as CO and methane (ppm analysis at combustion zone temperatures) as well as improved optics to maintain alignment over path lengths up to 30 meters. Proof-of-concept was demonstrated on a modern olefins furnace located at Dow Chemical's facility in Freeport TX where the improved measurements were compared side-by-side to accepted best practice techniques (zirconium oxide and catalytic bead or thick film sensors). After developing and installing the improved combustion measurements (O2, CO, and methane), we also demonstrated

  20. Modelling the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod; Etude de l'impact de la fissuration des combustibles nucleaires oxyde sur le comportement normal et incidentel des crayons combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfer, Th

    2006-03-15

    This thesis aims to model the cracking of pressurised water reactor fuel pellets and its consequences on the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod. Fuel cracking has two main consequences. It relieves the stress in the pellet, upon which the majority of the mechanical and physico-chemical phenomena are dependent. It also leads to pellet fragmentation. Taking fuel cracking into account is therefore necessary to adequately predict the mechanical loading of the cladding during the course of an irradiation. The local approach to fracture was chosen to describe fuel pellet cracking. Practical considerations brought us to favour a quasi-static description of fuel cracking by means of a local damage models. These models describe the appearance of cracks by a local loss of rigidity of the material. Such a description leads to numerical difficulties, such as mesh dependency of the results and abrupt changes in the equilibrium state of the mechanical structure during unstable crack propagations. A particular attention was paid to these difficulties because they condition the use of such models in engineering studies. This work was performed within the framework of the ALCYONE fuel performance package developed at CEA/DEC/SESC which relies on the PLEIADES software platform. ALCYONE provides users with various approaches for modelling nuclear fuel behaviour, which differ in terms of the type geometry considered for the fuel rod. A specific model was developed and implemented to describe fuel cracking for each of these approaches. The 2D axisymmetric fuel rod model is the most innovative and was particularly studied. We show that it is able to assess, thanks to an appropriate description of fuel cracking, the main geometrical changes of the fuel rod occurring under normal and off-normal operating conditions. (author)

  1. Advanced combustion, emission control, health impacts, and fuels merit review and peer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-10-01

    This report is a summary and analysis of comments from the Advisory Panel at the FY 2006 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, held May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory. The work evaluated in this document supports the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE in making its funding decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

  2. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  3. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  4. Development of Computational Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Steven; Rapp, Robert

    2014-08-31

    A comprehensive corrosion research project consisting of pilot-scale combustion testing and long-term laboratory corrosion study has been successfully performed. A pilot-scale combustion facility available at Brigham Young University was selected and modified to enable burning of pulverized coals under the operating conditions typical for advanced coal-fired utility boilers. Eight United States (U.S.) coals were selected for this investigation, with the test conditions for all coals set to have the same heat input to the combustor. In addition, the air/fuel stoichiometric ratio was controlled so that staged combustion was established, with the stoichiometric ratio maintained at 0.85 in the burner zone and 1.15 in the burnout zone. The burner zone represented the lower furnace of utility boilers, while the burnout zone mimicked the upper furnace areas adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters. From this staged combustion, approximately 3% excess oxygen was attained in the combustion gas at the furnace outlet. During each of the pilot-scale combustion tests, extensive online measurements of the flue gas compositions were performed. In addition, deposit samples were collected at the same location for chemical analyses. Such extensive gas and deposit analyses enabled detailed characterization of the actual combustion environments existing at the lower furnace walls under reducing conditions and those adjacent to the superheaters and reheaters under oxidizing conditions in advanced U.S. coal-fired utility boilers. The gas and deposit compositions were then carefully simulated in a series of 1000-hour laboratory corrosion tests, in which the corrosion performances of different commercial candidate alloys and weld overlays were evaluated at various temperatures for advanced boiler systems. Results of this laboratory study led to significant improvement in understanding of the corrosion mechanisms operating on the furnace walls as well as superheaters and reheaters in

  5. Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Reliability, Availability & Maintainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Angello

    2005-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established Operation and Maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that, in real time, interpret data to assess the 'total health' of combustion turbines. The 'Combustion Turbine Health Management System' (CTHMS) will consist of a series of 'Dynamic Link Library' (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. CTHMS interprets sensor and instrument outputs, correlates them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, the CTHMS enables real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

  6. Transient dynamic crack propagation in gas pressurised pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldis, E.S.; Owen, D.R.J.; Taylor, C.

    1983-01-01

    The prime limitation of dynamic fracture analysis is the lack of a fundamental crack advance theory which can be easily and economically adopted for use with numerical models. The necessity for the inclusion of inertia effects in the solution of certain problem classes is now evident, but most transient dynamic fracture models considered to date include (of necessity) some intuitive/empirical parameters with a frequent need of a priori knowledge of experimental solutions. The particular problem considered in this study is Mode I transient dynamic crack propagation in gas pressurised pipelines. The steel pipe is modelled using thin shell Semiloof finite elements and its transient response is coupled to a one-dimensional finite element model of the compressible gas equations, incorporating a lateral gas flow parameter. The pipe is governed by the usual dynamic equilibrium equation which is discretised in the time domain by a central difference explicit algorithm. The compressible gas response is modelled by the Continuity and Momentum equations and time discretisation is performed by means of a fully backward difference scheme in time. (orig./GL)

  7. Advanced exergoenvironmental analysis of a near-zero emission power plant with chemical looping combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulou, Fontina; Tsatsaronis, George; Morosuk, Tatiana

    2012-03-06

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) from power plants can be used to mitigate CO(2) emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. However, CCS technologies are energy intensive, decreasing the operating efficiency of a plant and increasing its costs. Recently developed advanced exergy-based analyses can uncover the potential for improvement of complex energy conversion systems, as well as qualify and quantify plant component interactions. In this paper, an advanced exergoenvironmental analysis is used for the first time as means to evaluate an oxy-fuel power plant with CO(2) capture. The environmental impacts of each component are split into avoidable/unavoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts. In an effort to minimize the environmental impact of the plant operation, we focus on the avoidable part of the impact (which is also split into endogenous and exogenous parts) and we seek ways to decrease it. The results of the advanced exergoenvironmental analysis show that the majority of the environmental impact related to the exergy destruction of individual components is unavoidable and endogenous. Thus, the improvement potential is rather limited, and the interactions of the components are of lower importance. The environmental impact of construction of the components is found to be significantly lower than that associated with their operation; therefore, our suggestions for improvement focus on measures concerning the reduction of exergy destruction and pollutant formation.

  8. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  9. Gasification of sawdust in pressurised internally circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, R.; Lindblom, M. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A test plant for pressurised gasification of biofuels in a internally circulating fluidized bed has been built at the department of Chemical Engineering II at the University of Lund. The design performance is set to maximum 20 bar and 1 050 deg C at a thermal input of 100 kW or a maximum fuel input of 18 kg/in. The primary task is to study pressurised gasification of biofuels in relation to process requirements of the IGCC concept (integrated gasification combined cycle processes), which includes studies in different areas of hot gas clean-up in reducing atmosphere for gas turbine applications. (orig.)

  10. Gasification of sawdust in pressurised internally circulating fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maartensson, R; Lindblom, M [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    A test plant for pressurised gasification of biofuels in a internally circulating fluidized bed has been built at the department of Chemical Engineering II at the University of Lund. The design performance is set to maximum 20 bar and 1 050 deg C at a thermal input of 100 kW or a maximum fuel input of 18 kg/in. The primary task is to study pressurised gasification of biofuels in relation to process requirements of the IGCC concept (integrated gasification combined cycle processes), which includes studies in different areas of hot gas clean-up in reducing atmosphere for gas turbine applications. (orig.)

  11. Linkages from DOE’s Vehicle Technologies R&D in Advanced Combustion to More Efficient, Cleaner-Burning Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting Inc., Emerald Isle, NC (United States); Thomas, Patrick [1790 Analytics LLC., Haddonfield, NC (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This report uses bibliometric analysis, supported by interview and review of documents and databases, to trace linkages from knowledge outputs resulting from DOE's advances in vehicle engine combustion to downstream innovations in commercial diesel engines and other areas. This analysis covers the period from 1974 through 2008 (and in some cases to early 2009).

  12. Optimization of a Gas Switching Combustion process through advanced heat management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloete, Schalk; Zaabout, Abdelghafour; Romano, Matteo C.; Chiesa, Paolo; Lozza, Giovanni; Gallucci, Fausto; Sint Annaland, Martin van; Amini, Shahriar

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • GSC is a promising new reactor concept for power production with cost effective CO 2 capture. • The standalone fluidized bed reactors employed will allow for easy process scale-up. • The GSC simple configuration achieves higher efficiencies than conventional solutions. • Further increases in efficiency can be achieved via advanced heat management. • The 41.9% maximum efficiency is in line with other CLC–IGCC configurations. - Abstract: Gas Switching Combustion (GSC) is a promising new process concept for energy efficient power production with integrated CO 2 capture. In comparison to conventional Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) carried out in interconnected fluidized beds, the GSC concept will be substantially easier to design and scale up, especially for pressurized conditions. One potential drawback of the GSC concept is the gradual temperature variation over the transient process cycle, which leads to a drop in electric efficiency of the plant. This article investigates heat management strategies to mitigate this issue both through simulations and experiments. Simulation studies of the GSC concept integrated into an IGCC power plant show that heat management using a nitrogen recycle stream can increase plant efficiency by 3 percentage points to 41.6% while maintaining CO 2 capture ratios close to 90%. Reactive multiphase flow simulations of the GSC reactor also showed that heat management can eliminate fuel slip problems. In addition, the GSC concept offers the potential to remove the need for a nitrogen recycle stream by implementing a concentrated air injection that extracts heat while only a small percentage of oxygen reacts. Experiments have shown that, similar to nitrogen recycle, this strategy reduces transient temperature variations across the cycle and therefore merits further investigation.

  13. Assessment of RANS CFD modelling for pressurised thermal shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander M Willemsen; Ed MJ Komen; Sander Willemsen

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The most severe Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) scenario is a cold water Emergency Core Coolant (ECC) injection into the cold leg during a LOCA. The injected ECC water mixes with the hot fluid present in the cold leg and flows towards the downcomer where further mixing takes place. When the cold mixture comes into contact with the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall, it may lead to large temperature gradients and consequently to high stresses in the RPV wall. Knowledge of these thermal loads is important for RPV remnant life assessments. The existing thermal-hydraulic system codes currently applied for this purpose are based on one-dimensional approximations and can, therefore, not predict the complex three-dimensional flows occurring during ECC injection. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be applied to predict these phenomena, with the ultimate benefit of improved remnant RPV life assessment. The present paper presents an assessment of various Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) CFD approaches for modeling the complex mixing phenomena occurring during ECC injection. This assessment has been performed by comparing the numerical results obtained using advanced turbulence models available in the CFX 5.6 CFD code in combination with a hybrid meshing strategy with experimental results of the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). The UPTF was a full-scale 'simulation' of the primary system of the four loop 1300 MWe Siemens/KWU Pressurised Water Reactor at Grafenrheinfeld. The test vessel upper plenum internals, downcomer and primary coolant piping were replicas of the reference plant, while other components, such as core, coolant pump and steam generators were replaced by simulators. From the extensive test programme, a single-phase fluid-fluid mixing experiment in the cold leg and downcomer was selected. Prediction of the mixing and stratification is assessed by comparison with the measured temperature profiles at several locations

  14. Fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, T.; Kudjoi, A.; Hippinen, I.; Heinolainen, A.; Suominen, M.; Lu Yong [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Lab of Energy Economics and Power Plant Engineering

    1996-12-01

    Partial gasification processes have been presented as possibilities for future power production. In the processes, the solid materials removed from a gasifier (i.e. fly ash and bed material) contain unburnt fuel and the fuel conversion is increased by burning this gasification residue either in an atmospheric or a pressurised fluidised-bed. In this project, which is a part of European JOULE 2 EXTENSION research programme, the main research objectives are the behaviour of calcium and sulphur compounds in solids and the emissions of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurised fluidised-bed combustion of gasification residues. (author)

  15. Fuel Combustion Laboratory | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion Laboratory Fuel Combustion Laboratory NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the combustion chamber platform for fuel ignition kinetics research, was acquired to expand the lab's

  16. Advances in Turbulent Combustion Dynamics Simulations in Bluff-Body Stabilized Flames-Body Stabilized Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    during combustion for GRI -Mech 1.2 reaction mechanism using LEM and CHEMKIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.7 Comparison of temperature during...combustion for GRI -Mech 1.2 raction mechanism using LEM and CHEMKIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 3.8 The methane profile along the 5 mm long...combustion process was tested using GRI -Mech 1.2 [44]. GRI -Mech is an optimized detailed chemical reaction mechanism capable of the best representation of

  17. Development and testing of on-line analytical instrumentation for alkali and heavy metal release in pressurised conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R; Haeyrinen, V; Oikari, R [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the project is to demonstrate in industrial conditions and further develop the continuous alkali measurement method plasma excited alkali resonance line spectroscopy (PEARLS) developed at Tampere University of Technology (TUT). The demonstration takes place in joint measuring campaigns, where two other continuous alkali measurement methods, ELIF and surface ionisation, are being simultaneously demonstrated. A modification of PEARLS will also be developed for the continuous measurement of heavy metal concentrations. A market study of continuous measuring techniques for alkali and heavy metals is further part of the project. The method will be demonstrated in two pressurised fluidised bed combustion facilities. One of these is the 10 MW PCFB of Foster Wheeler Energia Oy in Karhula. The second one is yet to be decided. The first measuring campaign is scheduled for the spring of 1997 in Karhula. In 1996 the group at TUT participated in the performance of a market study regarding continuous measuring techniques for alkali and heavy metal concentrations. A draft report was submitted to and approved by the EC. Development work on PEARLS in 1996 has centered around the construction of a calibration device for alkali measurements. The device can be used by all three measuring techniques in the project to check readings against a known alkali concentration at controlled and known conditions. In 1996 PEARLS was applied for alkali measurement at several pressurised combustion installations of laboratory and industrial pilot scale

  18. Advanced Optical Diagnostic Methods for Describing Fuel Injection and Combustion Flowfield Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Randy J.; Hicks, Yolanda R.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade advanced optical diagnostic techniques have evolved and matured to a point where they are now widely applied in the interrogation of high pressure combusting flows. At NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), imaging techniques have been used successfully in on-going work to develop the next generation of commercial aircraft gas turbine combustors. This work has centered on providing a means by which researchers and designers can obtain direct visual observation and measurements of the fuel injection/mixing/combustion processes and combustor flowfield in two- and three-dimensional views at actual operational conditions. Obtaining a thorough understanding of the chemical and physical processes at the extreme operating conditions of the next generation of combustors is critical to reducing emissions and increasing fuel efficiency. To accomplish this and other tasks, the diagnostic team at GRC has designed and constructed optically accessible, high pressurer high temperature flame tubes and sectar rigs capable of optically probing the 20-60 atm flowfields of these aero-combustors. Among the techniques employed at GRC are planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) for imaging molecular species as well as liquid and gaseous fuel; planar light scattering (PLS) for imaging fuel sprays and droplets; and spontaneous Raman scattering for species and temperature measurement. Using these techniques, optical measurements never before possible have been made in the actual environments of liquid fueled gas turbines. 2-D mapping of such parameters as species (e.g. OH-, NO and kerosene-based jet fuel) distribution, injector spray angle, and fuel/air distribution are just some of the measurements that are now routinely made. Optical imaging has also provided prompt feedback to researchers regarding the effects of changes in the fuel injector configuration on both combustor performance and flowfield character. Several injector design modifications and improvements have

  19. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  20. Force-deflection analysis of offset indentations on pressurised pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, T.H.; Luo, R.; Becker, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    The indenter force vs. deflection characteristics of pressurised pipes with long offset indentations under plane strain conditions have been investigated using finite element (FE) and analytical methods with four experimental tests performed on aluminium rings. Two different materials and five different geometries were used to investigate their effects on the elastic-plastic behaviour. A comparison of the experimental, FE and the analytical results indicates that the analytical formulation developed in this paper, for predicting the force-deflection curves for pressurised pipes with offset indenters, is reasonably accurate. Also, all of the analyses presented in this paper indicate that by using a representative flow stress, which is defined as the average of the yield and ultimate tensile stresses, the analytical method can accurately predict the force-deflection curves

  1. Combustion synthesis of advanced materials. [using in-situ infiltration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. J.; Feng, H. J.; Perkins, N.; Readey, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The combustion synthesis of ceramic-metal composites using an in-situ liquid infiltration technique is described. The effect of varying the reactants and their stoichiometry to provide a range of reactant and product species i.e. solids, liquids and gases, with varying physical properties e.g. thermal conductivity, on the microstructure and morphology of synthesized products is also described. Alternatively, conducting the combustion synthesis reaction in a reactive gas environment is also discussed, in which advantages can be gained from the synergistic effects of combustion synthesis and vapor phase transport. In each case, the effect of the presence or absence of gravity (density) driven fluid flow and vapor transport is discussed as is the potential for producing new and perhaps unique materials by conducting these SHS reactions under microgravity conditions.

  2. Recent advances in the use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Two major coal combustion problems are the formation and build-up of slag deposits on heat transfer surfaces and the production and control of toxic species in coal combustion emissions. The use of synchrotron radiation for the analysis of coal combustion products can play a role in the better understanding of both these phenomena. An understanding of the chemical composition of such slags under boiler operating conditions and as a function of the mineral composition of various coals is one ultimate goal of this program. The principal constituents in the ash of many coals are the oxides of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, K, S, and Na. The analytical method required must be able to determine the functional forms of all these elements both in coal and in coal ash at elevated temperatures. One unique way of conducting these analyses is by x-ray spectroscopy.

  3. Systematic design of an intra-cycle fueling control system for advanced diesel combustion concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kefalidis, L.

    2017-01-01

    This technical report presents a systematic approach for the design and development of an intra-cycle fueling control system for diesel combustion concepts. A high level system was developed and implemented on an experimental engine setup. Implementation and experimental validation are performed for

  4. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  5. Advanced Laser-Based Techniques for Gas-Phase Diagnostics in Combustion and Aerospace Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehn, Andreas; Zhu, Jiajian; Li, Xuesong; Kiefer, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    Gaining information of species, temperature, and velocity distributions in turbulent combustion and high-speed reactive flows is challenging, particularly for conducting measurements without influencing the experimental object itself. The use of optical and spectroscopic techniques, and in particular laser-based diagnostics, has shown outstanding abilities for performing non-intrusive in situ diagnostics. The development of instrumentation, such as robust lasers with high pulse energy, ultra-short pulse duration, and high repetition rate along with digitized cameras exhibiting high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and frame rates on the order of MHz, has opened up for temporally and spatially resolved volumetric measurements of extreme dynamics and complexities. The aim of this article is to present selected important laser-based techniques for gas-phase diagnostics focusing on their applications in combustion and aerospace engineering. Applicable laser-based techniques for investigations of turbulent flows and combustion such as planar laser-induced fluorescence, Raman and Rayleigh scattering, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, laser-induced grating scattering, particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler anemometry, and tomographic imaging are reviewed and described with some background physics. In addition, demands on instrumentation are further discussed to give insight in the possibilities that are offered by laser flow diagnostics.

  6. Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Smutzer

    2010-01-31

    Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order

  7. Advanced light water reactor program at ABB-Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, H.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of Electric Utilities ordering nuclear power plants in the 1990s, ABB-Combustion Engineering is developing two designs which will meet EPRI consensus requirements and new licensing issues. The System 80 Plus design is an evolutionary pressurized water reactor plant modelled after the successful System 80 design in operation in Palo Verde and under construction in Korea. System Plus is currently under review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with final design approval expected in 1991 and design certification in 1992. The Safe Integral Reactor (SIR) plant is a smaller facility with passive safety features and modular construction intended for design certification in the late 1990s. (author)

  8. ADVANCED MONITORING TO IMPROVE COMBUSTION TURBINE/COMBINED CYCLE CT/(CC) RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY AND MAINTAINABILITY (RAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Angello

    2003-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established operation and maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. Such systems would interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to the machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, forward projections of servicing intervals, estimate remaining component life, and identify faults. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that will, in real time, interpret data to assess the ''total health'' of combustion turbines. The Combustion Turbine Health Management System (CTHM) will consist of a series of dynamic link library (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. The CTHM system will be a significant improvement over currently available techniques for turbine monitoring and diagnostics. CTHM will interpret sensor and instrument outputs, correlate them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, it will enable real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical

  9. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system -- combustion development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCren, R.T.

    1994-06-01

    This topical report summarizes the combustor development work accomplished under the subject contract. The objective was to develop a combustion system for the Solar 4MW Type H Centaur gas turbine generator set which was to be used to demonstrate the economic, technical and environmental feasibility of a direct coal-fueled gas turbine in a 100 hour proof-of-concept test. This program started with a design configuration derived during the CSC program. The design went through the following evolution: CSC design which had some known shortcomings, redesigned CSC now designated as the Two Stage Slagging Combustor (TSSC), improved TSSC with the PRIS evaluated in the IBSTF, and full scale design. Supporting and complimentary activities included computer modelling, flow visualization, slag removal, SO{sub x} removal, fuel injector development and fuel properties evaluation. Three combustor rigs were utilized: the TSSC, the IBSTF and the full scale rig at Peoria. The TSSC rig, which was 1/10th scale of the proposed system, consisted of a primary and secondary zone and was used to develop the primary zone performance and to evaluate SO{sub x} and slag removal and fuel properties variations. The IBSTF rig which included all the components of the proposed system was also 1/10th scale except for the particulate removal system which was about 1/30th scale. This rig was used to verify combustor performance data obtained on the TSSC and to develop the PRIS and the particulate removal system. The full scale rig initially included the primary and secondary zones and was later modified to incorporate the PRIS. The purpose of the full scale testing was to verify the scale up calculations and to provide a combustion system for the proof-of-concept engine test that was initially planned in the program.

  10. Advanced exergy analysis for a bottoming organic rankine cycle coupled to an internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, J.; Ruiz, S.; Dolz, V.; Royo-Pascual, L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Advanced exergy analysis were carried out using experimental data of an ORC. • Exergy destruction analyzed as endogenous/exogenous and unavoidable/avoidable. • Exergy destruction was estimated by considering technological restrictions. - Abstract: This paper deals with the evaluation and analysis of a bottoming ORC cycle coupled to an IC engine by means of conventional and advanced exergy analysis. Using experimental data of an ORC coupled to a 2 l turbocharged engine, both conventional and advanced exergy analysis are carried out. Splitting the exergy in the advanced exergy analysis into unavoidable and avoidable provides a measure of the potential of improving the efficiency of this component. On the other hand, splitting the exergy into endogenous and exogenous provides information between interactions among system components. The result of this study shows that there is a high potential of improvement in this type of cycles. Although, from the conventional analysis, the exergy destruction rate of boiler is greater than the one of the expander, condenser and pump, the advanced exergy analysis suggests that the first priority of improvement should be given to the expander, followed by the pump, the condenser and the boiler. A total amount of 3.75 kW (36.5%) of exergy destruction rate could be lowered, taking account that only the avoidable part of the exergy destruction rate can be reduced.

  11. Advanced CFD modelling of air and recycled flue gas staging in a waste wood-fired grate boiler for higher combustion efficiency and greater environmental benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajh, Boštjan; Yin, Chungen; Samec, Niko; Hriberšek, Matjaž; Kokalj, Filip; Zadravec, Matej

    2018-07-15

    Grate-fired boilers are commonly used to burn biomass/wastes for heat and power production. In spite of the recent breakthrough in integration of advanced secondary air systems in grate boilers, grate-firing technology needs to be advanced for higher efficiency and lower emissions. In this paper, innovative staging of combustion air and recycled flue gas in a 13 MW th waste wood-fired grate boiler is comprehensively studied based on a numerical model that has been previously validated. In particular, the effects of the jet momentum, position and orientation of the combustion air and recycled flue gas streams on in-furnace mixing, combustion and pollutant emissions from the boiler are examined. It is found that the optimized air and recycled flue gas jets remarkably enhance mixing and heat transfer, result in a more uniform temperature and velocity distribution, extend the residence time of the combustibles in the hot zone and improve burnout in the boiler. Optimizing the air and recycled flue gas jet configuration can reduce carbon monoxide emission from the boiler by up to 86%, from the current 41.0 ppm to 5.7 ppm. The findings of this study can serve as useful guidelines for novel design and optimization of the combustion air supply and flue gas recycling for grate boilers of this type. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  13. Fiscal 1993-1998 integrated research report. R and D on advanced combustion technology under microgravity environment; 1993 - 1998 nendo sogo seika hokokusho. Bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita kodo nensho gijutsu soshutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    For developing advanced combustion technology by using JAMIC's facility, the advanced combustion technology research committee supported by researchers of universities, national institutes and industries was prepared in JSUP, and R and D using a microgravity experiment facility and the international joint research with NASA were carried out. By using the advanced experimental equipment and measuring instrument developed for microgravity experiments, studies were made on combustion and evaporation of fuel droplets, combustion characteristics of dense fuel, flammability limit and NO{sub x} generation mechanism, and such precious results were obtained as storage of abundant experimental data, explication of a combustion mechanism, preparation of a database and find of new phenomena. In the ground verification experiment using the newly fabricated advanced combustor test equipment, various data effective for developing high-efficiency low-pollution combustors were obtained. Through the joint research with NASA including 5 themes, various results and the real relationship between the researchers were also obtained. (NEDO)

  14. Advanced Heat Exchanger for Combustion/Gasification Task 3; Development of Ammonia Removal Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Magnus; Espenaes, Bengt-Goeran [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Studsvik (Sweden)

    2003-03-01

    The report contains two parts. The first part is a review on the different ammonia removal options that can be considered in gasification of solid fuels. Issues discussed are the formation of nitrogen compounds in the gasifier and measures that can be taken to reduce the formation of such compounds, gas cleaning options at high temperature, low temperature cleaning and low NO{sub x} combustion in turbine applications. The second part presents experimental work on the kinetics of decomposition of ammonia by two nickel catalysts in a simulated fuel gas. The conditions used for the most thoroughly investigated catalyst included concentrations of H{sub 2}S from 22 ppm to 800 ppm, temperature from 76 deg C to 950 deg C, and total pressure at 1, 4 and 20 bar. The influence from H{sub 2}S on the reaction rate of ammonia at atmospheric pressure was found to be qualitatively different at low and at high concentrations of sulphur. The activity decreased at increase of the H{sub 2}S concentration up to about 200 ppm. A minimum of activity was obtained at about 200-300 ppm H{sub 2}S, and the activity increased again at further increase of the H{sub 2}S content. A more detailed investigation was performed for the low concentration range up to about 200 ppm at 1 and at 4 bar. The deactivation by H{sub 2}S is only partly reversible, and the activity that is attained when H{sub 2}S is removed depends strongly on which maximum concentration the catalyst has been exposed to. The nickel catalyst was found to convert ammonia in a raw fuel gas containing about 70 ppm H{sub 2}S at nearly the same rate as would be expected from the experimental data for the synthetic gas mixtures. Thus, there is not any important retarding effect from competition with the reactions that convert tar components and hydrocarbons simultaneously. The reaction rate of NH{sub 3} was compared to the reaction rate of methane found in a previous work, using the same catalyst. It was concluded that the size of a

  15. Evolution of Surface Nanopores in Pressurised Gyrospun Polymeric Microfibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Eranka Illangakoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of a solvent or solvent system and the ensuing polymer–solvent interactions are crucial factors affecting the preparation of fibers with multiple morphologies. A range of poly(methylmethacrylate fibers were prepared by pressurised gyration using acetone, chloroform, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF, ethyl acetate and dichloromethane as solvents. It was found that microscale fibers with surface nanopores were formed when using chloroform, ethyl acetate and dichloromethane and poreless fibers were formed when using acetone and DMF as the solvent. These observations are explained on the basis of the physical properties of the solvents and mechanisms of pore formation. The formation of porous fibers is caused by many solvent properties such as volatility, solubility parameters, vapour pressure and surface tension. Cross-sectional images show that the nanopores are only on the surface of the fibers and they were not inter-connected. Further, the results show that fibers with desired nanopores (40–400 nm can be prepared by carefully selecting the solvent and applied pressure in the gyration process.

  16. Design and Verification of Critical Pressurised Windows for Manned Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoure, Richard; Busto, Lara; Novo, Francisco; Sinnema, Gerben; Leal, Mendes M.

    2014-06-01

    The Window Design for Manned Spaceflight (WDMS) project was tasked with establishing the state-of-art and explore possible improvements to the current structural integrity verification and fracture control methodologies for manned spacecraft windows.A critical review of the state-of-art in spacecraft window design, materials and verification practice was conducted. Shortcomings of the methodology in terms of analysis, inspection and testing were identified. Schemes for improving verification practices and reducing conservatism whilst maintaining the required safety levels were then proposed.An experimental materials characterisation programme was defined and carried out with the support of the 'Glass and Façade Technology Research Group', at the University of Cambridge. Results of the sample testing campaign were analysed, post-processed and subsequently applied to the design of a breadboard window demonstrator.Two Fused Silica glass window panes were procured and subjected to dedicated analyses, inspection and testing comprising both qualification and acceptance programmes specifically tailored to the objectives of the activity.Finally, main outcomes have been compiled into a Structural Verification Guide for Pressurised Windows in manned spacecraft, incorporating best practices and lessons learned throughout this project.

  17. Heat and mass transfer in air-fed pressurised suits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesch, K.; Collins, M.W.; Karayiannis, T.G.; Atherton, M.A.; Edwards, P.

    2009-01-01

    Air-fed pressurised suits are used to protect workers against contamination and hazardous environments. The specific application here is the necessity for regular clean-up maintenance within the torus chamber of fusion reactors. The current design of suiting has been developed empirically. It is, therefore, very desirable to formulate a thermo-fluids model, which will be able to define optimum designs and operating parameters. Two factors indicate that the modelling should be as comprehensive as possible. Firstly, the overall thermo-fluids problem is three-dimensional and includes mass as well as heat transfer. The fluid field is complex, bounded on one side by the human body and on the other by what may be distensible, porous and multi-layer clothing. In this paper, we report firstly the modelling necessary for the additional mass and heat transport processes. This involves the use of Fick's and Fourier's laws and conjugate heat transfer. The results of an initial validation study are presented. Temperatures at the outlet of the suits were obtained experimentally and compared with those predicted by the overall CFD model. Realistic three-dimensional geometries were used for the suit and human body. Calculations were for turbulent flow with single- and two-component (species) models

  18. Conceptual design study and evaluation of an advanced treatment process applying a submerged combustion technique for spent solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Gunzo; Maeda, Mitsuru; Fijine, Sachio; Chida, Mitsuhisa; Kirishima, Kenji.

    1993-10-01

    An advanced treatment process based on a submerged combustion technique was proposed for spent solvents and the distillation residues containing transuranium (TRU) nuclides. A conceptual design study and the preliminary cost estimation of the treatment facility applying the process were conducted. Based on the results of the study, the process evaluation on the technical features, such as safety, volume reduction of TRU waste and economics was carried out. The key requirements for practical use were also summarized. It was shown that the process had the features as follows: the simplified treatment and solidification steps will not generate secondary aqueous wastes, the volume of TRU solid waste will be reduced less than one tenth of that of a reference technique (pyrolysis process), and the facility construction cost is less than 1 % of the total construction cost of a future large scale reprocessing plant. As for the low level wastes of calcium phosphate, it was shown that the further removal of β · γ nuclides with TRU nuclides from the wastes would be required for the safety in interim storage and transportation and for the load of shielding. (author)

  19. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placet, M.; Gerry, P.A.; Kenski, D.M.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the examination of potential overseas markets for using small-scale, US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technologies (ACTs). In previous work, member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on their potential for using ACTs through a comprehensive screening methodology. The three most promising OECD markets were found to be Spain, Italy, and Turkey. This report provides in-depth analyses of these three selected countries. First, it addresses changes in the European Community with particular reference to the 1992 restructuring and its potential effect on the energy situation in Europe, specifically in the three subject countries. It presents individual country studies that examine demographics, economics, building infrastructures, and energy-related factors. Potential niches for ACTs are explored for each country through regional analyses. Marketing channels, strategies, and the trading environments in each country are also discussed. The information gathered indicates that Turkey is a most promising market, Spain is a fairly promising market, and Italy appears to be a somewhat limited market for US ACTs. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline emissions in advanced engine technologies. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL's combustion research and combustion and engine research activities include: Developing experimental and simulation research platforms

  1. Fiscal 1998 research report. R and D on advanced combustion technology under microgravity environment; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita kodo nensho gijutsu soshutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Research was made on explication of a combustion phenomenon by using a microgravity facility, and a combustor possible to realize advanced combustion technology. In the basic research composed of 5 themes by the international joint research with NASA, 52 drop experiments using JAMIC's facility and 100 drop experiments using NASA's 2.2s drop tower were carried out. The themes are composed of an interaction in droplet arrays combustion, combustion of binary fuel sprays, combustion characteristics of solid fuel, flame dynamics around a lean flammability limit, and mass transfer around a combustion field. In the experiment using the microgravity experiment facility and analysis evaluation of the experimental data, studies were made on combustion and evaporation of fuel droplets, combustion characteristics of dense fuel, flammability limit, formation mechanism of NO{sub x} and an advanced combustor. For applying a pre-evaporating/pre- mixing combustion system to a combustor for aircraft engines, studies were made on some issues such as improvement of a combustion stability, NO{sub x} discharge characteristics, and optimum fuel atomizing. (NEDO)

  2. Fiscal 1998 research report. R and D on advanced combustion technology under microgravity environment; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho. Bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita kodo nensho gijutsu soshutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Research was made on explication of a combustion phenomenon by using a microgravity facility, and a combustor possible to realize advanced combustion technology. In the basic research composed of 5 themes by the international joint research with NASA, 52 drop experiments using JAMIC's facility and 100 drop experiments using NASA's 2.2s drop tower were carried out. The themes are composed of an interaction in droplet arrays combustion, combustion of binary fuel sprays, combustion characteristics of solid fuel, flame dynamics around a lean flammability limit, and mass transfer around a combustion field. In the experiment using the microgravity experiment facility and analysis evaluation of the experimental data, studies were made on combustion and evaporation of fuel droplets, combustion characteristics of dense fuel, flammability limit, formation mechanism of NO{sub x} and an advanced combustor. For applying a pre-evaporating/pre- mixing combustion system to a combustor for aircraft engines, studies were made on some issues such as improvement of a combustion stability, NO{sub x} discharge characteristics, and optimum fuel atomizing. (NEDO)

  3. Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BeerBeer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    greenhouse gas debate. This is adding the task of raising the thermodynamic efficiency of the power generating cycle to the existing demands for reduced pollutant emission. Reassessment of the long-term availability of natural gas, and the development of low NO{sub x} and highly efficient gas turbine-steam combined cycles made this mode of power generation greatly attractive also for base load operation. However, the real prize and challenge of power generation R&D remains to be the development of highly efficient and clean coal-fired systems. The most promising of these include pulverised coal combustion in a supercritical steam boiler, pressurised fluid bed combustion without or with topping combustion, air heater gas turbine-steam combined cycle, and integrated gasification combined cycle. In the longer term, catalytic combustion in gas turbines and coal gasification-fuel cell systems hold out promise for even lower emissions and higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency. The present state of these advanced power-generating cycles together with their potential for application in the near future is discussed, and the key role of combustion science and technology as a guide in their continuing development highlighted. (Author)

  4. Advanced closed loop combustion control of a LTC diesel engine based on in-cylinder pressure signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, A.P.; Laforgia, D.; Motz, S.; Saracino, R.; Wenzel, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We have proposed an in-cylinder pressure-based closed loop combustion control. • We have tested the control on an engine at the test bench. • We have tested the control on the engine equipping a Euro 6-compliant vehicle. • The control is effective in increasing torque stability and reduce engine noise. - Abstract: The adoption of diesel LTC combustion concepts is widely recognised as a practical way to reduce simultaneously nitric oxides and particulate emission levels from diesel internal combustion engines. However, several challenges have to be faced up when implementing diesel LTC concepts in real application vehicles. In particular, achieving acceptable performance concerning the drivability comfort, in terms of output torque stability and combustion noise during engine dynamic transients, is generally a critical point. One of the most promising solutions to improve the LTC combustion operation lays in the exploitation of closed loop combustion control, based on in-cylinder pressure signals. In this work, the application of an in-cylinder pressure-based closed loop combustion control to a Euro 6-compliant demonstrator vehicle has been developed. The main challenges deriving from the control of the LTC combustion, directly affecting the engine/vehicle performance, have been analysed in detail. In order to overcome these drawbacks, a new control function, integrated into the base closed loop system, has been designed. The performance of the new function have been experimentally tested at the engine test bench. Results showed a significant enhancement of the LTC operation, in terms of both combustion stability and noise reduction during engine transients. The new function was also implemented on a real vehicle, thus proving the potential of the new control concept in realistic operating conditions

  5. Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion advanced system concepts applicable to small industrial and commercial markets. Topical report, Level 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ake, T.R.; Dixit, V.B.; Mongeon, R.K.

    1992-09-01

    As part of an overall strategy to promote FBC coal combustion and to improve the marketability of the eastern coals, the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Research Center awarded a three level contract to Riley Stoker Corporation to develop advanced Multi Solids Fluidized Bed (MSFB) boiler designs. The first level of this contract targeted the small package boiler (10,000--50,000 lb/hr steam) and industrial size boiler (75,000--150,000 lb/hr steam) markets. Two representative sizes, 30,000 lb/hr and 110,000 lb/hr of steam, were selected for the two categories for a detailed technical and economic evaluation. Technically, both the designs showed promise, however, the advanced industrial design was favored on economic considerations. It was thus selected for further study in the second level of the contract. Results of this Level-2 effort, presented in this report, consisted of testing the design concept in Riley`s 4.4 MBtu/hr pilot MSFB facility located at Riley Research Center in Worcester, Mass. The design and economics of the proof of concept facility developed in Level-1 of the contract were then revised in accordance with the findings of the pilot test program. A host site for commercial demonstration in Level-3 of the contract was also secured. It was determined that co-firing coal in combination with paper de-inking sludge will broaden the applicability of the design beyond conventional markets. International Paper (IP), the largest paper company in the world, is willing to participate in this part of the program. IP has offered its Hammermill operation at Lockhaven, Pa, site of a future paper de-inking plant, for the proof of concept installation. This plant will go in operation in 1994. It is recommended that METC proceed to the commercial demonstration of the design developed. The approach necessary to satisfy the needs of the customer while meeting the objectives of this program is presented along with a recommended plan of action.

  6. 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorge, J.N.; Larrimore, C.L.; Slatsky, M.D.; Menzies, W.R.; Smouse, S.M.; Stallings, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the technical progress of a US Department of Energy Innovative Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The primary objectives of the demonstration is to determine the long-term NOx reduction performance of advanced overfire air (AOFA), low NOx burners (LNB), and advanced digital control optimization methodologies applied in a stepwise fashion to a 500 MW boiler. The focus of this paper is to report (1) on the installation of three on-line carbon-in-ash monitors and (2) the design and results to date from the advanced digital control/optimization phase of the project.

  7. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  8. Pressurisation of IP-SOFC technology for second generation hybrid application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L.

    2005-07-01

    The Integrated Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IP-SOFC) technology developed by Rolls-Royce plc is a hybrid fuel cell technology considered highly suitable for the distributed power generation market. This report presents the results of a project to examine the technical viability of the IP-SOFC technology and some of the associated hybrid system component technologies under pressurised conditions and to investigate the validity of the predicted pressurisation phenomena. The work included: identification of critical material specifications, construction processes, control parameters, etc; the design and commissioning of two pressurised IP-SOFC test rigs at Rolls Royce in Derby; testing two multi-bundle strips at high temperature and atmospheric pressure; testing an active IP-SOFC bundle at high temperature and pressure; testing an experimental steam reforming unit at high temperature and pressure; testing a novel low pressure drop, off-gas combustor concept under atmospheric and pressurised conditions; design studies to identify key parameters affecting the successful integration and packaging of the fuel cell stack with certain associated hybrid components; and designing a hybrid system experimental verification rig. Significant progress was made in addressing the development challenges associated with the IP-SOFC of leakage, performance, durability, yield and geometry, the reaction rate of steam reforming and emissions from the off-gas combustor. Recommendations for future work are made.

  9. A monitoring device for pressurised-air-driven diaphragm-based artificial heart assist devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; de Mul, F.F.M.; Stokkink, J.S.D.; Stokkink, H.S.D.; Koelink, M.H.; Koelink, M.H.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    A non-invasive device has been developed to monitor the diaphragm position and the blood flow in artificial heart assist devices equipped with a pressurised-air-driven diaphragm. Light scattering from the diaphragm is used as a mechanism for measuring. Information about the position of several

  10. Quantification of four ionophores in soil, sediment and manure using pressurised liquid extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Søren Alex; Hansen, Martin; Pedersen, Kenneth Munk

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) methodology has been established for the determination of the four ionophores: lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin and narasin in solid environmental matrices. The PLE methodology is combined with solid phase extraction as clean-up using liquid...

  11. Equipment concept design and development plans for microgravity science and applications research on space station: Combustion tunnel, laser diagnostic system, advanced modular furnace, integrated electronics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhran, M. L.; Youngblood, W. W.; Georgekutty, T.; Fiske, M. R.; Wear, W. O.

    1986-01-01

    Taking advantage of the microgravity environment of space NASA has initiated the preliminary design of a permanently manned space station that will support technological advances in process science and stimulate the development of new and improved materials having applications across the commercial spectrum. Previous studies have been performed to define from the researcher's perspective, the requirements for laboratory equipment to accommodate microgravity experiments on the space station. Functional requirements for the identified experimental apparatus and support equipment were determined. From these hardware requirements, several items were selected for concept designs and subsequent formulation of development plans. This report documents the concept designs and development plans for two items of experiment apparatus - the Combustion Tunnel and the Advanced Modular Furnace, and two items of support equipment the Laser Diagnostic System and the Integrated Electronics Laboratory. For each concept design, key technology developments were identified that are required to enable or enhance the development of the respective hardware.

  12. Advanced Catalysis Technologies: Lanthanum Cerium Manganese Hexaaluminate Combustion Catalysts for Flat Plate Reactor for Compact Steam Reformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    packed-bed steam reformer reactor using an open-flame or radiant burner as the heat source, the rate of heat transfer is limited by wall film and bed...resistances. Heat transfer can be effectively improved by replacing the burner /packed-bed system with parallel channels containing metal foam...combustion reactor was tested using the hexaaluminate catalyst in pellets and supported on FeCrAlloy metal foam. Both tests burned propane and JP-8

  13. Determination of pharmaceuticals in environmental and biological matrices using pressurised liquid extraction--are we developing sound extraction methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runnqvist, Hannah; Bak, Søren Alex; Hansen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) is now a well established and extensively applied extraction technique in environmental analysis for pollutants such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs). During the past decade, an emerging group of environmentally interesting analytes are pharmaceuticals...

  14. Water relations in silver birch during springtime: How is sap pressurised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölttä, T; Dominguez Carrasco, M D R; Salmon, Y; Aalto, J; Vanhatalo, A; Bäck, J; Lintunen, A

    2018-05-06

    Positive sap pressures are produced in the xylem of birch trees in boreal conditions during the time between the thawing of the soil and bud break. During this period, xylem embolisms accumulated during wintertime are refilled with water. The mechanism for xylem sap pressurization and its environmental drivers are not well known. We measured xylem sap flow, xylem sap pressure, xylem sap osmotic concentration, xylem and whole stem diameter changes, and stem and root non-structural carbohydrate concentrations, along with meteorological conditions at two sites in Finland during and after the sap pressurisation period. The diurnal dynamics of xylem sap pressure and sap flow during the sap pressurisation period varied, but were more often opposite to the diurnal pattern after bud burst, i.e. sap pressure increased and sap flow rate mostly decreased when temperature increased. Net conversion of soluble sugars to starch in the stem and roots occurred during the sap pressurisation period. Xylem sap osmotic pressure was small in comparison to total sap pressure, and it did not follow changes in environmental conditions or tree water relations. Based on these findings, we suggest that xylem sap pressurisation and embolism refilling occur gradually over a few weeks through water transfer from parenchyma cells to xylem vessels during daytime, and then the parenchyma are refilled mostly during nighttime by water uptake from soil. Possible drivers for water transfer from parenchyma cells to vessels are discussed. Also the functioning of thermal dissipation probes in conditions of changing stem water content is discussed. © 2018 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Indian nuclear power programme with pressurised heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-09-01

    This compilation is a part of ongoing efforts by Nuclear Power Corporation (NPC) to enable persons: to visit the plants under construction and operation to see for themselves adoption of new and advanced techniques; to have contact with the realities of NPC`s facilities; to familiarize themselves with the regulatory aspects on radiological and environmental protection; and assess for themselves the extent of thrust and importance given to overall safety. figs., tabs.

  16. Laminar Burning Velocities of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Gasoline and Gasoline Surrogates with and without Ethanol Blending Associated with Octane Rating

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama

    2016-05-04

    Laminar burning velocities of fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) C gasoline and of several blends of surrogate toluene reference fuels (TRFs) (n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene mixtures) of the same research octane number are presented. Effects of ethanol addition on laminar flame speed of FACE-C and its surrogate are addressed. Measurements were conducted using a constant volume spherical combustion vessel in the constant pressure, stable flame regime at an initial temperature of 358 K and initial pressures up to 0.6 MPa with the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.6. Comparable values in the laminar burning velocities were measured for the FACE-C gasoline and the proposed surrogate fuel (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) over the range of experimental conditions. Sensitivity of flame propagation to total stretch rate effects and thermo-diffusive instability was quantified by determining Markstein length. Two percentages of an oxygenated fuel of ethanol as an additive, namely, 60 vol% and 85 vol% were investigated. The addition of ethanol to FACE-C and its surrogate TRF-1 (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) resulted in a relatively similar increase in the laminar burning velocities. The high-pressure measured values of Markstein length for the studied fuels blended with ethanol showed minimal influence of ethanol addition on the flame’s response to stretch rate and thermo-diffusive instability. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  17. Laminar Burning Velocities of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) Gasoline and Gasoline Surrogates with and without Ethanol Blending Associated with Octane Rating

    KAUST Repository

    Mannaa, Ossama; Mansour, Morkous S.; Roberts, William L.; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Laminar burning velocities of fuels for advanced combustion engines (FACE) C gasoline and of several blends of surrogate toluene reference fuels (TRFs) (n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene mixtures) of the same research octane number are presented. Effects of ethanol addition on laminar flame speed of FACE-C and its surrogate are addressed. Measurements were conducted using a constant volume spherical combustion vessel in the constant pressure, stable flame regime at an initial temperature of 358 K and initial pressures up to 0.6 MPa with the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.6. Comparable values in the laminar burning velocities were measured for the FACE-C gasoline and the proposed surrogate fuel (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) over the range of experimental conditions. Sensitivity of flame propagation to total stretch rate effects and thermo-diffusive instability was quantified by determining Markstein length. Two percentages of an oxygenated fuel of ethanol as an additive, namely, 60 vol% and 85 vol% were investigated. The addition of ethanol to FACE-C and its surrogate TRF-1 (17.60% n-heptane + 77.40% iso-octane + 5% toluene) resulted in a relatively similar increase in the laminar burning velocities. The high-pressure measured values of Markstein length for the studied fuels blended with ethanol showed minimal influence of ethanol addition on the flame’s response to stretch rate and thermo-diffusive instability. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.

  18. Development of a leak-before break procedure for pressurised components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langston, D.B.

    1989-05-01

    For pressurised components there is an increasing interest in the use of leak-before-break arguments to show that defects will behave in a ''failsafe'' manner by growing in such a way as to cause a detectable leak before a disruptive failure of the pressure boundary can occur. The CEGB operates a wide variety of plant and has recognised the need for a flexible leak-before-break procedure which can be applied in a variety of different situations including part-through defects. This paper describes the development of such a procedure and discusses some of the key aspects of the leak-before-break procedure. (author)

  19. Quantification of four ionophores in soil, sediment and manure using pressurised liquid extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Søren Alex; Hansen, Martin; Pedersen, Kenneth Munk

    2013-01-01

    A multi-residue pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) methodology has been established for the determination of the four ionophores: lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin and narasin in solid environmental matrices. The PLE methodology is combined with solid phase extraction as clean-up using liquid...... chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry applying electrospray ionisation for detection. The samples were freeze-dried prior to extraction. The absolute recoveries for soil and sediment ranged from 71 to 123% (relative standard deviation (RSDs) below 16%) and in the range 94-133% (RSDs 9...

  20. The velocity of missiles generated by the disintegration of gas-pressurised vessels and pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1983-03-01

    A theoretical model is developed to describe the velocity of fragments generated when a gas-pressurised vessel disintegrates. The predictions are compared with new and existing experimental data for spherical and cylindrical vessels and are shown to be an improvement over the widely used empirical correlation developed by Moore. It is also shown that, by an appropriate definition of the energy available for doing work on the fragments, the velocity of the fragments from the disintegration of a section of gas pipeline may be predicted by the same model. (author)

  1. Effects of some structural materials on the reactivity and flux distributions in a pressurised water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, A.M.W.; Mannan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the structural materials of the guide tubes, spacer grids and the shroud on the reactivity and the flux distribution of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) has been studied. Group constants of different cells of guide tubes, spacer grids, shroud and the fuel have been calculated using the cell codes LEOPARD, PANTHER and METHUSELAH. Core calculations have been performed using the diffusion code EQUIPOISE. It has been found for a PWR of 1300 MWe of Kraftwork Union design for Iron that the total change in reactivity due to the presence of guide tubes, spacer grids and the shroud is about -2.48x10 -2 . (author)

  2. Gasification of biomass and coal in a pressurised fluidised bed gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J; Jong, W de; Hein, K R.G. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    During a 3 year (1996-1998) multinational JOULE project, partly funded by the EU, experimental and theoretical research is being done on co-gasification of biomass (pelletised straw and Miscanthus) and coal in a pressurised fluidised bed reactor. The influence of feedstock and operating conditions on gasification characteristics has been studied using a 1.5 MW{sub th} gasifier, which has been operated at a pressure of 5 bar and temperatures up to 900 C. The project and the test rig are described and results obtained in the first part of the project are presented and analysed. (orig.)

  3. Advanced air staging techniques to improve fuel flexibility, reliability and emissions in fluidized bed co-combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aamand, Lars-Erik; Leckner, Bo [Chalmers Technical Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden); Luecke, Karsten; Werther, Joachim [Technical Univ. of Hamburg-Harburg (Germany)

    2001-12-01

    A joint research project between the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg and Chalmers Technical University. For operation under co-combustion the following results should be considered: The high ash content of the sewage sludge results in significantly increased ash flows. Although high alkali metal concentrations are found in the sewage sludge ash, no critical concentrations were reached and tendencies to fouling were not observed. The trace metal input rises with increased sludge fraction. However, emissions of metal compounds were well below legal limits. The trace metals tend to accumulate on the fly ash. In general, very low fuel nitrogen conversions to NO and N{sub 2}O of 2 - 4 % are achievable. With coal as a base fuel alternative air staging with secondary air supply after solids separation attains even lower NO emissions than normal staging without strongly affecting CO and SO{sub 2} emissions. Alternative staging also reduces N{sub 2}O emissions. An optimum for the excess air ratio in the riser of 1.05 was found for a total excess air ratio of 1.2. The higher the volatile content of the fuel is, the less effective the NO reduction due to air staging becomes. The measurements suggest that the optimum gas residence time regarding the emissions in CFB combustors is around 6 to 7 s. These times are achieved in commercial scale plants due to their large cyclones that perhaps partly can replace a large afterburner chamber. The circulating fluidized bed boiler can be operated in a very flexible way with various fuel mixtures up to an energy fraction of sludge of 25% without exceeding legal emission limits.

  4. Combustion engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ragland, Kenneth W

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Combustion Engineering The Nature of Combustion Combustion Emissions Global Climate Change Sustainability World Energy Production Structure of the Book   Section I: Basic Concepts Fuels Gaseous Fuels Liquid Fuels Solid Fuels Problems Thermodynamics of Combustion Review of First Law Concepts Properties of Mixtures Combustion StoichiometryChemical EnergyChemical EquilibriumAdiabatic Flame TemperatureChemical Kinetics of CombustionElementary ReactionsChain ReactionsGlobal ReactionsNitric Oxide KineticsReactions at a Solid SurfaceProblemsReferences  Section II: Combustion of Gaseous and Vaporized FuelsFlamesLaminar Premixed FlamesLaminar Flame TheoryTurbulent Premixed FlamesExplosion LimitsDiffusion FlamesGas-Fired Furnaces and BoilersEnergy Balance and EfficiencyFuel SubstitutionResidential Gas BurnersIndustrial Gas BurnersUtility Gas BurnersLow Swirl Gas BurnersPremixed-Charge Engine CombustionIntroduction to the Spark Ignition EngineEngine EfficiencyOne-Zone Model of Combustion in a Piston-...

  5. Some Factors Affecting Combustion in an Internal-Combustion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Cohn, Mildred

    1936-01-01

    An investigation of the combustion of gasoline, safety, and diesel fuels was made in the NACA combustion apparatus under conditions of temperature that permitted ignition by spark with direct fuel injection, in spite of the compression ratio of 12.7 employed. The influence of such variables as injection advance angle, jacket temperature, engine speed, and spark position was studied. The most pronounced effect was that an increase in the injection advance angle (beyond a certain minimum value) caused a decrease in the extent and rate of combustion. In almost all cases combustion improved with increased temperature. The results show that at low air temperatures the rates of combustion vary with the volatility of the fuel, but that at high temperatures this relationship does not exist and the rates depend to a greater extent on the chemical nature of the fuel.

  6. DRUCKFLAMM - Investigation on combustion and hot gas cleanup in pulverized coal combustion systems. Final report; DRUCKFLAMM - Untersuchungen zur Verbrennung und Heissgasreinigung bei der Druckkohlenstaubfeuerung. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, K.R.G.; Benoehr, A.; Schuermann, H.; Stroehle, J.; Klaiber, C.; Kuhn, R.; Maier, J.; Schnell, U.; Unterberger, S.

    2001-07-01

    The ambitions of making energy supply more efficient and less polluting brought forth the development of coal based combined cycle power plants allowing considerable increases in net efficiencies. One of the regarded firing concepts for a coal based combined cycle power plant is represented by the pressurised pulverised coal combustion process which has the highest efficiency potential compared with the other coal based concepts. The fundamental purpose of the project was to gain firm knowledge concerning firing behaviour of coal in a pressurised pulverised coal combustion system. Detailed investigations were carried out in a pressurised entrained flow reactor taking into account fuel conversion and particle behaviour, pollutant formation and material behaviour under conditions of a pressurised pulverised coal firing. During the project's investigations several different measurement techniques were tested and partially also acquired (e.g. a two-colour-pyrometry system to measure simultaneous particle surface temperature and particle diameter of burning fuel particles). Calculation models under pressurised conditions for pressure vessel simulation and better scale-up were developed synchronously with the experimental investigations. The results gained using the pressurised entrained flow reactor show that many combustion mechanisms are influenced by increased pressure, for instance the fuel conversion is intensified and at the same time pollutant emissions decreased. The material investigations show that the ceramic materials used due to the very high combustion temperatures are very sensitive versus slagging and fast temperature changes, therefore further development requirements are needed to fully realise the high durability of ceramics in the pressurised furnace. Concerning the improvement of existing models for furnace simulation under pressurised conditions, a good resemblance can be observed when considering the actual measurement results from the test

  7. Experimental analysis of pressurised humidification tower for humid air gas turbine cycles. Part A: Experimental campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedemonte, A.A.; Traverso, A.; Massardo, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most interesting methods of water introduction in a gas turbine circuit is represented by the humid air turbine cycle (HAT). In the HAT cycle, the humidification can be provided by a pressurised saturator (i.e. humidification tower or saturation tower), this solution being known to offer several attractive features. This part A is focused on an experimental study of a pressurised humidification tower, with structured packing inside. After a description of the test rig employed to carry out the measuring campaign, the results relating to the thermodynamic process are presented and discussed. The experimental campaign was carried out over 162 working points, covering a relatively wide range of possible operating conditions. Details about measured data are provided in the appendix. It is shown that the saturator's behaviour, in terms of air outlet humidity and temperature, is primarily driven by, in decreasing order of relevance, the inlet water temperature, the inlet water over inlet dry air mass flow ratio and the inlet air temperature. Finally, the exit relative humidity is shown to be consistently over 100%, which may be explained partially by measurement accuracy and droplet entrainment, and partially by the non-ideal behaviour of air-steam mixtures close to saturation

  8. A modelling study of the multiphase leakage flow from pressurised CO{sub 2} pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuejin; Li, Kang [Department of Safety Science Engineering & State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tu, Ran [College of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Huaqiao University, Jimei, Xiamen 361000 (China); Yi, Jianxin; Xie, Qiyuan [Department of Safety Science Engineering & State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jiang, Xi, E-mail: x.jiang@lancaster.ac.uk [Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • A simplified model for CO{sub 2} decompression from high pressure pipelines is proposed. • The multiphase fluid was considered as a homogeneous equilibrium mixture. • Different real gas equations of state were incorporated into the model. • Detailed chocked flow calculation with capillary tube assumption was performed. • The model was validated against experimental data with discrepancies discussed. - Abstract: The accidental leakage is one of the main risks during the pipeline transportation of high pressure CO{sub 2}. The decompression process of high pressure CO{sub 2} involves complex phase transition and large variations of the pressure and temperature fields. A mathematical method based on the homogeneous equilibrium mixture assumption is presented for simulating the leakage flow through a nozzle in a pressurised CO{sub 2} pipeline. The decompression process is represented by two sub-models: the flow in the pipe is represented by the blowdown model, while the leakage flow through the nozzle is calculated with the capillary tube assumption. In the simulation, two kinds of real gas equations of state were employed in this model instead of the ideal gas equation of state. Moreover, results of the flow through the nozzle and measurement data obtained from laboratory experiments of pressurised CO{sub 2} pipeline leakage were compared for the purpose of validation. The thermodynamic processes of the fluid both in the pipeline and the nozzle were described and analysed.

  9. Pilot-Scale Evaluation of an Advanced Carbon Sorbent-Based Process for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornbostel, Marc [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The overall objective of this project is to achieve the DOE’s goal to develop advanced CO2 capture and separation technologies that can realize at least 90% CO2 removal from flue gas steams produced at a pulverized coal (PC) power plant at a cost of less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. The principal objective is to test a CO2 capture process that will reduce the parasitic plant load by using a CO2 capture sorbent that will require a reduced amount of steam. The process is based on advanced carbon sorbents having a low heat of adsorption, high CO2 adsorption capacity, and excellent selectivity. While the intent of this project was to produce design and performance data by testing the sorbent using a slipstream of coal-derived flue gas at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) under realistic conditions and continuous long-term operation, the project was terminated following completion of the detailing pilot plant design/engineering work on June 30, 2016.

  10. TSO Study Project on Development of a Common Safety Approach in the EU for Large Evolutionary Pressurised Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    In pursuance of the objectives of the Council Resolutions of 1975 and 1992 on the technological issues of nuclear safety, the European Commission (EC) is seeking to promote a sustained joint in-depth study on possible significant future nuclear power reactor safety cases. To that end the EC decided to support financially a study by the grouping of the European Union Technical Safety Organisations (TSOG). The general objective of the study programme was to promote, through a collaboration of European Union Technical Safety Organisations (TSOs), common views on technical safety issues related to large evolutionary PWRs in Europe, which could be ready for operation during the next decade. AVN (Belgium) (Technical project leader), AEA Technology (United Kingdom), ANPA (Italy) CIEMAT (Spain), GRS (Germany), IPSN (France), were the TSOs participating in the study which was co-ordinated by RISKAUDIT. The study focused notably on the EPR project initiated by the French and German utilities and vendors. It also considered relevant projects, even of plants of different size, developed outside the European Union in order to provide elements important for the safety characterisation and which could contribute to the credibility and confidence of EPR. It is expected that this study will constitute a significant step towards the development of a common safety approach in EU countries. The study constitutes an important step forward in the development of a common approach of the TSOs to the safety of advanced evolutionary pressurised water reactors. This goal was mainly achieved by an in-depth analysis of the key safety issues, taking into account new developments in the national technical safety objectives and in the EPR design. For this reason the Commission has decided to publish at least the present summary report containing the main outcomes of the TSO study. Confidentiality considerations unfortunately prevent the open publication of the full series of reports. (author)

  11. Demonstration of advanced combustion NO(sub X) control techniques for a wall-fired boiler. Project performance summary, Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The project represents a landmark assessment of the potential of low-NO(sub x) burners, advanced overtire air, and neural-network control systems to reduce NO(sub x) emissions within the bounds of acceptable dry-bottom, wall-fired boiler performance. Such boilers were targeted under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). Testing provided valuable input to the Environmental Protection Agency ruling issued in March 1994, which set NO(sub x) emission limits for ''Group 1'' wall-fired boilers at 0.5 lb/10(sup 6) Btu to be met by January 1996. The resultant comprehensive database served to assist utilities in effectively implementing CAAA compliance. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program established to address energy and environmental concerns related to coal use. Five nationally competed solicitations sought cost-shared partnerships with industry to accelerate commercialization of the most advanced coal-based power generation and pollution control technologies. The Program, valued at over$5 billion, has leveraged federal funding twofold through the resultant partnerships encompassing utilities, technology developers, state governments, and research organizations. This project was one of 16 selected in May 1988 from 55 proposals submitted in response to the Program's second solicitation. Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS) conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation's (FWEC) advanced overfire air (AOFA), low-NO(sub x) burners (LNB), and LNB/AOFA on wall-fired boiler NO(sub x) emissions and other combustion parameters. SCS also evaluated the effectiveness of an advanced on-line optimization system, the Generic NO(sub x) Control Intelligent System (GNOCIS). Over a six-year period, SCS carried out testing at Georgia Power Company's 500-MWe Plant Hammond Unit 4 in Coosa, Georgia. Tests proceeded in a logical sequence using rigorous statistical analyses to

  12. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    spectral measurements at several line-of-sights with a view to applications for tomographic measurements on full-scale industrial combustion systems. The system was successfully applied on industrial scale for simultaneous fast exhaust gas temperature measurements in the three optical ports of the exhaust......D project, it was also important to investigate the spectral properties of major combustion species such as carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the infrared range at high temperatures to provide the theoretical background for the development of the optical tomography methods. The new software....... JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  13. Key factors of combustion from kinetics to gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rubtsov, Nikolai M

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the main advances in the mechanisms of combustion processes. It focuses on the analysis of kinetic mechanisms of gas combustion processes and experimental investigation into the interrelation of kinetics and gas dynamics in gas combustion. The book is complimentary to the one previously published, The Modes of Gaseous Combustion.

  14. Miniaturised pressurised liquid extraction aromatic hydrocarbons from soil and sediment with subsequent large-volume injection-gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramos, L.; Vreuls, J.J.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    Analyte extraction is the main limitation when developing at-line, or on-line, procedures for the preparation of (semi)solid environmental samples. Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) is an analyte- and matrix-independent technique which provides cleaner extracts than the time-consuming classical

  15. Proceedings of the 1999 international joint power generation conference (FACT-vol. 23). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; and Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Moussa, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Gas turbine combustion; Advanced energy conversion; Low NOx solutions; Burner developments; Alternative fuels combustion; Advanced energy conversion technologies; Numerical modeling of combustion; Fluidized bed combustion; Coal combustion; Combustion research; Gasification systems; Mercury emissions; Highly preheated air combustion; Selective catalytic reduction; Special topics in combustion research; Gas turbines and advanced energy; and How can the nuclear industry become more efficient? Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  16. Engine combustion network (Ecn) : characterization and comparison of boundary conditions for different combustion vessels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johnson, J.; Naber, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Malbec, L.M.; Bruneaux, G.; Pickett, L.M.; Bardi, M.; Payri, R.; Bazyn, T.

    2012-01-01

    The Engine Combustion Network (ECN) is a worldwide group of institutions using combustion vessels and/or performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, whose aim is to advance the state of spray and combustion knowledge at engine-relevant conditions. A key activity is the use of spray

  17. Combustion physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. R.

    1985-11-01

    Over 90% of our energy comes from combustion. By the year 2000 the figure will still be 80%, even allowing for nuclear and alternative energy sources. There are many familiar examples of combustion use, both domestic and industrial. These range from the Bunsen burner to large flares, from small combustion chambers, such as those in car engines, to industrial furnaces for steel manufacture or the generation of megawatts of electricity. There are also fires and explosions. The bountiful energy release from combustion, however, brings its problems, prominent among which are diminishing fuel resources and pollution. Combustion science is directed towards finding ways of improving efficiency and reducing pollution. One may ask, since combustion is a chemical reaction, why physics is involved: the answer is in three parts. First, chemicals cannot react unless they come together. In most flames the fuel and air are initially separate. The chemical reaction in the gas phase is very fast compared with the rate of mixing. Thus, once the fuel and air are mixed the reaction can be considered to occur instantaneously and fluid mechanics limits the rate of burning. Secondly, thermodynamics and heat transfer determine the thermal properties of the combustion products. Heat transfer also plays a role by preheating the reactants and is essential to extracting useful work. Fluid mechanics is relevant if work is to be performed directly, as in a turbine. Finally, physical methods, including electric probes, acoustics, optics, spectroscopy and pyrometry, are used to examine flames. The article is concerned mainly with how physics is used to improve the efficiency of combustion.

  18. Development of pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) for essential compounds from Moringa oleifera leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matshediso, Phatsimo G; Cukrowska, Ewa; Chimuka, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE) is a "green" technology which can be used for the extraction of essential components in Moringa oleifera leaf extracts. The behaviour of three flavonols (myricetin, quercetin and kaempferol) and total phenolic content (TPC) in Moringa leaf powder were investigated at various temperatures using PHWE. The TPC of extracts from PHWE were investigated using two indicators. These are reducing activity and the radical scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Flavonols content in the PHWE extracts were analysed on high performance liquid chromatography with ultra violet (HPLC-UV) detection. The concentration of kaempferol and myricetin started decreasing at 150 °C while that of quercetin remained steady with extraction temperature. Optimum extraction temperature for flavonols and DPPH radical scavenging activity was found to be 100 °C. The TPC increased with temperature until 150 °C and then decreased while the reducing activity increased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physics evaluation for testino. of RAPS and TAPS fuel pins in CIRUS pressurised water loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, Benjamin; Paul, O.P.K.

    1976-01-01

    Relevant calculations carried out to assess the reactivity effect, heat generation and other parameters for testing of RAPS and TAPS fuel pins in the Cirus pressurised water loop are summarised. The Cirus neutron flux level being low, in order to simulate the RAPS design heat rating of ∫ Kdtheta = 40 w/cm, the required plutonium enrichment in mixed plutonium uranium oxide fuel pin was worked out. The results showed that a PuO 2 enrichment of 1.5 wt percent would be necessary to meet the above requirement. The analysis for the TAPS pin indicated that the desired heat flux of 115w/cm 2 cannot be obtained in the Cirus loop with either a 7 pin cluster geometry, or with a single pin with the enrichment level as used in TAPS pin. Lattice code DUMLAC and the core simulation code AECLHEX were used for these studies. (author)

  20. Probablistic risk assessment methodology application to Indian pressurised heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, A.K.; Grover, R.B.; Mehra, V.K.; Gangwal, D.K.; Chakraborty, G.

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment in the context of nuclear power plants is associated with models that predict the offsite radiological releases resulting from reactor accidents. Level 1 PRA deals with the identification of accident sequences relevant to the design of a system and also with their quantitative estimation. It is characterised by event tree, fault tree analysis. The initiating events applicable to pressurised heavy water reactors have been considered and the dominating initiating events essential for detailed studies are identified in this paper. Reliability analysis and the associated problems encountered during the case studies are mentioned briefly. It is imperative to validate the failure data used for analysis. Bayesian technique has been employed for the same and a brief account is included herein. A few important observations, e.g. effects of the presence of moderator, made during the application of probabilistic risk assessment methodology are also discussed. (author)

  1. Modelling the behaviour of corrosion products in the primary heat transfer circuits of pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodliffe, R.S.; Polley, M.V.; Thornton, E.W.

    1985-05-01

    The redistribution of corrosion products from the primary circuit surfaces of a water reactor can result in increased flow resistance, poorer heat transfer performance, fuel failure and radioactive contamination of circuit surfaces. The environment is generally sufficiently well controlled to ensure that the first three effects are not limiting. The last effect is of particular importance since radioactive corrosion products are major contributors to shutdown fields and since it is necessary to ensure that the radiation exposure of personnel is as low as reasonably achievable. This review focusses attention on the principles which must form the basis for any mechanistic model describing the formation, transport and deposition of radioactive corrosion products. It is relevant to all water reactors in which the primary heat transfer medium is predominantly single-phase water and in which steam is generated in a secondary circuit, i.e. including CANDU pressurised heavy water reactors, Sovient VVERs, etc. (author)

  2. Innovative clean coal technology: 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report, Phases 1 - 3B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project was conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The technologies demonstrated at this site include Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation`s advanced overfire air system and Controlled Flow/Split Flame low NOx burner. The primary objective of the demonstration at Hammond Unit 4 was to determine the long-term effects of commercially available wall-fired low NOx combustion technologies on NOx emissions and boiler performance. Short-term tests of each technology were also performed to provide engineering information about emissions and performance trends. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications was established for the project. Short-term and long-term baseline testing was conducted in an {open_quotes}as-found{close_quotes} condition from November 1989 through March 1990. Following retrofit of the AOFA system during a four-week outage in spring 1990, the AOFA configuration was tested from August 1990 through March 1991. The FWEC CF/SF low NOx burners were then installed during a seven-week outage starting on March 8, 1991 and continuing to May 5, 1991. Following optimization of the LNBs and ancillary combustion equipment by FWEC personnel, LNB testing commenced during July 1991 and continued until January 1992. Testing in the LNB+AOFA configuration was completed during August 1993. This report provides documentation on the design criteria used in the performance of this project as it pertains to the scope involved with the low NOx burners and advanced overfire systems.

  3. Combustion 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Levasseur; S. Goodstine; J. Ruby; M. Nawaz; C. Senior; F. Robson; S. Lehman; W. Blecher; W. Fugard; A. Rao; A. Sarofim; P. Smith; D. Pershing; E. Eddings; M. Cremer; J. Hurley; G. Weber; M. Jones; M. Collings; D. Hajicek; A. Henderson; P. Klevan; D. Seery; B. Knight; R. Lessard; J. Sangiovanni; A. Dennis; C. Bird; W. Sutton; N. Bornstein; F. Cogswell; C. Randino; S. Gale; Mike Heap

    2001-06-30

    . To achieve these objectives requires a change from complete reliance of coal-fired systems on steam turbines (Rankine cycles) and moving forward to a combined cycle utilizing gas turbines (Brayton cycles) which offer the possibility of significantly greater efficiency. This is because gas turbine cycles operate at temperatures well beyond current steam cycles, allowing the working fluid (air) temperature to more closely approach that of the major energy source, the combustion of coal. In fact, a good figure of merit for a HIPPS design is just how much of the enthalpy from coal combustion is used by the gas turbine. The efficiency of a power cycle varies directly with the temperature of the working fluid and for contemporary gas turbines the optimal turbine inlet temperature is in the range of 2300-2500 F (1260-1371 C). These temperatures are beyond the working range of currently available alloys and are also in the range of the ash fusion temperature of most coals. These two sets of physical properties combine to produce the major engineering challenges for a HIPPS design. The UTRC team developed a design hierarchy to impose more rigor in our approach. Once the size of the plant had been determined by the choice of gas turbine and the matching steam turbine, the design process of the High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF) moved ineluctably to a down-fired, slagging configuration. This design was based on two air heaters: one a high temperature slagging Radiative Air Heater (RAH) and a lower temperature, dry ash Convective Air Heater (CAH). The specific details of the air heaters are arrived at by an iterative sequence in the following order:-Starting from the overall Cycle requirements which set the limits for the combustion and heat transfer analysis-The available enthalpy determined the range of materials, ceramics or alloys, which could tolerate the temperatures-Structural Analysis of the designs proved to be the major limitation-Finally the commercialization

  4. Biofuels combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Charles K

    2013-01-01

    This review describes major features of current research in renewable fuels derived from plants and from fatty acids. Recent and ongoing fundamental studies of biofuel molecular structure, oxidation reactions, and biofuel chemical properties are reviewed, in addition to combustion applications of biofuels in the major types of engines in which biofuels are used. Biofuels and their combustion are compared with combustion features of conventional petroleum-based fuels. Two main classes of biofuels are described, those consisting of small, primarily alcohol, fuels (particularly ethanol, n-butanol, and iso-pentanol) that are used primarily to replace or supplement gasoline and those derived from fatty acids and used primarily to replace or supplement conventional diesel fuels. Research efforts on so-called second- and third-generation biofuels are discussed briefly.

  5. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.

    2017-03-28

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON = 46). The motored pressure at TDC is maintained at 35 bar and fuelMEP is kept constant at 5.1 bar to account for the difference in fuel properties between naphtha and diesel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is injected at a pressure of 800 bar. Photron FASTCAM SA4 that captures in-cylinder combustion at the rate of 10000 frames per second is employed. The captured high speed video is processed to study the combustion homogeneity based on an algorithm reported in previous studies. Starting from late fuel injection timings, combustion stratification is investigated by advancing the fuel injection timings. For late start of injection (SOI), a direct link between SOI and combustion phasing is noticed. At early SOI, combustion phasing depends on both intake air temperature and SOI. In order to match the combustion phasing (CA50) of diesel, the intake air temperature is increased to 90°C for naphtha. The combustion stratification from CI to PPC is also investigated for various level of dilution by displacing oxygen with nitrogen in the intake. The start of combustion (SOC) was delayed with the increase in dilution and to compensate for this, the intake air temperature is increased. The mixture homogeneity is enhanced for higher dilution due to longer ignition delay. The results show that high speed image is initially blue and then turned yellow, indicating soot formation and oxidation. The luminosity of combustion images decreases with early SOI and increased dilution. The images are processed to generate the level of stratification based on the image intensity. The level of stratification is same for diesel and naphtha at various SOI. When O concentration in the intake is decreased to 17.7% and 14

  6. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani

    2014-10-01

    , also emphasizing advanced engine concepts. Research results addressing combustion reaction mechanisms have been reported based on results from pyrolysis and oxidation reactors, shock tubes, rapid compression machines, and research engines. This work is complemented by the development of detailed combustion models with the support of chemical kinetics and quantum chemistry. This paper seeks to provide an introduction to and overview of recent results on alcohol combustion by highlighting pertinent aspects of this rich and rapidly increasing body of information. As such, this paper provides an initial source of references and guidance regarding the present status of combustion experiments on alcohols and models of alcohol combustion. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Flooding and non-equilibrium in counter-current flows with reference to pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, M.M.M.

    1981-12-01

    During the refill stage of a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) the effectiveness with which the emergency coolant penetrates to the lower plenum, and hence to the core, is of paramount importance. Results of experimental and theoretical work carried out at the University of Strathclyde on two 1/10 scale planar test sections of a PWR downcomer annulus are presented. The experiments involved the countercurrent flows of air and water and the data were compared with existing flooding correlations for tubes. It was found experimentally that, as the inlet air flowed upwards against two opposing waterfalls, an increase in air flowrate caused the waterfalls to mover closer together until a critical air flowrate was reached where the waterfalls collapsed. A theoretical model defined this collapse condition. It was shown to be analogous to the choked flow of air through a nozzle whose cross sectional area varied with pressure. Previous experimental results for steam-water mixtures on similar test sections and the present air-water data were used to study condensation effects. Non-equilibrium effects were isolated and correlated against the dependent parameters of inlet water flowrate, inlet subcooling and downcomer wall temperature. A theoretical model giving good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment was developed. (author)

  8. Study of the contamination level in the primary circuit of a pressurised water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomit, J.-M.

    1980-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to work out a model which allows to predict the contamination level in the primary circuit of a pressurised water reactor (PWR). We assume that the passage of fission products from fuel (UO 2 ) to water takes place in two stages: a) the fission products created in the fuel diffuse and go out into the gap; b) owing to failure of clad, fission products stored in the gap diffuse into the water. A migration constant will correspond to each of these stages (ν(C) for fuel and ν(J) for gap). We have designed two models: - an empiric model in which constants ν(C) and ν(J) are adjusted from experiments CYRANO and BOUFFON carried out by the CEA; - a theoretical model to describe the physical mechanisms of migration inside the fuel. This leads us to introduce trapping and resolution probabilities. This models lead to a theoretical definition of ν(C). We have undertaken a second qualification of the empiric model using code PROFIP 3. Application to the Tihange reactor enabled us to get a good estimation of activity in the primary circuit and the number of failed rods during the first cycle [fr

  9. Shallow crack effect on brittle fracture of RPV during pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the study on behaviour of postulated shallow surface cracks in embrittled reactor pressure vessel subjected to pressurised thermal shock loading in an emergency core cooling. The study is related to the pressure vessel of a VVER-440 type reactor. Instead of a conventional fracture parameter like stress intensity factor or J integral the maximum principal stress distribution on a crack tip area is used as a fracture criteria. The postulated cracks locate circumferentially at the inner surface of the reactor pressure wall and they penetrate the cladding layer and open to the inner surface. Axisymmetric and semielliptical crack shapes were studied. Load is formed of an internal pressure acting also on crack faces and of a thermal gradient in the pressure vessel wall. Physical properties of material and loading data correspond real conditions in VVER-440 RPV. The study was carried out by making lot of 2D- and 3D- finite element calculations. Analysing principles and computer programs are explained. Except of studying the shallow crack effect, one objective of the study has also been to develop further expertise and the in-house developed computing system to make effectively elastic-plastic fracture mechanical analyses for real structures under complicated loads. Though the study concerns VVER-440 RPV, the results are of more general interest especially related to thermal loads. (orig.) (11 refs.)

  10. Local multigrid mesh refinement in view of nuclear fuel 3D modelling in pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbie, L.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to improve the performances, in terms of memory space and computational time, of the current modelling of the Pellet-Cladding mechanical Interaction (PCI), complex phenomenon which may occurs during high power rises in pressurised water reactors. Among the mesh refinement methods - methods dedicated to efficiently treat local singularities - a local multi-grid approach was selected because it enables the use of a black-box solver while dealing few degrees of freedom at each level. The Local Defect Correction (LDC) method, well suited to a finite element discretization, was first analysed and checked in linear elasticity, on configurations resulting from the PCI, since its use in solid mechanics is little widespread. Various strategies concerning the implementation of the multilevel algorithm were also compared. Coupling the LDC method with the Zienkiewicz-Zhu a posteriori error estimator in order to automatically detect the zones to be refined, was then tested. Performances obtained on two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases are very satisfactory, since the algorithm proposed is more efficient than h-adaptive refinement methods. Lastly, the LDC algorithm was extended to nonlinear mechanics. Space/time refinement as well as transmission of the initial conditions during the re-meshing step were looked at. The first results obtained are encouraging and show the interest of using the LDC method for PCI modelling. (author) [fr

  11. Representative stresses for creep deformation and failure of pressurised tubes and pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cane, B.J.; Browne, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a series of tube and uniaxial tests on two casts of 1/2CrMoV pipe steel are examined to determine the representative stress which must be applied to uniaxial data in order to predict the strain rates and lives of pressurised tubes and pipes. The stress criterion for deformation is shown to correlate with the analytically derived reference stress (σsub(R)) at low pressure while at high pressures a modified reference stress (> σsub(R)) must be used. The rupture life exhibits a similar correlation such that the representative stress for rupture is given by σsub(R) at low stresses yet, at high stresses, it is greater than σsub(R) and attains a value comparable with the mean diameter hoop stress. The latter thus describes the rupture life at high pressures but significantly underestimates the life at low pressures approaching those in service. Consideration is given to the multiaxial stress rupture criterion and the effect of geometry in constant load tests. (author)

  12. Selective Extraction of Organic Contaminants from Soil Using Pressurised Liquid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the application of sorbents in pressurised liquid extraction (PLE cell to establish a selective extraction of a variety of organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, phenol, pentachlorophenol, and sterols from soil. The selectivity and efficiency of each sorbent depend on the properties of the material, extracting solvent, capacity factor, organic compounds of interest, and PLE operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and extraction time. Several sorbents (silica, alumina, and Florisil were evaluated and with the proper choice of solvents, polar and nonpolar compounds were successfully separated in two fractions. Nonpolar compounds (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, and pentachlorophenol were recovered in the first fraction using a polar sorbent such as Florisil or alumina, and n-hexane as eluting solvent, while more polar compounds (phenol and sterols were recovered in the second fraction using methanol. Silica (5 g was found to be effective for selective extraction with the satisfactory recoveries for all compounds (PAHs from 87.1–96.2%, chlorpyrifos 102.9%, sterols from 93.7–100.5%, phenol 91.9%, and pentachlorophenol 106.2%. The efficiency and precision of this extraction approach and the existing EPA Method 3545 were compared.

  13. Towards a strengthening of inspections carried out on pressurised equipment and pipework..

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, St.

    2010-01-01

    Following the fast presidential election, a major restructuring of the administrative landscape was set in motion. Tasks that historically were the responsibility of the Ministry of Industry are now carried out by the Ministry of Sustainable Development, which in particular is responsible for the whole policy to do with the prevention of technological risks. The General Directorate for the Prevention of Risks (Direction generale de la prevention des risques (DGPR)) of this ministry is now responsible for controlling technological risks, opening up new perspectives in terms of managing accidental risks and offering a new opportunity for an 'integrated' approach, making it possible to deal with an industrial installation in all its facets. Within the DGPR, the Office for the Safety of Industrial Equipment (bureau de la securite des equipements industriels (BSEI)) is responsible for the safety of pressurised equipment, as well as pipes carrying gas, inflammable liquids and chemical products. After a quick presentation of the inspections carried out on this equipment, issues to do with their safety will be dealt with and in particular: - the suitability of inspections carried out in the tight of faults that are likely to occur and develop in the structures; - control of ageing; - management of the quality of new equipment. (author)

  14. Role of pressuriser in enhancing pressure control system capability in primary system of 500 MWe PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, M P.S.; Misri, Vijay; Bapat, C N; Sharma, V K [Nuclear Power Corporation, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The primary heat transport system of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) extracts and transports the heat produced in the fuel (located inside coolant channel assemblies) to the steam generators where steam is generated to run the turbo-generator. The heat transport medium (primary coolant) is heavy water which is kept in a pressurized liquid state with the help of a pressure control system. Feed and bleed circuits with associated equipment of PHT main system have traditionally constituted the pressure control system. However, for large size reactors of 500 MWe capacity, a surge tank known as pressurizer was incorporated due to the presence of relatively large inventory in PHT main circuit. The pressurizer acts as a cushion for pressure variations resulting from various transients. This significantly reduces the onerous demand on feed and bleed system, thereby reducing reactor outages on system pressure excursions. The paper describes in detail the pressure control system of 500 MWe PHWR involving pressuriser and feed and bleed system including their functions and instrumentation. The results of mathematical modelling/analysis undertaken to establish the response adequacy of pressure control system, to postulated plant transients vis-a-vis the role of pressurizer are presented. (author). 10 figs.

  15. Optimisation of pressurised liquid extraction of antioxidants from black bamboo leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Ya Fang; Kim, Sang Min; Um, Byung-Hun

    2014-07-01

    To develop an efficient green extraction approach for recovering bioactive compounds from natural plants, the potential of using pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) was examined on black bamboo (Phyllostachys nigra) leaves, with ethanol/water as solvents. The superheated PLE process showed a higher recovery of most constituents and antioxidative activity, compared to reflux extraction, with a significantly improved recovery of the total phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (TF) content and DPPH radical scavenging ability. For a broad range of ethanol aqueous solutions and temperatures, 50% EtOH and 200°C (static time: 25min) gave the best performance, in terms of the TP and TF (75% EtOH) content yield and DPPH scavenging ability (25% EtOH). Under the optimised extraction conditions, eight main antioxidative compounds were isolated and identified with HPLC-ABTS(+) assay guidance and assessed for radical scavenging activity. The superheated extraction process for black bamboo leaves enhanced the antioxidant properties by increasing the extraction of the phenolic components. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Preliminary Study Of The Effect Of Some Pressurising Gasses On The Viscosity Of Dimethyl Ether

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Jakobsen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    -micro glass viscometers, size 25, submerged completely in a constant temperature bath. A kinematic viscosity of 0,188 cSt  0,001 cSt @ 25 C, was found, consistent with the previous and initial result 0,186 cSt   0,002 cSt. Key words: Dimethyl Ether (DME), a clean substitute for diesel oil. DME viscosity......, of glass, has been used. No significant change of the efflux time was found for all the pressurising gasses, except for the gas CO2. A reduction of efflux times was found for the CO2 of about 9 %   0,6 %. The measurement accuracy for all these series was found for this very low viscosity fluid...... to be in the range 0,2 % up to more than 1 %. The previously reported viscosity of DME has been corrected for the surface tension effect. Viscosity determination was initially based on a direct comparison of efflux times of DME with efflux times of distilled water. Assuming an upper limit for the variation...

  17. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  18. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  19. Volcanic instability: the effects of internal pressurisation and consideration of rock mass properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M.; Petford, N.; Bromhead, E. N.

    2003-04-01

    Since the events at mount St Helens during May 1980, there has been considerable attention focused on the mechanisms and consequences of volcanic edifice collapse. As a result catastrophic edifice failure is now recognised as perhaps the most socially devastating natural disaster associated with volcanic activity. The tendency of volcanic edifices to fail appears ubiquitous behaviour, and a number of failure precursors and more importantly triggers have been suggested, of which magmagenic (e.g. thermal and mechanical pore pressure increases) and seismogenic (e.g. tectonic or volcanic earthquakes) are common. Despite the increased interest in this field, large-scale, deep seated catastrophic edifice failure has still only be successfully modelled in the most extreme of cases, which does not account for the volume of field evidence of edifice collapse. One possible reason for this is the way that pore pressures are considered. For pore fluids that are entering the system from the surface (e.g. rain water) there is a set volume and therefore a set pressure that the system can accommodate, as once the edifice becomes saturated, any new fluids to fall on the surface of the edifice simply run off. If we consider internal pore fluid pressurisation from magmatic gasses, then the pressurising fluid is already in the system and the only limit to how much pressure can be accommodated is the strength of the edifice itself. The failure to fully consider the strength and deformability of a rock mass compared to an intact laboratory sample of a volcanic rock may result in a misleading assessment of edifice strength. An intact laboratory sample of basalt may yield a strength of 100--350 MPa (from uniaxial compression tests), a volcanic edifice however is not an intact rock, and is cut through by many discontinuities, including; faults, fractures and layering from discrete lava flows. A better approximation of the true strength can be determined from the rock mass rating (RMR

  20. Pressurised electro-osmotic dewatering of activated and anaerobically digested sludges: electrical variables analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citeau, M; Olivier, J; Mahmoud, A; Vaxelaire, J; Larue, O; Vorobiev, E

    2012-09-15

    Pressurised electro-osmotic dewatering (PEOD) of two sewage sludges (activated and anaerobically digested) was studied under constant electric current (C.C.) and constant voltage (C.V.) with a laboratory chamber simulating closely an industrial filter. The influence of sludge characteristics, process parameters, and electrode/filter cloth position was investigated. The next parameters were tested: 40 and 80 A/m², 20, 30, and 50 V-for digested sludge dewatering; and 20, 40 and 80 A/m², 20, 30, and 50 V-for activated sludge dewatering. Effects of filter cloth electric resistance and initial cake thickness were also investigated. The application of PEOD provides a gain of 12 points of dry solids content for the digested sludge (47.0% w/w) and for the activated sludge (31.7% w/w). In PEOD processed at C.C. or at C.V., the dewatering flow rate was similar for the same electric field intensity. In C.C. mode, both the electric resistance of cake and voltage increase, causing a temperature rise by ohmic effect. In C.V. mode, a current intensity peak was observed in the earlier dewatering period. Applying at first a constant current and later on a constant voltage, permitted to have better control of ohmic heating effect. The dewatering rate was not significantly affected by the presence of filter cloth on electrodes, but the use of a thin filter cloth reduced remarkably the energy consumption compared to a thicker one: 69% of reduction energy input at 45% w/w of dry solids content. The reduction of the initial cake thickness is advantageous to increase the final dry solids content. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling and numerical simulation of the corrosion product transport in the pressurised water reactor primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetto, C.

    2002-05-01

    During operation of pressurised water reactor, corrosion of the primary circuit alloys leads to the release of metallic species such as iron, nickel and cobalt in the primary fluid. These corrosion products are implicated in different transport phenomena and are activated in the reactor core where they are submitted to neutron flux. The radioactive corrosion products are afterwards present in the out of flux parts of primary circuit where they generate a radiation field. The first part of this study deals with the modelling of the corrosion: product transport phenomena. In particular, considering the current state of the art, corrosion and release mechanisms are described empirically, which allows to take into account the material surface properties. New mass balance equations describing the corrosion product behaviour are thus obtained. The numerical resolution of these equations is implemented in the second part of this work. In order to obtain large time steps, we choose an implicit time scheme. The associated system is linearized from the Newton method and is solved by a preconditioned GMRES method. Moreover, a time step auto-adaptive management based on Newton iterations is performed. Consequently, an efficient resolution has been implemented, allowing to describe not only the quasi-steady evolutions but also the fast transients. In a last step, numerical simulations are carried out in order to validate the new corrosion product transport modelling and to illustrate the capabilities of this modelling. Notably, the numerical results obtained indicate that the code allows to restore the on-site observations underlining the influence of material surface properties on reactor contamination. (author)

  2. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multi-Phase Combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Kenneth Kuan-yun

    2012-01-01

    Detailed coverage of advanced combustion topics from the author of Principles of Combustion, Second Edition Turbulence, turbulent combustion, and multiphase reacting flows have become major research topics in recent decades due to their application across diverse fields, including energy, environment, propulsion, transportation, industrial safety, and nanotechnology. Most of the knowledge accumulated from this research has never been published in book form-until now. Fundamentals of Turbulent and Multiphase Combustion presents up-to-date, integrated coverage of the fundamentals of turbulence

  3. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  4. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  5. Combustion Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Combustion Research Laboratory facilitates the development of new combustion systems or improves the operation of existing systems to meet the Army's mission for...

  6. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  7. Sistema de simulación de escenarios de ciclos avanzados de combustible nuclear en transición = Simulation system for advanced fuel cycle transition scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Merino Rodríguez, Iván

    2015-01-01

    El estudio de los ciclos del combustible nuclear requieren de herramientas computacionales o "códigos" versátiles para dar respuestas al problema multicriterio de evaluar los actuales ciclos o las capacidades de las diferentes estrategias y escenarios con potencial de desarrollo en a nivel nacional, regional o mundial. Por otra parte, la introducción de nuevas tecnologías para reactores y procesos industriales hace que los códigos existentes requieran nuevas capacidades para evaluar la transi...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL RADIATIVELY/CONDUCTIVELY STABILIZED BURNER FOR SIGNIFICANT REDUCTION OF NOx EMISSIONS AND FOR ADVANCING THE MODELING AND UNDERSTANDING OF PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION AND EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noam Lior; Stuart W. Churchill

    2003-10-01

    The primary objective of the proposed study was the study and analysis of, and design recommendations for, a novel radiatively-conductively stabilized combustion (RCSC) process for pulverized coal, which, based on our prior studies with both fluid fuels and pulverized coal, holds a high promise to reduce NO{sub x} production significantly. We have primarily engaged in continuing and improving our process modeling and analysis, obtained a large amount of quantitative information about the effects of the major parameters on NO{sub x} production, conducted an extensive exergy analysis of the process, evaluated the practicalities of employing the Radiatively-Conductively Stabilized Combustor (RCSC) to large power and heat plants, and improved the experimental facility. Prior experimental work has proven the feasibility of the combustor, but slagging during coal combustion was observed and should be dealt with. The primary outcomes and conclusions from the study are: (1) we developed a model and computer program that represents the pulverized coal combustion in the RCSC, (2) the model predicts that NO{sub x} emissions can be reduced by a number of methods, detailed in the report. (3) the exergy analysis points out at least a couple of possible ways to improve the exergetic efficiency in this combustor: increasing the effectiveness of thermal feedback, and adjusting the combustor mixture exit location, (4) because of the low coal flow rates necessitated in this study to obtain complete combustion in the burner, the size of a burner operating under the considered conditions would have to be up to an order of magnitude, larger than comparable commercial burners, but different flow configurations of the RCSC can yield higher feed rates and smaller dimensions, and should be investigated. Related to this contract, eleven papers were published in journals and conference proceedings, and ten invited presentations were given at university and research institutions, as well as at

  9. Influence of forest biomass grown in fertilised soils on combustion and gasification processes as well as on the environment with integrated bioenergy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaanu, K; Orjala, M [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Fuel Production

    1997-12-01

    This presentation describes research carried out by VTT Energy and METLA during 1996, as part of the collaborative EU project involving Finland, Portugal and Spain. The main objectives of this project are to carry out experimental studies of both combustion and gasification under atmospheric (Portugal and Spain) and pressurised conditions (Finland) using biomass from different countries, namely Finland, Portugal and Spain. This was to determine the influence of biomass fertilising conditions on the process itself and the impact on the integrated energy production facilities, such as gas turbines. The aim of the research was carried out during 1996: (1) To complete the biomass collection, analyses and selection of the samples for combustion and gasification tests. This task has been carried out in co-operation with VTT and METLA, (2) To start the combustion and gasification tests under pressurised and atmospheric conditions. The combustion research in Finland is being performed in pressurised entrained flow reactor at VTT in Jyvaeskylae and the gasification research is being conducted at VTT in Espoo. The collection of biomass samples has been completed. The analyses of the samples show that for instance potassium and phosphorus content will be increased by about 30-50 % due to fertilisation. In the ash fusion tests, the ash from fertilised bark and branches and needles may start to soften already at 900 deg C under reducing conditions depending on the composition of the ash. In oxidising atmospheres the ash softening seems to occur at higher temperatures. Preliminary results indicate that the fertilisation may have an influence on the combustion process

  10. Adapted ECC ozonesonde for long-duration flights aboard boundary-layer pressurised balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheusi, François; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Attié, Jean-Luc; Commun, Philippe; Barret, Brice; Basdevant, Claude; Clenet, Antoine; Derrien, Solène; Doerenbecher, Alexis; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Fontaine, Alain; Hache, Emeric; Jambert, Corinne; Jaumouillé, Elodie; Meyerfeld, Yves; Roblou, Laurent; Tocquer, Flore

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970s, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurised balloons (BLPBs) with the capability to transport lightweight scientific payloads at isopycnic level and offer a quasi-Lagrangian sampling of the lower atmosphere over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks).Electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are widely used under small sounding balloons. However, their autonomy is limited to a few hours owing to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation. An adaptation of the ECC sonde has been developed specifically for long-duration BLPB flights. Compared to conventional ECC sondes, the main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences (with possible remote control during the flight). To increase the ozonesonde autonomy, the strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (2-3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min). The rest of the time, the sonde pump is turned off. Results of preliminary ground-based tests are first presented. In particular, the sonde was able to provide correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV-absorption ozone analyser every 15 min for 4 days. Then we illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched over the western Mediterranean during three summer field campaigns of the ChArMEx project (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr): TRAQA in 2012, and ADRIMED and SAFMED in 2013. BLPB drifting altitudes were in the range 0.25-3.2 km. The longest flight lasted more than 32 h and covered more than 1000 km. Satisfactory data were obtained when compared to independent ozone measurements close in space and time. The quasi-Lagrangian measurements allowed a first look at ozone diurnal evolution in the marine boundary layer as well as in the lower free troposphere. During some flight segments, there was indication of photochemical ozone production in the marine boundary layer or even in the free troposphere, at rates ranging from 1 to 2 ppbv h -1, which

  11. Rotary combustion device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Rotary combustion device (1) with rotary combustion chamber (4). Specific measures are taken to provide ignition of a combustible mixture. It is proposed that a hollow tube be provided coaxially with the axis of rotation (6), so that a small part of the mixture is guided into the combustion chamber.

  12. A Comparison of Prominent LES Combustion Models for Nonpremixed Supersonic Combustion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The capability of accurately simulating supersonic combustion is a vital topic for designing and advancing hypersonic air-breathing vehicles. As a consequence, there...

  13. The role of advanced calculation and simulation tools in the evolution of fuel; El papel de las herramientas avanzadas de calculo y simulacion en la evolucion del combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Reja, C.; Cerracin, A.; Corpa, R.

    2015-07-01

    This article is focused on the role of the advanced calculation/simulation tools on the development of the fuel designs as well as in the assessment of the effect of the changes in the operation. With this purpose, the article describes and shows some examples of the use by ENUSA of some of these tools in the fuel engineering. To conclude, the future on the evolution of the advanced tools is also presented. (Author)

  14. Investigation of flow behaviour of coat/ash particles in an advanced pressurised fluidized bed gasifier (APFBG) using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, H.J.; Sharma, V.K.; Gursharan Singh; Vidhya Kamadu, M.; Prakash, S.G.; Krishanamoorthy, S.; Ramani, N.V.S.; Sonde, R.R.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of Residence Time Distribution (RTD), Mean Residence Time (MRT) and degree of backmixing of solid phase is important for efficient operation of the coal gasifier. Radiotracer technique was used for measure RTD of coal/ash particles in a pilot-scale gasifier and obtain the values of MRT and backmixing. Lanthanum 140 labeled coal (100 g) was used as a tracer. The tracer was instantaneously injected into the coal feed line and monitored at ash and gas outlets of the gasifier using collimated scintillation detectors. The measured RTD data were treated and MRTs of coal/ash particles were determined. The treated data were simulated using tank-in-series model. The simulation RTD data indicated good degree of mixing with minor bypassing/short-circulating of coal particles. The results of the investigation were found useful for scale-up of the gasification process. (author)

  15. Reduced NOX combustion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delano, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for combusting fuel and oxidant to achieve reduced formation of nitrogen oxides. It comprises: It comprises: heating a combustion zone to a temperature at least equal to 1500 degrees F.; injecting into the heated combustion zone a stream of oxidant at a velocity within the range of from 200 to 1070 feet per second; injecting into the combustion zone, spaced from the oxidant stream, a fuel stream at a velocity such that the ratio of oxidant stream velocity to fuel stream velocity does not exceed 20; aspirating combustion gases into the oxidant stream and thereafter intermixing the aspirated oxidant stream and fuel stream to form a combustible mixture; combusting the combustible mixture to produce combustion gases for the aspiration; and maintaining the fuel stream substantially free from contact with oxidant prior to the intermixture with aspirated oxidant

  16. The John Zink Hamworthy combustion handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    Despite the length of time it has been around, its importance, and vast amounts of research, combustion is still far from being completely understood. Issues regarding the environment, cost, and fuel consumption add further complexity, particularly in the process and power generation industries. Dedicated to advancing the art and science of industrial combustion, The John Zink Hamworthy Combustion Handbook, Second Edition: Volume 3 - Applications offers comprehensive, up-to-date coverage of equipment used in the process and power generation industries. Under the leadership of Charles E. Baukal

  17. Characterizations of self-combustion reactions (SCR) for the production of nanomaterials used as advanced cathodes in Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haik, Ortal; Martha, Surendra K.; Sclar, Hadar; Samuk-Fromovich, Zvi; Zinigrad, Ella; Markovsky, Boris [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Kovacheva, Daniela; Saliyski, Nikolay [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Aurbach, Doron, E-mail: aurbach@mail.biu.ac.il [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2009-09-10

    In this work, self-combustion reactions (SCR) for the preparation of important cathode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries were investigated by thermal analytical tools (DSC, ARC, TGA), electron microscopy, XRD, various spectroscopies (MS, Raman, FTIR) and elemental analysis by ICP. The systems studied include solutions containing metal nitrates at the right stoichiometry and sucrose as a fuel, for the preparation of LiMn{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} (layered), LiMn{sub 1.5}Ni{sub 0.5}O{sub 4} (spinel), LiMn{sub 0.33}Ni{sub 0.33}Co{sub 0.33}O{sub 2} (layered), and LiMn{sub 0.4}Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} (layered). Similar products, which do not depend on the atmosphere of the processes (air or inert) were obtained by spontaneous SCR and the gradual heating of the same solutions by DSC, ARC, and TGA. The reactions involve the partial caramelization of sucrose, complicated by red-ox reactions with the nitrates that form solid products, whose organic part is finally decomposed around 400 {sup o}C. The presence of cobalt ions has a stabilizing effect, which is expressed by the low dissolution rates of Li ions from the solid products thus formed, into aqueous solutions. The reaction mechanisms are discussed herein.

  18. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booras, George [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Powers, J. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Riley, C. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hendrix, H. [Hendrix Engineering Solutions, Inc., Calera, AL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  19. Stress intensity factors for underclad and through clad defects in a reactor pressure vessel submitted to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Menager, Y.; Chapuliot, S.

    2005-01-01

    CEA has launched important work on the development of a Stress Intensity Factors compendium for cracks in a Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) taking into account the cladding. The work is performed by Finite Element analysis with a parametric mesh for two types of defects (under clad defect and through clad defect) and a wide range of geometrical and material parameters. In addition, an analytical stress solution for Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) on the RPV is proposed to allow a complete analytical estimation of the stress intensity factor K I for the PTS problem. The results are validated by comparison with a complete 3D finite element calculation performed on a complex and realistic case study

  20. Synthesis of the IRSN report on the issue of severe accidents which may occur on operating pressurised water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    While containing other related documents (expert report, mail), this synthetic report analyses and comments some aspects of the assessment and treatment of severe accidents by EDF in its operating PWRs (pressurised water nuclear reactors). These aspects are: the EDF referential related to severe accidents (objectives of consequence limitation and prevention, long term management, probabilistic objectives, radiological objectives, expected performance of equipment and systems), the re-assessment of the 'S3 reference source term' which corresponds to a typical discharge (selection of representative scenarios, new approach based on waste categorization, the taking into account of various species, components and systems), the water management in the reactor tank (risks of explosion, of critical corium level, etc.), the strategy of an anticipated opening of the containment envelope venting-filtration device in order to avoid a core fusion, and the risk associated by a cesspool filling-in by debris

  1. Preliminary thermodynamic study for an efficient turbo-blower external combustion Rankine cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Gómez, Manuel; Romero Gómez, Javier; Ferreiro Garcia, Ramón; Baaliña Insua, Álvaro

    2014-08-01

    This research paper presents a preliminary thermodynamic study of an innovative power plant operating under a Rankine cycle fed by an external combustion system with turbo-blower (TB). The power plant comprises an external combustion system for natural gas, where the combustion gases yield their thermal energy, through a heat exchanger, to a carbon dioxide Rankine cycle operating under supercritical conditions and with quasi-critical condensation. The TB exploits the energy from the pressurised exhaust gases for compressing the combustion air. The study is focused on the comparison of the combustion system's conventional technology with that of the proposed. An energy analysis is carried out and the effect of the flue gas pressure on the efficiency and on the heat transfer in the heat exchanger is studied. The coupling of the TB results in an increase in efficiency and of the convection coefficient of the flue gas with pressure, favouring a reduced volume of the heat exchanger. The proposed innovative system achieves increases in efficiency of around 12 % as well as a decrease in the heat exchanger volume of 3/5 compared with the conventional technology without TB.

  2. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Topical report, LNCFS Levels 1 and 3 test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-17

    This report presents results from the third phase of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICC-1) project demonstrating advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from a coal-fired boiler. The purpose of this project was to study the NO{sub x} emissions characteristics of ABB Combustion Engineering`s (ABB CE) Low NO{sub x} Concentric Firing System (LNCFS) Levels I, II, and III. These technologies were installed and tested in a stepwise fashion at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Lansing Smith Unit 2. The objective of this report is to provide the results from Phase III. During that phase, Levels I and III of the ABB C-E Services Low NO{sub x} Concentric Firing System were tested. The LNCFS Level III technology includes separated overfire air, close coupled overfire air, clustered coal nozzles, flame attachment coal nozzle tips, and concentric firing. The LNCFS Level I was simulated by closing the separated overfire air nozzles of the LNCFS Level III system. Based upon long-term data, LNCFS Level HI reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 45 percent at full load. LOI levels with LNCFS Level III increased slightly, however, tests showed that LOI levels with LNCFS Level III were highly dependent upon coal fineness. After correcting for leakage air through the separated overfire air system, the simulated LNCFS Level I reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 37 percent. There was no increase in LOI with LNCFS Level I.

  3. Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — For more than 30 years The Combustion Research Facility (CRF) has served as a national and international leader in combustion science and technology. The need for a...

  4. Alcohol combustion chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Sarathy, Mani; Oß wald, Patrick; Hansen, Nils; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    . While biofuel production and its use (especially ethanol and biodiesel) in internal combustion engines have been the focus of several recent reviews, a dedicated overview and summary of research on alcohol combustion chemistry is still lacking. Besides

  5. Maximal combustion temperature estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golodova, E; Shchepakina, E

    2006-01-01

    This work is concerned with the phenomenon of delayed loss of stability and the estimation of the maximal temperature of safe combustion. Using the qualitative theory of singular perturbations and canard techniques we determine the maximal temperature on the trajectories located in the transition region between the slow combustion regime and the explosive one. This approach is used to estimate the maximal temperature of safe combustion in multi-phase combustion models

  6. Influence of Advanced Injection Timing and Fuel Additive on Combustion, Performance, and Emission Characteristics of a DI Diesel Engine Running on Plastic Pyrolysis Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kalargaris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the investigation of engine optimisation when plastic pyrolysis oil (PPO is used as the primary fuel of a direct injection diesel engine. Our previous investigation revealed that PPO is a promising fuel; however the results suggested that control parameters should be optimised in order to obtain a better engine performance. In the present work, the injection timing was advanced, and fuel additives were utilised to overcome the issues experienced in the previous work. In addition, spray characteristics of PPO were investigated in comparison with diesel to provide in-depth understanding of the engine behaviour. The experimental results on advanced injection timing (AIT showed reduced brake thermal efficiency and increased carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides emissions in comparison to standard injection timing. On the other hand, the addition of fuel additive resulted in higher engine efficiency and lower exhaust emissions. Finally, the spray tests revealed that the spray tip penetration for PPO is faster than diesel. The results suggested that AIT is not a preferable option while fuel additive is a promising solution for long-term use of PPO in diesel engines.

  7. Uncertainties in hydrogen combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamps, D.W.; Wong, C.C.; Nelson, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Three important areas of hydrogen combustion with uncertainties are identified: high-temperature combustion, flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition, and aerosol resuspension during hydrogen combustion. The uncertainties associated with high-temperature combustion may affect at least three different accident scenarios: the in-cavity oxidation of combustible gases produced by core-concrete interactions, the direct containment heating hydrogen problem, and the possibility of local detonations. How these uncertainties may affect the sequence of various accident scenarios is discussed and recommendations are made to reduce these uncertainties. 40 references

  8. Science review of internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Alex M.K.P.

    2008-01-01

    Internal combustion engines used in transportation produce about 23% of the UK's carbon dioxide emission, up from 14% in 1980. The current science described in this paper suggests that there could be 6-15% improvements in internal combustion fuel efficiency in the coming decade, although filters to meet emission legislation reduce these gains. Using these engines as hybrids with electric motors produces a reduction in energy requirements in the order of 21-28%. Developments beyond the next decade are likely to be dominated by four topics: emission legislation and emission control, new fuels, improved combustion and a range of advanced concepts for energy saving. Emission control is important because current methods for limiting nitrogen oxides and particulate emissions imply extra energy consumption. Of the new fuels, non-conventional fossil-derived fuels are associated with larger greenhouse gas emissions than conventional petroleum-based fuels, while a vehicle propelled by fuel cells consuming non-renewable hydrogen does not necessarily offer an improvement in emissions over the best hybrid internal combustion engines. Improved combustion may be developed for both gasoline and diesel fuels and promises better efficiency as well as lower noxious emissions without the need for filtering. Finally, four advanced concepts are considered: new thermodynamic cycles, a Rankine bottoming cycle, electric turbo-compounding and the use of thermoelectric devices. The latter three all have the common theme of trying to extract energy from waste heat, which represents about 30% of the energy input to an internal combustion engine

  9. New class of combustion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzhanov, A.G.; Borovinskaya, I.P.

    1975-01-01

    A short review is given of the results of work carried out since 1967 on studying the combustion processes caused by the interaction of chemical elements in the condensed phase and leading to the formation of refractory compounds. New phenomena and processes are described which are revealed when investigating the combustion of the systems of this class, viz solid-phase combustion, fast combustion in the condensed phase, filtering combustion, combustion in liquid nitrogen, spinning combustion, self-oscillating combustion, and repeated combustion. A new direction in employment of combustion processes is discussed, viz. a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory nitrides, carbides, borides, silicides and other compounds

  10. Research and development achievement report for fiscal 1994 concerning the creation of advanced combustion technologies utilizing the microgravity environment; 1994 nendo bisho juryoku kankyo wo riyoshita kodo nensho gijutsu soshutsu ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The development committee concluded an agreement about on-site researches with NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) for an international joint study, and the joint study was started at the underground microgravity center. Experiments were conducted at microgravity experimenting facilities and the data obtained were subjected to analysis and evaluation, which eventually contributed to the accumulation of useful data. In this fiscal year, microgravity experimenting facilities were utilized for experiments and tests for (1) the evaluation of the combustion and vaporization of fuel droplets and fuel droplet arrays, (2) analysis and evaluation of high-density fuel combustion characteristics, (3) evaluation of flammability limits, and (4) elucidation of the mechanism of the generation of NOx and the like. A total of 112 drop tests were conducted, and the acquired data were subjected to analysis and evaluation for the elucidation of the combustion mechanism, and findings were collected as mentioned below. Learned were the combustion behavior of fuel droplets such as ignition and flame propagation under item (1), combustion behavior such as ignition and combustion of high-density fuel under item (2), combustion behavior and combustion limits of premixed fuel under (3), and measurement of distribution of combustion products such as OH in the droplet fuel flaming zone under item (4). (NEDO)

  11. Microscale combustion and power generation

    CERN Document Server

    Cadou, Christopher; Ju, Yiguang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in microfabrication technologies have enabled the development of entirely new classes of small-scale devices with applications in fields ranging from biomedicine, to wireless communication and computing, to reconnaissance, and to augmentation of human function. In many cases, however, what these devices can actually accomplish is limited by the low energy density of their energy storage and conversion systems. This breakthrough book brings together in one place the information necessary to develop the high energy density combustion-based power sources that will enable many of these devices to realize their full potential. Engineers and scientists working in energy-related fields will find: An overview of the fundamental physics and phenomena of microscale combustion; Presentations of the latest modeling and simulation techniques for gasphase and catalytic micro-reactors; The latest results from experiments in small-scale liquid film, microtube, and porous combustors, micro-thrusters, a...

  12. Cyclic pressurisation of Mount St Helens dacites and basalt. Laboratory results and implications for lava dome monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Jackie; Dainty, Matthew; Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter; Pallister, John; Meredith, Phillip

    2010-05-01

    Lava domes are frequently subjected to cyclic heating and pressurisation, which may weaken the dome rocks, leading to renewed extrusion, explosions or collapse. These heating and loading cycles can be recreated in the laboratory, allowing the level of crack damage caused by these cycles to be established through analysing elastic moduli. Acoustic emissions (AEs) indicate the timing of cracking, and can also be used to interpret precursory seismicity for eruption prediction. Experiment samples are from Mount St. Helens, USA: 3 dacites from the Pine Creek eruptive period (2.9-2.55 ka), a Castle Creek age basalt (2.55-1.895 ka), and 4 dacites from the 2004-2008 eruption. Each sample was cut into several cylindrical cores (25 mm diameter and 62.5-70 mm long). Some samples were then heated and cooled at 1˚C/ minute to a target temperature of 600o C or 900o C, and held for 2 hours to achieve thermal equilibrium. This heating can cause cracking due to contrasts in thermal expansion of different minerals. Dynamic elastic moduli were calculated for each sample using ultrasonic wave velocity, density and porosity for later comparison to static elastic moduli gathered during deformation. One core of each sample was loaded to failure in uniaxial compression in order to find the short term strength of the sample. For all cyclic loading tests, conducted on pre-heated and unheated cores, samples were loaded at 10-5 s-1 strain rate then unloaded to 5MPa. Subsequent cycles had an increasing peak load. Most had the same rate for unloading, with a few samples unloaded instantaneously. Axial, radial and volumetric strain were determined from the recorded displacement throughout the experiment and used with the axial stress measurements to calculate static elastic moduli. Samples loaded to failure with no cycling generally failed at higher stresses than their cyclically loaded counter-parts, whilst rapid unloading increased their strength. Failure stresses of the dacite lava dome

  13. Combustion modeling in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental assumptions of the Blizard and Keck combustion model for internal combustion engines are examined and a generalization of that model is derived. The most significant feature of the model is that it permits the occurrence of unburned hydrocarbons in the thermodynamic-kinetic modeling of exhaust gases. The general formulas are evaluated in two specific cases that are likely to be significant in the applications of the model.

  14. Boiler using combustible fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

    1974-07-03

    A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

  15. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  16. Lump wood combustion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubesa, Petr; Horák, Jiří; Branc, Michal; Krpec, Kamil; Hopan, František; Koloničný, Jan; Ochodek, Tadeáš; Drastichová, Vendula; Martiník, Lubomír; Malcho, Milan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with the combustion process for lump wood in low-power fireplaces (units to dozens of kW). Such a combustion process is cyclical in its nature, and what combustion facility users are most interested in is the frequency, at which fuel needs to be stoked to the fireplace. The paper defines the basic terms such as burnout curve and burning rate curve, which are closely related to the stocking frequency. The fuel burning rate is directly dependent on the immediate thermal power of the fireplace. This is also related to the temperature achieved in the fireplace, magnitude of flue gas losses and the ability to generate conditions favouring the full burnout of the fuel's combustible component, which, at once ensures the minimum production of combustible pollutants. Another part of the paper describes experiments conducted in traditional fireplaces with a grate, at which well-dried lump wood was combusted.

  17. The John Zink Hamworthy combustion handbook, v.1 fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Baukal, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Despite the length of time it has been around, its importance, and vast amounts of research, combustion is still far from being completely understood. Environmental, cost, and fuel consumption issues add further complexity, particularly in the process and power generation industries. Dedicated to advancing the art and science of industrial combustion, The John Zink Hamworthy Combustion Handbook, Second Edition: Volume One - Fundamentals gives you a strong understanding of the basic concepts and theory. Under the leadership of Charles E. Baukal, Jr., top combustion engineers and technologists f

  18. Flameless Combustion Workshop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gutmark, Ephraim

    2005-01-01

    .... "Flameless Combustion" is characterized by high stability levels with virtually no thermoacoustic instabilities, very low lean stability limits and therefore extremely low NOx production, efficient...

  19. Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL) develops aerospace propulsion technology by performing tests on propulsion components and materials. Altitudes up to 137,000...

  20. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  1. Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Yan, Jinyue

    2016-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of pulverized fuels (PF), as a promising technology for CO2 capture from power plants, has gained a lot of concerns and also advanced considerable research, development and demonstration in the last past years worldwide. The use of CO2 or the mixture of CO2 and H2O vapor as th...

  2. Design and development of rolled joint for moderator sparger channel of an Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joemon, V.; Sinha, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors are natural uranium fuelled heavy water moderated and cooled reactors. As per the conventional scheme, the moderator enters through one or more inlet nozzles penetrating the calandria shell and flows out through outlet nozzles. Baffles are fixed at the inlet nozzles for proper distribution of moderator in the calandria and to avoid the impact of the jet on the neighbouring calandria tubes. An alternate scheme for moderator inlet has been conceived and engineered in which three lower peripheral lattice locations of the reactor are converted into moderator inlets. This is achieved by moderator sparger channels each containing a 5 m long perforated zircaloy-2 sparger tube rolled to the calandria tube sheets and extended by stainless steel tubular components (inserts) at both ends of a sparger channel. Moderator enters the sparger channel at both ends and flows into the calandria. In the absence of standard codes for design of rolled joints, it was requires to develop these joints based on trials followed by various tests. this paper discusses the details of the rolled joint developed for this purpose, the details of the trials with test results and optimization of rolling parameters for these joints

  3. Experimental study of the effect of neutron radiation on pressurised water reactor vessel steel resilience - First part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdeau, Jean-Jacques

    1969-12-01

    After having outlined the importance of the embrittlement of vessel steels by neutrons during the exploitation of pressurised water reactors, the author reports a set of tests which aimed at determining the effect of neutron irradiation on vessel steel resilience for operated, under construction or projected pressurized water reactors. He also tries to highlight the influence of irradiation temperature and of initial thermal treatments, and to look for a restoration thermal treatment of neutron-induced damages which could be applied to the considered vessels. Tests were performed on V Charpy resilience samples. Some samples have been irradiated by the Pile Department of the Grenoble CEN and then broken by the Laboratory of very high activity, whereas other samples have been irradiated in a prototype vessel and broken by a Cadarache department. The author presents characteristics of the studied steels (chemical compositions, thermal treatments), describes sample irradiation conditions, and the method of assessment of the transition temperature after irradiation, presents experimental results, discusses their interpretation, and presents future tests to be performed [fr

  4. Role of research and development in life management programme and upgradation of safety of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupani, B.B.; Vijayan, P.K.; Rama Rao, A.; Sinha, R.K.

    2009-01-01

    At present, India has a fleet of thirteen small size 220 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and two medium size 540 MWe PHWRs. Reactor Engineering Division (RED) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has pursued multi-faceted Research and Development programmes to support each phase of PHWR i.e. design, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance, In-Service Inspection, repair and replacement and life extension, This programme is mainly related to life management of coolant channels, development of tooling and techniques for In-service Inspection of coolant channels, development of repair and replacement technology for coolant channels and moderator system, In-house development of technology and equipments like rolled joints to joint dissimilar metals and lancing equipment for steam generator and state-of art diagnostic systems for trouble shooting critical operating systems. The strong R and D support provided in the programme has significantly contributed towards safe operation of PHWRs. This paper gives the highlights of the major activities in above areas with their end uses and capability. (author)

  5. Vibration and acoustic signatures of the water circulation pump in the pressurised LMR fuel element test loop at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents results of vibration and acoustic field measurements made on the water circulating pump in the IPEN - CNEN/Sao Paulo pressurised water loop. The use of such measurements to monitor the vibration of coolant circulating pumps of light water reactors is indicated. Measurements were made for defined water flows and pressures varying between 5 bar/5.22 ls sup(-1) and 40 bar/17,42ls sup(-1). Analyses of various recordings of two accelerometer signals and 1 microphone signal were made principally in the frequency range 0-5 KHz using a Nicolet 660 A Fourier analyser. Results of these analyses indicate that CPSD distributions might be more sensitive indicators of changes in pump operating conditions than the more frequently used PSD distributions. In addition, as an indicador of changing pump conditions the acoustic-vibration signal pair is perhaps a more sensitive indicator than the vibration-vibration signal pair. While coherence distributions are elearly sensitive to changing pump conditions, trends in the change of these distributions were not readily identified. It is recommended that more detailed analyses be made using pattern recognition techniques in conjunction with frequency zooming. (Author) [pt

  6. Integration of acoustic emission systems within Integri-TechTM analysis system for structural health monitoring of pressurised engineering plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghouri, A A; Galbraith, Walter; Pierce, S Gareth; Gachagan, Anthony; Rafferty, Steven; Pickwell, Andy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this Acoustic Emission (AE) based Structural Health Monitoring project is to enable accurate location of AE sources in pressurised engineering plant and to use AE source location data to establish defect locations for use within Integri-Tech TM ; a finite element based analysis, monitoring and fitness for service assessment system. Integri-Tech TM is a windows based system which carries out combined analysis and assessment providing fatigue life and remnant life calculations and inspection priorities presenting the results in an accessible web portal format. The software uses finite element stress models created in the companion software Model Wizard. The AE monitoring system that has been developed can be used with an array of up to four AE broad band sensor channels with associated signal processing. Using a flexible approach in MATLAB, the authors have developed algorithms which were used for analysing the received AE signals to extract information about the nature and location of the source. The ability to carry out source location and possibly perform real time monitoring (detecting cracking as it occurs) is attractive feature of the AE system developed for this project. The time of arrival (TOA) data was used by Integri-Tech TM software to calculate source location using its own built-in algorithm, and this was verified independently using a MATLAB approach. (paper)

  7. The effect of actuator nozzle designs on the electrostatic charge generated in pressurised metered dose inhaler aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Young, Paul M; Fletcher, David F; Chan, Hak Kim; Long, Edward; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Traini, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the influence of different actuator nozzle designs on aerosol electrostatic charges and aerosol performances for pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Four actuator nozzle designs (flat, curved flat, cone and curved cone) were manufactured using insulating thermoplastics (PET and PTFE) and conducting metal (aluminium) materials. Aerosol electrostatic profiles of solution pMDI formulations containing propellant HFA 134a with different ethanol concentration and/or model drug beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) were studied using a modified electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) for all actuator designs and materials. The mass of the deposited drug was analysed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both curved nozzle designs for insulating PET and PTFE actuators significantly influenced aerosol electrostatics and aerosol performance compared with conducting aluminium actuator, where reversed charge polarity and higher throat deposition were observed with pMDI formulation containing BDP. Results are likely due to the changes in plume geometry caused by the curved edge nozzle designs and the bipolar charging nature of insulating materials. This study demonstrated that actuator nozzle designs could significantly influence the electrostatic charges profiles and aerosol drug deposition pattern of pMDI aerosols, especially when using insulating thermoplastic materials where bipolar charging is more dominant.

  8. Heat treatments of irradiated uranium oxide in a pressurised water reactor (P.W.R.): swelling and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharie, I.

    1997-01-01

    In order to keep pressurised water reactors at a top level of safety, it is necessary to understand the chemical and mechanical interaction between the cladding and the fuel pellet due to a temperature increase during a rapid change in reactor. In this process, the swelling of uranium oxide plays an important role. It comes from a bubble precipitation of fission gases which are released when they are in contact with the outside. Therefore, the aim of this thesis consists in acquiring a better understanding of the mechanisms which come into play. Uranium oxide samples, from a two cycles irradiated fuel, first have been thermal treated between 1000 deg C and 1700 deg C for 5 minutes to ten hours. The gas release amount related to time has been measured for each treatment. The comparison of the experimental results with a numerical model has proved satisfactory: it seems that the gases release, after the formation of intergranular tunnels, is controlled by the diffusion phenomena. Afterwards, the swelling was measured on the samples. The microscopic examination shows that the bubbles are located in the grain boundaries and have a lenticular shape. The swelling can be explained by the bubbles coalescence and a model was developed based on this observation. An equation allows to calculate the intergranular swelling in function of time and temperature. The study gives the opportunity to predict the fission gases behaviour during a fuel temperature increase. (author)

  9. Pressurised light water reactor failed fuel monitoring. Comparison of international strategies used in the surveillance of the primary barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldworth, Robin; Dinse, Christelle; Mole, Didier

    2014-01-01

    As part of its focus on continuous improvement, the nuclear industry has devoted considerable effort to the prevention, monitoring, characterisation and impact mitigation of fuel failures. Failed fuel and primary circuit activity monitoring strategies have thus evolved over time, with utilities changing their strategies as a function of operational experience, regulator encouragement and improvements to scientific understanding. Differences among utility fuel monitoring strategies are therefore to be expected. This paper compares and analyses a selection of failed fuel and primary circuit activity monitoring strategies employed at French, American, South-African and Belgian pressurised water reactors (PWRs). These strategies, which were received in response to a questionnaire sent by Electricité de France, are discussed with a number of potential best practices and areas for future research and development being provided. Finally, and so as to ensure the utility of this paper with regards to the development, or evolution of, failed fuel monitoring strategies, this paper has been split into four sections representing the primary radiochemistry indicator groups: gross, calculated, fission products and activated corrosion products. (author)

  10. Combustion Stratification for Naphtha from CI Combustion to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Yanzhao; Dawood, Alaaeldin; Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates the combustion stratification from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC). Experiments are performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for diesel and naphtha (RON

  11. Co-gasification of biomass and coal in a pressurised fluidised bed gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, L.; Hein, K.R.G. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    The Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology is participating in an EU funded, international, R + D project which is designed to aid European industry in addressing issues regarding co-utilisation of biomass and/or waste in advanced coal conversion processes. The project comprises three main programmes, each of which includes a number of smaller subprogrammes. The three main programmes are: Coal-biomass systems component development and design; Coal-biomass environmental studies; Techno-economic assessment studies. (orig)

  12. Co-gasification of biomass and coal in a pressurised fluidised bed gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, L; Hein, K R.G. [Lab. for Thermal Power Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    The Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology is participating in an EU funded, international, R + D project which is designed to aid European industry in addressing issues regarding co-utilisation of biomass and/or waste in advanced coal conversion processes. The project comprises three main programmes, each of which includes a number of smaller subprogrammes. The three main programmes are: Coal-biomass systems component development and design; Coal-biomass environmental studies; Techno-economic assessment studies. (orig)

  13. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  14. An insight on the spray-A combustion characteristics by means of RANS and LES simulations using flamelet-based combustion models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkurt, B.; Akargün, H.Y.; Somers, L.M.T.; Deen, N.G.; Novella, R.; Perez-Sanchez, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of reacting sprays provides access to information not available even applying the most advanced experimental techniques. This is particularly evident if the combustion model handles detailed chemical kinetic models efficiently to describe the fuel

  15. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  16. Catalytically enhanced combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, C.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a fuel having improved combustion efficiency. It comprises a petroleum based liquid hydrocarbon; and a combustion catalyst comprising from about 18 to about 21 weight percent naphthalene, from about 75 to about 80 weight percent toluene, and from about 2.8 to about 3.2 weight percent benzyl alcohol

  17. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers

  18. Chemical Processes Related to Combustion in Fluidised Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Lindqvist, Oliver [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry

    2002-12-01

    This report covers work that has been carried out in the combustion chemistry group at the Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry, Chalmers, within the STEM project 12859-1, during the period 2000-07-01 to 2002-06-30. The work was comprised of the following parts: Sulphur chemistry under pressurised and atmospheric conditions; Gas/solid reactions related to sintering and fouling; Chemistry of volatile metals in combustion; Ash leaching properties; Theoretical modelling of the interactions between ions in a solution and mineral surfaces; Some related issues and co-operations with other departments. The work on sulphur chemistry has been a central issue in our group and it has now been finalised with a PhD thesis discussing some aspects of the sulphation of limestone under pressurised conditions. The influence of a number of parameters on the sulphation efficiency was investigated and compared with similar studies under atmospheric conditions. In a special study it was shown that the influence of alternating calcining - non-calcining conditions on the conversion was substantial. In addition, the oxidation of CaS and sulphided limestone was studied and a regeneration method for the sulphide sorbent was proposed. In the project part concerning gas - solid reactions that are relevant to sintering and fouling, the application of an on-line measurement technique for the study of alkali metal capture by kaolin or other sorbents is described. A new reactor set-up has been constructed and the initial results from this set up are promising. The chemistry of cadmium in combustion of MSW and biomass is the object of a PhD project. This work has been concentrated on the task of identifying Cd-compounds in fly ash samples. It has now come to a point where enough data has been collected to make it possible to give an indication about the Cd speciation in some ash types. In MSW ash particles, cadmium seem to occur mainly as chloride, oxide and sulphate. The work will continue

  19. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-08-17

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  20. Fuels and Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses the combustion processes and the link to the fuel properties that are suitable for them. It describes the basic three concepts, including spark ignition (SI) and compression ignition (CI), and homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The fuel used in a CI engine is vastly different from that in an SI engine. In an SI engine, the fuel should sustain high pressure and temperature without autoignition. Apart from the dominating SI and CI engines, it is also possible to operate with a type of combustion: autoignition. With HCCI, the fuel and air are fully premixed before combustion as in the SI engine, but combustion is started by the increased pressure and temperature during the compression stroke. Apart from the three combustion processes, there are also a few combined or intermediate concepts, such as Spark-Assisted Compression Ignition (SACI). Those concepts are discussed in terms of the requirements of fuel properties.

  1. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    .... The PDF approach to turbulent combustion has the advantages of fully representing the turbulent fluctuations of species and temperature, and of allowing realistic combustion chemistry to be implemented...

  2. Second law comparison of oxy-fuel combustion and post-combustion carbon dioxide separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Adam P.; Simon, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    To define 2nd law efficiency targets for novel separation technologies, a simplified model of a power plant with two forms of CO 2 capture was developed. In this investigation, oxy-fuel combustion and post-combustion CO 2 separation were compared on an exergetic basis. Using exergy balances and black-box models of power plant components, multiple scenarios were run to determine the impact of plant configuration and separation unit efficiency on overall plant performance. Second law efficiency values from the literature were used to set the baseline performance of various CO 2 separation configurations. Assumed advances in 2nd law efficiency were used to determine the potential for overall system performance improvement. It was found that the 2nd law efficiency of air separation must reach a critical value before the thermodynamics of oxy-fuel combustion become favorable. Changes in operating equivalence ratio significantly move the tipping-point between post-combustion and oxy-fuel strategies

  3. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of 2-Methylhexane Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah Y.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important for investigating the combustion behavior of diesel, gasoline, and aviation fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracy in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and kinetic model for a gasoline surrogate fuel, 2-methylhexane, with recently published group values and rate rules. These update provides a better agreement with rapid compression machine measurements of ignition delay time, while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  4. Advanced energy production based on fossil and renewable fuels; Energiantuotannon tehostaminen fossiilisiin ja uusiutuviin polttoaineisiin perustuvassa energiantuotannossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepola, J.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland)

    2002-07-01

    The objects of this survey were gasification and combustion techniques, coproduction alternatives of energy, fuels and chemicals, as well as high-temperature fuel cells and hybrid fuel cell systems. The potential and market outlook of pressurised fluidised-bed combustion have been declined, i.a., due to the good competitivity of natural gas combined-cycle technology, tightening emission standards, and the development outlook for gasification combined-cycle technology. Development of a combined-cycle power plant process based on pressurised pulverised combustion of coal is still at an initial stage. The oxygen based IGCC plants in the world have so far been demonstration plants. The IGCC technology is expected to commercialise first in residual oil gasification applications integrated to oil refineries and then in coal powered condensed power plants. In addition, one biomass-based IGCC plant has been constructed. This process is so called simplified IGCC, utilising pressurised air blown gasification and hot gas cleaning. The test trials of this plant were completed in 1999. The process is technically feasible also for large-scale demonstration. Gasification technology has also been developed for black liquor. The ChemRec black liquor gasification process is technically the most advanced process at the moment. The atmospheric process has been demonstrated and the pressurised process demonstration is about to start in Sweden and in USA. In utilising biomass fuels or black liquor, the IGCC process offers the possibility to significantly increase the ratio of electrical power to thermal power with combined cycle. Synthesis gas produced by gasification technology can be used for producing different gaseous or liquid fuels and chemicals and for energy production. In a flexible use of feedstocks and products this coproduction method offers a significantly more feasible alternative to present energy production plants. There are several projects underway in the United States

  5. Versatile Affordable Advanced Fuels and Combustion Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Fuels, Vol. 22, No. 4, 2008 2415 165 elastomer is highly fluorinated and relatively inert, as evident by the very low percentage of volume swell. Previous...decomposition often include gums, varnishes , and coke, which are detrimental because they can foul and plug fuel system components, such as filters

  6. Nonsteady Combustion Mechanisms of Advanced Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branch, Melvyn

    1997-01-01

    .... The individual tasks which we are studying will pursue solid propellant decomposition under unsteady conditions, nonsteady aspects of gas phase flame structure measurements, numerical modeling...

  7. The influence of long-range residual stress on plastic collapse of pressurised pipes with and without flaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Gui-Yi; Smith, David J.; Pavier, Martyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Structural integrity assessments of pressurised pipes include plastic collapse as a potential failure mode. This paper uses analytical and numerical models to explore the effect of the end conditions of the pipe on the collapse pressure. The pipe is open-ended and two bounding conditions are addressed: one where axial loading is applied to the ends of the pipe and the other where a fixed axial displacement is applied. The fixed axial displacement condition represents long-range or fit-up residual stress. It is common practice to treat long-range residual stress in the same way as axial loading, leading to the conclusion that such long-range residual stress reduces the collapse pressure. Pipes in a number of states are considered: pipes with no flaws, pipes with fully circumferential flaws and pipes with part circumferential flaws. The flaws consist of either a crack or a slot on the external surface of the pipe. For the axial load condition, the collapse pressure for a flawed pipe is reduced when higher magnitudes of tensile or compressive axial loads are applied. For the fixed displacement condition however, the magnitude of the displacement may have little or no effect on the collapse pressure. The results of the work indicate that substantially conservative assessments may be made of the collapse pressures of pipes containing flaws, when long-range residual stress is taken to be a form of axial loading. -- Highlights: • The effect of end conditions on the collapse pressure of a pipe has been explored. • Fixed displacement conditions represent long-range residual stress. • Long-range residual stress is commonly thought to contribute to plastic collapse. • We show long-range residual stress has no influence on collapse for flawed pipes. • It is therefore possible to reduce conservatism in structural integrity assessment

  8. The release of nitrogen in coal combustion and pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varey, J.E.; Hindmarsh, C.J.; Thomas, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    Environmental aspects of coal utilization are a major concern. Recent advances in the development of low NO x burners and the emerging technologies of fluidized bed combustion have led to the identification of coal char nitrogen as the major contributor to the nitrogen oxides released during combustion. The temperature programmed combustion and pyrolysis of a series of coals covering a wide range of rank have been investigated. In addition, maceral concentrates have been investigated to assess the variation in the combustion behavior and the release of nitrogen in the pyrolysis and combustion of macerals. This investigation has involved the use of thermogravimetric analysis - mass spectrometry (TG-MS) with two sampling options: (1) ∼1cm from the sample and (2) at the exit of the TG. The former allows reactive species to be identified in the combustion of the coals. These temperature programmed combustion results have been compared with similar measurements carried out at the exit of the TG where the products are at equilibrium. In addition, pyrolysis studies have been carried out under similar conditions. The results show that reactive intermediate species such as HCN, (CN) 2 , COS etc. can be detected in the combustion products. The evolution of these species during combustion are compared with the pyrolysis products of the coal. The results are discussed in relation to the structure of the coals and the conversion of volatile species and char nitrogen to nitrogen oxides

  9. Research and development with regard to severe accidents in pressurised water reactors: Summary and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document reviews the current state of research on severe accidents in France and other countries. It aims to provide an objective vision, and one that's as exhaustive as possible, for this innovative field of research. It will help in identifying R and D requirements and categorising them hierarchically. Obviously, the resulting prioritisation must be completed by a rigorous examination of needs in terms of safety analyses for various risks and physical phenomena, especially in relation to Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessments. PSA-2 should be sufficiently advanced so as not to obscure physical phenomena that, if not properly understood, might result in substantial uncertainty. It should be noted that neither the safety analyses nor PSA-2 are presented in this document. This report describes the physical phenomena liable to occur during a severe accident, in the reactor vessel and the containment. It presents accident sequences and methods for limiting impact. The corresponding scenarios are detailed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with in-vessel accident progression, examining core degradation (3.1), corium behaviour in the lower head (3.2), vessel rupture (3.3) and high-pressure core meltdown (3.4). Chapter 4 focuses on phenomena liable to induce early containment failure, namely direct containment heating (4.1), hydrogen risk (4.2) and steam explosions (4.3). The phenomenon that could lead to a late containment failure, namely molten core-concrete interaction, is discussed in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 focuses on problems related to in-vessel and ex-vessel corium retention and cooling, namely in-vessel retention by flooding the primary circuit or the reactor pit (6.1), cooling of the corium under water during the corium-concrete interaction (6.2), corium spreading (6.3) and ex-vessel core catchers (6.4). Chapter 7 relates to the release and transport of fission products (FP), addressing the themes of in-vessel FP release (7.1) and ex-vessel FP release (7.3), FP

  10. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  11. Shale oil combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-dabbas, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    A 'coutant' carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs

  12. Shale oil combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-dabbas, M A

    1992-05-01

    A `coutant` carbon steel combustion chamber cooled by water jacket was conslructed to burn diesel fuel and mixlure of shale oil and diesel fuels. During experimental work nir fuel ratio was determined, temperaturces were measured using Chromel/ Almel thermocouple, finally the gasous combustion product analysis was carricd out using gas chromatograph technique. The constructed combustion chamber was operating salisfactory for several hours of continous work. According to the measurements it was found that: the flame temperature of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was greater than the flame temperature of diesel fuel. and the sulfer emissious of a mixture of diesel and shale oil fuels was higher than that of diesel fuel. Calculation indicated that the dry gas energy loss was very high and the incomplete combustion energy loss very small. (author). 23 refs., 35 figs.

  13. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  14. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included

  15. An analysis of workers' tritium concentration in urine samples as a function of time after intake at Korean pressurised heavy water reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Geun; Kong, Tae Young

    2012-12-01

    In general, internal exposure from tritium at pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWRs) accounts for ∼20-40 % of the total radiation dose. Tritium usually reaches the equilibrium concentration after a few hours inside the body and is then excreted from the body with an effective half-life in the order of 10 d. In this study, tritium metabolism was reviewed using its excretion rate in urine samples of workers at Korean PHWRs. The tritium concentration in workers' urine samples was also measured as a function of time after intake. On the basis of the monitoring results, changes in the tritium concentration inside the body were then analysed.

  16. Combustion characteristics and influential factors of isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xingcai; Ji, Libin; Ma, Junjun; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Huang, Zhen [Key Lab. for Power Machinery and Engineering of MOE, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents an experimental study on the isooctane active-thermal atmosphere combustion (ATAC) which is assisted by two-stage reaction of n-heptane. The active-thermal atmosphere is created by low- and high-temperature reactions of n-heptane which is injected at intake port, and isooctane is directly injected into combustion chamber near the top dead center. The effects of isooctane injection timing, active-thermal atmosphere intensity, overall equivalence ratio, and premixed ratio on combustion characteristics and emissions are investigated. The experimental results reveal that, the isooctane ignition and combustion can be classified to thermal atmosphere combustion, active atmosphere combustion, and active-thermal atmosphere combustion respectively according to the extent of n-heptane oxidation as well as effects of isooctane quenching and charge cooling. n-Heptane equivalence ratio, isooctane equivalence ratio and isooctane delivery advance angle are major control parameters. In one combustion cycle, the isooctane ignited and burned after those of n-heptane, and then this combustion phenomenon can also be named as dual-fuel sequential combustion (DFSC). The ignition timing of the overall combustion event is mainly determined by n-heptane equivalence ratio and can be controlled in flexibility by simultaneously adjusting isooctane equivalence ratio. The isooctane ignition regime, overall thermal efficiency, and NO{sub x} emissions show strong sensitivity to the fuel delivery advance angle between 20 CA BTDC and 25 CA BTDC. (author)

  17. Sandia Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.C.; Palmer, R.E.; Montana, C.A. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    During the late 1970s, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''user facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative-involving US inventories, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions several research projects which have been simulated by working groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship program, supported through the Office of Energy Research, has been instrumental in the success of some of these joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents results of calendar year 1988, separated thematically into eleven categories. Referred journal articles appearing in print during 1988 and selected other publications are included at the end of Section 11. Our traditional'' research activities--combustion chemistry, reacting flows, diagnostics, engine and coal combustion--have been supplemented by a new effort aimed at understanding combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

  18. Gasoline Combustion Fundamentals DOE FY17 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekoto, Isaac W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Advanced automotive gasoline engines that leverage a combination of reduced heat transfer, throttling, and mechanical losses; shorter combustion durations; and higher compression and mixture specific heat ratios are needed to meet aggressive DOE VTP fuel economy and pollutant emission targets. Central challenges include poor combustion stability at low-power conditions when large amounts of charge dilution are introduced and high sensitivity of conventional inductive coil ignition systems to elevated charge motion and density for boosted high-load operation. For conventional spark ignited operation, novel low-temperature plasma (LTP) or pre-chamber based ignition systems can improve dilution tolerances while maintaining good performance characteristics at elevated charge densities. Moreover, these igniters can improve the control of advanced compression ignition (ACI) strategies for gasoline at low to moderate loads. The overarching research objective of the Gasoline Combustion Fundamentals project is to investigate phenomenological aspects related to enhanced ignition. The objective is accomplished through targeted experiments performed in a single-cylinder optically accessible research engine or an in-house developed optically accessible spark calorimeter (OASC). In situ optical diagnostics and ex situ gas sampling measurements are performed to elucidate important details of ignition and combustion processes. Measurements are further used to develop and validate complementary high-fidelity ignition simulations. The primary project audience is automotive manufacturers, Tier 1 suppliers, and technology startups—close cooperation has resulted in the development and execution of project objectives that address crucial mid- to long-range research challenges.

  19. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Meyer, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition have been obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. The reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate-fired boiler...... but under well-defined conditions. The experimental results are compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predictions, using the eddy dissipation model (EDM) its well as the eddy dissipation concept (EDC). The use of EDC allows for implementation of more advanced combustion schemes; we have...... tested the four-step global mechanism by Jones and Lindstedt (Combust. Flame 1988, 73, 233-249), and the 16 species and 41 reaction skeletal mechanism by Yang and Pope (Combust. Flame 1998, 112 16-32). The CFD model captured the main features of the combustion process and flow patterns. The application...

  20. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulations for Combustion Science: Past, Present, and Future

    KAUST Repository

    Im, Hong G.

    2017-12-12

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion have evolved tremendously in the past decades, thanks to the rapid advances in high performance computing technology. Today’s DNS is capable of incorporating detailed reaction mechanisms and transport properties, with physical parameter ranges approaching laboratory scale flames, thereby allowing direct comparison and cross-validation against laser diagnostic measurements. While these developments have led to significantly improved understanding of fundamental turbulent flame characteristics, there are increasing demands to explore combustion regimes at higher levels of turbulent Reynolds (Re) and Karlovitz (Ka) numbers, with a practical interest in new combustion engines driving towards higher efficiencies and lower emissions. This chapter attempts to provide a brief historical review of the progress in DNS of turbulent combustion during the past decades. Major scientific accomplishments and contributions towards fundamental understanding of turbulent combustion will be summarized and future challenges and research needs will be proposed.

  2. High temperature combustion facility: present capabilities and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Ciccarelli, G.

    1995-01-01

    The high-temperature combustion facility constructed and operated by the Department of Advanced Technology of Brookhaven National Laboratory to support and promote research in the area of hydrogen combustion phenomena in mixtures prototypical to light-water reactor containment atmospheres under potential severe accident conditions is reported. The facility can accommodate combustion research activities encompassing the fields of detonation physics, flame acceleration, and low-speed deflagration in a wide range of combustible gas mixtures at initial temperatures up to 700 K and post-combustion pressures up to 100 atmospheres. Some preliminary test results are presented that provide further evidence that the effect of temperature is to increase the sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation [ru

  3. Evaluation of endcap welds in thin walled fuel elements of pressurised heavy water reactor by ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, C.V.; Thavasimuthu, M.; Kalyansundaram, P.; Bhattacharya, D.K.; Raj, Baldev

    1992-01-01

    In the pressurised heavy water reactor systems of India, the fuel is encapsulated in thin-walled tubes (0.342 mm) closed with endcaps by resistance welding. The integrity of these fuel elements should be such that no fission gas leakage takes place during reactor operation. The quality control of the endcap welds needed to satisfy this requirement includes helium leak test and destructive metallographic test (on sample basis). This paper discusses the feasibility study that has been carried out in the author's laboratory to develop an immersion ultrasonic test method for evaluating the integrity of the endcap weld region. Through holes of various sizes (0.15mm, 0.2mm, 0.4mm diameter and 0.185mm and 0.342mm deep) were machined by spark erosion machining at the weld joints to simulate defects of various sizes. Line focussed probe of 10 MHz frequency was used for the testing. It was possible to detect clearly all the machined holes. Based on the above standardised procedure, further testing was done on endcap welds which were rejected during fabrication on account of showing leak rate of 3 x 10 -6 std. c.c/sec. or more during helium leak test. Though it was possible to get echoes from the natural defects in the rejected tubes with echo amplitude of 70%, the signal was accompanied by the geometrical reflection (noise) giving an amplitude of 20% from the weld region, giving rise to the problem of resolving the defect indication from the geometric indications. Therefore, signal analysis approach was adopted. The signal obtained from the weld zone were subjected to various analysis procedures like a) autopower spectrum, b) total energy content and c) demodulated auto correlation function. It was possible by all the three methods to differentiate the defect signal from those due to weld geometry or due to noise. Subsequently, metallography was carried out to characterise the type of defects observed during the ultrasonic testing. (author). 4 figs

  4. Two-phase flow experiments in a model of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Tobias; Vallee, Christophe; Lucas, Dirk; Beyer, Matthias; Deendarlianto

    2011-09-15

    In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour in a complex reactor-typical geometry and to supply suitable data for CFD code validation, a model of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor was built at FZD. The hot leg model is operated in the pressure chamber of the TOPFLOW test facility, which is used to perform high-pressure experiments under pressure equilibrium with the inside atmosphere of the chamber. This technique makes it possible to visualise the two-phase flow through large windows, also at reactor-typical pressure levels. In order to optimise the optical observation possibilities, the test section was designed with a rectangular cross-section. Experiments were performed with air and water at 1.5 and 3.0 bar at room temperature as well as with steam and water at 15, 30 and 50 bar and the corresponding saturation temperature (i.e. up to 264 C). The total of 194 runs are divided into 4 types of experiments covering stationary co-current flow, counter-current flow, flow without water circulation and transient counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) experiments. This report provides a detailed documentation of the experiments including information on the experimental setup, experimental procedure, test matrix and on the calibration of the measuring devices. The available data is described and data sheets were arranged for each experiment in order to give an overview of the most important parameters. For the cocurrent flow experiments, water level histograms were arranged and used to characterise the flow in the hot leg. In fact, the form of the probability distribution was found to be sensitive to the boundary conditions and, therefore, is useful for the CFD comparison. Furthermore, the flooding characteristics of the hot leg model plotted in terms of the classical Wallis parameter or Kutateladze number were found to fail to properly correlate the data of the air/water and steam/water series. Therefore, a modified Wallis parameter is proposed, which

  5. Development of Hplc Techniques for the Analysis of Trace Metal Species in the Primary Coolant of a Pressurised Water Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Keiron Robert Philip

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The need to monitor corrosion products in the primary circuit of a pressurised water reactor (PWR), at a concentration of 10pg ml^{-1} is discussed. A review of trace and ultra-trace metal analysis, relevant to the specific requirements imposed by primary coolant chemistry, indicated that high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with preconcentration of sample was an ideal technique. A HPLC system was developed to determine trace metal species in simulated PWR primary coolant. In order to achieve the desired detection limit an on-line preconcentration system had to be developed. Separations were performed on Aminex A9 and Benson BC-X10 analytical columns. Detection was by post column reaction with Eriochrome Black T and Calmagite Linear calibrations of 2.5-100ng of cobalt (the main species of interest), were achieved using up to 200ml samples. The detection limit for a 200ml sample was 10pg ml^{-1}. In order to achieve the desired aim of on-line collection of species at 300^circ C, the use of inorganic ion-exchangers is essential. A novel application, utilising the attractive features of the inorganic ion-exchangers titanium dioxide, zirconium dioxide, zirconium arsenophosphate and pore controlled glass beads, was developed for the preconcentration of trace metal species at temperature and pressure. The performance of these exchangers, at ambient and 300^ circC was assessed by their inclusion in the developed analytical system and by the use of radioisotopes. The particular emphasis during the development has been upon accuracy, reproducibility of recovery, stability of reagents and system contamination, studied by the use of radioisotopes and response to post column reagents. This study in conjunction with work carried out at Winfrith, resulted in a monitoring system that could follow changes in coolant chemistry, on deposition and release of metal species in simulated PWR water loops. On

  6. Two-phase flow experiments in a model of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Tobias; Vallee, Christophe; Lucas, Dirk; Beyer, Matthias; Deendarlianto

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate the two-phase flow behaviour in a complex reactor-typical geometry and to supply suitable data for CFD code validation, a model of the hot leg of a pressurised water reactor was built at FZD. The hot leg model is operated in the pressure chamber of the TOPFLOW test facility, which is used to perform high-pressure experiments under pressure equilibrium with the inside atmosphere of the chamber. This technique makes it possible to visualise the two-phase flow through large windows, also at reactor-typical pressure levels. In order to optimise the optical observation possibilities, the test section was designed with a rectangular cross-section. Experiments were performed with air and water at 1.5 and 3.0 bar at room temperature as well as with steam and water at 15, 30 and 50 bar and the corresponding saturation temperature (i.e. up to 264 C). The total of 194 runs are divided into 4 types of experiments covering stationary co-current flow, counter-current flow, flow without water circulation and transient counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) experiments. This report provides a detailed documentation of the experiments including information on the experimental setup, experimental procedure, test matrix and on the calibration of the measuring devices. The available data is described and data sheets were arranged for each experiment in order to give an overview of the most important parameters. For the cocurrent flow experiments, water level histograms were arranged and used to characterise the flow in the hot leg. In fact, the form of the probability distribution was found to be sensitive to the boundary conditions and, therefore, is useful for the CFD comparison. Furthermore, the flooding characteristics of the hot leg model plotted in terms of the classical Wallis parameter or Kutateladze number were found to fail to properly correlate the data of the air/water and steam/water series. Therefore, a modified Wallis parameter is proposed, which

  7. Controllable production of liquid and solid biofuels by doping-free, microwave-assisted, pressurised pyrolysis of hemicellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.; Remón, J.; Shuttleworth, P.S.; Jiang, Z.; Fan, J.; Clark, J.H.; Budarin, V.L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Microwave pyrolysis of xylan in the absence of any external microwave absorber. • High energy-efficient and controllable production of biochar and bio-oil from xylan. • Water in liquid phase is needed for fast microwave pyrolysis. • Production of bio-oil and bio-char with HHVs 52% and 19% greater than that of xylan. - Abstract: Batch, pressurised microwave-assisted pyrolysis of hemicellulose in the absence of any external microwave absorber was found to be a promising route for the production of bio-based chemicals and biofuels. The experiments were conducted in a 10 mL batch reactor using a fixed power of 200 W employing different initial masses of xylan (0.1–0.7 g) for a maximum time, temperature and pressure of 10 min, 250 °C and 200 psi, respectively. The gas, bio-oil and solid (char) yields varied by 16–40%, 2–21% and 40–82%, respectively. Char production is preferential using a low amount of xylan (<0.25 g), while bio-oil production is favoured using a high amount of xylan (0.25–0.7 g). The effect of the sample mass is accounted for by the different physical state of the volatiles released during pyrolysis depending on the pressure attained during the experiment. This permits the process to be easily customised for the selective production of liquid (bio-oil) or solid (bio-char). Regarding the bio-oil, it is composed of a mixture of platform chemicals such as aldehydes, alkenes, phenols, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHC), cyclic ketones and furans, with the composition varying depending on the initial mass of xylan. The char had a higher proportion of C together with a lower proportion of O than the original feedstock. Energy efficiencies of 100 and 26% were achieved for char and bio-oil production, respectively; thus leading to an increase in the HHV of the products (with respect to the original feedstock) of 52% for char and 19% for bio-oil.

  8. Ab initio quantum chemistry for combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, M.; Lengsfield, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in theoretical and computational methods, coupled with the rapid development of powerful and inexpensive computers, fuel the current rapid development in computational quantum chemistry (QC). Nowhere is this more evident than in the areas of QC most relevant to combustion: the description of bond breaking and rate phenomena. although the development of faster computers with larger memories has had a major impact on the scope of problems that can be addressed with QC, the development of new theoretical techniques and capabilities is responsible for adding new dimensions in QC and has paved the way for the unification of QC electronic structure calculations with statistical and dynamical models of chemical reactions. These advances will be stressed in this chapter. This paper describes past accomplishments selectively to set the stage for discussion of ideas or techniques that we believe will have significant impact on combustion research. Thus, the focus of the chapter is as much on the future as it is on the past

  9. Measure Guideline: Combustion Safety for Natural Draft Appliances Through Appliance Zone Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, J. [Center for Energy and Environment, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Bohac, D. [Center for Energy and Environment, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This measure guideline covers how to assess and carry out the isolation of natural draft combustion appliances from the conditioned space of low-rise residential buildings. It deals with combustion appliances located either within the living space in enclosed closets or side rooms or outside the living space in an adjacent area like an attic or garage. This subset of houses does not require comprehensive combustion safety tests and simplified prescriptive procedures can be used to address safety concerns. This allows residential energy retrofit contractors inexperienced in advanced combustion safety testing to effectively address combustion safety issues and allow energy retrofits including tightening and changes to distribution and ventilation systems to proceed.

  10. Intelligent flame analysis for an optimized combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Peper; Dirk Schmidt [ABB Utilities GmbH, Mainheimm (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    One of the primary challenges in the area of process control is to ensure that many competing optimization goals are accomplished at the same time and be considered in time. This paper describes a successful approach through the use of an advanced pattern recognition technology and intelligent optimization tool modeling combustion processes more precisely and optimizing them based on a holistic view. 17 PowerPoint slides are also available in the proceedings. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The pressurised water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flood, M.; Chudleigh, R.; Conroy, C.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: energy forecasts - their decline and fall (Department of Energy; electricity supply industry; the writing on the wall); nuclear economics - how the dream dissolved (Britain's programme - off to a bad start; the government's programme -a catastrophe about to be repeated; the cost of a British PWR; a new choice - nuclear power versus insulation); PWR safety - the unresolvable problem (one in a million (query); fundamental weaknesses; consequences of an accident; unresolved safety problems; the select committee's findings); a new energy strategy - catering for our needs (energy efficiency; district heating/combined heat and power; solar heating; liquid fuels; the international context); conclusions. (U.K.)

  12. Energy balance of a wood biomass combustion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggio, P.; Cemin, A.; Grigiante, M.; Ragazzi, M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reports the results of a project developed at the University of Trent dealing with some wood biomass combustion processes. The project has been particularly dedicated to the study of the energetic analysis of the combustion processes that occur on a gasified wood stove of advanced combustion technologies. A considerable number of experimental tests has been carried out making use of different type of wood widely in use in Trentino region. The wood stove is a part of a pilot plant providing an hydraulic circuit equipped with a specific apparatus to measure all the necessary data to determine the energy balance required and specifically the thermal efficiency of the plant [it

  13. Transient flow combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Non-steady combustion problems can result from engine sources such as accelerations, decelerations, nozzle adjustments, augmentor ignition, and air perturbations into and out of the compressor. Also non-steady combustion can be generated internally from combustion instability or self-induced oscillations. A premixed-prevaporized combustor would be particularly sensitive to flow transients because of its susceptability to flashback-autoignition and blowout. An experimental program, the Transient Flow Combustion Study is in progress to study the effects of air and fuel flow transients on a premixed-prevaporized combustor. Preliminary tests performed at an inlet air temperature of 600 K, a reference velocity of 30 m/s, and a pressure of 700 kPa. The airflow was reduced to 1/3 of its original value in a 40 ms ramp before flashback occurred. Ramping the airflow up has shown that blowout is more sensitive than flashback to flow transients. Blowout occurred with a 25 percent increase in airflow (at a constant fuel-air ratio) in a 20 ms ramp. Combustion resonance was found at some conditions and may be important in determining the effects of flow transients.

  14. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  15. Combustion and regulation; Combustion et reglementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This conference was organized after the publication of the French by-law no 2010 relative to combustion installations and to the abatement of atmospheric pollution. Five topics were discussed during the conference: the new regulations, their content, innovations and modalities of application; the means of energy suppliers to face the new provisions and their schedule; the manufacturers proposals for existing installations and the new equipments; the administration control; and the impact of the new measures on exploitation and engineering. Twenty papers and 2 journal articles are reported in these proceedings. (J.S.)

  16. Combustible structural composites and methods of forming combustible structural composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Michael A.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Steffler, Eric D.; Swank, W. David

    2013-04-02

    Combustible structural composites and methods of forming same are disclosed. In an embodiment, a combustible structural composite includes combustible material comprising a fuel metal and a metal oxide. The fuel metal is present in the combustible material at a weight ratio from 1:9 to 1:1 of the fuel metal to the metal oxide. The fuel metal and the metal oxide are capable of exothermically reacting upon application of energy at or above a threshold value to support self-sustaining combustion of the combustible material within the combustible structural composite. Structural-reinforcing fibers are present in the composite at a weight ratio from 1:20 to 10:1 of the structural-reinforcing fibers to the combustible material. Other embodiments and aspects are disclosed.

  17. Internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Quentin A.; Mecredy, Henry E.; O'Neal, Glenn B.

    1991-01-01

    An improved engine is provided that more efficiently consumes difficult fuels such as coal slurries or powdered coal. The engine includes a precombustion chamber having a portion thereof formed by an ignition plug. The precombustion chamber is arranged so that when the piston is proximate the head, the precombustion chamber is sealed from the main cylinder or the main combustion chamber and when the piston is remote from the head, the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication. The time for burning of fuel in the precombustion chamber can be regulated by the distance required to move the piston from the top dead center position to the position wherein the precombustion chamber and main combustion chamber are in communication.

  18. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a clear definition of “fuel and combustion stratifications” is obvious in literature. Hence, it is difficult to compare stratification levels of different PPC strategies or other combustion concepts. T...

  19. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  20. High Gravity (g) Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    UNICORN (Unsteady Ignition and Combustion with Reactions) code10. Flame propagation in a tube that is 50-mm wide and 1000-mm long (similar to that...turbine engine manufacturers, estimating the primary zone space heating rate. Both combustion systems, from Company A and Company B, required a much...MBTU/atm-hr-ft3) Te m pe ra tu re R is e (K ) dP/P = 2% dP/P = 2.5% dP/P = 3% dP/P = 3.5% dP/P = 4% Company A Company B Figure 13: Heat Release Rate

  1. Combustibility of tetraphenylborate solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid slurries expected under normal in-tank processing (ITP) operations are not ignitible because of their high water content. However, deposits of dry solids from the slurries are combustible and produce dense, black smoke when burned. The dry solids burn similarly to Styrofoam and more easily than sawdust. It is the opinion of fire hazard experts that a benzene vapor deflagration could ignite the dry solids. A tetraphenylborate solids fire will rapidly plug the waste tank HEPA ventilation filters due to the nature of the smoke produced. To prevent ignition and combustion of these solids, the waste tanks have been equipped with a nitrogen inerting system

  2. Studies in combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koszykowski, M.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding and a quantitative predictive capability in combustion modeling. A large part of the understanding of the chemistry of combustion processes comes from {open_quotes}chemical kinetic modeling.{close_quotes} However, successful modeling is not an isolated activity. It necessarily involves the integration of methods and results from several diverse disciplines and activities including theoretical chemistry, elementary reaction kinetics, fluid mechanics and computational science. Recently the authors have developed and utilized new tools for parallel processing to implement the first numerical model of a turbulent diffusion flame including a {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} chemical mechanism.

  3. Combustion stratification for naphtha from CI combustion to PPC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallinayagam, R.; Vedharaj, S.; An, Y.; Dawood, A.; Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Somers, L.M.T.; Johansson, B.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrated the change in combustion homogeneity from conventional diesel combustion via partially premixed combustion towards HCCI. Experiments are performed in an optical diesel engine at a speed of 1200 rpm with diesel fuel. Single injection strategy is employed and the fuel is

  4. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  5. Effect of water chemistry on corrosion of stainless steel and deposition of corrosion products in high temperature pressurised water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Jonathan; Cooper, Christopher; Ponton, Clive; Connolly, Brian; Banks, Andrew

    2012-09-01

    In any water-cooled nuclear reactor, the corrosion of the structural materials in contact with the coolant and the deposition of the resulting oxidised species has long been an operational concern within the power generation industry. Corrosion of the structural materials at all points in the reactor leads to low concentrations of oxidised metal species in the coolant water. The oxidised metal species can subsequently be deposited out as CRUD deposits at various points around the reactor's primary and secondary loops. The deposition of soluble oxidised material at any location in the reactor cooling system is undesirable due to several effects; deposits have a porous structure, capable of incorporating radiologically active material (forming out of core radiation fields) and concentrating aggressively corrosive chemicals, which exacerbate environmental degradation of structural and fuel-cladding materials. Deposits on heat transfer surfaces also limit efficiency of the system as a whole. The work in this programme is an attempt to determine and understand the fundamental corrosion and deposition behaviour under controlled, simulated reactor conditions. The rates of corrosion of structural materials within pressurised water reactors are heavily dependent on the condition of the exposed surface. The effect of mechanical grinding and of electropolishing on the corrosion rate and structure of the resultant oxide film formed on grade 316L stainless steel exposed to high purity water, modified to pH 9.5 and 10.5 at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg. C and pressures of up to 100 bar will be investigated. The corrosion of stainless steel in water via electrochemical oxidation leads to the formation of surface iron, nickel and chromium based spinels. Low concentrations of these spinels can be found dissolved in the coolant water. The solubility of magnetite, stainless steels' major corrosion product, in high purity water will be studied at pH 9.5 to 10.5 at

  6. Underground treatment of combustible minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapuu, E

    1954-10-14

    A process is described for treating oil underground, consisting in introducing several electrodes spaced one from the other in a bed of combustibles underground so that they come in electric contact with this bed of combustibles remaining insulated from the ground, and applying to the electrodes a voltage sufficient to produce an electric current across the bed of combustibles, so as to heat it and create an electric connection between the electrodes on traversing the bed of combustibles.

  7. Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    was in collaboration with Prof. R. Bowersox (Texas A&M University) and Dr. K. Kobayashi ( Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA). 4.2 Ignition... cinema stereoscopic PIV system for the measurement of micro- and meso-scale turbulent premixed flame dynamics,” Paper B13, 5th US Combustion

  8. Infrared monitoring of combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.C.; Morrison, P.W. Jr.; Solomon, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the use of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy for combustion monitoring is described. A combination of emission, transmission, and reflection FT-IR spectroscopy yields data on the temperature and composition of the gases, surfaces and suspended particles in the combustion environment. Detection sensitivity of such trace exhaust gases as CO, CO 2 , SO 2 , NO x , and unburned hydrocarbons is at the ppm level. Tomographic reconstruction converts line-of-sight measurements into spatially resolved temperature and concentration data. Examples from various combustion processes are used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique. Industrial measurements are described that have been performed directly in the combustion zone and in the exhaust duct of a large chemical recovery boiler. Other measurements of hot slag show how FT-IR spectroscopy can determine the temperature and optical properties of surfaces. In addition, experiments with water droplets show that transmission FT-IR data yield spectra that characterize particle size and number density

  9. Combustible dust tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugar dust explosion in Georgia on February 7, 2008 killed 14 workers and injured many others (OSHA, 2009). As a consequence of this explosion, OSHA revised its Combustible Dust National Emphasis (NEP) program. The NEP targets 64 industries with more than 1,000 inspections and has found more tha...

  10. Model predictive control as a tool for improving the process operation of MSW combustion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskens, M.; Kessel, L.B.M. van; Bosgra, O.H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feasibility study is presented on the application of the advanced control strategy called model predictive control (MPC) as a tool for obtaining improved process operation performance for municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion plants. The paper starts with a discussion of the operational objectives and control of such plants, from which a motivation follows for applying MPC to them. This is followed by a discussion on the basic idea behind this advanced control strategy. After that, an MPC-based combustion control system is proposed aimed at tackling a typical MSW combustion control problem and, using this proposed control system, an assessment is made of the improvement in performance that an MPC-based MSW combustion control system can provide in comparison to conventional MSW combustion control systems. This assessment is based on simulations using an experimentally obtained process and disturbance model of a real-life large-scale MSW combustion plant

  11. Development of an empirical correlation for combustion durations in spark ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayraktar, Hakan; Durgun, Orhan

    2004-01-01

    Development of an empirical correlation for combustion duration is presented. For this purpose, the effects of variations in compression ratio engine speed, fuel/air equivalence ratio and spark advance on combustion duration have been determined by means of a quasi-dimensional SI engine cycle model previously developed by the authors. Burn durations at several engine operating conditions were calculated from the turbulent combustion model. Variations of combustion duration with each operating parameter obtained from the theoretical results were expressed by second degree polynomial functions. By using these functions, a general empirical correlation for the burn duration has been developed. In this correlation, the effects of engine operating parameters on combustion duration were taken into account. Combustion durations predicted by means of this correlation are in good agreement with those obtained from experimental studies and a detailed combustion model

  12. Low emission internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaba, Albert M.

    1979-01-01

    A low emission, internal combustion compression ignition engine having a cylinder, a piston movable in the cylinder and a pre-combustion chamber communicating with the cylinder near the top thereof and in which low emissions of NO.sub.x are achieved by constructing the pre-combustion chamber to have a volume of between 70% and 85% of the combined pre-chamber and main combustion chamber volume when the piston is at top dead center and by variably controlling the initiation of fuel injection into the pre-combustion chamber.

  13. Proceedings of the 1998 international joint power generation conference (FACT-Vol.22). Volume 1: Fuels and combustion technologies; Gas turbines; Environmental engineering; Nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.; Natole, R.; Sanyal, A.; Veilleux, J.

    1998-01-01

    Papers are arranged under the following topical sections: Fuels and combustion technologies; Low NOx burner applications; Low cost solutions to utility NOx compliance issues; Coal combustion--Retrofit experiences, low NOx, and efficiency; Highly preheated air combustion; Combustion control and optimization; Advanced technology for gas fuel combustion; Spray combustion and mixing; Efficient power generation using gas turbines; Safety issues in power industry; Efficient and environmentally benign conversion of wastes to energy; Artificial intelligence monitoring, control, and optimization of power plants; Combustion modeling and diagnostics; Advanced combustion technologies and combustion synthesis; Aero and industrial gas turbine presentations IGTI gas turbine division; NOx/SO 2 ; Plant cooling water system problems and solutions; Issues affecting plant operations and maintenance; and Costs associated with operating and not operating a nuclear power plant. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database

  14. Isolation by pressurised fluid extraction (PFE) and identification using CPC and HPLC/ESI/MS of phenolic compounds from Brazilian cherry seeds (Eugenia uniflora L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alessandra L; Destandau, Emilie; Fougère, Laëtitia; Lafosse, Michel

    2014-02-15

    Brazilian cherry seeds are a waste product from juice and frozen pulp production and, the seeds composition was investigated to valorize this by-product. Compounds separation was performed with ethanol by pressurised fluid extraction (PFE). Here we determine the effect of temperature (T), static time (ST), number of cycles (C), and flush volume (VF) on the yield, composition and total phenolic content (TPC) of the seed extracts. T, ST and their interaction positively influenced yield and TPC. Extracts were fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC). The collected fractions characterizations were made by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) indicated the presence of ellagic acid pentoside and deoxyhexose, quercitrin and kaempferol pentoside. All of these compounds have antioxidant properties and normally are found in plant extracts. These results confirm that Brazilian cherry seed extract is a potentially valuable source of antioxidants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimisation of pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) for rapid and efficient extraction of superficial and total mineral oil contamination from dry foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Sabrina; Scolaro, Marianna; Barp, Laura; Purcaro, Giorgia; Sander, Maren; Conte, Lanfranco S

    2014-08-15

    Pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) represents a powerful technique which can be conveniently used for rapid extraction of mineral oil saturated (MOSH) and aromatic hydrocarbons (MOAH) from dry foods with a low fat content, such as semolina pasta, rice, and other cereals. Two different PLE methods, one for rapid determination of superficial contamination mainly from the packaging, the other for efficient extraction of total contamination from different sources, have been developed and optimised. The two methods presented good performance characteristics in terms of repeatability (relative standard deviation lower than 5%) and recoveries (higher than 95%). To show their potentiality, the two methods have been applied in combination on semolina pasta and rice packaged in direct contact with recycled cardboard. In the case of semolina pasta it was possible to discriminate between superficial contamination coming from the packaging, and pre-existing contamination (firmly enclosed into the matrix). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilik, Gregory K.; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhang, Hedan; Haworth, Daniel C. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Herreros, Jose Martin [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla La-Mancha, Avda. Camilo Jose Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged, common rail, direct injection light-duty diesel engine, with a focus on exhaust emissions. Hydrogen was substituted for diesel fuel on an energy basis of 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10% and 15% by aspiration of hydrogen into the engine's intake air. Four speed and load conditions were investigated (1800 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output and 3600 rpm at 25% and 75% of maximum output). A significant retarding of injection timing by the engine's electronic control unit (ECU) was observed during the increased aspiration of hydrogen. The retarding of injection timing resulted in significant NO{sub X} emission reductions, however, the same emission reductions were achieved without aspirated hydrogen by manually retarding the injection timing. Subsequently, hydrogen assisted diesel combustion was examined, with the pilot and main injection timings locked, to study the effects caused directly by hydrogen addition. Hydrogen assisted diesel combustion resulted in a modest increase of NO{sub X} emissions and a shift in NO/NO{sub 2} ratio in which NO emissions decreased and NO{sub 2} emissions increased, with NO{sub 2} becoming the dominant NO{sub X} component in some combustion modes. Computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD) of the hydrogen assisted diesel combustion process captured this trend and reproduced the experimentally observed trends of hydrogen's effect on the composition of NO{sub X} for some operating conditions. A model that explicitly accounts for turbulence-chemistry interactions using a transported probability density function (PDF) method was better able to reproduce the experimental trends, compared to a model that ignores the influence of turbulent fluctuations on mean chemical production rates, although the importance of the fluctuations is not as strong as has been reported in some other recent modeling studies. The CFD results confirm

  17. Structure of Partially Premixed Flames and Advanced Solid Propellants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Branch, Melvyn

    1998-01-01

    The combustion of solid rocket propellants of advanced energetic materials involves a complex process of decomposition and condensed phase reactions in the solid propellant, gaseous flame reactions...

  18. Fuel properties to enable lifted-flame combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Eric [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The Fuel Properties to Enable Lifted-Flame Combustion project responded directly to solicitation DE-FOA-0000239 AOI 1A, Fuels and Lubricants for Advanced Combustion Regimes. This subtopic was intended to encompass clean and highly-efficient, liquid-fueled combustion engines to achieve extremely low engine-out nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) as a target and similar efficiency as state-of-the-art direct injection diesel engines. The intent of this project was to identify how fuel properties can be used to achieve controllable Leaner Lifted Flame Combustion (LLFC) with low NOx and PM emissions. Specifically, this project was expected to identify and test key fuel properties to enable LLFC and their compatibility with current fuel systems and to enhance combustion models to capture the effect of fuel properties on advanced combustion. Successful demonstration of LLFC may reduce the need for after treatment devices, thereby reducing costs and improving thermal efficiency. The project team consisted of key technical personnel from Ford Motor Company (FMC), the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL). Each partner had key roles in achieving project objectives. FMC investigated fuel properties relating to LLFC and sooting tendency. Together, FMC and UW developed and integrated 3D combustion models to capture fuel property combustion effects. FMC used these modeling results to develop a combustion system and define fuel properties to support a single-cylinder demonstration of fuel-enabled LLFC. UW investigated modeling the flame characteristics and emissions behavior of different fuels, including those with different cetane number and oxygen content. SNL led spray combustion experiments to quantify the effect of key fuel properties on combustion characteristics critical for LLFC, as well as single cylinder optical engine experiments to improve fundamental

  19. Challenges in simulation of chemical processes in combustion furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Kilpinen, P. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The presentation gives an introduction to some of the present issues and problems in treating the complex chemical processes in combustion. The focus is in the coupling of the hydrocarbon combustion process with nitrogen oxide formation and destruction chemistry in practical furnaces or flames. Detailed kinetic modelling based on schemes of elementary reactions are shown to be a useful novel tool for identifying and studying the key reaction paths for nitrogen oxide formation and destruction in various systems. The great importance of the interaction between turbulent mixing and combustion chemistry is demonstrated by the sensitivity of both methane oxidation chemistry and fuel nitrogen conversion chemistry to the reactor and mixing pattern chosen for the kinetic calculations. The fluidized bed combustion (FBC) nitrogen chemistry involves several important heterogeneous reactions. Particularly the char in the bed plays an essential role. Recent research has advanced rapidly and the presentation proposes an overall picture of the fuel nitrogen reaction routes in circulating FBC conditions. (author)

  20. Challenges in simulation of chemical processes in combustion furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M; Kilpinen, P [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation gives an introduction to some of the present issues and problems in treating the complex chemical processes in combustion. The focus is in the coupling of the hydrocarbon combustion process with nitrogen oxide formation and destruction chemistry in practical furnaces or flames. Detailed kinetic modelling based on schemes of elementary reactions are shown to be a useful novel tool for identifying and studying the key reaction paths for nitrogen oxide formation and destruction in various systems. The great importance of the interaction between turbulent mixing and combustion chemistry is demonstrated by the sensitivity of both methane oxidation chemistry and fuel nitrogen conversion chemistry to the reactor and mixing pattern chosen for the kinetic calculations. The fluidized bed combustion (FBC) nitrogen chemistry involves several important heterogeneous reactions. Particularly the char in the bed plays an essential role. Recent research has advanced rapidly and the presentation proposes an overall picture of the fuel nitrogen reaction routes in circulating FBC conditions. (author)

  1. Modeling of Supersonic Combustion Systems for Sustained Hypersonic Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Neill

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Through Computational Fluid Dynamics and validation, an optimal scramjet combustor has been designed based on twin-strut Hydrogen injection to sustain flight at a desired speed of Mach 8. An investigation undertaken into the efficacy of supersonic combustion through various means of injection saw promising results for Hydrogen-based systems, whereby strut-style injectors were selected over transverse injectors based on their pressure recovery performance and combustive efficiency. The final configuration of twin-strut injectors provided robust combustion and a stable region of net thrust (1873 kN in the nozzle. Using fixed combustor inlet parameters and injection equivalence ratio, the finalized injection method advanced to the early stages of two-dimensional (2-D and three-dimensional (3-D scramjet engine integration. The overall investigation provided a feasible supersonic combustion system, such that Mach 8 sustained cruise could be achieved by the aircraft concept in a computational design domain.

  2. Combustion strategy : United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edingburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom). School of Engineering and Physical Sciences

    2009-07-01

    The United Kingdom's combustion strategy was briefly presented. Government funding sources for universities were listed. The United Kingdom Research Councils that were listed included the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC); the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC); the Economic and Social Research Council; the Medical Research Council; the Natural Environment Research Council; and the Science and Technology Facilities Council. The EPSRC supported 65 grants worth 30.5 million pounds. The combustion industry was noted to be dominated by three main players of which one was by far the largest. The 3 key players were Rolls-Royce; Jaguar Land Rover; and Doosan Babcock. Industry and government involvement was also discussed for the BIS Technology Strategy Board, strategy technology areas, and strategy application areas.

  3. Aerosols from biomass combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nussbaumer, T.

    2001-07-01

    This report is the proceedings of a seminar on biomass combustion and aerosol production organised jointly by the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 32 on bio energy and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). This collection of 16 papers discusses the production of aerosols and fine particles by the burning of biomass and their effects. Expert knowledge on the environmental impact of aerosols, formation mechanisms, measurement technologies, methods of analysis and measures to be taken to reduce such emissions is presented. The seminar, visited by 50 participants from 11 countries, shows, according to the authors, that the reduction of aerosol emissions resulting from biomass combustion will remain a challenge for the future.

  4. Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    Tracking an individual streamer branch among others in a pulsed induced discharge J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 2823--9 [29] van Veldhuizen E M and Rutgers...2005) AIAA–2005–0405. [99] E.M. Van Veldhuizen (ed) Electrical Discharges for Environmental Purposes: Fun- damentals and Applications (New York: Nova...Vandooren J, Van Tiggelen P J 1977 Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in Lean Hydrogen–Nitrous Oxide Flames Combust. Flame 28 165 [201] Dean A M, Steiner

  5. Fluid-bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.; Schoebotham, N.

    1981-02-01

    In Energy Equipment Company's two-stage fluidized bed system, partial combustion in a fluidized bed is followed by burn-off of the generated gases above the bed. The system can be retrofitted to existing boilers, and can burn small, high ash coal efficiently. It has advantages when used as a hot gas generator for process drying. Tests on a boiler at a Cadbury Schweppes plant are reported.

  6. Combustion science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Annamalai, Kalyan

    2006-01-01

    Introduction and Review of Thermodynamics Introduction Combustion Terminology Matter and Its Properties Microscopic Overview of Thermodynamics Conservation of Mass and Energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics The Second Law of Thermodynamics Summary Stoichiometry and Thermochemistry of Reacting Systems Introduction Overall Reactions Gas Analyses Global Conservation Equations for Reacting Systems Thermochemistry Summary Appendix Reaction Direction and Equilibrium Introduction Reaction Direction and Chemical Equilibrium Chemical Equilibrium Relations Vant Hoff Equation Adi

  7. Carbonation of Mg(OH){sub 2} in a pressurised fluidised bed for CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagerlund, J.

    2012-07-01

    To date, a number of methods to accelerate natural weathering or in other words increase the CO{sub 2} uptake rate of various minerals have been suggested; commonly this is known as mineral carbonation or CO{sub 2} mineralisation. A brief literature review of recently published articles in this field is presented, showing that the interest in mineral carbonation is increasing. However, it should be noted that mineral carbonation is only one option in a larger portfolio of various carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) alternatives. Unlike many other options, the CO{sub 2} mineralisation option considered in this thesis is largely founded on the possibility to utilise the exothermic nature of magnesium carbonation and based on this notion, it has been divided into three steps. The first two steps are energy demanding, while the third step is energy 'negative', and in theory, the source of the energy required in the first two steps. Unfortunately, however, the energy demanded by the first two steps, Mg extraction and Mg(OH){sub 2} production, is (currently) much higher than what could be generated by the subsequent Mg(OH){sub 2} carbonation step. Nevertheless, opportunities to reduce the energy intensity of the process in question are still being investigated, and while an energy-neutral carbonation process might be difficult to achieve, energy requirements can still be rendered industrially acceptable (and comparable to or even better than for other CCS methods). The main focus of this thesis lies with the third step, Mg(OH){sub 2} carbonation, which is performed using a pressurised fluidised bed (PFB). The elevated CO{sub 2} pressure conditions (typically approx 20 bar) allow for the carbonation reaction to take place at higher temperatures (typically approx 500 deg C) than otherwise due to thermodynamic constraints on carbonate stability. The increase in reaction rate as a function of temperature follows the Arrhenius equation of exponential increase

  8. Methodologies and technologies for life assessment and management of coolant channels of Indian pressurised heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupani, B.B.; Sinha, S.K.; Sinha, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    Zirconium alloy coolant channels are central to the design of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and form the individual pressure boundaries. These coolant channels consist of horizontal pressure tubes made of zirconium alloys, which are separated from cold calandria tubes using garter spring spacers. High temperature heavy water coolant flows through the pressure tube which supports the fuel bundles. A typical coolant channel in a PHWR is shown. These pressure tubes are subjected to several life limiting degradation mechanisms like creep and growth, hydrogen pick-up, reduction in fracture toughness and delayed hydride cracking phenomena because of their operation under high temperature, high stress and high fast neutron flux environment. Considering the early onset of these degradation mechanisms in Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes used in the early generation of Indian PHWRs, the life management of these coolant channels becomes a challenging task, involving multidisciplinary R and D efforts in areas like analytical modelling of degradation mechanisms, evolution of methodologies for assessment of fitness for service and, tools and techniques for remote on line monitoring of integrity, maintenance and replacement. The degradation mechanisms have been modelled and incorporated into specially developed computer codes, such as SCAPCA for irradiation induced creep and growth deformation modelling, HYCON for hydrogen pick-up modelling, BLIST for hydrogen diffusion, blister nucleation and growth modelling and CEAL for assessment of leak before break behaviour. These codes have been validated with respect to the results of in-service inspection and post irradiation examination. Development of analytical models actually paved the way for the evolution of more refined methodologies for assessing the safe residual life of coolant channel. Information gathered from various experiments simulating the degradation mechanisms, results of post-irradiation examination of the

  9. Issues in waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Robertson, Kerstin; Tullin, Claes [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Boraas (Sweden); Sundquist, Lena; Wrangensten, Lars [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Blom, Elisabet [AaF-Processdesign AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-05-01

    The main purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art on research and development issues related to waste combustion with relevance for Swedish conditions. The review focuses on co-combustion in grate and fluidised bed furnaces. It is primarily literature searches in relevant databases of scientific publications with to material published after 1995. As a complement, findings published in different report series, have also been included. Since the area covered by this report is very wide, we do not claim to cover the issues included completely and it has not been possitile to evaluate the referred studies in depth. Basic knowledge about combustion issues is not included since such information can be found elsewhere in the literature. Rather, this review should be viewed as an overview of research and development in the waste-to-energy area and as such we hope that it will inspire scientists and others to further work in relevant areas.

  10. Proceedings of IEA combustion 2009 : IEA 31. task leaders meeting on energy conservation and emissions reduction in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) supports research and development in energy technology. This meeting provided a forum to discuss combustion processes, which is fundamental to achieving further improvements in fuel use efficiency, reducing the production of pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, and facilitating the transition to alternative fuels. The presentations demonstrated recent studies in improving the efficiency and fuel flexibility of automotive engines; improving the performance of industrial furnaces; emissions formation and control mechanisms; and fuel injection and fuel/air mixing. The conference also highlighted studies involving hydrogen combustion, alternative fuels, particulate diagnostics, fuel sprays, gas turbines, and advanced combustion processes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI). The sessions were entitled: HCCI fuels; sprays; nanoparticle diagnostics; alternative fuels; hydrogen internal combustion engines; turbines; energy security; and collaborative task planning. All 45 presentations from the conference have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  11. Robust Multivariable Feedback Control of Natural Gas-Diesel RCCI Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Indrajuana, A.; Bekdemir, C.; Luo, X.; Willems, F.P.T.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced combustion concepts such as Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) demonstrate very high thermal efficiencies combined with ultra low NOx emissions. As RCCI is sensitive for operating conditions, closed-loop control is a crucial enabler for stable and robust combustion. The

  12. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  13. Internal combustion engine using premixed combustion of stratified charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Craig D [Rochester Hills, MI; Reitz, Rolf D [Madison, WI

    2003-12-30

    During a combustion cycle, a first stoichiometrically lean fuel charge is injected well prior to top dead center, preferably during the intake stroke. This first fuel charge is substantially mixed with the combustion chamber air during subsequent motion of the piston towards top dead center. A subsequent fuel charge is then injected prior to top dead center to create a stratified, locally richer mixture (but still leaner than stoichiometric) within the combustion chamber. The locally rich region within the combustion chamber has sufficient fuel density to autoignite, and its self-ignition serves to activate ignition for the lean mixture existing within the remainder of the combustion chamber. Because the mixture within the combustion chamber is overall premixed and relatively lean, NO.sub.x and soot production are significantly diminished.

  14. Development of flameless combustion; Desarrollo de la combustion sin flama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores Sauceda, M. Leonardo; Cervantes de Gortari, Jaime Gonzalo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: 8344afc@prodigy.net.mx; jgonzalo@servidor.unam.mx

    2010-11-15

    The paper intends contribute to global warming mitigation joint effort that develops technologies to capture the CO{sub 2} produced by fossil fuels combustion and to reduce emission of other greenhouse gases like the NO{sub x}. After reviewing existing combustion bibliography is pointed out that (a) touches only partial aspects of the collective system composed by Combustion-Heat transfer process-Environment, whose interactions are our primary interest and (b) most specialists think there is not yet a clearly winning technology for CO{sub 2} capture and storage. In this paper the study of combustion is focused as integrated in the aforementioned collective system where application of flameless combustion, using oxidant preheated in heat regenerators and fluent gas recirculation into combustion chamber plus appropriated heat and mass balances, simultaneously results in energy saving and environmental impact reduction. [Spanish] El trabajo pretende contribuir al esfuerzo conjunto de mitigacion del calentamiento global que aporta tecnologias para capturar el CO{sub 2} producido por la combustion de combustibles fosiles y para disminuir la emision de otros gases invernadero como NOx. De revision bibliografica sobre combustion se concluye que (a) trata aspectos parciales del sistema compuesto por combustion-proceso de trasferencia de calor-ambiente, cuyas interacciones son nuestro principal interes (b) la mayoria de especialistas considera no hay todavia una tecnologia claramente superior a las demas para captura y almacenaje de CO{sub 2}. Se estudia la combustion como parte integrante del mencionado sistema conjunto, donde la aplicacion de combustion sin flama, empleando oxidante precalentado mediante regeneradores de calor y recirculacion de gases efluentes ademas de los balances de masa y energia adecuados, permite tener simultaneamente ahorros energeticos e impacto ambiental reducido.

  15. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Glarborg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    of the sulphur compounds in fossil fuels and the possibilities to remove them will be given. Then the combustion of sulphur species and their influence on the combustion chemistry and especially on the CO oxidation and the NOx formation will be described. Finally the in-situ removal of sulphur in the combustion...... process by reaction between SO2 and calcium containing sorbents and the influence on the NOx chemistry will be treated....

  16. Pulsating combustion - Combustion characteristics and reduction of emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholm, Annika

    1999-11-01

    In the search for high efficiency combustion systems pulsating combustion has been identified as one of the technologies that potentially can meet the objectives of clean combustion and good fuel economy. Pulsating combustion offers low emissions of pollutants, high heat transfer and efficient combustion. Although it is an old technology, the interest in pulsating combustion has been renewed in recent years, due to its unique features. Various applications of pulsating combustion can be found, mainly as drying and heating devices, of which the latter also have had commercial success. It is, however, in the design process of a pulse combustor, difficult to predict the operating frequency, the heat release etc., due to the lack of a well founded theory of the phenomenon. Research concerning control over the combustion process is essential for developing high efficiency pulse combustors with low emissions. Natural gas fired Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been the experimental objects of this study. In order to investigate the interaction between the fluid dynamics and the chemistry in pulse combustors, laser based measuring techniques as well as other conventional measuring techniques have been used. The experimental results shows the possibilities to control the combustion characteristics of pulsating combustion. It is shown that the time scales in the large vortices created at the inlet to the combustion chamber are very important for the operation of the pulse combustor. By increasing/decreasing the time scale for the large scale mixing the timing of the heat release is changed and the operating characteristics of the pulse combustor changes. Three different means for NO{sub x} reduction in Helmholtz type pulse combustors have been investigated. These include exhaust gas recirculation, alteration of air/fuel ratio and changed inlet geometry in the combustion chamber. All used methods achieved less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} emitted (referred to stoichiometric

  17. Turbulent combustion modeling using Flamelet-Generated Manifolds for Gas Turbine applications in OpenFOAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fancello, A.; Panek, L.; Lammel, O.; Krebs, W.; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; de Goey, L.P.H.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous interest in reducing pollutions and developing both an efficient and clean combustion system require large attention in the design requirements, especially when related to industrial gas turbine application. Although in recent years the advancements in modelling have increased

  18. Combustion from basics to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Maximilian; Winter, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Combustion, the process of burning, is defined as a chemical reaction between a combustible reactant (the fuel) and an oxidizing agent (such as air) in order to produce heat and in most cases light while new chemical species (e.g., flue gas components) are formed. This book covers a gap on the market by providing a concise introduction to combustion. Most of the other books currently available are targeted towards the experienced users and contain too many details and/or contain knowledge at a fairly high level. This book provides a brief and clear overview of the combustion basics, suitable f

  19. Mathematical Modeling in Combustion Science

    CERN Document Server

    Takeno, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    An important new area of current research in combustion science is reviewed in the contributions to this volume. The complicated phenomena of combustion, such as chemical reactions, heat and mass transfer, and gaseous flows, have so far been studied predominantly by experiment and by phenomenological approaches. But asymptotic analysis and other recent developments are rapidly changing this situation. The contributions in this volume are devoted to mathematical modeling in three areas: high Mach number combustion, complex chemistry and physics, and flame modeling in small scale turbulent flow combustion.

  20. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  1. The combustion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    The burning rates of sodium in the form of vapour jets, droplets, sprays and unconfined and confined pools have been reviewed. Attention has been paid to assessing the value of models in the various combustion modes. Additional models have been constructed for the descriptions of laminar and turbulent vapour jets, stationary droplets, forced convection over ambient pool fires together with correlations for peak pressures in confined pool environments. Where appropriate experiments with sodium have not been conducted, the likely behaviour is predicted by comparison with the burning of other fuels, particularly in the field of large free ambient fires. Some areas where further knowledge is required are highlighted. (author)

  2. Alternate fuels; Combustibles alternos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero Paredes R, Hernando; Ambriz G, Juan Jose [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana. Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    In the definition and description of alternate fuels we must center ourselves in those technological alternatives that allow to obtain compounds that differ from the traditional ones, in their forms to be obtained. In this article it is tried to give an overview of alternate fuels to the conventional derivatives of petroleum and that allow to have a clear idea on the tendencies of modern investigation and the technological developments that can be implemented in the short term. It is not pretended to include all the tendencies and developments of the present world, but those that can hit in a relatively short term, in accordance with agreed with the average life of conventional fuels. Nevertheless, most of the conversion principles are applicable to the spectrum of carbonaceous or cellulosic materials which are in nature, are cultivated or wastes of organic origin. Thus one will approach them in a successive way, the physical, chemical and biological conversions that can take place in a production process of an alternate fuel or the same direct use of the fuel such as burning the sweepings derived from the forests. [Spanish] En la definicion y descripcion de combustibles alternos nos debemos centrar en aquellas alternativas tecnologicas que permitan obtener compuestos que difieren de los tradicionales, al menos en sus formas de ser obtenidos. En este articulo se pretende dar un panorama de los combustibles alternos a los convencionales derivados del petroleo y que permita tener una idea clara sobre las tendencias de la investigacion moderna y los desarrollos tecnologicos que puedan ser implementados en el corto plazo. No se pretende abarcar todas las tendencias y desarrollos del mundo actual, sino aquellas que pueden impactar en un plazo relativamente corto, acordes con la vida media de los combustibles convencionales. Sin embargo, la mayor parte de los principios de conversion son aplicables al espectro de materiales carbonaceos o celulosicos los cuales se

  3. Fluidised bed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion systems that facilitates the maintenance of the depth of the bed are described. A discharge pipe projects upwardly into the bed so that bed material can flow into its upper end and escape downwardly. The end of the pipe is surrounded by an enclosure and air is discharged into the enclosure so that material will enter the pipe from within the enclosure and have been cooled in the enclosure by the air discharged into it. The walls of the enclosure may themselves be cooled

  4. Fuel and combustion stratification study of Partially Premixed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izadi Najafabadi, M.; Dam, N.; Somers, B.; Johansson, B.

    2016-01-01

    Relatively high levels of stratification is one of the main advantages of Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) over the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Fuel stratification smoothens heat release and improves controllability of this kind of combustion. However, the lack of a

  5. The reduction of air pollution by improved combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, S.W. [Pennsylvania Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The contributions of combustion to air pollution and possible remedies are discussed. Control and reduction of air pollution from combustion is more feasible than from other sources because of its discrete localization. The gaseous products of combustion inevitably include H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, NO and/or NO{sub 2} and may include N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3} and unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons. Soot, ash and other dispersed solids may also be present, but are not considered herein. Unburned and partially burned hydrocarbons are prima facie evidence of poor mechanics of combustion and should not be tolerated. On the other hand, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are unavoidable if the fuel contains nitrogen and sulfur. The best remedy in this latter case is to remove these species from the fuel. Otherwise their products of combustion must be removed by absorption, adsorption or reaction. NO{sub x} from the fixation of N{sub 2} in the air and CO may be minimized by advanced techniques of combustion. One such method is described in some detail. If CO{sub 2} must be removed this can be accomplished by absorption, adsorption or reaction, but precooling is necessary and the quantity is an order of magnitude greater than that of any of the other pollutants. (Author)

  6. Research on combustion of black-liquor drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, A.

    1999-01-01

    Black liquor, the major by-product of the kraft process for production of pulp, is one of the most important industrial fuels. It is burned in recovery boilers in the form of large spray drops (mm), with the objective of simultaneous recovery of heat and chemicals (sodium and sulfur). Even though black-liquor combustion in boilers has been practised for over half a century, research efforts toward improvement of combustion efficiency and abatement of environmental emissions are much more recent. The present paper addresses a specific aspect of that research, namely, elucidation of processes which occur during combustion of black-liquor drops in boiler-gas streams. The paper (a) gives a brief description of the kraft process, (b) reviews the experimental and theoretical (modeling) research advances on combustion of kraft-liquor drops during the 1980s and 1990s, (c) re-examines the results of an earlier combustion study in which black-liquor drops were observed in free flight at temperatures near those in recovery boilers, and (d) recommends input for the modeling of in-flight combustion of kraft-liquor drops in recovery boilers. (author)

  7. Methane combustion over lanthanum-based perovskite mixed oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arandiyan, Hamidreza [New South Wales Univ., Sydney (Australia). School of Chemical Engineering

    2015-11-01

    This book presents current research into the catalytic combustion of methane using perovskite-type oxides (ABO{sub 3}). Catalytic combustion has been developed as a method of promoting efficient combustion with minimum pollutant formation as compared to conventional catalytic combustion. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have recommended that noble metals supported on (ABO{sub 3}) with well-ordered porous networks show promising redox properties. Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) materials with interpenetrated and regular mesoporous systems have recently triggered enormous research activity due to their high surface areas, large pore volumes, uniform pore sizes, low cost, environmental benignity, and good chemical stability. These are all highly relevant in terms of the utilization of natural gas in light of recent catalytic innovations and technological advances. The book is of interest to all researchers active in utilization of natural gas with novel catalysts. The research covered comes from the most important industries and research centers in the field. The book serves not only as a text for researcher into catalytic combustion of methane, 3DOM perovskite mixed oxide, but also explores the field of green technologies by experts in academia and industry. This book will appeal to those interested in research on the environmental impact of combustion, materials and catalysis.

  8. A practical approach in porous medium combustion for domestic application: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A. K.; Ibrahim, N. H.; Shamsuddin, K. A.; Abdullah, M. Z.; Zubair, M.

    2018-05-01

    Combustion in porous media has been widely studied. Many application involving the combustion of porous media has been reported in various way with most consider on numerical works and industrial application. Besides, recent application of porous medium combustion for domestic is the topic of interest among researchers. In this paper, a review was conducted on the combustion of porous media in term of practical application for domestic consumers. Details on the type of fuel used including bio fuel and their system have been search thoroughly. Most of the system have utilized compressed air system to provide lean combustion in domestic application. Some self-aspirating system of porous medium burner was also reported. The application of new technology such as cogeneration by using thermoelectric cells in tandem with porous medium combustion is also revised according to recent work which have already been published. Besides, the recent advances which include coating of porous material is also considered at the end of this paper.

  9. Preliminary assessment of combustion modes for internal combustion wave rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalim, M. Razi

    1995-01-01

    Combustion within the channels of a wave rotor is examined as a means of obtaining pressure gain during heat addition in a gas turbine engine. Several modes of combustion are considered and the factors that determine the applicability of three modes are evaluated in detail; premixed autoignition/detonation, premixed deflagration, and non-premixed compression ignition. The last two will require strong turbulence for completion of combustion in a reasonable time in the wave rotor. The compression/autoignition modes will require inlet temperatures in excess of 1500 R for reliable ignition with most hydrocarbon fuels; otherwise, a supplementary ignition method must be provided. Examples of combustion mode selection are presented for two core engine applications that had been previously designed with equivalent 4-port wave rotor topping cycles using external combustion.

  10. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  11. Path planning during combustion mode switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Ravi, Nikhil

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods are provided for transitioning between a first combustion mode and a second combustion mode in an internal combustion engine. A current operating point of the engine is identified and a target operating point for the internal combustion engine in the second combustion mode is also determined. A predefined optimized transition operating point is selected from memory. While operating in the first combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion engine to approach the selected optimized transition operating point. When the engine is operating at the selected optimized transition operating point, the combustion mode is switched from the first combustion mode to the second combustion mode. While operating in the second combustion mode, one or more engine actuator settings are adjusted to cause the operating point of the internal combustion to approach the target operating point.

  12. AIR EMISSIONS FROM SCRAP TIRE COMBUSTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses air emissions from two types of scrap tire combustion: uncontrolled and controlled. Uncontrolled sources are open tire fires, which produce many unhealthful products of incomplete combustion and release them directly into the atmosphere. Controlled combustion...

  13. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  14. Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarunjit S. Butalia; William E. Wolfe

    2006-01-11

    This final project report presents the activities and accomplishments of the ''Coal Combustion Products Extension Program'' conducted at The Ohio State University from August 1, 2000 to June 30, 2005 to advance the beneficial uses of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highway and construction, mine reclamation, agricultural, and manufacturing sectors. The objective of this technology transfer/research program at The Ohio State University was to promote the increased use of Ohio CCPs (fly ash, FGD material, bottom ash, and boiler slag) in applications that are technically sound, environmentally benign, and commercially competitive. The project objective was accomplished by housing the CCP Extension Program within The Ohio State University College of Engineering with support from the university Extension Service and The Ohio State University Research Foundation. Dr. Tarunjit S. Butalia, an internationally reputed CCP expert and registered professional engineer, was the program coordinator. The program coordinator acted as liaison among CCP stakeholders in the state, produced information sheets, provided expertise in the field to those who desired it, sponsored and co-sponsored seminars, meetings, and speaking at these events, and generally worked to promote knowledge about the productive and proper application of CCPs as useful raw materials. The major accomplishments of the program were: (1) Increase in FGD material utilization rate from 8% in 1997 to more than 20% in 2005, and an increase in overall CCP utilization rate of 21% in 1997 to just under 30% in 2005 for the State of Ohio. (2) Recognition as a ''voice of trust'' among Ohio and national CCP stakeholders (particularly regulatory agencies). (3) Establishment of a national and international reputation, especially for the use of FGD materials and fly ash in construction applications. It is recommended that to increase Ohio's CCP utilization rate from 30% in 2005 to

  15. Manifold methods for methane combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, B.; Pope, S.B. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Great progresses have been made in combustion research, especially, the computation of laminar flames and the probability density function (PDF) method in turbulent combustion. For one-dimensional laminar flames, by considering the transport mechanism, the detailed chemical kinetic mechanism and the interactions between these two basic processes, today it is a routine matter to calculate flame velocities, extinction, ignition, temperature, and species distributions from the governing equations. Results are in good agreement with those obtained for experiments. However, for turbulent combustion, because of the complexities of turbulent flow, chemical reactions, and the interaction between them, in the foreseeable future, it is impossible to calculate the combustion flow field by directly integrating the basic governing equations. So averaging and modeling are necessary in turbulent combustion studies. Averaging, on one hand, simplifies turbulent combustion calculations, on the other hand, it introduces the infamous closure problems, especially the closure problem with chemical reaction terms. Since in PDF calculations of turbulent combustion, the averages of the chemical reaction terms can be calculated, PDF methods overcome the closure problem with the reaction terms. It has been shown that the PDF method is a most promising method to calculate turbulent combustion. PDF methods have been successfully employed to calculate laboratory turbulent flames: they can predict phenomena such as super equilibrium radical levels, and local extinction. Because of these advantages, PDF methods are becoming used increasingly in industry combustor codes.

  16. In situ high-temperature gas sensors: continuous monitoring of the combustion quality of different wood combustion systems and optimization of combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kohler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The sensing characteristics and long-term stability of different kinds of CO ∕ HC gas sensors (non-Nernstian mixed potential type during in situ operation in flue gas from different types of low-power combustion systems (wood-log- and wood-chip-fuelled were investigated. The sensors showed representative but individual sensing behaviour with respect to characteristically varying flue gas composition over the combustion process. The long-term sensor signal stability evaluated by repeated exposure to CO ∕ H2 ∕ N2 ∕ synthetic air mixtures showed no sensitivity loss after operation in the flue gas. Particularly for one of the sensors (Heraeus GmbH, this high signal stability was observed in a field test experiment even during continuous operation in the flue gas of the wood-chip firing system over 4 months. Furthermore, it was experimentally shown that the signals of these CO ∕ HC sensing elements yield important additional information about the wood combustion process. This was demonstrated by the adaptation of an advanced combustion airstream control algorithm on a wood-log-fed fireplace and by the development of a combustion quality monitoring system for wood-chip-fed central heaters.

  17. Combustion & Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLDRC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: The Combustion and Laser Diagnostics Research Complex (CLRDC) supports the experimental and computational study of fundamental combustion phenomena to...

  18. Combustion instability control in the model of combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmadullin, A N; Ahmethanov, E N; Iovleva, O V; Mitrofanov, G A

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study of the influence of external periodic perturbations on the instability of the combustion chamber in a pulsating combustion. As an external periodic disturbances were used sound waves emitted by the electrodynamics. The purpose of the study was to determine the possibility of using the method of external periodic perturbation to control the combustion instability. The study was conducted on a specially created model of the combustion chamber with a swirl burner in the frequency range from 100 to 1400 Hz. The study found that the method of external periodic perturbations may be used to control combustion instability. Depending on the frequency of the external periodic perturbation is observed as an increase and decrease in the amplitude of the oscillations in the combustion chamber. These effects are due to the mechanisms of synchronous and asynchronous action. External periodic disturbance generated in the path feeding the gaseous fuel, showing the high efficiency of the method of management in terms of energy costs. Power required to initiate periodic disturbances (50 W) is significantly smaller than the thermal capacity of the combustion chamber (100 kW)

  19. The Effect of Temperature on Pressurised Hot Water Extraction of Pharmacologically Important Metabolites as Analysed by UPLC-qTOF-MS and PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Khoza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolite extraction methods have been shown to be a critical consideration for pharmacometabolomics studies and, as such, optimization and development of new extraction methods are crucial. In the current study, an organic solvent-free method, namely, pressurised hot water extraction (PHWE, was used to extract pharmacologically important metabolites from dried Moringa oleifera leaves. Here, the temperature of the extraction solvent (pure water was altered while keeping other factors constant using a homemade PHWE system. Samples extracted at different temperatures (50, 100, and 150°C were assayed for antioxidant activities and the effect of the temperature on the extraction process was evaluated. The samples were further analysed by mass spectrometry to elucidate their metabolite compositions. Principal component analysis (PCA evaluation of the UPLC-MS data showed distinctive differential metabolite patterns. Here, temperature changes during PHWE were shown to affect the levels of metabolites with known pharmacological activities, such as chlorogenic acids and flavonoids. Our overall findings suggest that, if not well optimised, the extraction temperature could compromise the “pharmacological potency” of the extracts. The use of MS in combination with PCA was furthermore shown to be an excellent approach to evaluate the quality and content of pharmacologically important extracts.

  20. Simultaneous quantification of major flavonoids in "Bawanghua", the edible flower of Hylocereus undatus using pressurised liquid extraction and high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yan; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Li, Song-Lin; Wang, Ying; Ye, Wen-Cai; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-11-15

    A pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for simultaneous quantification of six major flavonoids in edible flower of Hylocereus undatus. In order to achieve the baseline separation of two pairs of isomers, the HPLC conditions were optimised with different kind of reversed phase columns and mobile phase gradient programs. In addition, the solvent concentration, extraction temperature, extraction time and flush cycle for PLE were also optimised. Zorbax SB-C8 (100×2.1 mm, 1.8 μm) column was chosen with acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid as mobile phase, the six analytes were eluted with baseline separation. The calibration curves showed good linearity (r(2)>0.9994) with LODs and LOQs less than 0.90 and 3.60 ng respectively. The RSDs for intra- and inter-day repeatability was not more than 1.09% and 1.79% respectively. The overall recovery of the assay was 96.9-105.2%. The sample was stable for at least 12 h. The newly established method was successfully applied to quantify six flavonoids in different parts of "Bawanghua", and the commercial samples from different locations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Space Station Freedom combustion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Extended operations in microgravity, on board spacecraft like Space Station Freedom, provide both unusual opportunities and unusual challenges for combustion science. On the one hand, eliminating the intrusion of buoyancy provides a valuable new perspective for fundamental studies of combustion phenomena. On the other hand, however, the absence of buoyancy creates new hazards of fires and explosions that must be understood to assure safe manned space activities. These considerations - and the relevance of combustion science to problems of pollutants, energy utilization, waste incineration, power and propulsion systems, and fire and explosion hazards, among others - provide strong motivation for microgravity combustion research. The intrusion of buoyancy is a greater impediment to fundamental combustion studies than to most other areas of science. Combustion intrinsically heats gases with the resulting buoyant motion at normal gravity either preventing or vastly complicating measurements. Perversely, this limitation is most evident for fundamental laboratory experiments; few practical combustion phenomena are significantly affected by buoyancy. Thus, we have never observed the most fundamental combustion phenomena - laminar premixed and diffusion flames, heterogeneous flames of particles and surfaces, low-speed turbulent flames, etc. - without substantial buoyant disturbances. This precludes rational merging of theory, where buoyancy is of little interest, and experiments, that always are contaminated by buoyancy, which is the traditional path for developing most areas of science. The current microgravity combustion program seeks to rectify this deficiency using both ground-based and space-based facilities, with experiments involving space-based facilities including: laminar premixed flames, soot processes in laminar jet diffusion flames, structure of laminar and turbulent jet diffusion flames, solid surface combustion, one-dimensional smoldering, ignition and flame

  2. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  3. Producer for vegetal combustibles for internal-combustion motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-12-28

    A producer is described for internal-combustion motors fed with wood or agricultural byproducts characterized by the fact that its full operation is independent of the degree of wetness of the material used.

  4. Reducing emissions from diesel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains information dealing with engine design to reduce emissions and improve or maintain fuel economy. Topics include: Observation of High Pressure Fuel Spray with Laser Light Sheet Method; Determination of Engine Cylinder Pressures from Crankshaft Speed Fluctuations; Combustion Similarity for Different Size Diesel Engines: Theoretical Prediction and Experimental Results; Prediction of Diesel Engine Particulate Emission During Transient Cycles; Characteristics and Combustibility of Particulate Matter; Dual-Fuel Diesel Engine Using Butane; Measurement of Flame Temperature Distribution in D.I. Diesel Engine with High Pressure Fuel Injection: and Combustion in a Small DI Diesel Engine at Starting

  5. Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, O.K.; Levasseur, A.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) of the U.S. Department of Energy is sponsoring the development of advanced coal-cleaning technologies aimed at expanding the use of the nation`s vast coal reserves in an environmentally and economically acceptable manner. Because of the lack of practical experience with deeply beneficiated coal-based fuels, PETC has contracted Combustion Engineering, Inc. to perform a multi-year project on `Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.` The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels (BCs) influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs.

  6. Gaussian process regression based optimal design of combustion systems using flame images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junghui; Chan, Lester Lik Teck; Cheng, Yi-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The digital color images of flames are applied to combustion design. • The combustion with modeling stochastic nature is developed using GP. • GP based uncertainty design is made and evaluated through a real combustion system. - Abstract: With the advanced methods of digital image processing and optical sensing, it is possible to have continuous imaging carried out on-line in combustion processes. In this paper, a method that extracts characteristics from the flame images is presented to immediately predict the outlet content of the flue gas. First, from the large number of flame image data, principal component analysis is used to discover the principal components or combinational variables, which describe the important trends and variations in the operation data. Then stochastic modeling of the combustion process is done by a Gaussian process with the aim to capture the stochastic nature of the flame associated with the oxygen content. The designed oxygen combustion content considers the uncertainty presented in the combustion. A reference image can be designed for the actual combustion process to provide an easy and straightforward maintenance of the combustion process

  7. Computational Modeling of Turbulent Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the research presented in this thesis is development and validation of predictive models or modeling approaches of liquid fuel combustion (spray combustion) in hot-diluted environments, known as flameless combustion or MILD combustion. The goal is to combine good physical insight,

  8. Measures for a quality combustion (combustion chamber exit and downstream); Mesures pour une combustion de qualite (sortie de chambre de combustion et en aval)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epinat, G. [APAVE Lyonnaise, 69 (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a review of the different pollutants related to the various types of stationary and mobile combustion processes (stoichiometric, reducing and oxidizing combustion), measures and analyses than may be used to ensure the quality and efficiency of combustion processes are reviewed: opacimeters, UV analyzers, etc. The regulation and control equipment for combustion systems are then listed, according to the generator capacity level

  9. Fuels and Combustion | Transportation Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuels and Combustion Fuels and Combustion This is the March 2015 issue of the Transportation and , combustion strategy, and engine design hold the potential to maximize vehicle energy efficiency and performance of low-carbon fuels in internal combustion engines with a whole-systems approach to fuel chemistry

  10. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R.; Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe

    1997-01-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data

  11. Environmental sensing and combustion diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoleri, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Environmental Sensing and Combustion Diagnostics. Topics covered include: Incineration Systems Applications, Permitting, And Monitoring Overview; Infrared Techniques Applied to Incineration Systems; Continuous Emission Monitors; Analyzers and Sensors for Process Control And Environmental Monitoring

  12. Sodium nitrate combustion limit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitel, G.A.

    1976-04-01

    Sodium nitrate is a powerful solid oxidant. Energetically, it is capable of exothermically oxidizing almost any organic material. Rate-controlling variables such as temperature, concentration of oxidant, concentration of fuel, thermal conductivity, moisture content, size, and pressure severely limit the possibility of a self-supported exothermic reaction (combustion). The tests reported in this document were conducted on one-gram samples at atmospheric pressure. Below 380 0 C, NaNO 3 was stable and did not support combustion. At moisture concentrations above 22 wt percent, exothermic reactions did not propagate in even the most energetic and reactive compositions. Fresh resin and paraffin were too volatile to enable a NaNO 2 -supported combustion process to propagate. Concentrations of NaNO 3 above 95 wt percent or below 35 wt percent did not react with enough energy release to support combustion. The influence of sample size and confining pressure, both important factors, was not investigated in this study

  13. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ..., rubber, drugs, dried blood, dyes, certain textiles, and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium..., furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal products and machinery manufacturing, pesticide... standard that will comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dust. The Agency...

  14. Numerical simulations of turbulent jet ignition and combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Validi, Abdoulahad; Irannejad, Abolfazl; Jaberi, Farhad

    2013-11-01

    The ignition and combustion of a homogeneous lean hydrogen-air mixture by a turbulent jet flow of hot combustion products injected into a colder gas mixture are studied by a high fidelity numerical model. Turbulent jet ignition can be considered as an efficient method for starting and controlling the reaction in homogeneously charged combustion systems used in advanced internal combustion and gas turbine engines. In this work, we study in details the physics of turbulent jet ignition in a fundamental flow configuration. The flow and combustion are modeled with the hybrid large eddy simulation/filtered mass density function (LES/FMDF) approach, in which the filtered form the compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a high-order finite difference scheme for the turbulent velocity and the FMDF transport equations are solved with a Lagrangian stochastic method to obtain the scalar (temperature and species mass fractions) field. The hydrogen oxidation is described by a detailed reaction mechanism with 37 elementary reactions and 9 species.

  15. Getting the measure of particles in combustion gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Measuring particles in combustion gases has never been entirely simple: optical systems do not measure particle mass directly and with sampling systems you have to wait for the results. A novel sensor that can give reliable, real-time information about the amount and size of particles in conventional and advanced combustion systems has now been developed by Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. The work was funded by the Energy Technology Centre in Morgantown, West Virginia, of the United States Department of Energy. The heart of the sensor is a tapered element, oscillating microbalance (TEOM). Made of glass, it looks a bit like a hollow champagne glass. Where the base of the glass would be, a filter is fitted, and the mouth of the glass is fitted firmly to a base plate. This system was developed in support of the DOE's hot gas cleanup program, and operates at temperatures as high as 970/sup 0/C and pressures up to 10 bar in combustion chambers where is samples particles produced during combustion. Sandia's engineers believe the device has wide applications, for anywhere where information about combustion effluents or airborne particles is needed, from hospitals and clean rooms to foundries and kilns.

  16. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  17. Quantifying emissions from spontaneous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-01

    Spontaneous combustion can be a significant problem in the coal industry, not only due to the obvious safety hazard and the potential loss of valuable assets, but also with respect to the release of gaseous pollutants, especially CO2, from uncontrolled coal fires. This report reviews methodologies for measuring emissions from spontaneous combustion and discusses methods for quantifying, estimating and accounting for the purpose of preparing emission inventories.

  18. Biomass combustion technologies for power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr. [Appel Consultants, Inc., Stevenson Ranch, CA (United States); McGowin, C.R.; Hughes, E.E. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Technology in power production from biomass has been advancing rapidly. Industry has responded to government incentives such as the PURPA legislation in the US and has recognized that there are environmental advantages to using waste biomass as fuel. During the 1980s many new biomass power plants were built. The relatively mature stoker boiler technology was improved by the introduction of water-cooled grates, staged combustion air, larger boiler sizes up to 60 MW, higher steam conditions, and advanced sootblowing systems. Circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) technology achieved full commercial status, and now is the leading process for most utility-scale power applications, with more complete combustion, lower emissions, and better fuel flexibility than stoker technology. Bubbling fluidized-bed (BFB) technology has an important market niche as the best process for difficult fuels such as agricultural wastes, typically in smaller plants. Other biomass power generation technologies are being developed for possible commercial introduction in the 1990s. Key components of Whole Tree Energy{trademark} technology have been tested, conceptual design studies have been completed with favorable results, and plans are being made for the first integrated process demonstration. Fluidized-bed gasification processes have advanced from pilot to demonstration status, and the world`s first integrated wood gasification/combined cycle utility power plant is starting operation in Sweden in early 1993. Several European vendors offer biomass gasification processes commercially. US electric utilities are evaluating the cofiring of biomass with fossil fuels in both existing and new plants. Retrofitting existing coal-fired plants gives better overall cost and performance results than any biomass technologies;but retrofit cofiring is {open_quotes}fuel-switching{close_quotes} that provides no new capacity and is attractive only with economic incentives.

  19. Combustion means for solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, D.

    1987-09-23

    A combustion device for solid fuel, suitable for coal, coke, charcoal, coal-dust briquettes etc., comprising:- a base stand with an opening therein, an imperforate heat resistant holding board locatable to close said opening; a combustion chamber standing on the base stand with the holding board forming the base of the combustion chamber; a wiper arm pivoted for horizontal wiping movement over the upper surface of the holding board; an inlet means at a lower edge of said chamber above the base stand, and/or in a surrounding wall of said chamber, whereby combustion air may enter as exhaust gases leave the combustion chamber; an exhaust pipe for the exhaust gases; generally tubular gas-flow heat-exchange ducting putting the combustion chamber and exhaust pipe into communication; and means capable of moving the holding board into and out of the opening for removal of ash or other residue. The invention can be used for a heating system in a house or in a greenhouse or for a boiler.

  20. Advanced steel reheat furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

  1. The energetic performance of a novel hybrid solar thermal and chemical looping combustion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarian, Mehdi; Arjomandi, Maziar; Nathan, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid solar chemical looping combustion power cycle is reported. • The cycle is studied for two configurations, with and without an after-burner. • The oxygen carrier particles are used as storage medium for solar thermal energy. • Total solar shares of 41.4% and 60% are achieved with and without the after-burner. • Efficiencies of 50% and 44.0% are achieved with and without the after-burner. - Abstract: The overall energetic performance of a gas turbine combined cycle powered by a hybrid cycle between a solar thermal and a chemical looping combustion (CLC) system firing methane is reported for two configurations. In one case, the outlet from the air reactor is fed directly to a gas turbine, while in the other an after-burner, also firing methane, is added to increase the gas turbine inlet temperature. The cycle is simulated using Aspen Plus software for the average diurnal profile of normal irradiance for Port Augusta, South Australia. The first law efficiency, total solar absorption efficiency, average and peak fractional power boosts, total solar share, net solar to electrical efficiency, fraction of pressurised CO 2 , incremental CO 2 avoidance and the exergy efficiency for both cycles are reported. The calculations predict a first law efficiency of 50.0% for the cycle employing an after-burner, compared with 44.0% for that without the after-burner. However, this is achieved at the cost of decreasing the solar share from 60.0%, without the after-burner, to 41.4% with it. Also reported is the sensitivity analysis of performance to variations in key operating parameters. The sensitivity analysis shows that further improvements to the performance of the cycle are possible

  2. Improvement of the calculation of the stress intensity factors for underclad and through-clad defects in a reactor pressure vessel subjected to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Chapuliot, S.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of the stability of a defect in a cladded reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of a nuclear pressure water reactor (PWR) subjected to pressurised thermal shock (PTS) is one main elements of the general safety demonstration. Recently, CEA proposed several improved analytical tools for the analysis of the PTS. First, an analytical solution for the vessel through-thickness temperature variation has been developed to deal with any fluid temperature, taking into account the possible presence of a cladding, in the case of an internal PTS. The associated thermal stress expression has been simplified and a complete linearised solution is given for the thermal loading and also for internal pressure, depending on the main vessel material and on the cladding properties. Finally, a complete compendium is also given for the elastic stresses intensity factor calculation. This paper proposes several improvements of the proposed analytical method to deal with a PTS in a PWR cladded vessel. A variable heat transfer coefficient is now taken into account based on an equivalent fluid temperature variation determination, associated with a constant heat transfer coefficient, to keep the same thermal exchange between the fluid and the inner skin of the vessel obtained with the initial data. A more accurate expression for the linearised stresses due to the internal pressure is given, and a possible effect of residual stresses due to the difference between the operating temperature and the stress-free temperature is also taken into account. Finally, an extension of the domain of definition of the influence functions for the elastic stress intensity factor calculation is given

  3. Utilising DualEELS to probe the nanoscale mechanisms of the corrosion of Zircaloy-4 in 350 °C pressurised water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annand, Kirsty J., E-mail: k.annand.1@research.gla.ac.uk [Materials and Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); MacLaren, Ian [Materials and Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Gass, Mhairi [AMEC Foster Wheeler, Clean Energy, Walton House, Birchwood Park, WA3 6GA (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Characterisation of materials utilised for fuel cladding in nuclear reactors prior to service is integral in order to understand corrosion mechanisms which would take place in reactor. Zircaloy-4 is one such material of choice for nuclear fuel containment in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). In particular, the metal-oxide interface has been a predominant focus of previous research, however, due to the complex oxidation process of zirconium cladding, there is still no clear understanding of what is present at the interface. Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) and Dual Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (DualEELS), we have studied the corrosion of this material under conditions similar to those that could be encountered in service. It is shown that under all conditions, whether during faster oxidation in the early stages, slow growth just prior to the transition to a new growth regime, or in the faster growth that happens after this transition, the surface of the metal below the scale is loaded with oxygen up to around 33 at%. Approaching transition, in conditions of slow growth and slow oxygen supply, an additional metastable suboxide is apparent with a thickness of tens of nm. By studying changes in both chemical composition and dielectric function of the material at the oxide scale – metal interface with nanometre resolution, quantitative mapping could be achieved, clearly showing that this is a suboxide composition of ZrO and a Zr oxidation state close to +2. - Highlights: • Metal-oxide interface evolution studied by few-nm resolution EELS mapping. • Low loss EELS is very effective for mapping phase evolution. • ZrO suboxide phase characterised using EELS, which fits theoretical predictions. • ZrO formation found to correlate to local growth rate of oxide scale.

  4. A new plastic correction for the stress intensity factor of an under-clad defect in a PWR vessel subjected to a pressurised thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2007-01-01

    For the assessment of an under-clad defect in a vessel subjected to a cold pressurised thermal shock, plasticity is considered through the amplification β of the elastic stress intensity factor K I in the ferritic part of the vessel. An important effort has been made recently by CEA to improve the analytical tools in the frame of R and D activities funded by IRSN. The current solution in the French RSE-M code has been developed from fitted F.E. calculation results. A more physical solution is proposed in this paper. This takes into account two phenomena: the amplification of the elastic K I due to plasticity in the cladding and a plastic zone size correction in the ferritic part. The first correction has been established by representing the cladding plasticity by an imposed displacement on the crack faces at the interface between the cladding and the ferritic vessel. The corresponding elastic stress intensity factor is determined from the elastic plane strain asymptotic solution for the opening displacement. Plasticity in the ferritic steel is considered through a classical plastic zone size correction. The application of the solution to axisymmetric defects is first checked. The case of semi-elliptical defects is also investigated. For the correction determined at the interface between the cladding and the ferritic vessel, an amplification of the correction proposed for the deepest point is determined from a fitting of the 3D F.E. calculation results. It is also shown that the proposition of RSE-M, which consists in applying the same β correction at the deepest point and the interface point is not suitable. The applicability to a thermal shock, eventually combined with an internal pressure has been verified. For the deepest point, the proposed correction leads to similar results to the RSE-M method, but presents an extended domain of validity (no limits on the crack length are imposed)

  5. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sendilvelan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combustion rate controllable. Meanwhile, the periphery of the fuel-rich zone leads to fierce burning, which results in slightly high NOx emissions. The experiments were conducted in a modified single cylinder water-cooled diesel engine. In this experiment we use diesel, bio-diesel (Jatropha and gasoline as the fuel at different mixing ratios. HCCI has advantages in high thermal efficiency and low emissions and could possibly become a promising combustion method in internal combustion engines.

  6. Improvement study for the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haj Ayed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The dry-low-NOx (DLN micromix combustion principle is developed for the low emission combustion of hydrogen in an industrial gas turbine APU GTCP 36-300. The further decrease of NOx emissions along a wider operation range with pure hydrogen supports the introduction of the micromix technology to industrial applications. Experimental and numerical studies show the successful advance of the DLN micromix combustion to extended DLN operation range. The impact of the hydrogen fuel properties on the combustion principle and aerodynamic flame stabilization design laws, flow field, flame structure and emission characteristics is investigated by numerical analysis using an eddy dissipation concept combustion model and validated against experimental results.

  7. Combustion Kinetic Studies of Gasolines and Surrogates

    KAUST Repository

    Javed, Tamour

    2016-11-01

    Future thrusts for gasoline engine development can be broadly summarized into two categories: (i) efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines, and (ii) development of advance compression ignition (ACI) concepts. Efficiency improvements in conventional spark ignition engines requires downsizing (and turbocharging) which may be achieved by using high octane gasolines, whereas, low octane gasolines fuels are anticipated for ACI concepts. The current work provides the essential combustion kinetic data, targeting both thrusts, that is needed to develop high fidelity gasoline surrogate mechanisms and surrogate complexity guidelines. Ignition delay times of a wide range of certified gasolines and surrogates are reported here. These measurements were performed in shock tubes and rapid compression machines over a wide range of experimental conditions (650 – 1250 K, 10 – 40 bar) relevant to internal combustion engines. Using the measured the data and chemical kinetic analyses, the surrogate complexity requirements for these gasolines in homogeneous environments are specified. For the discussions presented here, gasolines are classified into three categories: (i)\\tLow octane gasolines including Saudi Aramco’s light naphtha fuel (anti-knock index, AKI = (RON + MON)/2 = 64; Sensitivity (S) = RON – MON = 1), certified FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasoline I and J (AKI ~ 70, S = 0.7 and 3 respectively), and their Primary Reference Fuels (PRF, mixtures of n-heptane and iso-octane) and multi-component surrogates. (ii)\\t Mid octane gasolines including FACE A and C (AKI ~ 84, S ~ 0 and 1 respectively) and their PRF surrogates. Laser absorption measurements of intermediate and product species formed during gasoline/surrogate oxidation are also reported. (iii)\\t A wide range of n-heptane/iso-octane/toluene (TPRF) blends to adequately represent the octane and sensitivity requirements of high octane gasolines including FACE gasoline F and G

  8. Techniques de combustion Combustin Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perthuis E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available L'efficacité d'un processus de chauffage par flamme est étroitement liée à la maîtrise des techniques de combustion. Le brûleur, organe essentiel de l'équipement de chauffe, doit d'une part assurer une combustion complète pour utiliser au mieux l'énergie potentielle du combustible et, d'autre part, provoquer dans le foyer les conditions aérodynamiques les plus propices oux transferts de chaleur. En s'appuyant sur les études expérimentales effectuées à la Fondation de Recherches Internationales sur les Flammes (FRIF, au Groupe d'Étude des Flammes de Gaz Naturel (GEFGN et à l'Institut Français du Pétrole (IFP et sur des réalisations industrielles, on présente les propriétés essentielles des flammes de diffusion aux combustibles liquides et gazeux obtenues avec ou sans mise en rotation des fluides, et leurs répercussions sur les transferts thermiques. La recherche des températures de combustion élevées conduit à envisager la marche à excès d'air réduit, le réchauffage de l'air ou son enrichissement à l'oxygène. Par quelques exemples, on évoque l'influence de ces paramètres d'exploitation sur l'économie possible en combustible. The efficiency of a flame heating process is closely linked ta the mastery of, combustion techniques. The burner, an essential element in any heating equipment, must provide complete combustion sa as to make optimum use of the potential energy in the fuel while, at the same time, creating the most suitable conditions for heat transfers in the combustion chamber. On the basis of experimental research performed by FRIF, GEFGN and IFP and of industrial achievements, this article describesthe essential properties of diffusion flames fed by liquid and gaseous fuels and produced with or without fluid swirling, and the effects of such flames on heat transfers. The search for high combustion temperatures means that consideration must be given to operating with reduced excess air, heating the air or

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  10. Jet plume injection and combustion system for internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, Antoni K.; Maxson, James A.; Hensinger, David M.

    1993-01-01

    An improved combustion system for an internal combustion engine is disclosed wherein a rich air/fuel mixture is furnished at high pressure to one or more jet plume generator cavities adjacent to a cylinder and then injected through one or more orifices from the cavities into the head space of the cylinder to form one or more turbulent jet plumes in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition of the rich air/fuel mixture in the cavity of the jet plume generator. The portion of the rich air/fuel mixture remaining in the cavity of the generator is then ignited to provide a secondary jet, comprising incomplete combustion products which are injected into the cylinder to initiate combustion in the already formed turbulent jet plume. Formation of the turbulent jet plume in the head space of the cylinder prior to ignition has been found to yield a higher maximum combustion pressure in the cylinder, as well as shortening the time period to attain such a maximum pressure.

  11. Co-Optimization of Internal Combustion Engines and Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L.

    2016-03-08

    The development of advanced engines has significant potential advantages in reduced aftertreatment costs for air pollutant emission control, and just as importantly for efficiency improvements and associated greenhouse gas emission reductions. There are significant opportunities to leverage fuel properties to create more optimal engine designs for both advanced spark-ignition and compression-ignition combustion strategies. The fact that biofuel blendstocks offer a potentially low-carbon approach to fuel production, leads to the idea of optimizing the entire fuel production-utilization value chain as a system from the standpoint of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions. This is a difficult challenge that has yet to be realized. This presentation will discuss the relationship between chemical structure and critical fuel properties for more efficient combustion, survey the properties of a range of biofuels that may be produced in the future, and describe the ongoing challenges of fuel-engine co-optimization.

  12. Twenty-fifth symposium (international) on combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of the papers presented at this conference are contained in this volume. The other one-third appear in special issues of ''Combustion and Flame'', Vol. 99, 1994 and Vol. 100, 1995. Papers are divided into the following sections: Supersonic combustion; Detonations and explosions; Internal combustion engines; Practical aspects of combustion; Incineration and wastes; Sprays and droplet combustion; Coal and organic solids combustion; Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Reaction kinetics; NO x ; Turbulent flames; Turbulent combustion; Laminar flames; Flame spread, fire and halogenated fire suppressants; Global environmental effects; Ignition; Two-phase combustion; Solid propellant combustion; Materials synthesis; Microgravity; and Experimental diagnostics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  13. Ozone applied to the homogeneous charge compression ignition engine to control alcohol fuels combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masurier, J.-B.; Foucher, F.; Dayma, G.; Dagaut, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ozone was useful to control combustion phasing of alcohol fuels in HCCI engine. • Ozone helps to improve the combustion and advance its phasing. • Butanol is more impacted by ozone than methanol and ethanol. • HCCI combustion parameters may be controlled by managing ozone concentration. • Kinetics demonstrates that alcohol fuels are initially oxidized by O-atoms. - Abstract: The present investigation examines the impact of seeding the intake of an HCCI engine with ozone, one of the most oxidizing chemical species, on the combustion of three alcohol fuels: methanol, ethanol and n-butanol. The research was performed through engine experiments and constant volume computations. The results showed that increasing the ozone concentration led to an improvement in combustion coupled with a combustion advance. It was also observed, by comparing the results for each fuel selected, that n-butanol is the most impacted by ozone seeding and methanol the least. Further analyses of the experimental results showed that the alcohol fuel combustion can be controlled with ozone, which presents an interesting potential. Finally, computation results confirmed the experimental results observed. They also showed that in presence of ozone, alcohol fuels are not initially oxidized by molecular oxygen but by O-atoms coming from the ozone decomposition.

  14. In-cylinder Combustion and Soot Evolution in the Transition from Conventional CI mode to PPC

    KAUST Repository

    An, Yanzhao

    2018-01-09

    The present study intends to explore the in-cylinder combustion and evolution of soot emission during the transition from conventional compression ignition (CI) combustion to partially premixed combustion (PPC) at low load conditions. In-cylinder combustion images and engine-out emissions were measured in an optical engine fueled with low octane heavy naphtha fuel (RON = 50). Full cycle engine simulations were performed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code CONVERGETM, coupled with gas phase chemical kinetics, turbulence, and particulate size mimic soot model. The simulations were performed under low load conditions (IMEP ~ 2 to 3 bar) at an engine speed of 1200 rpm. The start of injection (SOI) was advanced from late (-10 CAD aTDC) to early fuel injection timings (-40 CAD aTDC) to realize the combustion transition from CI combustion to PPC. The simulation results of combustion and emission are compared with the experimental results at both CI and PPC combustion modes. The results of the study show a typical low-temperature stratified lean combustion at PPC mode, while high-temperature spray-driven combustion is evident at CI mode. The in-cylinder small intermediates species such as acetylene (C2H2), propargyl (C3H3), cyclopentadienyl (C5H5) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were significantly suppressed at PPC mode. Nucleation reaction of PAHs collision contributed to main soot mass production. The distribution of soot mass and particle number density was consistent with the distribution of high-temperature zones at CI and PPC combustion modes.

  15. Application and demonstration of oxyfuel combustion technologies to the existing power plant in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Terutoshi; Yamada, Toshihiko; Watanabe, Shuzo; Kiga, Takashi; Gotou, Takahiro [IHI Corporation, Tokyo (Japan). Power Plant Div.; Misawa, Nobuhiro [Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Spero, Chris [CS Energy Ltd, Brisbane (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Oxyfuel combustion is able to directly make the highly concentrated CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of pulverized coal fired power plant and, therefore, is expected as one of the promising technologies for CO{sub 2} capture. We are advancing the Oxyfuel combustion demonstration project, which is called Callide Oxyfuel Project, with the support of both Australian and Japanese governments. Currently the boiler retrofit work is completed and the commissioning in air combustion is going on. In this paper, we introduce the general outline of the Callide Oxyfuel Project and its progress.

  16. Numerical analysis of exhaust jet secondary combustion in hypersonic flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Peng; Wang, Jiang-Feng; Zhao, Fa-Ming; Fan, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yu-Han

    2018-05-01

    The interaction effect between jet and control surface in supersonic and hypersonic flow is one of the key problems for advanced flight control system. The flow properties of exhaust jet secondary combustion in a hypersonic compression ramp flow field were studied numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with multi-species and combustion reaction effects. The analysis was focused on the flow field structure and the force amplification factor under different jet conditions. Numerical results show that a series of different secondary combustion makes the flow field structure change regularly, and the temperature increases rapidly near the jet exit.

  17. EMISSION AND COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT FUELS IN A HCCI ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sendilvelan; S.Mohanamurugan

    2011-01-01

    Different intake valve timings and fuel injection amounts were tested in order to identify their effects on exhaust emissions and combustion characteristics using variable valve actuation (VVA) in a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. The HCCI engine is a promising concept for future automobile engines and stationary power plants. The two-stage ignition process in a HCCI engine creates advanced ignition and stratified combustion, which makes the ignition timing and combus...

  18. Combustion dynamics in cryogenic rocket engines: Research programme at DLR Lampoldshausen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardi, Justin S.; Traudt, Tobias; Bombardieri, Cristiano; Börner, Michael; Beinke, Scott K.; Armbruster, Wolfgang; Nicolas Blanco, P.; Tonti, Federica; Suslov, Dmitry; Dally, Bassam; Oschwald, Michael

    2018-06-01

    The Combustion Dynamics group in the Rocket Propulsion Department at the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Lampoldshausen, strives to advance the understanding of dynamic processes in cryogenic rocket engines. Leveraging the test facilities and experimental expertise at DLR Lampoldshausen, the group has taken a primarily experimental approach to investigating transient flows, ignition, and combustion instabilities for over one and a half decades. This article provides a summary of recent achievements, and an overview of current and planned research activities.

  19. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gopalendu

    involves interactions between the local particle and energy emitted by all other particles and, hence, cannot be obtained from particle ensembles directly. To close the nonlinear coupling between turbulence and absorption, i.e., "absorption TRI", an optically thin fluctuation approximation can be applied to virtually all combustion problems and obtain acceptable accuracy. In the present study a composition-PDF method is applied, in which only the temperature and the species concentrations are treated as random variables. A closely coupled hybrid finite-volume/Monte Carlo scheme is adopted, in which the Monte Carlo method is used to solve the composition-PDF for chemical reactions and the finite volume method is used to solve for the flow field and radiation. Spherical harmonics method-based finite volume solvers (P-1 and P-3) are developed using the data structures of the high fidelity open-source code flow software OpenFOAM. Spectral radiative properties of the participating medium are modeled using full-spectrum k-distribution methods. Advancements of basic k-distribution methods are performed for nongray nonhomogeneous gas- and particulate-phase (soot, fuel droplets, ash, etc.) participating media using multi-scale and multi-group based approaches. These methods achieve close-to benchmark line-by-line (LBL) accuracy in strongly inhomogeneous media at a tiny fraction of LBL's computational cost. A portable spectral module is developed, which includes all the basic to advanced k-distribution methods along with the precompiled accurate and compact k-distribution databases. The P-1 /P-3 RTE solver coupled with the spectral module is used in conjunction with the combined Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and composition-PDF-based turbulence-chemistry solver to investigate TRI in multiphase turbulent combustion systems. The combustion solvers developed in this study is employed to simulate several turbulent jet flames, such as Sandia Flame D, and artificial nonsooting

  20. Characterisation of wood combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto

    The combustion of wood chips and wood pellets for the production of renewable energy in Denmark increased from 5.7 PJ to 16 PJ during the period 2000-2015, and further increases are expected to occur within the coming years. In 2012, about 22,300 tonnes of wood ashes were generated in Denmark....... Currently, these ashes are mainly landfilled, despite Danish legislation allowing their application onto forest and agricultural soils for fertilising and/or liming purposes. During this PhD work, 16 wood ash samples generated at ten different Danish combustion plants were collected and characterised...... for their composition and leaching properties. Despite the relatively large variations in the contents of nutrients and trace metals, the overall levels were comparable to typical ranges reported in the literature for other wood combustion ashes, as well as with regards to leaching. In general, the composition...

  1. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  2. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  3. Improvement of fuel combustion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumanovskii, A.G.; Babii, V.I.; Enyakin, Y.P.; Kotler, V.R.; Ryabov, G.V.; Verbovetskii, E.K.; Nadyrov, I.I. [All-Russian Thermal Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-07-01

    The main problems encountered in the further development of fuel combustion technologies at thermal power stations in Russia are considered. Experience is generalized and results are presented on the efficiency with which nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by means of technological methods when burning natural gas, fuel oil, and coal. The problems that arise in the introduction of new combustion technologies and in using more promising grades of coal are considered. The results studies are presented that show that low grade Russian coals can be burnt in circulating fluidized bed boilers. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  5. Application of the FIRST Combustion model to Spray Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, B.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Liquid fuel is of interest to apply to gas turbines. The large advantage is that liquids are easily storable as compared to gaseous fuels. Disadvantage is that liquid fuel has to be sprayed, vaporized and mixed with air. Combustion occurs at some stage of mixing and ignition. Depending on the

  6. Development of a Premixed Combustion Capability for Scramjet Combustion Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Robert D.; Goyne, Christopher P.; Rice, Brian E.; Chelliah, Harsha; McDaniel, James C.; Edwards, Jack R.; Cantu, Luca M. L.; Gallo, Emanuela C. A.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing engines rely on scramjet combustion processes, which involve high speed, compressible, and highly turbulent flows. The combustion environment and the turbulent flames at the heart of these engines are difficult to simulate and study in the laboratory under well controlled conditions. Typically, wind-tunnel testing is performed that more closely approximates engine testing rather than a careful investigation of the underlying physics that drives the combustion process. The experiments described in this paper, along with companion data sets being developed separately, aim to isolate the chemical kinetic effects from the fuel-air mixing process in a dual-mode scramjet combustion environment. A unique fuel injection approach is taken that produces a nearly uniform fuel-air mixture at the entrance to the combustor. This approach relies on the precombustion shock train upstream of the dual-mode scramjet combustor. A stable ethylene flame anchored on a cavity flameholder with a uniformly mixed combustor inflow has been achieved in these experiments allowing numerous companion studies involving coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), particle image velocimetry (PIV), and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) to be performed.

  7. Characterisation of Oxides Formed on the Internal Surface of Steam Generator Tubes in Alloy 690 Corroded in the Primary Environment of Pressurised Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrette, Florence; Leclercq, Stephanie; Legras, Laurent

    2012-09-01

    Since the end of the 1990s, EDF R and D has been studying the phenomenon of corrosion product release from Steam Generator tubes in order to minimize the Source Term of the contamination and radiation exposure during operation and maintenance of Pressurised Water Reactors. With the BOREAL loop, release tests in primary water at 325 deg. C were performed on various Steam Generator tubes made of alloy 690. The experimental conditions of these tests (chemistry, temperature and hydraulics) were the same for all the tests but the results showed various behaviours towards release. For some tubes, the release was weak whereas for others, it was higher; the release rate of the tubes decreased more or less quickly with time. In order to explain these results, the internal surface of the tubes was characterised before and after the tests. Before the tests, various parameters were studied; the main parameters were the roughness, the impurities, the grain size and the cold work. The results demonstrated that it was not easy to quantify the influence of each parameter on release and to differentiate the tubes. A new parameter was proposed to characterise the internal extreme surface of SG tubes: the surface nano-hardness by nano-indentation measurements. The tubes were also observed and analysed by SEM, (X)TEM. Data obtained by (X)TEM revealed differences of the surface state (layer of perturbed microstructure, density of dislocations, grain size, impurities, initial oxide,...). After the tests, the oxides formed on the internal surface and the underlying material of the samples were characterised by SEM, (X)TEM and SIMS. The examinations showed various types of oxides. For some tubes, a duplex oxide scale was identified, for the others, only one oxide scale was observed. For equivalent durations of corrosion, the thickness of the enriched - chromium oxide layer can vary from 5 nm to 100 nm and the chemical composition can be different. The examinations of the underlying

  8. International Benchmark on Pressurised Water Reactor Sub-channel and Bundle Tests. Volume II: Benchmark Results of Phase I: Void Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Adam; Avramova, Maria; Velazquez-Lozada, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    This report summarised the first phase of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Benchmark based on NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Tests (PSBT), which was intended to provide data for the verification of void distribution models in participants' codes. This phase was composed of four exercises; Exercise 1: steady-state single sub-channel benchmark, Exercise 2: steady-state rod bundle benchmark, Exercise 3: transient rod bundle benchmark and Exercise 4: a pressure drop benchmark. The experimental data provided to the participants of this benchmark is from a series of void measurement tests using full-size mock-up tests for both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). These tests were performed from 1987 to 1995 by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) in Japan and made available by the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation (JNES) for the purposes of this benchmark, which was organised by Pennsylvania State University. Twenty-one institutions from nine countries participated in this benchmark. Seventeen different computer codes were used in Exercises 1, 2, 3 and 4. Among the computer codes were porous media, sub-channel, systems thermal-hydraulic code and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. It was observed that the codes tended to overpredict the thermal equilibrium quality at lower elevations and under predict it at higher elevations. There was also a tendency to overpredict void fraction at lower elevations and underpredict it at high elevations for the bundle test cases. The overprediction of void fraction at low elevations is likely caused by the x-ray densitometer measurement method used. Under sub-cooled boiling conditions, the voids accumulate at heated surfaces (and are therefore not seen in the centre of the sub-channel, where the measurements are being taken), so the experimentally-determined void fractions will be lower than the actual void fraction. Some of the best

  9. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sö ren; Jarząbek, Michał; Hadrich, Torsten; Michels, Dominik L.; Palubicki, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical

  10. Free Energy and Internal Combustion Engine Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, William D.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of one type (Carnot) of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) cycle is analyzed within the framework of thermodynamic free energies. ICE performance is different from that of an External Combustion Engine (ECE) which is dictated by Carnot's rule.

  11. Method for storing radioactive combustible waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbee, H.W.; Lovelace, R.C.

    1973-10-01

    A method is described for preventing pressure buildup in sealed containers which contain radioactively contaminated combustible waste material by adding an oxide getter material to the container so as to chemically bind sorbed water and combustion product gases. (Official Gazette)

  12. Scramjet Combustion Stability Behavior Modeling, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in combustion stability analysis (UCDS) offers the potential to predict the combustion stability of a scramjet. This capability is very...

  13. Scramjet Combustion Stability Behavior Modeling, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A recent breakthrough in combustion stability analysis (UCDS) offers the means to accurately predict the combustion stability of a scramjet. This capability is very...

  14. Publication sites productive uses of combustion ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publication Sites Productive Uses of Combustion Ash For more information contact: e:mail: Public waste combustion ash in landfills. The new technology brief describes recent studies where ash was used

  15. Combustion Research Facility | A Department of Energy Office of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaborative Research Facility Back to Sandia National Laboratory Homepage Combustion Research Search the CRF Combustion Chemistry Flame Chemistry Research.Combustion_Chemistry.Flame_Chemistry Theory and Modeling Theory and Modeling Combustion Kinetics High Pressure Chemistry Chemistry of Autoignition

  16. High Frequency Combustion Instabilities of LOx/CH4 Spray Flames in Rocket Engine Combustion Chambers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliphorst, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the early stages of space transportation in the 1940’s, and the related liquid propellant rocket engine development, combustion instability has been a major issue. High frequency combustion instability (HFCI) is the interaction between combustion and the acoustic field in the combustion

  17. Assessing Spontaneous Combustion Instability with Nonlinear Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, C. J.; Casiano, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable interest lies in the ability to characterize the onset of spontaneous instabilities within liquid propellant rocket engine (LPRE) combustion devices. Linear techniques, such as fast Fourier transforms, various correlation parameters, and critical damping parameters, have been used at great length for over fifty years. Recently, nonlinear time series methods have been applied to deduce information pertaining to instability incipiency hidden in seemingly stochastic combustion noise. A technique commonly used in biological sciences known as the Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis has been extended to the combustion dynamics field, and is introduced here as a data analysis approach complementary to linear ones. Advancing, a modified technique is leveraged to extract artifacts of impending combustion instability that present themselves a priori growth to limit cycle amplitudes. Analysis is demonstrated on data from J-2X gas generator testing during which a distinct spontaneous instability was observed. Comparisons are made to previous work wherein the data were characterized using linear approaches. Verification of the technique is performed by examining idealized signals and comparing two separate, independently developed tools.

  18. Heat transfer and combustion in microgravity; Mujuryokuka deno netsukogaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-09-05

    Examples of thermal engineering under gravity free state are introduced. When making semiconductor crystals, the thermal conductivity of the molten substance becomes important but in a microgravity environment where the thermal convection is suppressed, this value can be accurately measured. Although there are many unknown points regarding the thermal conductive mechanism of thermal control equipment elements under microgravity, theoretical analysis is being advanced. It is anticipated that the verification of this theory using liquid droplets will be made. The conveying of boiling heat under microgravity is suppressed because the bubbles stick to the heat source. When a non-azeotropic composition is used, Marangoni convection occurs, and the conveying is promoted. Since there is no thermal convection in microgravity combustion, diffusion dominates. In order to make the phenomenon clear, the free-fall tower can be utilized. A liquid droplet flame will become a complete, integrated, spherical flame. Vaporization coefficient and combustion velocity which are impossible to measure on the ground can be measured. In the case of metal fires occuring in space, the movement of metal dominates the combustion. In microgravity, dust coal will float in a stationary state so the process of combustion can be observed. It is believed that the diffusion flame of hydrocarbons will be thicker than the flame on the ground. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Final Report - Low Temperature Combustion Chemistry And Fuel Component Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, Margaret [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-02-24

    Recent research into combustion chemistry has shown that reactions at “low temperatures” (700 – 1100 K) have a dramatic influence on ignition and combustion of fuels in virtually every practical combustion system. A powerful class of laboratory-scale experimental facilities that can focus on fuel chemistry in this temperature range is the rapid compression facility (RCF), which has proven to be a versatile tool to examine the details of fuel chemistry in this important regime. An RCF was used in this project to advance our understanding of low temperature chemistry of important fuel compounds. We show how factors including fuel molecular structure, the presence of unsaturated C=C bonds, and the presence of alkyl ester groups influence fuel auto-ignition and produce variable amounts of negative temperature coefficient behavior of fuel ignition. We report new discoveries of synergistic ignition interactions between alkane and alcohol fuels, with both experimental and kinetic modeling studies of these complex interactions. The results of this project quantify the effects of molecular structure on combustion chemistry including carbon bond saturation, through low temperature experimental studies of esters, alkanes, alkenes, and alcohols.

  20. Methane combustion in various regimes: First and second thermodynamic-law comparison between air-firing and oxyfuel condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaming; Chen, Sheng; Liu, Shi; Feng, Yongxin; Xu, Kai; Zheng, Chuguang

    2016-01-01

    MILD oxyfuel combustion has been attracting increasing attention as a promising clean combustion technology. How to design a pathway to reach MILD oxyfuel combustion regime and what can provide a theoretical guide to design such a pathway are two critical questions that need to be answered. So far there has been no open literature on these issues. A type of combustion regime classification map proposed in our previous work, based on the so-called ”Hot Diluted Diffusion Ignition” (HDDI) configuration, is adopted here as a simple but useful tool to solve these problems. Firstly, we analyze comprehensively the influences of various dilution atmosphere and fuel type on combustion regimes. The combustion regime classification maps are made out according to the analyses. In succession, we conduct a comparison between the map in air-firing condition and its oxyfuel counterpart. With the aid of the second thermodynamic-law analysis on the maps, it is easy to identify the major contributors to entropy generation in various combustion regimes in advance, which is crucial for combustion system optimization. Moreover, we find that, for the first time, a combustion regime classification map also may be used as a safety indicator. With the aid of these maps, some conclusions in previous publications can be explained more straightforwardly. - Highlights: • Analyze the influences of different fuels and dilution atmosphere on combustion regimes for the first time. • Provide a theoretical guide for practical operation to establish MILD oxyfuel combustion for the first time. • A new finding to expand the purposes of combustion regime maps for practical operation and combustion optimization.

  1. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the combustion process at low loads of a diesel natural gas dual-fuel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weifeng; Liu, Zhongchang; Wang, Zhongshu

    2016-01-01

    To construct an effective method to analyze the combustion process of dual fuel engines at low loads, effects of combustion boundaries on the combustion process of an electronically controlled diesel natural gas dual-fuel engine at low loads were investigated. Three typical combustion modes, including h, m and n, appeared under different combustion boundaries. In addition, the time-sequenced characteristic and the heat release rate-imbalanced characteristic were found in the dual fuel engine combustion process. To quantify these characteristics, two quantitative indicators, including the TSC (time-sequenced coefficient) and the HBC (HRR-balanced coefficient) were defined. The results show that increasing TSC and HBC can decrease HC (hydrocarbon) emissions and improve the BTE (brake thermal efficiency) significantly. The engine with the n combustion mode can obtain the highest BTE and the lowest HC emissions, followed by m, and then h. However, the combustion process of the engine will deteriorate sharply if boundary conditions are not strictly controlled in the n combustion mode. Based on the n combustion mode, advancing the start of diesel injection significantly, using large EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) rate and appropriately intake throttling can effectively reduce HC emissions and improve the BTE of dual fuel engines at low loads with relatively high natural gas PES (percentage energy substitution). - Highlights: • We reported three typical combustion modes of a dual-fuel engine at low loads. • Time-sequenced characteristic was put forward and qualified. • HRR-imbalanced characteristic was put forward and qualified. • Three combustion modes appeared as equivalence ratio/diesel injection timing varied. • The engine performance varied significantly with different combustion mode.

  2. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomass combustion ashes for fertilizing and liming purposes has been widely addressed in scientific literature. Nevertheless, the content of potentially toxic compounds raises concerns for a possible contamination of the soil. During this study five ash samples generated at four...

  3. An incinerator for combustable radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jingquan; Jiang Yun; Zhang Yinsheng; Chen Boling; Zhang Shihang

    1989-01-01

    An incinerator has been built up in Shanghai. In this paper, the devices of the incinerator, main parameters of the process, and the results of non-radioactive waste and simulated radwaste combustion tests were contributed. That provides reference information for radwaste treatment with incineration process

  4. 75 FR 32142 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    .... Contact Mat Chibbaro, P.E., Fire Protection Engineer, Office of Safety Systems, OSHA Directorate of..., and metals (such as aluminum and magnesium). Industries that may have combustible dust hazards include..., chemical manufacturing, textile manufacturing, furniture manufacturing, metal processing, fabricated metal...

  5. Sulfur Chemistry in Combustion II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Kiil, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Several options are available to control the emission of SO2 from combustion processes. One possibility is to use a cleaner technology, i.e. fuel switching from oil and coal to natural gas or biomass, or to desulphurize coal and oil. Another possibility is to change to a different technology...

  6. Multi-zone modelling of PCCI combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egüz, U.; Somers, L.M.T.; Leermakers, C.A.J.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Early Direct Injection Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (EDI PCCI) combustion is a promising concept for the diesel combustion. Although EDI PCCI assures very low soot and NO xemission levels, the injection is uncoupled from combustion, which narrows down the operating conditions. The main

  7. Method and device for diagnosing and controlling combustion instabilities in internal combustion engines operating in or transitioning to homogeneous charge combustion ignition mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert M [Knoxville, TN; Daw, Charles S [Knoxville, TN; Green, Johney B [Knoxville, TN; Edwards, Kevin D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-07

    This invention is a method of achieving stable, optimal mixtures of HCCI and SI in practical gasoline internal combustion engines comprising the steps of: characterizing the combustion process based on combustion process measurements, determining the ratio of conventional and HCCI combustion, determining the trajectory (sequence) of states for consecutive combustion processes, and determining subsequent combustion process modifications using said information to steer the engine combustion toward desired behavior.

  8. Environmental optimisation of waste combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Robert [AaF Energikonsult, Stockholm (Sweden); Berge, Niclas; Stroemberg, Birgitta [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-12-01

    The regulations concerning waste combustion evolve through R and D and a strive to get better and common regulations for the European countries. This study discusses if these rules of today concerning oxygen concentration, minimum temperature and residence time in the furnace and the use of stand-by burners are needed, are possible to monitor, are the optimum from an environmental point of view or could be improved. No evidence from well controlled laboratory experiments validate that 850 deg C in 6 % oxygen content in general is the best lower limit. A lower excess air level increase the temperature, which has a significant effect on the destruction of hydrocarbons, favourably increases the residence time, increases the thermal efficiency and the efficiency of the precipitators. Low oxygen content is also necessary to achieve low NO{sub x}-emissions. The conclusion is that the demands on the accuracy of the measurement devices and methods are too high, if they are to be used inside the furnace to control the combustion process. The big problem is however to find representative locations to measure temperature, oxygen content and residence time in the furnace. Another major problem is that the monitoring of the operation conditions today do not secure a good combustion. It can lead to a false security. The reason is that it is very hard to find boilers without stratifications. These stratifications (stream lines) has each a different history of residence time, mixing time, oxygen and combustible gas levels and temperature, when they reach the convection area. The combustion result is the sum of all these different histories. The hydrocarbons emission is in general not produced at a steady level. Small clouds of unburnt hydrocarbons travels along the stream lines showing up as peaks on a THC measurement device. High amplitude peaks has a tendency to contain higher ratio of heavy hydrocarbons than lower peaks. The good correlation between some easily detected

  9. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  10. Pressurised-water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergloeff, D.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent improves the plant described in main patent 2244562 where the primary coolant pump is built into the housing of the steam raising unit, by overcoming certain difficulties in the transition from the specially extensive tube floor of the steam raising unit to the narrow crossection of the pump penetration. This is achieved by the formation of an unsymmetrical inlet funnel between the tube floor of the steam raising unit and the suction side of the pump. A side wall of the funnel forms the separating wall between the inlet and the outlet chamber below the tube floor of the steam raising unit. The crossection of the inlet funnel is reduced towards the pump by 2/3 to 1/3. Even laminar flow conditions are obtained at all flow velocities. Erosion, which disturbs flow and causes cavitation, no longer occurs. (ORU) [de

  11. Coal combustion waste management study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    Coal-fired generation accounted for almost 55 percent of the production of electricity in the United States in 1990. Coal combustion generates high volumes of ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes, estimated at almost 90 million tons. The amount of ash and flue gas desulfurization wastes generated by coal-fired power plants is expected to increase as a result of future demand growth, and as more plants comply with Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Nationwide, on average, over 30 percent of coal combustion wastes is currently recycled for use in various applications; the remaining percentage is ultimately disposed in waste management units. There are a significant number of on-site and off-site waste management units that are utilized by the electric utility industry to store or dispose of coal combustion waste. Table ES-1 summarizes the number of disposal units and estimates of waste contained at these unites by disposal unit operating status (i.e, operating or retired). Further, ICF Resources estimates that up to 120 new or replacement units may need to be constructed to service existing and new coal capacity by the year 2000. The two primary types of waste management units used by the industry are landfills and surface impoundments. Utility wastes have been exempted by Congress from RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste regulation since 1980. As a result of this exemption, coal combustion wastes are currently being regulated under Subtitle D of RCRA. As provided under Subtitle D, wastes not classified as hazardous under Subtitle C are subject to State regulation. At the same time Congress developed this exemption, also known as the ''Bevill Exclusion,'' it directed EPA to prepare a report on coal combustion wastes and make recommendations on how they should be managed

  12. Modeling of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Haruaki

    2012-10-01

    Recently, many experimental study of plasma-assisted combustion has been done. However, numerous complex reactions in combustion of hydrocarbons are preventing from theoritical study for clarifying inside the plasma-assisted combustion, and the effect of plasma-assist is still not understood. Shinohara and Sasaki [1,2] have reported that the shortening of flame length by irradiating microwave without increase of gas temperature. And they also reported that the same phenomena would occur when applying dielectric barrier discharges to the flame using simple hydrocarbon, methane. It is suggested that these phenomena may result by the electron heating. To clarify this phenomena, electron behavior under microwave and DBD was examined. For the first step of DBD plasma-assisted combustion simulation, electron Monte Carlo simulation in methane, oxygen and argon mixture gas(0.05:0.14:0.81) [2] has been done. Electron swarm parameters are sampled and electron energy distribution function (EEDF)s are also determined. In the combustion, gas temperature is higher(>1700K), so reduced electric field E/N becomes relatively high(>10V/cm/Torr). The electrons are accelerated to around 14 eV. This result agree with the optical emission from argon obtained by the experiment of reference [2]. Dissociation frequency of methane and oxygens are obtained in high. This might be one of the effect of plasma-assist. And it is suggested that the electrons should be high enough to dissociate methane, but plasma is not needed.[4pt] [1] K. Shinohara et al, J. Phys. D:Appl. Phys., 42, 182008 (1-7) (2009).[0pt] [2] K. Sasaki, 64th Annual Gaseous Electronic Conference, 56, 15 CT3.00001(2011).

  13. Combustive management of oil spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Extensive experiments with in situ incineration were performed on a desert site at the University of Arizona with very striking results. The largest incinerator, 6 feet in diameter with a 30 foot chimney, developed combustion temperatures of 3000, F, and attendant soot production approximately 1000 times less than that produced by conventional in situ burning. This soot production, in fact, is approximately 30 times less than current allowable EPA standards for incinerators and internal combustion engines. Furthermore, as a consequence of the high temperature combustion, the bum rate was established at a very high 3400 gallons per hour for this particular 6 foot diameter structure. The rudimentary design studies we have carried out relative to a seagoing 8 foot diameter incinerator have predicted that a continuous burn rate of 7000 gallons per hour is realistic. This structure was taken as a basis for operational design because it is compatible with C130 flyability, and will be inexpensive enough ($120,000 per copy) to be stored at those seaside depots throughout the US coast line in which the requisite ancillary equipments (booms, service tugs, etc.) are already deployed. The LOX experiments verified our expectations with respect to combustion of debris and various highly weathered or emulsified oils. We have concluded, however, that the use of liquid oxygen in actual beach clean up is not promising because the very high temperatures associated with this combustion are almost certain to produce environmentally deleterious effects on the beach surface and its immediately sublying structures. However, the use of liquid oxygen augmentation for shore based and flyable incinerators may still play an important role in handing the problem of accumulated debris

  14. Combustion Characteristics of C5 Alcohols and a Skeletal Mechanism for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Combustion Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Sungwoo

    2015-10-27

    C5 alcohols are considered alternative fuels because they emit less greenhouse gases and fewer harmful pollutants. In this study, the combustion characteristics of 2-methylbutanol (2-methyl-1-butanol) and isopentanol (3-methyl-1-butanol) and their mixtures with primary reference fuels (PRFs) were studied using a detailed chemical kinetic model obtained from merging previously published mechanisms. Ignition delay times of the C5 alcohol/air mixtures were compared to PRFs at 20 and 40 atm. Reaction path analyses were conducted at intermediate and high temperatures to identify the most influential reactions controlling ignition of C5 alcohols. The direct relation graph with expert knowledge methodology was used to eliminate unimportant species and reactions in the detailed mechanism, and the resulting skeletal mechanism was tested at various homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine combustion conditions. These simulations were used to investigate the heat release characteristics of the methyl-substituted C5 alcohols, and the results show relatively strong reactions at intermediate temperatures prior to hot ignition. C5 alcohol blending in PRF75 in HCCI combustion leads to a significant decrease of low-temperature heat release (LTHR) and a delay of the main combustion. The heat release features demonstrated by C5 alcohols can be used to improve the design and operation of advanced engine technologies.

  15. Ash quality and environmental quality assurance system in co-combustion - Co-combustion of forest industry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine-Ylijoki, J.; Wahlstroem, M.

    2000-01-01

    The environmental acceptability and possible utilization of co-combustion ashes will have a significant influence on the wider use of co-combustion in the future. At present the correlation between currently used fuels, their mixture ratios, and quality variations in ashes are not known, which complicates the assessment of possible utilization and environmental acceptability of co-combustion ashes. The composition of ashes has also been found to vary significantly. Effective utilization requires that process variations to alter ash composition and quality variations are known in advance. The aim of the research was to characterize the fly ash from co- combustion of peat, wood and biological paper mill sludge produced under different fuel loadings, especially with and without sludge addition, ant to identify critical parameters influencing on the ash composition. The variations in the leaching properties of ashes collected daily were followed up. The environmental acceptability of the ashes produced under different fuel loadings, especially their suitability for use in road constructions, were evaluated. The project included also the preparation of laboratory reference material from ash material. Guidelines were developed for sampling, sample preparation and analysis, and leaching tests. Furthermore, a quality control system, including sampling strategies, sample analysis and leaching testing, was established

  16. Reactivity and NO emissions of coal blends during combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Arias; R.I. Backreedy; A. Arenillas; J.M. Jones; F. Rubiera; M. Pourkashanian; A. Williams; J.J. Pis [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Oviedo (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    This work is focussed on burnout and NO emissions during coal blend combustion. Two different approaches were used. In a first step, experimental work was carried out in a laminar entrained flow reactor (EFR) and then computational techniques were applied to improve the burnout prediction of coals and blend during the experiments. A preliminary study on the combustibility of the samples was made using a thermogravimetric analyser. An entrained flow reactor was employed to study the behaviour of coals and blends at high heating rate and short residence times. Burnout and NO emissions were measured during these experiments. Two methods were used to modelling the combustion in the entrained flow reactor: a commercial CFD code and an advanced char burnout model. Experiments done in the EFR showed that burnout and NO emissions of some blends can be predicted from the weighted average of the values of individual coals, especially when blended coals have the same rank. When a blend is made with coals of different rank, some deviations were observed with respect to the averaged values in burnout and especially in NOx emissions. Burnouts predicted with a commercial CFD code were higher than the experimental values. The use of an advanced char burnout model improved greatly the results, showing the advantages of coupling these two mathematical techniques. 9 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Use of combustible wastes as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, V.R.; Salamov, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    Achievements of science and technology in creating and using units for combustion of wastes with recovery of heat of the escaping gases has been systematized and generalized. Scales and outlooks are examined for the use of general, industrial and agricultural waste as fuel, composition of the waste, questions of planning and operating units for combustion of solid refuse, settling of waste water and industrial and agricultural waste. Questions are covered for preparing them for combustion use in special units with recovery of heat and at ES, aspects of environmental protection during combustion of waste, cost indicators of the employed methods of recovering the combustible waste.

  18. Distributed Low Temperature Combustion: Fundamental Understanding of Combustion Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assessment of... behaviour as compared to ethanol. The latter fuel has also been considered along with methane. Work has also been performed on the further assess- ment of...identification of various combustion gas states. A range of Damköhler numbers (Da) from the conventional propagating flamelet regime well into the distributed

  19. Large Eddy simulation of turbulent hydrogen-fuelled supersonic combustion in an air cross-flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, A.; Cecere, D.; Giacomazzi, E.

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of this article is to provide a theoretical understanding of the physics of supersonic mixing and combustion. Research in advanced air-breathing propulsion systems able to push vehicles well beyond is of interest around the world. In a scramjet, the air stream flow captured by the inlet is decelerated but still maintains supersonic conditions. As the residence time is very short , the study of an efficient mixing and combustion is a key issue in the ongoing research on compressible flows. Due to experimental difficulties in measuring complex high-speed unsteady flowfields, the most convenient way to understand unsteady features of supersonic mixing and combustion is to use computational fluid dynamics. This work investigates supersonic combustion physics in the Hyshot II combustion chamber within the Large Eddy simulation framework. The resolution of this turbulent compressible reacting flow requires: (1) highly accurate non-dissipative numerical schemes to properly simulate strong gradients near shock waves and turbulent structures away from these discontinuities; (2) proper modelling of the small subgrid scales for supersonic combustion, including effects from compressibility on mixing and combustion; (3) highly detailed kinetic mechanisms (the Warnatz scheme including 9 species and 38 reactions is adopted) accounting for the formation and recombination of radicals to properly predict flame anchoring. Numerical results reveal the complex topology of the flow under investigation. The importance of baroclinic and dilatational effects on mixing and flame anchoring is evidenced. Moreover, their effects on turbulence-scale generation and the scaling law are analysed.

  20. Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

    2010-09-30

    In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

  1. ZMOTTO- MODELING THE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The ZMOTTO program was developed to model mathematically a spark-ignited internal combustion engine. ZMOTTO is a large, general purpose program whose calculations can be established at five levels of sophistication. These five models range from an ideal cycle requiring only thermodynamic properties, to a very complex representation demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. ZMOTTO is a flexible and computationally economical program based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The calculations assume that heat transfer is expressed in terms of a heat transfer coefficient and that the cylinder average of kinetic plus potential energies remains constant. During combustion, the pressures of burned and unburned gases are assumed equal and their heat transfer areas are assumed proportional to their respective mass fractions. Even the simplest ZMOTTO model provides for residual gas effects, spark advance, exhaust gas recirculation, supercharging, and throttling. In the more complex models, 1) finite rate chemistry replaces equilibrium chemistry in descriptions of both the flame and the burned gases, 2) poppet valve formulas represent fluid flow instead of a zero pressure drop flow, and 3) flame propagation is modeled by mass burning equations instead of as an instantaneous process. Input to ZMOTTO is determined by the model chosen. Thermodynamic data is required for all models. Transport properties and chemical kinetics data are required only as the model complexity grows. Other input includes engine geometry, working fluid composition, operating characteristics, and intake/exhaust data. ZMOTTO accommodates a broad spectrum of reactants. The program will calculate many Otto cycle performance parameters for a number of consecutive cycles (a cycle being an interval of 720 crankangle degrees). A typical case will have a number of initial ideal cycles and progress through levels

  2. Molten salt combustion of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.; Richards, W.L.; Oldenkamp, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Atomics International Molten Salt Combustion Process reduces the weight and volume of combustible β-γ contaminated transuranic waste by utilizing air in a molten salt medium to combust organic materials, to trap particulates, and to react chemically with any acidic gases produced during combustion. Typically, incomplete combustion products such as hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide are below detection limits (i.e., 3 ) is directly related to the sodium chloride vapor pressure of the melt; >80% of the particulate is sodium chloride. Essentially all metal oxides (combustion ash) are retained in the melt, e.g., >99.9% of the plutonium, >99.6% of the europium, and >99.9% of the ruthenium are retained in the melt. Both bench-scale radioactive and pilot scale (50 kg/hr) nonradioactive combustion tests have been completed with essentially the same results. Design of three combustors for industrial applications are underway

  3. A flammability and combustion model for integrated accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plys, M.G.; Astleford, R.D.; Epstein, M.

    1988-01-01

    A model for flammability characteristics and combustion of hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixtures is presented for application to severe accident analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR's). Flammability of general mixtures for thermodynamic conditions anticipated during a severe accident is quantified with a new correlation technique applied to data for several fuel and inertant mixtures and using accepted methods for combining these data. Combustion behavior is quantified by a mechanistic model consisting of a continuity and momentum balance for the burned gases, and considering an uncertainty parameter to match the idealized process to experiment. Benchmarks against experiment demonstrate the validity of this approach for a single recommended value of the flame flux multiplier parameter. The models presented here are equally applicable to analysis of current LWR's. 21 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Internal Combustion Engine Powered by Synthesis Gas from Pyrolysed Plastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chríbik Andrej

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the application of synthesis gas from pyrolysis of plastics in petrol engine. The appropriate experimental measurements were performed on a combustion engine LGW 702 designated for micro-cogeneration unit. The power parameters, economic parameters in term of brake specific fuel consumption, and internal parameters of the engine were compared to the engine running on the reference fuel - natural gas and synthesis gas. Burning synthesis gas leads to decreased performance by about 5% and to increased mass hourly consumption by 120 %. In terms of burning, synthesis gas has similar properties as natural gas. Compared with [5] a more detailed study has been prepared on the effects of angle of spark advance on the engine torque, giving more detailed assessment of engine cycle variability and considering specification of start and end of combustion in the logarithm p-V diagram.

  5. Visualization of conventional and combusting subsonic jet instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, Victor; Litvinenko, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Based on new information obtained on free microjets, this book explains the latest phenomena in flame evolution in the presence of a transverse acoustic field with round and plane propane microjet combustion. It gives an overview of recent experimental results on instability and dynamics of jets at low Reynolds numbers and provides the reader, step by step, with the milestones and recent advances in jet flow stability and combustion. Readers will also discover a clarification of the differences between top-hat and parabolic round and plane jet instability. Chapters demonstrate features of the interaction between jet and crossflow, and how experimental data testify to similarities of the perturbed flow patterns of laminar and turbulent round jets. A similar response of the jets to external acoustic oscillations is shown, as well as the peculiarities of the effect of a transverse acoustic field on downstream evolution of round and plane macro- and microjets. Basic features of round and plane, macro and micro je...

  6. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent lean premixed combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R; Chen, Jacqueline H; Lu Tianfeng; Law, Chung K

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, due to the advent of high-performance computers and advanced numerical algorithms, direct numerical simulation (DNS) of combustion has emerged as a valuable computational research tool, in concert with experimentation. The role of DNS in delivering new Scientific insight into turbulent combustion is illustrated using results from a recent 3D turbulent premixed flame simulation. To understand the influence of turbulence on the flame structure, a 3D fully-resolved DNS of a spatially-developing lean methane-air turbulent Bunsen flame was performed in the thin reaction zones regime. A reduced chemical model for methane-air chemistry consisting of 13 resolved species, 4 quasi-steady state species and 73 elementary reactions was developed specifically for the current simulation. The data is analyzed to study possible influences of turbulence on the flame thickness. The results show that the average flame thickness increases, in qualitative agreement with several experimental results

  7. Tailoring next-generation biofuels and their combustion in next-generation engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladden, John Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wu, Weihua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Taatjes, Craig A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scheer, Adam Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, Kevin M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yu, Eizadora T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); O' Bryan, Greg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Powell, Amy Jo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gao, Connie W. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Increasing energy costs, the dependence on foreign oil supplies, and environmental concerns have emphasized the need to produce sustainable renewable fuels and chemicals. The strategy for producing next-generation biofuels must include efficient processes for biomass conversion to liquid fuels and the fuels must be compatible with current and future engines. Unfortunately, biofuel development generally takes place without any consideration of combustion characteristics, and combustion scientists typically measure biofuels properties without any feedback to the production design. We seek to optimize the fuel/engine system by bringing combustion performance, specifically for advanced next-generation engines, into the development of novel biosynthetic fuel pathways. Here we report an innovative coupling of combustion chemistry, from fundamentals to engine measurements, to the optimization of fuel production using metabolic engineering. We have established the necessary connections among the fundamental chemistry, engine science, and synthetic biology for fuel production, building a powerful framework for co-development of engines and biofuels.

  8. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojeda, William de

    2010-07-31

    The project which extended from November 2005 to May of 2010 demonstrated the application of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) with engine out NOx levels of 0.2 g/bhp-hr throughout the program target load of 12.6bar BMEP. The project showed that the range of loads could be extended to 16.5bar BMEP, therefore matching the reference lug line of the base 2007 MY Navistar 6.4L V8 engine. Results showed that the application of LTC provided a dramatic improvement over engine out emissions when compared to the base engine. Furthermore LTC improved thermal efficiency by over 5% from the base production engine when using the steady state 13 mode composite test as a benchmark. The key enablers included improvements in the air, fuel injection, and cooling systems made in Phases I and II. The outcome was the product of a careful integration of each component under an intelligent control system. The engine hardware provided the conditions to support LTC and the controller provided the necessary robustness for a stable combustion. Phase III provided a detailed account on the injection strategy used to meet the high load requirements. During this phase, the control strategy was implemented in a production automotive grade ECU to perform cycle-by-cycle combustion feedback on each of the engine cylinders. The control interacted on a cycle base with the injection system and with the Turbo-EGR systems according to their respective time constants. The result was a unique system that could, first, help optimize the combustion system and maintain high efficiency, and secondly, extend the steady state results to the transient mode of operation. The engine was upgraded in Phase IV with a Variable Valve Actuation system and a hybrid EGR loop. The impact of the more versatile EGR loop did not provide significant advantages, however the application of VVA proved to be an enabler to further extend the operation of LTC and gain considerable benefits in fuel economy and soot reduction. Finally

  9. Estimation of fracture toughness of Zr 2.5% Nb pressure tube of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor using cyclic ball indentation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, S., E-mail: subrata@barc.gov.in; Panwar, Sanjay; Madhusoodanan, K.; Rama Rao, A.

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Measurement of fracture toughness of pressure tube is required for its fitness assessment. • Pressure tube removal from the core consumes large amount of radiation for laboratory test. • A remotely operable In situ Property Measurement System (IProMS) has been designed in house. • Conventional and IProMS tests conducted on pressure tube spool pieces having different mechanical properties. • Correlation has been established between the conventional and IProMS estimated fracture properties. - Abstract: In Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) fuel bundles are located inside horizontal pressure tubes made up of Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloy. Pressure tubes undergo degradation during its service life due to high pressure, high temperature and radiation environment. Measurement of mechanical properties of degraded pressure tubes is important for assessing their fitness for further operation. Presently as per safety guidelines imposed by the regulatory body, a few pre-decided pressure tubes are removed from the reactor core at regular intervals during the planned reactor shut down to carry out post irradiation examination (PIE) in a laboratory which consumes lots of man-rem and imposes economic penalties. Hence a system is indeed felt necessary which can carry out experimental trials for measurement of mechanical properties of pressure tubes under in situ conditions. The only way to accomplish this important objective is to develop a system based on an in situ measurement technique. In the field of in situ estimation of properties of materials, cyclic ball indentation is an emerging technique. Presently, commercial systems are available for doing an indentation test either on the outside surface of a component at site or on a test piece in a laboratory. However, these systems cannot be used inside a pressure tube for carrying out ball indentation trials under in situ conditions. Considering the importance of such measurements, an In situ Property

  10. Surrogate fuel formulation for light naphtha combustion in advanced combustion engines

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Ahfaz; Khurshid, Muneeb; Naser, Nimal; Badra, Jihad; Gaillard, Pattrick; Chung, Suk-Ho; Roberts, William L.; Sarathy, Mani

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil once recovered is further separated in to several distinct fractions to produce a range of energy and chemical products. One of the less processed fractions is light naphtha (LN), hence they are more economical to produce than

  11. Combustion process science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    An important and substantial area of technical work in which noncontact temperature measurement (NCTM) is desired is that involving combustion process research. In the planning for this workshop, it was hoped that W. Serignano would provide a briefing regarding the experimental requirements for thermal measurements to support such research. The particular features of thermal measurement requirements included those describing the timeline for combustion experiments, the requirements for thermal control and diagnostics of temperature and other related thermal measurements and the criticality to the involved science to parametric features of measurement capability including precision, repeatability, stability, and resolution. In addition, it was hoped that definitions could be provided which characterize the needs for concurrent imaging as it relates to science observations during the conduct of experimentation.

  12. Dynamical issues in combustion theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, P.C.; Williams, F.

    1991-01-01

    This book looks at the world of combustion phenomena covering the following topics: modeling, which involves the elucidation of the essential features of a given phenomenon through physical insight and knowledge of experimental results, devising appropriate asymptotic and computational methods, and developing sound mathematical theories. Papers in this book describe how all of these challenges have been met for particular examples within a number of common combustion scenarios: reactive shocks, low Mach number premixed reactive flow, nonpremixed phenomena, and solid propellants. The types of phenomena examined are also diverse: the stability and other properties of steady structures, the long time dynamics of evolving solutions, properties of interfaces and shocks, including curvature effects, and spatio-temporal patterns

  13. SPECIFIC EMISSIONS FROM BIOMASS COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skopec

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with determining the specific emissions from the combustion of two kinds of biomass fuels in a small-scale boiler. The tested fuels were pellets made of wood and pellets made of rape plant straw. In order to evaluate the specific emissions, several combustion experiments were carried out using a commercial 25 kW pellet-fired boiler. The specific emissions of CO, SO2 and NOx were evaluated in relation to a unit of burned fuel, a unit of calorific value and a unit of produced heat. The specific emissions were compared with some data acquired from the reference literature, with relatively different results. The differences depend mainly on the procedure used for determining the values, and references provide no information about this. Although some of our experimental results may fit with one of the reference sources, they do not fit with the other. The reliability of the references is therefore disputable.

  14. Steady state HNG combustion modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louwers, J.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L. [TNO Prins Maurits Lab., Rijswijk (Netherlands); Brewster, M.Q. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Son, S.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Parr, T.; Hanson-Parr, D. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Two simplified modeling approaches are used to model the combustion of Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF, N{sub 2}H{sub 5}-C(NO{sub 2}){sub 3}). The condensed phase is treated by high activation energy asymptotics. The gas phase is treated by two limit cases: the classical high activation energy, and the recently introduced low activation energy approach. This results in simplification of the gas phase energy equation, making an (approximate) analytical solution possible. The results of both models are compared with experimental results of HNF combustion. It is shown that the low activation energy approach yields better agreement with experimental observations (e.g. regression rate and temperature sensitivity), than the high activation energy approach.

  15. Oxy-coal Combustion Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Eddings, E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lighty, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ring, T. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Smith, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thornock, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Y Jia, W. Morris [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Pedel, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Rezeai, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wang, L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Zhang, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-01-06

    The objective of this project is to move toward the development of a predictive capability with quantified uncertainty bounds for pilot-scale, single-burner, oxy-coal operation. This validation research brings together multi-scale experimental measurements and computer simulations. The combination of simulation development and validation experiments is designed to lead to predictive tools for the performance of existing air fired pulverized coal boilers that have been retrofitted to various oxy-firing configurations. In addition, this report also describes novel research results related to oxy-combustion in circulating fluidized beds. For pulverized coal combustion configurations, particular attention is focused on the effect of oxy-firing on ignition and coal-flame stability, and on the subsequent partitioning mechanisms of the ash aerosol.

  16. Coal combustion technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z.X.

    1994-01-01

    Coal is the most important energy source in China, the environmental pollution problem derived from coal burning is rather serious in China. The present author discusses coal burning technologies both in boilers and industrial furnaces and their relations with environmental protection problems in China. The technological situations of Circulating Fluidized Bed Coal Combustor, Pulverized Coal Combustor with Aerodynamic Flame Holder and Coal Water Slurry Combustion have been discussed here as some of the interesting problems in China only. (author). 3 refs

  17. Example Problems in LES Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Lesieur, M., Turbulence in Fluids , 2nd Revised Ed., Fluid Mechanics and Its Applications, Vol. 1, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1990...34, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , Vol. 238, 1992, pp. 155-185. 5. Hirsch, C., Numerical Computation of Internal and External Flows, Vol. 2, Computational...reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels in flames", Combustion Science and Technology, Vol. 27, 1981, pp. 31-43. 14. Spalding, D.B

  18. Combustion and Heat Transfer Studies Utilizing Advanced Diagnostics: Fuels Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    competing reactions (Reactions (6) and (7)) and their respective rate equations (Eqs. 8 and 9). Reaction (6) has the advantage of no activation energy and...cartridges were J&W (diol, cyano and C-18) J.T. Baker (silica gel) and Alltech (IC/Ag). All were conditioned and used according to the vendors...hot fuel through the test section. At the same time the water supply to the fuel cooler is turned on. The main advantage of this procedure is that it

  19. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    stoichiometric H2-air reaction with complex kinetics. Curves can be fitted as t ∼ α(P )eβ(P )T . 43 CHAPTER 3 Numerical Methods The following chapter will...discontinuities, and rarefactions as well as the interactions of these structures. The first test case was introduced by Sod [54], known presently as Sod’s...4.1(a) shows the solution for the schemes at t = 200 μs which contains a single shock, contact discontinuity and rarefaction . The figure clearly shows

  20. Rocket Combustor Validation Data for Advanced Combustion Models, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The pace and cost of developing an engine system for future explorations is strongly influenced by the inadequacies of design tools and the supporting databases. The...

  1. Combustion char characterisation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, P; Ingermann Petersen, H; Sund Soerensen, H; Thomsen, E; Guvad, C

    1996-06-01

    The aim was to correlate reactivity measures of raw coals and the maceral concentrates of the coals obtained in a previous project with the morphology of the produced chars by using a wire grid devolatilization method. Work involved determination of morphology, macroporosity and a detailed study by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Systematic variations in the texture of chars produced in different temperature domains and heating rates were demonstrated by using incident light microscopy on polished blocks and by SEM studies directly on the surfaces of untreated particles. Results suggest that work in the field of char reactivity estimates and correlations between char morphology and coal petrography can be accomplished only on chars produced under heating rates and temperatures comparable to those for the intended use of coal. A general correlation between the coals` petrography and the the morphology of high temperature chars was found. The SEM study of the chars revealed that during the devolatilization period the particles fuse and the macroporosity and thus the morphotypes are formed. After devolatilization ceases, secondary micropores are formed. These develop in number and size throughout the medium combustion interval. At the end of the combustion interval the macrostructure breaks down, caused by coalescence of the increased number of microspores. This can be observed as a change in the morphology and the macroporosity of the chars. Results indicate that char reactivity is a function of the macroporosity and thus the morphology of combustion chars. (AB) 34 refs.

  2. Management of coal combustion wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-02-01

    It has been estimated that 780 Mt of coal combustion products (CCPs) were produced worldwide in 2010. Only about 53.5% were utilised, the rest went to storage or disposal sites. Disposal of coal combustion waste (CCW) on-site at a power plant may involve decades-long accumulation of waste, with hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of tonnes of dry ash or wet ash slurry being stored. In December 2008, a coal combustion waste pond in Kingston, Tennessee, USA burst. Over 4 million cubic metres of ash sludge poured out, burying houses and rivers in tonnes of toxic waste. Clean-up is expected to continue into 2014 and will cost $1.2 billion. The incident drew worldwide attention to the risk of CCW disposal. This caused a number of countries to review CCW management methods and regulations. The report begins by outlining the physical and chemical characteristics of the different type of ashes generated in a coal-fired power plant. The amounts of CCPs produced and regulations on CCW management in selected countries have been compiled. The CCW disposal methods are then discussed. Finally, the potential environmental impacts and human health risks of CCW disposal, together with the methods used to prevent them, are reviewed.

  3. Modeling the internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleznik, F. J.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A flexible and computationally economical model of the internal combustion engine was developed for use on large digital computer systems. It is based on a system of ordinary differential equations for cylinder-averaged properties. The computer program is capable of multicycle calculations, with some parameters varying from cycle to cycle, and has restart capabilities. It can accommodate a broad spectrum of reactants, permits changes in physical properties, and offers a wide selection of alternative modeling functions without any reprogramming. It readily adapts to the amount of information available in a particular case because the model is in fact a hierarchy of five models. The models range from a simple model requiring only thermodynamic properties to a complex model demanding full combustion kinetics, transport properties, and poppet valve flow characteristics. Among its many features the model includes heat transfer, valve timing, supercharging, motoring, finite burning rates, cycle-to-cycle variations in air-fuel ratio, humid air, residual and recirculated exhaust gas, and full combustion kinetics.

  4. Low-Temperature Combustion of High Octane Fuels in a Gasoline Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanh Duc Cung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gasoline compression ignition (GCI has been shown as one of the advanced combustion concepts that could potentially provide a pathway to achieve cleaner and more efficient combustion engines. Fuel and air in GCI are not fully premixed compared to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI, which is a completely kinetic-controlled combustion system. Therefore, the combustion phasing can be controlled by the time of injection, usually postinjection in a multiple-injection scheme, to mitigate combustion noise. Gasoline usually has longer ignition delay than diesel. The autoignition quality of gasoline can be indicated by research octane number (RON. Fuels with high octane tend to have more resistance to autoignition, hence more time for fuel-air mixing. In this study, three fuels, namely, aromatic, alkylate, and E30, with similar RON value of 98 but different hydrocarbon compositions were tested in a multicylinder engine under GCI combustion mode. Considerations of exhaust gas recirculating (EGR, start of injection, and boost were investigated to study the sensitivity of dilution, local stratification, and reactivity of the charge, respectively, for each fuel. Combustion phasing (location of 50% of fuel mass burned was kept constant during the experiments. This provides similar thermodynamic conditions to study the effect of fuels on emissions. Emission characteristics at different levels of EGR and lambda were revealed for all fuels with E30 having the lowest filter smoke number and was also most sensitive to the change in dilution. Reasonably low combustion noise (<90 dB and stable combustion (coefficient of variance of indicated mean effective pressure <3% were maintained during the experiments. The second part of this article contains visualization of the combustion process obtained from endoscope imaging for each fuel at selected conditions. Soot radiation signal from GCI combustion were strong during late injection and also more intense

  5. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  6. Particle Emissions from Biomass Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpila, Aneta; Bohgard, Mats [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Div. of Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology; Strand, Michael; Lillieblad, Lena; Sanati, Mehri [Vaexjoe Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Bioenergy Technology; Pagels, Joakim; Rissler, Jenny; Swietlicki, Erik; Gharibi, Arash [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Physics

    2003-05-01

    We have shown that high concentrations of fine particles of the order of 2-7x10{sup -7} particles per cm{sup 3} are being formed in all the combustion units studied. There was a higher difference between the units in terms of particle mass concentrations. While the largest differences was found for gas-phase constituents (CO and THC) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In 5 out of 7 studied units, multi-cyclones were the only measure for flue-gas separation. The multicyclones had negligible effect on the particle number concentration and a small effect on the mass of particles smaller than 5 {mu}m. The separation efficiency was much higher for the electrostatic precipitators. The boiler load had a dramatic influence on the coarse mode concentration during combustion of forest residue. PM0.8-6 increased from below 5 mg/m{sup 3} to above 50 mg/m{sup 3} even at a moderate change in boiler load from medium to high. A similar but less pronounced trend was found during combustion of dry wood. PM0.8-PM6 increased from 12 to 23 mg/m{sup 3} when the load was changed from low to high. When increasing the load, the primary airflow taken through the grate is increased; this itself may lead to a higher potential of the air stream to carry coarse particles away from the combustion zone. Measurements with APS-instrument with higher time-resolution showed a corresponding increase in coarse mode number concentration with load. Additional factor influencing observed higher concentration of coarse mode during combustion of forest residues, could be relatively high ash content in this type of fuel (2.2 %) in comparison to dry wood (0.3 %) and pellets (0.5 %). With increasing load we also found a decrease in PM1 during combustion of forest residue. Whether this is caused by scavenging of volatilized material by the high coarse mode concentration or a result of a different amount of volatilized material available for formation of fine particles needs to be shown in future studies. The

  7. IEA combustion agreement : a collaborative task on alternative fuels in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larmi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the alternative fuels in combustion task of the International Energy Agency is on high efficiency engine combustion, furnace combustion, and combustion chemistry. The objectives of the task are to develop optimum combustion for dedicated fuels by fully utilizing the physical and chemical properties of synthetic and renewable fuels; a significant reduction in carbon dioxide, NOx and particulate matter emissions; determine the minimum emission levels for dedicated fuels; and meet future emission standards of engines without or with minimum after-treatment. This presentation discussed the alternative fuels task and addressed issues such as synthetic fuel properties and benefits. The anticipated future roadmap was presented along with a list of the synthetic and renewable engine fuels to be studied, such as neat oxygenates like alcohols and ethers, biogas/methane and gas combustion, fuel blends, dual fuel combustion, high cetane number diesel fuels like synthetic Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel and hydrogenated vegetable oil, and low CN number fuels. Implementation examples were also discussed, such as fuel spray studies in optical spray bombs; combustion research in optical engines and combustion chambers; studies on reaction kinetics of combustion and emission formation; studies on fuel properties and ignition behaviour; combustion studies on research engines; combustion optimization; implementing the optimum combustion in research engines; and emission measurements. Overall milestone examples and the overall schedule of participating countries were also presented. figs.

  8. Combustion of Solid Propellants (La Combustion des Propergols Solides)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    the of ether and ethyl alcohol and removing objective of these lectures to give a this solvent. Instead of having a fibrous comprehensive understanding...do cetto esrne do Les propergols composites, A matrice confifrences une description tout A fait A polymarique charg~o pst, un oxydant at un jour des...rusa., De nouveaux souvant suppos6 qua la vitesa des gaz de oxydes de for ultrafirts mont aujourd’hui combustion est n~gligeable at qua d~velopps pour

  9. Straw combustion on slow-moving grates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2005-01-01

    Combustion of straw in grate-based boilers is often associated with high emission levels and relatively poor fuel burnout. A numerical grate combustion model was developed to assist in improving the combustion performance of these boilers. The model is based on a one-dimensional ‘‘walking......-column’’ approach and includes the energy equations for both the fuel and the gas accounting for heat transfer between the two phases. The model gives important insight into the combustion process and provides inlet conditions for a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the freeboard. The model predictions...... indicate the existence of two distinct combustion modes. Combustion air temperature and mass flow-rate are the two parameters determining the mode. There is a significant difference in reaction rates (ignition velocity) and temperature levels between the two modes. Model predictions were compared...

  10. Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion is suggested as one of the possible, promising technologies for capturing CO2 from power plants. The concept of oxy-fuel combustion is removal of nitrogen from the oxidizer to carry out the combustion process in oxygen and, in most concepts, recycled flue gas to lower the flame...... provide additional options for improvement of process economics are however likewise investigated. Of particular interest is the change of the combustion process induced by the exchange of carbon dioxide and water vapor for nitrogen as diluent. This paper reviews the published knowledge on the oxy......-fuel process and focuses particularly on the combustion fundamentals, i.e. flame temperatures and heat transfer, ignition and burnout, emissions, and fly ash characteristics. Knowledge is currently available regarding both an entire oxy-fuel power plant and the combustion fundamentals. However, several...

  11. Combustion phasing for maximum efficiency for conventional and high efficiency engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caton, Jerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion phasing for max efficiency is a function of engine parameters. • Combustion phasing is most affected by heat transfer, compression ratio, burn duration. • Combustion phasing is less affected by speed, load, equivalence ratio and EGR. • Combustion phasing for a high efficiency engine was more advanced. • Exergy destruction during combustion as functions of combustion phasing is reported. - Abstract: The importance of the phasing of the combustion event for internal-combustion engines is well appreciated, but quantitative details are sparse. The objective of the current work was to examine the optimum combustion phasing (based on maximum bmep) as functions of engine design and operating variables. A thermodynamic, engine cycle simulation was used to complete this assessment. As metrics for the combustion phasing, both the crank angle for 50% fuel mass burned (CA 50 ) and the crank angle for peak pressure (CA pp ) are reported as functions of the engine variables. In contrast to common statements in the literature, the optimum CA 50 and CA pp vary depending on the design and operating variables. Optimum, as used in this paper, refers to the combustion timing that provides the maximum bmep and brake thermal efficiency (MBT timing). For this work, the variables with the greatest influence on the optimum CA 50 and CA pp were the heat transfer level, the burn duration and the compression ratio. Other variables such as equivalence ratio, EGR level, engine speed and engine load had a much smaller impact on the optimum CA 50 and CA pp . For the conventional engine, for the conditions examined, the optimum CA 50 varied between about 5 and 11°aTDC, and the optimum CA pp varied between about 9 and 16°aTDC. For a high efficiency engine (high dilution, high compression ratio), the optimum CA 50 was 2.5°aTDC, and the optimum CA pp was 7.8°aTDC. These more advanced values for the optimum CA 50 and CA pp for the high efficiency engine were

  12. Determination of tributyltin (TBT) in marine sediment using pressurised liquid extraction-gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (PLE-GC-IDMS) with a hexane-tropolone mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konieczka, Piotr; Sejerøe-Olsen, Berit; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Schimmel, Heinz

    2007-06-01

    Extraction conditions for the determination of tributyltin (TBT) in sediment samples have been developed further. The analytical procedure is based on spiking with isotopically labelled analyte, pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) with a hexane/tropolone mixture, Grignard derivatization and quantification by GC-MS. It was applied to two unknown sediment samples as part of an intercomparison exercise of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM). The detection limit was approximately 1.5 ng/g TBT as Sn, while the repeatability and intermediate precision (as the coefficient of variation) were 1.9% and 3.2%, respectively. The expanded uncertainty was 6.2% (coverage factor k = 2), and the accuracy was confirmed by measurement of a certified reference material.

  13. Combustion Dynamics and Control for Ultra Low Emissions in Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Future aircraft engines must provide ultra-low emissions and high efficiency at low cost while maintaining the reliability and operability of present day engines. The demands for increased performance and decreased emissions have resulted in advanced combustor designs that are critically dependent on efficient fuel/air mixing and lean operation. However, all combustors, but most notably lean-burning low-emissions combustors, are susceptible to combustion instabilities. These instabilities are typically caused by the interaction of the fluctuating heat release of the combustion process with naturally occurring acoustic resonances. These interactions can produce large pressure oscillations within the combustor and can reduce component life and potentially lead to premature mechanical failures. Active Combustion Control which consists of feedback-based control of the fuel-air mixing process can provide an approach to achieving acceptable combustor dynamic behavior while minimizing emissions, and thus can provide flexibility during the combustor design process. The NASA Glenn Active Combustion Control Technology activity aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines by providing experiments tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. The intent is to allow the technology maturity of active combustion control to advance to eventual demonstration in an engine environment. Work at NASA Glenn has shown that active combustion control, utilizing advanced algorithms working through high frequency fuel actuation, can effectively suppress instabilities in a combustor which emulates the instabilities found in an aircraft gas turbine engine. Current efforts are aimed at extending these active control technologies to advanced ultra-low-emissions combustors such as those employing multi-point lean direct injection.

  14. Numerical investigation of biogas flameless combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ehsan; Bagheri, Ghobad; Wahid, Mazlan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fuel consumption decreases from 3.24 g/s in biogas conventional combustion to 1.07 g/s in flameless mode. • The differences between reactants and products temperature intensifies irreversibility in traditional combustion. • The temperature inside the chamber is uniform in biogas flameless mode and exergy loss decreases in this technique. • Low O 2 concentration in the flameless mode confirms a complete and quick combustion process in flameless regime. - Abstract: The purpose of this investigation is to analyze combustion characteristics of biogas flameless mode based on clean technology development strategies. A three dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study has been performed to illustrate various priorities of biogas flameless combustion compared to the conventional mode. The effects of preheated temperature and wall temperature, reaction zone and pollutant formation are observed and the impacts of combustion and turbulence models on numerical results are discussed. Although preheated conventional combustion could be effective in terms of fuel consumption reduction, NO x formation increases. It has been found that biogas is not eligible to be applied in furnace heat up due to its low calorific value (LCV) and it is necessary to utilize a high calorific value fuel to preheat the furnace. The required enthalpy for biogas auto-ignition temperature is supplied by enthalpy of preheated oxidizer. In biogas flameless combustion, the mean temperature of the furnace is lower than traditional combustion throughout the chamber. Compared to the biogas flameless combustion with uniform temperature, very high and fluctuated temperatures are recorded in conventional combustion. Since high entropy generation intensifies irreversibility, exergy loss is higher in biogas conventional combustion compared to the biogas flameless regime. Entropy generation minimization in flameless mode is attributed to the uniform temperature inside the chamber

  15. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  16. Turbine Burners: Turbulent Combustion of Liquid Fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirignano, William A; Liu, Feng; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2006-01-01

    The proposed theoretical/computational and experimental study addresses the vital two-way coupling between combustion processes and fluid dynamic phenomena associated with schemes for burning liquid...

  17. Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion of Sewage Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshizo; Nojima, Tomoyuki; Kakuta, Akihiko; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    A conceptual design of an energy recovering system from sewage sludge was proposed. This system consists of a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, a gas turbine, and a heat exchanger for preheating of combustion air. Thermal efficiency was estimated roughly as 10-25%. In order to know the combustion characteristics of the sewage sludge under the elevated pressure condition, combustion tests of the dry and wet sewage sludge were carried out by using laboratory scale pressurized fluidized bed combustors. Combustibility of the sewage sludge was good enough and almost complete combustion was achieved in the combustion of the actual wet sludge. CO emission and NOx emission were marvelously low especially during the combustion of wet sewage sludge regardless of high volatile and nitrogen content of the sewage sludge. However, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission was very high. Hence, almost all nitrogen oxides were emitted as the form of N2O. From these combustion tests, we judged combustion of the sewage sludge with the pressurized fluidized bed combustor is suitable, and the conceptual design of the power generation system is available.

  18. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  19. Super-adiabatic combustion in Al2O3 and SiC coated porous media for thermoelectric power conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Kyle T.; Waters, Oliver; Bubnovich, Valeri; Orlovskaya, Nina; Chen, Ruey-Hung

    2013-01-01

    The combustion of ultra-lean fuel/air mixtures provides an efficient way to convert the chemical energy of hydrocarbons and low-calorific fuels into useful power. Matrix-stabilized porous medium combustion is an advanced technique in which a solid porous medium within the combustion chamber conducts heat from the hot gaseous products in the upstream direction to preheat incoming reactants. This heat recirculation extends the standard flammability limits, allowing the burning of ultra-lean and low-calorific fuel mixtures and resulting a combustion temperature higher than the thermodynamic equilibrium temperature of the mixture (i.e., super-adiabatic combustion). The heat generated by this combustion process can be converted into electricity with thermoelectric generators, which is the goal of this study. The design of a porous media burner coupled with a thermoelectric generator and its testing are presented. The combustion zone media was a highly-porous alumina matrix interposed between upstream and downstream honeycomb structures with pore sizes smaller than the flame quenching distance, preventing the flame from propagating outside of the central section. Experimental results include temperature distributions inside the combustion chamber and across a thermoelectric generator; along with associated current, voltage and power output values. Measurements were obtained for a catalytically inert Al 2 O 3 medium and a SiC coated medium, which was tested for the ability to catalyze the super-adiabatic combustion. The combustion efficiency was obtained for stoichiometric and ultra-lean (near the lean flammability limit) mixtures of CH 4 and air. - Highlights: • Design of a porous burner coupled with a thermoelectric module. • Super-adiabatic combustion in a highly-porous ceramic matrix was investigated. • Both alumina and silicon carbide ceramic surfaces were used as porous media. • Catalytic properties of Al 2 O 3 and SiC ceramic surfaces were studied

  20. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  1. Theoretical studies of combustion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, J.M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The basic objectives of this research program are to develop and apply theoretical techniques to fundamental dynamical processes of importance in gas-phase combustion. There are two major areas currently supported by this grant. One is reactive scattering of diatom-diatom systems, and the other is the dynamics of complex formation and decay based on L{sup 2} methods. In all of these studies, the authors focus on systems that are of interest experimentally, and for which potential energy surfaces based, at least in part, on ab initio calculations are available.

  2. Modeling nitrogen chemistry in combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Miller, James A.; Ruscic, Branko

    2018-01-01

    the accuracy of engineering calculations and thereby the potential of primary measures for NOx control. In this review our current understanding of the mechanisms that are responsible for combustion-generated nitrogen-containing air pollutants is discussed. The thermochemistry of the relevant nitrogen...... via NNH or N2O are discussed, along with the chemistry of NO removal processes such as reburning and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NO. Each subset of the mechanism is evaluated against experimental data and the accuracy of modeling predictions is discussed....

  3. Experimental validation for combustion analysis of GOTHIC code in 2-dimensional combustion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. W.; Yang, S. Y.; Park, K. C.; Jung, S. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the prediction capability of GOTHIC code for hydrogen combustion phenomena was validated with the results of two-dimensional premixed hydrogen combustion experiment executed by Seoul National University. The experimental chamber has about 24 liter free volume (1x0.024x1 m 3 ) and 2-dimensional rectangular shape. The test were preformed with 10% hydrogen/air gas mixture and conducted with combination of two igniter positions (top center, top corner) and two boundary conditions (bottom full open, bottom right half open). Using the lumped parameter and mechanistic combustion model in GOTHIC code, the SNU experiments were simulated under the same conditions. The GOTHIC code prediction of the hydrogen combustion phenomena did not compare well with the experimental results. In case of lumped parameter simulation, the combustion time was predicted appropriately. But any other local information related combustion phenomena could not be obtained. In case of mechanistic combustion analysis, the physical combustion phenomena of gas mixture were not matched experimental ones. In boundary open cases, the GOTHIC predicted very long combustion time and the flame front propagation could not simulate appropriately. Though GOTHIC showed flame propagation phenomenon in adiabatic calculation, the induction time of combustion was still very long compare with experimental results. Also, it was found that the combustion model of GOTHIC code had some weak points in low concentration of hydrogen combustion simulation

  4. Techno-economic analysis of PC versus CFB combustion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-10-01

    In the last ten years circulating fluidised bed combustion (CFBC) has emerged as a viable alternative to pulverised coal combustion (PCC) for utility-scale coal power generation, with widespread deployment of 300 MW boilers and the successful demonstration of supercritical units of up to 600 MW. Although CFBC offers a greater degree of fuel flexibility and does not usually require downstream flue gas cleaning, high capital costs and high auxiliary power use have hindered the adoption of CFBC for utility power generation. Recent advances in CFBC unit capacity and steam conditions have led to higher efficiencies and economies of scale, with the result that a CFBC plant may now be more economically favourable than a PCC plant depending on a range of factors such as available fuels and regional emissions limits. This report reviews the state-of-the-art for both technologies and provides a comparison of their relative performances and economic costs. Standard operational parameters such as efficiency, availability, and flexibility are assessed, in addition to relative suitability for biomass cofiring and oxyfuel combustion as strategies for carbon mitigation. A review of recent cost evaluations of the two technologies is accompanied by a breakdown of individual plant expenses including flue gas scrubbing equipment and ash recycle value.

  5. Ignition timing advance in the bi-fuel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek FLEKIEWICZ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of ignition timing on CNG combustion process has been presented in this paper. A 1.6 liter SI engine has been tested in the special program. For selected engine operating conditions, following data were acquired: in cylinder pressure, crank angle, fuel mass consumption and exhaust gases temperatures. For the timing advance correction varying between 0 to 15 deg crank angle, the internal temperature of combustion chamber, as well as the charge combustion ratio and ratio of heat release has been estimated. With the help of the mathematical model, emissions of NO, CO and CO2 were additionally estimated. Obtained results made it possible to compare the influence of ignition timing advance on natural gas combustion in the SI engine. The engine torque and in-cylinder pressure were used for determination of the optimum engine timing advance.

  6. Sensors Based Measurement Techniques of Fuel Injection and Ignition Characteristics of Diesel Sprays in DI Combustion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rehman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovative sensor based measurement techniques like needle lift sensor, photo (optical sensor and piezoresistive pressure transmitter are introduced and used to measure the injection and combustion characteristics in direct injection combustion system. Present experimental study is carried out in the constant volume combustion chamber to study the ignition, combustion and injection characteristics of the solid cone diesel fuel sprays impinging on the hot surface. Hot surface ignition approach has been used to create variety of advanced combustion systems. In the present study, the hot surface temperatures were varied from 623 K to 723 K. The cylinder air pressures were 20, 30 and 40 bar and fuel injection pressures were 100, 200 and 300 bar. It is found that ignition delay of fuel sprays get reduced with the rise in injection pressure. The ignition characteristics of sprays much less affected at high fuel injection pressures and high surface temperatures. The fuel injection duration reduces with the increase in fuel injection pressures. The rate of heat release becomes high at high injection pressures and it decreases with the increase in injection duration. It is found that duration of burn/combustion decrease with the increase in injection pressure. The use of various sensors is quite effective, reliable and accurate in measuring the various fuel injection and combustion characteristics. The study simulates the effect of fuel injection system parameters on combustion performance in large heavy duty engines.

  7. Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainikka, Pasi; Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilä, Kai; Hupa, Mikko

    2012-03-01

    Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO(2)-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis the ECFM-3Z Combustion Model for Simulating the Combustion Process and Emission Characteristics in a HSDI Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Mobasheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An advanced CFD simulation has been performed to analyze the ECFM-3Z (Extended Coherent Flame Model-3Z combustion model for simulating the combustion process and emission characteristics in a high speed direct injection (HSDI diesel engine. A four cylinders, HSDI diesel engine based on a Ford production engine with a 2nd generation Delphi common rail fuel injection system has been modeled in this research. 3D CFD simulation was carried out from intake valve closing (IVC to exhaust valve opening (EVO. A good agreement of calculated and measured in-cylinder pressure trace as well as pollutant formation trends could be observed for all investigated operating points. Based on the confidence gained from validation, the study is extended to evaluate the effect of fuel injection timing on engine performance and emissions. For this purpose, a comprehensive study of the effect of injection timing with respect to performance and emissions has been considered. Three main injection timing, (1 2.65 BTDC, (2 0.65 BTDC and (3 1.35 ATDC, all with 30 crank angle pilot separations has been used to investigate the effect of the injection timing. The results show that the current methodology can be applied as a beneficial tool for analyzing the parameters of the diesel combustion under HSDI operating condition.

  9. Combustion Sensors: Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Mel

    2002-01-01

    This report documents efforts to survey the current research directions in sensor technology for gas turbine systems. The work is driven by the current and future requirements on system performance and optimization. Accurate real time measurements of velocities, pressure, temperatures, and species concentrations will be required for objectives such as combustion instability attenuation, pollutant reduction, engine health management, exhaust profile control via active control, etc. Changing combustor conditions - engine aging, flow path slagging, or rapid maneuvering - will require adaptive responses; the effectiveness of such will be only as good as the dynamic information available for processing. All of these issues point toward the importance of continued sensor development. For adequate control of the combustion process, sensor data must include information about the above mentioned quantities along with equivalence ratios and radical concentrations, and also include both temporal and spatial velocity resolution. Ultimately these devices must transfer from the laboratory to field installations, and thus must become low weight and cost, reliable and maintainable. A primary conclusion from this study is that the optics-based sensor science will be the primary diagnostic in future gas turbine technologies.

  10. Nitrogen chemistry in combustion and gasification - mechanisms and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to increase the understanding of the complex details of gaseous emission formation in energy production techniques based on combustion and/or gasification. The aim has also been to improve the accuracy of mathematical furnace models when they are used for predicting emissions. The main emphasis has been on nitrogen oxides (NO x , N 2 O). The work supports development of cleaner and more efficient combustion technology. The main emphasis has been on combustion systems that are based on fluidized bed technology including both atmospheric and pressurized conditions (BFBC, CFBC, PFBC/G). The work has consisted of advanced theoretical modeling and of experiments in laboratory devices that have partly been made in collaboration with other LIEKKI projects. Two principal modeling tools have been used: detailed homogeneous chemical kinetic modeling and computational fluid dynamic simulation. In this report, the most important results of the following selected items will be presented: (1) Extension of a detailed kinetic nitrogen and hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism into elevated pressure, and parametric studies on: effect of pressure on fuel-nitrogen oxidation under PFBC conditions, effect of pressure on selective non-catalytic NO x reduction under PFBC conditions, effect of different oxidizers on hot-gas cleaning of ammonia by means of selective oxidation in gasification gas. (2) Extension of the above mechanism to include chlorine reactions at atmospheric pressure, and parametric studies on: effect of HCl on CO burn-out in FBC combustion of waste. (3) Development of more accurate emission prediction models: incorporation of more accurate submodels on hydrocarbon oxidation into CFD furnace models, and evaluation of different concepts describing the interaction between turbulence and chemical reaction, development of a mechanistic detailed 1.5-dimensional emission model for circulating fluidized bed combustors. (orig.) 14 refs

  11. Combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants; Chimie de la combustion et formation des polluants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This book of proceedings reports on 7 papers on combustion chemistry and formation of pollutants presented during the workshop organized by the `Combustion and Flames` section of the French society of thermal engineers. The chemistry of combustion is analyzed in various situations such as: turbojet engines, spark ignition engines, industrial burners, gas turbines etc... Numerical simulation is used to understand the physico-chemical processes involved in combustion, to describe the kinetics of oxidation, combustion and flame propagation, and to predict the formation of pollutants. (J.S.)

  12. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  13. Study of mechanically activated coal combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burdukov Anatolij P.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion and air gasification of mechanically activated micro-ground coals in the flux have been studied. Influence of mechanically activated methods at coals grinding on their chemical activeness at combustion and gasification has been determined. Intense mechanical activation of coals increases their chemical activeness that enables development of new highly boosted processing methods for coals with various levels of metamorphism.

  14. Internal combustion engines in hybrid vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.; Weijer, C.J.T. van de; Beckman, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the use of internal combustion engines in hybrid powertrains is investigated. The substantial difference between the use of internal combustion engines in conventional and in hybrid vehicles mean that engines for hybrid vehicles should be designed specifically for the purpose. At the

  15. Flue Gas Emissions from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramer, E.A.; Valk, M.

    1995-01-01

    During the past decades fluidized bed coal combustion was developed as a technology for burning coal in an effective way meeting the standards for pollution control. During the earlier years of research on fluidized bed combustion, the potential for limiting the S02 emission by adding limestone to

  16. Combustion and extinction of magnesium fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.C.; Duverger de Cuy, G.

    1988-01-01

    The studies made in France on magnesium combustion and extinguishing means are associated at the nuclear fuel of the graphite-gas reactor. Safety studies are made for ameliorate our knowledge on: - magnesium combustion - magnesium fire propagation - magnesium fire extinguishing [fr

  17. Coal combustion ashes: A radioactive Waste?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michetti, F.P.; Tocci, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radioactive substances naturally hold in fossil fuels, such as Uranium and Thorium, after the combustion, are subjected to an increase of concentration in the residual combustion products as flying ashes or as firebox ashes. A significant percentage of the waste should be classified as radioactive waste, while the political strategies seems to be setted to declassify it as non-radioactive waste. (Author)

  18. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  19. 30 CFR 57.4104 - Combustible waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combustible waste. 57.4104 Section 57.4104... Control Prohibitions/precautions/housekeeping § 57.4104 Combustible waste. (a) Waste materials, including liquids, shall not accumulate in quantities that could create a fire hazard. (b) Waste or rags containing...

  20. Injector tip for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Tsu Pin; Ye, Wen

    2003-05-20

    This invention relates to a the tip structure of a fuel injector as used in a internal combustion engine. Internal combustion engines using Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) technology require a tip structure that directs fuel spray in a downward direction. This requirement necessitates a tip design that is capable of withstanding mechanical stresses associated with the design.

  1. Ultra-low pollutant emission combustion method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khinkis, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a method for ultra-low pollutant emission combustion of fossil fuel. It comprises: introducing into a primary combustion chamber a first fuel portion of about 1 percent to about 20 percent of a total fuel to be combusted; introducing primary combustion air into the primary combustion chamber; introducing a first portion of water into the primary combustion chamber, having a first water heat capacity equivalent to a primary combustion air heat capacity of one of a primary combustion air amount of about 10 percent to about 60 percent of the first stoichiometirc requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion and an excess primary combustion air amount of about 20 percent to about 150 percent of the first stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the first fuel portion; burning the first fuel portion with the primary combustion air in the primary combustion chamber at a temperature abut 2000 degrees F to about 2700 degrees F producing initial combustion products; passing the initial combustion products into a secondary combustion chamber; introducing into the secondary combustion chamber a second fuel portion of about 80 percent to about 99 percent of the total fuel to be combusted; introducing secondary combustion air into the secondary combustion chamber in an amount of about 105 percent to about 130 percent of a second stoichiometric requirement for complete combustion of the second fuel portion; introducing a second portion of water into the secondary combustion chamber; burning the second fuel portion and any remaining fuel in the initial combustion products; passing the final combustion products into a dilution chamber; introducing dilution air into the dilution chamber; discharging the ultra-low pollutant emission vitiated air form the dilution chamber

  2. Internal and surface phenomena in metal combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Molodetsky, Irina E.; Law, Chung K.

    1995-01-01

    Combustion of metals has been widely studied in the past, primarily because of their high oxidation enthalpies. A general understanding of metal combustion has been developed based on the recognition of the existence of both vapor-phase and surface reactions and involvement of the reaction products in the ensuing heterogeneous combustion. However, distinct features often observed in metal particle combustion, such as brightness oscillations and jumps (spearpoints), disruptive burning, and non-symmetric flames are not currently understood. Recent metal combustion experiments using uniform high-temperature metal droplets produced by a novel micro-arc technique have indicated that oxygen dissolves in the interior of burning particles of certain metals and that the subsequent transformations of the metal-oxygen solutions into stoichiometric oxides are accompanied with sufficient heat release to cause observed brightness and temperature jumps. Similar oxygen dissolution has been observed in recent experiments on bulk iron combustion but has not been associated with such dramatic effects. This research addresses heterogeneous metal droplet combustion, specifically focusing on oxygen penetration into the burning metal droplets, and its influence on the metal combustion rate, temperature history, and disruptive burning. A unique feature of the experimental approach is the combination of the microgravity environment with a novel micro-arc Generator of Monodispersed Metal Droplets (GEMMED), ensuring repeatable formation and ignition of uniform metal droplets with controllable initial temperature and velocity. The droplet initial temperatures can be adjusted within a wide range from just above the metal melting point, which provides means to ignite droplets instantly upon entering an oxygen containing environment. Initial droplet velocity will be set equal to zero allowing one to organize metal combustion microgravity experiments in a fashion similar to usual microgravity

  3. A predictive model of natural gas mixture combustion in internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Espinoza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the development of a predictive natural gas mixture combustion model for conventional com-bustion (ignition engines. The model was based on resolving two areas; one having unburned combustion mixture and another having combustion products. Energy and matter conservation equations were solved for each crankshaft turn angle for each area. Nonlinear differential equations for each phase’s energy (considering compression, combustion and expansion were solved by applying the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The model also enabled studying different natural gas components’ composition and evaluating combustion in the presence of dry and humid air. Validation results are shown with experimental data, demonstrating the software’s precision and accuracy in the results so produced. The results showed cylinder pressure, unburned and burned mixture temperature, burned mass fraction and combustion reaction heat for the engine being modelled using a natural gas mixture.

  4. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  5. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials

  6. Final report: Prototyping a combustion corridor; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutland, Christopher J.; Leach, Joshua

    2001-01-01

    The Combustion Corridor is a concept in which researchers in combustion and thermal sciences have unimpeded access to large volumes of remote computational results. This will enable remote, collaborative analysis and visualization of state-of-the-art combustion science results. The Engine Research Center (ERC) at the University of Wisconsin - Madison partnered with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, and several other universities to build and test the first stages of a combustion corridor. The ERC served two important functions in this partnership. First, we work extensively with combustion simulations so we were able to provide real world research data sets for testing the Corridor concepts. Second, the ERC was part of an extension of the high bandwidth based DOE National Laboratory connections to universities

  7. Modeling and simulating combustion and generation of NOx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaroiu, Gheorghe

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the modeling and simulation of combustion processes and generation of NO x in a combustion chamber and boiler, with supplementary combustion in a gas turbine installation. The fuel burned in the combustion chamber was rich gas with a chemical composition more complex than natural gas. Pitcoal was used in the regenerative boiler. From the resulting combustion products, 17 compounds were retained, including nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Using the developed model, the simulation resulted in excess air for a temperature imposed at the combustion chamber exhaust. These simulations made it possible to determine the concentrations of combustion compounds with a variation in excess combustion. (author)

  8. Control of emissions from stationary combustion sources: Pollutant detection and behavior in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licht, W.; Engel, A.J.; Slater, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Stationary combustion resources continue to be significant sources of NOx and SOx pollutants in the ambient atmosphere. This volume considers four problem areas: (1) control of emissions from stationary combustion sources, particularly SOx and NOx (2) pollutant behavior in the atmosphere (3) advances in air pollution analysis and (4) air quality management. Topics of interest include carbon slurries for sulfur dioxide abatement, mass transfer in the Kellogg-Weir air quality control system, oxidation/inhibition of sulfite ion in aqueous solution, some micrometeorological methods of measuring dry deposition rates, Spanish moss as an indicator of airborne metal contamination, and air quality impacts from future electric power generation in Texas

  9. Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

    2013-12-17

    A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

  10. Nanoparticle emissions from combustion engines

    CERN Document Server

    Merkisz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

     This book focuses on particulate matter emissions produced by vehicles with combustion engines. It describes the physicochemical properties of the particulate matter, the mechanisms of its formation and its environmental impacts (including those on human beings). It discusses methods for measuring particulate mass and number, including the state-of-the-art in Portable Emission Measurement System (PEMS) equipment for measuring the exhaust emissions of both light and heavy-duty vehicles and buses under actual operating conditions. The book presents the authors’ latest investigations into the relations between particulate emission (mass and number) and engine operating parameters, as well as their new findings obtained through road tests performed on various types of vehicles, including those using diesel particulate filter regeneration. The book, which addresses the needs of academics and professionals alike, also discusses relevant European regulations on particulate emissions and highlights selected metho...

  11. Radiation treatment of combustion gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, S.; Tokunaga, O.; Nishimura, K.; Hasimoto, S.; Kawakami, W.; Washino, M.; Kawamura, K.; Aoki, S.; Adachi, K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot plant for the radiation treatment of combustion gas in a flow-system was planned and completed in 1974 at the Abara Mfg. Co. Ltd., Central Laboratory in Fujisawa. The plant has been successfully operated for more than one year. The capacity of the pilot plant is 1000 Nm 3 per hour of the gas with the use of an electron accelerator of 60 mA and 0.75 MeV. The objective of this paper is to review a series of the researches including recent unpublished results, and to discuss the characteristics of the process. The outline and typical results of the pilot plant are first reported here. (author)

  12. Ignition circuit for combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, H W

    1977-05-26

    The invention refers to the ignition circuit for combustion engines, which are battery fed. The circuit contains a transistor and an oscillator to produce an output voltage on the secondary winding of an output transformer to supply an ignition current. The plant is controlled by an interrupter. The purpose of the invention is to form such a circuit that improved sparks for ignition are produced, on the one hand, and that on the other hand, the plant can continue to function after loss of the oscillator. The problem is solved by the battery and the secondary winding of the output transformers of the oscillator are connected via a rectifier circuit to produce a resultant total voltage with the ignition coil from the battery voltage and the rectified pulsating oscillator output.

  13. Trace emissions from gaseous combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seebold, J.G. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The U.S. Clean Air Act (CAA) was amended in 1990 to include the development of maximum achievable control technology (MACT) emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for certain stationary sources by November 2000. MACT emissions standards would affect process heaters and industrial boilers since combustion processes are a potential source for many air toxins. The author noted that one of the problems with MACT is the lack of a clear solid scientific footing which is needed to develop environmentally responsible regulations. In order to amend some of these deficiencies, a 4-year, $7 million research project on the origin and fate of trace emissions in the external combustion of gaseous hydrocarbons was undertaken in a collaborative effort between government, universities and industry. This collaborative project entitled the Petroleum Environmental Research Forum (PERF) Project 92-19 produced basic information and phenomenological understanding in two important areas, one basic and one applied. The specific objectives of the project were to measure emissions while operating different full-scale burners under various operating conditions and then to analyze the emission data to identify which operating conditions lead to low air toxic emissions. Another objective was to develop new chemical kinetic mechanisms and predictive models for the formation of air toxic species which would explain the origin and fate of these species in process heaters and industrial boilers. It was determined that a flame is a very effective reactor and that trace emissions from a typical gas-fired industry burner are very small. An unexpected finding was that trace emissions are not affected by hydrocarbon gaseous fuel composition, nor by the use of ultra low nitrous oxide burners. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Tabulated Combustion Model Development For Non-Premixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prithwish

    Turbulent non-premixed flames play a very important role in the field of engineering ranging from power generation to propulsion. The coupling of fluid mechanics and complicated combustion chemistry of fuels pose a challenge for the numerical modeling of these type of problems. Combustion modeling in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is one of the most important tools used for predictive modeling of complex systems and to understand the basic fundamentals of combustion. Traditional combustion models solve a transport equation of each species with a source term. In order to resolve the complex chemistry accurately it is important to include a large number of species. However, the computational cost is generally proportional to the cube of number of species. The presence of a large number of species in a flame makes the use of CFD computationally expensive and beyond reach for some applications or inaccurate when solved with simplified chemistry. For highly turbulent flows, it also becomes important to incorporate the effects of turbulence chemistry interaction (TCI). The aim of this work is to develop high fidelity combustion models based on the flamelet concept and to significantly advance the existing capabilities. A thorough investigation of existing models (Finite-rate chemistry and Representative Interactive Flamelet (RIF)) and comparative study of combustion models was done initially on a constant volume combustion chamber with diesel fuel injection. The CFD modeling was validated with experimental results and was also successfully applied to a single cylinder diesel engine. The effect of number of flamelets on the RIF model and flamelet initialization strategies were studied. The RIF model with multiple flamelets is computationally expensive and a model was proposed on the frame work of RIF. The new model was based on tabulated chemistry and incorporated TCI effects. A multidimensional tabulated chemistry database generation code was developed based on the 1

  15. In-cylinder pressure-based direct techniques and time frequency analysis for combustion diagnostics in IC engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Ambrosio, S.; Ferrari, A.; Galleani, L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Direct pressure-based techniques have been applied successfully to spark-ignition engines. • The burned mass fraction of pressure-based techniques has been compared with that of 2- and 3-zone combustion models. • The time frequency analysis has been employed to simulate complex diesel combustion events. - Abstract: In-cylinder pressure measurement and analysis has historically been a key tool for off-line combustion diagnosis in internal combustion engines, but online applications for real-time condition monitoring and combustion management have recently become popular. The present investigation presents and compares different low computing-cost in-cylinder pressure based methods for the analyses of the main features of combustion, that is, the start of combustion, the end of combustion and the crankshaft angle that responds to half of the overall burned mass. The instantaneous pressure in the combustion chamber has been used as an input datum for the described analytical procedures and it has been measured by means of a standard piezoelectric transducer. Traditional pressure-based techniques have been shown to be able to predict the burned mass fraction time history more accurately in spark ignition engines than in diesel engines. The most suitable pressure-based techniques for both spark ignition and compression ignition engines have been chosen on the basis of the available experimental data. Time–frequency analysis has also been applied to the analysis of diesel combustion, which is richer in events than spark ignited combustion. Time frequency algorithms for the calculation of the mean instantaneous frequency are computationally efficient, allow the main events of the diesel combustion to be identified and provide the greatest benefits in the presence of multiple injection events. These algorithms can be optimized and applied to onboard diagnostics tools designed for real control, but can also be used as an advanced validation tool for

  16. Effect of Variant End of Injection Period on Combustion Process of Biodiesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Amir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel as a replacement to the standard diesel fuel in combustion diesel engine. The biodiesel fuel has a significantly influences throughout the combustion process and exhaust emission. The purpose of this research is to investigate the combustion process behavior during the End of Injection (EOI period and operates under variant conditions using Rapid Compression Machine (RCM. Experimental of RCM is used to simulate a combustion process and combustion characteristics of diesel engine combustion. Three types of biodiesel blend which are B5, B10 and B15 were tested at several injection pressures of 80 MPa, 90 MPa and 130 MPa under different ambient temperatures, 750 K to 1100 K. The results of this study showed that the ignition delay slightly reduced with increasing the content of biodiesel blends from B5, B10 and B15 and became more shorten as the injection pressure been enhanced. As the injection pressure increased, the behavior of combustion pressure at end of injection is reduced, radically increased the NOX emission. It is noted that the process of combustion at the end of injection increased as the ambient temperature is rising. In fact, higher initial ambient temperature improved the fuel atomization and mixing process. Under the biodiesel combustion with higher ambient temperature condition, the exhaust emission of CO, O2, and HC became less but increased in NOX emission. Besides, increased in blends of biodiesel ratio are found to enhance the combustion process, resulted a decreased in HC emissions.

  17. Extended lattice Boltzmann scheme for droplet combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashna, Mostafa; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Fakhari, Abbas

    2017-05-01

    The available lattice Boltzmann (LB) models for combustion or phase change are focused on either single-phase flow combustion or two-phase flow with evaporation assuming a constant density for both liquid and gas phases. To pave the way towards simulation of spray combustion, we propose a two-phase LB method for modeling combustion of liquid fuel droplets. We develop an LB scheme to model phase change and combustion by taking into account the density variation in the gas phase and accounting for the chemical reaction based on the Cahn-Hilliard free-energy approach. Evaporation of liquid fuel is modeled by adding a source term, which is due to the divergence of the velocity field being nontrivial, in the continuity equation. The low-Mach-number approximation in the governing Navier-Stokes and energy equations is used to incorporate source terms due to heat release from chemical reactions, density variation, and nonluminous radiative heat loss. Additionally, the conservation equation for chemical species is formulated by including a source term due to chemical reaction. To validate the model, we consider the combustion of n-heptane and n-butanol droplets in stagnant air using overall single-step reactions. The diameter history and flame standoff ratio obtained from the proposed LB method are found to be in good agreement with available numerical and experimental data. The present LB scheme is believed to be a promising approach for modeling spray combustion.

  18. Bifurcation, pattern formation and chaos in combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayliss, A.; Matkowsky, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper problems in gaseous combustion and in gasless condensed phase combustion are studied both analytically and numerically. In gaseous combustion we consider the problem of a flame stabilized on a line source of fuel. The authors find both stationary and pulsating axisymmetric solutions as well as stationary and pulsating cellular solutions. The pulsating cellular solutions take the form of either traveling waves or standing waves. Transitions between these patterns occur as parameters related to the curvature of the flame front and the Lewis number are varied. In gasless condensed phase combustion both planar and nonplanar problems are studied. For planar condensed phase combustion we consider two models: accounts for melting and does not. Both models are shown to exhibit a transition from uniformly to pulsating propagating combustion when a parameter related to the activation energy is increased. Upon further increasing this parameter both models undergo a transition to chaos: by intermittency and by a period doubling sequence. In nonplanar condensed phase combustion the nonlinear development of a branch of standing wave solutions is studied and is shown to lead to relaxation oscillations and subsequently to a transition to quasi-periodicity

  19. Thermogravimetric analysis of biowastes during combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, M.; Sanchez, M.E.; Gomez, X.; Moran, A.

    2010-01-01

    The combustion of sewage sludge (SS), animal manure (AM) and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was assessed and compared with that of a semianthracite coal (SC) and of a PET waste by thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Differences were found in the TG curves obtained for the combustion of these materials accordingly to their respective proximate analysis. Non-isothermal thermogravimetric data were used to assess the kinetics of the combustion of these biowastes. The present paper reports on the application of the Vyazovkin model-free isoconversional method for the evaluation of the activation energy necessary for the combustion of these biowastes. The activation energy related to SS combustion (129.1 kJ/mol) was similar to that corresponding to AM (132.5 kJ/mol) while the OFMSW showed a higher value (159.3 kJ/mol). These values are quite higher than the one determined in the same way for the combustion of SC (49.2 kJ/mol) but lower than that for the combustion of a PET waste (165.6 kJ/mol).

  20. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)