WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced power plants

  1. Advanced Coordinating Control System for Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Peng; WEI Shuangying

    2006-01-01

    The coordinating control system is popular used in power plant. This paper describes the advanced coordinating control by control methods and optimal operation, introduces their principals and features by using the examples of power plant operation. It is wealthy for automation application in optimal power plant operation.

  2. Advanced nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) is the largest power company among the six subsidiaries that separated from Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) in 2001, accounting for approximately 25% of electricity producing facilities, hydro and nuclear combined. KHNP operates 20 nuclear power plants in Kori, Yonggwang, Ulchin and Wolsong site and several hydroelectric power generation facilities, providing approximately 36% of the national power supply. As a major source of electricity generation in Korea, nuclear energy contributes greatly to the stability of national electricity supply and energy security. KHNP's commercial nuclear power plant operation, which started with Kori Unit 1 in 1978, has achieved an average capacity factor more than 90% since 2000 and a high record of 93.4% in 2008. Following the introduction of nuclear power plants in the 1970's, Korea accumulated its nuclear technology in the 1980's, developed OPR 1000(Optimized Power Reactor) and demonstrated advanced level of its nuclear technology capabilities in the 2000's by developing an advanced type reactor, APR 1400(Advanced Power Reactor) which is being constructed at Shin-Kori Unit 3 and 4 for the first time. By 2022, KHNP will construct additional 12 nuclear power plants in order to ensure a stable power supply according to the Government Plan of Long-Term Electricity supply and Demand. 4 units of OPR 1000 reactor model will be commissioned by 2013 and 8 units of APR 1400 are under construction and planned. At the end of 2022, the nuclear capacity will reach 33% share of total generation capacity in Korea and account for 48% of national power generation. (author)

  3. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analyses Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.S. Samuelsen; A.D. Rao

    2006-02-06

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include ''Zero Emission'' power plants and the ''FutureGen'' H{sub 2} co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the ''Vision 21'' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  4. Advanced Power Plant Development and Analysis Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.D. Rao; G.S. Samuelsen; F.L. Robson; B. Washom; S.G. Berenyi

    2006-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory, a multi-disciplinary team led by the Advanced Power and Energy Program of the University of California at Irvine is defining the system engineering issues associated with the integration of key components and subsystems into advanced power plant systems with goals of achieving high efficiency and minimized environmental impact while using fossil fuels. These power plant concepts include 'Zero Emission' power plants and the 'FutureGen' H2 co-production facilities. The study is broken down into three phases. Phase 1 of this study consisted of utilizing advanced technologies that are expected to be available in the 'Vision 21' time frame such as mega scale fuel cell based hybrids. Phase 2 includes current state-of-the-art technologies and those expected to be deployed in the nearer term such as advanced gas turbines and high temperature membranes for separating gas species and advanced gasifier concepts. Phase 3 includes identification of gas turbine based cycles and engine configurations suitable to coal-based gasification applications and the conceptualization of the balance of plant technology, heat integration, and the bottoming cycle for analysis in a future study. Also included in Phase 3 is the task of acquiring/providing turbo-machinery in order to gather turbo-charger performance data that may be used to verify simulation models as well as establishing system design constraints. The results of these various investigations will serve as a guide for the U. S. Department of Energy in identifying the research areas and technologies that warrant further support.

  5. Recent Advances in Ocean Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Heon Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, recent advances in Ocean Nuclear Power Plants (ONPPs are reviewed, including their general arrangement, design parameters, and safety features. The development of ONPP concepts have continued due to initiatives taking place in France, Russia, South Korea, and the United States. Russia’s first floating nuclear power stations utilizing the PWR technology (KLT-40S and the spar-type offshore floating nuclear power plant designed by a research group in United States are considered herein. The APR1400 and SMART mounted Gravity Based Structure (GBS-type ONPPs proposed by a research group in South Korea are also considered. In addition, a submerged-type ONPP designed by DCNS of France is taken into account. Last, issues and challenges related to ONPPs are discussed and summarized.

  6. Advances in materials for fossil power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The external constraints on the electric power industry over the past 10-15 years have resulted in increased demands on the performance and reliability of materials used in fossil power plants. At the same time, the construction of new plants has been at a low ebb, because of reduced capacity growth and surplus capacity. This led to creation of new institutions to support materials research and development during a period of malaise in industrial support. A remarkable surge of new materials and components for turbines, boilers, and auxiliaries have emerged. Some of the materials advances developed during this period are described. These include improved 1 CrMoV and 12 Cr rotors, temper resistant low Mn 3.5 NiCrMoV, super 9 Cr for heavy section piping and castings, super 12 Cr tubing for superheaters, Nimonic 80A high temperature bolting, titanium alloy blading for L.P. turbines, and many others covered by the present conference

  7. Advances in geodetic surveying of power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zak, M.

    1981-05-01

    Advances have been made in the last few years in geodetic surveying with a view to the following problems: (a) permanent measurement and recording of deformations, and (b) assembly of turbosets by the producer and installation on the power plant foundations. Methods of measurement and recording have been developed in West Germany for the first time. Surveying methods for work as in 'b' have been developed in Poland where, by now, all turbosets produced and assembled in Polish works are installed with the aid of optical methods of measurement. The latter activities receive most attention in the article.

  8. Advances in geodetic surveying of power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances have been made in the last few years in geodetic surveying with a view to the following problems: a) permanent measurement and recording of deformations, b) assembly of turbosets by the producer and installation on the power plant foundations. Methods of measurement and recording have been developed in West Germany for the first time. Surveying methods for work as in 'b' have been developed in Poland where, by now, all turbosets produced and assembled in Polish works are installed with the aid of optical methods of measurement. The latter activities receive most attention in the article. (orig.)

  9. Modeling of advanced fossil fuel power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihian, Farshid

    The first part of this thesis deals with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fuel-fired power stations. The GHG emission estimation from fossil fuel power generation industry signifies that emissions from this industry can be significantly reduced by fuel switching and adaption of advanced power generation technologies. In the second part of the thesis, steady-state models of some of the advanced fossil fuel power generation technologies are presented. The impacts of various parameters on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) overpotentials and outputs are investigated. The detail analyses of operation of the hybrid SOFC-gas turbine (GT) cycle when fuelled with methane and syngas demonstrate that the efficiencies of the cycles with and without anode exhaust recirculation are close, but the specific power of the former is much higher. The parametric analysis of the performance of the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle indicates that increasing the system operating pressure and SOFC operating temperature and fuel utilization factor improves cycle efficiency, but the effects of the increasing SOFC current density and turbine inlet temperature are not favourable. The analysis of the operation of the system when fuelled with a wide range of fuel types demonstrates that the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle efficiency can be between 59% and 75%, depending on the inlet fuel type. Then, the system performance is investigated when methane as a reference fuel is replaced with various species that can be found in the fuel, i.e., H2, CO2, CO, and N 2. The results point out that influence of various species can be significant and different for each case. The experimental and numerical analyses of a biodiesel fuelled micro gas turbine indicate that fuel switching from petrodiesel to biodiesel can influence operational parameters of the system. The modeling results of gas turbine-based power plants signify that relatively simple models can predict plant performance with acceptable accuracy. The unique

  10. Spanish program of advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy Spanish Plan is promoting some actions within the area of advanced reactors. Efforts are focussed onto the European Program of Advanced Reactors, the Program of Passive Plants (EPRI), European Fast Reactor Project and the APWR-1000 Program of INI. Electrical sector utilities and industrial partners supported by the Administration have organized an steering committee. The program of Passive Plants includes activities on Qualification, design and detailed engineering (Qualification project, SBWR project of G.E. and AP600 Project of Westinghouse. The european project on advanced plants has the following Spanish contribution: Analysis of alternative Dossier on European requisites (EUR) and Design of an European Reactor (EPR)

  11. Recent advances in nuclear power plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of industrial simulation has experienced very significant progress in recent years, and power plant simulation in particular has been an extremely active area. Improvements may be recorded in practically all simulator subsystems. In Europe, the construction of new full- or optimized-scope nuclear power plant simulators during the middle 1990's has been remarkable intense. In fact, it is possible to identify a distinct simulator generation, which constitutes a new de facto simulation standard. Thomson Training and Simulation has taken part in these developments by designing, building, and validation several of these new simulators for Dutch, German and French nuclear power plants. Their characteristics are discussed in this paper. The following main trends may be identified: Process modeling is clearly evolving towards obtaining engineering-grade performance, even under the added constraints of real-time operation and a very wide range of operating conditions to be covered; Massive use of modern graphic user interfaces (GUI) ensures an unprecedented flexibility and user-friendliness for the Instructor Station; The massive use of GUIs also allows the development of Trainee Stations (TS), which significantly enhance the in-depth training value of the simulators; The development of powerful Software Development Environments (SDE) enables the simulator maintenance teams to keep abreast of modifications carried out in the reference plants; Finally, simulator maintenance and its compliance with simulator fidelity requirements are greatly enhanced by integrated Configuration Management Systems (CMS). In conclusion, the power plant simulation field has attained a strong level of maturity, which benefits its approximately forty years of service to the power generation industry. (author)

  12. Advanced nuclear power plant solidification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hirayama, S.; Nishi, T. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Huang, C. T. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lungtan (Taiwan)

    2003-07-01

    'Slim-Rad' is an advanced radioactive waste treatment system reflecting Hitachi's long experience as a supplier of nuclear plants. The system utilizes new technologies such as a hollow fiber filter, high-performance cement solidification and laundry and shower drain treatment. By adopting this Slim-Rad system, not only the final waste volume but also the number of radwaste tanks can be reduced 1/8 and 1/2, respectively, compared with previous Hitachi radwaste treatment systems. Moreover, release of radioactivity into the environment from the treated waste is reduced effectively. This paper outlines the system and describes its features, as well as the features of the key technology such as volume reduction and solidification technology.

  13. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  14. Cogeneration power plant concepts using advanced gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huettenhofer, K.; Lezuo, A. [Siemens Power Generation, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) is undeniably the environmentally most favourable way of making efficient use of energy in the power generation industry. Cogeneration is also particularly appreciated by political decision makers because of its high yield from primary energy sources, and thus its contribution to the protection of the environment and the conservation of resources. Advanced gas turbines, along with an intelligent power plant design consisting of pre-engineered, modular power plant items, will help cogeneration to play an important role in future energy markets also from an economic point of view. (orig.)

  15. Advanced control room design for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power industry has seen a continuous growth of size and complexity of nuclear power plants. Accompanying these changes have been extensive regulatory requirements resulting in significant construction, operation and maintenance costs. In response to related concerns raised by industry members, Combustion Engineering developed the NUPLEX 80 Advanced Control Room. The goal of NUPLEX 80TM is to: reduce design and construction costs; increase plant safety and availability through improvements in the man-machine interface; and reduce maintenance costs. This paper provides an overview of the NUPLEX 80 Advanced Control Room and explains how the stated goals are achieved. (author)

  16. Welding advances in power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second in a series of articles outlining areas in which modern welding technology has been applied to the production of components for the power industry. The experience gained in the manufacture of AGR boilers led to work on the development of mechanised orbital TIG welding. Some of this development work, carried out for both fossil fired and nuclear powered stations, is detailed. (U.K.)

  17. Prospects for advanced coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of ECN's in-house R and D programmes on clean energy conversion systems with high efficiencies and low emissions, system assessment studies have been carried out on coal gasification power plants integrated with high-temperature fuel cells (IGFC). The studies also included the potential to reduce CO2 emissions, and to find possible ways for CO2 extraction and sequestration. The development of this new type of clean coal technology for large-scale power generation is still far off. A significant market share is not envisaged before the year 2015. To assess the future market potential of coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants, the promise of this fuel cell technology was assessed against the performance and the development of current state-of-the-art large-scale power generation systems, namely the pulverized coal-fired power plants and the integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. With the anticipated progress in gas turbine and gas clean-up technology, coal-fuelled fuel cell power plants will have to face severe competition from advanced IGCC power plants, despite their higher efficiency. (orig.)

  18. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  19. Advanced robot vision system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a robot vision system for advanced robots used in nuclear power plants, under a contract with the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. This work is part of the large-scale 'advanced robot technology' project. The robot vision system consists of self-location measurement, obstacle detection, and object recognition subsystems, which are activated by a total control subsystem. This paper presents details of these subsystems and the experimental results obtained. (author)

  20. Fireside corrosion of superheaters/reheaters in advanced power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, A.U.; Simms, N.J.; Oakey, J.E. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre

    2010-07-01

    The generation of increasing amounts of electricity while simultaneously reducing environmental emissions (CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particles, etc) has become a goal for the power industry worldwide. Co-firing biomass and coal in new advanced pulverised fuel power plants is one route to address this issue, since biomass is regarded as a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel (i.e. CO{sub 2} uptake during its growth equals the CO{sub 2} emissions produced during its combustion) and such new advanced power plants operate at higher efficiencies than current plants as a result of using steam systems with high temperatures and pressures. However, co-firing has the potential to cause significant operational challenges for such power plants as amongst other issues, it will significantly change the chemistry of the deposits on the heat exchanger surfaces and the surrounding gas compositions. As a result these critical components can experience higher corrosion rates, and so shorter lives, causing increased operational costs, unless the most appropriate materials are selected for their construction. This paper reports the results of a series of 1000 hour laboratory corrosion tests that have been carried out in controlled atmosphere furnaces, to assess the effect of biomass/coal co-firing on the fireside corrosion of superheaters/reheaters. The materials used for the tests were one ferritic alloy (T92), two austenitic alloys (347HFG and HR3C) and one nickel based alloy (alloy 625). Temperatures of 600 and 650 C were used to represent the metal temperatures in advanced power plants. During these exposures, traditional mass change data were recorded as the samples were recoated with the simulated deposits. After these exposures, cross-sections through samples were prepared using standard metallographic techniques and then analysed using SEM/EDX. Pre-exposure micrometer and post-exposure image analyser measurements were used so that the metal wastage could be calculated. These data are

  1. Research and development of advanced robots for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Social and economic demands have been pressing for automation of inspection tasks, maintenance and repair jobs of nuclear power plants, which are carried out by human workers under circumstances with high radiation level. Since the plants are not always designed for introduction of automatic machinery, sophisticated robots shall play a crucial role to free workers from hostile environments. We have been studying intelligent robot systems and regarded nuclear industries as one of the important application fields where we can validate the feasibility of the methods and systems we have developed. In this paper we firstly discuss on the tasks required in nuclear power plants. Secondly we introduce current status of R and D on special purpose robots, versatile robots and intelligent robots for automatizing the tasks. Then we focus our discussions on three major functions in realizing robotized assembly tasks under such unstructured environments as in nuclear power plants; planning, vision and manipulation. Finally we depict an image of a prototype robot system for nuclear power plants based on the advanced functions. (author) 64 refs

  2. Advanced coal gasifier-fuel cell power plant systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    Two advanced, high efficiency coal-fired power plants were designed, one utilizing a phosphoric acid fuel cell and one utilizing a molten carbonate fuel cell. Both incorporate a TRW Catalytic Hydrogen Process gasifier and regenerator. Both plants operate without an oxygen plant and without requiring water feed; they, instead, require makeup dolomite. Neither plant requires a shift converter; neither plant has heat exchangers operating above 1250 F. Both plants have attractive efficiencies and costs. While the molten carbonate version has a higher (52%) efficiency than the phosphoric acid version (48%), it also has a higher ($0.078/kWh versus $0.072/kWh) ten-year levelized cost of electricity. The phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant is probably feasible to build in the near term: questions about the TRW process need to be answered experimentally, such as weather it can operate on caking coals, and how effective the catalyzed carbon-dioxide acceptor will be at pilot scale, both in removing carbon dioxide and in removing sulfur from the gasifier.

  3. Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants have to meet increasing demands for safety and availability. Additionally specific requirements arising from nuclear qualification have to be fulfilled. To meet both subjects adequately in the future, Siemens has developed advanced I and C technology consisting of the two complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS. The main features of these systems are a clear task related architecture with adaptable redundancy, a consequent application of standards for interfaces and communication, comprehensive tools for easy design and service and a highly ergonomic screen based man-machine-interface. The engineering tasks are supported by an integrated engineering system, which has the capacity for design, test and diagnosis of all I and C functions and the related equipment. TELEPERM XP is designed to optimally perform all automatic functions, which require no nuclear specific qualification. This includes all sequences and closed-loop controls as well as most man-machine-interface functions. TELEPERM XS is designed for all control tasks which require a nuclear specific qualification. This especially includes all function to initiated automatic countermeasures to prevent or to cope with accidents. By use of the complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS, advanced and likewise economical plant automation and man-machine-interfaces can be implemented into Nuclear Power Plant, assuring compliance with the relevant international safety standards. (author). 10 figs

  4. Advanced coal based power plants for the next millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liere, J. van; Burgt, M.J. van der [KEMA, Arnhem (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    The global electric power generation demand from the year 2000 to 2015 is estimated to approach 1700 GWe. The global market share of coal is projected to be 38% - a significant market to penetrate for new clean coal technologies. Coal-based power generation has shown continued and steady growth during recent decades, despite drastic changes in political and general economic conditions. This is due to the abundance of global coal resources, their geographical dispersion and a comparatively low price for extraction, transportation and conversion. Demands for reduction of the environmental impact of power generation have so far been met by appropriate technological development, and efforts are made to face the latest challenge - the reduction of CO{sub 2} - emissions. This report presents a utility view on various advanced coal-based technologies for the next millennium: the pulverized coal-fired plant with advanced steam data (PF-USC), the integrated coal gasification/combined cycle plant (IGCC), and the pressurized fluid-bed combustion combined cycle plant (PFBC-CC). Furthermore, the longer-term perspectives of new coal-based technologies are addressed. Key topics are: energy efficiency, economy and ecology. 14 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Overview of global development of advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power has proven its viability as an energy source in many countries. Nuclear power technology is mature, and has achieved tremendous progress in the last decades. Like any other progressing technology, it continues to pursue improvements. The accumulated experience, which now exceeds 14,000 reactor-years of operation, is being used to develop advanced nuclear power plant designs. This development is proceeding for all reactor lines (water-cooled reactors, gas-cooled reactors, and liquid metal-cooled reactors) so that nuclear power can play an important and increasing role in global energy supply in the future. Improved economic competitiveness and a very high level of safety are common goals for advanced designs. To achieve economic competitiveness for new plants, proven means for achieving cost efficiency are being applied and new approaches are being pursued. There is also considerable potential for nuclear energy to expand beyond production of electricity to other applications such as sea-water desalination and hydrogen production. (author)

  6. Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants have to meet increasing demands for safety and availability. Additionally, specific requirements coming from the nuclear qualification have to be fulfilled. To meet both subjects adequately in the future, Siemens has developed advanced I and C technology consisting of the two complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS. The main features of these systems are the clear task related architecture with adaptable redundancy, the consequent application of standards for interfaces and communication, comprehensive tools for easy design and service and a highly ergonomic screen based man-machine-interface. The engineering tasks are supported by an integrated engineering system, which has the capacity for design, test and diagnosis of all I and C functions and the related equipment. TELEPERM XP is designed to optimally perform all automatic functions, which require no nuclear specific qualification. This includes all sequences and closed-loop controls as well as most man-machine-interface functions. TELEPERM XS is designed for all control tasks which require a nuclear specific qualification. This especially includes all functions to initiate automatic countermeasures to prevent or to cope with accidents. By use of the complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS, economical as well as advanced plant automation and man-machine-interfaces can be implemented into Nuclear Plants, assuring the compliance with the relevant international safety standards. (author). 10 figs

  7. Advanced applications of water cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By August 2007, there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation worldwide, with a total capacity of 371.7 GW(e). Further, 31 units, totaling 24.1 GW(e), were under construction. During 2006 nuclear power produced 2659.7 billion kWh of electricity, which was 15.2% of the world's total. The vast majority of these plants use water-cooled reactors. Based on information provided by its Member States, the IAEA projects that nuclear power will grow significantly, producing between 2760 and 2810 billion kWh annually by 2010, between 3120 and 3840 billion kWh annually by 2020, and between 3325 and 5040 billion kWh annually by 2030. There are several reasons for these rising expectations for nuclear power: - Nuclear power's lengthening experience and good performance: The industry now has more than 12 000 reactor years of experience, and the global average nuclear plant availability during 2006 reached 83%; - Growing energy needs: All forecasts project increases in world energy demand, especially as population and economic productivity grow. The strategies are country dependent, but usually involve a mix of energy sources; - Interest in advanced applications of nuclear energy, such as seawater desalination, steam for heavy oil recovery and heat and electricity for hydrogen production; - Environmental concerns and constraints: The Kyoto Protocol has been in force since February 2005, and for many countries (most OECD countries, the Russian Federation, the Baltics and some countries of the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) greenhouse gas emission limits are imposed; - Security of energy supply is a national priority in essentially every country; and - Nuclear power is economically competitive and provides stability of electricity price. In the near term most new nuclear plants will be evolutionary water cooled reactors (Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), often pursuing economies of scale. In the longer term, innovative designs that

  8. Thermoeconomic Analysis of Advanced Solar-Fossil Combined Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Allani

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Hybrid solar thermal power plants (with parabolic trough type of solar collectors featuring gas burners and Rankine steam cycles have been successfully demonstrated by California's Solar Electric Generating System (SEGS. This system has been proven to be one of the most efficient and economical schemes to convert solar energy into electricity. Recent technological progress opens interesting prospects for advanced cycle concepts: a the ISCCS (Integrated Solar Combined Cycle System that integrates the parabolic trough into a fossil fired combined cycle, which allows a larger exergy potential of the fuel to be converted. b the HSTS (Hybrid Solar Tower System which uses high concentration optics (via a power tower generator and high temperature air receivers to drive the combined cycle power plant. In the latter case, solar energy is used at a higher exergy level as a heat source of the topping cycle. This paper presents the results of a thermoeconomic investigation of an ISCCS envisaged in Tunisia. The study is realized in two phases. In the first phase, a mixed approach, based on pinch technology principles coupled with a mathematical optimization algorithm, is used to minimize the heat transfer exergy losses in the steam generators, respecting the off design operating conditions of the steam turbine (cone law. In the second phase, an economic analysis based on the Levelized Electricity Cost (LEC approach was carried out for the configurations, which provided the best concepts during the first phase. A comparison of ISCCS with pure fossil fueled plants (CC+GT is reported for the same electrical power load. A sensitivity analysis based on the relative size of the solar field is presented.

    •  This paper was presented at the ECOS'00 Conference in Enschede, July 5-7, 2000

  9. Advanced Thermodynamic Analysis and Evaluation of a Supercritical Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tsatsaronis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A conventional exergy analysis can highlight the main components having high thermodynamic inefficiencies, but cannot consider the interactions among components or the true potential for the improvement of each component. By splitting the exergy destruction into endogenous/exogenous and avoidable/unavoidable parts, the advanced exergy analysis is capable of providing additional information to conventional exergy analysis for improving the design and operation of energy conversion systems. This paper presents the application of both a conventional and an advanced exergy analysis to a supercritical coal-fired power plant. The results show that the ratio of exogenous exergy destruction differs quite a lot from component to component. In general, almost 90% of the total exergy destruction within turbines comes from their endogenous parts, while that of feedwater preheaters contributes more or less 70% to their total exergy destruction. Moreover, the boiler subsystem is proven to have a large amount of exergy destruction caused by the irreversibilities within the remaining components of the overall system. It is also found that the boiler subsystem still has the largest avoidable exergy destruction; however, the enhancement efforts should focus not only on its inherent irreversibilities but also on the inefficiencies within the remaining components. A large part of the avoidable exergy destruction within feedwater preheaters is exogenous; while that of the remaining components is mostly endogenous indicating that the improvements mainly depend on advances in design and operation of the component itself.

  10. Advanced interaction media in nuclear power plant control rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    The shift from analog to digital Instruments (related mainly to information visualization) and Controls in Nuclear Power Plant Main Control Rooms (NPP MCR) is a central current topic of investigation. In NPP MCR, digitalization was implemented gradually, analog and digital systems still coexisting for the two main systems related to safety--Safety Instruments and Control System (SICS) and Process Instruments and Controls System (PICS). My ongoing research focuses on the introduction of Advanced Interaction Media (AIM) such as stereoscopic 3D visualization and multi-touch surfaces in control rooms. This paper proposes a Safety-Centric approach for gathering the Design Rationale needed in the specification of such novel AIM concepts as well as their evaluation through user tests. Beyond methodological research, the final output of the current research is to build an experimental simulator aiming to enhance improvements in Human-Systems Integration (HSI). This paper provides an overview of the topics under consideration. PMID:22317419

  11. Advanced handbook for accident analyses of German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced handbook of safety analyses (HSA) comprises a comprehensive electronic collection of knowledge for the compilation and conduction of safety analyses in the area of reactor, plant and containment behaviour as well as results of existing safety analyses (performed by GRS in the past) with characteristic specifications and further background information. In addition, know-how from the analysis software development and validation process is presented and relevant rules and regulations with regard to safety demonstration are provided. The HSA comprehensively covers the topic thermo-hydraulic safety analyses (except natural hazards, man-made hazards and malicious acts) for German pressurized and boiling water reactors for power and non-power operational states. In principle, the structure of the HSA-content represents the analytical approach utilized by safety analyses and applying the knowledge from safety analyses to technical support services. On the basis of a multilevel preparation of information to the topics ''compilation of safety analyses'', ''compilation of data bases'', ''assessment of safety analyses'', ''performed safety analyses'', ''rules and regulation'' and ''ATHLET-validation'' the HSA addresses users with different background, allowing them to enter the HSA at different levels. Moreover, the HSA serves as a reference book, which is designed future-oriented, freely configurable related to the content, completely integrated into the GRS internal portal and prepared to be used by a growing user group.

  12. The ARIES Advanced and Conservative Tokamak Power Plant Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak power plants are studied with advanced and conservative design philosophies to identify the impacts on the resulting designs and to provide guidance to critical research needs. Incorporating updated physics understanding and using more sophisticated engineering and physics analysis, the tokamak configurations have developed a more credible basis compared with older studies. The advanced configuration assumes a self-cooled lead lithium blanket concept with SiC composite structural material with 58% thermal conversion efficiency. This plasma has a major radius of 6.25 m, a toroidal field of 6.0 T, a q95 of 4.5,a βtotalN of 5.75, an H98 of 1.65, an n/nGr of 1.0, and a peak divertor heat flux of 13.7 MW/m2. The conservative configuration assumes a dual-coolant lead lithium blanket concept with reduced-activation ferritic martensitic steel structural material and helium coolant, achieving a thermal conversion efficiency of 45%. The plasma has a major radius of 9.75 m, a toroidal field of 8.75 T, a q95 of 8.0, a βtotalN of 2.5, an H98 of 1.25, an n/nGr of 1.3, and a peak divertor heat flux of 10 MW/m2. The divertor heat flux treatment with a narrow power scrape-off width has driven the plasmas to larger major radius. Edge and divertor plasma simulations are targeting a basis for high radiated power fraction in the divertor, which is necessary for solutions to keep the peak heat flux in the range 10 to 15 MW/m2. Combinations of the advanced and conservative approaches show intermediate sizes. A new systems code using a database approach has been used and shows that the operating point is really an operating zone with some range of plasma and engineering parameters and very similar costs of electricity. Other papers in this issue provide more detailed discussion of the work summarized here

  13. ARIES-AT: An advanced tokamak, advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several avenues were pursued in order to arrive at plasmas with a higher β and better bootstrap alignment compared to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher βN and β. Advanced technologies that are examined in detail include: (1) Possible improvements to the overall system by using high-temperature superconductors, (2) Innovative SiC blankets that lead to a high thermal cycle efficiency of ∼60%; and (3) Advanced manufacturing techniques which aim at producing near-finished products directly from raw material, resulting in low-cost, and reliable components. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.4 m, minor radius of 1.3 M, a toroidal β of 9.2% (βN=6.0) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current drive power is 24 MW. The ARIES-AT study shows that the combination of advanced tokamak modes and advanced technology leads to attractive fusion power plant with excellent safety and environmental characteristics and with a cost of electricity (5c/kWh), which is competitive with those projected for other sources of energy. (author)

  14. A study on advanced man-machine interface system for autonomous nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A man-machine interface(MMI) system of an autonomous nuclear power plant has an advanced function compared with that of the present nuclear power plants. The MMI has a function model of a plant state, and updates and revises this function model by itself. This paper describes the concept of autonomous nuclear power plants, a plant simulator of an autonomous power plant, a contracted function model of a plant state, three-dimensional color graphic display of a plant state, and an event-tree like expression for plant states. (author)

  15. Advanced surveillance of Resistance Temperature Detectors in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A two time constant transfer function is proposed to describe the Resistance Temperature Detector dynamics. • One constant is only related to the inner dynamics whereas the other one is related to the process and to the inner dynamics. • The two time constants have been found in several RTDs from a Nuclear Power Plant. • A Monte Carlo simulation is used to properly adjust the sampling time to find both constants. - Abstract: The dynamic response of several RTDs located at the cold leg of a PWR has been studied. A theoretical model for the heat transfer between the RTDs and the surrounding fluid is derived. It proposes a two real poles transfer function. By means of noise analysis techniques in the time domain (autoregressive models) and the Dynamic Data System methodology, the two time constants of the system can be found. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed in order to choose the proper sampling time to obtain both constants. The two poles are found and they permit an advance in situ surveillance of the sensor response time and the sensor dynamics performance. One of the poles is related to the inner dynamics whereas the other one is linked to the process and the inner dynamics. So surveillance on the process and on the inner dynamics can be distinguished

  16. Improving human reliability through better nuclear power plant system design: Program for advanced nuclear power studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project on ''Development of a Theory of the Dependence of Human Reliability upon System Designs as a Means of Improving Nuclear Power Plant Performance'' was been undertaken in order to address the problem of human error in advanced nuclear power plant designs. Lack of a mature theory has retarded progress in reducing likely frequencies of human errors. Work being pursued in this project is to perform a set of experiments involving human subjects who are required to operate, diagnose and respond to changes in computer-simulated systems, relevant to those encountered in nuclear power plants, which are made to differ in complexity in a systematic manner. The computer program used to present the problems to be solved also records the response of the operator as it unfolds

  17. Systems Analysis Of Advanced Coal-Based Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrall, Joseph F.; Jennings, Charles N.; Pappano, Alfred W.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents appraisal of integrated coal-gasification/fuel-cell power plants. Based on study comparing fuel-cell technologies with each other and with coal-based alternatives and recommends most promising ones for research and development. Evaluates capital cost, cost of electricity, fuel consumption, and conformance with environmental standards. Analyzes sensitivity of cost of electricity to changes in fuel cost, to economic assumptions, and to level of technology. Recommends further evaluation of integrated coal-gasification/fuel-cell integrated coal-gasification/combined-cycle, and pulverized-coal-fired plants. Concludes with appendixes detailing plant-performance models, subsystem-performance parameters, performance goals, cost bases, plant-cost data sheets, and plant sensitivity to fuel-cell performance.

  18. Advanced targeted monitoring of high temperature components in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Maile, K.; Jovanovic, A. [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The article presents the idea of targeted monitoring of high-temperature pressurized components in fossil-fueled power plants, implemented within a modular software system and using, in addition to pressure and temperature data, also displacement and strain measurement data. The concept has been implemented as a part of a more complex company-oriented Internet/Intranet system of MPA Stuttgart (ALIAS). ALIAS enables to combine smoothly the monitoring results with those of the off-line analysis, e. g. sensitivity analyses, comparison with preceding experience (case studies), literature search, search in material databases -(experimental and standard data), nonlinear FE-analysis, etc. The concept and the system have been implemented in real plant conditions several power plants in Germany and Europe: one of these applications and its results are described more in detail in the presentation. (orig.) 9 refs.

  19. Advanced maintenance, inspection & repair technology for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, B.M.

    1994-12-31

    Maintenance, inspection, and repair technology for nuclear power plants is outlined. The following topics are discussed: technology for reactor systems, reactor refueling bridge, fuel inspection system, fuel shuffling software, fuel reconstitution, CEA/RCCA/CRA inspection, vessel inspection capabilities, CRDM inspection and repair, reactor internals inspection and repair, stud tensioning system, stud/nut cleaning system, EDM machining technology, MI Cable systems, core exit T/C nozzle assemblies, technology for steam generators, genesis manipulator systems, ECT, UT penetrant inspections, steam generator repair and cleaning systems, technology for balance of plant, heat exchangers, piping and weld inspections, and turbogenerators.

  20. Development of advanced RFID application system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In late years there comes to be close request for traceability of the information such as production control, construction and maintenance record and work history of nuclear power plants. On the other hand, the Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology that can specify a product and personnel by an electric wave has raised the functionality and versatility as the base technology that can support ubiquitous information society around the mass production industry. In such a background, this article described the developed system, which applied the RFID to nuclear power plants in the areas of production control of the piping manufacture, the construction management and condition monitoring for maintenance works in order to improve their quality and reliability. (T. Tanaka)

  1. The ARIES-AT advanced tokamak, Advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant and to identifying physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving attractive and competitive fusion power in order to guide fusion R and D. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.3 m, a toroidal β of 9.2% (β N = 5.4) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current-drive power is 35 MW. The ARIES-AT design uses the same physics basis as ARIES-RS, a reversed-shear plasma. A distinct difference between ARIES-RS and ARIES-AT plasmas is the higher plasma elongation of ARIES-AT (κ x = 2.2) which is the result of a 'thinner' blanket leading to a large increase in plasma β to 9.2% (compared to 5% for ARIES-RS) with only a slightly higher β N. ARIES-AT blanket is a simple, low-pressure design consisting of SiC composite boxes with a SiC insert for flow distribution that does not carry any structural load. The breeding coolant (Pb-17Li) enters the fusion core from the bottom, and cools the first wall while traveling in the poloidal direction to the top of the blanket module. The coolant then returns through the blanket channel at a low speed and is superheated to ∼1100 deg. C. As most of the fusion power is deposited directly into the breeding coolant, this method leads to a high coolant outlet temperature while keeping the temperature of the SiC structure as well as interface between SiC structure and Pb-17Li to about 1000 deg. C. This blanket is well matched to an advanced Brayton power cycle, leading to an overall thermal efficiency of ∼59%. The very low afterheat in SiC composites results in exceptional safety and waste disposal characteristics. All of the fusion core components qualify for shallow land burial under U.S. regulations (furthermore, ∼90% of components qualify as Class-A waste, the lowest level). The ARIES

  2. South Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant. Advanced Computer Information System Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South Ukraine upgrade is the first of many that will take place in the former eastern bloc countries over the next several years. Westron is currently developing a similar system for the Zaporozhe nuclear power plant. In addition, there are eleven other WWER type units in operation in the Ukraine, as well as twenty seven others in operation throughout Eastern and Central Europe and Russia - all potential upgrade projects. (author)

  3. National project : advanced robot for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The national project 'Advanced Robot' has been promoted by the Agency of Industrial science and Technology, MITI for eight years since 1983. The robot for a nuclear plant is one of the projects, and is a prototype intelligent one that also has a three dimensional vision system to generate an environmental model, a quadrupedal walking mechanism to work on stairs and four fingered manipulators to disassemble a valve with a hand tool. Many basic technologies such as an actuator, a tactile sensor, autonomous control and so on progress to high level. The prototype robot succeeded functionally in official demonstration in 1990. More refining such as downsizing and higher intelligence is necessary to realize a commercial robot, while basic technologies are useful to improve conventional robots and systems. This paper presents application studies on the advanced robot technologies. (author)

  4. Siemens' steam turbine generator packages for advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the current economic crisis and the increasing share of renewable energy, the long term perspective predicts an increasing global demand for nuclear power generation applications. [1] In response to the growing demand for new nuclear power plants (NPPs), Siemens is implementing and further developing a modular platform of half speed steam turbines and generators covering the most relevant power range from 1000 - 1900 MWe. The paper presents details of the Siemens' Steam Turbine Generator Packages (turboset - Fig. 1) consisting of: Modular Steam Turbine Platform: SST-9000 series 4 pole turbo generator fleet SGEN5-4000W The design of the turbosets for NPPs is based on excellent operational experience with Siemens KONVOI saturated steam turbosets together with service and retrofit experience as well as on experience gained during the project execution of the world largest turboset in Olkiluoto 3. (orig.)

  5. Weldability and weld properties for advanced power plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerjak, H.; Letofsky, E. [Graz Univ. of Technology, Graz (Austria); Jochum, C. [Thyssen Schweisstechnik, Hamm (Germany); Nies, H. [Oerlikon Schweisstechnik, Eisenberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    This paper shows the contributions of the suppliers of consumables, foundries and research institutes to the European COST program 522 for the development of new Co modified 9-12% Cr-steels. The characterisation of welded joints in advanced high creep resistant steels is of decisive importance in the design of modern power stations. The key to solve these takes in the understanding of the metallurgical behaviour of the different microstructures appearing in the welded joint - base material, heat affected zone and weld deposit under creep exposure conditions. (orig.)

  6. Proceedings of 2009 international congress on advances in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This CD-ROM is the collection of the paper presented at the 2009 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP'09) . The 365 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  7. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment a draft NUREG, NUREG-2104, Revision 0, ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water...

  8. Application of Advanced Technology to Improve Plant Performance in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in computer technologies, signal processing, analytical modeling, and the advent of wireless sensors have provided the nuclear industry with ample means to automate and optimize maintenance activities and improve safety, efficiency, and availability, while reducing costs and radiation exposure to maintenance personnel. This paper provides a review of these developments and presents examples of their use in the nuclear power industry and the financial and safety benefits that they have produced. As the current generation of nuclear power plants have passed their mid-life, increased monitoring of their health is critical to their safe operation. This is especially true now that license renewal of nuclear power plants has accelerated, allowing some plants to operate up to 60 years or more. Furthermore, many utilities are maximizing their power output through uprating projects and retrofits. This puts additional demand and more stress on the plant equipment such as the instrumentation and control (I and C) systems and the reactor internal components making them more vulnerable to the effects of aging, degradation, and failure. In the meantime, the nuclear power industry is working to reduce generation costs by adopting condition-based maintenance strategies and automation of testing activities. These developments have stimulated great interest in on-line monitoring (OLM) technologies and new diagnostic and prognostic methods to anticipate, identify, and resolve equipment and process problems and ensure plant safety, efficiency, and immunity to accidents. The foundation for much of the required technologies has already been established through 40 years of research and development (R and D) efforts performed by numerous organizations, scientists, and engineers around the world including the author. This paper provides examples of these technologies and demonstrates how the gap between some of the more important R and D efforts and end users have been filled

  9. Ceramic membranes for gas separation in advanced fossil power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulenberg, W.A.; Baumann, S.; Ivanova, M.; Gestel, T. van; Bram, M.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF)

    2010-07-01

    The reduction or elimination of CO{sub 2} emissions from electricity generation power plants fuelled by coal or gas is a major target in the current socio-economic, environmental and political discussion to reduce green house gas emissions such as CO{sub 2}. This mission can be achieved by introducing gas separation techniques making use of membrane technology, which is, as a rule, associated with significantly lower efficiency losses compared with the conventional separation technologies. Depending on the kind of power plant process different membrane types (ceramic, polymer, metal) can be implemented. The possible technology routes are currently investigated to achieve the emission reduction. They rely on different separation tasks. The CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation is the main target in the post-combustion process. Air separation (O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) is the focus of the oxyfuel process. In the pre-combustion process an additional H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation is included. Although all separation concepts imply different process requirements they have in common a need in membranes with high permeability, selectivity and stability. In each case CO{sub 2} is obtained in a readily condensable form. CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation membranes like microporous membranes or polymer membranes are applicable in post-combustion stages. In processes with oxyfuel combustion, where the fuel is combusted with pure oxygen, oxygen transport membranes i.e. mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes with mainly perovskite or fluorite structure can be integrated. In the pre-combustion stages of the power plant process, H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation membranes like microporous membranes e.g. doped silica or mixed protonic electronic conductors or metal membranes can be applied. The paper gives an overview about the considered ceramic materials for the different gas separation membranes. The manufacturing of bulk materials as well as supported thin films of these membranes along

  10. The Westinghouse AP600 -- An update on the advanced simplified nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, government and industry are working together on advanced nuclear power plant designs that take advantage of valuable lessons learned from the experience to date and promise to reconcile the demands of economic expansion with the laws of environmental protection. In the U.S., the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a design certification program in 1989 to develop and commercialize advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for the next round of power plant construction. Advanced, simplified technology is one approach under development to end the industry's search for a simpler, more forgiving, and less costly reactor. As part of this program, Westinghouse is developing the AP600, a new standard 600 MWe advanced, simplified plant. The design strikes a balance between the use of proven technology and new approaches. The result is a greatly streamlined plant that can meet safety regulations and reliability requirements, be economically competitive, and promote broader public confidence in nuclear energy

  11. Advanced superconducting MHD magnet design for a retrofit power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnet system has been designed for an MHD topping cycle retrofit of a conventional power plant. The channel power output wil be --35 MWe. The 4.5 T peak on-axis field magnet will be constructed of an unusual NbTi superconductor wound into four subunits per dipole half. These will be three 450 saddle coils with circular or ellipsoidal end turns and a single planar coil with a modified racetrack shape that will serve principally as a field shaping coil. This planar coil also enables a substantial reduction in the ratio of peak to central field strength. Among the unique features of this design will be the use of flexible bands in tension as the primary element of the transverse force containment structure. The conductor will be of the cable-in-conduit type with a low copper-to-superconductor ratio cable and a thick-walled aluminum conduit sheath. The sheath will support the axial loads on the saddles and will also provide thermal mass for protection against overheating in the event of an energy dump. The analysis and design of this magnet system and its projected advantages in both performance and economics are discussed

  12. Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants feedback of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced I and C systems for nuclear power plants have to meet increasing demands for safety and availability. Additionally specific requirements arising from nuclear qualification have to be fulfilled. To meet both subjects adequately in the future, Siemens has developed advanced I and C technology consisting of the two complementary I and C systems TELEPERM XP and TELEPERM XS.(author)

  13. The EU power plant conceptual study - neutronic design analyses for near term and advanced reactor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A power plant conceptual study (PPCS) has been conducted in the framework of the European fusion programme with the main objective to demonstrate the safety and environmental advantages and the economic viability of fusion power. Power plant models with limited (''near term concepts'') and advanced plasma physics and technological extrapolations (''advanced concepts'') were considered. Two near term plant models were selected, one employing a water cooled lithium-lead (WCLL), and the other one a helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) blanket. Two variants were also considered for the advanced power plant models, one adopting a liquid metal blanket with a self-cooled lithium-lead breeder zone and a helium cooled steel structure (''dual coolant lithium lead'', DCLL), and the other one a self-cooled lithium-lead (SCLL) blanket with SiCf/SiC composite as structural material. This report provides a detailed documentation of the neutronics design analyses performed as part of the PPCS study for both the near term and advanced power plant models. Main issues are the assessment of the tritium breeding capability, the evaluation of the nuclear power generation and its spatial distribution, and the assessment and optimisation of the shielding performance. The analyses were based on three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNP code using suitable torus sector models developed for the different PPCS plant variants. (orig.)

  14. Advanced plant maintenance and surveillance system for the nuclear power plants of the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional approach to nuclear power plant maintenance and surveillance employs a preventive maintenance philosophy that can result in excessive labor being expended and in unnecessary and potentially damaging testing being performed. Plant downtime may also be increased and availability reduced because of the large number of critical tasks that need to be accomplished during a maintenance outage. In addition, modern control equipment is increasingly computerized and software-driven, and thus is not readily accessible or understandable to an operator using conventional surveillance techniques. The proposed advanced approach uses a diagnostic system based on the advanced and still emerging technologies of neural networks and fuzzy expert systems. This system monitors operating conditions of control equipment in real time and also monitors past performance based on maintenance records and equipment specifications entered into a computerized database. Plant system availability can be enhanced and maintenance costs can be reduced by automatically adjusting surveillance periods and maintenance schedules to actual trends in equipment performance. Equipment in multiple redundant instrument channels may need calibration and testing at different times to maintain a system in an optimal state of readiness. Moreover, redundant systems generally use the same type of equipment in the separate channels. Manufacturing defects, wear-out effects, or changes in environmental conditions may result in common-cause failures over a short period of time, thus degrading the protection capability of the safety systems. Normal surveillance may not uncover many of these incipient equipment failures, but a neural-fuzzy expert system that continuously oversees the complex relationships of operating parameters among system equipment can rapidly discern deviations from normal behavior and make maintenance recommendations, including replace-or-repair decisions

  15. Recent advances in application of intelligent decision suport software systes for inspection planning in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the BE5935 joint project of the Commission of the European Communities and European industry a new concept of advanced multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) has been developed and applied onto several selected practical problems (bridges, offshore structures, power plants). The example in the area of power plants concerns the planning of periodic inspections (overhauls). The paper describes the concept as applied and customized for power plant related practical applications, and presents the results obtained in 1994 and early 1995. The results confirm the high relevance of the concept for the practice. (author). 6 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Reference Operational Concepts for Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugo, Jacques Victor [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Farris, Ronald Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report represents the culmination of a four-year research project that was part of the Instrumentation and Control and Human Machine Interface subprogram of the DOE Advanced Reactor Technologies program.

  17. Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant

  18. Welding advances in power plant construction. Orbital TIG welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T. (Babcock and Wilcox Ltd., Renfrew (UK))

    1984-09-01

    The second in a series of articles outlining areas in which modern welding technology has been applied to the production of components for the power industry. The experience gained in the manufacture of AGR boilers led to work on the development of mechanised orbital TIG welding. Some of this development work, carried out for both fossil fired and nuclear powered stations, is detailed.

  19. Hiberarchy of requirement analysis of reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the security and the margin of safety of nuclear power plant, the research on requirement analysis of digital reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant was developed. Based on the known technology, a requirement analysis report was performed. A kind of three-levels pyramidal hierarchy was adopted in the requirement analysis, and the design characteristics of the requirement analysis were described in the analysis report. This hiberarchy can directly illuminate the design characters and logical achievement of the requirement analysis for advanced pressurized water reactor digital protection system. (authors)

  20. Advanced Control Structures of Turbo Generator System of Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł Sokólski; Karol Kulkowski; Anna Kobylarz; Kazimierz Duzinkiewicz; Tomasz A. Rutkowski; Michał Grochowski

    2015-01-01

    In the paper a synthesis of advanced control structures of turbine and synchronous generator for nuclear power plant working under changing operating conditions (supplied power level) is presented. It is based on the nonlinear models of the steam turbine and synchronous generator cooperating with the power system. The considered control structure consists of multi-regional fuzzy control systems with local linear controllers, including PID controllers, in particular control loops of turbine...

  1. Waste-to-energy advanced cycles and new design concepts for efficient power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Branchini, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of state-of-the-art technologies for energy conversion from waste, as well as a much-needed guide to new and advanced strategies to increase Waste-to-Energy (WTE) plant efficiency. Beginning with an overview of municipal solid waste production and disposal, basic concepts related to Waste-To-Energy conversion processes are described, highlighting the most relevant aspects impacting the thermodynamic efficiency of WTE power plants. The pervasive influences of main steam cycle parameters and plant configurations on WTE efficiency are detailed and quantified. Advanc

  2. Advanced Thermodynamic Analysis and Evaluation of a Supercritical Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    George Tsatsaronis; Yongping Yang; Tatiana Morosuk; Ligang Wang

    2012-01-01

    A conventional exergy analysis can highlight the main components having high thermodynamic inefficiencies, but cannot consider the interactions among components or the true potential for the improvement of each component. By splitting the exergy destruction into endogenous/exogenous and avoidable/unavoidable parts, the advanced exergy analysis is capable of providing additional information to conventional exergy analysis for improving the design and operation of energy conversion systems. Thi...

  3. External costs of silicon carbide fusion power plants compared to other advanced generation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechon, Y. E-mail: yolanda.lechon@ciemat.es; Cabal, H.; Saez, R.M.; Hallberg, B.; Aquilonius, K.; Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Ward, D.; Hamacher, T.; Korhonen, R

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed in the framework of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3), which is jointly conducted by Euratom and the fusion associations. Assessments of monetarized external impacts of the fusion fuel-cycle were previously performed (SERF1 and SERF2). Three different power plant designs were studied, with the main difference being the structural materials and cooling system used. In this third phase of the SERF project the external costs of three additional fusion power plant models using silicon carbide as structural material have been analysed. A comparison with other advanced generation technologies expected to be in use around 2050, when the first fusion power plant would be operative, has also been performed. These technologies include advanced fossil technologies, such as Natural Gas Combined Cycle, Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with carbon sequestration technologies; fuel cells and renewable technologies including geothermal energy, wind energy and photovoltaic systems with energy storage devices. Fusion power plants using silicon carbide as structural material have higher efficiencies than plants using steel and this fact has a very positive effect on the external costs per kW h. These external costs are in the lowest range of the external costs of advanced generation technologies indicating the outstanding environmental performance of fusion power.

  4. External costs of silicon carbide fusion power plants compared to other advanced generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed in the framework of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3), which is jointly conducted by Euratom and the fusion associations. Assessments of monetarized external impacts of the fusion fuel-cycle were previously performed (SERF1 and SERF2). Three different power plant designs were studied, with the main difference being the structural materials and cooling system used. In this third phase of the SERF project the external costs of three additional fusion power plant models using silicon carbide as structural material have been analysed. A comparison with other advanced generation technologies expected to be in use around 2050, when the first fusion power plant would be operative, has also been performed. These technologies include advanced fossil technologies, such as Natural Gas Combined Cycle, Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with carbon sequestration technologies; fuel cells and renewable technologies including geothermal energy, wind energy and photovoltaic systems with energy storage devices. Fusion power plants using silicon carbide as structural material have higher efficiencies than plants using steel and this fact has a very positive effect on the external costs per kW h. These external costs are in the lowest range of the external costs of advanced generation technologies indicating the outstanding environmental performance of fusion power

  5. Advanced control and instrumentation systems in nuclear power plants. Design, verification and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Committee Meeting on design, verification and validation of advanced control and instrumentation systems in nuclear power plants was held in Espoo, Finland on 20 - 23 June 1994. The meeting was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) International Working Group's (IWG) on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation (NPPCI) and on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (ATWR). VTT Automation together with Imatran Voima Oy and Teollisuuden Voima Oy responded about the practical arrangements of the meeting. In total 96 participants from 21 countries and the Agency took part in the meeting and 34 full papers and 8 posters were presented. Following topics were covered in the papers: (1) experience with advanced and digital systems, (2) safety and reliability analysis, (3) advanced digital systems under development and implementation, (4) verification and validation methods and practices, (5) future development trends. (orig.)

  6. Advanced surveillance of resistance temperature detectors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic response of several RTDs located at the cold leg of a PWR has been studied. A theoretical model for the heat transfer between the RTDs and the surrounding fluid is derived. It proposes a two real poles transfer function. By means of noise analysis techniques in the time domain (autoregressive models) and the Dynamic Data System methodology, the two time constants of the system can be found. A Monte Carlo simulation is performed in order to choose the proper sampling time to obtain both constants. The two poles are found and they permit an advance in situ surveillance of the sensor response time and the sensor dynamics performance. One of the poles is related to the inner dynamics whereas the other one is linked to the process and the inner dynamics. So surveillance on the process and on the inner dynamics can be distinguished. (author)

  7. Advancement of safeguards inspection technology for CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Park, W. S.; Cha, H. R.; Ham, Y. S.; Lee, Y. G.; Kim, K. P.; Hong, Y. D

    1999-04-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop both inspection technology and safeguards instruments, related to CANDU safeguards inspection, through international cooperation, so that those outcomes are to be applied in field inspections of national safeguards. Furthermore, those could contribute to the improvement of verification correctness of IAEA inspections. Considering the level of national inspection technology, it looked not possible to perform national inspections without the joint use of containment and surveillance equipment conjunction with the IAEA. In this connection, basic studies for the successful implementation of national inspections was performed, optimal structure of safeguards inspection was attained, and advancement of safeguards inspection technology was forwarded. The successful implementation of this project contributed to both the improvement of inspection technology on CANDU reactors and the implementation of national inspection to be performed according to the legal framework. In addition, it would be an opportunity to improve the ability of negotiating in equal shares in relation to the IAEA on the occasion of discussing or negotiating the safeguards issues concerned. Now that the national safeguards technology for CANDU reactors was developed, the safeguards criteria, procedure and instruments as to the other item facilities and fabrication facilities should be developed for the perfection of national inspections. It would be desirable that the recommendations proposed and concreted in this study, so as to both cope with the strengthened international safeguards and detect the undeclared nuclear activities, could be applied to national safeguards scheme. (author)

  8. Advancement of safeguards inspection technology for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this project are to develop both inspection technology and safeguards instruments, related to CANDU safeguards inspection, through international cooperation, so that those outcomes are to be applied in field inspections of national safeguards. Furthermore, those could contribute to the improvement of verification correctness of IAEA inspections. Considering the level of national inspection technology, it looked not possible to perform national inspections without the joint use of containment and surveillance equipment conjunction with the IAEA. In this connection, basic studies for the successful implementation of national inspections was performed, optimal structure of safeguards inspection was attained, and advancement of safeguards inspection technology was forwarded. The successful implementation of this project contributed to both the improvement of inspection technology on CANDU reactors and the implementation of national inspection to be performed according to the legal framework. In addition, it would be an opportunity to improve the ability of negotiating in equal shares in relation to the IAEA on the occasion of discussing or negotiating the safeguards issues concerned. Now that the national safeguards technology for CANDU reactors was developed, the safeguards criteria, procedure and instruments as to the other item facilities and fabrication facilities should be developed for the perfection of national inspections. It would be desirable that the recommendations proposed and concreted in this study, so as to both cope with the strengthened international safeguards and detect the undeclared nuclear activities, could be applied to national safeguards scheme. (author)

  9. Development of advanced I and C in nuclear power plants: ADIOS and ASICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper Automatic Startup Intelligent Control System (ASICS) that automatically controls the PWR plant from cold shutdown to 5% of reactor power and Alarm and Diagnosis-Integrated Operator Support System (ADIOS) that is integrated with alarms, process values, and diagnostic information to an expert system focused on alarm processing are described. Nuclear Power Plant is manually controlled from cold shutdown to 5% according to the general operation procedures for startup operation of nuclear power plant. Alarm information is the primary sources to detect abnormalities in nuclear power plants or other process plants. The conventional hardwired alarm systems, characterized by one sensor-one indicator may lead the control room operators to be confused with avalanching alarms during plant transients. ASICS and ADIOS are designed to reduce the operator burden. The advances in computer software and hardware technology and also in information processing provide a good opportunity to improve the control systems and the annunciator systems of nuclear power plants or other similar process plants. It is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the function of the computer- or software-based systems like ASICS and ADIOS. The performance and the function of ASICS and ADIOS are evaluated with the real-time functional test facility and the results have shown that the developed systems are efficient and useful for operation and operator support

  10. Development of advanced I and C in nuclear power plants: ADIOS and ASICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung-Taek E-mail: jtkim@nanum.kaeri.re.kr; Kwon, Kee-Choon; Hwang, In-Koo; Lee, Dong-Young; Park, Won-Man; Kim, Jung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Jeong

    2001-07-01

    In this paper Automatic Startup Intelligent Control System (ASICS) that automatically controls the PWR plant from cold shutdown to 5% of reactor power and Alarm and Diagnosis-Integrated Operator Support System (ADIOS) that is integrated with alarms, process values, and diagnostic information to an expert system focused on alarm processing are described. Nuclear Power Plant is manually controlled from cold shutdown to 5% according to the general operation procedures for startup operation of nuclear power plant. Alarm information is the primary sources to detect abnormalities in nuclear power plants or other process plants. The conventional hardwired alarm systems, characterized by one sensor-one indicator may lead the control room operators to be confused with avalanching alarms during plant transients. ASICS and ADIOS are designed to reduce the operator burden. The advances in computer software and hardware technology and also in information processing provide a good opportunity to improve the control systems and the annunciator systems of nuclear power plants or other similar process plants. It is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the function of the computer- or software-based systems like ASICS and ADIOS. The performance and the function of ASICS and ADIOS are evaluated with the real-time functional test facility and the results have shown that the developed systems are efficient and useful for operation and operator support.

  11. Proceedings of the 2006 international congress on advances in nuclear power plants - ICAPP'06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the highly successful ICAPP'05 meeting held in Seoul Korea, the 2006 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants brought together international experts of the nuclear industry involved in the operation, development, building, regulation and research related to Nuclear Power Plants. The program covers the full spectrum of Nuclear Power Plant issues from design, deployment and construction of plants to research and development of future designs and advanced systems. The program covers lessons learned from power, research and demonstration reactors from over 50 years of experience with operation and maintenance, structures, materials, technical specifications, human factors, system design and reliability. The program by technical track deals with: - 1. Water-Cooled Reactor Programs and Issues Evolutionary designs, innovative, passive, light and heavy water cooled reactors; issues related to meeting medium term utility needs; design and regulatory issues; business, political and economic challenges; infrastructure limitations and improved construction techniques including modularization. - 2. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Design and development issues, components and materials, safety, reliability, economics, demonstration plants and environmental issues, fuel design and reliability, power conversion technology, hydrogen production and other industrial uses; advanced thermal and fast reactors. - 3. Long Term Reactor Programs and Strategies Reactor technology with enhanced fuel cycle features for improved resource utilization, waste characteristics, and power conversion capabilities. Potential reactor designs with longer development times such as, super critical water reactors, liquid metal reactors, gaseous and liquid fuel reactors, Gen IV, INPRO, EUR and other programs. - 4. Operation, Performance and Reliability Management Training, O and M costs, life cycle management, risk based maintenance, operational experiences, performance and

  12. Advanced Grid-Friendly Controls Demonstration Project for Utility-Scale PV Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); O' Neill, Barbara [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-21

    A typical photovoltaic (PV) power plant consists of multiple power electronic inverters and can contribute to grid stability and reliability through sophisticated 'grid-friendly' controls. The availability and dissemination of actual test data showing the viability of advanced utility-scale PV controls among all industry stakeholders can leverage PV's value from being simply an energy resource to providing additional ancillary services that range from variability smoothing and frequency regulation to power quality. Strategically partnering with a selected utility and/or PV power plant operator is a key condition for a successful demonstration project. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Office selected the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to be a principal investigator in a two-year project with goals to (1) identify a potential partner(s), (2) develop a detailed scope of work and test plan for a field project to demonstrate the gird-friendly capabilities of utility-scale PV power plants, (3) facilitate conducting actual demonstration tests, and (4) disseminate test results among industry stakeholders via a joint NREL/DOE publication and participation in relevant technical conferences. The project implementation took place in FY 2014 and FY 2015. In FY14, NREL established collaborations with AES and First Solar Electric, LLC, to conduct demonstration testing on their utility-scale PV power plants in Puerto Rico and Texas, respectively, and developed test plans for each partner. Both Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas expressed interest in this project because of the importance of such advanced controls for the reliable operation of their power systems under high penetration levels of variable renewable generation. During FY15, testing was completed on both plants, and a large amount of test data was produced and analyzed that demonstrates the ability of

  13. Proceedings of the 2004 international congress on advances in nuclear power plants - ICAPP'04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2004 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP'04) provides a forum for the industry to exchange the latest ideas and research findings on nuclear plants from all perspectives. This conference builds on the success of last year's meeting held in Cordoba, Spain, and on the 2002 inaugural meeting held in Hollywood, Florida. Because of the hard work of many volunteers from around the world, ICAPP'04 has been successful in achieving its goal. More than 325 invited and contributed papers/presentations are part of this ICAPP. There are 5 invited plenary sessions and 70 technical sessions with contributed papers. The ICAPP'04 Proceedings contain almost 275 papers prepared by authors from 25 countries covering topics related to advances in nuclear power plant technology. The program by technical track deals with: 1 - Water-Cooled Reactor Programs and Issues (Status of All New Water-Cooled Reactor Programs; Advanced PWRs: Developmental Stage I; Advanced PWRs: Developmental Stage II; Advanced PWRs: Basic Design Stage; Advanced BWRs; Economics, Regulation, Licensing, and Construction; AP1000); 2 - High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (Pebble Bed Modular Reactors; Very High Temperature Reactors; HTR Fuels and Materials; Innovative HTRs and Fuel Cycles); 3 - Long Term Reactor Programs and Strategies (Supercritical Pressure Water Reactors; Lead-Alloy Fast Reactors; Sodium and Gas Fast Reactors; Status of Advanced Reactor Programs; Non-classical Reactor Concepts); 4 - Operation, Performance, and Reliability Management (Information Technology Effect on Plant Operation; Operation, Maintenance and Reliability; Improving Performance and Reducing O and M Costs; Plant Modernization and Retrofits); 5 - Plant Safety Assessment and Regulatory Issues (LOCA and non-LOCA Analysis Methodologies; LOCA and non-LOCA Plant Analyses; In-Vessel Retention; Containment Performance and Hydrogen Control; Advances in Severe Accident Analysis; Advances in Severe Accident

  14. Using the DSNP Modular Modeling System for the Safety Assessment of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced nuclear reactor concepts require even in their inception or preliminary conceptual design a safety assessment and a coupled neutronic-thermal hydraulic analysis. Often, such analyses cannot be performed with standard system analysis and simulation codes, because in most cases advanced reactor concepts, particularly in what is considered to be Gen-IV rectors, include unusual design features, which cannot be modeled with available simulation packages. The unusual features can be specially designed heat exchangers integrated in the core vessel wall, reactor vessel air cooling systems employing natural circulation phenomena, unusual fuel elements such as pebbles of different sizes and construction, fluidized bed fuel, exotic coolant such as led-bismuth eutectic for which special equations of state are needed, and accelerator driven systems with unique control features. The combination of new reactor components, fuels and coolants in advanced nuclear power plants require a specific modeling system such as the DSNP. (Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants)

  15. Advanced maintenance strategies for power plant operators--introducing inter-plant life cycle management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important goals of competing power plant operators is to ensure safe operation of their plants, characterized by maximum availability throughout the entire life cycle and minimized specific generating costs. One parameter crucial to the total price of electricity--and one that can be actively influenced by the power plant operators--is maintenance. Up to 30% of all electricity generating costs accrue from maintenance. In the past years maintenance measures have been optimized particularly by the application and continuing development of testing and diagnostic techniques, by the increased level of system and component automation as well as more efficient organization structures. Despite the considerable success of these efforts, the potential for further cost reductions is still far from exhausted. But the risks connected to reliability, availability and safety need to be analyzed in greater detail in order to ensure the sustainability of the savings already achieved as well as those yet to be realized. The systematic application of condition-based maintenance and the implementation of structured life cycle management are essential requirements. An inter-plant approach is recommended to make a quick implementation of maintenance optimization potentials possible. Plant-specific improvement potentials can be established with the help of a best-practice comparison, and measures and priorities can be defined for realizing them. Creating an inter-plant database will allow experience and findings to be analyzed quickly and efficiently by experts and made available to all participants on a neutral platform. Despite--or maybe owing to--the increasingly competitive marketplace, a sustained reduction in the maintenance costs of power plant operators can only be achieved through a structured, inter-plant exchange of experience. The ZES offers the industry a suitable platform for cooperation with its 'Condition-Based Maintenance' research focus. The introduction

  16. Improvement of environmental aspects of thermal power plant operation by advanced control concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulandrić Robert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, as formulated in the Kyoto Protocol, imposes the need for improving environmental aspects of existing thermal power plants operation. Improvements can be reached either by efficiency increment or by implementation of emission reduction measures. Investments in refurbishment of existing plant components or in plant upgrading by flue gas desulphurization, by primary and secondary measures of nitrogen oxides reduction, or by biomass co-firing, are usually accompanied by modernisation of thermal power plant instrumentation and control system including sensors, equipment diagnostics and advanced controls. Impact of advanced control solutions implementation depends on technical characteristics and status of existing instrumentation and control systems as well as on design characteristics and actual conditions of installed plant components. Evaluation of adequacy of implementation of advanced control concepts is especially important in Western Balkan region where thermal power plants portfolio is rather diversified in terms of size, type and commissioning year and where generally poor maintenance and lack of investments in power generation sector resulted in high greenhouse gases emissions and low efficiency of plants in operation. This paper is intended to present possibilities of implementation of advanced control concepts, and particularly those based on artificial intelligence, in selected thermal power plants in order to increase plant efficiency and to lower pollutants emissions and to comply with environmental quality standards prescribed in large combustion plant directive. [Acknowledgements. This paper has been created within WBalkICT - Supporting Common RTD actions in WBCs for developing Low Cost and Low Risk ICT based solutions for TPPs Energy Efficiency increasing, SEE-ERA.NET plus project in cooperation among partners from IPA SA - Romania, University of Zagreb - Croatia and Vinca

  17. Advanced exergoenvironmental analysis of a near-zero emission power plant with chemical looping combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulou, Fontina; Tsatsaronis, George; Morosuk, Tatiana

    2012-03-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) from power plants can be used to mitigate CO(2) emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. However, CCS technologies are energy intensive, decreasing the operating efficiency of a plant and increasing its costs. Recently developed advanced exergy-based analyses can uncover the potential for improvement of complex energy conversion systems, as well as qualify and quantify plant component interactions. In this paper, an advanced exergoenvironmental analysis is used for the first time as means to evaluate an oxy-fuel power plant with CO(2) capture. The environmental impacts of each component are split into avoidable/unavoidable and endogenous/exogenous parts. In an effort to minimize the environmental impact of the plant operation, we focus on the avoidable part of the impact (which is also split into endogenous and exogenous parts) and we seek ways to decrease it. The results of the advanced exergoenvironmental analysis show that the majority of the environmental impact related to the exergy destruction of individual components is unavoidable and endogenous. Thus, the improvement potential is rather limited, and the interactions of the components are of lower importance. The environmental impact of construction of the components is found to be significantly lower than that associated with their operation; therefore, our suggestions for improvement focus on measures concerning the reduction of exergy destruction and pollutant formation. PMID:22239071

  18. Development and utilization of the NRC policy statement on the regulation of advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 26, 1985, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued for public comment a ''Proposed Policy for Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (50 FR 11884). This report presents and discusses the Commission's final version of that policy as titled and published on July 8, 1986 ''Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants, Statement of Policy'' (51 FR 24643). It provides an overview of comments received from the public, of the significant changes from the proposed Policy Statement to the final Policy Statement, and of the Commission's response to six questions contained in the proposed Policy Statement. The report also discusses the definition for advanced reactors, the establishment of an Advanced Reactors Group, the staff review approach and information needs, and the utilization of the Policy Statement in relation to other NRC programs, including the policies for safety goals, severe accidents and standardization. In addition, guidance for advanced reactors with respect to operating experience, technology development, foreign information and data, and prototype testing is provided. Finally, a discussion on the use of less prescriptive and nonprescriptive design criteria for advanced reactors, which the Policy Statement encourages, is presented

  19. Advanced control systems to improve nuclear power plant reliability and efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TECDOC is the result of a series of an advisory and consultants meetings held by the IAEA in 1995-1996 in Vienna (March 1995), in Erlangen Germany (December 1995), in Garching, Germany (June 1996) and in Vienna (November 1996). It was prepared with the participation and contributions of experts from Austria, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, the Republic of Korea, Norway, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The publication not only describes advanced control systems for the improvement of nuclear power plant reliability and efficiency, but also provides a road map to guide interested readers to plan and execute an advanced instrumentation and control project. The subjects include: identification of needs and requirements, justification for safety and user acceptance, and the development of an engineering process. The report should be of interest to nuclear power plant staff, I and C system designers and integrators as well as regulators and researchers. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Advanced pulverized-coal power plants: A U.S. export opportunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) power generation systems and its potential for generating power worldwide. Based on the fuel availability, power requirements, and environmental regulations, countries have been identified that need to build advanced, clean, efficient, and economical power generation, systems. It is predicted that ''more electrical generation capacity will be built over the next 25 years than was built in the previous century''. For example, China and India alone, with less than 10% of today's demand, plan to build what would amount to a quarter of the world's new capacity. For the near- to mid-term, the LEBS program of Combustion 2000 has the promise to fill some of the needs of the international coal-fired power generation market. The high efficiency of LEBS, coupled with the use of advanced, proven technologies and low emissions, make it a strong candidate for export to those areas whose need for additional power is greatest. LEBS is a highly advanced version of conventional coal-based power plants that have been utilized throughout the world for decades. LEBS employs proven technologies and doesn't require gasification and/or an unconventional combustion environment (e.g., fluidized bed). LEBS is viewed by the utility industry as technically acceptable and commercially feasible

  1. Proceedings of the 2008 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants - ICAPP '08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ICAPP 2008 congress brought together international experts of the nuclear industry involved in the operation, development, building, regulation and research related to Nuclear Power Plants. The program covered the full spectrum of Nuclear Power Plant issues from design, deployment and construction of plants to research and development of future designs and advanced systems. It covered also lessons learned from power, research and demonstration reactors from over 50 years of experience with operation and maintenance, structures, materials, technical specifications, human factors, system design and reliability. The program comprised 13 technical tracks: 1. Water-Cooled Reactor Programs and Issues: Evolutionary designs, innovative, passive, light and heavy water cooled reactors; issues related to meeting near term utility needs; design issues; business, economical cost challenges; infrastructure limitations and improved construction techniques including modularization. 2. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors: Design and development issues, components and materials, safety, reliability, economics, demonstration plants and environmental issues, fuel design and reliability, power conversion technology, impact of non electricity applications on reactor design; advanced thermal and fast reactors. 3. LMFR and Longer Term Reactor Programs: Reactor technology with enhanced fuel cycle features for improved resource utilization, waste characteristics, and power conversion capabilities. Potential reactor designs with longer development times such as super critical water reactors and liquid fuel reactors, Gen IV, INPRO, EUR and other programs. 4. Operation, Performance and Reliability Management: Training, O and M costs, life cycle management, risk based maintenance, operational experiences, performance and reliability improvements, outage optimization, human factors, plant staffing, outage reduction features, major component reliability, repair and replacement, in

  2. Advanced modeling and simulation of integrated gasification combined cycle power plants with CO2-capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this thesis is to provide an extensive description of the correlations in some of the most crucial sub-processes for hard coal fired IGCC with carbon capture (CC-IGCC). For this purpose, process simulation models are developed for four industrial gasification processes, the CO-shift cycle, the acid gas removal unit, the sulfur recovery process, the gas turbine, the water-/steam cycle and the air separation unit (ASU). Process simulations clarify the influence of certain boundary conditions on plant operation, performance and economics. Based on that, a comparative benchmark of CC-IGCC concepts is conducted. Furthermore, the influence of integration between the gas turbine and the ASU is analyzed in detail. The generated findings are used to develop an advanced plant configuration with improved economics. Nevertheless, IGCC power plants with carbon capture are not found to be an economically efficient power generation technology at present day boundary conditions.

  3. Axial enrichment profile in advance nuclear energy power plant at supercritical-pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashakor, S. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School; Islamic Azad Univ., Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Zarifi, E. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School; Salehi, A.A. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Energy

    2015-12-15

    The High-Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is the European version of the advance nuclear energy power plant at Supercritical-pressure. A light water reactor at supercritical pressure, being currently under design, is the new generation of nuclear reactors. The aim of this study is to predict the HPLWR neutronic behavior of the axial enrichment profile with an average enrichment of 5 w/o U-235. Neutronic calculations are performed using WIMS and CITATION codes. Changes in neutronic parameter, such as Power Peaking Factor (PPF) are discussed in this paper.

  4. Computer visualization for enhanced operator performance for advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operators of nuclear power plants are presented with an often uncoordinated and arbitrary array of displays and controls. Information is presented in different formats and on physically dissimilar instruments. In an accident situation, an operator must be very alert to quickly diagnose and respond to the state of the plant as represented by the control room displays. Improvements in display technology and increased automation have helped reduce operator burden; however, too much automation may lead to operator apathy and decreased efficiency. A proposed approach to the human-system interface uses modern graphics technology and advances in computational power to provide a visualization or ''virtual reality'' framework for the operator. This virtual reality comprises a simulated perception of another existence, complete with three-dimensional structures, backgrounds, and objects. By placing the operator in an environment that presents an integrated, graphical, and dynamic view of the plant, his attention is directly engaged. Through computer simulation, the operator can view plant equipment, read local displays, and manipulate controls as if he were in the local area. This process not only keeps an operator involved in plant operation and testing procedures, but also reduces personnel exposure. In addition, operator stress is reduced because, with realistic views of plant areas and equipment, the status of the plant can be accurately grasped without interpreting a large number of displays. Since a single operator can quickly ''visit'' many different plant areas without physically moving from the control room, these techniques are useful in reducing labor requirements for surveillance and maintenance activities. This concept requires a plant dynamic model continuously updated via real-time process monitoring. This model interacts with a three-dimensional, solid-model architectural configuration of the physical plant

  5. Safety and economical requirements of conceptual fusion power reactors in co-existing advanced fission plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An EPR fission plant is expected to operate from 2010 to 2070. In this time range a new generation of advanced fission reactors and several stages of fusion reactors from ITER to DEMO will emerge. Their viability in the competitive socio-economic environment and also their possible synergy benefits are discussed in this paper. The studied cases involve the Finnish EPR, Generation IV, and the EFDA Power Plant Conceptual Study Models A-D. The main focus is on economic and safety assessments. Some cross-cutting issues of technologies are discussed. Concerning the economic potential of both conceptual fusion power plants and those of Generation IV candidates, we have used the present Finnish EPR as a reference. Comparisons using various pricing methods are made for fusion and Generation IV: mass flow analyses together with engineering, construction and financial margins form one method and another one is based on simple scaling relations between components or structures with common technology level. In all these studies fusion competitiveness has to be improved in terms of plant availability and internal power recirculation. At present the best fission plants have a plant availability close to 95% and an internal power recirculation of the order of 3-4%. The operation and maintenance solutions of Model C and D show the right way for fusion. A remarkable rise of the fuel costs of present LWRs would first make the Generation IV breeder options and thereafter the fusion plants more competitive. The costs of safety related components, such as the containment and the equipment for severe accident mitigation (e.g. the core catcher in a LWR), should be accounted for and the extent to which the inherent fusion safety features could compensate such expenses should be analysed. For an overall assessment of the various nuclear options both internal and external costs are considered. (author)

  6. Laguna Verde nuclear power plant: an experience to consider in advanced BWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna Verde is a BWR 5 containment Mark II. Designed by GE, two external re-circulation loops, each of them having two speed re-circulation pump and a flow control valve to define the drive flow and consequently the total core flow an power control by total core flow. Laguna Verde Design and operational experience has shown some insights to be considering in design for advanced BRW reactors in order to improve the potential of nuclear power plants. NSSS and Balance of plant design, codes used to perform nuclear core design, margins derived from engineering judgment, at the time Laguna Verde designed and constructed had conducted to have a plant with an operational license, generating with a very good performance and availability. Nevertheless, some design characteristics and operational experience have shown that potential improvements or areas of opportunity shall be focused in the advanced BWR design. Computer codes used to design the nuclear core have been evolved relatively fast. The computers are faster and powerful than those used during the design process, also instrumentation and control are becoming part of this amazing technical evolution in the industry. The Laguna Verde experience is the subject to share in this paper. (author)

  7. Deepwell water system control and monitoring in a nuclear power plant by telemetry and advanced instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potable water in the Philippine Nuclear Power Plant is supplied by a network of ten interconnected deepwell turbine pumps. These underground submersible pumps are installed very deep in the ground. The region is hilly and large. Adequate protection of the expensive pumps, a high degree of automation, reliability and flexibility were the overall goals of the control and instrumentation. The advanced instrumentation consisted of: digital control and digital monitoring; a telemetry system for transmission of all signals between the master station and the ten satellite stations; radiofrequency water level measurement in the wells. This paper describes the system in details. It also points out the characteristics of the system which may be considered as unique or uncommon in a Nuclear Power Plant

  8. Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the

  9. Global development of advanced nuclear power plants, and related IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renewed interest in the potential of nuclear energy to contribute to a sustainable worldwide energy mix is underlining the IAEA's statutory role in fostering the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, in particular the need for effective exchanges of information and collaborative research and technology development among Member States on advanced nuclear power technologies deployable in the near term as well as in the longer term. For applications in the medium to longer term, with rising expectations for the role of nuclear energy in the future, technological innovation has become a strong focus of nuclear power technology developments by many Member States. To meet Member States' needs, the IAEA conducts activities to foster information exchange and collaborative research and development in the area of advanced nuclear reactor technologies. These activities include coordination of collaborative research, organization of international information exchange, and analyses of globally available technical data and results, with a focus on reducing nuclear power plant capital costs and construction periods while further improving performance, safety and proliferation resistance. In other activities, evolutionary and innovative advances are catalyzed for all reactor lines such as advanced water cooled reactors, high temperature gas cooled reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors and accelerator driven systems, including small and medium sized reactors. In addition, there are activities related to other applications of nuclear energy such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications. This brochure summarizes the worldwide status and the activities related to advanced nuclear power technology development and related IAEA activities. It includes a list of the collaborative research and development projects conducted by the IAEA, as well as of the status reports and other publications produced

  10. Development of an advanced thermal hydraulics model for nuclear power plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the development of an advanced digital computer thermal hydraulics model for nuclear power plant simulation. A review of thermal hydraulics code design options is presented together with a review of existing engineering models. CAE has developed an unequal temperatures-unequal velocities five equation model based on the drift flux formalism. CAE has selected the model on the basis that phase separation and thermal non-equilibrium are required to simulate complex and important phenomena occurring in systems such as reactor cooling systems (RCS) and steam generators (SG). The drift flux approach to phase separation and countercurrent flow was selected because extensive testing and validation data supports full-range drift flux parameters correlations. The five equation model was also chosen because it conserves important quantities, i.e. mass and energy of each phase, and because of numerical advantages provided by the case of coupling phasic mass conservation equations with phasic energy conservation equations. The basis of CAE's model as well as supporting models for convection and conduction heat transfer, break flow, interphase mass and heat transfer are described. Comparison of code calculations with experimental measurements taken during a small break LOCA test with the OTIS facility are presented. The use of such advanced thermal hydraulics model as plant analyzer considerably improves simulation capabilities of severe transient as well as of normal operation of two phase systems in nuclear power plants. (orig./HP)

  11. Advances in processing technologies for titanium heat exchanger tubes of fossil and nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhareva, T.P.; Tchizhik, A.A.; Chavchanidze, N.N. [Polzanov Central Boiler and Turbine Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The advances in processing technologies for titanium heat exchangers with rolled and welded tubes of fossil and nuclear power plants in Russia are presented. The special methodology of investigations with constant small strain rate have been used to study the effects of mixed corrosion and creep processes in condensers cooled by sea or synthetic sea waters. The results of corrosion creep tests and K1scc calculations are given. The Russian science activities concerning condensers manufactured from titanium show the possibilities for designing structures with very high level service reliability in different corrosion aggressive mediums with high total salt, Cl-ion and oxygen contents. (orig.)

  12. Intelligent software system for the advanced control room of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intelligent software system for nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been conceptually designed in this study. Its design goals are to operate NPPs in an improved manner and to support operator's cognitive tasks. It consists of six major modules such as 'Information Processing,' 'Alarm Processing,' 'Procedure Tracking,' 'Performance Diagnosis', and 'Event Diagnosis' modules for operators and 'Malfunction Diagnosis' module for maintenance personnel. Most ot the modules have been developed for several years and the others are under development . After the completion of development, they will be combined into one system that would be main parts of advanced control rooms in NPPs

  13. Bumpless Transfer Between Advanced Controllers with Applications to Power Plant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Stoustrup, Jakob; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with bumpless transfer between a number of advanced controllers, e.g. in a gain-scheduling architecture. Linear observer-based controllers are designed for a number of linear approximations of the system model in a set of operating points, and gain scheduling control can subseque....... In this paper we propose a systematic approach to achieve bumpless transfer between different nominal controllers. The approach is tested on a simple, but highly nonlinear model of a coal-fired power plant....

  14. Advancements in Risk-Informed Performance-Based Asset Management for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, ABSG Consulting Inc. (ABS Consulting) and the South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company (STPNOC) have developed a decision support process and associated software for risk-informed, performance-based asset management (RIPBAM) of nuclear power plant facilities. RIPBAM applies probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) tools and techniques in the realm of plant physical and financial asset management. The RIPBAM process applies a tiered set of models and supporting performance measures (or metrics) that can ultimately be applied to support decisions affecting the allocation and management of plant resources (e.g., funding, staffing, scheduling, etc.). In general, the ultimate goal of the RIPBAM process is to continually support decision-making to maximize a facility's net present value (NPV) and long-term profitability for its owners. While the initial applications of RIPBAM have been for nuclear power stations, the methodology can easily be adapted to other types of power station or complex facility decision-making support. RIPBAM can also be designed to focus on performance metrics other than NPV and profitability (e.g., mission reliability, operational availability, probability of mission success per dollar invested, etc.). Recent advancements in the RIPBAM process focus on expanding the scope of previous RIPBAM applications to include not only operations, maintenance, and safety issues, but also broader risk perception components affecting plant owner (stockholder), operator, and regulator biases. Conceptually, RIPBAM is a comprehensive risk-informed cash flow model for decision support. It originated as a tool to help manage plant refueling outage scheduling, and was later expanded to include the full spectrum of operations and maintenance decision support. However, it differs from conventional business modeling tools in that it employs a systems engineering approach with broadly based probabilistic analysis of organizational 'value

  15. Development of a test bed for operator aid and advanced control concepts in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great amount of research and development is currently under way in the utilization of artificial intelligence (AI), expert system, and control theory advances in nuclear power plants as a basis for operator aids and automatic control systems. This activity requires access to the measured dynamic responses of the plant to malfunction, operator- or automatic-control-initiated actions. This can be achieved by either simulating plant behavior or by using an actual plant. The advantage of utilizing an actual plant versus a simulator is that the true behavior is assured of both the power generation system and instrumentation. Clearly, the disadvantages of using an actual plant are availability due to licensing, economic, and risk constraints and inability to address accident conditions. In this work the authors have decided to employ a functional one-ninth scale model of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The scaled PWR (SPWR) facility is a two-loop representation of a Westinghouse PWR utilizing freon as the working fluid and electric heater rods for the core. The heater rods are driven by a neutron kinetics model accounting for measured thermal core conditions. A control valve in the main steam line takes the place of the turbine generator. A range of normal operating and accident situations can be addressed. The SPWR comes close to offering all the advantages of both a simulator and an actual physical plant in regard to research and development on AI, expert system, and control theory applications. The SPWR is being employed in the development of an expert-system-based operator aid system. The current status of this project is described

  16. Assessment of modular construction for safety-related structures at advanced nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braverman, J.; Morante, R.; Hofmayer, C.

    1997-03-01

    Modular construction techniques have been successfully used in a number of industries, both domestically and internationally. Recently, the use of structural modules has been proposed for advanced nuclear power plants. The objective in utilizing modular construction is to reduce the construction schedule, reduce construction costs, and improve the quality of construction. This report documents the results of a program which evaluated the proposed use of modular construction for safety-related structures in advanced nuclear power plant designs. The program included review of current modular construction technology, development of licensing review criteria for modular construction, and initial validation of currently available analytical techniques applied to concrete-filled steel structural modules. The program was conducted in three phases. The objective of the first phase was to identify the technical issues and the need for further study in order to support NRC licensing review activities. The two key findings were the need for supplementary review criteria to augment the Standard Review Plan and the need for verified design/analysis methodology for unique types of modules, such as the concrete-filled steel module. In the second phase of this program, Modular Construction Review Criteria were developed to provide guidance for licensing reviews. In the third phase, an analysis effort was conducted to determine if currently available finite element analysis techniques can be used to predict the response of concrete-filled steel modules.

  17. Assessment of modular construction for safety-related structures at advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modular construction techniques have been successfully used in a number of industries, both domestically and internationally. Recently, the use of structural modules has been proposed for advanced nuclear power plants. The objective in utilizing modular construction is to reduce the construction schedule, reduce construction costs, and improve the quality of construction. This report documents the results of a program which evaluated the proposed use of modular construction for safety-related structures in advanced nuclear power plant designs. The program included review of current modular construction technology, development of licensing review criteria for modular construction, and initial validation of currently available analytical techniques applied to concrete-filled steel structural modules. The program was conducted in three phases. The objective of the first phase was to identify the technical issues and the need for further study in order to support NRC licensing review activities. The two key findings were the need for supplementary review criteria to augment the Standard Review Plan and the need for verified design/analysis methodology for unique types of modules, such as the concrete-filled steel module. In the second phase of this program, Modular Construction Review Criteria were developed to provide guidance for licensing reviews. In the third phase, an analysis effort was conducted to determine if currently available finite element analysis techniques can be used to predict the response of concrete-filled steel modules

  18. An advanced nuclear power plant for heavy oil exploitation in the Venezuelan Orinoco oil belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important characteristics of the Orinoco Oil Belt (OOB) and of its heavy oil content, together with the main requirements for its exploitation, are presented here for analyzing the possibilities of the application of advanced nuclear power as main energy source in the heavy oil exploitation in the OOB. A steamsupply advanced nuclear cogeneration plant based on high temperature reactors is suggested for both the extraction and upgrading of the crude oil. The model consists of a plant for a 100 km2 oil field producing 100.000 barrels per day of refinery ready synthetic oil during 25 years. Three 1200 MW(th) reactors, built successively, supply a great portion of the required process heat, injection steam and electricity. Steam conditions are: for the process heat, a maximum pressure of 10 MPa at a temperature of 500deg C, and, for the injection steam, pressures between 12 and 17 MPa at saturation temperatures. Clear advantages for an advanced nuclear option application in the OOB development are substantiated, and a feasibility study is recommended. (orig.)

  19. Efficiency improvement of nuclear power plant operation: the significant role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the increased liberalisation of the power markets, nuclear power generation is being exposed to high cost reduction pressure. In this paper we highlight the role of advanced nuclear fuel technologies to reduce the fuel cycle costs and therefore increase the efficiency of nuclear power plant operation. The key factor is a more efficient utilisation of the fuel and present developments at Siemens are consequently directed at (i) further increase of batch average burnup, (ii) improvement of fuel reliability, (iii) enlargement of fuel operation margins and (iv) improvement of methods for fuel design and core analysis. As a result, the nuclear fuel cycle costs for a typical LWR have been reduced during the past decades by about US$ 35 million per year. The estimated impact of further burnup increases on the fuel cycle costs is expected to be an additional saving of US$10 - 15 million per year. Due to the fact that the fuel will operate closer to design limits, a careful approach is required when introducing advanced fuel features in reload quantities. Trust and co-operation between the fuel vendors and the utilities is a prerequisite for the common success. (authors)

  20. The Physics Basis For An Advanced Physics And Advanced Technology Tokamak Power Plant Configuration, ARIES-ACT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Kessel, et al

    2014-03-05

    The advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n=3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, and requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reached βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle MHD stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling show that about 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while over 95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring about ~ 1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ICRF/FW and 40 MW of LHCD. EC was examined and is most effective for safety factor control over ρ ~ 0.2-0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~ 0.9x1020 /m3 and the temperature is ~ 4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the net power to LH threshold power is 2.8- 3.0 in the flattop.

  1. Advanced Condenser Boosts Geothermal Power Plant Output (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-01

    When power production at The Geysers geothermal power complex began to falter, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) stepped in, developing advanced condensing technology that dramatically boosted production efficiency - and making a major contribution to the effective use of geothermal power. NREL developed advanced direct-contact condenser (ADCC) technology to condense spent steam more effectively, improving power production efficiency in Unit 11 by 5%.

  2. Thermodynamic and economic analysis of a partially-underground tower-type boiler design for advanced double reheat power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increasing number of tower-type boilers have been selected for advanced double reheat power plants, due to the uniform flue gas profile and the smooth steam temperature increase. The tall height and long steam pipelines lengths will however, result in dramatic increases in the difficulty of construction, as well as increased power plant investment cost. Given these factors, a novel partially-underground tower-type boiler design has been proposed in this study, which has nearly half of the boiler embedded underground, thereby significantly reducing the boiler height and steam pipeline lengths. Thermodynamic and economic analyses were quantitatively conducted on a 1000 MW advanced double reheat steam cycle. Results showed that compared to the reference power plant, the power plant with the proposed tower-type boiler design could reduce the net heat rate by 18.3 kJ/kWh and could reduce the cost of electricity (COE) by $0.60/MWh. The study also investigated the effects of price fluctuations on the cost-effectiveness of the reference power plant, for both the conventional and the proposed tower-type boilers designs, and found that the double reheat power plant with the proposed tower-type boiler design would be even more competitive and price-effective when the coal price and the investment costs increase. The research of this paper may provide a promising tower-type boiler design for advanced double reheat power plants with lower construction complexity and better cost-effectiveness. - Highlights: • A partially-underground tower-type boiler in double reheat power plants is proposed. for double reheat power plants is proposed. • Thermodynamic and economic analyses are quantitatively conducted. • Better energetic efficiency and greater economic benefits are achieved. • The impacts of price fluctuations on the economic feasibility are discussed

  3. Progress of nuclear safety for symbiosis and sustainability advanced digital instrumentation, control and information systems for nuclear power plants

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces advanced methods of computational and information systems allowing readers to better understand the state-of-the-art design and implementation technology needed to maintain and enhance the safe operation of nuclear power plants. The subjects dealt with in the book are (i) Full digital instrumentation and control systems and human?machine interface technologies (ii) Risk? monitoring methods for large and? complex? plants (iii) Condition monitors for plant components (iv) Virtual and augmented reality for nuclear power plants and (v) Software reliability verification and val

  4. Intelligent software system for the advanced control room of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Kyun; Heo, Gyung Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Gon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The intelligent software system for nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been conceptually designed in this study. Its design goals are to operate NPPs in an improved manner and to support operators` cognitive takes. It consists of six major modules such as {sup I}nformation Processing,{sup {sup A}}larm Processing,{sup {sup P}}rocedure Tracking,{sup {sup P}}erformance Diagnosis,{sup a}nd {sup E}vent Diagnosis{sup m}odules for operators and {sup M}alfunction Diagnosis{sup m}odule for maintenance personnel. Most of the modules have been developed for several years and the others are under development. After the completion of development, they will be combined into one system that would be main parts of advanced control rooms in NPPs. 5 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  5. Technology and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the contributions presented at the 18th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in the field of technology and power plants are summarised with reference to the following distinct issues: ITER EDA Design, ITER Technology R and D, Progress Towards Advanced Performance and Steady State, Compact Cu Burning Plasma Experiments and Neutron Sources, Advanced Materials Research, Power Plant Design and Economic Forecasts, and Conclusions

  6. Looking back on safety management in construction of advanced thermal nuclear power plant 'Fugen'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety management of the advanced thermal nuclear power plant ''Fugen'' during the period from the preparation of plant construction in October, 1970, to the full power operation in March, 1979, is looked back and explained. Any large human and material accidents did not occur during the long construction time. The total numbers of persons and hours were 1.397 x 106 workers and 11.55 x 106 hours, respectively. The number of labor accidents was twenty with no dead person, the number of loss days was 645 days, the number of accident rate was 1.73, the intensity rate was 0.06, and the mean rate of labor accidents per year per 1000 workers was 6.4. The radiation exposure dose was 65.27 man-rem for the managed 1804 workers in total, during the testing and operating periods. These data show that the safety management for ''Fugen'' is very excellent, considering the following special features: 1) there were many works which were carried out for the first time, 2) the construction of the plant was conducted by five contractors taking partial charge, there were many kinds of construction works, the construction and testing periods were long, and the workers had to go to the site from Tsuruga city by car and bus. The organization of preventing disasters, the concrete implementation items for safety management, including the planning of activities, various meetings, patrol, education and training, the honoring system, the prevention of traffic accident and so on, and the results of actual safety management are explained with the reflection. (Nakai, Y.)

  7. Development of an advanced human-machine interface for next generation nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced human-machine interface (HMI) has been developed to enhance the safety and availability of a nuclear power plant (NPP) by improving operational reliability. The key elements of the proposed HMI are the large display panels which present synopsis of plant status and the compact, computer-based work stations for monitoring, control and protection functions. The work station consists of four consoles such as a dynamic alarm console (DAC), a system information console (SIC), a computerized operating-procedure console (COC), and a safety system information console (SSIC). The DAC provides clean alarm pictures, in which information overlapping is excluded and alarm impacts are discriminated, for quick situation awareness. The SIC supports a normal operation by offering all necessary system information and control functions over non-safety systems. In addition, it is closely linked to the other consoles in order to automatically display related system information according to situations of the DAC and the COC. The COC aids operators with proper operating procedures during normal plant startup and shutdown or after a plant trip, and it also reduces their physical/mental burden through soft automation. The SSIC continuously displays safety system status and enables operators to control safety systems. The proposed HMI has been evaluated using the checklists that are extracted from various human factors guidelines. From the evaluation results, it can be concluded that the HMI is so designed as to address the human factors issues reasonably. After sufficient validation, the concept and the design features of the proposed HMI will be reflected in the design of the main control room of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR)

  8. Investigation on the advanced control room design for next generation nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced human-machine interface (HMI) has been developed to enhance the safety and availability of a nuclear power plant (NPP) by improving operational reliability. The key elements of the proposed HMI are the large display panels which present synopsis of plant status and the compact, computer-based work stations for monitoring, control and protection functions. The work station consists of four consoles such as a dynamic alarm console (DAC), a system information console (SIC), a computerized operating-procedure console (COC), and a safety system information console (SSIC). The DAC provides clean alarm pictures, in which information overlapping is excluded and alarm impacts are discriminated, for quick situation awareness. The SIC supports a normal operation by offering all necessary system information and control functions over non-safety systems. In addition, it is closely linked to the other consoles in order to automatically display related system information according to situations of the DAC and the COC. The COC aids operators with proper operating procedures during normal plant startup and shutdown or after a plant trip, and it also reduces their physical/mental burden through soft automation. The SSIC continuously displays safety system status and enables operators to control safety systems. With regard to automation, the automating strategies of emergency operation are developed for achieving safe shutdown in pressurized water reactors. These strategies can make emergency operation optimal, and as well they considerably lengthen the operator response time. Decision-making and control are investigated in order to develop the automating strategies. In decision-making, diagnostic trees are established to automate the diagnostic tasks for selecting appropriate emergency operations, and the decision-making procedure is developed to automate some decisions which must be made on a plant- and event-specific basis. In control, cooldown is planned by

  9. Use of an advanced document system in post-refuelling updating of nuclear power plant documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the results of the extensive use of an advanced document system to update documentation prepared by traditional methods and affected by changes in the period between two plant refuellings. The implementation of a system for the capture, retrieval and storage of drawings using optical discs is part of a plan to modernize production and management tools and to thus achieve better control of document configuration. These processes are consequently optimized in that: 1. The deterioration of drawings is detained with the help of an identical, updated, legible, reliable support for all users. 2. The time required to update documentation is reduced. Given the large number of drawings, the implementation method should effectively combine costs and time. The document management tools ensure optical disc storage control so that from the moment a drawing resides in the system, any modification to it is made through the system utilities, thus ensuring quality and reducing schedules. The system described was used to update the electrical drawings of Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant. Changes made during the eighth refuelling of Unit I were incorporated and the time needed to issue the updated drawings was reduced by one month. (author)

  10. The advanced pulverized coal-fired power plant - status and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaer, S. [ELSAMPROJEKT A/S, Fredericia (Denmark). Boiler and Turbine Dept.

    1997-12-31

    Construction work on two seawater-cooled 400 MW pulverized coal-fired and gas-fired power plants with advanced design parameters for operation in 1997 and 1998 has been initiated by the Danish power utility ELSAM. Main steam pressure at the turbine inlet will be 285 bar (4130 psia) and main steam temperature will be 580{degree}C (1076{degree}F). Double reheat is expected to be 580{degree}C (1076{degree}F) and final feedwater temperature will be 300{degree}C (572{degree}F). Net efficiency will be 47% for coal and 49% for gas. Detailed information on the design of the sliding pressure-controlled once-through tower boilers designed by Danish Burmeister and Wain Energy (BWE) and the five casing turbo groups from MAN-Energie and GEC/Alsthom are presented. ELSAM`s investigations into further improvements of the conversion from coal to electricity up to an efficiency of approx. 50% are also presented. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  11. New advanced small and medium nuclear power reactors: possible nuclear power plants for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years interest has increased in small and medium sized nuclear power reactors for generating electricity and process heat. This interest has been driven by a desire to reduce capital costs, construction times and interest during construction, service remote sites and ease integration into small grids. The IAEA has recommended that the term 'small' be applied to reactors with a net electrical output less than 300 MWe and the term 'medium' to 300-700 MWe. A large amount of experience has been gained over 50 years in the design, construction and operation of small and medium nuclear power reactors. Historically, 100% of commercial reactors were in these categories in 1951-1960, reducing to 21% in 1991-2000. The technologies involved include pressurised water reactors, boiling water reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors and molten salt reactors. Details will be provided of two of the most promising new designs, the South African Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) of about 110 MWe, and the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor of about 335 MWe. Their construction costs are estimated to be about US$l,000/kWe with a generating cost for the PBMR of about US1.6c/kWh. These costs are lower than estimated for the latest designs of large reactors such as the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) designed for 1,600 MWe for use in Europe in the next decade. It is concluded that a small or medium nuclear power reactor system built in modules to follow an increasing demand could be attractive for generating low cost electricity in many Australian states and reduce problems arising from air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels

  12. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiolo, Pablo R. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Conway, Lawarence E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Oriani, Luca [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Lahoda, Edward J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; DeSilva, Greg [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Hu, Min H. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Hartz, Josh [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Bachrach, Uriel [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Smith, Larry [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Dudek, Daniel F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Toman, Gary J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Feng, Dandong [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kazimi, Mujid S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a standard 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (~600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output.

  13. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a ''standard'' 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (∼600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output

  14. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  15. Microstructural aspects on the creep behaviour of advanced power plant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerjak, H.; Hofer, P.; Schaffernak, B. [Technische Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde und Schweisstechnik

    2000-07-01

    There is a world-wide substantial demand to increase the application temperature and design stresses of advanced creep resistant ferritic-martensitic 9-12% Cr steels to increase the efficiency of thermal power plants. These alloys show during service conditions pronounced microstructural changes in the aged as well as in the stressed conditions. Therefore an intensive investigation and modelling of the microstructure of the cast steel material G-X12CrMoVWNbN10-1-1, was applied to understand the mechanisms. Hardness tests, optical microscopy, TEM methods and thermodynamic equilibrium phase diagram calculations were performed. By means of the EFTEM (energy filtering TEM) method a quantification of the precipitation sequence of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, MX, Laves phase and Z - phase could be established at 600 C as a function of exposure time. A new approach (''graz model'') was proposed for the improvement of the creep resistant alloys in terms of the {alpha}/{gamma} - transformation temperature and diffusion behaviour respectively, which influence the microstructural stability. Both were found as important influencing factors. (orig.)

  16. Microstructural aspects on the creep behaviour of advanced power plant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a world-wide substantial demand to increase the application temperature and design stresses of advanced creep resistant ferritic-martensitic 9-12% Cr steels to increase the efficiency of thermal power plants. These alloys show during service conditions pronounced microstructural changes in the aged as well as in the stressed conditions. Therefore an intensive investigation and modelling of the microstructure of the cast steel material G-X12CrMoVWNbN10-1-1, was applied to understand the mechanisms. Hardness tests, optical microscopy, TEM methods and thermodynamic equilibrium phase diagram calculations were performed. By means of the EFTEM (energy filtering TEM) method a quantification of the precipitation sequence of M23C6, MX, Laves phase and Z - phase could be established at 600 C as a function of exposure time. A new approach (''graz model'') was proposed for the improvement of the creep resistant alloys in terms of the α/γ - transformation temperature and diffusion behaviour respectively, which influence the microstructural stability. Both were found as important influencing factors. (orig.)

  17. Metallurgical considerations in the design of creep exposed, high temperature components for advanced power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic components in advanced power generating plants are subjected to temperatures at which the material properties are significantly time-dependent, so that the creep properties become dominant for the design. In this investigation, methods by which such components are to be designed are given, taking into account metallurgical principles. Experimental structure mechanics testing of component related specimens carried out for representative loading conditions has confirmed the proposed methods. The determination of time-dependent design values is based on a scatterband evaluation of long-term testing data obtained for a number of different heats of a given alloy. The application of computer-based databank systems is recommendable. The description of the technically important secondary creep rate based on physical metallurgy principles can be obtained using the exponential relationship originally formulated by Norton, εmin = k.σn. The deformation of tubes observed under internal pressure with a superimposed static or cyclic tensile stress and a torsion loading can be adequately described with the derived, three-dimensional creep equation (Norton). This is also true for the description of creep ratcheting and creep buckling phenomena. By superimposing a cyclic stress, the average creep rate is increased in one of the principal deformation axes. This is also true for the creep crack growth rate. The Norton equation can be used to derive this type of deformation behaviour. (orig.)

  18. Advanced techniques for rationalization of the construction of Montalto di Castro nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the steps taken at the Alto Lazio (Montalto di Castro) nuclear power plant construction site in order to rationalize construction methods and work control systems. They consist mainly of: (a) using models for studying construction sequences and for identifying in advance any modifications that may have to be made in the design; (b) using pre-assembling and prefabrication for civil structures and plant components; and (c) using computerized management and work control procedures. As regards the first of the above measures, models of the more complex civil engineering structures were developed. This made it possible to foresee interferences between reinforcing bars and embedments, thus avoiding delays during the construction phase. As regards the second type of measures, large scale prefabrication and/or pre-assembling was planned and carried out for the following elements: reinforcing bar assemblies of walls, floor slabs and particularly complex and heavy structures; metal structures such as the primary steel container, fuel pool and drywell liners, the dome of the shield building, as well as wholly prefabricated reinforced concrete elements and assemblies of mechanical components. Lastly, computerized systems were devised for rational management of quality and work progress control. It was thus possible to determine the work status in real time and hence to adopt any corrective action necessary. The results of these measures applied in Montalto were positive, in spite of initial difficulties deriving from the fact that prefabrication (and/or pre-assembling) was introduced when work was already under way, so that both the design and the site organization had to be adapted. In addition to reducing construction time, prefabrication also meant a great step forward as regards safety and quality, thanks to better working conditions and ease of control. (author). 4 figs, 1 tab

  19. Advance: research project on aging electrical wiring in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As Nuclear Power Plants get older it is more important to know the real condition of low voltage, instrumentation, power and control cables. Additionally, as new plants are being built, the election of cables and the use of in-situ monitoring techniques to get reliable aging indicators, can be very useful during the plant life. The goal of this Project is to adapt, optimize and asses Condition Monitoring techniques for Nuclear Power Plants cables. These techniques, together with the appropriate acceptance criteria, would allow specialists to know the state of the cable over its entire length and estimate its residual life. In the Project, accelerated ageing is used in cables installed in European NPPs in order to evaluate different techniques to detect local and global ageing. Results are compared with accepted tests to validate its use for the estimation of cables residual life. This paper describes the main stages of the Project and some results. (Author)

  20. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented

  1. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  2. Development of advanced digital control and monitoring system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the latest Operating Japanese PWR Plant, to enhance reliability, operability and maintainability, the state of the art computer technology and human factors engineering has been applied for Main Control Boards, and the digital technology has been applied for main control system of the latest operating Japanese PWR plant. For the next Japanese PWR plant (APWR; Advanced PWR), it is planed to apply digital technology for all the instrumentation and control (I and C) system including the safety grade system and also apply advanced Main Control Boards which utilize soft operation, to enhance the system capability. This paper describes the system concepts, configuration, features and enhanced maintainability of integrated digital I and C system. And also describes prototype system validation. (author)

  3. Power plants 2002. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main topics of the meeting: Power economy for the Eastern European countries and their economical growth during overtaking by utilities; climatic change by fossil-fuel power plants; deregulation and competition challenges; cogeneration from fossil fuels and renewable energy sources; research programs for advanced energy systems and problems of certification and regulations; power trade and influence on the operators; air pollution and kyoto protocol and climatic change between policy and engineering tasks. (GL)

  4. Advanced ecological and economical power plant technology based on CFB combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scenario of the power plant industry is worldwide affected by one important issue, namely the stringent and steadily increasing environment regulations. Fluidized bed boilers, based on Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) technology with in-situ emission control, and improved economics as well as with proven record of high efficiency and reliability meets the ecological, economical and technical requirements. It should be noted that in addition to their attractive performance, regarding efficiency and pollution control, coal fired CFB boilers have been successfully introduced not only in power plant industry, but also in other industrial units such as chemical plants, automobile industry, paper mills, cement, etc. The experience gained to date confirms the advantages and also the reliability of this technology. (author)

  5. CAE advanced reactor demonstrators for CANDU, PWR and BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAE, a private Canadian company specializing in full scope flight, industrial, and nuclear plant simulators, will provide a license to IAEA for a suite of nuclear power plant demonstrators. This suite will consist of CANDU, PWR and BWR demonstrators, and will operate on a 486 or higher level PC. The suite of demonstrators will be provided to IAEA at no cost to IAEA. The IAEA has agreed to make the CAE suite of nuclear power plant demonstrators available to all member states at no charge under a sub-license agreement, and to sponsor training courses that will provide basic training on the reactor types covered, and on the operation of the demonstrator suite, to all those who obtain the demonstrator suite. The suite of demonstrators will be available to the IAEA by March 1997. (author)

  6. Description of the tasks of control room operators in German nuclear power plants and support possibilities by advanced computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In course of the development of nuclear power plants the instrumentation and control systems and the information in the control room have been increasing substantially. With this background it is described which operator tasks might be supported by advanced computer aid systems with main emphasis to safety related information and diagnose facilities. Nevertheless, some of this systems under development may be helpful for normal operation modes too. As far as possible recommendations for the realization and test of such systems are made. (orig.)

  7. Experience and regulatory activities on advanced instrumentation and control systems applied to nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the status for applying microprocessor-based systems to nuclear power plants in Korea and the regulatory activities performed by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). And this presents the development of safety and regulatory technology for advanced I and C systems that has been carried out as a part of the next generation reactor development program in Korea. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  8. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  9. Performance and costs of advanced sustainable central power plants with CCS and H2 co-production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Thermo-economic analyses of co-producing electricity and H2 with CO2 capture. ► Gasification plants with solid oxide fuel cells and combined cycles are compared. ► 66 wt.% Utah coal, 17 wt.% corn stover and 17 wt.% cereal straw are gasified. ► H2 production cost is lowered by >50% with fuel cell based gasification plant. ► 70% more net electricity due to synergy between hydrogasification and fuel cells. -- Abstract: With increasing concerns over global climate change caused by GHG emissions, carbon capture and storage (CCS) has become imperative for coal based power plants. Meanwhile, with the development and deployment of hybrid vehicles, electric vehicles, and alternative fuel vehicles, GHG reduction efforts in the power industry can also benefit the transportation sector. Power plants with H2 co-production capability can contribute significantly in such development trends because H2 powered fuel cell hybrid vehicles are very promising for future “zero emissions vehicles”. This work investigates the thermodynamic performance and cost advantage of employing advanced technologies currently under development for central power plants that (1) employ coal and biomass as feed stock; (2) co-produce power and high purity H2; (3) capture most of the CO2 evolved within the plants. Two system designs are developed: the first “base” case is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system consisting of commercially ready technologies; the second “advanced” case is an integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) system. The feedstock employed consists of Utah bituminous coal along with two typical biomass resources, corn stover and cereal straw. The IGFC plant produces significantly higher amount of electricity for the same amounts of feedstock and H2 export while the cost of producing the H2 using a cost of electricity of $135/MW h is $1178/tonne for the IGFC case versus $2620/tonne for the IGCC case.

  10. Advanced technologies for conditioning low and medium activity wastes from nuclear power plants. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere is presented for the past 1000 years. A dramatic growth is experienced in the past decades. Many opinions state that, in spite of the hazards of growing CO2 concentration, the nuclear power is more dangerous, partly due to the long-term effects of radioactive wastes. The unit volume of low and medium activity waste has been decreasing continuously. The wastes from nuclear power plants are categorized and characterized. The trends of managing high-level radioactive wastes are discussed. (R.P.)

  11. Prospects for Martensitic 12 % Cr Steels for Advanced Steam Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, John

    2016-01-01

    and FB2 are now used in power plants up to 600–620 °C steam temperature. For higher steam temperatures up to 650 °C steels with 11–12 % Cr are needed for better resistance against steam oxidation. However, fine V and Nb based nitrides may transform to coarse Z-phase [Cr(V,Nb)N] nitrides in steels with...

  12. Testing of advance design types of instrument current transformers for Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current transformers designed and produced in IVEP Brno for the measurement of electric energy, for control and protection of the generator-transformer unit of the Temelin nuclear power plant are described. Presented are tests performed according to the standard test CSN 35 1360 and CSN 35 1361 as well as tests respecting a revision of these standards according to IEC 185. (author) 1 tab., 2 figs., 7 refs

  13. An Investigation for Arranging the Video Display Unit Information in a Main Control Room of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current digital instrumentation and control and main control room (MCR) technology has extended the capability of integrating information from numerous plant systems and transmitting needed information to operations personnel in a timely manner that could not be envisioned when previous generation plants were designed and built. A MCR operator can complete all necessary operating actions on the video display unit (VDU). It is extremely flexible and convenient for operators to select and to control the system display on the screen. However, a high degree of digitalization has some risks. For example, in nuclear power plants, failures in the instrumentation and control devices could stop the operation of the plant. Human factors engineering (HFE) approaches would be a manner to solve this problem. Under HFE considerations, there exists 'population stereotype' for operation. That is, the operator is used to operating a specific display on the specific VDU for operation. Under emergency conditions, there is possibility that the operator will response with this habit population stereotype, and not be aware that the current situation has already changed. Accordingly, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the MCR VDU configuration plan to meet the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. On the other hand, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the human factors verification and validation plan of the MCR VDU configuration to verify and validate the configuration of the MCR VDUs, and to ensure that the MCR VDU configuration allows the operator shift to meet the HFE consideration and the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. This paper is one of the HF V V plans of the MCR VDU configuration of the advanced nuclear power plant. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether the VDU configuration meets the human factors principles and the consistent

  14. An Investigation for Arranging the Video Display Unit Information in a Main Control Room of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chong Cheng; Yang, Chih Wei [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Current digital instrumentation and control and main control room (MCR) technology has extended the capability of integrating information from numerous plant systems and transmitting needed information to operations personnel in a timely manner that could not be envisioned when previous generation plants were designed and built. A MCR operator can complete all necessary operating actions on the video display unit (VDU). It is extremely flexible and convenient for operators to select and to control the system display on the screen. However, a high degree of digitalization has some risks. For example, in nuclear power plants, failures in the instrumentation and control devices could stop the operation of the plant. Human factors engineering (HFE) approaches would be a manner to solve this problem. Under HFE considerations, there exists 'population stereotype' for operation. That is, the operator is used to operating a specific display on the specific VDU for operation. Under emergency conditions, there is possibility that the operator will response with this habit population stereotype, and not be aware that the current situation has already changed. Accordingly, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the MCR VDU configuration plan to meet the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. On the other hand, the advanced nuclear power plant should establish the human factors verification and validation plan of the MCR VDU configuration to verify and validate the configuration of the MCR VDUs, and to ensure that the MCR VDU configuration allows the operator shift to meet the HFE consideration and the consistent teamwork goal under normal operation, transient and accident conditions. This paper is one of the HF V V plans of the MCR VDU configuration of the advanced nuclear power plant. The purpose of this study is to confirm whether the VDU configuration meets the human factors principles and the consistent

  15. Qualification issues associated with the use of advanced instrumentation and control systems hardware in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber-optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light water reactor. The template was then used to address reliability issues for microprocessor-based protection systems. Standards (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems were also identified. This approach addresses in part issues raised in Nuclear Regulatory Commission policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are open-quotes being developed without consensus standards, as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.close quotes

  16. Advanced Plant Habitat (APH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Reed, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) hardware will be a large growth volume plant habitat, capable of hosting multigenerational studies, in which environmental variables (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide level light intensity and spectral quality) can be tracked and controlled in support of whole plant physiological testing and Bio-regenerative Life Support System investigations.

  17. Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

    1993-06-01

    Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

  18. Advanced power systems featuring a closely coupled catalytic gasification carbonate fuel cell plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinfeld, G.; Wilson, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient uulization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, a study was conducted with DOE/METC support to evaluate the potential of integrated gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation systems. By closely coupling the fuel cell with the operation of a catalytic gasifier, the advantages of both the catalytic gasification and the high efficiency fuel cell complement each other, resulting in a power plant system with unsurpassed efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV). Low temperature catalytic gasification producing a high methane fuel gas offers the potential for high gas efficiencies by operating with minimal or no combustion. Heat required for gasification is provided by combination of recycle from the fuel cell and exothermic methanation and shift reactions. Air can be supplemented if required. In combination with internally reforming carbonate fuel cells, low temperature catalytic gasification can achieve very attractive system efficiencies while producing extremely low emissions compared to conventional plants utilizing coal. Three system configurations based on recoverable and disposable gasification catalysts were studied. Experimental tests were conducted to evaluate these gasification catalysts. The recoverable catalyst studied was potassium carbonate, and the disposable catalysts were calcium in the form of limestone and iron in the form of taconite. Reactivities of limestone and iron were lower than that of potassium, but were improved by using the catalyst in solution form. Promising results were obtained in the system evaluations as well as the experimental testing of the gasification catalysts. To realize the potential of these high efficiency power plant systems more effort is required to develop catalytic gasification systems and their integration with carbonate fuel cells.

  19. Transition core DNBR penalty determination for Angra-1 nuclear power plant mixed cores consisting of standard and advanced fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When two (or more) types of Fuel Assemblies (FA) are inserted in a nuclear reactor core, a flow redistribution occurs, due to the different hydraulic resistances of these assemblies. This way, the FA's with higher hydraulic resistance will get a Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) penalty since a part of the total flow will diverge to the FA's with lower hydraulic resistance. Regarding Angra-1 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), it is planned in a next cycle to insert a new Advanced FA that is a result from a joint-venture project of the companies INB - Industrias Nucleares do Brasil, WEC - Westinghouse Electric Company and KNF - Korean Nuclear Fuel. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to show the work done to determine the DNBR penalty to be applied to the Advanced FA's present in a mixed (or transition) core consisting of Advanced and Standard FA's. (author)

  20. Thermodynamic evaluation of a geothermal power plant for advanced exergy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of decreasing fossil fuel resources and their adverse impacts on the environment, interest in renewable energy resources, particularly geothermal energy, has been revived. Finding approaches that are more accurate and systematic to the energy system development is of great importance for the exploitation of geothermal energy. The aim of this study was to carry out both conventional and advanced exergy analyses of an existing geothermal binary power system. In this way, in-depth information was collected about the exergy destroyed in the system and its parts. Through advanced analysis, it became possible to investigate the interactions between the system components and the actual performance of the reasonable improvements. The results show that the order of the primary improved components is CON 1, TURB 1 and VAP 2 for the conventional analysis and CON 1, CON 2 and PRE-HE 1 for the advanced analysis. The results of the advanced analysis were found to be more qualified than the results of the conventional one. The improvements made to the system, increased the modified exergy efficiency to 18.26%, while the total system efficiency was found to be 9.60% in the real conditions. - Highlights: • Evaluating thermodynamic performance of a GPP using advanced exergy analysis for the first time. • Investigating the interactions between system components and their improvement potential. • The conventional exergy efficiency is 9.60% while the modified exergy efficiency is 18.26% through improving. • Total avoidable exergy destruction indicates that the heat exchangers and the turbine all merit priority for modifications

  1. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.)

  2. Impact of Advanced Alarm Systems and Information Displays on Human Reliability in the Digital Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Dang, Vinh N [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    This paper discusses the potential impacts of two advanced features of digital control rooms, alarm systems and information display systems, on the Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in nuclear power plants. Although the features of digital control rooms have already been implemented in new or upgraded nuclear power plants, HRAs have so far not taken much credit for these features. In this circumstance, this paper aims at examining the potential effects of these features on human performance and discussing how these effects can be addressed with existing HRA methods. A conclusion derivable from past experimental studies is that those features are supportive in the severe conditions such as complex scenarios and knowledge-based works. However, in the less complex scenarios and rule-based work, they may have no difference with or sometimes negative impacts on operator performance. The discussion about the impact on the HRA is provided on the basis on the THERP method.

  3. Impact of Advanced Alarm Systems and Information Displays on Human Reliability in the Digital Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the potential impacts of two advanced features of digital control rooms, alarm systems and information display systems, on the Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in nuclear power plants. Although the features of digital control rooms have already been implemented in new or upgraded nuclear power plants, HRAs have so far not taken much credit for these features. In this circumstance, this paper aims at examining the potential effects of these features on human performance and discussing how these effects can be addressed with existing HRA methods. A conclusion derivable from past experimental studies is that those features are supportive in the severe conditions such as complex scenarios and knowledge-based works. However, in the less complex scenarios and rule-based work, they may have no difference with or sometimes negative impacts on operator performance. The discussion about the impact on the HRA is provided on the basis on the THERP method

  4. Advanced techniques for storage and disposal of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricity generation using fossil fuel at comparatively low costs forces nuclear energy to explore all economic potentials. The cost advantage of direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel compared to reprocessing gives reason enough to follow that path more and more. The present paper describes components and facilities for long-term storage as well as packaging strategies, developed and implemented under the responsibility of the German utilities operating nuclear power plants. A proposal is made to complement or even to replace the POLLUX cask concept by a system using BSK 3 fuel rod containers together with LB 21 storage casks. (author)

  5. Advances in inspection and maintenance of nuclear power plants of Electricite de France (EDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a survey of activities and results in the field of maintenance over the past 15 years. The measures initiated since the year 1990 have achieved until present an overall availablity of approx. 82%, and there is good reason to expect that availability will have been stabilised at 85% towards the end of the century. Application of the ALARA principle has brought down the collective dose from 2.3 to 1.7 manSv per power plant unit and year, and is expected to be cut down to 1.2 manSv over the next few years. (orig./HP)

  6. Advanced digital instrumentation and control system for nuclear power plant protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Diverse Protection System (DPS) is described. The DPS is a state-of-the-art digital protection system developed as a back-up to the primary reactor protection system at the Temelin nuclear power plant, featuring a compact hardware design based on VMEbus technology. This technology allows for ease in adding or modifying the number and type of input modules and processors. The DPS software is written in a high level language suitable for safety critical applications. The software is both modular and configurable allowing for potential future modifications and software reuse

  7. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control design of an advanced micro-hydro power plant for distributed generation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, J.L. [Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste 1109, J5400ARL San Juan (Argentina); Molina, M.G. [CONICET, Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste 1109, J5400ARL San Juan (Argentina); Pacas, J.M. [Institut fuer Leistungselektronik und Elektrische Antriebe, Universitaet Siegen, Fachbereich 12 Hoelderlinstr 3, D 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    A small-scale hydropower station is usually a run-of-river plant that uses a fixed speed drive with mechanical regulation of the turbine water flow rate for controlling the active power generation. This design enables to reach high efficiency over a wide range of water flows but using a complex operating mechanism, which is in consequence expensive and tend to be more affordable for large systems. This paper proposes an advanced structure of a micro-hydro power plant (MHPP) based on a smaller, lighter, more robust and more efficient higher-speed turbine. The suggested design is much simpler and eliminates all mechanical adjustments through a novel electronic power conditioning system for connection to the electric grid. In this way, it allows obtaining higher reliability and lower cost of the power plant. A full detailed model of the MHPP is derived and a new three-level control scheme is designed. The dynamic performance of the proposed MHPP is validated through digital simulations and employing a small-scale experimental set-up. (author)

  8. Nickel-base alloy forgings for advanced high temperature power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donth, B.; Diwo, A.; Blaes, N.; Bokelmann, D. [Saarschmiede GmbH Freiformschmiede, Voelklingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The strong efforts to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions lead to the demand for improved thermal efficiency of coal fired power plants. An increased thermal efficiency can be realised by higher steam temperatures and pressures in the boiler and the turbine. The European development aims for steam temperatures of 700 C which requires the development and use of new materials and also associated process technology for large components. Temperatures of 700 C and above are too high for the application of ferritic steels and therefore only Nickel-Base Alloys can fulfill the required material properties. In particular the Nickel-Base Alloy A617 is the most candidate alloy on which was focused the investigation and development in several German and European programs during the last 10 years. The goal is to verify and improve the attainable material properties and ultrasonic detectability of large Alloy 617 forgings for turbine rotors and boiler parts. For many years Saarschmiede has been manufacturing nickel and cobalt alloys and is participating the research programs by developing the manufacturing routes for large turbine rotor forgings up to a maximum diameter of 1000 mm as well as for forged tubes and valve parts for the boiler side. The experiences in manufacturing and testing of very large forgings made from nickel base alloys for 700 C steam power plants are reported. (orig.)

  9. Hitachi advanced operating nuclear power plant total preventive maintenance management and service system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent rate of operation of Japanese nuclear power stations attained the result exceeding 70 %, but in order to improve it further and maintain the high reliability, the preventive maintenance program of more elaborate and systematic must be planned and executed. However, in order to establish the plan for maintaining efficiently and with high accuracy the enormous machinery and equipment exceeding 60000 in a nuclear power station, the high advance by mechanization is indispensable. Therefore, Hitachi Ltd. has developed the total preventive maintenance system, and it has partially begun operation. This system has the function of the life diagnosis of machinery and equipment, in addition, it constructs the data base with the specifications of machinery and equipment, the history of checkup, the information on reliability in Japan and foreign countries and so on, and based on these information, the recommendation of checkup, the proposal of improving facilities and other items are to be summarized and offered to electric power companies. The preventive maintenance activities in Hitachi Ltd., the concept and the outline of the total preventive maintenance system are reported. (K.I.)

  10. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapter 1, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  11. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapters 2--13, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  12. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With recent theoretical and empirical research in basic and applied psychology, human factors, and engineering, it is now sufficient to define an integrated approach to the deign of advanced displays for present and future nuclear power plants. Traditionally, the conventional displays have shown operators the individual variables on gauges, meters, strip charts, etc. This design approach requires the operators to mentally integrate the separately displayed variables and determine the implications for the plant state. This traditional approach has been known as the single-sensor-single-indicator display design and it places an intolerable amount of mental workload on operators during transients and abnormal conditions. This report discusses a new alternative approach which is the use of direct perception interfaces. Direct perception a interfaces display the underlying physical and system constraints of the situation in a directly perceptual way, such that the viewer need not reason about what is seen to identify system states, but can identify the state of the system perceptually. It is expected that displays which show the dynamics of fundamental physical laws should better support operator decisions and diagnoses of plant states. The purpose of this research project is to develop a suite of direct perception displays for PWR nuclear power plant operations

  13. Materials for advanced power engineering 2010. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 9th Liege Conference on ''Materials for Advanced Power Engineering'' presents the results of the materials related COST Actions 536 ''Alloy Development for Critical Components of Environmentally Friendly Power Plants'' and 538 ''High Temperature Plant Lifetime Extension''. In addition, the broad field of current materials research perspectives for high efficiency, low- and zero- emission power plants and new energy technologies for the next decades are reported. The Conference proceedings are structured as follows: 1. Materials for advanced steam power plants; 2. Gas turbine materials; 3. Materials for nuclear fission and fusion; 4. Solid oxide fuel cells; 5. Corrosion, thermomechanical fatigue and modelling; 6. Zero emission power plants.

  14. Regulatory perspective on digital instrumentation and control systems for future advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the question of using digital technology in instrumentation and control systems for modern nuclear power reactors. The general opinion in the industry and among NRC staff is that such technology provides the opportunity for enhanced safety and reliable reactor operations. The major concern is the safe application of this technology so as to avoid common mode or common cause failures in systems. There are great differences between digital and analog system components. SECY-91-292 identifies some general regulatory concerns with regard to digital systems. There is clearly a lack of adequate regulatory direction on the application of digital equipment at this time, but the issue is being addressed by the industry, outside experts, and NRC staff. NRC staff presents a position on the issue of defense-in-depth and diversity with regard to insuring plant safety. Independent manual controls and readouts must be available to allow safe shutdown and monitoring of the plant in the event of safety system failures

  15. Consideration of a design optimization method for advanced nuclear power plant thermal-hydraulic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet the global energy demand and also mitigate climate change, we anticipate a significant resurgence of nuclear power in the next 50 years. Globally, Generation III plants (ABWR) have been built; Gen' III+ plants (EPR, AP1000 others) are anticipated in the near term. The U.S. DOE and Japan are respectively pursuing the NGNP and MSFR. There is renewed interest in closing the fuel cycle and gradually introducing the fast reactor into the LWR-dominated global fleet. In order to meet Generation IV criteria, i.e. thermal efficiency, inherent safety, proliferation resistance and economic competitiveness, plant and energy conversion system engineering design have to increasingly meet strict design criteria with reduced margin for reliable safety and uncertainties. Here, we considered a design optimization approach using an anticipated NGNP thermal system component as a Case Study. A systematic, efficient methodology is needed to reduce time consuming trial-and-error and computationally-intensive analyses. We thus developed a design optimization method linking three elements; that is, benchmarked CFD used as a 'design tool', artificial neural networks (ANN) to accommodate non-linear system behavior and enhancement of the 'design space', and finally, response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize the design solution with targeted constraints. The paper presents the methodology including guiding principles, an integration of CFD into design theory and practice, consideration of system non-linearities (such as fluctuating operating conditions) and systematic enhancement of the design space via application of ANN, and a stochastic optimization approach (RSM) with targeted constraints. Results from a Case Study optimizing the printed circuit heat exchanger for the NGNP energy conversion system will be presented. (author)

  16. Advanced Surveillance, Diagnostic and Prognostic Techniques in Monitoring Structures, Systems and Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    during LTO. It should be pointed out here that LTO has different meanings in different countries. For example, in the United States of America, LTO refers to operation beyond the original 40 year licence period. That is, a nuclear plant in the USA can add 20 years to its licensed length of operation, extending the plant life to 60, 80, or more years in 20 year increments. In other countries such as Japan, LTO refers to operations beyond 30 years; while advanced gas cooled reactors (AGRs) in the United Kingdom may extend their licensed life by five years at a time beyond the original 30 years of licensed length. One may divide the SSCs of a nuclear plant into two general classes: those that are active components, such as pumps, motors, turbogenerators, valves, compressors, sensors and actuators, and those that are passive components, such as the reactor vessel, piping, reactor internals, containment structure, cables and the like. For active components (e.g. rotating machinery), there are plenty of SDP techniques, with the exception of prognostics, that are proven and routinely used. The advances in this area have occurred in the ability to see the degradation more quickly and more clearly through the use of high resolution data and improved data processing and visualization techniques. The same is not true for passive components. For passive components, periodic in-service inspections (ISIs) are implemented in accordance with ageing management plans, using non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques, such as eddy current testing and ultrasonic wave measurements. These measurements are defined in numerous codes and standards that have been available and used for years, not only in the nuclear industry but also in aerospace and other fields. While effective, the NDE techniques do not normally provide in situ, continuous on-line, or remote testing capabilities

  17. Toward the ultimate goal of tritium self-sufficiency: Technical issues and requirements imposed on ARIES advanced power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the lack of external tritium sources, all fusion power plants must demonstrate a closed tritium fuel cycle. The tritium breeding ratio (TBR) must exceed unity by a certain margin. The key question is: how large is this margin and how high should the calculated TBR be? The TBR requirement is design and breeder-dependent and evolves with time. At present, the ARIES requirement is 1.1 for the calculated overall TBR of LiPb systems. The Net TBR during plant operation could be around 1.01. The difference accounts for deficiencies in the design elements (nuclear data evaluation, neutronics code validation, and 3D modeling tools). Such a low Net TBR of 1.01 is potentially achievable in advanced designs employing advanced physics and technology. A dedicated R and D effort will reduce the difference between the calculated TBR and Net TBR. A generic breeding issue encountered in all fusion designs is whether any fusion design will over-breed or under-breed during plant operation. To achieve the required Net TBR with sufficient precision, an online control of tritium breeding is highly recommended for all fusion designs. This can easily be achieved for liquid breeders through online adjustment of Li enrichment.

  18. Introduction condition of a tokamak fusion power plant as an advanced technology in world energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study reveals the following two introduction conditions of a tokamak fusion power plant in a long term world energy scenario. The first condition is the electric breakeven condition, which is required for the fusion energy to be recognized as a suitable candidate of an alternative energy source in the long term world energy scenario. As for the plasma performance (normalized beta value βN, confinement improvement factor for H-mode HH, the ratio of plasma density to Greenwald density limit fnGW), the electric breakeven condition requires the simultaneous achievement of 1.2NGWtmax=16 T, thermal efficiency ηe=30%, and current drive power PNBIN∼1.8, HH∼1.0, and fnGW∼0.9, which correspond to the ITER reference operation parameters, have a strong potential to achieve the electric breakeven condition. The second condition is the economic breakeven condition, which is required to be selected as an alternative energy source. By using a long term world energy and environment model, the potential of the fusion energy in the long term world energy scenario is being investigated. Under the constraint of 550 ppm CO2 concentration in the atmosphere, a breakeven price for introduction of the fusion energy in the year 2050 is estimated from 65mill/kWh to 135mill/kWh, which is considered as the economic breakeven condition in the present study. Under the conditions of Btmax=16T, ηe=40%, plant availability 60%, and a radial build with/without CS coil, the economic breakeven condition requires βN∼2.5 for 135mill/kWh of higher breakeven price case and βN∼6.0 for 65mill/kWh of lower breakeven price case. Finally, the demonstration of steady state operation with βN∼3.0 in the ITER project leads to the prospect to achieve the upper region of breakeven price in the world energy scenario. (author)

  19. Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Christopher; Pavlish, John

    2013-09-30

    The University of North Dakota’s Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing a market-focused dry cooling technology that is intended to address the key shortcomings of conventional dry cooling technologies: high capital cost and degraded cooling performance during daytime temperature peaks. The unique aspect of desiccant dry cooling (DDC) is the use of a hygroscopic working fluid—a liquid desiccant—as a heat-transfer medium between a power plant’s steam condenser and the atmosphere. This configuration enables a number of beneficial features for large-scale heat dissipation to the atmosphere, without the consumptive use of cooling water. The overall goal of this project was to accurately define the performance and cost characteristics of DDC to determine if further development of the concept is warranted. A balanced approach of modeling grounded in applied experimentation was pursued to substantiate DDC-modeling efforts and outline the potential for this technology to cool full-scale power plants. The resulting analysis shows that DDC can be a lower-cost dry cooling alternative to an air-cooled condenser (ACC) and can even be competitive with conventional wet recirculating cooling under certain circumstances. This project has also highlighted the key technological steps that must be taken in order to transfer DDC into the marketplace. To address these issues and to offer an extended demonstration of DDC technology, a next-stage project should include the opportunity for outdoor ambient testing of a small DDC cooling cell. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Wyoming State Legislature under an award made through the Wyoming Clean Coal Technologies Research Program.

  20. Advanced Concepts: Aneutronic Fusion Power and Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Aneutronic Fusion for In-Space thrust, power. Clean energy & potential nuclear gains. Fusion plant concepts, potential to use advanced fuels. Methods to harness ionic momentum for high Isp thrust plus direct power conversion into electricity will be presented.

  1. Annual meeting on nuclear technology '96. Technical session: Advanced methods for operation, control and management of German nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The six papers of this session deal with experience, results and data obtained in nuclear power plant operation in Germany, and with the conclusions drawn relating to optimisation of maintenance work, insight drawn from reports on events and incidents in nuclear power plant, human factors engineering, or power plant life management. One paper discusses measures for safeguarding in the long run the functional integrity of the Mochovce-1 nuclear power station unit. (DG)

  2. Recent advances in creep-resistant steels for power plant applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P J Ennis; A Czyrska-Filemonowicz

    2003-06-01

    The higher steam temperatures and pressures required to achieve increase in thermal efficiency of fossil fuel-fired power-generation plants necessitate the use of steels with improved creep rupture strength. The 9% chromium steels developed during the last three decades are of great interest in such applications. In this report, the development of steels P91, P92 and E911 is described. It is shown that the martensitic transformation in these three steels produces high dislocation density that confers significant transient hardening. However, the dislocation density decreases during exposure at service temperatures due to recovery effects and for long-term creep strength the sub-grain structure produced under different conditions is most important. The changes in the microstructure mean that great care is needed in the extrapolation of experimental data to obtain design values. Only data from tests with rupture times above 3,000 h provide reasonable extrapolated values. It is further shown that for the 9% chromium steels, oxidation resistance in steam is not sufficiently high for their use as thin-walled components at temperatures of 600°C and above. The potential for the development of steels of higher chromium contents (above 11%) to give an improvement in steam oxidation resistance whilst maintaining creep resistance to the 9% chromium steels is discussed.

  3. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power...

  4. Advanced breaking technology on the Mochovce nuclear power plant building site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observing the given deadlines of the construction of the Mochovce nuclear power plant and the required volumes of breaking to the total value of 6.2 million m3 of rock, the required output was derived for the 7th five year plan to the value of 200,000 m3 per month, i.e., 10,000 m3 per day and 700 m3 per hour. The basic task is to build a flat building site with an area of 2,300 by 700 m2 which requires the removal of a masiff of rocks rising to a height of 37 m, and by compacting the mined rock to build heaps to a height of 20 m. The rocks were disintegrated by blasting. Surface blasting was used for mining faces and ribs. POLONIT 2 or PERMON DAP 1 were mainly used for blasting (ammonium nitrate explosives). The Danubit 1 detonator was used in holes flooded with water. For drilling a combination was used of drilling machines HBM 70 Hausherr with a drilling diameter of 130 to 155 mm and Ingersol Rand ECM 350 with a drilling diameter of 80 mm. The compressors used are Atlas Copco XRHS 350 Dd and PTS 900 Dd. As the optimal combination of machines for the removal of disengaged material for the daily output of 15,000 m3 the combination was used of 6 excavators with a shovel volume of 2.5 m3 ORENSTEIN-KOPPEL RH 25 with 12 Kockum 445 trucks and 18 ORENSTEIN-KOPPEL RH 40 excavators with a shovel volume of 4 m3 and a total of 64 Caterpillar 769 C, Belaz 548 A, Tatra T 200 and T 138 S1 trucks. The planned targets are being fulfilled and the work performed up to now on the Mochovce site equals 2.5 million m3 of excavated and removed rock. (B.S.)

  5. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  6. Wind power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiller, W.

    1980-01-01

    Wind power plants have practically faded into oblivion in Germany. These wind power plants are systems converting wind power into other usable energy forms, mainly into electric current. The irregularity of wind currents requires storage of the energy produced. The cost situation is calculated for a small wind power plant.

  7. Applying the crew reliability model for team error analysis in the modernized main control room of advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study implemented a crew reliability model (CRM) for analyzing human errors in a modernized main control room of advanced nuclear power plants. Instrumentation and controls systems in the main control room recently have changed most significantly with the digitalization of human-system interfaces. Ensuring the safe operation of nuclear power plants is an important driving force of these changes. Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is one of the most common methods to respond to these changes. PRA uses human reliability analysis (HRA) to assess human risk. In emergency situation, failure to detect a problem can have significant influences in process control and considerable effort has been invested in attempting to minimize this error through improved interface design, training, and the allocation of responsibilities within a control room team. This study provides a direction related to the crew errors. Furthermore, this study found that implementing the CRM fully considers the influences of team errors on the target system. The proposed model can be applied to specific systems in conjunction with a consideration of critical elements; they are design basis accidents, critical human actions, human error modes, and performance shaping factors. This model can be used to assist human error analysis in the main control room. Advanced technologies can reduce the occurrence of existed human errors from tradition human-system interfaces. However, the highly integrated room may hide some potential human errors that need to be further investigated. Furthermore, the use of a single example in this study is insufficient. Investigation of further examples in a future study would be useful for verification and validation of the proposed model. (author)

  8. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK-B135 This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies

  9. Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction Costs for Future Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiNunzio, Camillo A. [Framatome ANP DE& S, Marlborough, MA (United States); Gupta, Abhinav [Univ. of North Carolina, Raleigh, NC (United States); Golay, Michael [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Luk, Vincent [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turk, Rich [Westinghouse Electric Company Nuclear Systems, Windsor, CT (United States); Morrow, Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jin, Geum-Taek [Korea Power Engineering Company Inc., Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-30

    This report presents a summation of the third and final year of a three-year investigation into methods and technologies for substantially reducing the capital costs and total schedule for future nuclear plants. In addition, this is the final technical report for the three-year period of studies.

  10. Power Plant Cycling Costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

  11. Evaluation of operators' mental workload of human-system interface automation in the advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been expected that the automation of certain tasks in a control room would help decrease operators' mental workload, enhance situation awareness, and improve the whole system performance. However, there have been too many automation-induced system failures that would warrant a fresh look on the influences of automation. Automation problems include the reduction in the operator's system awareness, an increase in monitoring workload, and the degradation in manual skills. This study evaluates operators' mental workload and system performance during a human-system interface (HSI) automation in an advanced nuclear power plant (NPP). The reactor shutdown task and alarm reset task simulations were conducted in this study to evaluate operators' mental workload and performance. The results of this study indicated that for ensuring safe operating in NPPs, the design of automation needs to be carefully implemented. Task characteristics and degrees of automation should be carefully evaluated while designing HSIs. The reactor shutdown tasks studied in this paper suggest that a high level of automation design for the long period and low workload would be sufficient. On the other hand, the degree of automation of alarm reset task does not show a significant difference to the operator's mental workload. In conclusion, the human-system interface automation in advanced NPPs is suggested to be more flexible and needs to be continually improved.

  12. Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The indirect methanol cell fuel concept being actively pursued by the United States Department of Energy and General Motors Corporation is based on electrochemical engine (e.c.e.) an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electric power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen are under active development. This paper describes status of each of these components, and describe a model that predicts the steady state performance of the e.c.e

  13. Experience and improvements in advanced alarm annunciation systems in nuclear power plants. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the meeting is to provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion on R and D, in-plant experiences and improvements to annunciation systems. In planning the meeting, we have fully recognized that annunciation is an integral part of control centre design and plant operation. However, we have proposed to keep the meeting focussed on annunciation-related topics so as to maximize the benefits from the discussions. Among us this week, we have 62 participants from 9 countries presenting 22 papers. Further, these representatives are from utilities, design/engineering, research and development, and regulatory organizations. The meeting is organized into 7 session, focussing on a specific aspect or perspective on annunciation. Refs, figs, tabs

  14. Alarm Reduction Processing of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Using Data Mining and Active Database Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Advanced Alarm Processing (AAP) is to extract only the most important and the most relevant data out of large amount of available information. It should be noted that the integrity of the knowledge base is the most critical in developing a reliable AAP. This paper proposes a new approach to an AAP by using Event-Condition-Action(ECA) rules that can be automatically triggered by an active database. Also this paper proposed a knowledge acquisition method using data mining techniques to obtain the integrity of the alarm knowledge

  15. The development of advanced robotics for the nuclear industry -The development of robotic system for the nuclear power plants-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Robotics Department of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing a Dexterous Manipulation System (DMS) and a teleoperated mobile robot, identified as KAEROT/ml, for use in nuclear power plants. The DMS is being developed for performing tasks such as the opening and closing of nozzle dam inside water chamber of steam generator. The DMS has two major subsystems; a master-slave 6 degrees of freedom (dof) manipulator and a support device. The master-slave arms are designed dissimilar kinematically and dynamically, and their functions are performed by a bilateral force-reflecting force control. The slave is a hydraulically powered arm with a 3 dof end effector, and is mounted on the top of the support device for nozzle dam operation. The support device guides the slave arm into the water chamber and supports it during its operation. The DMS can be operated either in teleoperated or supervisory control modes. The KAEROT/ml is designed to be used in emergency response applications such as monitoring and mapping radiation areas, handling radioactive materials and performing decontamination tasks. The KAEROT/ml equipped with four-omnidirectional planetary wheels has a 6 dof joint-controlled arm and is capable of ascending and descending stairs and navigating flat surface with zero turning radius. This report describes the mechanical design, features, modeling and control system of both the DMS and the KAEROT/ml. 209 figs, 49 pix, 69 tabs, 62 refs. (Author)

  16. The development of advanced robotics for the nuclear industry -The development of robotic system for the nuclear power plants-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hoh; Kim, Chang Heui; Kim, Byung Soo; Hwang, Suk Yong; Kim, Kee Hoh; Lee, Jae Kyung; Lee, Yung Kwang; Suh, Yong Chil; Lee, Yong Bum; Kim, Woong Kee; Park, Soon Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Robotics Department of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing a Dexterous Manipulation System (DMS) and a teleoperated mobile robot, identified as KAEROT/ml, for use in nuclear power plants. The DMS is being developed for performing tasks such as the opening and closing of nozzle dam inside water chamber of steam generator. The DMS has two major subsystems; a master-slave 6 degrees of freedom (dof) manipulator and a support device. The master-slave arms are designed dissimilar kinematically and dynamically, and their functions are performed by a bilateral force-reflecting force control. The slave is a hydraulically powered arm with a 3 dof end effector, and is mounted on the top of the support device for nozzle dam operation. The support device guides the slave arm into the water chamber and supports it during its operation. The DMS can be operated either in teleoperated or supervisory control modes. The KAEROT/ml is designed to be used in emergency response applications such as monitoring and mapping radiation areas, handling radioactive materials and performing decontamination tasks. The KAEROT/ml equipped with four-omnidirectional planetary wheels has a 6 dof joint-controlled arm and is capable of ascending and descending stairs and navigating flat surface with zero turning radius. This report describes the mechanical design, features, modeling and control system of both the DMS and the KAEROT/ml. 209 figs, 49 pix, 69 tabs, 62 refs. (Author).

  17. Materials for Advanced Power Engineering 2014

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The 10th Liege Conference on Materials for Advanced Power Engineering presents theachievements of international materials related research for high eciency, low-emissionpower plants. Furthermore the new demands of the transition of electricity supply towardsmore and more regenerative power sources are reported.Resource preservation and maximization of economic success by improved plant e-ciency were the driving forces in past materials and power plant technology development.Fossil fuels will ...

  18. Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this brochure the Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina, (VED), subsidiary of the utility Slovenske Elektrarne, a.s. (Slovak Electric, plc. Bratislava) are presented. VED is mainly aimed at generating peak-load electrical energy and maintenance of operational equipment. Reaching its goals, company is first of all focused on reliability of production, economy and effectiveness, keeping principles of work safety and industry safety standards and also ecology. VED operates eight hydroelectric power plants, from which PVE Ruzin I and PVE Dobsina I are pump storage ones and they are controlled directly by the Slovak Energy Dispatch Centre located in Zilina thought the system LS 3200. Those power plants participate in secondary regulation of electrical network of Slovakia. They are used to compensate balance in reference to foreign electrical networks and they are put into operation independently from VED. Activity of the branch is focused mainly on support of fulfilment of such an important aim as electric network regulation. Beginnings of the subsidiary Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina are related to the year of 1948. After commissioning of the pump storage Hydroelectric Power Plants Dobsina in 1953, the plant started to carry out its mission. Since that time the subsidiary has been enlarged by other seven power plants, through which it is fulfilling its missions nowadays. The characteristics of these hydroelectric power plants (The pump-storage power plant Dobsina, Small hydroelectric power plant Dobsina II, Small hydroelectric power plant Rakovec, Small hydroelectric power plant Svedlar, Hydroelectric power plant Domasa, The pump-storage power plant Ruzin, and Small hydroelectric power plant Krompachy) are described in detail. Employees welfare and public relations are presented

  19. Advanced control systems to improve nuclear power plant reliability and efficiency. Working material. Report of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 13-17 March, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advisory Group Meeting as a consequence of the recommendations of the IAEA International Working Group on Nuclear Power Plant Control and Instrumentation to produce a practical guidance on the application of the advanced control systems available for nuclear power plant operation. The objective of the IAEA advisory group meeting were: To provide an international forum of exchange of ideas and views for the purpose of enhancement of nuclear power plant reliability and efficiency by adopting advanced control technologies; to develop a scope, table of content, and extended outlines for an IAEA technical document on the subject. The present volume contains summary report, materials prepared by the meeting, and reports presented by national delegates. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Quadruped locomotion system of prototype advanced robot for nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the robots for the works in nuclear power stations has been promoted. The demonstration machine developed comprises subsystems so that the design, manufacture, operation, maintenance and so on of the robots are simplified and made convenient, that is, the command for all actions, visual information processing subsystem, manipulation subsystem and movement subsystem. In this report, the elementary technology of movement and the movement subsystem are described. Quadruped walking, intelligent type motion control, and the target specification, movement subsystem and test of the demonstration machine are explained. (K.I.)

  1. Condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors and advances in their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration is being given to results of technical and economical investigations of advisability of increasing unit power by elevating steam generating capacity as a result of inserting numerous of stereotype sectional structural elements of the reactor with similar thermodynamic parameters. It is concluded that construction of power units of condensation nuclear power plants with water-cooled graphite-moderated channel type reactors of 2400-3200 MWe and higher unit power capacity represents the real method for sharp growth of efficiency and labour productivity in power industry. It can also provide the required increase of the rate of putting electrogenerating powers into operation

  2. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine

  3. Evaluation of an advanced fault detection system using Koeberg nuclear power plant data / H.L. Pelo.

    OpenAIRE

    Pelo, Herbert Leburu

    2013-01-01

    The control and protection system of early nuclear power plants (Generation II) have been designed and built on the then reliable analog system. Technology has evolved in recent times and digital system has replaced most analog technology in most industries. Due to safety precautions and robust licensing requirements in the nuclear industry, the analog and digital system works concurrent to each other in most control and protection systems of nuclear power plants. Due to the ageing, regular m...

  4. Small hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small hydroelectric power plants are power plants of 1 - 10 MW. For a supplier, this is an unnatural limit. A more natural limit involves compact engine design and simplified control system. The article discusses most of the engine and electrotechnical aspects in the development, construction and operation of such a plant

  5. Sensitivity analysis of exergy destruction in a real combined cycle power plant based on advanced exergy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The advanced exergy destruction components of a real CCPP are calculated. • The TIT and rc variation are investigated on exergy destruction parts of the cycle. • The TIT and rc growth increase the improvement potential in the most of components. • The TIT and rc growth decrease the unavoidable part in some components. - Abstract: The advanced exergy analysis extends engineering knowledge beyond the respective conventional methods by improving the design and operation of energy conversion systems. In advanced exergy analysis, the exergy destruction is splitting into endogenous/exogenous and avoidable/unavoidable parts. In this study, an advanced exergy analysis of a real combined cycle power plant (CCPP) with supplementary firing is done. The endogenous/exogenous irreversibilities of each component as well as their combination with avoidable/unavoidable irreversibilities are determined. A parametric study is presented discussing the sensitivity of various performance indicators to the turbine inlet temperature (TIT), and compressor pressure ratio (rc). It is observed that the thermal and exergy efficiencies increase when TIT and rc rise. Results show that combustion chamber (CC) concentrates most of the exergy destruction (more than 62%), dominantly in unavoidable endogenous form which is decreased by 11.89% and 13.12% while the avoidable endogenous exergy destruction increase and is multiplied by the factors of 1.3 and 8.6 with increasing TIT and rc, respectively. In addition, TIT growth strongly increases the endogenous avoidable exergy destruction in high pressure superheater (HP.SUP), CC and low pressure evaporator (LP.EVAP). It, also, increases the exogenous avoidable exergy destruction of HP.SUP and low pressure steam turbine (LP.ST) and leads to the high decrement in the endogenous exergy destruction of the preheater (PRE) by about 98.8%. Furthermore, rc growth extremely rises the endogenous avoidable exergy destruction of gas turbine

  6. Microstructural evolution in advanced boiler materials for ultra-supercritical coal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Quanyan

    The goal of improving the efficiency of pulverized coal powerplants has been pursued for decades. The need for greater efficiency and reduced environmental impact is pushing utilities to ultra supercritical conditions (USC), i.e. steam temperatures approaching 760°C under a stress of 35 MPa. The long-term creep strength and environmental resistance requirements imposed by these conditions are clearly beyond the capacity of the currently used ferritic steels and other conventional alloys. As part of a large DOE-funded consortium, new and existing materials based on advanced austenitic stainless steels and nickel base superalloys are being evaluated for these very demanding applications. In the present work, the nickel base superalloys of Inconel 617, CCA617, Haynes 230 and Inconel 740, and austenitic alloys Super 304H and HR6W, were evaluated on their microstructural properties over elevated temperature ageing and creep rupture conditions. The materials were aged for different lengths of time at temperatures relevant to USC applications, i.e., in the range from 700 to 800°C. The precipitation behaviors, namely of the gamma', carbides and eta phase in some conditions in nickel base superalloys, carbides in Haynes 230, Cu-rich precipitates in Super 304H and Laves phase particles in HR6W, were studied in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and related analytical techniques. Particular attention has been given on the structure, morphology and compositional distinctiveness of various phases (including gamma, gamma', carbides, secondary phase precipitates, and other types of particles) and their nature, dislocation structures and other types of defects. The results were presented and discussed in light of associated changes in microhardness in the cases of aged samples, and in close reference to mechanical testing (including tensile and creep rupture tests) wherever available. Several mechanical strengthening

  7. Fireside Corrosion Behavior of HVOF and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings in Advanced Coal/Biomass Co-Fired Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T.; Dudziak, T.; Simms, N. J.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a systematic evaluation of coatings for advanced fossil fuel plants and addresses fireside corrosion in coal/biomass-derived flue gases. A selection of four candidate coatings: alloy 625, NiCr, FeCrAl and NiCrAlY were deposited onto superheaters/reheaters alloy (T91) using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spraying. A series of laboratory-based fireside corrosion exposures were carried out on these coated samples in furnaces under controlled atmosphere for 1000 h at 650 °C. The tests were carried out using the "deposit-recoat" test method to simulate the environment that was anticipated from air-firing 20 wt.% cereal co-product mixed with a UK coal. The exposures were carried out using a deposit containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, and Fe2O3 to produce alkali-iron tri-sulfates, which had been identified as the principal cause of fireside corrosion on superheaters/reheaters in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The exposed samples were examined in an ESEM with EDX analysis to characterize the damage. Pre- and post-exposure dimensional metrologies were used to quantify the metal damage in terms of metal loss distributions. The thermally sprayed coatings suffered significant corrosion attack from a combination of aggressive combustion gases and deposit mixtures. In this study, all the four plasma-sprayed coatings studied performed better than the HVOF-sprayed coatings because of a lower level of porosity. NiCr was found to be the best performing coating material with a median metal loss of ~87 μm (HVOF sprayed) and ~13 μm (plasma sprayed). In general, the median metal damage for coatings had the following ranking (in the descending order: most to the least damage): NiCrAlY > alloy 625 > FeCrAl > NiCr.

  8. Optical Thin Films for Gas Sensing in Advanced Coal Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohodnicki, Paul; Brown, Thomas; Baltrus John; Chorpening, Benjamin

    2012-08-09

    Even for existing coal based plants, the opportunity for sensors and controls to improve efficiency is great. A wide range of gas species are of interest for relevant applications. Functional sensor layers for embedded sensing must be compatible with extreme conditions (temperature, pressure, corrosive). Au incorporated metal oxides have been looked at by a number of other authors previously for gas sensing, but have often focused on temperatures below 500{degree}C. Au nanoparticle incorporated metal oxide thin films have shown enhanced gas sensing response. In prior work, we have demonstrated that material systems such as Au nanoparticle incorporated TiO{sub 2} films exhibit a potentially useful optical response to changing gas atmospheres at temperatures up to ~800-850{degree}C. Current work is focused on sputter-deposited Au/TiO{sub 2} films. Au and Ti are multi-layered sputter deposited, followed by a 950{degree}C oxidation step. Increasing Au layer thickness yields larger particles. Interband electronic transitions significantly modify the optical constants of Au as compared to the damped free electron theory. A high temperature oxidation (20%O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) treatment was performed at 700{degree}C followed by a reduction (4%H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) treatment to illustrate the shift in both absorption and scattering with exposure to reducing gases. Shift of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak in changing gas atmospheres is well documented, but shift in the peak associated with diffuse scattering is a new observation. Increasing Au layer-thickness results in an increase in LSPR absorption and a shift to longer wavelengths. Diffuse scattering associated with the LSPR resonance of Au shows a similar trend with increasing Au thickness. To model the temperature dependence of LSPR, the modification to the plasmon frequency, the damping frequency, and the dielectric constant of the oxide matrix must be accounted for. Thermal expansion of Au causes

  9. Advanced handbook for accident analyses of German nuclear power plants; Weiterentwicklung eines Handbuches fuer Stoerfallanalysen deutscher Kernkraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerner, Alexander; Broecker, Annette; Hartung, Juergen; Mayer, Gerhard; Pallas Moner, Guim

    2014-09-15

    The advanced handbook of safety analyses (HSA) comprises a comprehensive electronic collection of knowledge for the compilation and conduction of safety analyses in the area of reactor, plant and containment behaviour as well as results of existing safety analyses (performed by GRS in the past) with characteristic specifications and further background information. In addition, know-how from the analysis software development and validation process is presented and relevant rules and regulations with regard to safety demonstration are provided. The HSA comprehensively covers the topic thermo-hydraulic safety analyses (except natural hazards, man-made hazards and malicious acts) for German pressurized and boiling water reactors for power and non-power operational states. In principle, the structure of the HSA-content represents the analytical approach utilized by safety analyses and applying the knowledge from safety analyses to technical support services. On the basis of a multilevel preparation of information to the topics ''compilation of safety analyses'', ''compilation of data bases'', ''assessment of safety analyses'', ''performed safety analyses'', ''rules and regulation'' and ''ATHLET-validation'' the HSA addresses users with different background, allowing them to enter the HSA at different levels. Moreover, the HSA serves as a reference book, which is designed future-oriented, freely configurable related to the content, completely integrated into the GRS internal portal and prepared to be used by a growing user group.

  10. Materials for advanced power engineering 2010. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Contrepois, Quentin; Beck, Tilmann; Kuhn, Bernd (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The 9th Liege Conference on ''Materials for Advanced Power Engineering'' presents the results of the materials related COST Actions 536 ''Alloy Development for Critical Components of Environmentally Friendly Power Plants'' and 538 ''High Temperature Plant Lifetime Extension''. In addition, the broad field of current materials research perspectives for high efficiency, low- and zero- emission power plants and new energy technologies for the next decades are reported. The Conference proceedings are structured as follows: 1. Materials for advanced steam power plants; 2. Gas turbine materials; 3. Materials for nuclear fission and fusion; 4. Solid oxide fuel cells; 5. Corrosion, thermomechanical fatigue and modelling; 6. Zero emission power plants.

  11. Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

  12. Evaluation of the applicability of existing nuclear power plant regulatory requirements in the U.S. to advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wheeler, Timothy A.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Middleton, Bobby D.; Jordan, Sabina Erteza; Duran, Felicia Angelica; Baum, Gregory A.

    2013-05-01

    The current wave of small modular reactor (SMR) designs all have the goal of reducing the cost of management and operations. By optimizing the system, the goal is to make these power plants safer, cheaper to operate and maintain, and more secure. In particular, the reduction in plant staffing can result in significant cost savings. The introduction of advanced reactor designs and increased use of advanced automation technologies in existing nuclear power plants will likely change the roles, responsibilities, composition, and size of the crews required to control plant operations. Similarly, certain security staffing requirements for traditional operational nuclear power plants may not be appropriate or necessary for SMRs due to the simpler, safer and more automated design characteristics of SMRs. As a first step in a process to identify where regulatory requirements may be met with reduced staffing and therefore lower cost, this report identifies the regulatory requirements and associated guidance utilized in the licensing of existing reactors. The potential applicability of these regulations to advanced SMR designs is identified taking into account the unique features of these types of reactors.

  13. Advanced maintenance strategies for power plant operators - introducing inter-plant life cycle management. ZES research focus 'condition-based maintenance in power engineering'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graeber, U.

    2003-07-01

    The optimisation of maintenance activities observed in recent years can be attributed above all to the use and continuing development of testing and diagnostic techniques, to the increased level of system and component automation and to more efficient work organisation. Despite the considerable success of these efforts, the potential for further cost reductions is still far from exhausted. The risks connected to reliability, availability and safety need to be analysed in greater detail in order to ensure the sustainability of the savings already achieved as well as those yet to be realised. The systematic application of condition-based maintenance and the introduction of structured life cycle management are essential prerequisites. Within the framework of its ''Condition-Based Maintenance in Power Engineering'' research focus, the Energy Research Centre (ZES) has set up a specialist network in which experts from various institutes belonging to the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and the Faculty of Informatic, Electrical Engineering and Information Technology can develop interdisciplinary solutions for advanced maintenance strategies. The ZES offers the industry a platform for cooperating on current issues relating to the supply of energy and supports the movement towards sustainable improvements to competitiveness through research and consulting activities. It applies professional project and quality management procedures to ensure that contracts covering interdisciplinary topics and projects are handled in a coherent manner. (orig.)

  14. Conceptual design of Advanced Central Receiver Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept: development plan and pilot plant description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-03-01

    This volume encompasses Task 6 of the Phase I effort on the Advanced Central Receiver. This task included developing a plan to bring the commercial plant conceptual design into being. The base version of the plan includes a pilot plant to be designed and constructed during Phases II and III, three subsystem research experiments to be performed during Phase II, and the design and construction of a commercial demonstration plant. These plans are discussed in detail, as well as several options which could reduce both cost and schedule to achieve the overall goal of a commercial-sized demonstration plant. In evaluating pilot plant characeristics, emphasis was placed on representing commercial plant receiver characteristics and total system operation. In considering total system operation, it was recognized that a water-steam pilot plant would already be in operation, hence certain systems will already have been tested. Several receiver configurations were investigated consisting of from one to five full-size panels, with the objective of representing peak north side power for a 100-MWe plant as well as the peak flux vaue of about 1.4 MW/m/sup 2/. This goal was accomplished with a 5-panel receiver; however, the power to the edge panels is very low. Hence, with little loss, these panels can be eliminated to give a 3-panel configuration. The total absorbed thermal power is about 38 MWt, which is sufficient for about 10 MWe. A plant of this size is described.

  15. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  16. Advance: research project on aging electrical wiring in nuclear power plants; Advance: proyecto de investigacion de envejecimiento en cableado electrico en centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, J. C.; Ruiz, S.

    2013-07-01

    As Nuclear Power Plants get older it is more important to know the real condition of low voltage, instrumentation, power and control cables. Additionally, as new plants are being built, the election of cables and the use of in-situ monitoring techniques to get reliable aging indicators, can be very useful during the plant life. The goal of this Project is to adapt, optimize and asses Condition Monitoring techniques for Nuclear Power Plants cables. These techniques, together with the appropriate acceptance criteria, would allow specialists to know the state of the cable over its entire length and estimate its residual life. In the Project, accelerated ageing is used in cables installed in European NPPs in order to evaluate different techniques to detect local and global ageing. Results are compared with accepted tests to validate its use for the estimation of cables residual life. This paper describes the main stages of the Project and some results. (Author)

  17. Support for cooperative control and maintenance operation in advanced nuclear power plant from generalized and intuitive viewpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To keep safety and effectiveness in control and maintenance operations of large and complex plants like nuclear power plants, cooperative operation among human and machine agents is proposed. The concept is that the cooperation augments human capability as an individual by closely related team members with adequate interfaces. This paper describes a basic concept of the cooperation, necessary interface functions, infrastructure of the cooperation and communication logging for accumulation and sharing of knowledge. (author)

  18. Solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar thermal power plant technology, the opportunities it presents and the developments in the market are outlined. The focus is on the technology of parabolic trough power plants, a proven technology for solar power generation on a large scale. In a parabolic trough power plant, trough-shaped mirrors concentrate the solar irradiation onto a pipe in the focal line of the collector. The thermal energy thus generated is used for electricity generation in a steam turbine. Parabolic trough plants can be combined with thermal storage and fossil or biomass fired heat exchangers to generate electricity even when the sun is not shining. Solar Millennium AG in Erlangen has developed the first power plant of this kind in Europe. After two years of construction the plant started operation in Southern Spain in 2008. This one and its sister projects are important steps leading the way for the whole market. The paper also covers the technological challenges, the key components used and the research and development activities concerning this technology. Solar thermal power plants are ideal for covering peak and medium loads in power grids. In hybrid operation they can also cover base-load. The Solar Chimney power plant, another striking technology for the conversion of solar into electric energy, is described briefly. The paper concludes with a look at the future - the import of solar energy from the deserts of North Africa to central Europe. (author)

  19. Power plant chemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    17 contributions covering topies of fossil fuel combustion, flue gas cleaning, power plant materials, corrosion, water/steam cycle chemistry, monitoring and control were presented at the annual meeting devoted to Power Plant Chemical Technology 1996 at Kolding (Denmark) 4-6 September 1996. (EG)

  20. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  1. Advanced digital I and C technology in nuclear power plants. A success story from Finland and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRAMATOME ANP together with Siemens PGL have just commissioned the I and C systems for the Chinese Nuclear Power Plant Tianwan Unit 1, design the I and C systems for the first European Pressurized Water Reactor Olkiluoto 3 in Finland and started one of the most extensive and ambitious modernization project in a nuclear power plant for Loviisa NPP in Finland. The presentation delivers an insight into the problematic of digital I and C systems integration and focuses on aspects regarding design criteria, Structure and test approaches. (author)

  2. The Kuroshio power plant

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Falin

    2013-01-01

    By outlining a new design or the Kuroshio power plant, new approaches to turbine design, anchorage system planning, deep sea marine engineering and power plant operations and maintenance are explored and suggested. The impact on the local environment, particularly in the face of natural disasters, is also considered to provide a well rounded introduction to plan and build a 30MW pilot power plant. Following a literature review, the six chapters of this book propose a conceptual design by focusing on the plant's core technologies and establish the separate analysis logics for turbine design and

  3. Nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, real time nuclear power plant simulator for student education is described. The simulator is composed of a hybrid computer and an operating console. Simulated power plant is a 36 MWt PWR plant, and the average temperature of the primary coolant within the reactor is controlled to be constant. Reactor Kinetics, fuel temperature, primary coolant temperature, temperature and pressure of steam within the steam generator, steam flow, control rod driving system, and feed water controlling system are simulated. The use of the hybrid computer made it possible to simulate a relatively large scale power plant with a comparatively small size computing system. (auth.)

  4. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  6. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  7. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  8. A Pilot Study Investigating the Effects of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant Control Room Technologies: Methods and Qualitative Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLanc, Katya Le [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Powers, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fitzgerald, Kirk [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Control room modernization is an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. None of the 99 currently operating commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. has completed a full-scale control room modernization to date. Nuclear power plant main control rooms for the existing commercial reactor fleet remain significantly analog, with only limited digital modernizations. Upgrades in the U.S. do not achieve the full potential of newer technologies that might otherwise enhance plant and operator performance. The goal of the control room upgrade benefits research is to identify previously overlooked benefits of modernization, identify candidate technologies that may facilitate such benefits, and demonstrate these technologies through human factors research. This report describes a pilot study to test upgrades to the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL.

  9. Advanced nuclear plants meet the economic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants operated in the baseload regime are economically competitive even when compared with plants burning fossil fuels. As they do not produce emissions when operated, they do not pollute the environment. This is clearly reflected also in the internalized costs. After 2000, many new power plants are expected to be constructed in the USA and worldwide. An important role in this phase will be played by advanced light water reactors of the ABWR and SBWR types representing the future state of the art in technology and safety as well as in cost and plant operations management. (orig.)

  10. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.)

  11. Offshore atomic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various merits of offshore atomic power plants are illustrated, and their systems are assessed. The planning of the offshore atomic power plants in USA is reviewed, and the construction costs of the offshore plant in Japan were estimated. Air pollution problem may be solved by the offshore atomic power plants remarkably. Deep water at low temperature may be advantageously used as cooling water for condensers. Marine resources may be bred by building artificial habitats and by providing spring-up equipments. In the case of floating plants, the plant design can be standardized so that the construction costs may be reduced. The offshore plants can be classified into three systems, namely artificial island system, floating system and sea bottom-based system. The island system may be realized with the present level of civil engineering, but requires the development of technology for the resistance of base against earthquake and its calculation means. The floating system may be constructed with conventional power plant engineering and shipbuilding engineering, but the aseismatic stability of breakwater may be a problem to be solved. Deep water floating system and deep water submerging system are conceivable, but its realization may be difficult. The sea bottom-based system with large caissons can be realized by the present civil engineering, but the construction of the caissons, stability against earthquake and resistance to waves may be problems to be solved. The technical prediction and assessment of new plant sites for nuclear power plants have been reported by Science and Technology Agency in 1974. The construction costs of an offshore plant has been estimated by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry to be yen71,026/kW as of 1985. (Iwakiri, K.)

  12. Power plants 2010. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings include the following lectures: Facing the challenges - new structures for electricity production. Renewable energies in Europe - chances and challenges. Nuclear outlook in the UK. Sustainable energy for Europe. Requirements of the market and the grid operator at the electricity production companies. Perspectives for the future energy production. Pumped storage plants - status and perspectives. Nuclear power/renewable energies -partners or opponents? New fossil fired power stations in Europe - status and perspectives. Nuclear energy: outlook for new build and lifetime extension in Europe. Biomass in the future European energy market - experiences for dong energy. Meeting the EU 20:20 renewable energy targets: the offshore challenges. DESERTEC: sustainable electricity for Europe, Middle East and North Africa. New power plants in Europe - a challenge for project and quality management. Consideration of safely in new build activities of power plants. Challenges to an integrated development in Maasvlakte, Netherlands. Power enhancement in EnBW power plants. Operational experiences of CCS pilot plants worldwide. Two years of operational experiences with Vattenfall's oxyfuel pilot plant. Pre-conditions for CCS. Storage technologies for a volatile generation. Overview: new generation of gas turbines.

  13. Power plant at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drilling platforms are rather inefficient when it comes to their own power supply. In view of ecotax and their environmental image, the offshore industry particularly the Norwegians is highly committed to changing this situation. An efficient power plant, specially designed for the offshore industry, might just prove to be the answer to their prayers

  14. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  15. LNG plant combined with power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LNG plant consumers a lot of power of natural gas cooling and liquefaction. In some LNG plant location, a rapid growth of electric power demand is expected due to the modernization of area and/or the country. The electric power demand will have a peak in day time and low consumption in night time, while the power demand of the LNG plant is almost constant due to its nature. Combining the LNG plant with power plant will contribute an improvement the thermal efficiency of the power plant by keeping higher average load of the power plant, which will lead to a reduction of electrical power generation cost. The sweet fuel gas to the power plant can be extracted from the LNG plant, which will be favorable from view point of clean air of the area. (Author). 5 figs

  16. Kruemmel nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This short description of the site and the nuclear power plant with information on the presumable effects on the environment and the general public is to provide some data material to the population in a popular form so that the citizens may in form themselves about the plant. In this description which shall be presented to the safety report, the site, the technical design and the operation mode of the nuclear power plant are described. Some problems of the emission and the effects of radioactive materials as well as other issues related to the plant which are of interest to the public are dealt with. The supposed accidents and their handling are discussed. The description shows that the selected site is suitable for both setting-up and operation of the plant without affecting the safety of the people living there and that in admissible burdens of the environment shall not have to be expected. (orig./HP)

  17. Nuclear power plants for protecting the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some figures are presented comparing date on the CO2 emission and oxygen consumption of nuclear, natural gas fired, advanced coal fired and oil fired power plants, for the same amounts of electricity generated. The data were deduced from the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary. (R.P.)

  18. Effect of nonsteady loading on creep behaviour of advanced 9-12%Cr fossil power plant steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Svoboda, Milan; Kloc, Luboš; Kudrman, J.

    Juelich : Forschungszentrum Juelich, 2006 - (Lecomte-Becker, J.; Carton, M.; Schubert, F.; Ennis, P.), s. 1127-1136 ISBN 3-89336-436-6. ISSN 1433-5522. - (Energy Technology. 53). [Materials for Advanced Power Engineering 2006. Liege (BE), 18.09.2006-20.09.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC007; GA MPO FD-K3/041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : nonsteady loading * 9-12%Cr steels * creep behaviour Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  19. A landscape simulation system for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As scenes of power plants give many influences to environments, the plants that harmonized with the environments are demanded. We developed a landscape simulation system for the plants by using computer graphics technologies. This system has functions to generate realistic images about plant buildings and environments. Since the system contains information of ridge lines in addition to usual terrain data, the terrain shapes are expressed more precisely. Because the system enables users to visualize plant construction plans, the advance evaluations of plant scenes become possible. We regard this system as useful for environmental assessment of power plants. (author)

  20. A study on the advanced methods for on-line signal processing by using artificial intelligence in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assist the operators at the transient states of a nuclear power plant, the automation of signal processing is needed. This study has the objective to process the signals from a nuclear power plant for the purpose of advising the operator. To meet this objective, in this study, two kinds of on-line signal processing system based on AI techniques are developed for the nuclear power plant application with on-line signals. First, an artificial neural network for signal prediction is developed for the adequate countermoves at transient states. The steam generator water level is adopted as the example and the outputs of a simulation program for the dynamics of steam generator combined with noises are used as the training patterns. For the training of the artificial neural network, the modified backpropagation algorithm is proposed for escaping quickly from local minima. The modified algorithm is different from the ordinary backpropagation algorithm in the aspect that the training rate coefficient is repeatedly adjusted randomly and taken when the training is improved. This trial has an effect to search for an adequate magnitude of a training rate coefficient. The comparison result shows that the modified algorithm enables the neural network to be trained more quickly. The simulation result shows that the outputs of the artificial neural network are not sensitive to noises. Using the artificial neural networks proposed in this thesis, the operators can predict the next status of a plant and can take actions to maintain the stability of plant. Second, the multi sensor integration system has been developed for the identification of transient states. The developed system is divided into two parts; pre-processors and a fusion part. An artificial neural network is adopted in the fusion part to include the knowledge about the identification and to make a decision of the transient state. The developed pre-processors play a role of classifying the trend types of

  1. Experiences Gained from Independent Assessment in Licensing of Advanced I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational benefits and enlarged functionality of modern technology, but also the physical and the technological aging of conventional instrumentation and control (I and C) systems, are motivations for modernization of I and C systems in nuclear power plants (NPPs). In case of safety-relevant I and C systems, the licensing authorities require the demonstration of sufficient safety of the systems.In several countries ongoing research and development projects are directed to provide a scientific basis and engineering solutions for cost-effective assessment of software-based I and C systems important to safety in NPPs. International initiatives have been started to develop a harmonized safety assessment methodology. The Institute for Safety Technology (ISTec) has been engaged in national and international programs as well as in establishing a two-phase qualification approach, which comprises a generic plant-independent qualification of hardware and software components and a plant-specific system qualification phase.In both generic qualification and plant-specific system qualification, ISTec has been involved as an independent third-party assessor for the relevant state authority. This paper reports experiences from the ISTec involvement in the assessment projects, e.g., in the assessment of the I and C important to safety in the new German High-Flux Research Reactor (FRM-2) in Munich and in the assessments of I and C modernization in NPPs of foreign countries (Bohunice, Slovak Republic; Paks, Hungary; and others). Conclusions are drawn from the experiences with respect to the practicability of the two-phase qualification concept and from the major findings in the plant-specific I and C assessments

  2. The possibility of building nuclear power plant free from severe accident risk: PWR NPP with advanced all passive safety cooling systems (AAP SCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete set of advanced all passive safety cooling systems (AAP SCS) for PWR NPP, actuated by natural force has been put forward in the article. Here the natural force mainly means the fore, which created by change of pressure distribution in the first loop of PWR as a result of operational regime conversion from one to another, including occurrence of accident situation. Correspondent safety cooling system will be actuated naturally and then put it into passive operation after occurring some kind of accident, so accidental situation will be mitigated right after it's occurrence and core residual heat will be naturally moved from the active core to the ultimate heat sink. There is no need to rely on automatic control system, any active equipment and human actions in all working process of the AAP SCS, which can reduce the probability of severe accident to zero, so as to exclude the need of evacuation plan around AAP nuclear power plant and eliminate the public's concern and doubt about nuclear power safety. Implementation of the AAP SCS concept is only based on use of evolutionary measures and state-of-the-art technology. So at present time it can be used for design of new-type third generation PWR nuclear power plant without severe accident risk, and for modernization of existing second generation nuclear power plant. (authors)

  3. Multiplex Tokamak power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of multiplexing for a fusion power core as an option for producing power is explored. Superconducting, as well as normal magnet, coils in either first or second stability regimes are considered. The results show that multiplex plants with superconducting magnets operating in the second stability regime could be competitive with the single-unit plants in some unit sizes. The key issues that impact the expected benefits of multiplexing must be investigated further. These are factory fabrication, economy of scale, the extent of equipment sharing, inherent safety, maintainability, and utility load management

  4. Modelling 3D crack propagation in ageing graphite bricks of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, crack propagation in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) graphite bricks with ageing properties is studied using the eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM). A parametric study for crack propagation, including the influence of different initial crack shapes and propagation criteria, is conducted. The results obtained in the benchmark study show that the crack paths from X-FEM are similar to the experimental ones. The accuracy of the strain energy release rate computation in a heterogeneous material is also evaluated using a finite difference approach. Planar and non-planar 3D crack growth simulations are presented to demonstrate the robustness and the versatility of the method utilized. Finally, this work contributes to the better understanding of crack propagation behaviour in AGR graphite bricks and so contributes to the extension of the AGR plant lifetimes in the UK by reducing uncertainties. (author)

  5. Economic evaluation of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  6. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  7. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  8. Information management systems improve advanced plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turk, R.S.; Serafin, S.A.; Leckey, J.B. [ABB-Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Morgan, J.S. [Duke Engineering & Services, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Computer-aided engineering tools are proving invaluable in both the design and operation of nuclear power plants. ABB Combustion Engineering`s Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) features a computerized Information Management System (IMS) as an integral part of the design. The System 80+ IMS represents the most powerful information management tool for Nuclear Power Plants commercially available today. Developed by Duke Power Company specifically for use by nuclear power plant owner operators, the IMS consists of appropriate hardware and software to manage and control information flow for all plant related work or tasks in a systematic, consistent, coordinated and informative manner. A significant feature of this IMS is that it is primarily based on plant data. The principal design tool, PASCE (Plant Application and Systems from Combustion Engineering), is comprised of intelligent databases that describe the design and from which accurate plant drawings are created. Additionally the IMS includes, at its hub, a relational database management system and an associated document management system. During the design phase, the IMS captures all design information in a database as it is generated. Interrelated data are automatically checked for consistency. Engineers and managers from various disciplines are automatically and simultaneously notified of pending changes. The 3-D model automatically checks for interferences and can be used to simulate the removal and replacement of equipment. Thus any potential difficulties can be corrected in the design phase. Document and data search times are greatly reduced by the querying capabilities of the system.

  9. Conceptual design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor (A-SSTR2) - Compact and safety oriented commercial power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the last decade JAERI reactor design studies, the advanced commercial reactor concept (A-SSTR2) which meets both economical and environmental requirements has been proposed. The A-SSTR2 is a compact power reactor (Rp=6.2m, ap=1.5m, Ip=12MA) with a high fusion power (Pf=4GW) and a net thermal efficiency of 51%. The machine configuration is simplified by eliminating a center solenoid (CS) coil system. SiC/SiC composite for blanket structure material, helium gas cooling with pressure of 10MPa and outlet temperature of 900 deg. C, and TiH2 for bulk shield material are introduced. For the toroidal field (TF) coil, a high temperature (TC) superconducting wire made of bismuth with the maximum field of 23T and the critical current density of 1000A/mm2 at a temperature of 20K is applied. In spite of the CS-less configuration, a computer simulation gives a satisfactory plasma equilibria, plasma initiation process and current ramp up scenario. (author)

  10. Technical analysis of a river basin-based model of advanced power plant cooling technologies for mitigating water management challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoelectric power plants require large volumes of water for cooling, which can introduce drought vulnerability and compete with other water needs. Alternative cooling technologies, such as cooling towers and hybrid wet-dry or dry cooling, present opportunities to reduce water diversions. This case study uses a custom, geographically resolved river basin-based model for eleven river basins in the state of Texas (the Brazos and San Jacinto-Brazos, Colorado and Colorado-Brazos, Cypress, Neches, Nueces, Red, Sabine, San Jacinto, and Trinity River basins), focusing on the Brazos River basin, to analyze water availability during drought. We utilized two existing water availability models for our analysis: (1) the full execution of water rights-a scenario where each water rights holder diverts the full permitted volume with zero return flow, and (2) current conditions-a scenario reflecting actual diversions with associated return flows. Our model results show that switching the cooling technologies at power plants in the eleven analyzed river basins to less water-intensive alternative designs can potentially reduce annual water diversions by 247-703 million m3-enough water for 1.3-3.6 million people annually. We consider these results in a geographic context using geographic information system tools and then analyze volume reliability, which is a policymaker's metric that indicates the percentage of total demand actually supplied over a given period. This geographic and volume reliability analysis serves as a measure of drought susceptibility in response to changes in thermoelectric cooling technologies. While these water diversion savings do not alleviate all reliability concerns, the additional streamflow from the use of dry cooling alleviates drought concerns for some municipal water rights holders and might also be sufficient to uphold instream flow requirements for important bays and estuaries on the Texas Gulf coast.

  11. Advanced Pipe Replacement Procedure for a Defective CRDM Housing Nozzle Enables Continued Normal Operation of a Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 2003 outage at the Ringhals Nuclear Plant in Sweden, a leak was found in the vicinity of a Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) housing nozzle at Unit 1. Based on the ALARA principle for radioactive contamination, a unique repair process was developed. The repair system includes utilization of custom, remotely controlled GTAW-robots, a CNC cutting and finishing machine, snake-arm robots and NDE equipment. The success of the repair solution was based on performing the machining and welding operations from the inside of the SCRAM pipe through the CRDM housing since accessibility from the outside was extremely limited. Before the actual pipe replacement procedure was performed, comprehensive training programs were conducted. Training was followed by certification of equipment, staff and procedures during qualification tests in a full scale mock-up of the housing nozzle. Due to the ingenuity of the overall repair solution and training programs, the actual pipe replacement procedure was completed in less than half the anticipated time. As a result of the successful pipe replacement, the nuclear power plant was returned to normal operation. (authors)

  12. Advanced pipe replacement procedure for a defective CRDM housing nozzle enables continued normal operation of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 2003 outage at the Ringhals Nuclear Plant in Sweden, a leak was found in the vicinity of a Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) housing nozzle at Unit 1. Based on the ALARA principle for radioactive contamination, a unique repair process was developed. The repair system includes utilization of custom, remotely controlled GTAW-robots, a CNC cutting and finishing machine, snake-arm robots and NDE equipment. The success of the repair solution was based on performing the machining and welding operations from the inside of the SCRAM pipe through the CRDM housing since accessibility from the outside was extremely limited. Before the actual pipe replacement procedure was performed, comprehensive training programs were conducted. Training was followed by certification of equipment, staff and procedures during qualification tests in a full scale mock-up of the housing nozzle. Due to the ingenuity of the overall repair solution and training programs, the actual pipe replacement procedure was completed in less than half the anticipated time. As a result of the successful pipe replacement, the nuclear power plant was returned to normal operation. (authors)

  13. Advanced space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of electrical power source concepts for application to near term space missions is presented along with a comparison of their weight and area estimates. The power sources reviewed include photovoltaic solar arrays, solar concentrators, radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG), Dynamic Isotope Power Subsystems (DIPS) and nuclear reactors. The solar arrays are found to be the lightest systems in the 1-6 kWe range for a 10 year mission life but they have the largest area of the practicable sources. Solar dynamics has the smallest area of the solar systems and has the lightest mass above 20 kWe of all the solar sources when a closed Brayton cycle power conversion system is used. The DIPS is the lightest weight system from 6 to 11 kWe above which the thermionic reactor is the lightest assuming a 38 foot boom is used to minimize shield weight

  14. SIROCCO project: 15 advanced instructor desk and 4 simulated control room for 900MW and 1300MW EDF power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the fifteen advanced instructors station and four simulated control delivered to EDF in the frame of the SIROCCO project by the Consortium formed by ATOS Origin, CORYS Tess, for the Electricite de France (EDF). These instructor stations are installed on fifteen replica training simulators located on different sites throughout France for the purposes of improving the job-related training of the EDF PWR nuclear power plant operating teams. This covers all 900 MW and 1300MW nuclear power plant of EDF. The simulated control rooms are installed on maintenance platform located at EDF and the consortium facilities. The consortium uses it to maintain and upgrade the simulators. EDF uses it to validate the upgrade delivered by the consortium before on site installation and to perform engineering analysis. This presentation sets out successively: - The major advantages of the generic and configurable connected module concept for flexible and quick adaptation to different simulators; - The innovative functionalities of the advanced Instructor Desk (IS) which make the instructor's tasks of preparation, monitoring and postanalysis of a training session easier and more homogeneous; - The use of the Simulated Control Room (SCR) for training purposes but also for those of maintenance and design studies for upgrades of existing control rooms

  15. Power plant process computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of instrumentation and control in nuclear power plants incorporates the use of process computers for tasks which are on-line in respect to real-time requirements but not closed-loop in respect to closed-loop control. The general scope of tasks is: - alarm annunciation on CRT's - data logging - data recording for post trip reviews and plant behaviour analysis - nuclear data computation - graphic displays. Process computers are used additionally for dedicated tasks such as the aeroball measuring system, the turbine stress evaluator. Further applications are personal dose supervision and access monitoring. (orig.)

  16. Super-simulator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The super-simulator is a conceptual name for future innovative simulators of nuclear power plants which surpass, to a large extent, the capabilities and performances of existing nuclear power plant simulators for operator training, plant analyzers for engineering studies or computer codes for dynamics analysis. Such super-simulators will be realized by employing highly advanced methods of mathematical modeling of the physical chemical and other related processes in the nuclear power plants and innovative methods of numerical computation using rapidly evolving high performance computing systems. (author)

  17. Miniature thermoelectric power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, António H. J.; Freitas, Ricardo; Esteves, João Sena

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a miniature thermoelectric power plant made with the boiler and the water pump from an old starch iron. It also uses a computer cooling fan, which serves as electric power generator. The boiler vaporizes the water it receives from the water pump. Then, the steam is injected over the turbine of the fan making it twirl. The voltage generated by the fan is enough to lighten a couple of LEDs. A wooden case with a chimney encloses all the referred devices.

  18. Miniature thermoelectric power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, António, 1957-; Freitas, Ricardo; Sepúlveda, João; Esteves, João Sena

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a miniature thermoelectric power plant made with the boiler and the water pump from an old starch iron. It also uses a computer cooling fan, which serves as electric power generator. The boiler vaporizes the water it receives from the water pump. Then, the steam is injected on the turbine of the fan, making it twirl. The voltage generated by the fan is enough to lighten a couple of LEDs. A wooden case with a chimney encloses all the referred devices.

  19. Nuclear turbine power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose : To improve the heat cycle balance in a nuclear turbine power plant or the like equipped with a moisture separating and reheating device, by eliminating undesired overcooling of the drains in the pipes of a heat transmission pipe bundle. Constitution : A high pressure turbine is driven by main steams from a steam generator. The steams after driving the high pressure turbine are removed with moistures by way of a moisture separator and then re-heated. Extracted steams from the steam generator or the high pressure turbine are used as a heating source for the reheating. In the nuclear turbine power plant having such a constitution, a vessel for separating the drains and the steams resulted from the heat exchange is provided at the outlet of the reheating device and the steams in the vessel are introduced to the inlet of the moisture separator. (Aizawa, K.)

  20. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To suppress corrosion at the inner surfaces of equipments and pipeways in nuclear power plants. Constitution: An injection device comprising a chemical injection tank and a plunger type chemical injection pump for injecting hydrazine as an oxygen remover and ammonia as a pH controller is disposed to the downstream of a condensate desalter column for primary coolant circuits. Since dessolved oxygen in circuit water injected with these chemicals is substantially reduced to zero and pH is adjuted to about 10 - 11, occurrence of stress corrosion cracks in carbon steels and stainless steels as main constituent materials for the nuclear power plant and corrosion products are inhibited in high temperature water, and of corrosion products are inhibited from being introduced as they are through leakage to the reactor core, by which the operators' exposure does can be decreased significantly. (Sekiya, K.)

  1. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before the economical adaptability of nuclear power plants was achieved, many ways were tried to technically use nuclear fission. In the course of a selection process, of numerous types of reactors, only a few have remained which are now taking part in the competition. The most important physical fundamentals, the occurence of various reactor concepts and the most important reactor types are the explained. (orig./TK)

  2. Nuclear power plant erection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The erection of a nuclear power plant covers all the installation operations related to mechanical and electrical equipment in buildings designed for this specific purpose. Some of these operations are described: erection of the nuclear boiler, erection work carried out in the building accomodating the nuclear auxiliary and ancillary equipment and the methods and the organization set up in order to carry out this work satisfactorily are analyzed

  3. Power plant emissions reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy

    2015-10-20

    A system for improved emissions performance of a power plant generally includes an exhaust gas recirculation system having an exhaust gas compressor disposed downstream from the combustor, a condensation collection system at least partially disposed upstream from the exhaust gas compressor, and a mixing chamber in fluid communication with the exhaust gas compressor and the condensation collection system, where the mixing chamber is in fluid communication with the combustor.

  4. Power plant design model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the Power Plant Design Model (PPDM) which is an interactive FORTRAN/2020 program with over 15,000 lines of code that allows a user to create an engineering model of a grass roots solid fuel-fired facility capable of generating steam for electrical power generation and/or sale. Capital, operating, and maintenance cost estimates of the modeled plant are also generated. The model's technical output contains complete material and energy balances of all major streams, parasitic power calculations, boiler operating data and a major equipment list. The economic output consists of a capital cost estimate for the plant in a spreadsheet format detailing the material, labor and indirect costs associated with each piece of equipment. The model was intended for use as a marketing tool to replace engineering feasibility studies which are needed to determine the viability of a project. The model provides preliminary economics at a fraction of time and manpower effort normally associated with this task

  5. Obrigheim nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973 the 345 MW pressurized water nuclear power plant at Obrigheim operated on base load, generating approximately 2.63 TWh, approximately 2.5 TWh of which was supplied to the KWO members. The plant availability for the year was 89.9%. Of the 10.1% non-availability, 6.4% (23 d) was caused by refuelling, including inspection, overhaul and repair operations and routine tests carried out in September 1973. 3.3% was due to stoppages for repairs to a steam generator and the two main cooling pumps, while 0.4% resulted from failures in the electrical section of the plant. The plant was shut down seven times in all, including three scrams. The average core burnup at the end of the fourth cycle (1 September 1973) was 18900 MWd/tU, representing an average burnup of approximately 37500 MWd/tU for a fuel element used in all four cycles. The operating performance of the steam generators and the result of the steam generator inspection carried out during refuelling in 1973 suggest no progressive damage. The quantities of radioactive materials released to the environment in 1973 were well below the officially permitted levels. The availability of the plant from the beginning of pilot operation in 1969 to the end of 1973 was 83.7 %

  6. Initiative against nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication of the Initiative of Austrian Nuclear Power Plant Opponents contains articles on radiactive waste dispoasal in Austria and and discusses safety issues of the nuclear power plant 'Zwentendorf'. (kancsar)

  7. Obrigheim nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gross output of the 345MWe pressurized water nuclear power station at Obrigheim, operation on base load, amounted to about 2.57TWh in 1974, the net power fed to the grid being about 2.44TWh. The core was used to its full capacity until 10 May 1974. Thereafter, the reactor was on stretch-out operation with steadily decreasing load until refuelled in August 1974. Plant availability in 1974 amounted to 92.1%. Of the 7.9% non-availability, 7.87% was attributable to the refuelling operation carried out from 16 August to 14 September and to the inspection, overhaul and repair work and the routine tests performed during this period. The plant was in good condition. Only two brief shutdowns occurred in 1974, the total outage time being 21/2 hours. From the beginning of trial operation in March 1969 to the end of 1974, the plant achieved an availability factor of 85.2%. The mean core burnup at the end of the fifth cycle was 19600 MWd/tonne U, with one fuel element that had been used for four cycles achieving a mean burnup of 39000 MWd/tonne U. The sipping test on the fuel elements revealed defective fuel-rods in a prototype plutonium fuel element, a high-efficiency uranium fuel element and a uranium fuel element. The quantities of radioactive substances released to the environment in 1974 were far below the officially permitted values. In july 1974, a reference preparation made up in the nuclear power station in October 1973 was discovered by outsiders on the Obrigheim municipality rubbish tip. The investigations revealed that this reference preparation had very probably been abstracted from the plant in October 1973 and arrived at the rubbish tip in a most irregular manner shortly before its discovery

  8. Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling and Water Recovery in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young Cho; Alexander Fridman

    2009-04-02

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop technologies to reduce freshwater consumption in a cooling tower of coal-based power plant so that one could significantly reduce the need of make-up water. The specific goal was to develop a scale prevention technology based an integrated system of physical water treatment (PWT) and a novel filtration method so that one could reduce the need for the water blowdown, which accounts approximately 30% of water loss in a cooling tower. The present study investigated if a pulsed spark discharge in water could be used to remove deposits from the filter membrane. The test setup included a circulating water loop and a pulsed power system. The present experiments used artificially hardened water with hardness of 1,000 mg/L of CaCO{sub 3} made from a mixture of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in order to produce calcium carbonate deposits on the filter membrane. Spark discharge in water was found to produce strong shockwaves in water, and the efficiency of the spark discharge in cleaning filter surface was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop across the filter over time. Results showed that the pressure drop could be reduced to the value corresponding to the initial clean state and after that the filter could be maintained at the initial state almost indefinitely, confirming the validity of the present concept of pulsed spark discharge in water to clean dirty filter. The present study also investigated the effect of a plasma-assisted self-cleaning filter on the performance of physical water treatment (PWT) solenoid coil for the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. The self-cleaning filter utilized shockwaves produced by pulse-spark discharges in water to continuously remove scale deposits from the surface of the filter, thus keeping the pressure drop across the filter at a relatively low value. Artificial hard water was used in the

  9. Natural circulation data and methods for advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex set of physical phenomena that occur in a gravity environment when a geometrically distinct heat sink and heat source are connected by a fluid flow path can be identified as natural circulation (NC). No external sources of mechanical energy for the fluid motion are involved when NC is established. Within the present context, natural convection is used to identify the phenomena that occur when a heat source is put in contact with a fluid. Therefore, natural convection characterizes a heat transfer regime that constitutes a subset of NC phenomena. This report provides the presented papers and summarizes the discussions at an IAEA Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Natural Circulation Data and Methods for innovative Nuclear Power Plant Design. While the planned scope of the TCM involved all types of reactor designs (light water reactors, heavy water reactors, gas-cooled reactors and liquid metal-cooled reactors), the meeting participants and papers addressed only light water reactors (LWRs) and heavy water reactors (HWRs). Furthermore, the papers and discussion addressed both evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactors, as defined by the IAEA. The accomplishment of the objectives of achieving a high safety level and reducing the cost through the reliance on NC mechanisms, requires a thorough understanding of those mechanisms. Natural circulation systems are usually characterized by smaller driving forces with respect to the systems that use an external source of energy for the fluid motion. For instance, pressure drops caused by vertical bends and siphons in a given piping system, or heat losses to environment are a secondary design consideration when a pump is installed and drives the flow. On the contrary, a significant influence upon the overall system performance may be expected due to the same pressure drops and thermal power release to the environment when natural circulation produces the coolant flow. Therefore, the level of knowledge for

  10. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional Single-Sensor-Single Indicator (SSSI) displays are poorly matched to the cognitive abilities of operators, especially for large and complex systems. It is difficult for operators to monitor very large arrays of displays and controls, and to integrate the information displayed therein. In addition, standard operating procedures (SOPs) are bulky (running to many hundreds of pages) and difficult to use, and operators may become lost. For these reasons, and also because it is becoming increasingly difficult to find replacements for aging hardware components, there is a trend towards computerized graphical interfaces for nuclear power plants (NPPs). There is, however, little rational theory for display design in this domain. This report describes some recent theoretical developments and shows how to develop displays which will greatly reduce the cognitive load on the operator and allow the use of perceptual rather than cognitive mechanisms while using SON and to support state diagnosis and fault management. The report outlines the conceptual framework within which such a new approach could be developed, and provides an example of how the operating procedures for the start-up sequence of a NPP could be realized. A detailed description of a set of displays for a graphical interface for the SON of the feedwater system is provided as an example of how the proposed approach could be realized, and a general account of how it would fit into the overall start-up sequence is given. Examples of open-quotes direct perceptionclose quotes or open-quotes ecologicalclose quotes configural state space displays to support the use of the proposed direct manipulation SOP interface are provided, and also a critical discussion which identifies some difficulties which may be anticipated should the general approach herein advocated be adopted

  11. Development of advanced direct perception displays for nuclear power plants to enhance monitoring, control and fault management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B.G.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N. [and others

    1997-08-01

    Traditional Single-Sensor-Single Indicator (SSSI) displays are poorly matched to the cognitive abilities of operators, especially for large and complex systems. It is difficult for operators to monitor very large arrays of displays and controls, and to integrate the information displayed therein. In addition, standard operating procedures (SOPs) are bulky (running to many hundreds of pages) and difficult to use, and operators may become lost. For these reasons, and also because it is becoming increasingly difficult to find replacements for aging hardware components, there is a trend towards computerized graphical interfaces for nuclear power plants (NPPs). There is, however, little rational theory for display design in this domain. This report describes some recent theoretical developments and shows how to develop displays which will greatly reduce the cognitive load on the operator and allow the use of perceptual rather than cognitive mechanisms while using SON and to support state diagnosis and fault management. The report outlines the conceptual framework within which such a new approach could be developed, and provides an example of how the operating procedures for the start-up sequence of a NPP could be realized. A detailed description of a set of displays for a graphical interface for the SON of the feedwater system is provided as an example of how the proposed approach could be realized, and a general account of how it would fit into the overall start-up sequence is given. Examples of {open_quotes}direct perception{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}ecological{close_quotes} configural state space displays to support the use of the proposed direct manipulation SOP interface are provided, and also a critical discussion which identifies some difficulties which may be anticipated should the general approach herein advocated be adopted.

  12. Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia Bonelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A description of the results for a Station Black-Out analysis for Atucha 2 Nuclear Power Plant is presented here. Calculations were performed with MELCOR 1.8.6 YV3165 Code. Atucha 2 is a pressurized heavy water reactor, cooled and moderated with heavy water, by two separate systems, presently under final construction in Argentina. The initiating event is loss of power, accompanied by the failure of four out of four diesel generators. All remaining plant safety systems are supposed to be available. It is assumed that during the Station Black-Out sequence the first pressurizer safety valve fails stuck open after 3 cycles of water release, respectively, 17 cycles in total. During the transient, the water in the fuel channels evaporates first while the moderator tank is still partially full. The moderator tank inventory acts as a temporary heat sink for the decay heat, which is evacuated through conduction and radiation heat transfer, delaying core degradation. This feature, together with the large volume of the steel filler pieces in the lower plenum and a high primary system volume to thermal power ratio, derives in a very slow transient in which RPV failure time is four to five times larger than that of other German PWRs.

  13. Garigliano nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period under review, the Garigliano power station produced 1,028,77 million kWh with a utilization factor of 73,41% and an availability factor of 85,64%. The disparity between the utilization and availability factors was mainly due to a shutdown of about one and half months owing to lack of staff at the plant. The reasons for nonavailability (14.36%) break down as follows: nuclear reasons 11,49%; conventional reasons 2,81%; other reasons 0,06%. During the period under review, no fuel replacements took place. The plant functioned throughout with a single reactor reticulation pump and resulting maximum available capacity of 150 MWe gross. After the month of August, the plant was operated at levels slightly below the maximum available capacity in order to lengthen the fuel cycle. The total number of outages during the period under review was 11. Since the plant was brought into commercial operation, it has produced 9.226 million kWh

  14. Floating nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article examines the legal regime for floating nuclear power plants (FNPs), in view of the absence of specific US legislation and the very limited references to artificial islands in the Law of the Sea Convention. The environmental impacts of FNPs are examined and changes in US regulation following the Three Mile Island accident and recent US court decisions are described. References in the Law of the Sea Convention relevant to FNPs are outlined and the current status of international law on the subject is analysed. (author)

  15. Demonstration tokamak power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.; Mattas, R.; Smith, D.L.; DeFreece, D.; Morgan, G.D.; Trachsel, C.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design for a tokamak demonstration power plant (DEMO) was developed. A large part of the study focused on examining the key issues and identifying the R and D needs for: (1) current drive for steady-state operation, (2) impurity control and exhaust, (3) tritium breeding blanket, and (4) reactor configuration and maintenance. Impurity control and exhaust will not be covered in this paper but is discussed in another paper in these proceedings, entitled Key Issues of FED/INTOR Impurity Control System.

  16. The use of nuclear energy for district heating. The branch program of activities. NIKIET design efforts on the advanced nuclear co-generation plant with VK-300 reactor, the Ruta nuclear heating plant and small power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: District heating is among the top priorities of the state economic and energy policy of Russia and is the largest and expanding sector of the national power industry. The nuclear sources of energy are regarded as the promising option for this sector of the power industry. The branch program of activities which is being implemented is intended for developing the policy and program of nuclear district heating. The priority task is to provide co-generated heat from the NPPs and nuclear co-generation plants to the amount of 30 mln Gcal/year by 2020 as specified in the Energy Policy of Russia for the period until 2020. NIKIET named after N.A. Dollezhal has been developing the special purpose reactor facilities for the power units of the nuclear co-generation plants and nuclear heating plants. The detailed design of the power unit with the simplified passive boiling water reactor VK-300 has been developed for the nuclear co-generation plant (NCP) intended to be deployed in the large-scale power industry. It has been demonstrated that NCP with VK-300 reactor is competitive with respect to the operating and advanced fossil thermal co-generation plants. It is envisaged to construct the four-unit first of-the-kind NCP with VK-300 reactor in Arkhangelsk region. The nuclear heating plant based on the pool RUTA reactors operating under atmospheric pressure is being developed for the small towns. It is planned to construct the pilot plant of such kind on the site of RF State Research Center FEI, Obninsk. In the frame of conversion of the defense-oriented works NIKIET has developed the UNITHERM reactor facility for a small NPP to be located in the distant and difficult-to access regions of Russia. To provide heat and electricity to the small communities, meteorological observatories, lighthouses and radio navigation stations in a reliable and safe way, it is possible to use non-attended small nuclear power plants based on the self-regulating water-water reactor and

  17. Civil engineering for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power plant structures are conspicuously visible and have an impact on our landscape. In the opinion of a critical public, a successful external design can greatly enhance acceptance of an undertaking and its plants. This paper considers the subjects - utilization of by-products, aggregation of series experience in the construction of nuclear power plants, architecture in power plant construction, water works for adequate cooling water supply and also quality assurance in civil engineering and optimum application of electronic data processing. (orig.)

  18. Energy balances for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important aspect of a power plant is its energy balance, i.e. the electrical energy produced by the plant over its overall operation period, compared to the amount of non-renewable energy used to create and build the plant. Tense discussions took place in the past between criticizers and promotors of a given technology, some technologies even being accused of having a negative energy balance. Mostly based on built examples the present study aims at giving objective data for the represented technologies, as follows: a 64 MW hydro power plant in the Alps, with seasonal water storage in a lake; a 60 MW run-of-river high-head hydro power plant in the Alps; two run-of-river low-head hydro power plants in the Swiss Midlands (14 MW and 25 MW respectively); a small 30 kW wind power generator located near the Simplon Pass at 2000 m over sea level, in the Alps; a 3 kW photovoltaic generator in the roof of a single-family house; a 500 kW photovoltaic power plant in the Jura, at 1000 m over sea level; a 0.9 MWel/8.8 MWtherm fossil-fuel co-generation plant near Zuerich; a 200 MW natural-gas-fired gas/vapour turbine power plant; a 300 MW heavy-fuel-fired power plant; a 500 MW coal-fired power plant; and the Leibstadt 990 MW nuclear power plant. The best energy balances are obtained for the hydro power plants, the worst for the Leibstadt nuclear power plant. In between the photovoltaic plants and the fossil-fuel-fired plants are found. The figures differ by more than two orders of magnitude

  19. Nuclear Power Plant 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Again this year, our magazine presents the details of the conference on Spanish nuclear power plant operation held in February and that was devoted to 1996 operating results. The Protocol for Establishment of a New Electrical Sector Regulation that was signed last December will undoubtedly represent a new challenge for the nuclear industry. By clearing stating that current standards of quality and safety should be maintained or even increased if possible, the Protocol will force the Sector to improve its productivity, which is already high as demonstrated by the results of the last few years described during this conference and by recent sectorial economic studies. Generation of a nuclear kWh that can compete with other types of power plants is the new challenge for the Sector's professionals, who do not fear the new liberalization policies and approaching competition. Lower inflation and the resulting lower interest rates, apart from being representative indices of our economy's marked improvement, will be very helpful in facing this challenge. (Author)

  20. Power Plant- A Scientific Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmateja Bandlamudi, Sahithi Avirneni

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper emphasisesthe society’s movement towards improvement of power sector as a pavement of luxury and on the benighted dark side of it. This produces the reasons for enchanting power plant as a scientific disaster. This paper gives the detailed list of effects caused by the power plants mainly on coal fired, nuclear and hydroelectric power plants, their adverse effects on environment and in turn human life.

  1. PLANT TRANSFORMATION: ADVANCES AND PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Adriana Cristina

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic transformation is a powerful tool for plant breeding and genetical, physiological or biochemical research, consequently it is an extremely dynamic field. Transgenic plants are commonly used to complete or substitute mutants in basic research, helping the studies of complex biological situations such as pathogenesis process, genome organization, light reception and signal transduction. In this review, recent approaches for foreign gene introduction (e.g. Agrobiolistics, whole tissue electroporation, in planta Agrobacterium transformation, screening (reporter gene possibilities and performance and transformant selection (ipt selective marker are discussed. Transgene expression and mechanisms underlying (transgene inactivation are presented. Practical applications of genetically modified plants, field tests and commercial transgenic crops worldwide and in Brazil are listed, as well as the main traits and species modified. Potential uses of transgenic plants for animal compound production, biological remediation and synthetic polymer assembly are also shown.

  2. Combined cycle power plant Skopje

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regarding the new directions in constructing combined cycle power plants, in this work an idea of such plant in Skopje with power of 190 MW has been elaborated. This plant will be constructed on the site of the existing TPP 'Energetika', AD ESM. The rates of efficiency for different condition of operation has been estimated. (Author)

  3. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morehead, H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  4. Hybrid combined cycle power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of re-powering the existing pressurised water nuclear power plants by the proposed HCCPP solution, we can increase the electricity output and efficiency significantly. If we convert a traditional nuclear power plant unit to a HCCPP solution, we can achieve a 3.2-5.5 times increase in electricity output and the achievable gross efficiency falls between 46.8-52% and above, depending on the applied solution. These figures emphasise that we should rethink our power plant technologies and we have to explore a great variety of HCCPP solutions. This may give a new direction in the development of nuclear reactors and power plants as well.(author)

  5. Power plant removal costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The financial, regulatory and political significance of the estimated high removal costs of nuclear power plants has generated considerable interest in recent years, and the political significance has resulted in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) eliminating the use of conventional depreciation accounting for the decontamination portion of the removal (decommissioning). While nuclear plant licensees are not precluded from utilizing conventional depreciation accounting for the demolition of non-radioactive structures and site restoration, state and federal utility regulators have not been favorably inclined to requests for this distinction. The realization that steam-generating units will be more expensive to remove, relative to their original cost, predates the realization that nuclear units will be expensive. However, the nuclear issues have overshadowed this realization, but are unlikely to continue to do so. Numerous utilities have prepared cost estimates for steam generating units, and this presentation discusses the implications of a number of such estimates that are a matter of public record. The estimates cover nearly 400 gas, oil, coal and lignite generating units. The earliest estimate was made in 1978, and for analysis purposes the author has segregated them between gas and oil units, and coal and lignite units

  6. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  7. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University's aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  8. Program increasing of nuclear power plant safeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results achieved within the project of national task 'Program increasing of nuclear power plant safeness' are presented in the document. The project was aimed to extend and deepen activities relating to safety increase of nuclear power units WWER-440 which play significant part in electricity production in the Slovak Republic. The application of advanced foreign calculating programs and calculation of radionuclide spreading in environment and techniques will influence the increase of extent, quality and international acceptance of safety analysis of nuclear power plant blocks WWER-440 and the risk valuation from operating nuclear power plants. Methodic resources for coping in emergency situation in nuclear energetics will be used for support in decision making in real time during radiation emergency on nuclear plant, region and state level. A long-term strategy in dealing with burnt fuel and radioactive substance formatting during nuclear power plant liquidation particularly with waste which is un acceptable in regional dump, has developed into a theoretical and practical preparation of solvable group for operating the converting centre Bohunice and in inactivating the nuclear power plant A-1. The diagnostic activities in nuclear power plants in the Slovak Republic have been elaborated into a project of norm documents in accordance with international norms for diagnostic systems. Presentation of new technologies and materials for repairs and reconstructions of components and nuclear power plant knots qualify increase in their reliability, safety and life. New objective methods and criterions for valuation and monitoring of the residual life and safety of fixed nuclear power plants. Results of problem solving linked with connecting the blocks of nuclear power plants to frequency regulation in electric network in the Slovak Republic are also presented in the document

  9. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a nuclear power plant which generates thermoelectric power by utilizing heat generated by fission reaction. Namely, a fuel/thermoelectric material is made of a semiconductor material containing fission products or a semimetal material containing fission products. A reactor container contains the fuel/thermoelectric material and a reactor core constituted by the fuel/thermoelectric material. The reactor container comprises coolants for removing heat generated by nuclear reaction of fission products from the reactor core and a high temperature side electrode connected to a central portion of the fuel/thermoelectric material and a low temperature side electrode connected to the outside of the fuel/thermoelectric material. Electromotive force is caused in the fuel/thermoelectric material by temperature difference upon combustion caused at the central portion and the outer surface of the fuel/thermoelectric material. The electromotive force is taken out of the high temperature side electrode and the low temperature side electrode. (I.S.)

  10. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

  11. Increase of power plant efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of power plant efficiency has always been the aim of power plant manufacturers and operators. Today, after the re-orientation of the worldwide market situation, it is necessary to newly assess the power plant efficiency in the field of competition and environment. The average efficiency of power plants presently ranges worldwide at about 30%, yet the status of available technology in the year 2000 permits efficiencies between 45 an 58% depending on the fuels used. VGB PowerTech has been monitoring the technical development of power generation for 80 years up to now. From our point of view, power plant technology still has a great development potential at its disposal. (orig.)

  12. Brighter for small power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article presents a small tunnel drilling machine aimed at using for the construction of small hydroelectric power plants and mentions briefly some advantages economically and environmentally of both the machine and the power production solution

  13. The P20 system: the advanced control system for the new French and British nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the latest French pressurized water reactors (PWR), the 1450MW N4 series, and the British Sizewell-B PWR are to use the P20 microprocessor based control system. It is fully decentralized by means of data highways and incorporates many technological improvements in microprocessor and data processing techniques. The first N4 plant to use the P20 system, the CH00Z-B units, are due to be commissioned in 1991. The P20 system, which has three main parts, is described and explained. (UK)

  14. EPR: an advanced but competitive technology. The French and German response to the needs of the future power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Framatome and Siemens and also the utilities in France and Germany believe in the future of nuclear power and decided therefore to develop a new reactor which shall fulfill the requirements of the 21. century, the EPR (European Pressurized Water Reactor). The main objectives of the EPR design are 1)to improve the preventive level of the defense in depth safety concept 2)to reduce severe accident probability and 3)to mitigate severe accidents up to and core meltdown accidents. The improvement of the preventive measures against the accidents repose sur of the safety techniques developed in France and in Germany. The design depends on deterministic rules validated by probabilistic analysis. The severe accidents are taken into account from the design so as the consequences require only very limited measures of protection in surface and in time. In spite of the improved safety characteristics, the cost of the EPR kWh is competitive compared with the other electric power production sources. This is due in particular to an important unitary power, an improvement of the yield, a larger availability, a larger life duration and on the running expenses, maintenance costs and fuels costs. (O.M.)

  15. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-10-20

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  16. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

    2003-08-04

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

  17. Are atomic power plants saver than nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is rather impossible to establish nuclear power plants against the resistance of the population. To prevail over this resistance, a clarification of the citizens-initiatives motives which led to it will be necessary. This is to say: It is quite impossible for our population to understand what really heappens in nuclear power plants. They cannot identify themselves with nuclear power plants and thus feel very uncomfortable. As the total population feels the same way it is prepared for solidarity with the citizens-initiatives even if they believe in the necessity of nuclear power plants. Only an information-policy making transparent the social-psychological reasons of the population for being against nuclear power plants could be able to prevail over the resistance. More information about the technical procedures is not sufficient at all. (orig.)

  18. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of September 1, 1982. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses

  19. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Soukri, Mustapha [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Farmer, Justin [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Mobley, Paul [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Tanthana, Jak [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Dongxiang [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Song, Chunshan [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  20. Analysis of simulation tools for the study of advanced marine power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Brochard, Paul Eugene

    1992-01-01

    The United States Navy is at a crossroads in the design of ship's engineering plants. Advances in solid-state power electronics combined with a shift to gas turbine powered propulsion and electric plants has placed renewed emphasis on developing advanced power systems. These advanced power systems may combine the prime movers associated with propulsion and electric power generation into an integrated system. The development of advanced electric distribution systems and propulsion derived ship...

  1. Application of complex engineering solutions through advanced composite innovation (for repair of degraded buried pipe at Vandellos II Nuclear Power Plant); Reparacion de tuberias de un sistema de servicios no esenciales con recubrimiento interno de fibra de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, J. M.; Raji, B. B.

    2011-07-01

    This technical presentation is focused on introducing an engineering solution approach and identification of sensitivity of applications of advanced carbon fiber in a pressurized wet environment: Engineering design, quality assurance of installation, inspection, and a comprehensive testing program to validate and bench mark the design data and compliance with code requirements in nuclear power plants.

  2. High power proton accelerator for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The novel nuclear power system--Energy Amplifier, proposed by C. Rubbia, attracts the interest as a prior option for the development of the next generation nuclear power plant in the first half of the 21st century. The accelerator used to drive the system should provide proton beam power tens higher than that of LAMPF. The accelerator physics and technology have been advancing greatly since LAPMF was built more than 20 years ago. These new progresses become the essential basis for the intense beam accelerator to advance up to a much higher beam power. However, some challenges are still being faced, including beam loss, high efficiency, reliability, as well as some technical issues associated with high power CW operation. The accelerator design options to tackle with the difficulties are discussed. The suggestions on R and D of high power accelerator in China are presented

  3. The function of the alarm system in advanced control rooms: an analysis of operator visual activity during a simulated nuclear power plant disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Brookhaven National Laboratory (US), and the OECD Halden Reactor Project conducted a large experiment, investigating the effects of alarm reduction and display on operator and plant performance (O'Hara et al., 1997), The results from this experiment indicated that the number of alarms presented to the operators, and the type of alarm display, had no impact on human performance during simulated disturbances. One possible interpretation of these surprising results is that operators in advanced control rooms use the alarm system only for limited purposes, i.e., the introduction of process formats, trend curves, overview displays, and computerized support systems have made the alarm system superfluous. Given the massive efforts put into the design and development of sophisticated alarm systems intended to maximize safety, this would be a paradoxical conclusion. To explore the role of the alarm system in more detail, we performed an analysis of eye-movement tracking data collected in the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLAB). The objective of the study was to examine to which extent, and for what purposes, licensed operators use the alarm system in advanced control rooms during complex problem solving. According to Funke (1991), complex problem solving situations are non-transparent, ill-defined, and dynamic, i.e., the underlying state of the system must be inferred from symptoms, the goal state is ambiguous, and the problem is in continuous change. This seems to be an appropriate description of the working conditions when operators are confronted with challenging scenarios in a full scope nuclear simulator. Five experts on nuclear power plant operation from the OECD Halden Reactor Project were convened in order to generate initial hypotheses about the operators' use of the alarm system. The expert panel estimated that operators in advanced control rooms would use the alarm system less than 10 percent of the available

  4. Effects of crew resource management training on the team performance of operators in an advanced nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the study are twofold: the development of a CRM training program appropriate to Korean NPPs and the evaluation of CRM training effectiveness. Firstly, the CRM program was developed with a focus on nontechnical skills - such as leadership, situational awareness, teamwork, and communication - which have been widely known to be critical for improving operational performance. Secondly, the effectiveness tests were conducted for two different crews of operators, performing six different emergency operation scenarios during a four-week period. All the crews (crews A and B) participated in the training program for the technical knowledge and skills, which were required to operate the simulator of the MCR during the first week. However, for the verification of the effectiveness of the CRM training program, only crew A was randomly selected to attend the CRM training after the technical knowledge and skills training. The results of the experiments showed that the CRM training program improved the individual attitudes of crew A with a statistical significance. The team skills of crew A were found to be significantly more advanced than those of crew B. However, the CRM training did not have a positive effect on enhancing the individual performance of crew A, as compared with that of crew B. (author)

  5. Development of concentrated solar power and conventional power plant hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Suojanen, Suvi

    2016-01-01

    CSP hybrids are one of the possible technical solutions in order to increase the share of renewable energy and decrease greenhouse gas emission levels as well as fuel consump-tion. The main objectives of the thesis are to research state-of-the-art technologies in concentrated solar power (CSP) and conventional power plants, to comprehensively study the possible integration options and to develop one CSP hybrid configuration by using Advanced Process Simulator (Apros), which is a dynamic model...

  6. Extended requirements on advanced thermal power plants as a necessary contribution to power systems transient stability. Fast valving for stable power plant operation; Erweiterte Anforderungen an neue thermische Kraftwerke als notwendiger Beitrag zur Systemstabilitaet. Schnellschlussventile fuer stabilen Kraftwerksbetrieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlich, Istvan [Univ. Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Loewen, Jakob; Schmidt, Joerg M.; Winter, Wilhelm [Eon Netz GmbH, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2008-09-08

    Due to the expected intensive use of wind power new requirements regarding the control behavior of the electric power system arise. This is forced especially by the increasing concentration of several units in large wind farms. In this paper reconstruction, realization and monitoring of decentralized power generation systems are presented in detail. Presented is in this special case shortage avoidance by fast turbine valve operations. (GL)

  7. Producing Electricity in Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Khabrana, Ahmed; Ageeli, Jaber

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This Bachelor thesis has been written at the Blekinge Institute of Technology. The thesis describes electricity production in Shoaiba Steam Power plant in Saudi Arabia. Shoaiba Power Plant is located 100 km South of Jeddah city in Saudi Arabia. Total power production ability reaches 4400 MW. Shoaiba Power Plant has two stages and is constructed with 11 units, each unit produces 400 MW at line voltage 24 kV and line current 16 kA. Main pieces of equipment and their function in the sta...

  8. AND THERMAL POWER PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alduhov Oleg Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the atmospheric dispersion as part of the process of selection of sites to accommodate nuclear and thermal power plants is performed to identify concentration fields of emissions and to assess the anthropogenic impact produced on the landscape components and human beings. Scattering properties of the atmospheric boundary layer are mainly determined by the turbulence intensity and the wind field. In its turn, the turbulence intensity is associated with the thermal stratification of the boundary layer. Therefore, research of the atmospheric dispersion is reduced to the study of temperature and wind patterns of the boundary layer. Statistical processing and analysis of the upper-air data involves the input of the data collected by upper-air stations. Until recently, the upper-air data covering the standard period between 1961 and 1970 were applied for these purposes, although these data cannot assure sufficient reliability of assessments in terms of the properties of the atmospheric dispersion. However, recent scientific and technological developments make it possible to substantially increase the data coverage by adding the upper-air data collected within the period between 1964 and 2010. The article has a brief overview of BL_PROGS, a specialized software package designated for the processing of the above data. The software package analyzes the principal properties of the atmospheric dispersion. The use of the proposed software package requires preliminary development of a database that has the information collected by an upper-air station. The software package is noteworthy for the absence of any substantial limitations imposed onto the amount of the input data that may go up in proportion to the amount of the upper-air data collected by upper-air stations.

  9. Simulators predict power plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, R.

    2002-07-01

    Mix the complexity of a new construction or major retrofit project with today's 'do more with less', a pinch of 'personnel inexperience,' and a dash of 'unintended consequences', and you have got a recipe for insomnia. Advanced simulation tools, however, can help you wring out your design train your operators before the first wire is terminated and just may be get a good night's rest. The article describes several examples of uses of simulation tools. Esscor recently completed a simulation project for a major US utility exploring the potential for furnace/duct implosion that could result from adding higher volumetric flow induced-draft fans and selective catalytic reduction to a 650-MW coal-fired plant. CAF Electronics Inc. provided a full-scope simulator for Alstom's KA24-1 combined-cycle power plant in Paris, France. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools are being used by the Gas Technology Institute to simulate the performance of the next generation of pulverized coal combustors. 5 figs.

  10. Study and Development of a Simulation System for Dynamic Evaluation on Man-machine Interface Design of Advanced Main Control Rooms of Nuclear Power Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangXiaojing; ZhouZhiwei; ChenXiaoming; MaYuanle; LiFu; DongYujie; WuWei; OhiTadashi

    2005-01-01

    Since the man-machine interfaces (MMI) of a main control room provide the control platform of a nuclear power plant (NPP),the development of the design quality of MMIs plays a very important role in the operation of a NPP. With the development of digital technology, the development of the advanced main control rooms (AMCRs) has become an inexorable trend. Therefore, the positive and the negative effects of AMCRs on human factors engineering need to be evaluated. For this p~, a simulation system has been studied and developed to quantitatively evaluate a MMI design from the viewpoint of human factors. The simulation system takes advantage of computer simulation technology to simulate an operating process of an interaction between operators and a MMI design under an instruction of an operation procedure of the AMCR of a NPP. Meanwhile, the necessary data are recorded for evaluation. It integrates two editors and one simulator. In the paper, the simulation system is presented in detail. Furthermore, one sample is given to show the results of each of these three subsystems.

  11. Development study on hydraulic three-dimensional seismic isolation system applied to advanced nuclear power plant. Development study on hydraulic rocking suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic isolation devices have been developed for the base isolation system of the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) that is an advanced nuclear reactor power plant building. The developed seismic isolation system consists of the hydraulic type vertical springs with rocking suppression mechanism and the laminated rubber bearings for horizontal direction. The isolation performances, i.e. natural period, damping, and rocking-suppression, have already been evaluated by the technical feasibility study and performance tests on a system which consists of down-sized devices on the shaking table, but in the seismic simulation on the real size building with this system, high hydraulic pressure was generated by rocking-suppression device under an extremely large seismic motion. In this paper, it is reported the frictional characteristics on high hydraulic pressure condition from the experiments on the 1/2 size of real device. To improve the damping performance of rocking-suppression, the orifice was added to the cylinder. At first the linear seismic simulation model of the real size system was constructed and damping coefficient was optimized by using that linear model. Finally, the detailed nonlinear simulation model was constructed, and time history analysis under simultaneous horizontal and vertical seismic motion was carried out, and the damping performance of rocking-suppression device was verified. (author)

  12. Effect of heat treatment on the microstructure of a Ni-Fe based superalloy for advanced ultra-supercritical power plant applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinbao Zhao; Yingying Dang; Hongfei Yin; Jintao Lu; Yong Yuan; Zhen Yang; Jingbo Yan; Yuefeng Gu

    2016-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and microhardness of a Ni–Fe based superalloy for 700 °C advanced ultra-supercritical coal-fired power plants was investigated. Results showed that the main phases in the alloy wereγ,γ′, MC and M23C6, and no harmful phase was observed in the alloy. M23C6-type carbides discretely distributed nearby grain boundaries as the alloy was aged at above 840 °C. The microhardness decreased with increasing aging temperature. The coarsening ofγ′led to the increment of microhardness at 780 °C and 810 °C for a short aging time, and a significant decrease in microhardness after aging at 840 °C. The aging temperature had more significant role on the micro-structure than holding time. Therefore, to obtain optimum strengthening effect for this alloy, the aging temperature should not exceed 810 °C.

  13. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide applies to nuclear power plants for which the total power supply comprises normal power supply (which is electric) and emergency power supply (which may be electric or a combination of electric and non-electric). In its present form the Guide provides general guidance for all types of emergency power systems (EPS) - electric and non-electric, and specific guidance (see Appendix A) on the design principles and the features of the emergency electric power system (EEPS). Future editions will include a second appendix giving specific guidance on non-electric power systems. Section 3 of this Safety Guide covers information on considerations that should be taken into account relative to the electric grid, the transmission lines, the on-site electrical supply system, and other alternative power sources, in order to provide high overall reliability of the power supply to the EPS. Since the nuclear power plant operator does not usually control off-site facilities, the discussion of methods of improving off-site reliability does not include requirements for facilities not under the operator's control. Sections 4 to 11 of this Guide provide information, recommendations and requirements that would apply to any emergency power system, be it electric or non-electric

  14. Proceedings of power plant dynamics, control and testing symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on reactor control and monitoring systems. Topics considered at the symposium included power plant modeling and simulation, reactor simulators, power reactor surveillance by noise analysis, in core instruments, computer codes, advanced data analysis techniques, loss of coolant simulation, nuclear power plant testing, reactor safety, expert systems, applications of artificial intelligence methodology, human factors, man-machine systems, and power plant diagnostics

  15. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  16. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The listing indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of August 15, 1977. The list includes all plants operating, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of antitrust license conditions and hearings, altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses

  17. The Mecca Biomass Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmac Energy, Inc. is constructing a 47 MW biomass-fired, electrical power generating plant in Mecca, California. Commercial operation is scheduled for April, 1992. Electrical power will be sold to Southern California Edison Company. The plant is unusual in its fuel choice and utilization. The fuel includes both wood chips and a variety of waste agricultural materials. These are processed and blended to provide a stable fuel product for the boiler. a recirculating fluidized bed boiler is used. The use of agricultural waste for fuel provides several benefits. Local truckers benefit by an added need for services. The plant itself, of course, provides employment opportunities and locally-generated electrical power

  18. Marine nuclear power plant simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a real time simulator of nuclear power plant for ship propulsion is described. The simulator is composed of a hybrid computer and an operating console. Simulated power plant is a 36 MWt PWR plant. Reactor kinetics, fuel temperature, primary coolant temperature, primary pressure, temperature and pressure of steam in the steam generator, steam flow, rotating speed of the propeller shaft, and various controlling system are simulated. Using this simulator, frequency response functions of the reactor power to the variation of reactivity and load were measured. (author)

  19. Owners of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of December 1, 1979. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docketed for NRC safety and envionmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally cancelled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of antitrust license conditions and hearings, altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified

  20. Owners of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  1. Owners of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, R.L.

    2000-01-12

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of November 1999. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  2. Role of advanced reactors in further nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the national long-term nuclear R and D program launched in 1992, an endeavor has been made in Korea to develop advanced nuclear reactor systems with significantly enhanced safety and economics from those of the current generation nuclear power plants. The advanced PWR nuclear reactor systems under development in Korea include 1300 MWe Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), 330 MWt Integral Type System Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART) for nuclear cogeneration, and 330 MWe Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER) in addition to the evolutionary enhancement of the 1000 MWt KSNPP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant). Three point design philosophy has been adopted for the development of the advanced reactors in Korea : enhancements on safety, economics and public acceptance of nuclear power. To enhance the safety of the advanced reactor systems, a strategy has been adopted to employ advanced design features as well as the passive safety design features. Economically viable design concepts also have been implemented in the evolutionary KSNPP, KNGR, and the SMART development. Economic competitiveness against the fossil plants also has been set as a major objective of the ALWR development program in Korea. These safer and more economical advanced reactors will better promote the public acceptance of the commercial use of the nuclear power and thus could be utilized to meet the forecasted national energy need in the early 21st century. International cooperation in the areas of ALWR development as well as improving public acceptance of the nuclear power is required. (author)

  3. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  4. Electricity production by advanced biomass power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solantausta, Y. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies; Bridgwater, T. [Aston Univ. Birmingham (United Kingdom); Beckman, D. [Zeton Inc., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-11-01

    This report gives the results of the Pyrolysis Collaborative Project organized by the International Energy Agency (IEA) under Biomass Agreement. The participating countries or organizations were Canada, European Community (EC), Finland, United States of America, and the United Kingdom. The overall objective of the project was to establish baseline assessments for the performance and economics of power production from biomass. Information concerning the performance of biomass-fuelled power plants based on gasification is rather limited, and even less data is available of on pyrolysis based power applications. In order to gain further insight into the potential for these technologies, this study undertook the following tasks: (1) Prepare process models to evaluate the cost and performance of new advanced biomass power production concepts, (2) Assess the technical and economic uncertainties of different biomass power concepts, (3) Compare the concepts in small scale and in medium scale production (5 - 50 MW{sub e}) to conventional alternatives. Processes considered for this assessment were biomass power production technologies based on gasification and pyrolysis. Direct combustion technologies were employed as a reference for comparison to the processes assessed in this study. Wood was used a feedstock, since the most data was available for wood conversion

  5. Nuclear power plant life management processes: Guidelines and practices for heavy water reactors. Report prepared within the framework of the Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors and on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time is right to address nuclear power plant life management and ageing management issues in terms of processes and refurbishments for long term operation and license renewal aspects of heavy water reactors (HWRs) because some HWRs are close to the design life. In general, HWR nuclear power plant (NPP) owners would like to keep their NPPs in service as long as they can be operated safely and economically. This involves the consideration of a number of factors, such as the material condition of the plant, comparison with current safety standards, the socio-political climate and asset management/ business planning considerations. This TECDOC deals with organizational and managerial means to implement effective plan life management (PLiM) into existing plant in operating HWR NPPs. This TECDOC discusses the current trend of PLiM observed in NPPs to date and an overview of PLiM programmes and considerations. This includes key objectives of such programs, regulatory considerations, an overall integrated approach, organizational and technology infrastructure considerations, importance of effective plant data management and finally, human issues related to ageing and finally integration of PLiM with economic planning. Also general approach to HWR PLiM, including the key PLiM processes, life assessment for critical structures and components, conditions assessment of structures and components and obsolescence is mentioned. Technical aspects are described on component specific technology considerations for condition assessment, example of a proactive ageing management programme, and Ontario power generation experiences in appendices. Also country reports from Argentina, Canada, India, the Republic of Korea and Romania are attached in the annex to share practices and experiences to PLiM programme. This TECDOC is primarily addressed to both the management (decision makers) and technical staff (engineers and scientists) of NPP owners/operators and technical support

  6. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  7. Nuclear Power Plant Simulation Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fran

    1979-01-01

    Presents a nuclear power plant simulation game which is designed to involve a class of 30 junior or senior high school students. Scientific, ecological, and social issues covered in the game are also presented. (HM)

  8. Hitachi's maintenance technologies for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract of high maintenance technologies for nuclear power plants, the technologies for new inspection system, maintenance of in-core instruments and piping, and technologies for high output power of plants are stated. The high maintenance technologies aim at long-term stable operation, increase of capacity factor, and decrease of exposure. Some examples of maintenance technologies of in-core equipments and primary loop recirculation (PLR) piping such as stress improvement and repair work are explained. Hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) and noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) for corrosion are described. Abstract of maintenance technologies, execution of water jet peening (WJP), outline of equipments of induction heating stress improvement (IHSI), the outside appearance of remote operation vehicle (ROV), advanced vortex nozzle (AVN), continuous cover blade (CCB), combined intermediate valve (CIV), moisture separator and heater (MSH), and evaluation examples of high output power of plants are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  9. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  10. The Daya Bay nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Daya Bay plant is nearing completion for the Guangdong Nuclear Power Joint Venture Company (GNPJVC), formed by the Chinese Government (75%) in conjunction with China Light Power, the Hong Kong utility (25%). 70% of generated power from two French-design 900 MWe class PWRs will be supplied to Hong Kong (the reference units: France's Gravelines-5 and -6). The Advanced Fuel Assembly designed by Framatome is used. The turbines are British-built (GEC) and designed differently from those installed in French units. 1 fig

  11. Robotics for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demand for robots in nuclear power plants is increasing of late in order to reduce workers' exposure to radiations. Especially, owing to the progress of microelectronics and robotics, earnest desire is growing for the advent of intellecturized robots that perform indeterminate and complicated security work. Herein represented are the robots recently developed for nuclear power plants and the review of the present status of robotics. (author)

  12. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides reduction of volumes of buildings and the area of the buildings having a plurality of plants. Namely, a plurality of reactor building areas corresponding to a plurality of plants are disposed in a reactor building. In each of the reactor building areas, apparatuses including reactors of the plants are disposed. In addition, a plurality of reactor wells, spent fuel pools, pools for temporary storing facilities are arranged on an identical line. With such a constitution, since various kinds of facilities in the reactor buildings can be used in common, the volume of buildings and areas for the buildings in the plants as a whole can be reduced. In addition, turbine buildings can be used in common by the same idea. As a result, the number of buildings, the volume of the buildings and the area of the buildings of the plants can be reduced as a whole thereby enabling to reduce the steps, costs and materials required for building construction. (I.S.)

  13. The development of advanced robotic technology. A study on the tele-existence and intelligent control of a robot system for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Myung Jin; Byun, Jueng Nam; Kim, Jong Hwan; Lee, Ju Jang; Bang, Seok Won; Chu, Gil Hwan; Park, Jong Cheol; Choi, Jong Seok; Yang, Jung Min; Hong, Sun Ki [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    To increase the efficiency of human intelligence it is required to develop an intelligent monitoring and system. In this research, we develop intelligent control methods related with tele-operation, tele-existence, real-time control technique, and intelligent control technique. Those are key techniques in tele-operation, especially for the repair and maintenance of nuclear power plants. The objective of this project is to develop of the tele-existence and intelligent control system for a robot used in the nuclear power plants. (author). 20 refs.

  14. Operate a Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpter, Bonnie J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom use of a computer program originally published in Creative Computing magazine. "The Nuclear Power Plant" (runs on Apple II with 48K memory) simulates the operating of a nuclear generating station, requiring students to make decisions as they assume the task of managing the plant. (JN)

  15. Maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides detailed guidance on the provisions of the Code on the Safety in Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-O(Rev.1) on the maintenance of structures, systems and components. Like the Code, the Guide forms part of the IAEA's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. Effective maintenance is essential for safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It not only ensures that the level of reliability and effectiveness of all plant structures, systems and components having a bearing on safety remains in accordance with design assumptions and intent, but also that the safety status of the plant is not adversely affected after commencement of operation. Nuclear power plant maintenance requires special attention because of: Limitations set by requirements that a minimum number of components remain operable even when the plant is shut down in order to ensure that all necessary safety functions are guaranteed; Difficulty of access to some plant items even when the plant is shut down, due to radiation protection constraints; Potential radiological hazards to site personnel and the public. This Guide covers the organizational and procedural aspects of maintenance but does not give detailed technical advice on the maintenance of particular plant items. It gives guidance on preventive and remedial measures necessary to ensure that all structures, systems and components important to safety are capable of performing as intended. The Guide covers the organizational and administrative requirements for establishing and implementing preventive maintenance schedules, repairing defective plant items, selecting and training maintenance personnel, providing maintenance facilities and equipment, procuring stores and spare parts, reviewing, controlling and carrying out plant modifications, and generating, collecting and retaining maintenance records for establishing and

  16. Advances in Solar Power Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, S. E.; Kosovic, B.; Drobot, S.

    2014-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research and partners are building a blended SunCast Solar Power Forecasting system. This system includes several short-range nowcasting models and improves upon longer range numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as part of the "Public-Private-Academic Partnership to Advance Solar Power Forecasting." The nowcasting models being built include statistical learning models that include cloud regime prediction, multiple sky imager-based advection models, satellite image-based advection models, and rapid update NWP models with cloud assimilation. The team has also integrated new modules into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) to better predict clouds, aerosols, and irradiance. The modules include a new shallow convection scheme; upgraded physics parameterizations of clouds; new radiative transfer modules that specify GHI, DNI, and DIF prediction; better satellite assimilation methods; and new aerosol estimation methods. These new physical models are incorporated into WRF-Solar, which is then integrated with publically available NWP models via the Dynamic Integrated Forecast (DICast) system as well as the Nowcast Blender to provide seamless forecasts at partner utility and balancing authority commercial solar farms. The improvements will be described and results to date discussed.

  17. Wind power plant system services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basit, Abdul; Altin, Müfit

    modern power system with large scale integration wind power. This study presents the investigation of the real-time balance control in a modern Danish power system, where WPPs can actively contribute to active power balance control. New solutions for the automatic generation control (AGC) dealing with...... WPPs are developed and analysed. The main results of this research work show that the WPPs can actively contribute to power balance control through primary and secondary response. The integration of WPPs control into the AGC is of high relevance, particularly in situations when wind power is...... beat risk unless the wind power plants (WPPs) are able to support and participate in power balancing services. The objective of this PhD project is to develop and analyse control strategies which can increase the WPPs capability to provide system services, such as active power balancing control, in a...

  18. High temperature corrosion in a biomass-fired power boiler : Reducing furnace wall corrosion in a waste wood-fired power plant with advanced steam data

    OpenAIRE

    Alipour, Yousef

    2013-01-01

    The use of waste (or recycled) wood as a fuel in heat and power stations is becoming more widespread in Sweden (and Europe), because it is CO2 neutral with a lower cost than forest fuel. However, it is a heterogeneous fuel with a high amount of chlorine, alkali and heavy metals which causes more corrosion than fossil fuels or forest fuel. A part of the boiler which is subjected to a high corrosion risk is the furnace wall (or waterwall) which is formed of tubes welded together. Waterwalls are...

  19. Maintenance of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance action of nuclear power plant (NPP) was described. Maintenance of NPP aimed at assurance of required function of NPP's equipment so as to prevent release of radioactive materials into the environment as well as attainment of stable operation of NPP. Philosophy of NPP safety was based on defense-in-depth or multiple barriers requiring specified function for the equipment. Preventive maintenance was essential to NPP's equipment and the scope of maintenance was decided on priority with adequate method and frequency of inspection. Most inspection was conducted during periodic inspection at outage. Repair or improvement works were performed if needed. Periodic inspection period was very long and then capacity factor of NPP was low in Japan compared with foreign data although frequency of unscheduled shutdown was very low. Introduction of reability- centered maintenance was requested based on past experiences of overhaul inspection. Technical evaluation of aged NPP had been conducted on aging phenomena and promotion of advanced maintenance was more needed. (T. Tanaka)

  20. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Nuclear Safety Standards programme for establishing Codes and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants (NPPs). The first edition of the present Safety Guide was developed in the early 1980s. The text has now been brought up-to-date, refined in several details and amended to include non-electrical diverse and independent power sources. This Guide applies to NPP for which the total power supply comprises a normal power supply and an emergency power supply (EPS), which may be electrical or a combination of electrical and non-electrical. The Guide provides general guidance for all types of EPS and specific guidance on the design safety requirements and the features of the electrical and non-electrical portions of the EPS. 9 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Power plant perspectives for sugarcane mills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomass, integral to life, is one of the main energy sources that modern technologies could widely develop, overcoming inefficient and pollutant uses. The sugarcane bagasse is one of the more abundant biomass. Moreover, the fluctuating sugar and energy prices force the sugarcane companies to implement improved power plants. Thanks to a multiyear collaboration between University of Rome and University of Piura and Chiclayo, this paper investigates, starting from the real data of an old sugarcane plant, the energy efficiency of the plant. Furthermore, it explores possible improvements as higher temperature and pressure Rankine cycles and innovative configurations based on gasifier plus hot gas conditioning and gas turbine or molten carbonate fuel cells. Even if the process of sugar extraction from sugarcane and the relative Rankine cycles power plants are well documented in literature, this paper shows that innovative power plant configurations can increase the bagasse-based cogeneration potential. Sugarcane companies can become electricity producers, having convenience in the use of sugarcane leaves and trash (when it is feasible). The worldwide implementation of advanced power plants, answering to a market competition, will improve significantly the renewable electricity produced, reducing CO2 emissions, and increasing economic and social benefits.

  2. Designing nuclear power plants for improved operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this publication is to compile demonstrated, experience based design guidelines for improving the operability and maintainability of nuclear power plants. The guidelines are for use principally in the design of new nuclear power plants, but should also be useful in upgrading existing designs. The guidelines derive from the experience of operating and maintaining existing nuclear power plants as well as from the design of recent plants. In particular these guidelines are based on and consistent with both the EPRI advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document, Volume 1, and the European Utility Requirements for LWR Nuclear Power Plants. 6 refs, 1 fig

  3. Energy sources and power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is obtained from various energy sources (coal, petroleum, natural gas, nuclear fuels, wind energy, solar energy, hydro power, biomass, geothermal energy). These differ in each case with respect to their availability, methods of their production and the required power plant technologies. As technologies of the future fuel cells and nuclear fusion are traded.

  4. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  5. TVA's nuclear power plant experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews TVA's nuclear power plant design and construction experience in terms of schedule and capital costs. The completed plant in commercial operation at Browns Ferry and six additional plants currently under construction represent the nation's largest single commitment to nuclear power and an ultimate investment of $12 billion by 1986. The presentation is made in three separate phases. Phase one will recapitulate the status of the nuclear power industry in 1966 and set forth the assumptions used for estimating capital costs and projecting project schedules for the first TVA units. Phase two describes what happened to the program in the hectic early 1979's in terms of expansion of scope (particularly for safety features), the dramatic increase in regulatory requirements, vendor problems, stretchout of project schedules, and unprecedented inflation. Phase three addresses the assumptions used today in estimating schedules and plant costs for the next ten-year period

  6. New advances in virtual plant research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Virtual plants are computer simulations of the growth, development and deployment of plants in a three-dimensional space. Over the past 20 years, significant pro-gress has been made in virtual plant modeling corresponding to the rapid advances in information technology. Virtual plant research has broad applications in agronomy, forestry, ecology, and remote sensing areas. In this review, we attempt to introduce the significance, modeling methodology, and main advances in virtual plant research and applications. The challenges associated with virtual plant modeling in agronomy applications, including the interaction mechanism between plant and environment and root system modeling, are also discussed. Insights into applications of virtual plants in agronomy are given in the areas of performing virtual experiments to accurately quantify the utilization of soil water and nutrients, to design crop ideotype on computers, and to improve crop planting.

  7. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modular design for an internal heat exchanger for a power reactor with separate primary and secondary cooling circuits, eg. a PWR, is described. The purpose of the design is to reduce the thermal stresses in the feed water system by a special arrangement of this. (JIW)

  8. Advances in Model-Based Design of Flexible and Prompt Energy Systems -- The CO2 Capture Plant at the Buggenum IGCC Power Station as a Test Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trapp, C.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-combustion CO2 capture applied to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is a promising technical solution to reduce CO2 emissions due to fossil-fuelled electricity generation in order to meet environmental targets in a carbon-constrained future. The pre-combustion capture pr

  9. A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasbir Gill

    2010-08-30

    Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica

  10. Baseline for coal powered plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequently, the cost performance of a specific power plant is measured by comparing the cost with the statistical average cost of plants through the industry. Unless all of the variables have been considered, this comparison may draw a misleading conclusion. The capital cost of a power plant varies with time (year of commercial operation and construction duration) due to the effect of inflation. Examine these cost data in detail revels that the variation in the cost is very wide. For example, published data shows that the ratio between the highest to the lowest cost per KW is more than 4 to 1 for the plants that commenced operation in 1984. The wide variation of the capital costs is explained below in relation to various influencing factors, differing conditions, and scope of work. This paper provides a defined baseline coal-fired plant, an analysis of its capital costs, and a discussion of the reasons for such wide variation

  11. Providing emergency supply of nuclear power plants

    OpenAIRE

    ROZMILER, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Work "Providing emergency power nuclear power plant" describes how solving their own consumption nuclear power plant, as emergency power supply is designed and how it should be a solution of known states of emergency, having an immediate impact on the power consumption of their own nuclear power plants. The aim of this thesis is to propose options to strengthen its own emergency power consumption of nuclear power plants, one might say-more resistant to harsh extremes, which could lead to loss...

  12. Submarine nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a ballast tank, and nuclear power facilities within the containment shell of a pressure resistance structure and a maintenance operator's entrance and a transmission cable cut-off device at the outer part of the containment shell, whereby after the construction, the shell is towed, and installed by self-submerging, and it can be refloated for repairs by its own strength. Constitution: Within a containment shell having a ballast tank and a pressure resisting structure, there are provided nuclear power facilities including a nuclear power generating chamber, a maintenance operator's living room and the like. Furthermore, a maintenance operator's entrance and exit device and a transmission cable cut-off device are provided within the shell, whereby when it is towed to a predetermined a area after the construction, it submerges by its own strength and when any repair inspection is necessary, it can float up by its own strength, and can be towed to a repair dock or the like. (Yoshihara, H.)

  13. Chemistry in power plants 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the VGB Powertech conference from 25th to 27th October, 2011, in Munich (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures and poster contributions were presented: (1) The revised VGB standard for water-steam-cycle Chemistry; (2) Switchover from neutral operation to oxygen treatment at the power station Stuttgart-Muenster of EnBW Kraftwerke AG; (3) Steam contamination with degradation products of organic matters present in the feedwater of the Lanxess-Rubber cogeneration plant; (4) Laboratory scale on-line noble metal deposition experiments simulating BWR plant conditions; (5) Building a new demin installation for the power plant EPZ in Borssele; (6) Replacement of the cooling tower installations in the nuclear power plant Goesgen-Daenien AG; (7) Aging of IEX resins in demin plants - Cost optimisation by adaptation of regenerants; (8) The largest DOW trademark EDI System at a combined cycled plant in Europe; (9) Upgrading river Main water to boiler feed water - Experiences with ultrafiltration; (10) Experiences with treatment of the water-steam-cycle in the RDF power plant Nehlsen Stavenhagen with film-forming amines; (11) Comparative modelling of the bubbles thermal collapse and cavitations for estimation of bubbles collapse influence; (12) Overcoming the steam quality - issues from an HRSG for the production of process steam; (13) Legionella - new requirements for power plant operation; (14) How the right chemistry in the FGD helps to improve the removal in the waste water treatment plant; (15) High efficiency filtration in dry/semi-dry FGD plants; (16) Expanding the variety of renewable fuels in the biomass power plant Timelkam using the chemical input control; (17) Corrosion, operating experiences and process improvements to increase the availability and operating time of the biomass power plant Timelkam; (18) The influence of temperature on the measurement of the conductivity of highly diluted solutions; (19) A multiparameter instrumentation approach

  14. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plant of the present invention can suppress the amount of clad in feedwater when drains of a moisture content separation heater or a high pressure feedwater heater are recovered. That is, the moisture content separation heater has ferrite or austenite type stainless steel heat transfer pipes. A chromium-enriched layer is formed on the surface of the heat transfer pipe by chromizing treatment or flame spraying. Then, a stainless steel heat transfer pipe having chromium-enriched layer is incorporated to at least one of the moisture content separation heater or the high pressure feedwater heater. During plant operation, the temperature of heated steams is as high as 235 to 282degC. Accordingly, this is a severe corrosion region for ferrite or austenite stainless steel. However, the chromium-enriched layer of excellent corrosion resistance is formed on the surface of the heat transfer pipe. Accordingly, metal ingredients are less leached. As a result, even if the drains are recovered to feedwater, increase of concentration of the clads in the feedwater can be prevented. (I.S.)

  15. Thermal Power Plant Performance Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the reliability and availability of power plants is frequently based on simple indexes that do not take into account the criticality of some failures used for availability analysis. This criticality should be evaluated based on concepts of reliability which consider the effect of a component failure on the performance of the entire plant. System reliability analysis tools provide a root-cause analysis leading to the improvement of the plant maintenance plan.   Taking in view that the power plant performance can be evaluated not only based on  thermodynamic related indexes, such as heat-rate, Thermal Power Plant Performance Analysis focuses on the presentation of reliability-based tools used to define performance of complex systems and introduces the basic concepts of reliability, maintainability and risk analysis aiming at their application as tools for power plant performance improvement, including: ·         selection of critical equipment and components, ·         defini...

  16. Financing solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been built following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply states, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects form the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies

  17. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised in debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies

  18. Pressurised fluidised bed power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, S.A.; Anderson, L. [ABB Carbon AB, Finspong (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    The combined experience from almost 75,000 hours of operation on widely different coals in Pressurised Fluidised bed Combined-cycle (PFBC) plants in Sweden, Spain, the US and Japan have demonstrated the viability of ABB`s PFBC technology and the general simplicity of the concept, as well as plant control principles and serviceability. This technology is now commercially offered world-wide and PFBC is being recognized as a competitive solution for power and for combined heat and power applications. The combined-cycle feature makes PFBC highly efficient for power generation. When compared with conventional power plants, and for the same steam conditions, a PFBC plant typically produces at least 10% more electricity from the same amount of coal. There is potential for future additional efficiency increases. The coals used so far in the existing PFBC power plants include bituminous coals with a wide range of sulphur and ash contents, and a sub-bituminous Spanish `black lignite` with extremely high and variable levels of sulphur, ash, and moisture. Brown coal from the eastern parts of Germany will be used as the fuel in a newly ordered PFBC plant in Cottbus, Germany. Oil shale, petcoke, anthracite, and different types of biomass mixed with coal are presently being considered for other PFBC projects under discussion. PFBC is suitable for greenfield plants, but a market also exists for PFBC repowering of older steam plants. Repowering provides an opportunity to convert older, low capacity factor units into assets that lower the system`s production costs as well as improving environmental performance. Ash utilisation also holds promise, elevating the ash from a disposable waste to a valuable resource. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The EU power plant conceptual study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) was launched in 1988 in the frame of the European Fusion Programme. The objective of the PPCS is to demonstrate: the credibility of fusion power plant design(s); the claims for the safety and environmental advantages and for the economic viability of fusion power. In addition results of the PPCS Programme will help to define the R and D Programme. The strategy of the PPCS is to study a limited number of Plant Models that span the expected range of possibilities. These range from an advanced version of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) through to the presently foreseen ultimately achievable values of the plasma physics and technology parameters, together with a range of blanket and high heat flux technologies. The primary focus of detailed studies, and the first work to be undertaken, is on two Plant Models that emphasise limited extrapolation, since credibility within the philosophy of a possible fast-track development of fusion power is a major aim of the study. The remainder of this paper discusses the physics studies and the preliminary technology studies that have formed the launching pad for the detailed studies of Plant Models within the PPCS. The discussion concentrates on the 'limited extrapolation' Models that are being studied first, with brief reference to the Models that are further from ITER

  20. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent liquid wastes from being discharged out of the system by processing to recover them in the nuclear reactor and reusing them. Constitution: Discharge of liquid wastes to the surrounding atmosphere are completely eliminated by collecting floor drains, a part of processing water for the regeneration of liquid wastes, non-radioactive steam drains and laundry drains conventionally discharged so far out of the system, processing them in a concentrator, a desalter or the like into water of a high purity and extremely low radioactive concentration, storing the water in an exclusive storage tank and supplying it as a steam or supplementing water to each portion in the plant that requires water of such high purity and extremely low radioactivity. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Intelligent distributed control for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project was initiated in September 1989 as a three year project to develop and demonstrate Intelligent Distributed Control (IDC) for Nuclear Power Plants. There were two primary goals of this research project. The first goal was to combine diagnostics and control to achieve a highly automated power plant as described by M.A. Schultz. The second goal was to apply this research to develop a prototype demonstration on an actual power plant system, the EBR-2 steam plant. Described in this Final (Third Annual) Technical Progress Report is the accomplishment of the project's final milestone, an in-plant intelligent control experiment conducted on April 1, 1993. The development of the experiment included: simulation validation, experiment formulation and final programming, procedure development and approval, and experimental results. Other third year developments summarized in this report are: (1) a theoretical foundation for Reconfigurable Hybrid Supervisory Control, (2) a steam plant diagnostic system, (3) control console design tools and (4) other advanced and intelligent control

  2. Engineering and Economic Analysis of an Advanced Ultra-Supercritical Pulverized Coal Power Plant with and without Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Task 7. Design and Economic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booras, George [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Powers, J. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Riley, C. [General Electric, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hendrix, H. [Hendrix Engineering Solutions, Inc., Calera, AL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report evaluates the economics and performance of two A-USC PC power plants; Case 1 is a conventionally configured A-USC PC power plant with superior emission controls, but without CO2 removal; and Case 2 adds a post-combustion carbon capture (PCC) system to the plant from Case 1, using the design and heat integration strategies from EPRI’s 2015 report, “Best Integrated Coal Plant.” The capture design basis for this case is “partial,” to meet EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standard, which was initially proposed as 500 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1100 lb-CO2/MWh (gross), but modified in August 2015 to 635 kg-CO2/MWh (gross) or 1400 lb-CO2/MWh (gross). This report draws upon the collective experience of consortium members, with EPRI and General Electric leading the study. General Electric provided the steam cycle analysis as well as v the steam turbine design and cost estimating. EPRI performed integrated plant performance analysis using EPRI’s PC Cost model.

  3. Control strategies based on effective power factor for distributed generation power plants during unbalanced grid voltage

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho Santiago, Antonio; Castilla Fernández, Miguel; Miret Tomàs, Jaume; Matas Alcalá, José; Guzmán Solà, Ramon; de Sousa Pérez, Óscar; Martí Colom, Pau; García de Vicuña Muñoz de la Nava, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Unbalanced voltages in three-phase power systems is a common perturbation propagated along the grid. Distributed Generation plants have gained widespread attention due to their capability to improve power quality in a distributed manner, including voltage unbalance mitigation. A conventional control strategy to command power plants during balanced grid voltages, is the use of power factor to inject/absorb reactive power depending on grid conditions. Advanced control strategies during unbalanc...

  4. Modernizing steam turbines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic and safe operation of nuclear power plants requires reliable steam turbines with high efficiencies. The progress in flow mechanics achieved over the past few years has allowed the use of powerful methods of flow calculation in developments of new blading with greatly enhanced efficiencies. Thanks to the latest manufacturing techniques, the newly developed blading systems can be produced at low cost. Next to progress in flow mechanics, also the broadbased use of advanced finite-element calculations resulted in a more thorough grasp of the many problems associated with structural mechanics assessment of steam turbine components. The theoretical methods have been supplemented by comprehensive efforts in fracture mechanics and experimental materials studies, thus helping to create a reliable knowledge base which will help to avoid the dreaded stress corrosion cracking phenomenon, in components of steam turbines. The measures introduced to improve operational reliability already in design and manufacture have been supplemented by modern measurement techniques. Thus, e.g., a system for contactless measurements of blade vibrations allows continuous blade monitoring while the steam turbine is in operation. All these advances are being used successfully in upgrading steam turbines for nuclear power plants. The article contains descriptions of the measures taken to increase efficiency, operational reliability, and service life, and includes a forecast of further improvements to be expected especially in increases in efficiency. A survey of past and planned revamping measures in nuclear power plant turbines confirms the validity of this approach. (orig.)

  5. Thermal power plants and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent versions of the air quality models which are reviewed and approved from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are analysed in favour of their application in simple and complex terrain, different meteorological conditions and modifications in the sources of pollutant emissions. Improvement of the standard methods for analysis of the risks affecting the environment from different energy sources has been carried out. The application of the newly introduced model enabled (lead to performing) risk analysis of the coal power plants compared to other types of energy sources. Detailed investigation of the risk assessment and perception from coal power plants, has been performed and applied to the Macedonian coal power plants. Introducing the concept of 'psychological pollution', a modification of the standard models and programs for risk assessment from various energy sources has been suggested (proposed). The model has been applied to REK Bitola, where statistically relevant differences in relation to the control groups have been obtained. (Original)

  6. Ocean power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembicki, E.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1980 on the shores of the Hawaiian Islands, a floating laboratory of the United States was successfully introduced for testing a heat exchanger and pipes for collecting cold water of the OTES with power of 1 MW. The first American OTES N=10-40 MW should start operation in 1985. By the year 2000, ..sigma..N of the U.S. OTES should reach 10 GW. The Japanese OTES N=10-25 MW should start up in 1989. The experimental OTES N=100 KW has been in operation since October 1981 on the Nauru Island. An OTES of 2 MW is under construction. The concern Empain-Schneider is involved in planning the OTES of closed cycle in France, and the concern CGE is planning the OTES of open cycle.

  7. Temperature Effect to Solar Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Modestas Pikutis

    2015-01-01

    There are a lot of different efficiency photovoltaic cells, which are used in solar power plants. All of these different photovoltaic cells are affected by different environment conditions. Maximum power point tracking is the main way to increase solar power plant efficiency. Mostly systems of maximum power point tracking are slow or inaccurate, that means the system cannot stay in maximum power point in solar power plant. This is the main reason why mostly of solar power plants are working n...

  8. Ways to Improve Russian Coal-Fired Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal is an important fuel for the electric power industry of Russia, especially in Ural and the eastern part of the country. It is fired in boilers of large (200 – 800 MW) condensing power units and in many cogeneration power plants with units rated at 50 – 180 MW. Many coal-fired power plants have been operated for more than 40 – 50 years. Though serviceable, their equipment is obsolete and does not comply with the current efficiency, environmental, staffing, and availability standards. It is urgent to retrofit and upgrade such power plants using advanced equipment, engineering and business ideas. Russian power-plant engineering companies have designed such advanced power units and their equipment such as boilers, turbines, auxiliaries, process and environmental control systems similar to those produced by the world’s leading manufacturers. Their performance and ways of implementation are discussed

  9. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a condensate cleanup system and a reactor water cleanup system of a BWR-type reactor, in which primary coolants flow, there is disposed a filtering and desalting device using hollow thread membrane filter and ion exchange resin for a condensate cleanup system, and using a high temperature filter made of a metal, a metal oxide or ceramics as a filtering material and a precoat filter made of a powdery ion exchange resin as a filtering material for a reactor water cleanup system. This can completely remove cruds generated in the condensate system. Since the reactor water cleanup system comprises the powdery resin precoat-type filtering and desalting device and the high temperature filter using ceramics, ionic impurities such as radioactive materials can be removed. Accordingly, cruds are not carried into the inside of the reactor, and since the radioactive concentration in the reactor water is reduced, radiation exposure upon periodical inspection can be minimized almost to zero, to attain a clean plant. (T.M.)

  10. Economic analysis of the need for advanced power sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the economic need for an advanced power source, be it fusion, solar, or some other concept. However, calculations were also performed assuming abandonment of the LMFBR program, so breeder benefits are a by-product of this study. The model used was the ALPS linear programming system for forecasting optimum power growth patterns. Total power costs were calculated over a planning horizon from 1975 to 2041 and discounted at 71/2 percent. The benefit of a particular advanced power source is simply the reduction in total power cost resulting from its introduction. Since data concerning advanced power sources (APS) are speculative, parametric calculations varying introduction dates and capital costs about a hypothetical APS plant were performed. Calculations were also performed without the LMFBR to determine the effect of the breeder on the benefits of an advanced power source. Other data used in the study, such as the energy demand curve and uranium resource estimates, are given in the Appendix, and a list of the 11 power plants used in this study is given. Calculations were performed for APS introduction dates of 2001 and 2011. Estimates of APS capital costs included cases where it was assumed the costs were $50/kW and $25/kW higher than the LMFBR. In addition, cases where APS and LMFBR capital costs are identical were also considered. It is noted that the APS capital costs used in this study are not estimates of potential advanced power system plant costs, but were chosen to compute potential dollar benefits of advanced power systems under extremely optimistic assumptions. As a further example, all APS fuel cycle costs were assumed to be zero

  11. Power plant conceptual studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been a study of conceptual designs for commercial fusion power plants. It focussed on five power plant models, named PPCS A, B, AB, C and D, which are illustrative of a wider spectrum of possibilities. They are all based on the tokamak concept and they have approximately the same net electrical power output, 1500 MWe. These span a range from relatively near-term, based on limited technology and plasma physics extrapolations, to an advanced conception. All five PPCS plant models differ substantially from the models that formed the basis of earlier European studies. They also differ from one another, which lead to differences in economic performance and in the details of safety and environmental impacts. The main emphasis of the study was on system integration. Systems analyses were used to produce self-consistent plant parameter sets with approximately optimal economic characteristics for all models. In the PPCS models, the favourable, inherent, features of fusion have been exploited to provide substantial safety and environmental advantages. The broad features of the safety and environmental conclusions of previous studies have been confirmed and demonstrated with increased confidence. Two key innovative developments made within the PPCS study are worthy of a special note. One is the development of a scheme for the scheduled replacement of the internal components which shows the potential for an overall plant availability in excess of 75%. The other is a conceptual design for a helium-cooled divertor, which permits the toleration of heat loads of at least 10 MW/m2. The PPCS study has highlighted the need for specific design and R and D activities, in addition to those already underway within the European long term R and D programme, as well as the need to clarify the concept of DEMO, the device that will bridge the gap between ITER and the first-of-a-kind fusion power plant. (author)

  12. Packing solutions for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbestos packings are being replaced in more and more countries with alternative products. This paper discusses modern packing solutions for valves and pumps in power plants. Die-moulded packing rings made of expanded graphite foil are described m detail, with recommendations for correct installation. Application examples for spring-loaded valves and cover lid seals are given. As an alternative for repair and service use, a braided expanded graphite packing reinforced with Inconel wire is described. Proposals for sealing various pump applications in power plants are also made. (Author)

  13. Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFARII) power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Compact Fusion Advanced Rankine (CFARII) power cycle is a direct plasma energy conversion scheme for inertial fusion (ICF) and magnetically-insulated, inertially confined fusion (MICF) reactors utilizing: (1) conversion of plasma thermal ionization and thermal energy into kinetic energy of a supersonic plasma jet, (2) conversion of the plasma jet kinetic energy into DC electricity by slowing down in an ''impulse'' type of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator, and (3) condensation and heat rejection of the exhaust plasma on droplets of recirculating condensate (''raindrop'' condensor). A preliminary evaluation of a particular reference case CFARII Balance-of-Plant (BoP) is found sufficiently attractive (52% gross cycle efficiency, 40 million 1991 $ BoP for 1 GWe gross electric) to warrant further work on several design issues

  14. Loviisa nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The APROS Simulation Environment has been developed since 1986 by Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). It provides tools, solution algorithms and process components for use in different simulation systems for design, analysis and training purposes. One of its main nuclear applications is the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant Analyzer (LPA). The Loviisa Plant Analyzer includes all the important plant components both in the primary and in the secondary circuits. In addition, all the main control systems, the protection system and the high voltage electrical systems are included. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear power plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current licensing emphasis is different from that existing when older nuclear power plants received their operating licenses. Today, there is increased regulatory focus on utility performance measured through new inspections such as the safety system functional inspection and the safety systems outage modifications inspection; and the use of performance indicators. These programs are intended to identify poorer performing plants and concentrate on improving overall plant performance. This paper discusses how, in an attempt to improve the maintenance performance of the nuclear industry, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently began work on a maintenance rule. In addition, the NRC will require partial probabilistic risk evaluations for each plant that will provide new insights as to a plant's risk. Risk information is being used to prioritize inspections

  16. Plant power supply device in an atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To avoid tripping of a 6.9 kV class bus line and to decrease a large electric current momentarily flown into a start transformer, in despite of the fact that the bus line is not changed over resulted from actuation of a generator lock-out relay. Structure: An atomic power plant comprising a bus line for a two-system plant power supply and a start transformer receiving power from an exterior system, characterized by the provision of a breaker for effecting the change-over of only one system bus line simultaneously with the reactor scrum and a breaker for effecting the change-over of the other bus line before a generator is tripped as a result of actuation of a generator lock-out relay in a predetermined period of time after the reactor scrum, to thereby reduce the momentary large current to the start transformer. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Solar thermionic power plant. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elfotouh, F.; Almassary, M.; Fatmi, H.

    It has been shown that the geometric configuration of a central receiver solar electric power plant SEPP can be optimized for the high power density and concentration required for the operation of a thermionic converter. The working period of a TDC constructed on the top of a SEPP in Riyadh area is 5 to 6 hours per day in winter and 6 to 8 hours in summer. At the 25 percent conversion efficiency achieved by a laboratory test model, a reduction in the cost per unit power of 8-12 per cent is expected. The spectral behavior and work functions of the working surface of the thermionic electrodes were investigated

  18. Noise from wind power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, the generation of noise at wind power plants and the character of the sound is described. The propagation of the sound and its dependence on the structure of the ground and on wind and temperature is treated next. Models for calculation of the noise emission are reviewed and examples of applications are given. Different means for reducing the disturbances are described

  19. Fire protection in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphex-CK 23 is a unique sodium fire extinction product. Minimum amounts of powder are required for very fast action. The sodium can be put to use again, when the fire has been extinguished. It can be applied in other industrial branches and with other metals, e.g. sodium/potassium circuits or lithium coolant in power plants.

  20. Docommissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German utilities operating nuclear power plants have long concerned themselves with aspects of decommissioning and for this purpose an engineering company was given a contract to study the entire spectrum of decommissioning. The results of this study have been available in autumn 1980 and it is possible to discuss all the aspects of decommissioning on a new basis. Following these results no change in the design concept of LWR nuclear power plants in operation or under construction is necessary because the techniques, necessary for decommissioning, are fully available today. The technical feasibility of decommissioning for power plants of Biblis A and KRB type has been shown in detail. The calculations of the quantity of waste produced during removal of a nuclear power plant could be confirmed and it could be determined with high procedure. The radiation dose to the decommissioning personnel is in the range of the radiation protection regulations and is in the same range as the radiation dose to the personnel within a yearly inservice inspection. (AF)

  1. World nuclear power plant capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the background information for statistics and analysis developed by NUKEM in its monthly Market Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The assessments in this Special Report are based on the continuous review of individual nuclear power plant projects. This Special Report begins with tables summarizing a variety of nuclear power generating capacity statistics for 1990. It continues with a brief review of the year's major events regarding each country's nuclear power program. The standard NUKEM Market Report tables on nuclear plant capacity are given on pages 24 and 25. Owing to space limitations, the first year shown is 1988. Please refer to previous Special Reports for data covering earlier years. Detailed tables for each country list all existing plants as well as those expected by NUKEM to be in commercial operation by the end of 2005. An Appendix containing a list of abbreviations can be found starting on page 56. Only nuclear power plants intended for civilian use are included in this Special Report. Reactor lifetimes are assumed to be 35 years for all light water reactors and 30 years for all other reactor types, unless other data or definite decommissioning dates have been published by the operators. (orig./UA)

  2. The Advanced BWR Nuclear Plant: Safe, economic nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, J.R. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The safety and economics of Advanced BWR Nuclear Power Plants are outlined. The topics discussed include: ABWR Programs: status in US and Japan; ABWR competitiveness: safety and economics; SBWR status; combining ABWR and SBWR: the passive ABWR; and Korean/GE partnership.

  3. Advanced power reactors with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of nuclear safety is the protection of individuals, society and environment against radiological hazards from accidental releases of radioactive materials contained in nuclear reactors. Hereto, these materials are enclosed by several successive barriers and the barriers protected against mishaps and accidents by a multi-level system of safety precautions. The evolution of reactor technology continuously improves this concept and its implementation. At a world-wide scale, several advanced reactor concepts are currently being considered, some of them already at a design stage. Essential safety objectives include both further strengthening the prevention of accidents and improving the containment of fission products should an accident occur. The proposed solutions differ considerably with regard to technical principles, plant size and time scales considered for industrial application. Two typical approaches can be distinguished: The first approach basically aims at an evolution of power reactors currently in use, taking into account the findings from safety research and from operation of current plants. This approach makes maximum use of proven technology and operating experience but may nevertheless include new safety features. The corresponding designs are often termed 'large evolutionary'. The second approach consists in more fundamental changes compared to present designs, often with strong emphasis on specific passive features protecting the fuel and fuel cladding barriers. Owing to the nature and capability of those passive features such 'innovative designs' are mostly smaller in power output. The paper describes the basic objectives of such developments and illustrates important technical concepts focusing on next generation plants, i.e. designs to be available for industrial application until the end of this decade. 1 tab. (author)

  4. Financing Solar Thermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, H. W.; Kistner, R.

    1999-11-01

    The commercialization of concentrating solar power technology took a major step forward in the mid 1980s and early 1990s with the development of the SEGS plants in California. Over the years they have proven that parabolic trough power technologies are the most cost-effective approach for commercial scale solar power generation in the sunbelt countries of the world. However, the question must be asked why no additional solar power plants have been build following the bankruptcy of the developer of the SEGS projects, LUZ International Limited. Although many believe the SEGS projects were a success as a result of parabolic trough technology they employ, in truth, the SEGS projects were developed simply because they represented an attractive opportunity for investors. Simply stated, no additional projects have been developed because no one has been able to put together a similarly attractive financial package to potential investors. More than $1.2 billion in private capital was raised i n debt and equity financing for the nine SEGS plants. Investors and bankers who make these investments are the real clients for solar power technologies. They are not interested in annual solar to electric efficiencies, but in risk, return on investments, and coverage ratios. This paper will take a look at solar power projects from the financier's perspective. The challenge in moving forward is to attract private investors, commercial lenders, and international development agencies and to find innovative solutions to the difficult issues that investment in the global power market poses for solar power technologies.

  5. Conception and design of steam power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manual presents the fundamentals of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics, the main components of steam power plants, and the power generation process. The following concepts and subjects are discussed at length: steam generator; steam turbines; turbogenerators; condensers; cooling technology; water/steam cycle and water treatment; design data of fossil-fuelled power plants; design and optimisation of nuclear power plant thermodynamics; pipelines and fittings; control systems in steam power plants; connection to the electricity grid and self-supply of thermal power plants; power plant transformer concepts and definitions. (HAG)

  6. Development of an Optimum Tracer Set for Apportioning Emissions of Individual Power Plants Using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements and Advanced Receptor Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Ondov; Gregory Beachley

    2007-07-05

    In previous studies, 11 elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn) were determined in 30-minute aerosol samples collected with the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler (SEAS; Kidwell and Ondov, 2001, 2004; SEAS-II) in several locations in which air quality is influenced by emissions from coal- or oil-fired power plants. At this time resolution, plumes from stationary high temperature combustion sources are readily detected as large excursions in ambient concentrations of elements emitted by these sources (Pancras et al. ). Moreover, the time-series data contain intrinsic information on the lateral diffusion of the plume (e.g., {sigma}{sub y}), which Park et al. (2005 and 2006) have exploited in their Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM), to calculate emission rates of SO{sub 2} and 11 elements (mentioned above) from four individual coal- and oil-fired power plants in the Tampa Bay area. In the current project, we proposed that the resolving power of source apportionment methods might be improved by expanding the set of maker species and that there exist some optimum set of marker species that could be used. The ultimate goal was to determine the utility of using additional elements to better identify and isolate contributions of individual power plants to ambient levels of PM and its constituents. And, having achieved better resolution, achieve, also, better emission rate estimates. In this study, we optimized sample preparation and instrumental protocols for simultaneous analysis of 28 elements in dilute slurry samples collected with the SEAS with a new state-of-the-art Thermo-Systems, Inc., X-series II, Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and reanalyzed the samples previously collected in Tampa during the modeling period studied by Park et al. (2005) in which emission rates from four coal- and oil-fired power plants affected air quality at the sampling site. In the original model, Park et al

  7. Lessons Learned after Nuclear Power Plants and Hydropower Plants Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The World is becoming more open and free for communication. However, the experience (positive or negative) is still badly cross over sectorial borders. I would like to illustrate the point with the examples, even with several unexpected ones. I would like to start with a few words regarding the Sayano – Shushenskaya Hydro Power Plant accident and the factors that caused it. Sayano – Shushenskaya Hydro Power Plant is a unique Hydro Power Plant with efficiency factor of 96 %. Nevertheless, the efficiency factor, in particular, caused a series of restrictions: hydro-electric units vibration amplitude must not exceed 4 micron!!! (Slide 1: Vibration amplitude dependence on output capacity) As it is clearly seen, there is a so called “prohibited area”, which the hydro-electric unit must pass over. Operations in the area are prohibited in accordance with the regulatory documents. However, due to the changes that occurred in Russian power supply industry, the hydro-electric unit passed through the prohibited area more than 12 times, if we take into account only the day of the accident. The bolts keeping the turbine cover, keeping water apart from the machinery hall, were too much released. The mentioned above reasons led to the hydro-electric unit disruption and the machinery hall flooding. Water inflow was possible to stop by putting down the regulating valves. However, the regulating valves control console was in the flooded machinery hall. There was standby emergency control console, but it was in the machinery hall, as well. The machinery hall was flooded, consequently, main and standby systems were destroyed. Moreover, the machinery hall, where all the units were disposed, was a huge hall without dividing walls, etc. (Photo) Take a look at the next slide. (Photo – Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant machinery hall). Take note of Fukushima–1 Nuclear Power Plant: standby power supply source was situated in the same place and destroyed by water. All the

  8. Safety for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York have reopened the debate in Germany abut the safety of existing nuclear power plants. On the one hand, it culminated in the demand, made from a prominent political position, to disconnect from the grid prematurely five of the older nuclear power plants because they offered no sufficient protection from terrorist attacks carried out by means of commercial airliners. On the other hand, the competent German Federal Ministry of the Interior to this day has not been able to detect a hazardous situation for Germany which would require nuclear power plants (or other facilities) to be shut down - temporarily -so as to reduce their hazard potential. The legal situation is discussed in detail. It is evident that the debate about the safety of any kind of industrial plants will go on and will be revived by any kind of event. Despite the growing need for public safety, it must not be overlooked in the public debate that an absolute exclusion of risk is impossible and that, consequently, there can be no absolute protection of any legal object. (orig.)

  9. Advanced Power System Analysis Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    As a continuing effort to assist in the design and characterization of space power systems, the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power and Propulsion Office developed a powerful computerized analysis tool called System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE). This year, SPACE was used extensively in analyzing detailed operational timelines for the International Space Station (ISS) program. SPACE was developed to analyze the performance of space-based photovoltaic power systems such as that being developed for the ISS. It is a highly integrated tool that combines numerous factors in a single analysis, providing a comprehensive assessment of the power system's capability. Factors particularly critical to the ISS include the orientation of the solar arrays toward the Sun and the shadowing of the arrays by other portions of the station.

  10. Impact on the bar value in hot by the introduction of advanced control bars in the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent dates the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power station (CNLV) has acquired new designs of control bars, this new type of bars presents modifications important in their design. For what is important to analyze their performance inside those reactors of this nuclear power station. Presently work is shown the behavior of the nucleus of the reactor in hot condition (HFP) when three different types of control bar are used. The first of them corresponds the one that initially has been used in this power station and that we will call original. The second type of control bars, it corresponds to an advanced type and it is the first design different from the original and it corresponds to a bar design that it includes Hafnium (Hf) like one of their neutronic absorption characteristics. The third, denoted as 2AV, include besides the material of the second type new design characteristics, and it is the last finish bar type that it has been introduced in the operation of the reactors of the CNLV. With base in the studied cases is found that the bars 2AV have a total power value, 7.6 % bigger respect the bars 1AV; and in turn the bars 1AV, 6.1 % bigger with respect the ORG control bars. (Author)

  11. Proceedings of an international workshop on passive system reliability - A challenge to reliability engineering and licensing of advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop provided a forum for the exchange of information on the technical issues associated with assessing the reliability of passive systems in the context of nuclear safety, regulatory practices and probabilistic safety analysis. Special emphasis was placed on the reliability of the systems based on thermal hydraulics, for which the methods are still in developing phase. Issues and discussions topics included lessons learned from designing passive systems, developing methodologies, performed studies, field experience with passive systems and need for future development. These proceedings provide a compilation of the papers presented and a summary of the discussions. Designs for Passive Systems have been and are currently being developed for new nuclear power plants. Based on the results of the survey performed by WGRisk and the workshop papers and discussions it is apparent that progress is being made in the development of methodologies to deal with the reliability of the Passive Systems being designed. In the three (3) main areas reviewed during the workshop: development and use, methodologies and licensing, the following conclusions were derived: 1. Development and Use of Passive Systems - Any new reactor being designed will most likely contain passive systems. Testing of passive systems has been performed by several groups but further testing and development is still required. Discussions are already in progress to make clear how passive systems should be introduced in a design; e.g., back-up of an active system, BOPHR strategy, etc. 2. Methodologies - While work is being performed on methodologies and progress is being made, a lack of data exists mainly since very little or no operational experience is available. This is especially true in the area of thermal hydraulics and the result is a large amount of uncertainties. 3. Licensing - Very little progress has been made relating to licensing of passive systems. This mainly due to the fact that it is

  12. Advanced genetic tools for plant biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, WS; Yuan, JS; Stewart, CN

    2013-10-09

    Basic research has provided a much better understanding of the genetic networks and regulatory hierarchies in plants. To meet the challenges of agriculture, we must be able to rapidly translate this knowledge into generating improved plants. Therefore, in this Review, we discuss advanced tools that are currently available for use in plant biotechnology to produce new products in plants and to generate plants with new functions. These tools include synthetic promoters, 'tunable' transcription factors, genome-editing tools and site-specific recombinases. We also review some tools with the potential to enable crop improvement, such as methods for the assembly and synthesis of large DNA molecules, plant transformation with linked multigenes and plant artificial chromosomes. These genetic technologies should be integrated to realize their potential for applications to pressing agricultural and environmental problems.

  13. Optimization of Maputo Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Abacar, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The Electricidade de Moçambique, E.P. (EDM) is the power utility in Mozambique, responsible to generate, transport and distribute electricity all over the country. The company has three gas turbines installed at Maputo Power Plant. All units burn diesel oil and are used only for back up. Currently only the unit #2 is available for operation. The main constraint that EDM faces is the high operation costs due to diesel price. Hence the company is considering converting units #2 and #3 to burn n...

  14. Fusion power plant studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European fusion programme is reactor oriented and it is aimed at the successive demonstration of the scientific, the technological and the economic feasibility of fusion power. For a reactor-oriented fusion development programme, it is essential to have a clear idea of the ultimate goal of the programme, namely a series of models of fusion power plants, in order to define the correct strategy and to assess the pertinence of the on-going activities. The European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) has been a study of conceptual designs for commercial fusion power plants. It focused on five power plant models, named PPCS A, B, AB, C and D, which are illustrative of a wider spectrum of possibilities. They are all based on the tokamak concept and they have approximately the same net electrical power output, 1500 MWe. These span a range from relatively near-term, based on limited technology and plasma physics extrapolations, to an advanced conception. All five PPCS plant models differ substantially from the models that formed the basis of earlier European studies. They also differ from one another, which lead to differences in economic performance and in the details of safety and environmental impacts. The main emphasis of the PPCS was on system integration. Systems analyses were used to produce self-consistent plant parameter sets with approximately optimal economic characteristics for all models. In the PPCS models, the favourable, inherent, features of fusion have been exploited to provide substantial safety and environmental advantages. The broad features of the safety and environmental conclusions of previous studies have been confirmed and demonstrated with increased confidence. The PPCS study highlighted the need for specific design and R and D activities, in addition to those already underway within the European long term R and D programme, as well as the need to clarify the concept of DEMO, the device that will bridge the gap between ITER and the first

  15. Nuclear power plants and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of nuclear power plants is analysed in details. The fundamental principles of reactors are described as well as the problems of safety involved with the reactor operation and the quantity and type of radioactive released to the environment. It shows that the amount of radioactive is very long. The reactor accidents has occurred, as three mile island, are also analysed. (M.I.A.)

  16. An interface redesign for the feed-water system of the advanced boiling water reactor in a nuclear power plant in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A well-designed human-computer interface for the visual display unit in the control room of a complex environment can enhance operator efficiency and, thus, environmental safety. In fact, a cognitive gap often exists between an interface designer and an interface user. Therefore, the issue of the cognitive gap of interface design needs more improvement and investigation. This is an empirical study that presents the application of an ecological interface design (EID) using three cases and demonstrates that an EID framework can support operators in various complex situations. Specifically, it analyzes different levels of automation and emergency condition response at the Lungmen Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan. A simulated feed-water system was developed involving two interface styles. This study uses the NASA Task Load Index to objectively evaluate the mental workload of the human operators and the Situation Awareness Rating Technique to subjectively assess operator understanding and response, and is a pilot study investigating EID display format use at nuclear power plants in Taiwan. Results suggest the EID-based interface has a remarkable advantage over the original interface in supporting operator performance in the areas of response time and accuracy rate under both normal and emergency situations and provide supporting evidence that an EID-based interface can effectively enhance monitoring tasks in a complex environment. (author)

  17. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2002-10-15

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to

  18. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2003-01-20

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to

  19. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan

    2002-04-15

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), and up to 5500 psi with emphasis upon 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced

  20. BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman

    2002-07-15

    The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. In the 21st century, the world faces the critical challenge of providing abundant, cheap electricity to meet the needs of a growing global population while at the same time preserving environmental values. Most studies of this issue conclude that a robust portfolio of generation technologies and fuels should be developed to assure that the United States will have adequate electricity supplies in a variety of possible future scenarios. The use of coal for electricity generation poses a unique set of challenges. On the one hand, coal is plentiful and available at low cost in much of the world, notably in the U.S., China, and India. Countries with large coal reserves will want to develop them to foster economic growth and energy security. On the other hand, traditional methods of coal combustion emit pollutants and CO{sub 2} at high levels relative to other generation options. Maintaining coal as a generation option in the 21st century will require methods for addressing these environmental issues. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to

  1. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 2003 version of Elecnuc contents information, data and charts on the nuclear power plants in the world and general information on the national perspectives concerning the electric power industry. The following topics are presented: 2002 highlights; characteristics of main reactor types and on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; the worldwide status of nuclear power plants on 2002/12/3; units distributed by countries; nuclear power plants connected to the Grid by reactor type groups; nuclear power plants under construction; capacity of the nuclear power plants on the grid; first electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit; electrical generation from nuclear plants by country at the end 2002; performance indicator of french PWR units; trends of the generation indicator worldwide from 1960 to 2002; 2002 cumulative Load Factor by owners; nuclear power plants connected to the grid by countries; status of license renewal applications in Usa; nuclear power plants under construction; Shutdown nuclear power plants; exported nuclear power plants by type; exported nuclear power plants by countries; nuclear power plants under construction or order; steam generator replacements; recycling of Plutonium in LWR; projects of MOX fuel use in reactors; electricity needs of Germany, Belgium, Spain, Finland, United Kingdom; electricity indicators of the five countries. (A.L.B.)

  2. Tidal Power Plant Energy Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva–Casarín R.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a methodology is presented which allows a quick and simple means of estimating the potential energy that can be obtained from a tidal power plant. The evaluation is made using a normalised nomograph, which is a function of the area of the tidal basin against the electricity installed capacity to thus obtain the potential energy for any location. The results describe two means of operation, one of "flow tide" and the other "flow–ebb tides", with two tidal basin systems operating: single and double reservoir systems. To obtain the normalised nomograph the numerical results for simulations of several tidal power plants under differing operational conditions over a period of one year. These conditions were established by varying the electricity installed capacity, the hydraulic conditions in "flow tide", "ebb tides" or both and with single or double reservoir systems and using sea level information taken every 15 minutes. To validate the model information from the tidal power plant at Rance, France, was used, which includes data concerning production, electricity installed capacity, turbine characteristics and tidal ranges. A very good correlation was found between the results of the numerical model and those reported in various technical reports.

  3. Nuclear power plants for mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. The technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants are examined. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  4. Biomass Co-Firing in Suspension-Fired Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kær, Søren Knudsen; Hvid, Søren Lovmand; Baxter, Larry

    The objective of the project is to investigate critical issues associated with cofiring with low-NOx burners and cofiring in advanced suspension-fired plants with for example high-temperature steam cycles. Experience has been gained using biofuels for cofiring in older power plant units. However...

  5. SWOT of nuclear power plant sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SWOT Analysis is a Useful tool that can he applied to most projects or business ventures. In this article we are going to examine major strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of nuclear power plants in view of sustainable development. Nuclear power plants have already attained widespread recognition for its benefits in fossil pollution abatement, near-zero green house gas emission, price stability and security of energy supply. The impressive new development is that these virtues are now a cost -free bonus, because, in long run, nuclear energy has become an inexpensive way to generate electricity. Nuclear energy's pre-eminence economically and environmentally has two implications for government policy. First, governments should ensure that nuclear licensing and safety oversight arc not only rigorous but also efficient in facilitating timely development of advanced power plants. Second, governments should be bold incentivizing the transformation to clean energy economics, recognizing that such short-term stimulus will, in the case of nuclear plants, simply accelerate desirable changes that now have their own long-term momentum. The increased competitiveness of nuclear power plant is the result of cost reductions in all aspects of nuclear economics: Construction, financing, operations, waste management and decommissioning. Among the cost-lowering factors are the evolution to standardized reactor designs, shorter construction periods, new financing techniques, more efficient generation technologies, higher rates of reactor utilization, and longer plant lifetimes. U.S World Nuclear Association report shows that total electricity costs for power plant construction and operation were calculated at two interest rates. At 10%, midrange generating costs per kilowatt-hour are nuclear at 4 cents, coal at 4.7 cents and natural gas at 5.1 cent. At a 5% interest rate, mid-range costs per KWh fall to nuclear at 2.6 cents, coal at 3.7 cents and natural gas at 4.3 cents

  6. Financing nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much is at stake in developing a financial strategy for decommissioning nuclear power plants. Since decommissioning experience is limited to relatively small reactors, will the costs associated with larger reactors be significantly higher. Certainly the decommissioning issue intersects with other critical issues that will help to determine the future of commercial nuclear power in the US. The author examines briefly the basic concepts and terms related to decommissioning expenses, namely: (1) segregated fund; (2) non-segregated fund; (3) external method; and (4) internal method. He concludes that state regulatory commissions have turned increasingly to the external funding method because of increasing costs and related problems associated with nuclear power, changing conditions and uncertainties concerned with utility restructuring, and recent changes in federal tax laws related to decommissioning. Further, this trend is likely to continue if financial assurance remains a primary concern of regulators to protect this public interest

  7. Nuclear power plant computer replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consumers Power Company (CPCo) has recently completed an ambitious project to replace the non-safety-related plant process computer for the Palisades Nuclear Plant. The replacement computer retains the functions of the old plant computer system with minor exceptions. However, the architecture of the new computer system is vastly improved from the old plant computer. The hardware and software components of the new computer system are the state of the art. The old system consisted of five stand-alone computers, each performing their intended function separately. The new architecture employs a number of computing and data acquisition nodes networked together to gather, share, process, present, and store data more efficiently. For cost efficiency, some of the old hardware, such as the Critical Functions Monitoring System multiplexer, has been retained. The new computer system has a significantly higher availability, and lower maintenance cost. It performs certain functions that were not possible with the old system, such as real-time validation of rod position monitored by the Plant Information Processor and the Secondary Position Indicator. While the new computer system is more capable, more reliable, more user friendly, and easier to maintain, taking it to operability status presented CPCo with some new and challenging issues

  8. Robots for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many industrial applications of robots, the objective is to replace human workers with machines that are more productive, efficient, and accurate. But for nuclear applications, the objective is not so much to replace workers as it is to extend their presence - for example, to project their reach into areas of a nuclear plant where the thermal or radiation environment prohibits or limits a human presence. The economic motivation to use robots for nuclear plant inspection and maintenance is centered on their potential for improving plant availability; a by-product is the potential for reducing the occupational radiation exposure of plant personnel. Robotic equipment in nuclear applications may be divided into two broad categories: single-purpose devices with limited ability to perform different operations, and reprogrammable, multi-purpose robots with some degree of computer-based artificial intelligence. Preliminary assessments of the potential for applying robotics in nuclear power plants - mainly at surveillance and inspection tasks - have been carried out. Future developments are considered

  9. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1997 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1997; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; forecasts; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  10. Cost estimate guidelines for advanced nuclear power technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several advanced power plant concepts are currently under development. These include the Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor and the Advanced Light Water Reactors. One measure of the attractiveness of a new concept is its cost. Invariably, the cost of a new type of power plant will be compared with other alternative forms of electrical generation. This report provides a common starting point, whereby the cost estimates for the various power plants to be considered are developed with common assumptions and ground rules. Comparisons can then be made on a consistent basis. This is the second update of these cost estimate guidelines. Changes have been made to make the guidelines more current (January 1, 1992) and in response to suggestions made as a result of the use of the previous report. The principal changes are that the reference site has been changed from a generic Northeast (Middletown) site to a more central site (EPRI's East/West Central site) and that reference bulk commodity prices and labor productivity rates have been added. This report is designed to provide a framework for the preparation and reporting of costs. The cost estimates will consist of the overnight construction cost, the total plant capital cost, the operation and maintenance costs, the fuel costs, decommissioning costs and the power production or busbar generation cost

  11. Atucha I nuclear power plant transients analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program for the transients simulation thermohydraulic calculation without loss of coolant (KWU-ENACE development) to evaluate Atucha I nuclear power plant behaviour is used. The program includes systems simulation and nuclear power plants control bonds with real parameters. The calculation results show a good agreement with the output 'protocol' of various transients of the nuclear power plant, keeping the error, in general, lesser than ± 10% from the variation of the nuclear power plant's state variables. (Author)

  12. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracey, T. R.

    1978-09-01

    The design of a 300 MWe tower focus power plant which uses molten salt heat transfer fluids and sensible heat storage is described in detail. The system consists of nine heliostat fields with 7711 heliostats in each. Four cavity receivers are located at the top of a 155-meter tower. Tasks include: (1) review and analysis of preliminary specification; (2) parametric analysis; (3) selection of preferred configuration; (4) commercial plant conceptual design; (5) assessment of commercial-sized advanced central power system; (6) development plan; (7) program plan; (8) reports and data; (9) program management; (10) safety analysis; and (11) material study and test program. (WHK)

  13. New hydro power plant Dobsina III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Another power plant will be added to the hydroelectric power plant Dobsina. Preparations for the construction of a small hydro power plant have started on the streams Hnilec and Dobsinsky Brook. Dobsina III will extend the portfolio of renewable sources of Slovenske elektrarne. (author)

  14. Occupational dose control in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction in occupational exposure at nuclear power plants is desirable not only in the interest of the health and safety of plant personnel, but also because it enhances the safety and reliability of the plants. This report summarises the current trends of doses to workers at nuclear power plants and the achievements and developments regarding methods for their reduction

  15. Nuclear power plant operating experience, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the third in a series of reports issued annually that summarize the operating experience of U.S. nuclear power plants in commercial operation. Power generation statistics, plant outages, reportable occurrences, fuel element performance, occupational radiation exposure and radioactive effluents for each plant are presented. Summary highlights of these areas are discussed. The report includes 1976 data from 55 plants--23 boiling water reactor plants and 32 pressurized water reactor plants

  16. Wind Power Plant Control - An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Altin, Müfit; Teodorescu, Remus; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; RODRIGUEZ, Pedro; Iov, Florin; Kjær, Philip C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in wind turbine technology go towards installation of larger Wind Power Plants (WPPs). Therefore, power system operators have been challenged by the WPP penetration impacts in order to maintain reliabillity and stability of the power system. The revised grid codes have concentrated on the WPP connection point and as a result a WPP is considered as a single power plant. Nevertheless, compared to conventional power plants, WPPs have different inherent features such as conver...

  17. Training of nuclear power plant personnel practices in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four nuclear power units are in commercial operation in Finland. TVO operates two 735 MW BWR units of Swedish design and IVO two 465 PWR units of Soviet design. Good availability figures have been reached during the last five years for all plants. Many different factors have been contributing to the success of nuclear power in Finland. The advanced training of the plant personnel combined with a high educational level of plant personnel is undoubtedly one of the most important factors. Another important factor has been the low turnover rate of the staff at the plant and in the nuclear industry in general. The favorable regulatory climate in Finland with open and trustworthy relations between the power companies and the authorities has also been an important contribution to the success. The paper gives an overview of the training of nuclear power plant personnel as seen from authorities', the power companies' and the research institutions' points of view

  18. Small, moveable nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most reliable projections indicate that by the year 2000 approximately 25% of the world's electrical energy and possibly 10% of its process heat for industry will be provided by nuclear power plants. Whilst much of this will come from large nuclear steam raising units-in excess of 900 M.W.(e)-an increasing proportion will be provided from small modular plant, designed for portabiity or mobility. The technical, environmental and economic parameters of such a plant which will usually be of a size around 600 M.W.(e) or less and which in general terms derives its basic design features from nuclear marine propulsion units is reviewed. If suitably standardised, such a nuclear plant, mounted on barges, installed in ships or even airlifted into difficult locations, could provide an attractive solution to the energy problems of developing countries or remote communities. Apart from electrical energy production, the units could operate in a duplex mode to supply steam for central heating, sea-water or bore water distillation or industrial process heat. (Author)

  19. Power plant intake entrainment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power plant condenser cooling water intake entrainment of fish eggs and larvae is becoming an issue in evaluating environmental impacts around the plants. Methods are required to evaluate intake entrainment on different types of water bodies. Presented in this paper is a derivation of the basic relationships for evaluating entrainment from the standing crop of fish eggs and larvae for different regions of a water body, and evaluating the rate of entrainment from the standing crop. These relationships are coupled with a 3D hydrodynamic and transport model that provides the currents and flows required to complete the entrainment evaluation. Case examples are presented for a simple river system, and for the more complex Delaware River Estuary with multiple intakes. Example evaluations are made for individual intakes, and for the cumulative impacts of multiple intakes

  20. Design of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criteria of design and safety, applied internationally to systems and components of PWR type reactors, are described. The main criteria of the design analysed are: thermohydraulic optimization; optimized arrangement of buildings and components; low costs of energy generation; high level of standardization; application of specific safety criteria for nuclear power plants. The safety criteria aim to: assure the safe reactor shutdown; remove the residual heat and; avoid the release of radioactive elements for environment. Some exemples of safety criteria are given for Angra-2 and Angra-3 reactors. (M.C.K.)

  1. Nuclear power plant simulator software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development is described of software for the simulator of technological equipment of a WWER-440 nuclear power plant unit, using an SM 4-20 computer operating under DOS RV V2 and using a FORTRAN translator. An asynchronous interrupt system is used for kayboard control. All utilities for I/0 operations are written in the macroassembler. The basic concept of the software is shown schematically as are the relations between the program modules and the instructor and student environment. (J.B.). 1 fig

  2. Modelling of nuclear power plant decommissioning financing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costs related to the decommissioning of nuclear power plants create a significant financial burden for nuclear power plant operators. This article discusses the various methodologies employed by selected European countries for financing of the liabilities related to the nuclear power plant decommissioning. The article also presents methodology of allocation of future decommissioning costs to the running costs of nuclear power plant in the form of fee imposed on each megawatt hour generated. The application of the methodology is presented in the form of a case study on a new nuclear power plant with installed capacity 1000 MW. (authors)

  3. Intelligent main control room for advanced PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design targets of the main control room of nuclear power plants are as follows. (1) To make a good working environment where operators can operate easily. (2) To reduce the work load and operators error. To this end, MHI has been improving main control room design for advanced PWR plants. The new intelligent main control room consists of a soft operation console and a large display panel. According to our evaluation, the work load and human error of the new main control room are reduced by about 35% compared with the latest plants. This new design will be used to plan new plants and will have the additional feature of saving costs by standardizing plant design. (author)

  4. The atlas of large photovoltaic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports all the photovoltaic power plants whose installed power is over 1 MWc and that are operating in France or in project. 446 power plants have been reviewed and their cumulated power reaches 2822 MWc. For each plant the following information is listed: the name of the municipality, the operator, the power capacity, the manufacturer of the photovoltaic panels and the type of technology used, the type of installation (on the ground, on the roof, on the facade, as sun protection,...), the yearly power output (kWh), and the date of commissioning. This review shows that 86% of these plants are ground-based. (A.C.)

  5. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

  6. Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented

  7. Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

  8. Performance Evaluation of the Concept of Hybrid Heat Pipe as Passive In-core Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeong Shin; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As an arising issue for inherent safety of nuclear power plant, the concept of hybrid heat pipe as passive in-core cooling systems was introduced. Hybrid heat pipe has unique features that it is inserted in core directly to remove decay heat from nuclear fuel without any changes of structures of existing facilities of nuclear power plant, substituting conventional control rod. Hybrid heat pipe consists of metal cladding, working fluid, wick structure, and neutron absorber. Same with working principle of the heat pipe, heat is transported by phase change of working fluid inside metal cask. Figure 1 shows the systematic design of the hybrid heat pipe cooling system. In this study, the concept of a hybrid heat pipe was introduced as a Passive IN-core Cooling Systems (PINCs) and demonstrated for internal design features of heat pipe containing neutron absorber. Using a commercial CFD code, single hybrid heat pipe model was analyzed to evaluate thermal performance in designated operating condition. Also, 1-dimensional reactor transient analysis was done by calculating temperature change of the coolant inside reactor pressure vessel using MATLAB. As a passive decay heat removal device, hybrid heat pipe was suggested with a concept of combination of heat pipe and control rod. Hybrid heat pipe has distinct feature that it can be a unique solution to cool the reactor when depressurization process is impossible so that refueling water cannot be injected into RPV by conventional ECCS. It contains neutron absorber material inside heat pipe, so it can stop the reactor and at the same time, remove decay heat in core. For evaluating the concept of hybrid heat pipe, its thermal performance was analyzed using CFD and one-dimensional transient analysis. From single hybrid heat pipe simulation, the hybrid heat pipe can transport heat from the core inside to outside about 18.20 kW, and total thermal resistance of hybrid heat pipe is 0.015 .deg. C/W. Due to unique features of long heat

  9. Performance Evaluation of the Concept of Hybrid Heat Pipe as Passive In-core Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an arising issue for inherent safety of nuclear power plant, the concept of hybrid heat pipe as passive in-core cooling systems was introduced. Hybrid heat pipe has unique features that it is inserted in core directly to remove decay heat from nuclear fuel without any changes of structures of existing facilities of nuclear power plant, substituting conventional control rod. Hybrid heat pipe consists of metal cladding, working fluid, wick structure, and neutron absorber. Same with working principle of the heat pipe, heat is transported by phase change of working fluid inside metal cask. Figure 1 shows the systematic design of the hybrid heat pipe cooling system. In this study, the concept of a hybrid heat pipe was introduced as a Passive IN-core Cooling Systems (PINCs) and demonstrated for internal design features of heat pipe containing neutron absorber. Using a commercial CFD code, single hybrid heat pipe model was analyzed to evaluate thermal performance in designated operating condition. Also, 1-dimensional reactor transient analysis was done by calculating temperature change of the coolant inside reactor pressure vessel using MATLAB. As a passive decay heat removal device, hybrid heat pipe was suggested with a concept of combination of heat pipe and control rod. Hybrid heat pipe has distinct feature that it can be a unique solution to cool the reactor when depressurization process is impossible so that refueling water cannot be injected into RPV by conventional ECCS. It contains neutron absorber material inside heat pipe, so it can stop the reactor and at the same time, remove decay heat in core. For evaluating the concept of hybrid heat pipe, its thermal performance was analyzed using CFD and one-dimensional transient analysis. From single hybrid heat pipe simulation, the hybrid heat pipe can transport heat from the core inside to outside about 18.20 kW, and total thermal resistance of hybrid heat pipe is 0.015 .deg. C/W. Due to unique features of long heat

  10. Fundamental researches for advancement of regulatory guide for reviewing the design of power reactor facilities and piping system. The fatigue crack propagation behavior of the piping model (elbow) of a nuclear power plant subjected to seismic forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it is widely recognized that the fracture mode related to the machinery and piping system of nuclear power plants is mainly due to low-cycle fatigue. On the other hand, it is specified in the 2006 revision of 'Regulatory guide for reviewing the seismic design of power reactor facilities,' that dynamic seismic vibration should be taken into account even in the vertical direction. Regarding the three-dimensional behavior of the piping of a nuclear power plant during earthquake, this study quantitatively examined with vibration test and numerical analysis, the effects of the various characteristics of input seismic vibration on the dynamic response of wide range covering from elastic region to plastic failure region related to crack propagation behavior. For the piping model (elbow) of a nuclear power plant, the results of a low-cycle fatigue crack propagation test and numeral simulation analysis were examined for comparison. Using a finite element method analysis, fatigue crack propagation analysis on the piping elbow with initial flaw was performed and its result was compared with the experimental result. Although the crack propagation velocity based on the analysis produced a faster result compared with the experimental result, this analytical method was concluded to be roughly practical. (A.O.)

  11. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the IAEA's PRIS and AREVA-CEA's GAIA databases. The following aspects are reviewed: 2007 highlights; Main characteristics of reactor types; Map of the French nuclear power plants on 2007/01/01; Worldwide status of nuclear power plants (12/31/2007); Units distributed by countries; Nuclear power plants connected to the Grid- by reactor type groups; Nuclear power plants under construction on 2007; Evolution of nuclear power plants capacities connected to the grid; First electric generations supplied by a nuclear unit in each country; Electrical generation from nuclear power plants by country at the end 2007; Performance indicator of French PWR units; Evolution of the generation indicators worldwide by type; Nuclear operator ranking according to their installed capacity; Units connected to the grid by countries at 12/31/2007; Status of licence renewal applications in USA; Nuclear power plants under construction at 12/31/2007; Shutdown reactors; Exported nuclear capacity in net MWe; Exported and national nuclear capacity connected to the grid; Exported nuclear power plants under construction; Exported and national nuclear capacity under construction; Nuclear power plants ordered at 12/31/2007; Long term shutdown units at 12/31/2007; COL (combined licences) applications in the USA; Recycling of Plutonium in reactors and experiences; Mox licence plants projects; Appendix - historical development; Meaning of the used acronyms; Glossary

  12. Profitability of small-scale power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several small-scale power plants have been constructed in Finland during the last few years. Fuel oil and natural gas has been used as a fuel in diesel plants, natural gas in gas-turbine plants, and peat and industrial waste wood in solid fuel fired plants. Larger towns have already acquired combined power and heat generation either in their own power plants or in cooperation with industry. A usual mean of cooperation has been buying of district heat from industrial back-pressure power plants. Numerous small district heat loads still rely on separate heat production. The cheap price of electric power, caused by the good water and nuclear power conditions and long-term delivery contracts, has rendered the construction of small-scale power plants. The fuel prices have been stable for the last few years. The most significant changes have been caused by changing of exchange rate of the Finnish mark and the fuel taxation. Two power plant are reviewed in detail: 6/17 MW peat fired steam power plant and 6/6 MW oil fueled diesel power plant. The electricity prices of these two have been compared with coal condensing power and the electricity tariffs. The price comparisons have been made using the present price level. Energia-Ekono has compiled a new simulation program ELMO, operating in PC-WINDOWS environment, for simulation of cogeneration

  13. Water processing in power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface water can be treated to a high degree of efficiency by means of new compact processes. The quantity of chemicals to be dosed can easily be adjusted to the raw water composition by intentional energy supply via agitators. In-line coagulations is a new filtration process for reducing organic substances as well as colloids present in surface water. The content of organic substances can be monitored by measuring the plugging index. Advanced ion-exchanger processes (fluidised-bed, compound fluidised-bed and continuously operating ion exchanger plants) allow the required quantity of chemicals as well as the plant's own water consumption to be reduced, thus minimising the adverse effect on the environment. The reverse-osmosis process is becoming more and more significant due to the low adverse effect on the environment and the given possibilities of automation. As not only ionogenic substances but also organic matter are removed by reverse osmosis, this process is particularly suited for treating surface water to be used as boiler feed water. The process of vacuum degassing has become significant for the cold removal of oxygen. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear power plant alarm systems: Problems and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the incorporation of advanced technology into nuclear power plant alarm systems, human factors problems remain. This paper identifies to be addressed in order to allow advanced technology to be used effectively in the design of nuclear power plant alarm systems. The operator's use and processing of alarm system information will be considered. Based upon a review of alarm system research, issues related to general system design, alarm processing, display and control are discussed. It is concluded that the design of effective alarm systems depends on an understanding of the information processing capabilities and limitations of the operator. 39 refs

  15. Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 2, Book 1. Commercial plant conceptual design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-01

    The conceptual design of the 100-MW solar tower focus commercial power plant is described in detail. Sodium is pumped up to the top of a tall tower where the receiver is located. The sodium is heated in the receiver and then flows down the tower, through a pressure reducing device, and thence into a large, hot storage tank which is located at ground level and whose size is made to meet a specific thermal energy storage capacity requirement. From this tank, the sodium is pumped by a separate pump, through a system of sodium-to-water steam generators. The steam generator system consists of a separate superheater and reheater operating in parallel and an evaporator unit operating in series with the other two units. The sodium flowing from the evaporator unit is piped to a cold storage tank. From the cold storage tank, sodium is then pumped up to the tip of the tower to complete the cycle. The steam generated in the steam generators is fed to a conventional off-the-shelf, high-efficiency turbine. The steam loop operates in a conventional rankine cycle with the steam generators serving the same purpose as a conventional boiler and water being fed to the evaporator with conventional feedwater pumps. The pressure reducing device (a standard drag valve, for example) serves to mitigate the pressure caused by the static head of sodium and thus allows the large tanks to operate at ambient pressure conditions. (WHK)

  16. CO2 mitigation in advanced power cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jens

    2004-01-01

    This thesis encompasses CO2 mitigation using three different processes: i) natural gas-fired combined cycle with chemical looping combustion (CLC), ii) trigeneration of electrical power, hydrogen and district heating with extended CLC, iii) steam-based gasification of biomass integrated in an advanced power cycle. In CLC, a solid oxygen carrier circulates between two fluidised-bed reactors and transports oxygen from the combustion air to the fuel; thus, the fuel is not mixed with air and an i...

  17. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  18. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  19. steam power plants re powering with gas turbine review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Re powering faith gas turbine means integration of new gas turbine in existing power plant. Such integration yield higher efficiencies lower operating and maintenance costs and reduction in pollution emission. This paper summarizes the results of a feasibility study that inquired the possibilities of such integration in Israel Electric Corporation - IEC's existing steam power plants (oil fired)

  20. Nuclear power plants and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental impacts are compared of conventional coal-fired and oil-fired power plants and of nuclear power plants. The values are compared of SO2, NO2, ash and soot emmisions with 133Xe and 85Kr fission products release and the requirement for air for diluting these emissions in the atmosphere is assessed. Also compared are thermal pollution from an oil-fired power plant and from PWR and fast reactor power plants. The conclusion is arrived at that nuclear energy can solve the problem of increasing demand for electric and heat power while reducing negative environmental impacts. (O.K.)

  1. Thermal power plant design and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Power Plant: Design and Operation deals with various aspects of a thermal power plant, providing a new dimension to the subject, with focus on operating practices and troubleshooting, as well as technology and design. Its author has a 40-long association with thermal power plants in design as well as field engineering, sharing his experience with professional engineers under various training capacities, such as training programs for graduate engineers and operating personnel. Thermal Power Plant presents practical content on coal-, gas-, oil-, peat- and biomass-fueled thermal power

  2. Electric power generation in large-scale power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future electric power consumption will be depending on the economic development of the Federal Republic of Germany. Thermal power plants are fueled with non-renewable energy sources, i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas or nuclear power. It is therefore important to assess the global coverage of these energy sources and to take stock of the reserves of the Federal Republic of Germany. If the waste heat left from electric power generation was made use of in dual-purpose power plants total energy consumption could be considerably reduced. Large-scale power plants do have to face and cope with the lack of distribution networks to supply the consumer. (DG)

  3. QA programs in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an overview of quality assurance programs in nuclear power plants, the energy picture as it appears today is reviewed. Nuclear power plants and their operations are described and an attempt is made to place in proper perspective the alleged ''threats'' inherent in nuclear power. Finally, the quality assurance programs being used in the nuclear industry are described

  4. Concentrated aqueous piperazine as CO2 capture solvent: detailed evaluation of the integration with a power plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, L.V. van der; Romano, M.C.; Kvamsdal, H.M.; Bonalumi, D.; Os, P.J. van; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated energetic evaluation has been performed of a reference coal-fired power plant, a power plant with an advanced MEA-based post-combustion CO2 capture plant, and a power plant with a capture plant using concentrated piperazine (PZ) and high-pressure flash regeneration. This comparison sho

  5. Nuclear power plant control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To effectively transfer the operation of a nuclear power plant including a bwr type reactor to single load operation in the station with no increase in the neutron flux and water level in the reactor by the combined use of recycle pump trip and feedwater pump trip. Method: Upon rapid load decrease in a turbine generator, at least one of usually operated feedwater pumps and a recycle pump are tripped and the starting for a stand-by feedwater pump is inhibited. This rapidly decreases the recycling flow rate to thereby lower the neutron flux before generation of pressure increase and also decreases the feedwater flow rate to thereby suppress the increase in the water level due to increase in voids, whereby the operation is smoothly transferred to the single load operation in the station. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Financing of nuclear power plant using resources of power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proved that during the lifetime of a power plant, financial resources are produced from depreciation and from the profit for the delivered electrical power in an amount allowing to meet the cost of construction, interests of credits, the corporation taxes, and the means usable by the utility for simple reproduction of the power plant, additional investment, or for the ultimate decommissioning of the nuclear power plant. The considerations are simplified to 1 MW of installed capacity of a WWER-440 nuclear power plant. The breakdown is shown of the profit and the depreciation over the power plant lifetime, the resources of regular payments of credit instalments for the construction and the method of its calculation, and the income for the state budget and for the utility during the plant liofetime. (J.B.). 5 tabs., 5 refs

  7. Economics of hybrid photovoltaic power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breyer, Christian

    2012-08-16

    The global power supply stability is faced to several severe and fundamental threats, in particular steadily increasing power demand, diminishing and degrading fossil and nuclear energy resources, very harmful greenhouse gas emissions, significant energy injustice and a structurally misbalanced ecological footprint. Photovoltaic (PV) power systems are analysed in various aspects focusing on economic and technical considerations of supplemental and substitutional power supply to the constraint conventional power system. To infer the most relevant system approach for PV power plants several solar resources available for PV systems are compared. By combining the different solar resources and respective economics, two major PV systems are identified to be very competitive in almost all regions in the world. The experience curve concept is used as a key technique for the development of scenario assumptions on economic projections for the decade of the 2010s. Main drivers for cost reductions in PV systems are learning and production growth rate, thus several relevant aspects are discussed such as research and development investments, technical PV market potential, different PV technologies and the energetic sustainability of PV. Three major market segments for PV systems are identified: off-grid PV solutions, decentralised small scale on-grid PV systems (several kWp) and large scale PV power plants (tens of MWp). Mainly by application of 'grid-parity' and 'fuel-parity' concepts per country, local market and conventional power plant basis, the global economic market potential for all major PV system segments is derived. PV power plant hybridization potential of all relevant power technologies and the global power plant structure are analyzed regarding technical, economical and geographical feasibility. Key success criteria for hybrid PV power plants are discussed and comprehensively analysed for all adequate power plant technologies, i.e. oil, gas and

  8. Communicating about advanced nuclear energy plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of advanced nuclear energy plants, as with any new product, will not depend on design alone. Success will require public support and good communications to achieve that support. In the past, communication weaknesses - including mixed and confusing messages - have sometimes created barriers between the technical community and the public. Several lessons learned from a decade of social science research in the United States of America have implications for communicating effectively about advanced design nuclear energy plants: (1) Most audiences are open-minded and receptive to communications on this topic. They view nuclear energy as a fuel of the future and want to be comfortable about the future. Most people in the USA (82%) expect future nuclear energy plants to be safer, so the improvements being made are simply consistent with public expectations. (2) Few people pay close attention to energy issues. (3) Communications must be simple and free of jargon. Because people do not pay close attention to the issues, their knowledge is limited. Some terms used by the industry to describe advanced design plants are misinterpreted. (4) Good communications focus on consumer wants and values, not industry needs or problems. People care about generational responsibility, planning for the future, environmental protection and security. (5) Benefits and safeguards should be shown instead of risk comparisons. Generic benefits of nuclear energy, such as clean air, are important to consumers. (6) Pictures and hand-on demonstrations help in communicating about nuclear energy plants, because many of the discussion concepts are abstract. (7) Trust is crucial and is established now for tomorrow through word and deed. (author)

  9. Dynamic Frequency Response of Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit

    method has less impact of the power system frequency compared to existing control concepts. Another advantage of the proposed inertial response control has the tuning methodology which can be utilized as a generic approach for any power system with high wind power penetration levels. Additionally, an...... maintain sustainable and reliable operation of the power system for these targets, transmission system operators (TSOs) have revised the grid code requirements. Also, the TSOs are planning the future development of the power system with various wind penetration scenarios to integrate more wind power...... according to their grid codes. In these scenarios particularly with high wind power penetration cases, conventional power plants (CPPs) such as old thermal power plants are planned to be replaced with wind power plants (WPPs). Consequently, the power system stability will be affected and the control...

  10. Advances in the research line of diagnosing of faults in fossil fuel power plants; Avances en la linea de investigacion de diagnostico de fallas en centrales termoelectricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruz H, Jose A [Universidad Autonoma del Carmen, Campeche (Mexico); Sanchez C, Edgar N [Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Suarez Cerda, Dionisio A; Quintero R, Agustin [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This article deals with a research in progress searching to take care of the faults that occur with greatest frequency in the fossil fuel power plants of Mexico with the aid of tools of computational intelligence such as the neuronal networks and the fuzzy logic, for the online recognition of the dynamic behavior patterns of variable groups. What this research looks for is the development of individual systems, in relation to the computational intelligence techniques that continuously supervise the functioning of the unit and inform the operator of the eventual faults in the understanding that on time attention to the faults will result in a minimum cost. The advantages of these diagnosis mechanisms are established in comparison to alternative diagnosis methods, such as their associative memory useful to store fault patterns. [Spanish] Se trata de una investigacion en progreso que busca atender las fallas que ocurren con mayor frecuencia en las unidades termoelectricas de Mexico con la ayuda de herramientas de inteligencia computacional como las redes neuronales y la logica difusa, para el reconocimiento en linea de patrones de comportamiento dinamico de grupos de variables. Lo que esta investigacion busca es desarrollar sendos sistemas, en relacion a las tecnicas de inteligencia computacional, que supervisen continuamente el funcionamiento de la unidad e informen al operador de fallas eventuales, en el entendido que la oportuna atencion a fallas redituara en un costo minimo. Las ventajas de estos mecanismos de diagnostico se establecen en comparacion a metodos de diagnostico alternativos, como su memoria asociativa util para almacenar patrones de falla.

  11. TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOSHIBA aims to secure safety, increase reliability and improve efficiency through the engineering for nuclear power plant using Computer Aided Engineering (CAE). TOSHIBA CAE system for nuclear power plant consists of numbers of sub-systems which had been integrated centering around the Nuclear Power Plant Engineering Data Base (PDBMS) and covers all stage of engineering for nuclear power plant from project management, design, manufacturing, construction to operating plant service and preventive maintenance as it were 'Plant Life-Cycle CAE System'. In recent years, TOSHIBA has been devoting to extend the system for integrated intelligent CAE system with state-of-the-art computer technologies such as computer graphics and artificial intelligence. This paper shows the outline of CAE system for nuclear power plant in TOSHIBA. (author)

  12. Fusion power plant availability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consideration of fusion as an alternative energy source will need to demonstrate that Fusion Power Plant (FPP) design, operating and maintenance characteristics meet the electrical market requirements forecast for the second half of this century. Until now, fusion has been developed in the framework of research and development programmes following natural technological trends. To bring a greater sense of realism to commercial viability and to guarantee that technology-driven fusion development responds to the demands of the market, a conceptual study of future commercial FPPs has been performed with a Power Plant Availability (PPA) study aimed at identifying the aspects affecting the availability and generating costs of FPPs. EFET, who has also been involved in the study, can visualise it from two different points of view; that of the industry (ANSALDO, IBERTEF, SIEMENS, NNC) and that of the utilities (BELGATOM, FRAMATOME, FORTUM). The work carried out covered the following points: socio-economic forecasting; safety and licensing; operation and maintenance; waste and decommissioning; availability and reliability. The following are the most relevant findings, conclusions and recommendations for all these aspects: Demonstrate definitively that the physical principles of nuclear fusion have been validated by means of experiments; Establish a European Industrial Group to support the demonstration phases; Create the financial and contracting framework required to construct these installations. Secure the necessary budgets for the European Union's 5th and 6th Research Programmes. Look for supplementary long term financing sources; The existing Regulatory Bodies should combine to form a single Working Group with responsibility for fusion reactor safety and licensing activities, working on the harmonisation of the regulatory processes, developing FPP safety criteria and guidelines and reviewing industry standards; To be competitive, FPPs should have high availability

  13. Repowering flexibility of coal-based advanced power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajura, R.A.; Bechtel, T.F.; Schmidt, D.K.; Wimer, J.G.

    1995-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) helps enhance the economic competitiveness, environmental quality, and national well-being of the U.S. by developing advanced power-generation systems. The potential market for advanced power-generation systems is large. In the U.S., electric demand is estimated to grow at about 1 percent per year through the year 2010. The total power generation market also includes new-capacity as well as replacement of existing power plants as they age. Thus, the market for power systems over the next 15 years is estimated to be about 279,000 megawatts (MW), but could range from as much as 484,000 MW to as little as 153,000 MW. These predictions are summarized. Over the next 15 years, the replacement market is potentially much larger than the expansion market because of the large base of aging power plants in the U.S.

  14. The core design of the advanced power reactor plus (APR+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advance Power Reactor Plus (APR+), a pressurized water reactor and an improved nuclear power reactor based on the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) in Korea, has been developed with 18-month cycle operation strategy from its initial core. The APR+ core power is 4290 MWth which corresponds to a 1500 MWe class nuclear power plant. The reactor core consists of 257 fuel assemblies. Comparing with APR1400 core design, 16 fuel assemblies are added. Its cycle length is expected about 450 EFPD directly from initial core, although most of previous other plants had been started according to their annual or 15-month cycle operation schedule at their initial core and gone to 18-month after third - fourth cycle. In order to reduce the peaking power, fuel pin configurations of the assembly, are optimized by using some low enriched fuel pins and gadolinia bearings. APR+ core has been met the requirements as well as the above cycle length requirement; 1) peaking factor, 2) Negative MTC(Moderator Temperature Coefficient), 3) sufficient shutdown margin, 4) convergent Xenon stability Index. The maximum rod burnup and the discharge fuel assembly burnup are also satisfied those of the limit. It is expected to acquire the standard design approval by the end of 2012 by the Korean nuclear regulatory. (authors)

  15. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated

  16. Applications of power from Temelin nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 10 papers of which 9 fall under the INIS scope. They all concern the intentions and possibilities of using heat from nuclear power plants, especially from the Temelin power plant. Waste heat will be used for district heating of adjacent conurbations and for agricultural purposes. Various projects are presented using heat from nuclear power plants, such as greenhouse heating, soil heating, cultivation of algae and fish in warmed-up water. The existing experience is described with the use of heat from the Bohunice nuclear power plant. (M.D.). 15 figs., 6 tabs., 17 refs

  17. New nuclear power plants for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the end of this year the Ontario government will select the technology for its future nuclear power plants. To clarify the differences between the contending reactors I have put together the following quick overview. Ontario's requirement is for a stand-alone two-unit nuclear power plant to provide around 2,000 to 3,500 MWe of baseload generating capacity at a site to he specified with an option for one or two additional units. It is likely that the first units will be located at either the Darlington site near Bowmanville or the Bruce site near Kincardine. However the output from the Bruce site is presently transmission constrained. All nuclear-electric generation in Ontario comes from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) CANDU reactors at Pickering, Darlington and Bruce. The contenders are, AECL's 1085 MWe (net) ACR-1000 (Advanced CANDU Reactor), Westinghouse Electric Company's 1117 MWe (net) AP1000 (Advanced Passive), AREVA NP's 1600 MWe (net) U.S. EPR (United States Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor) and the 1550 MWe (net) GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy's ESBWR (Economic and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor). Westinghouse has Toshiba as a majority shareholder, AREVA has the government of France as a majority shareholder and GE-Hitachi has GE as the major shareholder. AECL is a federal crown corporation and is part of Team CANDU consisting of Babcock and Wilcox Canada, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Hitachi Canada Limited and SNC-Lavalin Nuclear Inc. Generally the engineering split in Team CANDU would be, AECL, Mississauga, Ontario, responsible for the design of the nuclear steam plant including reactor and safety systems; Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario, responsible for supply of the steam generators and other pressure retaining components; GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Peterborough, Ontario for the fuel handling equipment; Hitachi Canada Limited, Mississauga, for the balance of plant steam to electricity conversion

  18. EPRI's state-of-the-art power plant (SOAPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EPRI is bringing together in one project the entire range of improvements in pulverized-coal (PC) power plant technology. This new project, called SOAPP, will provide utilities with specifications and guidelines for a state-of-the-art power plant. This advanced plant will include the latest materials, designs, components, and controls from the United States, Europe, and Japan, and will reduce the cost and risk of producing electricity. All the technology will be proven and commercially available. This paper describes the goals, objectives, and scope of the SOAPP project

  19. World power plant industry in recession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two scenarios of power plant ordering required to meet demand in 2000, based on reasonable assumptions of demand growth, plant lifetimes, and construction lead times, are presented. They result in a high and low of 191 and 75GWe per annum respectively. The scenarios are broken down into regions; Europe, North America, Japan, and less developed countries. It is thought that nuclear power is unlikely to gain a substantial share of the total power plant market. (U.K.)

  20. System Definition and Analysis: Power Plant Design and Layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Topical report for Task 6.0, Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The report describes work by Westinghouse and the subcontractor, Gilbert/Commonwealth, in the fulfillment of completing Task 6.0. A conceptual design for critical and noncritical components of the gas fired combustion turbine system was completed. The conceptual design included specifications for the flange to flange gas turbine, power plant components, and balance of plant equipment. The ATS engine used in the conceptual design is an advanced 300 MW class combustion turbine incorporating many design features and technologies required to achieve ATS Program goals. Design features of power plant equipment and balance of plant equipment are described. Performance parameters for these components are explained. A site arrangement and electrical single line diagrams were drafted for the conceptual plant. ATS advanced features include design refinements in the compressor, inlet casing and scroll, combustion system, airfoil cooling, secondary flow systems, rotor and exhaust diffuser. These improved features, integrated with prudent selection of power plant and balance of plant equipment, have provided the conceptual design of a system that meets or exceeds ATS program emissions, performance, reliability-availability-maintainability, and cost goals

  1. Investigation toward laser driven IFE power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) is becoming feasible due to the increasing understanding of implosion physics. Reactor technology issues have begun to be developed. Based on the conceptual design of Laser Driven IFE Power Plant, the technical and physical issues have been examined. R and D on key issues that affect the feasibility of power plant have been proceeded taking into account the collaboration in the field of laser driver, fuel pellet, reaction chamber and system design. It is concluded that the technical feasibility of IFE power plant seems to be reasonably high. Coordination and collaboration scheme of reactor technology experts in Japan on Laser Driven IFE Power Plant is being proceeded. (author)

  2. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significance results in relation to the researching in preventive and predictive maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and the Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the power plants control and instrumentation department's technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the object to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish nuclear power plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance. (Author)

  3. Preventive maintenance instrumentation results in Spanish nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curiel, M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Palomo, M. J.; Verdu, G. [ISIRYM, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain); Arnaldos, A., E-mail: m.curiel@lainsa.co [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    This paper is a recompilation of the most significance results in relation to the researching in preventive and predictive maintenance in critical nuclear instrumentation for power plant operation, which it is being developed by Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales and the Isirym Institute of the Polytechnic University of Valencia. Instrumentation verification and test, it is a priority of the power plants control and instrumentation department's technicians. These procedures are necessary information for the daily power plant work. It is performed according to different procedures and in different moments of the fuel cycle depending on the instrumentation critical state and the monitoring process. Normally, this study is developed taking into account the instantaneous values of the instrumentation measures and, after their conversion to physical magnitude, they are analyzed according to the power plant operation point. Moreover, redundant sensors measurements are taken into consideration to the equipment and/or power plant monitoring. This work goes forward and it is in advanced to the instrument analysis as it is, independently of the operation point, using specific signal analysis techniques for preventive and predictive maintenance, with the object to obtain not only information about possible malfunctions, but the degradation scale presented in the instrument or in the system measured. We present seven real case studies of Spanish nuclear power plants each of them shall give a significant contribution to problem resolution and power plant performance. (Author)

  4. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester M. Waganer

    2011-01-04

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  5. Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, 'Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the 'teething' problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated 'mature' subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

  6. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to ''seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world''. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The introduction of nuclear power brings new challenges to States - one of them being the selection of appropriates sites. It is a project that needs to begin early, be well managed, and deploy good communications with all stakeholders; including regulators. This is important, not just for those States introducing nuclear power for the first time, but for any State looking to build a new nuclear power plant. The purpose of the siting activities goes beyond choosing a suitable site and acquiring a licence. A large part of the project is about producing and maintaining a validated

  7. Full turbine bypass system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase in the weight of electric power network, vigilant watch is kept on the toughness of nuclear power plants against disturbances on the side of the network. Basically speaking, it is desirable that reactors continue operation even in case the station is removed from the network due to an outside disturbance. In order to meet this requirement, the application of a full-load turbine bypass system for 1,100-MW-class nuclear power plants has been planned; the development of system components was advanced; the reliability of the full-load turbine bypass system was confirmed through simulation tests. The process of development is outlined here. (author)

  8. Power source facility inside of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention simplifies power source facilities inside of a nuclear power plant and enables to provide countermeasures for troubles and inspection of one main transformer during plant operation. Namely, power in the plant is supplied to bus in ordinary use from a main power generator by way of a directly-coupled transformer in the plant during plant operation. Simultaneously, the power inside of the plant is supplied to a bus in non-ordinary use by way of a first communication bus. In this case, an onload tap changer of the direct transformer in the plant controls the voltage on the secondary side of the directly-coupled transformer to a lower level. On the other hand, when a load switcher of the power generator is opened under a predetermined condition, and the main power generator is disconnected from the main transformer and the directly-coupled transformer in the plant, power inside of the plant is supplied to the bus in ordinary use from the secondary side of the main transformer. In this case, the onload tap changer of the main transformer controls the voltage of the secondary side of the main transformer to a higher level. (I.S.)

  9. Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Baliga, B Jayant

    2012-01-01

    Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts describes devices utilized in power transmission and distribution equipment, and for very high power motor control in electric trains and steel-mills. Since these devices must be capable of supporting more than 5000-volts in the blocking mode, this books covers operation of devices rated at 5,000-V, 10,000-V and 20,000-V. Advanced concepts (the MCT, the BRT, and the EST) that enable MOS-gated control of power thyristor structures are described and analyzed in detail. In addition, detailed analyses of the silicon IGBT, as well as the silicon carbide MOSFET and IGBT, are provided for comparison purposes. Throughout the book, analytical models are generated to give a better understanding of the physics of operation for all the structures. This book provides readers with: The first comprehensive treatment of high voltage (over 5000-volts) power devices suitable for the power distribution, traction, and motor-control markets;  Analytical formulations for all the device ...

  10. Control of power plants and power systems. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 88 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the International Federation of Automatic Control Symposium held in Mexico in 1995. The broad areas which they cover are: self tuning control; power plant operations; dynamic stability; fuzzy logic applications; power plants modelling; artificial intelligence applications; power plants simulation; voltage control; control of hydro electric units; state estimation; fault diagnosis and monitoring systems; system expansion and operation planning; security assessment; economic dispatch and optimal load flow; adaptive control; distribution; transient stability and preventive control; modelling and control of nuclear plant; knowledge data bases for automatic learning methods applied to power system dynamic security assessment; control of combined cycle units; power control centres. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the three papers relating to nuclear power plants. (UK)

  11. Nuclear power plant diagnostics study at the Midland training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training simulators provide a real world environment for testing advanced diagnostic and control systems as an aid to nuclear power plant operators. The simulators not only duplicate the hardware din the actual control room, allowing for analysis of man-machine interface, but also represent the dynamic behavior of the reference plant in real-time, in a realistic manner. Training simulators provide the means to representing the reference plant operations in a wide range of operation conditions including off-normal and emergency conditions. Transient events with very low probability of occurrence can then be represented and used to test the capabilities of advanced diagnostic and control systems. For these reasons, full-scope operator training simulators have been used as a test bed for a number of advanced diagnostic concepts. The University of Michigan and Consumers Power Company have been collaborating in a program devoted to the development and study of advanced concepts for automatic diagnostics and control of nuclear power plants. The program has been focused on the use of the full-scope operator training Midland Nuclear Power Plant Unit 2 (MNP-2) Simulator for development, testing, and verification of advanced diagnostics concepts. In their current efforts, the authors have developed two artificial intelligent (AI) diagnostic concepts that have been applied to the MNP-2 Simulator: the systematic generation and updating of a rule-based knowledge system for nuclear power plant diagnostics and a nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm called the simulation filter. The simulation filter algorithm is used with the MNP-2 Simulator to improve the simulation of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. 11 refs., 4 figs

  12. Engineering and cost study of the CFAR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key objectives of the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for advanced tokamak reactors is to reduce the capital costs of the power conversion system and the balance of plant. A design of the heat rejection system has been done as part of a preliminary cost study in order to evaluate the capital costs of this fusion power plant concept. This system has been optimized to yield the minimum capital cost subject to constraints on the size of the desuperheater/condenser heat exchangers, the pressure drops and the pumping power required for the heat-rejection coolant. The results of this study including estimates of the cost of electricity for the CFAR concept with and without a bottoming plant are reported

  13. DEMO and fusion power plant conceptual studies in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS) four fusion power plant 'models' have been developed. Two of these models were developed considering limited extrapolations both in physics and in technology. For the two other models, advanced physics scenarios have been identified and combined with advanced blanket concepts that allow higher thermodynamic efficiencies of the power conversion systems. For all the PPCS models, systems analyses were used to integrate the plasma physics and technology constraints to produce self-consistent plant parameter sets. The broad features of the conclusions of previous studies on safety, environmental impact and economics have been confirmed for the new models and demonstrated with increased confidence. The PPCS also helps in the definition of the objectives and in the identification of the design drivers of DEMO, i.e. the device between the next step (ITER) and a first-of-a-kind reactor. These will constitute the basis of the European DEMO Conceptual Study that has recently started

  14. Vibrations of wind power plants; Schwingungen von Windenergieanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    means of a multi-component simulation and the finite element method (B. Schlecht, T. Rosenloechre, T. Schulze); (15) Impact of modelling on the simulation of the dynamics of the powertrain at wind power plants (T. Hecquet, S. Hauptmann, M. Kuehn, B. Marrant, J. Peeters, K. Smolders, J. Schwarte, F. Stache); (16) Aeroelastic rotors in the multi-component simulation (R. Schelenz, S. Flock, D. Moeller); (17) Investigations at hybrid tower constructions of wind power plants (J. Gruenberg, M. Hansen, S. Kromminga); (18) Vibration behaviour of pile founded wind power plants (J. Grabe, S. Henke, J. Duehrkop); (19) Operation behaviour and vibration behaviour of a powertrain of wind power plants (T. Gellermann); (20) Technical and financial results of a 5 years of condition monitoring on 8 wind turbines farm (F. Fugon, F. Wery); (21) Interactions of unbalanced states during the operation of a wind power plant and impact on the lifetime of all components (J. Holling, M. Bergmann); (22) Vibration dampers in wind power plants (T. Schumacher); (23) Advanced analysis of sensory data yields focused fault indications for industrial machinery, electrical power systems, and physical infrastructure (P. Johnson); (24) Connecting elements for wind power plants with enhanced vibration resistance (U. Hasselmann, T. Braun); (25) FMEA based vibration monitoring of wind power plants (J. Loesl, E. Becker); (26) Counterbalancing of generators at wind power plants (D. Franke, G. Schmidt); (27) Geotechnical measurements of the interaction surface-monopile at FINO (J. Gattermann, U. Berndt, J. Stahlmann); (28) APSOvib registered - tailor-made elastomer bearing for wind power plants (R. Eberlein).

  15. Control of renewable distributed power plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bullich Massagué, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this master thesis is to design a power plant controller for a photo- voltaic (PV) power plant. In a first stage, the current situation of the status of the electrical grid is analysed. The electrical network structure is moving from a conventional system (with centralized power generation, unidirectional power ows, easy control) to a smart grid system consisting on distributed generation, renewable energies, smart and complex control architecture and ...

  16. Future requirements for fossil power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spliethoff H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The fast increasing installation of technologies to convert renewable energy into power influences the operation of conventional power plants. New requirements on the technology, on the operation and on the economic have to be considered for already running and future power plants. Currently, first experiences with such a production and market situation are available. Technologies are discussed to store power and to reduce CO2 emissions. New compensation models are necessary to enable economic operation of fossil power plants in base load. This article gives a short review about available technologies and future challenges.

  17. Conceptual differences between existing and advanced reactors and criteria affecting the development of new types of nuclear power plants world-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of the nuclear safety principles and the design and operating parameters between existing and advanced reactors is presented, and criteria affecting the development of new types of nuclear reactor are outlined

  18. Economy of small-scale power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic requirement for profitable generation of power and heat is sufficient and even heat load. The investment required by a plant based on cogeneration is always higher than that of a plant producing only heat, and hence the full time operation of the plant should be ensured since the beginning of the plant operational age. The second requirement for profitable operation of a small-scale power plant is the homogenous heat and power consumption profiles. Because the plants always cause remarkable capital costs and other fixed costs it is important to make an economic survey of the costs before the decision making in the preliminary planning phase. The presentation gives a review of the factors effecting on the economy of small-scale power plant, the distribution of the costs, and the methods used for investigation of the economy are reviewed

  19. Nuclear Power Plants in the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) used every year to summarize a trend survey on the private nuclear power plants in the world in a shape of the 'Developmental trends on nuclear power plants in the world'. In this report, some data at the end of 1999 was made up on bases of answers on questionnaires from 72 electric companies in 31 nations and regions in the world by JAIF. This report is comprised of 19 items, and contains generating capacity of the plants; current status of Japan; trends of generating capacity of operating the plants, the plant orders and generating capacity of the plants; world nuclear capacity by reactor type; location of the plants; the plants in the world; and so forth. And, it also has some survey results on the 'Liberalization of electric power markets and nuclear power generation' such as some 70% of respondents in nuclear power for future option, gas-thermal power seen as power source with most to gain from liberalization, merits on nuclear power generation (environmental considerations and supply stability), most commonly voiced concern about new plant orders in poor economy, and so forth. (G.K.)

  20. Advanced Gasifier Pilot Plant Concept Definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Fusselman; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

    2005-08-31

    This report presents results from definition of a preferred commercial-scale advanced gasifier configuration and concept definition for a gasification pilot plant incorporating those preferred technologies. The preferred commercial gasifier configuration was established based on Cost Of Electricity estimates for an IGCC. Based on the gasifier configuration trade study results, a compact plug flow gasifier, with a dry solids pump, rapid-mix injector, CMC liner insert and partial quench system was selected as the preferred configuration. Preliminary systems analysis results indicate that this configuration could provide cost of product savings for electricity and hydrogen ranging from 15%-20% relative to existing gasifier technologies. This cost of product improvement draws upon the efficiency of the dry feed, rapid mix injector technology, low capital cost compact gasifier, and >99% gasifier availability due to long life injector and gasifier liner, with short replacement time. A pilot plant concept incorporating the technologies associated with the preferred configuration was defined, along with cost and schedule estimates for design, installation, and test operations. It was estimated that a 16,300 kg/day (18 TPD) pilot plant gasifier incorporating the advanced gasification technology and demonstrating 1,000 hours of hot-fire operation could be accomplished over a period of 33 months with a budget of $25.6 M.

  1. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  2. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I ampersand C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I ampersand C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper

  3. Special issue on start of construction of the Ohma nuclear power plant of J-Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (J-Power) started construction of its Ohma nuclear power plant - a 1383 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) - in Aomori prefecture on May 2008. The reactor of the Ohma plant will be the first to load MOX fuels in all of its reactor cores. It will be able to consume a quarter of all the recycled MOX fuels produced at Rokkasho reprocessing plant and hence make a major contribution to Japan's policy of recycling plutonium recovered from spent fuels. Special issue reviewed history and overview of the Ohma plant as well as its significance to enhance power generation portfolio in corresponding with national interests. Local governor's expectations and present state of the Ohma plant were also described. After preparation works, construction began on excavation of foundation for the service building, proceeding as always with safety the foremost priority during construction. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Alarm-Processing in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information overload due to the activation of a great number of alarms in a short time is a common problem for the operator in the control room of a industrial plant, mainly in complex process like the nuclear power plants.The problem is the conventional conception of the alarm system, that defines each alarm like a separated and independent entity of the global situation of the plant.A direct consequence is the generation of multiple alarms during a significative disturbance in the process, being most of them redundant and irrelevant to the actual process state wich involves an extra load to the operator, who wastes time in acting selecting the important alarms of the group that appears or lead to a an erroneous action.The present work first describes the techniques developed in the last years to attack the avalanche of alarms problem.Later we present our approach to alarm-processing: an expert system as alarm-filter.Our objective is collect in the system the state of the art in the development of advanced alarm systems, offering an improvement of the information flow to the operators through the suppression of nonsignificant alarms and a structured visualization of the process state.Such support is important during a disturbance for the identification of plant state, diagnosis, consequence prediction and corrective actions.The system is arranged in three stages: alarm-generation, alarm-filter and alarm-presentation.The alarm-generation uses conventional techniques or receives them from an external system.The alarm-filter uses suppression techniques based on: irrelevance analysis with the operation mode and the state of components, causal reasoning and static importance analysis.The alarm presentation is made through a structured way using a priority scheme with three level.The knowledge representation of each alarm is based on frames and a graph of alarms for global knowledge, where the connections between nodes represent causal and irrelevance relations

  5. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on monolithic refractory metal alloys and on metal matrix composites is being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in support of advanced space power systems. The overall philosophy of the research is to develop and characterize new high-temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites (Gr/Cu) for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites (W/NB) for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications

  6. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1999 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1999; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; grid connection forecasts; world electric power market; electronuclear owners and share holders in EU, capacity and load factor; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; 1999 gross load factor by operator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  7. Advanced designs of VVER reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of VVER reactors, current challenges and approaches to the challenges are highlighted. The VVER-1200 reactor of 3+ generation for AES-2006 units are under construction at the Leningrad 2 nuclear power plant (LNPP-2). The main parameters are listed and details are presented of the vessel, steam generator, and improved fuel. The issue of the NPP safety is discussed. Additional topics include the MIR-1200 reactor unit, VVER-600, and VVER-SCP (Generation 4). (P.A.)

  8. Nuclear Power Plant Module, NPP-1: Nuclear Power Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, Robert L.

    The purpose of the Nuclear Power Plant Modules, NPP-1, is to determine the total cost of electricity from a nuclear power plant in terms of all the components contributing to cost. The plan of analysis is in five parts: (1) general formulation of the cost equation; (2) capital cost and fixed charges thereon; (3) operational cost for labor,…

  9. Citizens contra nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is Wyhl the beginning of a new citizens' movement against official policies concerning atomic energy or is it the end of citizens' initiatives of latter years. Did democracy pass its test in Wyhl, or was the state's authority undermined. The danger of atomic energy was not the only concern of the citizens of the Rhine valley who demonstrated against the planned nuclear power plant, but also the quality of industrial and energy planning in which the democratic foundations have to be safeguarded. In the meantime, the doubts increase that this source of energy is of a not dangerous nature, and the myth of supposedly cheap atomic energy has been scattered. The dangers in connection with waste transport and storage were made public beyond the boundaries of the places in question, in particular as a result of the demonstrations. The publication documents the course of the demonstration and the site occupation from the beginning of Febuary 1975 onwards. The occupation still continued when the booklet was published despite the decision of the Administrative Court in Freiburg at the end of March (prohibition of commencement of building until the verdict on the principal suit against the overall project has been reached, the final decision to be made by the Higher Administrative Court in Mannheim). The author aims at describing the new quality of citizens' commitments in this booklet. (orig./LN)

  10. Ways to improve MHD power plants and prospects of their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper analyzes the characteristics of MHD power plants, modification possibilities and the areas of their application. The analysis is based on the status of available power plants, including steam turbine and combined cycle steam-gas power plants. Conventional MHD power plants based on existing technical solutions and various novel schemes are discussed. Main directions to improve energy conversion efficiency are presented, as well as ways to modify MHD systems to reduce capital costs. The conclusion is drawn that MHD power plants could be competitive with most advanced power generation technologies. (authors)

  11. Power plants 2002. Lectures; Kraftwerke 2002. Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Main topics of the meeting: Power economy for the Eastern European countries and their economical growth during overtaking by utilities; climatic change by fossil-fuel power plants; deregulation and competition challenges; cogeneration from fossil fuels and renewable energy sources; research programs for advanced energy systems and problems of certification and regulations; power trade and influence on the operators; air pollution and kyoto protocol and climatic change between policy and engineering tasks. (GL) [German] Energiewirtschaft in Mittel- und Osteuropa - Stand der Beitrittsverhandlungen. Perspektiven der Stromwirtschaft in Mittel- und Osteuropa. Technologiekonzepte fuer die Beitrittslaender in Mittel-/Osteuropa. Klimafakten - CO{sub 2} ist nicht alles. Im Spannungsfeld von Versorgungssicherheit und Klimaschutz. Ungarn vor der Marktoeffnung - Traeume und Realitaeten. Die polnische Energiewirtschaft auf dem Weg zum Vereinigten Europa. The Czech Power Industry against a Backdrop of Liberalisation and Privatisation. The Finish Way: Expansion of Nuclear Energy to Achieve a Reliable Energy Supply. Renewables and Co-generation Electricity in Europe - An Overview. Foerderung erneuerbarer Energien zwischen politischem Anspruch und Wirklichkeit. Emission Trading - Bewertung der Instrumente und Konsequenzen des EV-Vorschlages. Wirksame Instrumente zum Klimaschutz. Transaktionskosten beim Zertifikatehandel. Perspektiven zentraler und dezentraler Erzeugungstechnologien. Offshore Windpark Horns Rev - Konzeption und Perspektiven. Wasserkraft: Traditionell und Innovativ. Target Pricing - Eine interessante Alternative zum Pauschalfestpreis. Generation and Technology - European Agenda. Stromhandel im liberalisierten Markt - Auswirkungen auf die Erzeuger. Konzeption und erste Betriebserfahrungen BOA Niederaussem. Konzeption und erste Betrieserfahrungen Avedore 2. E{sub max}: VGB Initiative for Clean Coal Technologies. Anforderungen an die zukuenftige Ausbildung des

  12. Advanced plant engineering and construction of Japanese ABWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remarkable improvement has been made in recent nuclear power plant design and construction in Japan. These many improved engineering technologies has been made a good use in the lately commercial operated two world's first 1,356MWe ABW's (Advanced Boiling Water Reactors), and made a great contribution to the smooth progress and the completion of a highly reliable plant construction. Especially, two engineering technologies, (1), three-dimensional computer aided design system through engineering data-base, and (2), large scale modularising construction method, have been successfully applied as the integrated engineering technologies of the plant construction. And two integrated reviews, 'integrated design review, confirmation of new and changed design and prevention of failure recurrence' in the design stage, and 'constructing plant review' at the site, have been widely and systematically conducted as a link in the chain of steady reliability improvement activities. These advanced and/or continuous and steady technologies are one of most important factors for high reliability through the entire lifetime of a nuclear plant, including planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance stages. (author)

  13. Thermal power plant simulation and control

    CERN Document Server

    Flynn, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Contributors of world-class excellence are brought together in Thermal Power Plant Simulation and Control to illustrate how current areas of research can be applied to power plant operation, leading to enhanced unit performance, asset management andplant competitiveness through intelligent monitoring and control strategies.

  14. Quality assurance in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors related to the licensing procedures of a nuclear power plant (quality assurance and safety analysis) are presented and discussed. The consequences of inadequate attitudes towards these factors are shown and suggestions to assure the safety of nuclear power plants in Brazil are presented. (E.G.)

  15. Lessons learned from existing biomass power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltsee, G.

    2000-02-24

    This report includes summary information on 20 biomass power plants, which represent some of the leaders in the industry. In each category an effort is made to identify plants that illustrate particular points. The project experiences described capture some important lessons learned that lead in the direction of an improved biomass power industry.

  16. Slovak Electric, plc, Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this popular scientific brochure a brief description of construction scheme of Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant is presented. Electricity generation in a nuclear power plant is described. Instrumentation and control system as well as nuclear safety principles applied on the NPP are presented

  17. Working in a virtual power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical simulations on computer providing a virtual and reversible experience can now be used for maintenance in nuclear power plants allowing operations to be tested and tools to be optimised. Eventually, operatives will be trained to work in virtual nuclear power plants in complete safety. (authors)

  18. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the third quarter of 1993, all of Finland's four nuclear power plant units were in power operation, with the exception of the annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa units. The load factor average of the plant units was 83.6 %. None of the events which occurred during this annual quarter had any bearing on nuclear or radiation safety. (4 figs., 5 tabs.)

  19. Nuclear power plant risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book collects papers on nuclear plant risk management. Topics include: basic concepts in risk analysis and decision theory; establishing integrated plant models; core and containment response; and site modeling and consequences

  20. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH)

  1. Harmonics in a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preciado, V.; Madrigal, M.; Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2015-04-02

    Wind power generation has been growing at a very fast pace for the past decade, and its influence and impact on the electric power grid is significant. As in a conventional power plant, a wind power plant (WPP) must ensure that the quality of the power being delivered to the grid is excellent. At the same time, the wind turbine should be able to operate immune to small disturbances coming from the grid. Harmonics are one of the more common power quality issues presented by large WPPs because of the high switching frequency of the power converters and the possible nonlinear behavior from electric machines (generator, transformer, reactors) within a power plant. This paper presents a summary of the most important issues related to harmonics in WPPs and discusses practical experiences with actual Type 1 and Type 3 wind turbines in two WPPs.

  2. Hybrid wind-power-distillation plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninić Neven

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports and elaborates on the idea of a solar distiller and an offshore wind power plant operating together. The subject under discussion is a single-stage solar distillation plant with vaporization, using adiabatic expansion in the gravitational field inside a wind power plant supporting column. This scheme divides investment costs for electric power and distillate production. In the region of the Adriatic Sea, all electric power produced could be “converted” to hydrogen using less than 10% of the distillate produced.

  3. Human factors in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants

  4. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  5. Safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience shows that German nuclear power plants have always been operated reliably and safely. Over the years, the safety level in these plants has been raised considerably so that they can stand any comparison with other countries. This is confirmed by the two reports published by the Federal Ministry for the Environment on the nuclear safety convention. Behind this, there must obviously stand countless appropriate 'good practices' and a safety management system in nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  6. Linguistic control of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multivariable linguistic controller based on fuzzy set theory is discussed and its application to a pressurized water nuclear power plant control is illustrated by computer simulation. The nonlinear power plant simulation model has nine states, two control inputs, one disturbance input, and two outputs. Although relatively simple, the model captures the essential coupled nonlinear plant dynamics and is convenient to use for control system studies. The use of an adaptive version of the controller is also demonstrated by computer simulation

  7. City power plant of tomorrow; Tulevaisuuden kaupunkivoimala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroueh, U.M.; Loikkanen, T. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Environmental Technology

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this preliminary study is to create a basis for further studies on environmental, technical, economic and social demands and factors connected with the planning and operational management of city power plants, and for a systematic examination of environmental impacts of various energy production technologies. Environmental and operational-environmental demands, development trends of these demands in near future, technological solutions available for the generation of energy from solid fuels or natural gas, and the need to develop emission reduction technologies and environmental management systems are discussed in the report. In addition, production technologies suitable for the co-production of heat and electricity in big cities of the near future were compared on the basis of the most significant operational and environmental qualities. The study is based on domestic and foreign literature, research reports and discussions with both representatives of the companies that took part in the steering group of the project and other experts. The present state of research on energy and the environment, as well as future research needs are assessed especially on the basis of the results of SIHTI 2 energy and environment research program. The alternative production and environmental technologies available are not different from energy production technologies, in general. Also the procedures of environmental impact assessment and environmental management are fundamentally the same. The location of the plant amidst residential areas means, however, that the requirements for minimization of environmental hazards and risks, and the requirements for common acceptability will be strict. The number of potential fuels and production technology alternatives will be reduced by these circumstances, and by the fact that the selection of the plant site is tightly constrained by the zoning system. Because of these facts, environmentally advanced but, at the same time, low

  8. Plant life management and maintenance technologies for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power generation occupying an important position for energy source in Japan and supplying about one third of total electric power usage is now required for further upgrading of its economics under regulation relaxation of electric power business. And, under execution retardation of its new planning plant, it becomes important to operate the already established plants for longer term and to secure their stability. Therefore, technical development in response to the plant life elongation is promoted under cooperation of the Ministry of Economics and Industries, electric power companies, literate, and plant manufacturers. Under such conditions, the Hitachi, Ltd. has progressed some technical developments on check inspection, repairs and maintenance for succession of the already established nuclear power plants for longer term under securing of their safety and reliability. And in future, by proposing the check inspection and maintenance program combined with these technologies, it is planned to exert promotion of maintenance program with minimum total cost from a viewpoint of its plant life. Here were described on technologies exerted in the Hitachi, Ltd. such as construction of plant maintenance program in response to plant life elongation agreeing with actual condition of each plant, yearly change mechanism grasping, life evaluation on instruments and materials necessary for maintenance, adequate check inspection, repairs and exchange, and so forth. (G.K.)

  9. Alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behavior of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants has been investigated since 2005. The main source of alpha nuclides is core contamination with fissile material (so called tramp uranium or tramp fuel) which deposits on fuel rod surfaces and leads to the build-up of transuranium nuclides. Such alpha-nuclides are of special interest for health physics due to their high biological effectiveness. Having very high dose factors they lead to high dose weighting in case of incorporation. At NPC 2008 first results of the joint research project were presented concerning tramp fuel and its impact to alpha nuclides. The present publication will cover the ongoing results of this research project. A special focus is taken to deduce recommendations which allow plant operation personal to recognize situations in advance which can lead to enhanced appearance of alpha nuclides. Depending on the fuel conditions in the core and the activity level of fission products of the reactor coolant a better prediction of the alpha situation at the following outage and maintenance can be deduced. (author)

  10. Terrestrial Solar Thermal Power Plants: On the Verge of Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, M.; Martinez, D.; Zarza, E.

    2004-12-01

    Solar Thermal Power Plants (STPP) with optical concentration technologies are important candidates for providing the bulk solar electricity needed within the next few decades, even though they still suffer from lack of dissemination and confidence among citizens, scientists and decision makers. Concentrating solar power is represented nowadays at pilot-scale and demonstration-scale by four technologies, parabolic troughs, linear Fresnel reflector systems, power towers or central receiver systems, and dish/engine systems, which are ready to start up in early commercial/demonstration plants. Even though, at present those technologies are still three times more expensive than intermediate-load fossil thermal power plants, in ten years from now, STPP may already have reduced production costs to ranges competitive. An important portion of this reduction (up to 42%) will be obtained by R&D and technology advances in materials and components, efficient integration schemes with thermodynamic cycles, highly automated control and low-cost heat storage systems.

  11. Nuclear power plant after Fukushima incident: Lessons from Japan to Thailand for choosing power plant options

    OpenAIRE

    Tatcha Sudtasan; Komsan Suriya

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates four power plant options in Thailand to suggest whether the country should adopt nuclear power plants. It includes a scenario that nuclear power plants are forced to be shut because of natural disaster like what happened at Fukushima Daiishi nuclear power plant in Japan. The results found that, in terms of net present value both in duration of 30 and 50 years, nuclear power plants is the best choice under certainty of no severe natural disaster that would interrupt the op...

  12. Model Predictive Control of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Wayne Bequette; Priyadarshi Mahapatra

    2010-08-31

    The primary project objectives were to understand how the process design of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant affects the dynamic operability and controllability of the process. Steady-state and dynamic simulation models were developed to predict the process behavior during typical transients that occur in plant operation. Advanced control strategies were developed to improve the ability of the process to follow changes in the power load demand, and to improve performance during transitions between power levels. Another objective of the proposed work was to educate graduate and undergraduate students in the application of process systems and control to coal technology. Educational materials were developed for use in engineering courses to further broaden this exposure to many students. ASPENTECH software was used to perform steady-state and dynamic simulations of an IGCC power plant. Linear systems analysis techniques were used to assess the steady-state and dynamic operability of the power plant under various plant operating conditions. Model predictive control (MPC) strategies were developed to improve the dynamic operation of the power plants. MATLAB and SIMULINK software were used for systems analysis and control system design, and the SIMULINK functionality in ASPEN DYNAMICS was used to test the control strategies on the simulated process. Project funds were used to support a Ph.D. student to receive education and training in coal technology and the application of modeling and simulation techniques.

  13. EPRI nuclear power plant groundwater protection program - 59341

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Groundwater Protection Program conducts research related to the management of groundwater at nuclear power plant sites. Experiences at decommissioned and operating nuclear power plants show that leaks and spills from plant systems, structures, and components and work practices can lead to contamination on on-site soils and groundwater. While the levels of radioactivity resulting from such contamination events do not pose health and safety threats to the public, they have raised stakeholder concerns and, in some cases, have required remediation during decommissioning to meet site-release criteria. The EPRI Nuclear Power Plant Groundwater Protection Program provides technical support and guidance to the industry for prevention of leaks and spills, early detection of leaks and spills, monitoring of groundwater contamination, prevention of off-site migration of groundwater contamination, and remediation of groundwater and soil contamination. The EPRI Groundwater Protection Program is composed of two main objectives: 1) provide technical guidance and 2) develop advanced technologies. The cornerstones of the EPRI Groundwater Protection Program are the EPRI Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants and the EPRI Groundwater and Soil Remediation Guidelines

  14. Operating experience with nuclear power plants 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VGB Technical Committee 'Nuclear Plant Operation' has been exchanging operating experience about nuclear power plants for more than 30 years. Plant operators from several European countries are participating in the exchange. A report is given on the operating results achieved in 2013, events important to plant safety, special and relevant repair, and retrofit measures from Belgium, Germany, Finland, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Spain. (orig.)

  15. Reliability of emergency ac power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability of emergency onsite ac power systems at nuclear power plants has been questioned within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of the number of diesel generator failures reported by nuclear plant licensees and the reactor core damage that could result from diesel failure during an emergency. This report contains the results of a reliability analysis of the onsite ac power system, and it uses the results of a separate analysis of offsite power systems to calculate the expected frequency of station blackout. Included is a design and operating experience review. Eighteen plants representative of typical onsite ac power systems and ten generic designs were selected to be modeled by fault trees. Operating experience data were collected from the NRC files and from nuclear plant licensee responses to a questionnaire sent out for this project

  16. Vehicle bomb protection for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The six-step methodology presented in this paper can be applied to nuclear power reactors to provide protection measures and considerations against vehicle bomb threats. The methodology provides a structured framework for examining the potential vulnerability of a plant to a postulated vehicle bomb and for developing contingency planning strategies for dealing with such a possibility. The six steps are as follows: (1) identify system options available to establish and maintain a safe reactor shutdown; (2) identify buildings or other structures containing critical components and equipment associated with each system option; (3) determine survival envelopes for the system options; (4) review site features to determine vehicle access approach paths and distances as they relate to the survival envelopes; (5) identify measures to limit or thwart vehicle access, and protect and preserve preferred system options; (6) prepare contingency plans and make advance arrangements for implementation of contingency measures for a vehicle bomb attack. Portions of this methodology related to blast effects from vehicle bombs on power reactor components are implemented using BombCAD, a proprietary computer-aided design (CAD)-based blast effects analysis technique

  17. Transient analysis models for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modelling used for the simulation of the Angra-1 start-up reactor tests, using the RETRAN computer code is presented. Three tests are simulated: a)nuclear power plant trip from 100% of power; b)great power excursions tests and c)'load swing' tests.(E.G.)

  18. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  19. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MWth, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS

  20. Comments on seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the prediction of seismic hazard have resulted in concern that some nuclear power plant sites could experience seismic events in excess of their design bases. This concern, along with the considerable interest that has arisen from interpretations of probabilistic risk assessments, has resulted in significant professional activity in the prediction of fragilities of structures and equipment. Several programs sponsored by utilities, regulators and EPRI are addressing many of the aspects of seismic fragility. This paper discusses the current state-of-the-art in fragility prediction, fragility data sources, relative seismic ruggedness of power plant components, problem areas in fragility prediction, and suggested future work in fragility testing