WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced polymeric materials

  1. Advances in radiation processing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makuuchi, K.; Sasak, T.; Vikis, A.C.; Singh, A.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper we review recent advances in industrial applications of electron-beam irradiation in the field of polymer processing at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the Whiteshell Laboratories of AECL Research, Canada. Irradiation of a substrate with ionizing radiation produces free radicals through ionization and excitation events. The subsequent chemistry of these radicals is used in radiation processing as a substitute for conventional processing techniques based on heating and/or the addition of chemicals. The advantages of radiation processing include the formation of novel products with desirable material properties, favourable overall process economics and, often, environmental benefits

  2. Applied bioactive polymeric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles; Foster, Van

    1988-01-01

    The biological and biomedical applications of polymeric materials have increased greatly in the past few years. This book will detail some, but not all, of these recent developments. There would not be enough space in this book to cover, even lightly, all of the major advances that have occurred. Some earlier books and summaries are available by two of this book's Editors (Gebelein & Carraher) and these should be consul ted for additional information. The books are: "Bioactive Polymeric Systems" (Plenum, 1985); "Polymeric Materials In Medication" (Plenum, 1985); "Biological Acti vi ties of Polymers" (American Chemical Society, 1982). Of these three, "Bioacti ve Polymeric Systems" should be the most useful to a person who is new to this field because it only contains review articles written at an introductory level. The present book primarily consists of recent research results and applications, with only a few review or summary articles. Bioactive polymeric materials have existed from the creation of life...

  3. Conducting Polymeric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The overall objective of this collection is to provide the most recent developments within the various areas of conducting polymeric materials. The conductivity of polymeric materials is caused by electrically charged particles, ions, protons and electrons. Materials in which electrons...

  4. Recent Advances in Polymeric Materials Used as Electron Mediators and Immobilizing Matrices in Developing Enzyme Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mambo Moyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different classes of polymeric materials such as nanomaterials, sol-gel materials, conducting polymers, functional polymers and biomaterials have been used in the design of sensors and biosensors. Various methods have been used, for example from direct adsorption, covalent bonding, crossing-linking with glutaraldehyde on composites to mixing the enzymes or use of functionalized beads for the design of sensors and biosensors using these polymeric materials in recent years. It is widely acknowledged that analytical sensing at electrodes modified with polymeric materials results in low detection limits, high sensitivities, lower applied potential, good stability, efficient electron transfer and easier immobilization of enzymes on electrodes such that sensing and biosensing of environmental pollutants is made easier. However, there are a number of challenges to be addressed in order to fulfill the applications of polymeric based polymers such as cost and shortening the long laboratory synthetic pathways involved in sensor preparation. Furthermore, the toxicological effects on flora and fauna of some of these polymeric materials have not been well studied. Given these disadvantages, efforts are now geared towards introducing low cost biomaterials that can serve as alternatives for the development of novel electrochemical sensors and biosensors. This review highlights recent contributions in the development of the electrochemical sensors and biosensors based on different polymeric material. The synergistic action of some of these polymeric materials and nanocomposites imposed when combined on electrode during sensing is discussed.

  5. Designing materials for advanced microelectronic patterning applications using controlled polymerization RAFT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Chambers, Charles R.; Tran, Hoang V.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Brun, Yefim; Romberger, Matthew L.; Sounik, James R.

    2011-04-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization technology enables the production of polymers possessing low polydispersity (PD) in high yield for many applications. RAFT technology also enables control over polymer architecture. With synthetic control over these polymer characteristics, a variety of polymers can be designed and manufactured for use in advanced electronic applications. By matching the specific RAFT reagent and monomer combinations, we can accommodate monomer reactivity and optimize acrylate or methacrylate polymerizations (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or optimize styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to yield polymers with PD as low as 1.05. For 193i lithography, we have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising of a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials and a "low surface energy" block The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution migration behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. Directed self assembly is proving to be an interesting and innovative method to make 2- and even 3-dimensional periodic, uniform patterns. Two keys to acceptable performance of directed self assembly from block copolymers are the uniformity and the purity of the materials will be discussed.

  6. Recent advances of basic materials to obtain electrospun polymeric nanofibers for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Leon, A. L.; Popa, A.

    2016-08-01

    The most important applications of electrospun polymeric nanofibers are by far those from biomedical field. From the biological point of view, almost all the human tissues and organs consist of nanofibroas structures. The examples include the bone, dentine, cartilage, tendons and skin. All these are characterized through different fibrous structures, hierarchically organized at nanometer scale. Electrospinning represents one of the nanotechnologies that permit to obtain such structures for cell cultures, besides other technologies, such as selfassembling and phase separation technologies. The basic materials used to produce electrospun nanofibers can be natural or synthetic, having polymeric, ceramic or composite nature. These materials are selected depending of the nature and structure of the tissue meant to be regenerated, namely: for the regeneration of smooth tissues regeneration one needs to process through electrospinning polymeric basic materials, while in order to obtain the supports for the regeneration of hard tissues one must mainly use ceramic materials or composite structures that permit imbedding the bioactive substances in distinctive zones of the matrix. This work presents recent studies concerning basic materials used to obtain electrospun polymeric nanofibers, and real possibilities to produce and implement these nanofibers in medical bioengineering applications.

  7. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  8. Packaging based on polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Slobodan M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past two years the consumption of common in the developed countries world wide (high tonnage polymers for packaging has approached a value of 50 wt.%. In the same period more than 50% of the packaging units on the world market were made of polymeric materials despite the fact that polymeric materials present 17 wt.% of all packaging materials. The basic properties of polymeric materials and their environmental and economical advantages, providing them such a position among packaging materials, are presented in this article. Recycling methods, as well as the development trends of polymeric packaging materials are also presented.

  9. Electroactivity in Polymeric Materials

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Electroactivity in Polymeric Materials provides an in-depth view of the theory of electroactivity and explores exactly how and why various electroactive phenomena occur. The book explains the theory behind electroactive bending (including ion-polymer-metal-composites –IPMCs), dielectric elastomers, electroactive contraction, and electroactive contraction-expansion cycles.  The book also balances theory with applications – how electroactivity can be used – drawing inspiration from the manmade mechanical world and the natural world around us.  This book captures: A complete introduction to electroactive materials including examples and recent developments The theory and applications of numerous topics like electroactive bending of dielectric elastomers and electroactive contraction and expansion New topics, such as biomimetic applications and energy harvesting This is a must-read within the electroactive community, particularly for professionals and graduate students who are interested in the ...

  10. Multicomponent polymeric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Sabu; Saha, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    The book offers an in-depth review of the materials design and manufacturing processes employed in the development of multi-component or multiphase polymer material systems. This field has seen rapid growth in both academic and industrial research, as multiphase materials are increasingly replacing traditional single-component materials in commercial applications. Many obstacles can be overcome by processing and using multiphase materials in automobile, construction, aerospace, food processing, and other chemical industry applications. The comprehensive description of the processing, characterization, and application of multiphase materials presented in this book offers a world of new ideas and potential technological advantages for academics, researchers, students, and industrial manufacturers from diverse fields including rubber engineering, polymer chemistry, materials processing and chemical science. From the commercial point of view it will be of great value to those involved in processing, optimizing an...

  11. Novel polymeric materials from triglycerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triglycerides are good platforms for new polymeric products that can substitute for petroleum-based materials. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a number of reactions in efforts to produce a wide range of value-added products. In this ...

  12. Pharmaceutical Applications of Polymeric Nano materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, L.; Sun, L.

    2011-01-01

    With significant attention focused on nano science and nano technology in recent years, nano materials have been used in a wide variety of applications such as automotive, environmental, energy, catalysis, biomedical, drug delivery, and polymeric industries. Among those fields, the application of nano materials with pharmaceutical science is an emerging and rapidly growing field and has drawn increasing attention recently. Research and development in this field is mainly focused on several aspects such as the discoveries of novel functional nano materials, exploration on nanoparticles with controlled and targeted drug delivery characteristics, and investigation of bio functionalized and diagnostic nano materials. In this special issue, we have invited a few papers related to recent advances in pharmaceutical application of polymeric nano materials

  13. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials. Part III - Biodegradation of thermoformed rigid PLA packaging under industrial composting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musioł, Marta; Sikorska, Wanda; Adamus, Grazyna; Janeczek, Henryk; Richert, Jozef; Malinowski, Rafal; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a forensic engineering study on the biodegradation behaviour of prototype packaging thermoformed from PLA-extruded film and plain PLA film under industrial composting conditions. Hydrolytic degradation in water was conducted for reference. The effects of composting duration on changes in molar mass, glass transition temperature and degree of crystallinity of the polymeric material were monitored using gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The chemical structure of water soluble degradation products of the polymeric material was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results show that the biodegradation process is less dependent on the thermoforming process of PLA and more dependent on the composting/degradation conditions that are applied. The increase in the dispersity index, leading to the bimodal molar mass distribution profile, suggests an autocatalytic hydrolysis effect at the early stage of the composting process, during which the bulk hydrolysis mechanism dominantly operates. Both the prototype PLA-packaging and PLA rigid film samples were shown to have a gradual increase in opacity due to an increase in the degree of crystallinity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanostructured conductive polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed H.

    Conductive polymer composites (CPCs) are a suitable alternative to metals in many applications due to their light-weight, corrosion resistance, low cost, ease of processing and design flexibility. CPCs have been formulated using different types of conductive fillers. In this PhD thesis, the focus is on CPCs for electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection and electromagnetic interference (EMI) attenuation. Despite the versatility of conductive fillers, carbon black (CB) has been the dominant filler to make CPCs for ESD protection applications because CB/polymer composites have a cost advantage over all other CPCs. For EMI shielding, stainless steel fibres and metal coated fibers are the preferred fillers, however CPCs made of those fibers are not the dominant EMI shielding materials. Metal coated and polymer plated polymers are the most widely used EMI shielding options. The limited use of CPCs in the EMI shielding market is because the high filler loading required to formulate a composite with an adequate level of shielding remarkably increases the composite price. In order to increase the competitiveness of CPCs, percolation threshold should be minimized as much as possible and composites with high EMI shielding capabilities at low filler loading should be formulated because all conductive fillers are expensive compared to polymers. In this thesis, two different methodologies to reduce percolation threshold in CPCs have been successfully developed and a CPC with exceptional EMI shielding capability has been formulated using copper nanowires as conductive filler. The first percolation threshold reduction technique is based on the selective localization of CB at the interface of immiscible polymer blend. The technique requires adding a copolymer that prefers the blend's interface and for which CB nanoparticles has the highest affinity. The second method is based on producing a CPC powder and then using this powder as a conductive filler to produce composite by dry

  15. Polymeric materials in medication

    CERN Document Server

    Carraher, Charles

    1985-01-01

    The art of using chemical agents for medication dates back into antiquity, although most of the earliest examples used plants, herbs, and other natural materials. The old Egyptian medical papyri, which date from before 1400 B. C. , contain dozens of examples of such medicinal plants and animal extracts. In the Old Testament of the Bible, we can find references to using oil to soften the skin and sores (Isaiah 1:6), the use of tree leaves for medicine (Ezekiel 47:12) and various medical balms (Jeremiah 8:22). Not all these recipes were effective in curing the ailments for which they were used and sometimes the treatment was worse than the disease. Nevertheless, the art of using chemical derived agents for medicines continued to develop and received great impetus during the present century with the rise of synthetic organic chemistry. One of the most vexing problems has always been to achieve specifici­ ty with the medications. While some medical agents do indeed possess a relatively high degree of specificity...

  16. Polymeric membrane materials for artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Many polymeric materials have already been used in the field of artificial organs. However, the materials used in artificial organs are not necessarily created with the best material selectivity and materials design; therefore, the development of synthesized polymeric membrane materials for artificial organs based on well-defined designs is required. The approaches to the development of biocompatible polymeric materials fall into three categories: (1) control of physicochemical characteristics on material surfaces, (2) modification of material surfaces using biomolecules, and (3) construction of biomimetic membrane surfaces. This review will describe current issues regarding polymeric membrane materials for use in artificial organs.

  17. Polymeric materials from renewable resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frollini, Elisabete; Rodrigues, Bruno V. M.; Silva, Cristina G. da; Castro, Daniele O.; Ramires, Elaine C.; Oliveira, Fernando de; Santos, Rachel P. O. [Macromolecular Materials and Lignocellulosic Fibers Group, Center for Research on Science and Technology of BioResources, Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, CP 780, 13560-970 São Carlos, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-05-18

    The goals of our studies have been the use of renewable raw materials in the preparation of polymeric materials with diversified properties. In this context, lignosulfonate, which is produced in large scale around the world, but not widely used in the production of polymeric materials, was used to replace phenol and polyols in the preparation of phenolic- (Ligno-PH) and polyurethane-type (Ligno-PU) polymers, respectively. These polymers were used to prepare composites reinforced with sisal lignocellulosic fibers. The use of lignosulfonate in the formulation of both types of polymers was beneficial, because in general composites with improved properties, specially impact strength, were obtained. Composites were also prepared from the so called “biopolyethylene” (HDPE), curaua lignocellulosic fiber, and castor oil (CO). All composites HDBPE/CO/Fiber exhibited higher impact strength, when compared to those of the corresponding HDBPE/Fiber. These results, combined with others (eg SEM images of the fractured surfaces) indicated that, in addition to acting as a plasticizer, this oil may have acted as a compatibilizer of the hydrophilic fiber with the hydrophobic polymer. The set of results indicated that (i) mats with nano (diameter ≤ 100nm) and/or ultrafine (submicron scale) fibers were produced, (ii) hybrid fibers were produced (bio-based mats composites), (iii) cellulosic pulp (CP) and/or lignin (Lig) can be combined with PET matrices to control properties such as stiffness and hydrophilicity of the respective mats. Materials with diversified properties were prepared from high content of renewable raw materials, thus fulfilling the proposed targets.

  18. Polymeric materials from renewable resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frollini, Elisabete; Rodrigues, Bruno V. M.; da Silva, Cristina G.; Castro, Daniele O.; Ramires, Elaine C.; de Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Rachel P. O.

    2016-05-01

    The goals of our studies have been the use of renewable raw materials in the preparation of polymeric materials with diversified properties. In this context, lignosulfonate, which is produced in large scale around the world, but not widely used in the production of polymeric materials, was used to replace phenol and polyols in the preparation of phenolic- (Ligno-PH) and polyurethane-type (Ligno-PU) polymers, respectively. These polymers were used to prepare composites reinforced with sisal lignocellulosic fibers. The use of lignosulfonate in the formulation of both types of polymers was beneficial, because in general composites with improved properties, specially impact strength, were obtained. Composites were also prepared from the so called "biopolyethylene" (HDPE), curaua lignocellulosic fiber, and castor oil (CO). All composites HDBPE/CO/Fiber exhibited higher impact strength, when compared to those of the corresponding HDBPE/Fiber. These results, combined with others (eg SEM images of the fractured surfaces) indicated that, in addition to acting as a plasticizer, this oil may have acted as a compatibilizer of the hydrophilic fiber with the hydrophobic polymer. The set of results indicated that (i) mats with nano (diameter ≤ 100nm) and/or ultrafine (submicron scale) fibers were produced, (ii) hybrid fibers were produced (bio-based mats composites), (iii) cellulosic pulp (CP) and/or lignin (Lig) can be combined with PET matrices to control properties such as stiffness and hydrophilicity of the respective mats. Materials with diversified properties were prepared from high content of renewable raw materials, thus fulfilling the proposed targets.

  19. Recent advances in small molecular, non-polymeric organic hole transporting materials for solid-state DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Thanh-Tuan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Issue from thin-film technologies, dye-sensitized solar cells have become one of the most promising technologies in the field of renewable energies. Their success is not only due to their low weight, the possibility of making large flexible surfaces, but also to their photovoltaic efficiency which are found to be more and more significant (>12% with a liquid electrolyte, >7% with a solid organic hole conductor. This short review highlights recent advances in the characteristics and use of low-molecular-weight glass-forming organic materials as hole transporters in all solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. These materials must feature specific physical and chemical properties that will ensure both the operation of a photovoltaic cell and the easy implementation. This review is an english extended version based on our recent article published in Matériaux & Techniques 101, 102 (2013.

  20. Survey and research on precision polymerization polymeric materials; Seimitsu jugo kobunshi zairyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Survey and research on the precision control of primary structure of polymeric materials and the precision evaluation technology have been conducted to develop advanced polymeric materials. It is proposed that the three basic processes of polymer synthesis, i.e., addition, condensation, and biomimesis, in forming the precision polymerization skeleton are to be covered through a centralized joint research effort with participation of industry, academia, and the government institute and under the leadership of researchers from academic institutions as the team leaders. For the study of technology trends, international conferences held in UK, Germany, and Hawaii are introduced, and domestic meetings, i.e., Annual Polymer Congress and Polymer Conference, are summarized. In addition, Precision Polymerization Forum and International Workshop on Precision Polymerization were held. The basic studies include a quantum-chemical elucidation of the elementary process in polymerization reaction, time-resolved analysis of polymerization process and polymer properties, synthesis of polymers with controlled microstructures by coordination polymerization using metal complexes, synthesis of polymer with controlled microstructures by precision polycondensation, molecular recognition in catalyst-reaction site, and synthesis of imprinting polymers. 246 refs., 117 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Degradable polymeric materials for osteosynthesis: Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Eglin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This report summarizes the state of the art and recent developments and advances in the use of degradable polymers devices for osteosynthesis. The current generation of biodegradable polymeric implants for bone repair utilising designs copied from metal implants, originates from the concept that devices should be supportive and as “inert” substitute to bone tissue. Today degradable polymeric devices for osteosynthesis are successful in low or mild load bearing applications. However, the lack of carefully controlled randomized prospective trials that document their efficacy in treating a particular fracture pattern is still an issue. Then, the choice between degradable and non-degradable devices must be carefully weighed and depends on many factors such as the patient age and condition, the type of fracture, the risk of infection, etc. The improvement of the biodegradable devices mechanical properties and their degradation behaviour will have to be achieved to broaden their use. The next generation of biodegradable implants will probably see the implementation of the recent gained knowledge in cell-material interactions and cells therapy, with a better control of the spatial and temporal interfaces between the material and the surrounding bone tissue.

  2. Deformation and flow of polymeric materials

    CERN Document Server

    Münstedt, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the properties of single polymer molecules and polymeric materials and the methods how to characterize them. Molar masses, molar mass distributions and branching structure are discussed in detail. These properties are decisive for a deeper understanding of structure/properties relationships of polymeric materials. This book therefore describes and discusses them in detail. The mechanical behavior as a function of time and temperature is a key subject of the book. The authors present it on the basis of many original results they have obtained in their long research careers. They present the temperature dependence of mechanical properties of various polymeric materials in a wide temperature range: from cryogenic temperatures to the melt. Besides an extensive data collection on the transitions of various different polymeric materials, they also carefully present the physical explanations of the observed phenomena. Glass transition and melting temperatures are discussed, particularly, with the...

  3. Cross-linking of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, L.I.; Du Plessis, T.A.; Meij, G.O.

    1991-01-01

    The invention provides a method of producing a cured polymeric artifact from a polymeric thermoplastic starting material, the material of the artifact having reduced thermoplasticity relative to the starting material and exhibiting an enhanced degree of cross-linking relative to the starting material. The method includes subjecting a polymeric thermoplastic starting material, which is capable of being cross-linked by irradiation, to sufficient irradiation partially to cross-linked the starting material to produce a thermoplastic partially cross-linked intermediate material. The thermoplasticity of the intermediate material is then reduced by heating it to raise its melting point. The invention also provides a method of making a partially cross-linked feedstocks and a master batch for use in making such artifacts

  4. Polymeric materials obtained by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.; Moraru, R.; Martin, D.; Radoiu, M.; Marghitu, S.; Oproiu, C.

    1995-01-01

    Research activities in the field of electron beam irradiation of monomer aqueous solution to produce polymeric materials used for waste waters treatment, agriculture and medicine are presented. The technologies and special features of these polymeric materials are also described. The influence of the chemical composition of the solution to ba irradiated, absorbed dose level and absorbed dose rate level are discussed. Two kinds of polyelectrolytes, PA and PV types and three kinds of hydrogels, pAAm, pAAmNa and pNaAc types, the production of which was first developed with IETI-10000 Co-60 source and then adapted to the linacs built in Accelerator Laboratory, are described. (author)

  5. Polymeric matrix materials for infrared metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Shawn M; Rasberry, Roger D; Rahimian, Kamyar

    2014-04-22

    A polymeric matrix material exhibits low loss at optical frequencies and facilitates the fabrication of all-dielectric metamaterials. The low-loss polymeric matrix material can be synthesized by providing an unsaturated polymer, comprising double or triple bonds; partially hydrogenating the unsaturated polymer; depositing a film of the partially hydrogenated polymer and a crosslinker on a substrate; and photopatterning the film by exposing the film to ultraviolet light through a patterning mask, thereby cross-linking at least some of the remaining unsaturated groups of the partially hydrogenated polymer in the exposed portions.

  6. Polymeric Materials - introduction and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    These notes support the polymer part of the courses 91742 and 91762 (Materials and Corrosion/degradation of materials) taught in IFAKthey contain a short introduction on group contribution methods for estimating properties of polymers, polymer thermodynamics, viscoelasticity models as well...

  7. Polymeric Materials for Cell Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijaz, A; Perera, D; Olabisi, Ronke M

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cells have been microencapsulated within both natural and synthetic polymers for over half a century. Specifically, in the last 36 years microencapsulated cells have been used therapeutically to deliver a wide range of drugs, cytokines, growth factors, and hormones while enjoying the immunoisolation provided by the encapsulating material. In addition to preventing immune attack, microencapsulation prevents migration of entrapped cells. Cells can be microencapsulated in a variety of geometries, the most common being solid microspheres and hollow microcapsules. The micrometer scale permits delivery by injection and is within diffusion limits that allow the cells to provide the necessary factors that are missing at a target site, while also permitting the exchange of nutrients and waste products. The majority of cell microencapsulation is performed with alginate/poly-L-lysine microspheres. Since alginate itself can be immunogenic, for cell-based therapy applications various groups are investigating synthetic polymers to microencapsulate cells. We describe a protocol for the formation of microspheres and microcapsules using the synthetic polymer poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA).

  8. Bioactive Polymeric Materials for Tissue Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane R. Bienek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive polymeric materials based on calcium phosphates have tremendous appeal for hard tissue repair because of their well-documented biocompatibility. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP-based ones additionally protect against unwanted demineralization and actively support regeneration of hard tissue minerals. Our group has been investigating the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP polymeric composites for the last two decades. Here, we present ACP’s dispersion in a polymer matrix and the fine-tuning of the resin affects the physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties of ACP polymeric composites. These studies illustrate how the filler/resin interface and monomer/polymer molecular structure affect the material’s critical properties, such as ion release and mechanical strength. We also present evidence of the remineralization efficacy of ACP composites when exposed to accelerated acidic challenges representative of oral environment conditions. The utility of ACP has recently been extended to include airbrushing as a platform technology for fabrication of nanofiber scaffolds. These studies, focused on assessing the feasibility of incorporating ACP into various polymer fibers, also included the release kinetics of bioactive calcium and phosphate ions from nanofibers and evaluate the biorelevance of the polymeric ACP fiber networks. We also discuss the potential for future integration of the existing ACP scaffolds into therapeutic delivery systems used in the precision medicine field.

  9. Forensic engineering of advanced polymeric materials Part IV: Case study of oxo-biodegradable polyethylene commercial bag - Aging in biotic and abiotic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musioł, Marta; Rydz, Joanna; Janeczek, Henryk; Radecka, Iza; Jiang, Guozhan; Kowalczuk, Marek

    2017-06-01

    The public awareness of the quality of environment stimulates the endeavor to safe polymeric materials and their degradation products. The aim of the forensic engineering case study presented in this paper is to evaluate the aging process of commercial oxo-degradable polyethylene bag under real industrial composting conditions and in distilled water at 70°C, for comparison. Partial degradation of the investigated material was monitored by changes in molecular weight, thermal properties and Keto Carbonyl Bond Index and Vinyl Bond Index, which were calculated from the FTIR spectra. The results indicate that such an oxo-degradable product offered in markets degrades slowly under industrial composting conditions. Even fragmentation is slow, and it is dubious that biological mineralization of this material would occur within a year under industrial composting conditions. The slow degradation and fragmentation is most likely due to partially crosslinking after long time of degradation, which results in the limitation of low molecular weight residues for assimilation. The work suggests that these materials should not be labeled as biodegradable, and should be further analyzed in order to avoid the spread of persistent artificial materials in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in polymeric systems for tissue engineering and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Rajeswari; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Mukherjee, Shayanti; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2012-03-01

    The characteristics of tissue engineered scaffolds are major concerns in the quest to fabricate ideal scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. The polymer scaffolds employed for tissue engineering applications should possess multifunctional properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and favorable mechanical properties as it comes in direct contact with the body fluids in vivo. Additionally, the polymer system should also possess biomimetic architecture and should support stem cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. As the progress in polymer technology continues, polymeric biomaterials have taken characteristics more closely related to that desired for tissue engineering and clinical needs. Stimuli responsive polymers also termed as smart biomaterials respond to stimuli such as pH, temperature, enzyme, antigen, glucose and electrical stimuli that are inherently present in living systems. This review highlights the exciting advancements in these polymeric systems that relate to biological and tissue engineering applications. Additionally, several aspects of technology namely scaffold fabrication methods and surface modifications to confer biological functionality to the polymers have also been discussed. The ultimate objective is to emphasize on these underutilized adaptive behaviors of the polymers so that novel applications and new generations of smart polymeric materials can be realized for biomedical and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  12. Polymeric materials for solar thermal applications

    CERN Document Server

    Köhl, Michael; Papillon, Philippe; Wallner, Gernot M; Saile, Sandrin

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between basic science and technological applications, this is the first book devoted to polymers for solar thermal applications.Clearly divided into three major parts, the contributions are written by experts on solar thermal applications and polymer scientists alike. The first part explains the fundamentals of solar thermal energy especially for representatives of the plastics industry and researchers. Part two then goes on to provide introductory information on polymeric materials and processing for solar thermal experts. The third part combines both of these fields, dis

  13. Novel distributed strain sensing in polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abot, Jandro L; Song, Yi; Medikonda, Sandeep; Rooy, Nathan; Schulz, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring the state of strain throughout an entire structure is essential to determine its state of stress, detect potential residual stresses after fabrication, and also to help to establish its integrity. Several sensing technologies are presently available to determine the strain in the surface or inside a structure. Large sensor dimensions, complex signal conditioning equipment, and difficulty in achieving a widely distributed system have however hindered their development into robust structural health monitoring techniques. Recently, carbon nanotube forests were spun into a microscale thread that is electrically conductive, tough, and easily tailorable. The thread was integrated into polymeric materials and used for the first time as a piezoresistive sensor to monitor strain and also to detect damage in the material. It is revealed that the created self-sensing polymeric materials are sensitive to normal strains above 0.07% and that the sensor thread exhibits a perfectly linear delta resistance–strain response above 0.3%. The longitudinal gauge factors were determined to be in the 2–5 range. This low cost and simple built-in sensor thread may provide a new integrated and distributed sensor technology that enables robust real-time health monitoring of structures

  14. Polymeric Smart Skin Materials: Concepts, Materials, and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-31

    Fudouzi, H. and Xia, Y., Langmuir 2003, 19, 9653-9658 (also see the highlight in Materials Today, 2003, December, p. 7). 15. Langmuir - Blodgett Silver...development of electroactive dendrimers, dendronized polymers, hyperbranched polymers, and phase- separating block copolymers. Development of such materials...Dalton, and A. K-Y. Jen, " Hyperbranched Fluorinated Aromatic Polyester from Mild One-Pot Polymerization of AB 2 Hydroxy Acid Monomer," Macromolecules

  15. Joining of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Messler, Robert W

    1993-01-01

    Provides an unusually complete and readable compilation of the primary and secondary options for joining conventional materials in non-conventional ways. Provides unique coverage of adhesive bonding using both organic and inorganic adhesives, cements and mortars. Focuses on materials issues without ignoring issues related to joint design, production processing, quality assurance, process economics, and joining performance in service.Joining of advanced materials is a unique treatment of joining of both conventional and advanced metals andalloys, intermetallics, ceramics, glasses, polymers, a

  16. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26410809

  17. Machinability of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Davim, J Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Machinability of Advanced Materials addresses the level of difficulty involved in machining a material, or multiple materials, with the appropriate tooling and cutting parameters.  A variety of factors determine a material's machinability, including tool life rate, cutting forces and power consumption, surface integrity, limiting rate of metal removal, and chip shape. These topics, among others, and multiple examples comprise this research resource for engineering students, academics, and practitioners.

  18. Advanced energy materials (Preface)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Elby; Ventura, João; Araújo, João Pedro; Campos Gil, João

    2017-12-01

    Advances in material science make it possible to fabricate the building blocks of an entirely new generation of hierarchical energy materials. Recent developments were focused on functionality and areas connecting macroscopic to atomic and nanoscale properties, where surfaces, defects, interfaces and metastable state of the materials played crucial roles. The idea is to combine both, the top-down and bottom-up approach as well as shape future materials with a blend of both the paradigms.

  19. Photocontrol in Complex Polymeric Materials: Fact or Illusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerca, Valentin Victor; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2018-06-04

    Photoswitches: Exciting recent progress realized in the field of light-controlled polymeric materials is highlighted. It is discussed how the rational choice of azobenzene molecules and their incorporation into complex materials by making use of physical interactions can lead to genuine photocontrollable polymeric systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Advancing materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, H.D.; Psaras, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The topics discussed in this volume include historical perspectives in the fields of materials research and development, the status of selected scientific and technical areas, and current topics in materials research. Papers are presentd on progress and prospects in metallurgical research, microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, condensed-matter physics and materials research, quasi-periodic crystals, and new and artifically structured electronic and magnetic materials. Consideration is also given to materials research in catalysis, advanced ceramics, organic polymers, new ways of looking at surfaces, and materials synthesis and processing

  1. Advanced energy materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    An essential resource for scientists designing new energy materials for the vast landscape of solar energy conversion as well as materials processing and characterization Based on the new and fundamental research on novel energy materials with tailor-made photonic properties, the role of materials engineering has been to provide much needed support in the development of photovoltaic devices. Advanced Energy Materials offers a unique, state-of-the-art look at the new world of novel energy materials science, shedding light on the subject's vast multi-disciplinary approach The book focuses p

  2. Advances in electronic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, Erich; Grimmeiss, Hermann G

    2008-01-01

    This special-topic volume, Advances in Electronic Materials, covers various fields of materials research such as silicon, silicon-germanium hetero-structures, high-k materials, III-V semiconductor alloys and organic materials, as well as nano-structures for spintronics and photovoltaics. It begins with a brief summary of the formative years of microelectronics; now the keystone of information technology. The latter remains one of the most important global technologies, and is an extremely complex subject-area. Although electronic materials are primarily associated with computers, the internet

  3. Advanced Industrial Materials Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooksbury, F.

    1994-06-01

    The mission of the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDA's. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  4. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Ring-opening Metathesis Polymerization of Olefins and Polymerization of Alkynes

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    The first NATO Advanced Study Institute on Olefin Metathesis and Polymerization Catalysts was held on September 10-22, 1989 in Akcay, Turkey. Based on the fundamental research of RRSchrock, RGrubbs and K.B.Wagener in the field of ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), acyclic diene metathesis (ADMET) and alkyne polymerization, these areas gained growing interest within the last years. Therefore the second NATO-ASI held on metathesis reactions was on Ring Opening Metathesis Po­ lymerization of Olefins and Polymerization of Alkynes on September 3-16, 1995 in Akcay, Turkey. The course joined inorganic, organic and polymer chemists to exchange their knowledge in this field. This volume contains the main and short lectures held in Akcay. To include ADMET reactions better into the title of this volume we changed it into: Metathesis Polymerization of Olefins and Alkyne Polymerization. This volume is addressed to research scientists, but also to those who start to work in the area of olefin metathesis and al...

  5. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2017-01-01

    This second edition continues to be the most comprehensive review on the developments in advanced electronic packaging technologies, with a focus on materials and processing. Recognized experts in the field contribute to 22 updated and new chapters that provide comprehensive coverage on various 3D package architectures, novel bonding and joining techniques, wire bonding, wafer thinning techniques, organic substrates, and novel approaches to make electrical interconnects between integrated circuit and substrates. Various chapters also address advances in several key packaging materials, including: Lead-free solders Flip chip underfills Epoxy molding compounds Conductive adhesives Die attach adhesives/films Thermal interface materials (TIMS) Materials for fabricating embedded passives including capacitors, inductors, and resistors Materials and processing aspects on wafer-level chip scale package (CSP) and MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) Contributors also review new and emerging technologies such as Light ...

  6. Fluoropolymer materials and architectures prepared by controlled radical polymerizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Natanya Majbritt Louie; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2007-01-01

    This review initially summarizes the mechanisms, merits and limitations of the three controlled radical polymerizations: nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) or metal catalyzed living radical polymerization, and reversible addition–fragmentation chain...... transfer (RAFT) polymerization. This is followed by two parts, one dealing with homo- and copolymerizations of fluorinated methacrylates and acrylates, and a second where fluorinated styrenes, alone or in combination with other monomers, are the main issues. In these parts, initiators (including...... properties and functionalities that can be obtained from these novel fluorinated materials and architectures are especially emphasized. Thus, various amphiphilic, biocompatible or low energy materials, fluorinated nanoparticles and nanoporous films/membranes as well as materials for submicron and nanolevel...

  7. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  8. Anisotropic microporous supports impregnated with polymeric ion-exchange materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Dwayne; Babcock, Walter C.; Tuttle, Mark

    1985-05-07

    Novel ion-exchange media are disclosed, the media comprising polymeric anisotropic microporous supports containing polymeric ion-exchange or ion-complexing materials. The supports are anisotropic, having small exterior pores and larger interior pores, and are preferably in the form of beads, fibers and sheets.

  9. Polymerization Simulator for Introductory Polymer and Material Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirdon, William M.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes how molecular simulation of polymerization reactions can be used to enrich introductory polymer or material science courses to give students a deeper understanding of free-radical chain and stepwise growth polymerization reactions. These simulations have proven to be effective media for instruction that do not require material…

  10. Polymeric materials as artificial muscles: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariano, Paolo; Accardo, Daisy; Lombardi, Mariangela; Bocchini, Sergio; Draghi, Lorenza; De Nardo, Luigi; Fino, Paolo

    2015-03-18

    The accurate selection of materials and the fine tuning of their properties represent a fundamental aspect in the realization of new active systems able to produce actuating forces, such as artificial muscles. In this regard, exciting opportunities for the design of new advanced systems are offered by materials belonging to the emerging class of functional polymers: exploiting their actuation response, specific devices can be realized. Along this direction, materials showing either shape-memory effect (SME) or shape-change effect (SCE) have been the subject of extensive studies aimed at designing of actuators as artificial muscles. Here, we concisely review active polymers in terms of properties and main applications in artificial muscle design. The main aspects related to material properties in both shape-memory polymers (SMPs) and electroactive polymers (EAPs) are reviewed, based on recent scientific literature. SME in thermally activated SMPs is presented by preliminarily providing a definition that encompasses the new theories regarding their fundamental properties. EAPs are briefly presented, describing the working mechanisms and highlighting the main properties and drawbacks, in view of their application as actuators. For both classes of materials, some key examples of effective application in artificial muscles are offered. The potential in polymer architecture design for the fabrication of actively moving systems is described to give a perspective on the main achievements and new research activities.

  11. Recent progress of atomic layer deposition on polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hong Chen; Ye, Enyi [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Li, Zibiao, E-mail: lizb@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Han, Ming-Yong [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Loh, Xian Jun, E-mail: lohxj@imre.a-star.edu.sg [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 2 Fusionopolis Way, Innovis, #08-03, Singapore 138634 (Singapore); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Singapore Eye Research Institute, 20 College Road, Singapore 169856 (Singapore)

    2017-01-01

    As a very promising surface coating technology, atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to modify the surfaces of polymeric materials for improving their functions and expanding their application areas. Polymeric materials vary in surface functional groups (number and type), surface morphology and internal structure, and thus ALD deposition conditions that typically work on a normal solid surface, usually do not work on a polymeric material surface. To date, a large variety of research has been carried out to investigate ALD deposition on various polymeric materials. This paper aims to provide an in-depth review of ALD deposition on polymeric materials and its applications. Through this review, we will provide a better understanding of surface chemistry and reaction mechanism for controlled surface modification of polymeric materials by ALD. The integrated knowledge can aid in devising an improved way in the reaction between reactant precursors and polymer functional groups/polymer backbones, which will in turn open new opportunities in processing ALD materials for better inorganic/organic film integration and potential applications. - Highlights: • ALD deposition on different natural and synthetic polymer materials • Reaction mechanism based on the surface functional groups of polymers • Application of ALD-modified polymers in different fields.

  12. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.

    2012-06-24

    Membrane reactors are generally applied in high temperature reactions (>400 °C). In the field of fine chemical synthesis, however, much milder conditions are generally applicable and polymeric membranes were applied without their damage. The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane is to be used in. In this chapter a review of up to date literature about polymers and configuration catalyst/ membranes used in some recent polymeric membrane reactors is given. The new emerging concept of polymeric microcapsules as catalytic microreactors has been proposed. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. All rights reserved.

  13. Polymeric Materials for Printed-Based Electroanalytical (BioApplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cinti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in design of selective interfaces and printed technology have mighty contributed to the expansion of the electroanalysis fame. The real advantage in electroanalytical field is the possibility to manufacture and customize plenty of different sensing platforms, thus avoiding expensive equipment, hiring skilled personnel, and expending economic effort. Growing developments in polymer science have led to further improvements in electroanalytical methods such as sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility, and accuracy. This review provides an overview of the technical procedures that are used in order to establish polymer effectiveness in printed-based electroanalytical methods. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of electronalytical sensors and biosensors, which highlights the diverse role of the polymeric materials depending on their specific application. A wide overview is provided, taking into account the most significant findings that have been reported from 2010 to 2017.

  14. Radiation sterilization of polymeric implant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruck, S.D.; Mueller, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    High-energy irradiation sterilization of medical devices and implants composed of polymeric biomaterials that are in contact with tissue and/or blood, may adversely affect their long-term mechanical and/or biological performance (tissue and/or blood compatibility). Since many polymeric implants may contain trace quantities of catalysts and/or other additives, the effect of high-energy radiation on these additives, and possible synergistic effects with the polymer chains under the influence of high-energy radiation, must be considered. It is essential to indicate whether polymeric implants are used in short-term (acute) or long-term (chronic) applications. Relatively small changes in their physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties may be tolerable in the short term, whereas similar changes may lead to catastrophic failures in long-term applications. Therefore, polymeric implants which are to be sterilized by high-energy irradiation should be carefully evaluated for long-term property changes which may be induced by the radiation

  15. Advances in laser ablation of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Lowndes, D.H.; Chrisey, D.B.; Fogarassy, E.; Narayan, J.

    1998-01-01

    The symposium, Advances in Laser Ablation of Materials, was held at the 1998 MRS Spring Meeting in San Francisco, California. The papers in this symposium illustrate the advances in pulsed laser ablation for a wide variety of applications involving semiconductors, superconductors, metals, ceramics, and polymers. In particular, advances in the deposition of oxides and related materials are featured. Papers dealing with both fundamentals and the applications of laser ablation are presented. Topical areas include: fundamentals of ablation and growth; in situ diagnostics and nanoscale synthesis advances in laser ablation techniques; laser surface processing; pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric, magnetic, superconducting and optoelectronic thin films; and pulsed laser deposition of carbon-based and polymeric materials. Sixty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  16. Advanced superconducting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluekiger, R.

    1983-11-01

    The superconducting properties of various materials are reviewed in view of their use in high field magnets. The critical current densities above 12 T of conductors based on NbN or PbMo 6 S 8 are compared to those of the most advanced practical conductors based on alloyed by Nb 3 Sn. Different aspects of the mechanical reinforcement of high field conductors, rendered necessary by the strong Lorentz forces (e.g. in fusion magnets), are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Advanced broadband baffle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper broadband performance characteristics of robust, light-weight, diffuse-absorptive baffle surfaces fabricated from sputter-deposited beryllium on cross-rolled Be ingot sheet material and on Be foam, plasma sprayed beryllium, plasma sprayed boron-on-beryllium, and chemical vapor deposited boron carbide on graphite are described and compared to Martin Black. An overview of the Optics Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory (MODIL) Advanced Optical Baffle Program will be discussed

  18. Novel polymeric nanocomposites and porous materials prepared using organogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Wei-Chi; Tseng, Shen-Chen, E-mail: wclai@mail.tku.edu.t [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tamkang University, 151 Ying-chuan Road, Tamsui, Taipei 25137, Taiwan (China)

    2009-11-25

    We propose a new method for preparing polymeric nanocomposites and porous materials using self-assembled templates formed by 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) organogels. DBS is capable of self-assembling into a 3D nanofibrillar network at relatively low concentrations in some organic solvents to produce organogels. In this study, we induced the formation of such physical cross-linked networks in styrene. Subsequently, we polymerized the styrene in the presence of chemical cross-linkers, divinyl benzene (DVB), with different amounts of DBS using thermal-initiated polymerization. The resulting materials were transparent, homogeneous polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites with both physical and chemical cross-links. The porous polymeric materials were obtained by solvent extraction of the DBS nanofibrils from the PS. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements show that the amounts of DBS and DVB influenced the specific surface area after the removal of the DBS fibrils.

  19. Novel polymeric nanocomposites and porous materials prepared using organogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Wei-Chi; Tseng, Shen-Chen

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new method for preparing polymeric nanocomposites and porous materials using self-assembled templates formed by 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS) organogels. DBS is capable of self-assembling into a 3D nanofibrillar network at relatively low concentrations in some organic solvents to produce organogels. In this study, we induced the formation of such physical cross-linked networks in styrene. Subsequently, we polymerized the styrene in the presence of chemical cross-linkers, divinyl benzene (DVB), with different amounts of DBS using thermal-initiated polymerization. The resulting materials were transparent, homogeneous polystyrene (PS) nanocomposites with both physical and chemical cross-links. The porous polymeric materials were obtained by solvent extraction of the DBS nanofibrils from the PS. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements show that the amounts of DBS and DVB influenced the specific surface area after the removal of the DBS fibrils.

  20. Advanced Polymeric and Organic–Inorganic Membranes for Pressure-Driven Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu

    2017-02-13

    The state-of-the-art of membranes for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and gas separation is shortly reviewed, taking in account the most representative examples currently in application. Emphasis is also done on recent developments of advanced polymeric and organic–inorganic materials for pressure-driven processes. Many of the more recent membranes are not only polymeric but also contain an inorganic phase. Tailoring innovative materials with organic and inorganic phases coexisting in a nanoscale with multifunctionalization is an appealing approach to control at the same time diffusivity and gas solubility. Other advanced materials that are now being considered for membrane development are organic or organic–inorganic self-assemblies, metal-organic frameworks, and different forms of carbon fillers.

  1. Advanced Polymeric and Organic–Inorganic Membranes for Pressure-Driven Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu; Phuoc, Duong; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2017-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of membranes for reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and gas separation is shortly reviewed, taking in account the most representative examples currently in application. Emphasis is also done on recent developments of advanced polymeric and organic–inorganic materials for pressure-driven processes. Many of the more recent membranes are not only polymeric but also contain an inorganic phase. Tailoring innovative materials with organic and inorganic phases coexisting in a nanoscale with multifunctionalization is an appealing approach to control at the same time diffusivity and gas solubility. Other advanced materials that are now being considered for membrane development are organic or organic–inorganic self-assemblies, metal-organic frameworks, and different forms of carbon fillers.

  2. Polarons in advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Alexandre Sergeevich

    2008-01-01

    Polarons in Advanced Materials will lead the reader from single-polaron problems to multi-polaron systems and finally to a description of many interesting phenomena in high-temperature superconductors, ferromagnetic oxides, conducting polymers and molecular nanowires. The book divides naturally into four parts. Part I introduces a single polaron and describes recent achievements in analytical and numerical studies of polaron properties in different electron-phonon models. Part II and Part III describe multi-polaron physics, and Part IV describes many key physical properties of high-temperature superconductors, colossal magnetoresistance oxides, conducting polymers and molecular nanowires, which were understood with polarons and bipolarons. The book is written in the form of self-consistent reviews authored by well-established researchers actively working in the field and will benefit scientists and postgraduate students with a background in condensed matter physics and materials sciences.

  3. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  4. Advanced materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giamei, A.F.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced materials will require improved processing methods due to high melting points, low toughness or ductility values, high reactivity with air or ceramics and typically complex crystal structures with significant anisotropy in flow and/or fracture stress. Materials for structural applications at elevated temperature in critical systems will require processing with a high degree of control. This requires an improved understanding of the relationship between process variables and microstructure to enable control systems to achieve consistently high quality. One avenue to the required level of understanding is computer simulation. Past attempts to do process modeling have been hampered by incomplete data regarding thermophysical or mechanical material behavior. Some of the required data can be calculated. Due to the advances in software and hardware, accuracy and costs are in the realm of acquiring experimental data. Such calculations can, for example, be done at an atomic level to compute lattice energy, fault energies, density of states and charge densities. These can lead to fundamental information about the competition between slip and fracture, anisotropy of bond strength (and therefore cleavage strength), cohesive strength, adhesive strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion and possibly other quantities which are difficult (and therefore expensive to measure). Some of these quantities can be fed into a process model. It is probable that temperature dependencies can be derived numerically as well. Examples are given of the beginnings of such an approach for Ni 3 Al and MoSi 2 . Solidification problems are examples of the state-of-the-art process modeling and adequately demonstrate the need for extensive input data. Such processes can be monitored in terms of interfacial position vs. time, cooling rate and thermal gradient

  5. Optical investigations of various polymeric materials used in dental technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Ionita, Ciprian; Goguta, Luciana; Marcauteanu, Corina; Rominu, Mihai; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2011-10-01

    Dental prosthetic restorations have to satisfy high stress as well as aesthetic requirements. In order to avoid deficiencies of dental prostheses, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Increasing the biomechanical comportment of polymeric materials implies fiber reinforcing. The different fibers reinforcing products made very difficult the evaluation of their performances and biomechanical properties analysis. There are several known methods which are used to assess the quality of dental prostheses, but most are invasive. These lead to the destruction of the samples and often no conclusion could be drawn in the investigated areas of interest. Using a time domain en-face OCT system, we have recently demonstrated real time thorough evaluation of quality of various dental treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of various polymeric materials used in dental technology and to validate the en face OCT imagistic evaluation of polymeric dental prostheses by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microcomputer tomography (μCT). SEM investigations evidenced the nonlinear aspect of the interface between the polymeric material and the fiber reinforcement and materials defects in some samples. The results obtained by microCT revealed also some defects inside the polymeric materials and at the interfaces with the fiber reinforcement. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution. In addition, en face OCT investigations permit visualization of the more complex stratified structure at the interface between the polymeric material and the fiber reinforcement.

  6. Smart polymeric materials in forms of fiber and film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu

    1998-01-01

    Chemical grafting: graft polymerization is a powerful technology to append novel functionality to base fibers, clothes, felts, films and others, while maintaining their original properties. As shown in Figure 1, while a gardener may use a pair of shears to cut the branch, to cut the molecular branch of a polymeric material, one can utilize the radiation energy. Effective utilization of the radiation energy can proceed to a novel reaction that is impossible for other conventional methods and develop a new material bearing outstanding functions. This technology is named radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP). In this article, the present research and development of novel functional polymeric materials by radiation-induced graft polymerization is described. The felt of intertwined fibers has been widely used as a filter to remove particles from air but not toxic gaseous compounds. However, by RIGP, one can transform the felt into a high functional filter that will absorb the toxic gaseous compounds while removing particles simultaneously. As a result, the RIGP technology, which is impossible by conventional technology, has enabled the development of a novel functional material that produce highly pure air. Commercialization of this filter for applications in a semiconductor manufacturing facility and as an air purifier is under process. Moreover, this filter can also be used to produce highly purified water by removing toxic heavy metals. Commercially available polyethylene films are also been transform into conductive separators by RIGP to increase the lifetime of a battery by more than five-fold. (J.P.N)

  7. Handbook of Advanced Magnetic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi; Shindo, Daisuke

    2006-01-01

    From high-capacity, inexpensive hard drives to mag-lev trains, recent achievements in magnetic materials research have made the dreams of a few decades ago reality. The objective of Handbook of Advanced Magnetic Materials is to provide a timely, comprehensive review of recent progress in magnetic materials research. This broad yet detailed reference consists of four volumes: 1.) Nanostructured advanced magnetic materials, 2.) Characterization and simulation of advanced magnetic materials, 3.) Processing of advanced magnetic materials, and 4.) Properties and applications of advanced magnetic materials The first volume documents and explains recent development of nanostructured magnetic materials, emphasizing size effects. The second volume provides a comprehensive review of both experimental methods and simulation techniques for the characterization of magnetic materials. The third volume comprehensively reviews recent developments in the processing and manufacturing of advanced magnetic materials. With the co...

  8. Influence of zeolite nanofillers on properties of polymeric materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kopcová, M.; Ondrušová, D.; Krmela, J.; Průša, P.; Pajtášová, M.; Jankurová, Z.

    2012-01-01

    The present work deals with the preparation and study of modified polymeric materials with the replacement of carbon black by nanofillers on the basis of zeolite that is environmentally friendly. Natural zeolites from a group of aluminosilicate nanoporous materials have wide range of possibilities for applications that are environmentally friendly. Zeolites can be used in the role of fillers into the polymer materials too [1]. The given work deals with the preparation and study of modif...

  9. Functional polymeric materials : Complexing amphiphiles as structure-inducing elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, G.; Ikkala, O.

    2003-01-01

    Self-assembly of polymeric comb-shaped supramolecules is a powerful tool to prepare functional materials. Enhanced conductivity due to hexagonal self-organization of conducting polyaniline and polarized photoluminance in solid-state films of rodlike poly(2,5-pyridinediyl) obtained by removing

  10. Biodegradable starch-based polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, Anna I.; Tyukova, Irina S.; Trufanova, Elena I.

    2000-05-01

    The effects of low-molecular-weight additives, temperature and mechanical action on the structure and properties of starch are discussed. Special attention is given to mixtures of starch with synthetic polymers, e.g., co-polymers of ethylene with vinyl acetate, vinyl alcohol, acrylic acid, cellulose derivatives and other natural polymers. These mixtures can be used in the development of novel environmentally safe materials (films, coatings, packaging materials) and various articles for short-term use. The bibliography includes 105 references.

  11. Ballistic Puncture Self-Healing Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Keith L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Yost, William T.; Bogert, Phil B.; Howell, Patricia A.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Burke, Eric R.

    2017-01-01

    Space exploration launch costs on the order of $10,000 per pound provide an incentive to seek ways to reduce structural mass while maintaining structural function to assure safety and reliability. Damage-tolerant structural systems provide a route to avoiding weight penalty while enhancing vehicle safety and reliability. Self-healing polymers capable of spontaneous puncture repair show promise to mitigate potentially catastrophic damage from events such as micrometeoroid penetration. Effective self-repair requires these materials to quickly heal following projectile penetration while retaining some structural function during the healing processes. Although there are materials known to possess this capability, they are typically not considered for structural applications. Current efforts use inexpensive experimental methods to inflict damage, after which analytical procedures are identified to verify that function is restored. Two candidate self-healing polymer materials for structural engineering systems are used to test these experimental methods.

  12. Wheat B-starch based polymeric materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotek, Jiří; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Šárka, E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 9 (2011), s. 731 ISSN 0009-2770. [International Conference on Polysaccharides-Glycoscience /7./. 02.11.2011-04.11.2011, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/09/0607 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biodegradable plastic * polycaprolactone * B- starch Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  13. Porous polymeric materials for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Luping; Liu, Di-Jia; Yuan, Shengwen; Yang, Junbing

    2013-04-02

    A porous polymer, poly-9,9'-spirobifluorene and its derivatives for storage of H.sub.2 are prepared through a chemical synthesis method. The porous polymers have high specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution. Hydrogen uptake measurements conducted for these polymers determined a higher hydrogen storage capacity at the ambient temperature over that of the benchmark materials. The method of preparing such polymers, includes oxidatively activating solids by CO.sub.2/steam oxidation and supercritical water treatment.

  14. Fabricating Superhydrophobic Polymeric Materials for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jonah; Grinstaff, Mark

    2015-08-28

    Superhydrophobic materials, with surfaces possessing permanent or metastable non-wetted states, are of interest for a number of biomedical and industrial applications. Here we describe how electrospinning or electrospraying a polymer mixture containing a biodegradable, biocompatible aliphatic polyester (e.g., polycaprolactone and poly(lactide-co-glycolide)), as the major component, doped with a hydrophobic copolymer composed of the polyester and a stearate-modified poly(glycerol carbonate) affords a superhydrophobic biomaterial. The fabrication techniques of electrospinning or electrospraying provide the enhanced surface roughness and porosity on and within the fibers or the particles, respectively. The use of a low surface energy copolymer dopant that blends with the polyester and can be stably electrospun or electrosprayed affords these superhydrophobic materials. Important parameters such as fiber size, copolymer dopant composition and/or concentration, and their effects on wettability are discussed. This combination of polymer chemistry and process engineering affords a versatile approach to develop application-specific materials using scalable techniques, which are likely generalizable to a wider class of polymers for a variety of applications.

  15. Considerations for Electroactive Polymeric Materials and Actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Carl; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2010-01-01

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  16. Synthesizing Smart Polymeric and Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chaokun

    Smart materials have been widely investigated to explore new functionalities unavailable to traditional materials or to mimic the multifunctionality of biological systems. Synthetic polymers are particularly attractive as they already possess some of the attributes required for smart materials, and there are vast room to further enhance the existing properties or impart new properties by polymer synthesis or composite formulation. In this work, three types of smart polymer and composites have been investigated with important new applications: (1) healable polymer composites for structural application and healable composite conductor for electronic device application; (2) conducting polymer polypyrrole actuator for implantable medical device application; and (3) ferroelectric polymer and ceramic nanoparticles composites for electrocaloric effect based solid state refrigeration application. These application entail highly challenging materials innovation, and my work has led to significant progress in all three areas. For the healable polymer composites, well known intrinsically healable polymer 2MEP4F (a Diels-Alder crosslinked polymer formed from a monomer with four furan groups and another monomer with two maleimide groups) was first chosen as the matrix reinforced with fiber. Glass fibers were successfully functionalized with maleimide functional groups on their surface. Composites from functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F healable polymer were made to compare with composites made from commercial carbon fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. Dramatically improved short beam shear strength was obtained from composite of functionalized glass fibers and 2MEP4F polymer. The high cost of 2MEP4F polymer can potentially limit the large-scale application of the developed healable composite, we further developed a new healable polymer with much lower cost. This new polymer was formed through the Diels-Alder crosslinking of poly(furfuryl alcohol) (PFA) and 1,1'-(Methylenedi-4

  17. Handbook - Status assessment of polymeric materials in flue gas cleaning systems; Handbok - Statusbedoemning av polymera material i roekgassystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemhild, Stefanie

    2011-01-15

    In today's flue gas cleaning systems with advanced energy recovery systems and improved flue gas cleaning, the use of polymeric materials has continuously increased in applications where the flue gas environment is to corrosive to be handled with metallic materials. Typical polymeric materials used are fibre reinforced plastics (FRP), glassflake-filled linings, polypropylene (PP) and fluoropolymers. Demands on increased profitability and efficiency at incineration plants involve that also polymeric materials have to face more demanding environments with increased temperature, temperature changes, changes in fuel composition and therewith fluegas composition and longer service intervals. The knowledge on how polymeric materials perform in general and how these service conditions influence them, is, however, poor and continuous status assessment is therefore necessary. The overall aim of this project has been to assess simple techniques for status assessment of polymeric materials in flue gas cleaning equipment and to perform an inventory of present experience and knowledge on the use of polymeric materials. The project consisted of an inventory of present experience, analysis of material from shut-down plants and plants still in service, field testing in a plant adding sulphur during combustion and the assessment of different non-destructive testing (NDT) methods by laboratory experiments. The results of the project are summarised in the form of a handbook which in the first place addresses plant owners and maintenance staff at incineration plants and within the pulp and paper industry. In the introductory chapter typical polymeric materials (FRP, flake linings, PP and fluoropolymers) used in flue gas cleaning equipment are described as well as the occurring corrosion mechanisms. The inventory of process equipment is divided into sections about scrubbers, flue gas ducts, stacks, internals and other equipment such as storage tanks. Typical damages are

  18. Material properties of novel polymeric films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gene

    This dissertation will study the material properties of two types of novel polymer films (polyelectrolyte multilayer films and photolithographic polymer films). The formation of polylelectrolyte multilayer films onto functionalized aluminum oxide surfaces and functionalized poly(ethylene terephthaltate) (PET) were studied. Functionalization of the aluminum oxide surfaces was achieved via silane coupling. Functionalization of PET surfaces was achieved via hydrolysis and amidation. Surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic contact angle measurements were used to monitor the polyelectrolyte multilayer formation. Mechanical properties of the aluminum oxide supported polyelectrolyte multilayer films were tested using a simplified peel test. XPS was used to analyze the surfaces before and after peel. Single lap shear joint specimens were constructed to test the adhesive shear strength of the PET-supported polyelectrolyte multilayer film samples with the aid of a cyanoacrylate adhesive. The adhesive shear strength and its relation with the type of functionalization, number of polyelectrolyte layers, and the effect of polyelectrolyte conformation using added salt were explored. Also, characterization on the single lap joints after adhesive failure was carried out to determine the locus of failure within the multilayers by using XPS and SEM. Two types of photolithographic polymers were formulated and tested. These two polymers (photocrosslinkable polyacrylate (PUA), and a photocrosslinkable polyimide (HRP)) were used to investigate factors that would affect the structural integrity of these particular polymers under environmental variables such as processing (time, UV cure, pressure, and temperature) and ink exposure. Thermomechanical characterization was carried out to see the behavior of these two polymers under these environmental variables. Microscopic techniques were employed to study the morphological behavior of

  19. Apparatus and method for oxidation and stabilization of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; White, Terry L [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of plasma-derived gas containing at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at a selected temperature. The polymer may be directly exposed to the plasma, or alternatively, the plasma may be established in a separate volume from which the reactive species may be extracted and introduced into the vicinity of the polymer. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments.

  20. Apparatus and method for stabilization or oxidation of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulauskas, Felix L [Knoxville, TN; Sherman, Daniel M [Knoxville, TN

    2010-01-19

    An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere at a selected temperature; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of ozone-containing gas, which decomposes at the selected temperature yielding at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at the selected temperature. The ozone may be generated by a plasma discharge or by various chemical processes. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments as well as to make flame-retardant fabrics.

  1. Advanced EDL Materials (AEDLM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Via the exploration of alternate resins and substrate materials for ablative TPS, and the development of new high heat flux resistant flexible TPS systems, we intend...

  2. Supramolecular polymeric materials via cyclodextrin-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akira; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakahata, Masaki

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cyclodextrins (CDs) have many attractive functions, including molecular recognition, hydrolysis, catalysis, and polymerization. One of the most important uses of CDs is for the molecular recognition of hydrophobic organic guest molecules in aqueous solutions. CDs are desirable host molecules because they are environmentally benign and offer diverse functions. This Account demonstrates some of the great advances in the development of supramolecular materials through host-guest interactions within the last 10 years. In 1990, we developed topological supramolecular complexes with CDs, polyrotaxane, and CD tubes, and these preparation methods take advantage of self-organization between the CDs and the polymers. The combination of polyrotaxane with αCD forms a hydrogel through the interaction of αCDs with the OH groups on poly(ethylene glycol). We categorized these polyrotaxane chemistries within main chain type complexes. At the same time, we studied the interactions of side chain type supramolecular complexes with CDs. In these systems the guest molecules modified the polymers and selectively formed inclusion complexes with CDs. The systems that used low molecular weight compounds did not show such selectivity with CDs. The multivalency available within the complex cooperatively enhances the selective binding of CD with guest molecules via the polymer side chains, a phenomenon that is analogous to binding patterns observed in antigen-antibody complexes. To incorporate the molecular recognition properties of CDs within the polymer side chains, we first prepared stimuli-responsive sol-gel switching materials through host-guest interactions. We chose azobenzene derivatives for their response to light and ferrocene derivatives for their response to redox conditions. The supramolecular materials were both redox-responsive and self-healing, and these properties resulted from host-guest interactions. These sol-gels with built in switches gave us insight for

  3. A Thermally Re-mendable Cross-Linked Polymeric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangxu; Dam, Matheus A.; Ono, Kanji; Mal, Ajit; Shen, Hongbin; Nutt, Steven R.; Sheran, Kevin; Wudl, Fred

    2002-03-01

    We have developed a transparent organic polymeric material that can repeatedly mend or ``re-mend'' itself under mild conditions. The material is a tough solid at room temperature and below with mechanical properties equaling those of commercial epoxy resins. At temperatures above 120°C, approximately 30% (as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy) of ``intermonomer'' linkages disconnect but then reconnect upon cooling, This process is fully reversible and can be used to restore a fractured part of the polymer multiple times, and it does not require additional ingredients such as a catalyst, additional monomer, or special surface treatment of the fractured interface.

  4. Advanced Pressure Boundary Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Shingledecker, John P [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Increasing the operating temperatures of fossil power plants is fundamental to improving thermal efficiencies and reducing undesirable emissions such as CO{sub 2}. One group of alloys with the potential to satisfy the conditions required of higher operating temperatures is the advanced ferritic steels such as ASTM Grade 91, 9Cr-2W, and 12Cr-2W. These are Cr-Mo steels containing 9-12 wt% Cr that have martensitic microstructures. Research aimed at increasing the operating temperature limits of the 9-12 wt% Cr steels and optimizing them for specific power plant applications has been actively pursued since the 1970's. As with all of the high strength martensitic steels, specifying upper temperature limits for tempering the alloys and heat treating weldments is a critical issue. To support this aspect of development, thermodynamic analysis was used to estimate how this critical temperature, the A{sub 1} in steel terminology, varies with alloy composition. The results from the thermodynamic analysis were presented to the Strength of Weldments subgroup of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code and are being considered in establishing maximum postweld heat treatment temperatures. Experiments are also being planned to verify predictions. This is part of a CRADA project being done with Alstom Power, Inc.

  5. Microencapsulated Comb-Like Polymeric Solid-Solid Phase Change Materials via In-Situ Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the thermal stability and permeability resistance, a comb-like polymer with crystallizable side chains was fabricated as solid-solid phase change materials (PCMs inside the cores of microcapsules and nanocapsules prepared via in-situ polymerization. In this study, the effects on the surface morphology and microstructure of micro/nanocapsules caused by microencapsulating different types of core materials (i.e., n-hexadecane, ethyl hexadecanoate, hexadecyl acrylate and poly(hexadecyl acrylate were systematically studied via field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The confined crystallization behavior of comb-like polymer PCMs cores was investigated via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. Comparing with low molecular organic PCMs cores, the thermal stability of PCMs microencapsulated comb-like polymer enhanced significantly, and the permeability resistance improved obviously as well. Based on these resultant analysis, the microencapsulated comb-like polymeric PCMs with excellent thermal stability and permeability resistance showed promising foreground in the field of organic solution spun, melt processing and organic coating.

  6. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  7. New Soft Polymeric Materials Applicable as Elastomeric Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    An elastomer is a material characterized by the capability to regain its original size and shape after being deformed (stretched or distorted). An ideal elastomer for electroactive polymer (EAP) applications is a system characterized by high extensibility, flexibility and a good mechanical fatigue....... Dielectric elastomers (DEs) are part of electronic EAPs presenting a good combination of electromechanical properties such as high achievable strains and stresses, fast response speeds, long lifetime, high reliability and high efficiency1. Subjected to a voltage, a polymeric electroactive material sandwiched...... easy to handle. From a mechanical point of view, the materials for EAPs use have to be soft with sufficient mechanical strength so the rupture of the material can be avoided at high strain actuation. Considering the EAP requirements and the experimental data for the hyperswollen networks based...

  8. Polymeric Bicontinuous Microemulsions as Templates for Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brad Howard

    Ternary blends of two homopolymers and a diblock copolymer can self-assemble into interpenetrating, three dimensionally-continuous networks with a characteristic length scale of ˜ 100 nm. In this thesis, it is shown that these liquid phases, known as polymeric bicontinuous microemulsions (BμE), can be designed as versatile precursors to nanoporous materials having pores with uniform sizes of ˜ 100 nm. The model blends from which the porous materials are derived are composed of polyethylene (PE) and a sacrificial polyolefin. The liquid BμE structure is captured by crystallization of the PE, and a three-dimensionally continuous pore network with a narrow pore size distribution is generated by selective extraction of the sacrificial component. The original BμE structure is retained in the resultant nanoporous PE. This monolithic material is then used as a template in the synthesis of other nanoporous materials for which structural control at the nm scale has traditionally been difficult to achieve. These materials, which include a high-temperature ceramic, polymeric thermosets, and a conducting polymer, are produced by a simple nanocasting process, providing an inverse replica of the PE template. On account of the BμE structure of the template, the product materials also possess three-dimensionally continuous pore networks with narrow size distributions centered at ˜ 100 nm. The PE template is further used as a template for the production of hierarchically structured inorganic and polymeric materials by infiltration of mesostructured compounds into its pore network. In the former case, a hierarchically porous SiO2 material is demonstrated, simultaneously possessing two discrete, bicontinuous pore networks with sizes differing by over an order of magnitude. Finally, the templating procedures are extended to thin films supported on substrates and novel conductive polymer films are synthesized. The work described herein represents an unprecedented suite of

  9. Beam processing of advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.; Copley, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    International Conference on Beam Processing of Advanced Materials was held at the Fall TMS/ASM Materials Week at Chicago, Illinois, November 2--5, 1992. The symposium was devoted to the recent advances in processing of materials by an energy source such as laser, electron, ion beams, etc. The symposium served as a forum on the science of beam-induced materials processing and implications of this science to practical implementation. An increased emphasis on obtaining an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of beam-induced surface processes was a major trend observed at this years symposium. This has resulted in the increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and modeling studies to determine the rate controlling steps in these processes. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  10. Photo-triggered solvent-free metamorphosis of polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Satoshi; Toyota, Taro

    2017-09-11

    Liquefaction and solidification of materials are the most fundamental changes observed during thermal phase transitions, yet the design of organic and polymeric soft materials showing isothermal reversible liquid-nonliquid conversion remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate that solvent-free repeatable molecular architectural transformation between liquid-star and nonliquid-network polymers that relies on cleavage and reformation of a covalent bond in hexaarylbiimidazole. Liquid four-armed star-shaped poly(n-butyl acrylate) and poly(dimethyl siloxane) with 2,4,5-triphenylimidazole end groups were first synthesized. Subsequent oxidation of the 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoles into 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoryl radicals and their coupling with these liquid star polymers to form hexaarylbiimidazoles afforded the corresponding nonliquid network polymers. The resulting nonliquid network polymers liquefied upon UV irradiation and produced liquid star-shaped polymers with 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoryl radical end groups that reverted to nonliquid network polymers again by recoupling of the generated 2,4,5-triphenylimidazoryl radicals immediately after terminating UV irradiation.The design of organic and polymeric soft materials showing isothermal reversible liquid-nonliquid conversion is challenging. Here, the authors show solvent-free repeatable molecular architectural transformation between liquid-star and non-liquid-network polymers by the cleavage and reformation of covalent bonds in the polymer chain.

  11. A phenomenological approach of solidification of polymeric phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Seyed Amir; Royon, Laurent; Abou, Bérengère; Osipian, Rémy; Azzouz, Kamel; Bontemps, André

    2017-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are widely used in thermal energy storage and thermal management systems due to their small volume for a given stored energy and their capability for maintaining nearly constant temperatures. However, their performance is limited by their low thermal conductivity and possible leaks while in the liquid phase. One solution is to imprison the PCM inside a polymer mesh to create a Polymeric Phase Change Material (PPCM). In this work, we have studied the cooling and solidification of five PPCMs with different PCMs and polymer fractions. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms involved, we have carried out micro- and macrorheological measurements in which Brownian motion of tracers embedded in PPCMs has been depicted and viscoelastic moduli have been measured, respectively. Beyond a given polymer concentration, it was shown that the Brownian motion of the tracers is limited by the polymeric chains and that the material exhibits an elastic behavior. This would suggest that heat transfer essentially occurs by conduction, instead of convection. Experiments were conducted to measure temperature variation during cooling of the five samples, and a semi-empirical model based on a phenomenological approach was proposed as a practical tool to choose and size PPCMs.

  12. Advanced materials for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-02-23

    Popularization of portable electronics and electric vehicles worldwide stimulates the development of energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, toward higher power density and energy density, which significantly depends upon the advancement of new materials used in these devices. Moreover, energy storage materials play a key role in efficient, clean, and versatile use of energy, and are crucial for the exploitation of renewable energy. Therefore, energy storage materials cover a wide range of materials and have been receiving intensive attention from research and development to industrialization. In this Review, firstly a general introduction is given to several typical energy storage systems, including thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, hydrogen, and electrochemical energy storage. Then the current status of high-performance hydrogen storage materials for on-board applications and electrochemical energy storage materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors is introduced in detail. The strategies for developing these advanced energy storage materials, including nanostructuring, nano-/microcombination, hybridization, pore-structure control, configuration design, surface modification, and composition optimization, are discussed. Finally, the future trends and prospects in the development of advanced energy storage materials are highlighted.

  13. Advanced materials for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Cheng, Hui-Ming [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-02-23

    Popularization of portable electronics and electric vehicles worldwide stimulates the development of energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, toward higher power density and energy density, which significantly depends upon the advancement of new materials used in these devices. Moreover, energy storage materials play a key role in efficient, clean, and versatile use of energy, and are crucial for the exploitation of renewable energy. Therefore, energy storage materials cover a wide range of materials and have been receiving intensive attention from research and development to industrialization. In this review, firstly a general introduction is given to several typical energy storage systems, including thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, hydrogen, and electrochemical energy storage. Then the current status of high-performance hydrogen storage materials for on-board applications and electrochemical energy storage materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors is introduced in detail. The strategies for developing these advanced energy storage materials, including nanostructuring, nano-/microcombination, hybridization, pore-structure control, configuration design, surface modification, and composition optimization, are discussed. Finally, the future trends and prospects in the development of advanced energy storage materials are highlighted. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Development of deodorizing materials by radiation graft polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu; Okamoto, Jiro; Fujiwara, Kunio; Sekiguchi, Hideo.

    1989-01-01

    With the development of society, the countermeasures for service water and sewerage in large cities and the environment preservation in industrial districts become difficult as their scale becomes larger. There are many unsolved problems, for example photochemical smog due to harmful gases, exhaust gas from automobiles, and smell of toilets and home waste water. The deodorizing materials used so far are mainly inorganic substances, and their ability of adsorbing harmful gases is very low. Besides, those are mostly granular, and limited in the formability. Therefore, it is expected to develop the fibrous adsorbent which has large adsorbing surface area and is easy to make filters. The chemical structures of the compounds having smell are shown. Eight legal bad smell substances which exert large influence to environment even in very small amount are designated. In this paper, the method of introducing functional radicals into existing fiber materials by the application of radiation graft polymerization process and the test of removing smelling compositions by using the obtained resin are reported. The experimental method, and the results of radiation graft polymerization, the adsorption of basic gases and acid gases, and gas flow test are described. (K.I.)

  15. Advanced materials for clean energy

    CERN Document Server

    Xu (Kyo Jo), Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Arylamine-Based Photosensitizing Metal Complexes for Dye-Sensitized Solar CellsCheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wongp-Type Small Electron-Donating Molecules for Organic Heterojunction Solar CellsZhijun Ning and He TianInorganic Materials for Solar Cell ApplicationsYasutake ToyoshimaDevelopment of Thermoelectric Technology from Materials to GeneratorsRyoji Funahashi, Chunlei Wan, Feng Dang, Hiroaki Anno, Ryosuke O. Suzuki, Takeyuki Fujisaka, and Kunihito KoumotoPiezoelectric Materials for Energy HarvestingDeepam Maurya, Yongke Yan, and Shashank PriyaAdvanced Electrode Materials for Electrochemical Ca

  16. Tribology of polymeric nanocomposites friction and wear of bulk materials and coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Tribology of Polymeric Nanocomposites provides a comprehensive description of polymeric nanocomposites, both as bulk materials and as thin surface coatings, and provides rare, focused coverage of their tribological behavior and potential use in tribological applications. Providing engineers and designers with the preparation techniques, friction and wear mechanisms, property information and evaluation methodology needed to select the right polymeric nanocomposites for the job, this unique book also includes valuable real-world examples of polymeric nanocomposites in a

  17. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Frontiers in Polymerization Catalysis and Polymer Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Guyot, A

    1987-01-01

    Due to their specific properties, polymers with well-defined structures have been receiving increasing attention over the last several years. Owing to the wide variability of their properties, these specialty polymers have been used in various areas from biomedical engineering to electronics or energy applications. The synthesis of such polymers necessi­ tates the use of new methods of polymerization which derived from an insight into the mechanism of polymerization reactions. A NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Frontiers in Polymerization Catalysis and Polymer Synthesis" was held in BANDOl (FRANCE) in February 1987. Its aim was to assess the new polymerization methods, as well as the latest advances in the mechanisms of conventional polymerization reactions together with their applications to the synthesis of new macromolecular structures. The financial support from the NATO Scientific Affairs Division which covered the "lecturers' accomodation and travel expenses as well as the organization charges of th...

  18. POLYMERIC MATERIALS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION: A COMPARATIVE EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Doroshenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Full-scale metal solar collectors and solar collectors fabricated from polymeric materials are studied in present research. Honeycomb multichannel plates made from polycarbonate were chosen to create a polymeric solar collector. Polymeric collector is 67.8% lighter than metal solar collector. It was experimentally shown that the efficiency of a polymeric collector is 7–14% lower than a traditional collector. An ecologically based Life Cycle Assessment showed the advantages of the application of polymeric materials in the construction of solar collectors.

  19. Microbiological destruction of composite polymeric materials in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legonkova, O. A.; Selitskaya, O. V.

    2009-01-01

    Representatives of the same species of microscopic fungi developed on composite materials with similar polymeric matrices independently from the type of soils, in which the incubation was performed. Trichoderma harzianum, Penicillium auranthiogriseum, and Clonostachys solani were isolated from the samples of polyurethane. Fusarium solani, Clonostachys rosea, and Trichoderma harzianum predominated on the surface of ultrathene samples. Ulocladium botrytis, Penicillium auranthiogriseum, and Fusarium solani predominated in the variants with polyamide. Trichoderma harzianum, Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus ochraceus, and Acremonium strictum were isolated from Lentex-based composite materials. Mucor circinelloides, Trichoderma harzianum, and Penicillium auranthiogriseum were isolated from composite materials based on polyvinyl alcohol. Electron microscopy demonstrated changes in the structure of polymer surface (loosening and an increase in porosity) under the impact of fungi. The physicochemical properties of polymers, including their strength, also changed. The following substances were identified as primary products of the destruction of composite materials: stearic acid for polyurethane-based materials; imide of dithiocarbonic acid and 1-nonadecen in variants with ultrathene; and tetraaminopyrimidine and isocyanatodecan in variants with polyamide. N,N-dimethyldodecan amide, 2-methyloximundecanon and 2-nonacosane were identified for composites on the base of Lentex A4-1. Allyl methyl sulfide and imide of dithiocarbonic acid were found in variants with the samples of composites based on polyvinyl alcohol. The identified primary products of the destruction of composite materials belong to nontoxic compounds.

  20. Mechanics of advanced functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Biao

    2013-01-01

    Mechanics of Advanced Functional Materials emphasizes the coupling effect between the electric and mechanical field in the piezoelectric, ferroelectric and other functional materials. It also discusses the size effect on the ferroelectric domain instability and phase transition behaviors using the continuum micro-structural evolution models. Functional materials usually have a very wide application in engineering due to their unique thermal, electric, magnetic, optoelectronic, etc., functions. Almost all the applications demand that the material should have reasonable stiffness, strength, fracture toughness and the other mechanical properties. Furthermore, usually the stress and strain fields on the functional materials and devices have some important coupling effect on the functionality of the materials. Much progress has been made concerning the coupling electric and mechanical behaviors such as the coupled electric and stress field distribution in piezoelectric solids, ferroelectric domain patterns in ferr...

  1. Advances in Osteobiologic Materials for Bone Substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Byambaa, Batzaya; Morshed, Mahboob; Cheikh, Mohammad Ibrahim; Shakoor, Rana Abdul; Mustafy, Tanvir; Marei, Hany

    2018-04-27

    A significant challenge in the current orthopedics is the development of suitable osteobiologic materials that can replace the conventional allografts, autografts and xenografts, and thereby serve as implant materials as bone substitutes for bone repair or remodeling. The complex biology behind the nano-microstructure of bones and their repair mechanisms, which involve various types of chemical and biomechanical signaling amongst different cells, has set strong requirements for biomaterials to be used in bone tissue engineering. This review presents an overview of various types of osteobiologic materials to facilitate the formation of the functional bone tissue and healing of the bone, covering metallic, ceramic, polymeric and cell-based graft substitutes, as well as some biomolecular strategies including stem cells, extracellular matrices, growth factors and gene therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each type, particularly from the perspective of osteoinductive and osteoconductive capabilities, are discussed. Although the numerous challenges of bone regeneration in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are yet to be entirely addressed, further advancements in osteobiologic materials will pave the way towards engineering fully functional bone replacement grafts. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Studies on selected polymeric materials using the photoacoustic spectroscopic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Hukum

    2011-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate—graft—polybisphenol—A-carbonate (PMMA-G-PC) with 50% grafting is synthesized. The graft co-polymerization of methylmethacrylate (0.036 mol · lit −1 ) onto polybisphenol—A-carbonate (0.5 g) in the presence of a redox couple formed from potassium persulphate (40 mol · lit −1 ) and thio-urea (30 mmol · lit −1 ) in aqueous nitric acid (0.18 M, 100 ml) in air at (45±2) °C for 3.0 h. Condensation of (PMMA-G-PC) with N- [p-(carboxyl phenyl amino acetic acid)] hydrazide (PCPH) affords polybisphenol-A-carbonate-graft-polymethylmethacrylate hydrazide (PCGH). The photoacoustic (PA) spectra of (PCGH) are recorded in a wavelength range from 200 nm to 800 nm at a modulation frequency of 22 Hz, and compared with those of pure polybisphenol-A-carbonate (PC), (PMMA-G-PC) and (PCPH). In the present work, a non-destructive and non-contact analytical method, namely the photoacoustic technique, is successfully implemented for optical and thermal characterization of selected polymeric materials. The indigenous PA spectrometer used in the present study consists of a 300-W xenon arc lamp, a lock-in amplifier, a chopper, a (1/8)-m monochromator controlled by computer and a home-made PA cell. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Acoustical characterization and parameter optimization of polymeric noise control materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsi, Emile N.

    2003-10-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics of polymer-based materials are considered. Analytical models that predict, characterize and optimize the STL of polymeric materials, with respect to physical parameters that affect performance, are developed for single layer panel configuration and adapted for layered panel construction with homogenous core. An optimum set of material parameters is selected and translated into practical applications for validation. Sound attenuating thermoplastic materials designed to be used as barrier systems in the automotive and consumer industries have certain acoustical characteristics that vary in function of the stiffness and density of the selected material. The validity and applicability of existing theory is explored, and since STL is influenced by factors such as the surface mass density of the panel's material, a method is modified to improve STL performance and optimize load-bearing attributes. An experimentally derived function is applied to the model for better correlation. In-phase and out-of-phase motion of top and bottom layers are considered. It was found that the layered construction of the co-injection type would exhibit fused planes at the interface and move in-phase. The model for the single layer case is adapted to the layered case where it would behave as a single panel. Primary physical parameters that affect STL are identified and manipulated. Theoretical analysis is linked to the resin's matrix attribute. High STL material with representative characteristics is evaluated versus standard resins. It was found that high STL could be achieved by altering materials' matrix and by integrating design solution in the low frequency range. A suggested numerical approach is described for STL evaluation of simple and complex geometries. In practice, validation on actual vehicle systems proved the adequacy of the acoustical characterization process.

  4. Synthesis of Conductive Polymeric Nanocomposites for Applications in Responsive Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Jessica

    The development of next generation "smart" textiles has emerged with significant interest due to the immense demand for high-performance wearable technology. The economic market for wearable technologies is predicted to increase significantly in both volume and value. In the next four years, the wearable technology market will be valued at $34 billion. This large demand has opened up a new research area involving smart wearable devices and conductive fabrics. Many research groups have taken various paths to study and ultimately fabricate wearable devices. Due to the limiting capabilities of conventional conductors, researchers have centered their research on the integration of conductive polymers into textile materials for applications involving responsive material. Conducive polymers are very unique organic molecules that have the ability to transfer electrons across their molecular structure due to the excess presence of pi-electrons. Conductive polymers are favored over conventional conductors because they can be easily manipulated and integrated into flexible material. Two very common conductive polymers are polyaniline (PANI) and polypyrrole (PPY) because of their large favorability in literature, high conductance values, and environmental stability. Common commercial fibers were coated via the chemical polymerization of PANI or PPY. A series of reactions were done to study the polymerization process of each polymer. The conductive efficiency of each conducting polymer is highly dependent on the type of reactants used, the acidic nature of the reaction, and the temperature of the reaction. The coated commercial fiber nanocomposites produced higher conductivity values when the polymerization reaction was run using ammonium peroxydisulfate (APS) as the oxidizing agent, run in an acidic environment, and run at very low temperatures. Other factors that improved the overall efficiency of the coated commercial fiber nanocomposites was the increase in polymer

  5. Advanced Material Rendering in Blender

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hatka, Martin; Haindl, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 2 (2012), s. 15-23 ISSN 1081-1451 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0335; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Grant - others:CESNET(CZ) 387/2010; CESNET(CZ) 409/2011 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : realistic material rendering * bidirectional texture function * Blender Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/RO/haindl-advanced material rendering in blender.pdf

  6. Selected advances in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Several findings emanating from materials research that should have a beneficial impact on technological advancement in the future are described. The report deals with the GRAPHNOL, a new class of high-temperature brazing alloy for joining refractory components, gel-sphere-pac process for manufacture of nuclear fuel, and noble-metal fuel cladding for service in radioisotope thermoelectric generators designed to provide auxiliary power aboard spacecraft for planetary exploration

  7. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin G.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.

    1997-01-01

    Some of the primary purposes of this work are to study important technologies, particularly involving thin films, relevant to organic and polymeric materials for improving applicability to optical circuitry and devices and to assess the contribution of convection on film quality in unit and microgravity environments. Among the most important materials processing techniques of interest in this work are solution-based and by physical vapor transport, both having proven gravitational and acceleration dependence. In particular, PolyDiAcetylenes (PDA's) and PhthaloCyanines (Pc's) are excellent NonLinear Optical (NLO) materials with the promise of significantly improved NLO properties through order and film quality enhancements possible through microgravity processing. Our approach is to focus research on integrated optical circuits and optoelectronic devices relevant to solution-based and vapor processes of interest in the Space Sciences Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Modification of organic materials is an important aspect of achieving more highly ordered structures in conjunction with microgravity processing. Parallel activities include characterization of materials for particular NLO properties and determination of appropriation device designs consistent with selected applications. One result of this work is the determination, theoretically, that buoyancy-driven convection occurs at low pressures in an ideal gas in a thermalgradient from source to sink. Subsequent experiment supports the theory. We have also determined theoretically that buoyancy-driven convection occurs during photodeposition of PDA, an MSFC-patented process for fabricating complex circuits, which is also supported by experiment. Finally, the discovery of intrinsic optical bistability in metal-free Pc films enables the possibility of the development of logic gate technology on the basis of these materials.

  8. Lignin-Based Materials Through Thiol-Maleimide "Click" Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Pietro; Duval, Antoine; Averous, Luc; Habibi, Youssef

    2017-03-09

    In the present report an environmentally friendly approach to transforming renewable feedstocks into value-added materials is proposed. This transformation pathway was conducted under green conditions, without the use of solvents or catalyst. First, controlled modification of lignin, a major biopolymer present in wood and plants, was achieved by esterification with 11-maleimidoundecylenic acid (11-MUA), a derivative from castor oil that contains maleimide groups, following its transformation into 11-maleimidoundecanoyl chloride (11-MUC). Different degrees of substitution were achieved by using various amounts of the 11-MUC, leading to an efficient conversion of lignin hydroxy groups, as demonstrated by 1 H and 31 P NMR analyses. These fully biobased maleimide-lignin derivatives were subjected to an extremely fast (ca. 1 min) thiol-ene "click" polymerization with thiol-containing linkers. Aliphatic and aromatic thiol linkers bearing two to four thiol groups were used to tune the reactivity and crosslink density. The properties of the resulting materials were evaluated by swelling tests and thermal and mechanical analyses, which showed that varying the degree of functionality of the linker and the linker structure allowed accurate tailoring of the thermal and mechanical properties of the final materials, thus providing interesting perspectives for lignin in functional aromatic polymers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Studies on Stress-Strain Relationships of Polymeric Materials Used in Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Sadhan C.; Freed, Alan

    2002-01-01

    A two-year research plan was undertaken in association with Polymers Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, to carry out experimental and modeling work relating stress and strain behavior of polymeric materials, especially elastomers and vulcanized rubber. An experimental system based on MTS (Mechanical Testing and Simulation) A/T-4 test facility environment has been developed for a broader range of polymeric materials in addition to a design of laser compatible temperature control chamber for online measurements of various strains. Necessary material processing has been accomplished including rubber compounding and thermoplastic elastomer processing via injection molding. A broad suite of testing methodologies has been identified to reveal the complex non-linear mechanical behaviors of rubbery materials when subjected to complex modes of deformation. This suite of tests required the conceptualization, design and development of new specimen geometries, test fixtures, and test systems including development of a new laser based technique to measure large multi-axial deformations. Test data has been generated for some of these new fixtures and has revealed some complex coupling effects generated during multi-axial deformations. In addition, fundamental research has been conducted concerning the foundation principles of rubber thermodynamics and resulting theories of rubber elasticity. Studies have been completed on morphological properties of several thermoplastic elastomers. Finally, a series of steps have been identified to further advance the goals of NASA's ongoing effort.

  10. Programmed photodegradation of polymeric/oligomeric materials derived from renewable bioresources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Saravanakumar; Raghunathan, Ramya; Hevus, Ivan; Krishnan, Retheesh; Ugrinov, Angel; Sibi, Mukund P; Webster, Dean C; Sivaguru, Jayaraman

    2015-01-19

    Renewable polymeric materials derived from biomass with built-in phototriggers were synthesized and evaluated for degradation under irradiation of UV light. Complete decomposition of the polymeric materials was observed with recovery of the monomer that was used to resynthesize the polymers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Biocompatible Polymeric Materials Intended for Drug Delivery and Therapeutic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsted, Søren; Javakhishvili, Irakli; Bednarek, Melania

    2007-01-01

    of polymer blocks by “click chemistry”. An all polymerization strategy would imply preparing polymers by living/controlled techniques in such a manner that one block after polymerization can be converted to a macroinitiator enabling the second block to polymerize. The coupling strategy invariably inserts...... a linking unit, 1,4-triazol, resulting from the catalyzed, irreversible 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between an alkyne and an azide. Thus, this strategy necessitates the proper end functionalization of the polymeric building blocks. Fortunately the 1,4-triazol unit is FDA approved already existing...

  12. UV laser engraving of high temperature polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, D.; Laude, L.D.; Kolev, K.; Hanus, F.

    1999-01-01

    Among emerging technologies, those associated with laser sources as surface processing tools are quite promising. In the present work, a UV pulsed (excimer) laser source is experimented for engraving (or ablating) polymeric materials based on three high temperature polymers: polyethylene terephtalate (PET), polyethersulfone (PES) and polyphenylene sulfide (PPS). The ablation phenomenon is demonstrated on all these polymers and evaluated by stylus profilometry upon varying the laser fluence at impact. For each polymer, results give evidence for three characteristic quantities: an ablation threshold E sub 0, a maximum ablation depth per pulse z sub 0 and an initial rate of ablation α, just above threshold. A simple ablation model is presented which describes correctly the observed behaviours and associates closely the above quantities to the polymer formulation, thus providing for the first time a rational basis to polymer ablation. The model may be extended to parent plastic materials whenever containing the same polymers. It may also be used to predict the behaviours of other polymers when subjected to excimer laser irradiation

  13. Machine guides restoration by using a polymeric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Б. Струтинський

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of slide rest guides of the automatic lathe PUB 130 was made by using a polymeric material in the laboratory, and the measurements of the rest displacement strength were made on a specially created experimental stand with the ADC and the PC and subsequent determination of the coefficient of friction. The performed experiments revealed that in the speed range of saddle feed from 0,0228 to 0,075 m/s, the coefficient of friction is within 0,047-0,055. At the same time, the transition to the low-feed (0,0005-0,0022 m/s results in to marked increase of the friction coefficient and the rest hopping movement. However, this phenomenon is likely due to the fact that elastic tie in the form of steel beam with tensometers was put into the feeder of the rest. This explanation let us hope that, with rigid connection of the drive and the rest such a phenomenon will not take place and the value of friction will not differ substantially from the friction obtained at high speeds. The obtained results make it possible to consider the use of a polymer material to be the optimal way to restore worn-out machines

  14. Wind erosion control of soils using polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Movahedan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Wind erosion of soils is one of the most important problems in environment and agriculture which could affects several fields. Agricultural lands, water reservoires, irrigation canals, drains and etc. may be affected by wind erosion and suspended particles. As a result wind erosion control needs attention in arid and semi-arid regions. In recent years, some polymeric materials have been used for improvement of structural stability, increasing aggregate stability and soil stabilization, though kind of polymer, quantity of polymer, field efficiency and durability and environmental impacts are some important parameters which should be taken into consideration. In this study, a Polyvinil Acetate-based polymer was used to treat different soils. Then polymer-added soil samples were investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel to verify the effecte of polymer on wind erosion control of the soils and the results were compared with water treated soil samples. The results of wind tunnel experiments with a maximum 26 m/s wind velocity showed that there was a significat difference between the erosion of polymer treated and water treated soil samples. Application of 25g/m2 polymer to Aeolian sands reduced the erosion of Aeolian sands samples to zero related to water treated samples. For silty and calyey soils treated by polymer, the wind erosion reduced minimum 90% in relation to water treated samples.

  15. Characterization and damage evaluation of advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Milan

    Mechanical characterization of advanced materials, namely magnetostrictive and graphite/epoxy composite materials, is studied in this dissertation, with an emphasis on damage evaluation of composite materials. Consequently, the work in this dissertation is divided into two parts, with the first part focusing on characterization of the magneto-elastic response of magnetostrictlve materials, while the second part of this dissertation describes methods for evaluating the fatigue damage in composite materials. The objective of the first part of this dissertation is to evaluate a nonlinear constitutive relation which more closely depict the magneto-elastic response of magnetostrictive materials. Correlation between experimental and theoretical values indicate that the model adequately predicts the nonlinear strain/field relations in specific regimes, and that the currently employed linear approaches are inappropriate for modeling the response of this material in a structure. The objective of the second part of this dissertation is to unravel the complexities associated with damage events associated with polymeric composite materials. The intent is to characterize and understand the influence of impact and fatigue induced damage on the residual thermo-mechanical properties and compressive strength of composite systems. The influence of fatigue generated matrix cracking and micro-delaminations on thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) and compressive strength is investigated for woven graphite/epoxy composite system. Experimental results indicate that a strong correlation exists between TEC and compressive strength measurements, indicating that TEC measurements can be used as a damage metric for this material systems. The influence of delaminations on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a composite laminate is also investigated. Based on the changes of these parameters as a function of damage, a methodology for determining the size and location of damage is suggested

  16. Use of computed tomography in nondestructive testing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, S.; Oestman, E.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has been used to detect imperfections and to measure cross-link density gradients in polymeric products, such as airplane tires, rubber shock absorbers, and filament-wound high-pressure tanks

  17. Advanced Materials for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Curto, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    Since NASA was created in 1958, over 6400 patents have been issued to the agency--nearly one in a thousand of all patents ever issued in the United States. A large number of these inventions have focused on new materials that have made space travel and exploration of the moon, Mars, and the outer planets possible. In the last few years, the materials developed by NASA Langley Research Center embody breakthroughs in performance and properties that will enable great achievements in space. The examples discussed below offer significant advantages for use in small satellites, i.e., those with payloads under a metric ton. These include patented products such as LaRC SI, LaRC RP 46, LaRC RP 50, PETI-5, TEEK, PETI-330, LaRC CP, TOR-LM and LaRC LCR (patent pending). These and other new advances in nanotechnology engineering, self-assembling nanostructures and multifunctional aerospace materials are presented and discussed below, and applications with significant technological and commercial advantages are proposed.

  18. Advancing Polymer-Supported Ionogel Electrolytes Formed via Radical Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Adam F.

    fabricated. In addition to developing an understanding of UV-polymerized systems, a rapid 10 to 20 second, microwave-assisted polymerization method was developed as a novel means to create ionogels. These ionogels exhibited comparable mechanical response and ionic conductivity levels to those gels fabricated by the UV method. Lastly, an EDLC prototype was fabricated using a UV-polymerized ionogel formed in situ between two high-surface area carbon electrodes. The device performance metrics were comparable to commercial EDLCs, and functioned for several thousand cycles with limited loss in capacitance.

  19. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Janeczek, Maciej; Herman, Katarzyna; Fita, Katarzyna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk-Zaj?c, Ma?gorzata; Czajczy?ska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piesiak-Pa?czyszyn, Dagmara; Kosior, Piotr; Dobrzy?ski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved fo...

  20. Materials Advance Chemical Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In the future, the Planetary Science Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate hopes to use better-performing and lower-cost propulsion systems to send rovers, probes, and observers to places like Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. For such purposes, a new propulsion technology called the Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) was developed under NASA's In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project, located at Glenn Research Center. As an advanced chemical propulsion system, AMBR uses nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer and hydrazine fuel to propel a spacecraft. Based on current research and development efforts, the technology shows great promise for increasing engine operation and engine lifespan, as well as lowering manufacturing costs. In developing AMBR, ISPT has several goals: to decrease the time it takes for a spacecraft to travel to its destination, reduce the cost of making the propulsion system, and lessen the weight of the propulsion system. If goals like these are met, it could result in greater capabilities for in-space science investigations. For example, if the amount (and weight) of propellant required on a spacecraft is reduced, more scientific instruments (and weight) could be added to the spacecraft. To achieve AMBR s maximum potential performance, the engine needed to be capable of operating at extremely high temperatures and pressure. To this end, ISPT required engine chambers made of iridium-coated rhenium (strong, high-temperature metallic elements) that allowed operation at temperatures close to 4,000 F. In addition, ISPT needed an advanced manufacturing technique for better coating methods to increase the strength of the engine chamber without increasing the costs of fabricating the chamber.

  1. Recent advances on polymeric membranes for membrane reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Buonomenna, M. G.; Choi, Seung Hak

    2012-01-01

    . The successful use of membranes in membrane reactors is primary the result of two developments concerning: (i) membrane materials and (ii) membrane structures. The selection of a suited material and preparation technique depends on the application the membrane

  2. Advances in the material science of concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ideker, Jason H; Radlinska, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    ... Committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The session focused on material science aspects of concrete with an emphasis placed on advances in understanding the fundamental scientific topics of cement-based materials, as well as the crucial...

  3. Process, Design and Materials for Unidirectionally Tilted Polymeric Micro/Nanohairs and Their Adhesion Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Seong Im

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in the field of gecko-inspired dry adhesive has focused on modifying the material and structural properties of polymer-based nanohairs. Polymers such as polystyrene (PS, high-density polyethylene (HDPE, ultraviolet curable epoxy (SU-8, polyurethane acrylate (PUA, polycarbonate (PC, and polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS can fulfill many mechanical property requirements, are easily tunable, and can be produced via large-scale fabrication. However, the fabrication process for tilted structure remains challenging. The tilted structure is a crucial factor in high-degree conformal contact, which facilitates high adhesion, low effective modulus, and directional adhesion properties. Recent studies have attempted to create a tilted structure by applying beam irradiation, mechanical and thermal stress, and magnetic fields. This review provides a comprehensive investigation into advanced strategies for producing tilted polymeric nanostructures and their potential applications in the near future.

  4. Preparation and characterization of a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Peng; Gu Xiaohua; Cheng Bowen; Wang Yufei

    2009-01-01

    Here we reported a two-step procedure for preparing a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material. Firstly, a copolymer monomer containing a polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG) phase change unit and a vinyl unit was synthesized via the modification of hydrogen group of MPEG. Secondly, by copolymerization of the copolymer monomer and phenyl ethylene, a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material was prepared. The composition, structure and properties of the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material were characterized by IR, 1 H NMR, DSC, WAXD, and POM, respectively. The results show that the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material possesses of excellent crystal properties and high phase change enthalpy.

  5. Proline-poor hydrophobic domains modulate the assembly and material properties of polymeric elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiznieks, Lisa D; Reichheld, Sean E; Sitarz, Eva E; Miao, Ming; Keeley, Fred W

    2015-10-01

    Elastin is a self-assembling extracellular matrix protein that provides elasticity to tissues. For entropic elastomers such as elastin, conformational disorder of the monomer building block, even in the polymeric form, is essential for elastomeric recoil. The highly hydrophobic monomer employs a range of strategies for maintaining disorder and flexibility within hydrophobic domains, particularly involving a minimum compositional threshold of proline and glycine residues. However, the native sequence of hydrophobic elastin domain 30 is uncharacteristically proline-poor and, as an isolated polypeptide, is susceptible to formation of amyloid-like structures comprised of stacked β-sheet. Here we investigated the biophysical and mechanical properties of multiple sets of elastin-like polypeptides designed with different numbers of proline-poor domain 30 from human or rat tropoelastins. We compared the contributions of these proline-poor hydrophobic sequences to self-assembly through characterization of phase separation, and to the tensile properties of cross-linked, polymeric materials. We demonstrate that length of hydrophobic domains and propensity to form β-structure, both affecting polypeptide chain flexibility and cross-link density, play key roles in modulating elastin mechanical properties. This study advances the understanding of elastin sequence-structure-function relationships, and provides new insights that will directly support rational approaches to the design of biomaterials with defined suites of mechanical properties. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Application of radiation-induced graft polymerization to preparation of functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu

    2010-01-01

    Radiation-induced graft polymerization is a powerful method for appending various functionalities onto existing fabrics, nonwoven fabrics, fibers, membranes, and beads while maintaining the shape and mechanical strength. By using this method, the author has developed and commercialized functional polymeric materials over 45 years. The materials produced by the fruits of radiation chemistry contributed to the improvement of our lives and environments and the collection of rare metal resources. (author)

  7. How accelerated biological aging can affect solar reflective polymeric based building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C.; Santunione, G.; Libbra, A.; Muscio, A.; Sgarbi, E.

    2017-11-01

    Among the main issues concerning building materials, in particular outdoor ones, one can identify the colonization by microorganisms referred to as biological aggression. This can affect not only the aesthetical aspect but also the thermal performance of solar reflective materials. In order to improve the reliability of tests aimed to assess the resistance to biological aggression and contextually reduce the test duration, an accelerated test method has been developed. It is based on a lab reproducible setup where specific and controlled environmental and boundary conditions are imposed to accelerate as much as possible biological growth on building materials. Due to their widespread use, polymeric materials have been selected for the present analysis, in the aim of reaching an advanced bio-aged level in a relatively short time (8 weeks or less) and at the same time comparatively evaluate different materials under a given set of ageing conditions. Surface properties before, during and after ageing have been investigated by surface, microstructural and chemical analyses, as well as by examination of time progressive images to assess bacterial and algal growth rate.

  8. Development of a impact limiter for radioactive material transport packages - characterization of the polymeric material used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, Rogerio Pimenta; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    Impact limiters are sacrificial components widely used to protect radioactive waste packages against damages arising from falls, fires and collisions with protruding objects. Several materials have been used as impact limiter filling: wood, aluminum honeycomb, and metallic or polymeric foams. Besides, hollow structures are also used as shock absorbers, either as a single shell or as a tube array. One of the most popular materials among package designers is rigid polyurethane foam, owing to its toughness, workability, low specific weight, low costs and commercial availability. In Brazil, a foam developed using the polymer extracted from the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis) is being studied as a potential impact limiter filling. For a better performance of this material, it is necessary to minimize the impact limiter dimensions without compromising the package safety. For this, a detailed knowledge of the foam physical and mechanical properties is essential. A relatively vast amount of data about regular polymeric foams can be found in the literature and in foreign manufacturers brochures, but no data has been published about the properties of the castor oil foam. This paper presents data gathered in an ongoing research program aiming at the development of a Type-B packaging. Foam samples were submitted to uniaxial static compression tests and to hydrostatic tests. The results obtained reveal that the castor oil foam has a mechanical behavior similar to that of regular foams, with good property reproducibility and homogeneity. (author)

  9. Focused ion beam structuring of low melting polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmied, R.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on heating effects during focused ion beam (FIB) processing of low melting polymers. The combined approach using experiments and simulations identifies the in part massive local temperatures as a convolution between intrinsic ion-matter effects and a considerable, technically-induced heating component. While the former is invariable, the latter has been minimized by an alternative process strategy which massively improves the morphological stability and minimizes chemical damage during FIB processing, thus opening new possibilities for application on sensitive, low melting materials. The study starts with systematic experimental investigations which strongly suggested the existence of a technically-induced heating component as a consequence of classically-used serpentine or raster-like patterning strategies. Based on these results, a combined simulation approach of ion trajectories and thermal spike model calculations have been employed to get a deeper insight into spatial and temporal temperature evolution. The results were then combined with the thermodynamic behavior of polymers by means of melting and volatizing temperatures. The comparison of these simulationbased predictions with real FIB experiments revealed very good agreement, proving the applicability of the approach used to describe the temperature evolution from a fundamental point of view. As a next step, these simulations were then applied to the dierent scanning strategies which further con rmed the existence of a technically-induced heating component via classically-used patterning approaches. Due to the deep insight gained via simulations, an alternative patterning strategy was developed, which was expected to minimize these avoidable influences. This new strategy was then evaluated using a multi-technique approach, which revealed strongly reduced chemical damage together with increasing morphological stabilities even for temperature-sensitive polymers. Finally, this alternative

  10. Synthesis of polymeric micro- and nanostructural materials for application in non-linear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, Lyubov; Palistrant, Natalia; Bivol, Valerii; Robu, Stepan; Barba, Nikolai; Orelovitch, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a new approach developed for the preparation of micro- and nanostructural materials on the basis of polymeric compositions used as a matrix in non-linear optics. This approach consists in filling the pores of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes (PET TM) from polymeric compositions using an impregnation method. It is shown that depending on the concentration of polymeric compositions in the solution it is possible to form a variety of micro- and nanostructural materials (tubules and wires as well as composite membranes) with a wide spectrum of characteristics. The developed method of producing micro- and nanostructural materials provides a possible way for creating polymeric objects with non-linear optic properties which can be used to design electronic micro- and nanodevices and to obtain chemical and optical sensors

  11. Numerical study of the thermal degradation of isotropic and anisotropic polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, E. [Departamento de Lenguajes y Ciencias de la Computacion, ETSI Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013 Malaga (Spain)

    2005-08-01

    The thermal degradation of two-dimensional isotropic, orthotropic and anisotropic polymeric materials is studied numerically by means of a second-order accurate (in both space and time) linearly implicit finite difference formulation which results in linear algebraic equations at each time step. It is shown that, for both isotropic and orthotropic composites, the monomer mass diffusion tensor plays a role in initiating the polymerization kinetics, the formation of a polymerization kernel and the initial front propagation, whereas the later stages of the polymerization are nearly independent of the monomer mass diffusion tensor. In anisotropic polymeric composites, it has been found that the monomer mass diffusion tensor plays a paramount role in determining the initial stages of the polymerization and the subsequent propagation of the polymerization front, the direction and speed of propagation of which are found to be related to the principal directions of both the monomer mass and the heat diffusion tensors. It is also shown that the polymerization time and temperatures depend strongly on the anisotropy of the mass and heat diffusion tensors. (authors)

  12. Studies in reactive extrusion processing of biodegradable polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Sunder

    Various reaction chemistries such as Polymerization, Polymer cross-linking and Reactive grafting were investigated in twin-screw extruders. Poly (1,4-dioxan-2-one) (PPDX) was manufactured in melt by the continuous polymerization of 1,4-dioxan-2-one (PDX) monomer in a twin-screw extruder using Aluminum tri-sec butoxide (ATSB) initiator. Good and accurate control over molecular weight was obtained by controlling the ratio of monomer to initiator. A screw configuration consisting of only conveying elements was used for the polymerization. The polymerization reaction was characterized by a monomer-polymer dynamic equilibrium, above the melting temperature of the polymer, limiting the equilibrium conversion to 78-percent. Near complete (˜100-percent) conversion was obtained on co-polymerizing PDX monomer with a few mol-percent (around 8-percent) Caprolactone (CL) monomer in a twin-screw extruder using ATSB initiator. The co-polymers exhibited improved thermal stability with reduction in glass transition temperature. The extruder was modeled as an Axial Dispersed Plug Flow Reactor for the polymerization of CL monomer using Residence Time Distribution (RTD) Analysis. The model provided a good fit to the experimental RTD and conversion data. Aliphatic and aliphatic-aromatic co-polyesters, namely Polycaprolactone (PCL) and Poly butylenes (adipate-co-terephthalate) (Ecoflex) were cross-linked in a twin-screw extruder using radical initiator to form micro-gel reinforced biodegradable polyesters. Cross-linked Ecoflex was further extrusion blended with talc to form blends suitable to be blown into films. A screw configuration consisting of conveying and kneading elements was found to be effective in dispersion of the talc particles (5--10 microns) in the polyester matrix. While the rates of crystallization increased for the talc filled polyester blends, overall crystallinity reduced. Mechanical, tear and puncture properties of films made using the talc filled polyester blends

  13. High Temperature Materials Characterization and Advanced Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    The project has been carried out for 2 years in stage III in order to achieve the final goals of performance verification of the developed materials, after successful development of the advanced high temperature material technologies for 3 years in Stage II. The mechanical and thermal properties of the advanced materials, which were developed during Stage II, were evaluated at high temperatures, and the modification of the advanced materials were performed. Moreover, a database management system was established using user-friendly knowledge-base scheme to complete the integrated-information material database in KAERI material division

  14. Micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials by a polymeric stamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M C Ferraz da; Ribeiro, H B; Kessler, F; Souza, E A T de; Fechine, G J M

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an alternative technique to the traditional micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials is proposed, consisting of isolated flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide onto polymeric surfaces films. The set made up of polymer and flakes is fabricated by using a hot-press machine called polymeric stamp. The polymeric stamp was used to allocate flakes and also to allow the exfoliation process to take place just in one face of isolated flake. Optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy results showed that multilayers, bilayers and single layers of graphene and MoS 2 were obtained by using a polymeric stamp as tool for micromechanical exfoliation. These crystals were more easily found because the exfoliation process concentrates them in well-defined locations. The results prove the effectiveness of the method by embedding two-dimensional materials into polymers to fabricate fewer layers crystals in a fast, economic and clean way. (paper)

  15. Micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials by a polymeric stamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz da Costa, M. C.; Ribeiro, H. B.; Kessler, F.; de Souza, E. A. T.; Fechine, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, an alternative technique to the traditional micromechanical exfoliation of two-dimensional materials is proposed, consisting of isolated flakes of graphite and molybdenum disulphide onto polymeric surfaces films. The set made up of polymer and flakes is fabricated by using a hot-press machine called polymeric stamp. The polymeric stamp was used to allocate flakes and also to allow the exfoliation process to take place just in one face of isolated flake. Optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy results showed that multilayers, bilayers and single layers of graphene and MoS2 were obtained by using a polymeric stamp as tool for micromechanical exfoliation. These crystals were more easily found because the exfoliation process concentrates them in well-defined locations. The results prove the effectiveness of the method by embedding two-dimensional materials into polymers to fabricate fewer layers crystals in a fast, economic and clean way.

  16. Recent advances and developments in composite dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, N B; Stansbury, J W; Bowman, C N

    2011-04-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance.

  17. Report for fiscal 1998 on results of research and development of silicon-based polymeric material; 1998 nendo keisokei kobunshi zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The research and development of 'silicon-based polymeric materials' has been implemented under ten year plan since 1991 by the research and development system for industrial science and technology, with the following subjects conducted in the general accounting section of fiscal 1998. In the research and development of the synthetic technology of electrically conductive silicon-based polymeric materials, a synthetic method was established for unsaturated side-chain group polysilanes as a basic structural unit for structuring multidimensions. In the research and development of the synthetic technology of new silicon-based polymeric materials capable of plotting circuits, network-shaped polysilanes with various amino groups introduced were synthesized, for which electrical conductivity and temperature dependency were measured. In the research and development of new silicon-based polymeric materials with an electro-luminous function and the like, polymeric synthesis began developing smoothly that has hole-transporting and electron transporting properties concerning the electro-luminous function. In the research and development of silicon-based photoelectric conversion materials, examination was made on the improvement of photoelectric conversion performance by materialization technology including lamination and mixture. The general investigation and research committee contrived further advancement of the research and development. (NEDO)

  18. Materials for advanced power engineering 2010. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Contrepois, Quentin; Beck, Tilmann; Kuhn, Bernd [eds.

    2010-07-01

    The 9th Liege Conference on ''Materials for Advanced Power Engineering'' presents the results of the materials related COST Actions 536 ''Alloy Development for Critical Components of Environmentally Friendly Power Plants'' and 538 ''High Temperature Plant Lifetime Extension''. In addition, the broad field of current materials research perspectives for high efficiency, low- and zero- emission power plants and new energy technologies for the next decades are reported. The Conference proceedings are structured as follows: 1. Materials for advanced steam power plants; 2. Gas turbine materials; 3. Materials for nuclear fission and fusion; 4. Solid oxide fuel cells; 5. Corrosion, thermomechanical fatigue and modelling; 6. Zero emission power plants.

  19. Materials for advanced power engineering 2010. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Contrepois, Quentin; Beck, Tilmann; Kuhn, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    The 9th Liege Conference on ''Materials for Advanced Power Engineering'' presents the results of the materials related COST Actions 536 ''Alloy Development for Critical Components of Environmentally Friendly Power Plants'' and 538 ''High Temperature Plant Lifetime Extension''. In addition, the broad field of current materials research perspectives for high efficiency, low- and zero- emission power plants and new energy technologies for the next decades are reported. The Conference proceedings are structured as follows: 1. Materials for advanced steam power plants; 2. Gas turbine materials; 3. Materials for nuclear fission and fusion; 4. Solid oxide fuel cells; 5. Corrosion, thermomechanical fatigue and modelling; 6. Zero emission power plants.

  20. Polymeric Materials for Aerospace Power and Propulsion: Overview of Polymer Research at NASA Glenn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Weight, durability and performance are all major concerns for any NASA mission. Use of lightweight materials, such as fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites can lead to significant reductions in vehicle weight and improvements in vehicle performance. Research in the Polymeric Materials Branch at NASA Glenn is focused on improving the durability, properties, processability and performance of polymeric materials by utilizing both conventional polymer science and engineering as well as nanotechnology and bioinspired approaches. This presentation will provide an overview of these efforts and highlight recent progress.

  1. Glycopolymeric Materials for Advanced Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Muñoz-Bonilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, glycopolymers have particularly revolutionized the world of macromolecular chemistry and materials in general. Nevertheless, it has been in this century when scientists realize that these materials present great versatility in biosensing, biorecognition, and biomedicine among other areas. This article highlights most relevant glycopolymeric materials, considering that they are only a small example of the research done in this emerging field. The examples described here are selected on the base of novelty, innovation and implementation of glycopolymeric materials. In addition, the future perspectives of this topic will be commented on.

  2. Polymeric Materials For Scale Inhibition In Cooling Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najwa S.Majeed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate deposition is generally predominant in cooling water-circulating system. For the control of calcium carbonate scale formation two types of polymeric scale inhibitors were used Polyamino polyether methylene phosphonate  (PAPEMPand polyacrylaminde(PAA.Model of cooling tower system have been built up in laboratory scale. Experiments were carried out using different inhibitor concentrations(0.5,1,1.5,2,3ppm ,at water temperature of  40oC and flow rate of 150 l/hr. It was found that Polyamino polyether methylene phosphonate    more effective than polyacryle amide'  as scale inhibitor in all used concentrations and the best inhibition efficiency (95% was at (2.5ppm of Polyamino polyether methylene phosphonate  and (85% with poly acryle amide at concentrations of (3 ppm. The performance of the polymeric scale inhibitors was compared with a method used to control heavy calcium carbonate scale forming by the deposition of sufficiently thin protective calcium carbonate scale using sulfuric acid and depending on Ryznar stability index controlling method. 

  3. Simultaneous Contact Sensing and Characterizing of Mechanical and Dynamic Heat Transfer Properties of Porous Polymeric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-guo Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Porous polymeric materials, such as textile fabrics, are elastic and widely used in our daily life for garment and household products. The mechanical and dynamic heat transfer properties of porous polymeric materials, which describe the sensations during the contact process between porous polymeric materials and parts of the human body, such as the hand, primarily influence comfort sensations and aesthetic qualities of clothing. A multi-sensory measurement system and a new method were proposed to simultaneously sense the contact and characterize the mechanical and dynamic heat transfer properties of porous polymeric materials, such as textile fabrics in one instrument, with consideration of the interactions between different aspects of contact feels. The multi-sensory measurement system was developed for simulating the dynamic contact and psychological judgment processes during human hand contact with porous polymeric materials, and measuring the surface smoothness, compression resilience, bending and twisting, and dynamic heat transfer signals simultaneously. The contact sensing principle and the evaluation methods were presented. Twelve typical sample materials with different structural parameters were measured. The results of the experiments and the interpretation of the test results were described. An analysis of the variance and a capacity study were investigated to determine the significance of differences among the test materials and to assess the gage repeatability and reproducibility. A correlation analysis was conducted by comparing the test results of this measurement system with the results of Kawabata Evaluation System (KES in separate instruments. This multi-sensory measurement system provides a new method for simultaneous contact sensing and characterizing of mechanical and dynamic heat transfer properties of porous polymeric materials.

  4. Advanced materials and technologies. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, V K; Alander, T K.R. [eds.; Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

    1996-12-31

    The contents of the proceedings consist of three chapters, of which, the first discusses common megatrends, both nationally and globally, in different fields of materials technology. The second chapter is dealing with novel production and processing of base metals and, finally, the third chapter is related with current achievements and future goals of electronic, magnetic, optical and coating materials and their processing

  5. Advanced materials and technologies. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, V.K.; Alander, T.K.R. [eds.] [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Science

    1995-12-31

    The contents of the proceedings consist of three chapters, of which, the first discusses common megatrends, both nationally and globally, in different fields of materials technology. The second chapter is dealing with novel production and processing of base metals and, finally, the third chapter is related with current achievements and future goals of electronic, magnetic, optical and coating materials and their processing

  6. Advanced Materials for Automotive Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisza, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper some recent material developments will be overviewed mainly from the point of view of automotive industry. In car industry, metal forming is one of the most important manufacturing processes imposing severe restrictions on materials; these are often contradictory requirements, e.g. high strength simultaneously with good formability, etc. Due to these challenges and the ever increasing demand new material classes have been developed; however, the more and more wide application of high strength materials meeting the requirements stated by the mass reduction lead to increasing difficulties concerning the formability which requires significant technological developments as well. In this paper, the recent materials developments will be overviewed from the point of view of the automotive industry

  7. Investigation of crafting polymerization of acrylic acid to cellulose materials under the action of accelerated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, A.; Bazhenov, L.G.; Asamov, M.K.; Sagatov, Eh.A.

    1996-01-01

    Crafting polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) to cellulose materials in the presence of copper, zinc and silver salts under the action of accelerated electrons has been investigated with the aim to attach anti microbe properties to these materials. (author). 2 refs., 1 tab

  8. New methodology developed for the differential scanning calorimetry analysis of polymeric matrixes incorporating phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreneche, Camila; Solé, Aran; Miró, Laia; Martorell, Ingrid; Cabeza, Luisa F; Fernández, A Inés

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, thermal comfort needs in buildings have led to an increase in energy consumption of the residential and service sectors. For this reason, thermal energy storage is shown as an alternative to achieve reduction of this high consumption. Phase change materials (PCM) have been studied to store energy due to their high storage capacity. A polymeric material capable of macroencapsulating PCM was developed by the authors of this paper. However, difficulties were found while measuring the thermal properties of these materials by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The polymeric matrix interferes in the detection of PCM properties by DSC. To remove this interfering effect, a new methodology which replaces the conventional empty crucible used as a reference in the DSC analysis by crucibles composed of the polymeric matrix was developed. Thus, a clear signal from the PCM is obtained by subtracting the new full crucible signal from the sample signal. (paper)

  9. Preparation and use of polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for separation of cesium and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Rais, J.

    1997-01-01

    Preparation and use is described for polymeric materials containing hydrophobic anions and plasticizers for extraction of cesium and strontium. The use of polymeric materials containing plasticizers which are solvents for hydrophobic anions such as derivatives of cobalt dicarbollide or tetraphenylborate which are capable of extracting cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions in contact with the polymeric materials, is described. The polymeric material may also include a synergistic agent for a given ion like polyethylene glycol or a crown ether, for removal of radioactive isotopes of cesium and strontium from solutions of diverse composition and, in particular, for solutions containing large excess of sodium nitrate

  10. Design considerations for multi component molecular-polymeric nonlinear optical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, K.D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (USA). Dept. of Physics); Kuzyk, M.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA). Dept. of Physics); Fang, T.; Holland, W.R. (AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (USA)); Cahill, P.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    We review our work on multi component polymeric nonlinear optical materials. These materials consist of nonlinear optical molecules incorporated in a polymeric host. A cross-linked triazine polymer incorporating a dicyanovinyl terminated azo dye was found to be relatively stable at 85{degree} and posses an electro-optic coefficient of 11pm/V. We have also observed the zero dispersion condition in a new anomalous dispersion dye for phase matched second harmonic generation, and expect efficient conversion to the blue. A squarylium dye, ISQ, has been found to posses a large third order nonlinearity, and may display two-level behavior. 24 refs., 11 figs.

  11. TEGDMA and UDMA monomers released from composite dental material polymerized with diode and halogen lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacławczyk, Agnieszka; Postek-Stefańska, Lidia; Pietraszewska, Daria; Birkner, Ewa; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Wysoczańska-Jankowicz, Iwona

    2018-03-20

    More than 35 substances released from composite fillings have been identified. Among these, basic monomers and the so-called co-monomers are most often reported. The substances released from polymer-based materials demonstrate allergenic, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, embryotoxic, teratogenic, and estrogenic properties. The aim of this study was to measure the amounts of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) monomers released from composite dental fillings to citrate-phosphate buffer with the pH of 4, 6, 8 after 24 h and 6 months from the polymerization. Ten samples for each polymerization method had been made from the composite material (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, USA), which underwent polymerization using the following lamps: halogen lamp (Translux CL, Heraeus Kulzer, Hanau, Germany) (sample H) and diode lamp (Elipar Freelight 2, 3M ESPE), with soft start function (group DS) and without that function (group DWS). It has been demonstrated that the type of light-curing units has a significant impact on the amount of TEGDMA and UDMA released. The amount of UDMA and TEGDMA monomers released from composite fillings differed significantly depending on the source of polymerization applied, as well as the pH of the solution and sample storage time. Elution of the monomers from composite material polymerized using halogen lamp was significantly greater as compared to curing with diode lamps.

  12. Advanced infrared optically black baffle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Egert, C.M.; Allred, D.D.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared optically black baffle surfaces are an essential component of many advanced optical systems. All internal surfaces in advanced infrared optical sensors that require stray light management to achieve resolution are of primary concern in baffle design. Current industrial materials need improvements to meet advanced optical sensor systems requirements for optical, survivability, and endurability. Baffles are required to survive and operate in potentially severe environments. Robust diffuse-absorptive black surfaces, which are thermally and mechanically stable to threats of x-ray, launch, and in-flight maneuver conditions, with specific densities to allow an acceptable weight load, handleable during assembly, cleanable, and adaptive to affordable manufacturing, are required as optical baffle materials. In this paper an overview of recently developed advanced infrared optical baffle materials, requirements, manufacturing strategies, and the Optics MODIL (Manufacturing Operations Development and Integration Laboratory) Advanced Baffle Program are discussed

  13. The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing - LAMP - is a clean-room research facility run and operated by Pr. Gary Rubloff's group. Research activities focus...

  14. Advanced materials in radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bruzzi, M; Nava, F; Pini, S; Russo, S

    2002-01-01

    High band-gap semiconductor materials can represent good alternatives to silicon in relative dosimetry. Schottky diodes made with epitaxial n-type 4 H SiC and Chemical Vapor Deposited diamond films with ohmic contacts have been exposed to a sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma-source, 20 MeV electrons and 6 MV X photons from a linear accelerator to test the current response in on-line configuration in the dose range 0.1-10 Gy. The released charge as a function of the dose and the radiation-induced current as a function of the dose-rate are found to be linear. No priming effects have been observed using epitaxial SiC, due to the low density of lattice defects present in this material.

  15. Ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.W.; Marwick, A.D.; Roberto, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains research programs discussed at the materials research society symposia on ion beam processing of advanced electronic materials. Major topics include: shallow implantation and solid-phase epitaxy; damage effects; focused ion beams; MeV implantation; high-dose implantation; implantation in III-V materials and multilayers; and implantation in electronic materials. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  16. Polymeric and Molecular Materials for Advanced Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-20

    we were able to substantially lower the HOMOs while preserving excellent TFT hole transport, and investigated their use in bulk- hetero - junction ...metal oxide semiconductors, which are prepared by a low-temperature “combustion synthesis” route invented at NU under AFOSR support and published...98) v Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Introduction. CMOS, p/n- Junction Devices, and Flexible Electronics Flexible/printed electronics is a

  17. Polymeric and Molecular Materials for Advanced Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    C8H17) films on SiO2 exhibit electron mobilities in air > 0.2 cm 2 /Vs. Electrochemistry reveals reduction potentials ~ 0.0 V vs. S.C.E.; hence...enable low-voltage single-walled carbon nanotube and ZnO nanowire transistors, and can be integrated with GaAs JFETs (Fig. 9). Because of the very...large mobilities achieved in such devices (e ~ 3000 cm 2 V -1 s -1 for ZnO Figure 9. Top. Schematic representation of the TFT components of an

  18. Advanced fabrication of optical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hed, P.P.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    The fabrication of high-precision optical elements for new generations of high-power lasers requires a deterministic method of generating precision optical surfaces entailing considerably less time, skill, and money than present optical techniques. Such a process would use precision computer-controlled machinery with ongoing in situ metrology to generate precise optical surfaces. The implementation of deterministic processes requires a better understanding of the glass-grinding process, especially the control of ductile material removal. This project is intended to develop the basic knowledge needed to implement a computer-controlled optics-manufacturing methodology

  19. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Sulfur-Containing Polymeric Materials Prepared via Inverse Vulcanization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergej Diez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new methods have been developed for the utilization of elemental sulfur as a feedstock for novel polymeric materials. One promising method is the inverse vulcanization, which is used to prepare polymeric structures derived from sulfur and divinyl comonomers. However, the mechanical and electrical properties of the products are virtually unexplored. Hence, in the present study, we synthesized a 200 g scale of amorphous, hydrophobic as well as translucent, hyperbranched polymeric sulfur networks that provide a high thermal resistance (>220 °C. The polymeric material properties of these sulfur copolymers can be controlled significantly by varying the monomers as well as the feed content. The investigated comonomers are divinylbenzene (DVB and 1,3-diisopropenylbenzene (DIB. Plastomers with low elastic content and high shape retention containing 12.5%–30% DVB as well as low viscose waxy plastomers with a high flow behavior containing a high DVB content of 30%–35% were obtained. Copolymers with 15%–30% DIB act, on the one hand, as thermoplastics and, on the other hand, as vitreous thermosets with a DIB of 30%–35%. Results of the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, the dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC and mechanical characterization, such as stress–strain experiments and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, are discussed with the outcome that they support the assumption of a polymeric cross-linked network structure in the form of hyper-branched polymers.

  20. Microgravity Processing and Photonic Applications of Organic and Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Donald 0; Penn, Benjamin G.; Smith, David; Witherow, William K.; Paley, M. S.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been directed toward the use of organic materials in the development of high-efficiency optoelectronic and photonic devices. There is a myriad of possibilities among organic which allow flexibility in the design of unique structures with a variety of functional groups. The use of nonlinear optical (NLO) organic materials such as thin-film waveguides allows full exploitation of their desirable qualities by permitting long interaction lengths and large susceptibilities allowing modest power input. There are several methods in use to prepare thin films, such as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembly techniques, vapor deposition, growth from sheared solution or melt, and melt growth between glass plates. Organics have many features that make Abstract: them desirable for use in optical devices such as high second- and third-order nonlinearities, flexibility of molecular design, and damage resistance to optical radiation. However, their use in devices has been hindered by processing difficulties for crystals and thin films. In this chapter, we discuss photonic and optoelectronic applications of a few organic materials and the potential role of microgravity on processing these materials. It is of interest to note how materials with second- and third-order nonlinear optical behavior may be improved in a diffusion-limited environment and ways in which convection may be detrimental to these materials. We focus our discussion on third-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for all-optical switching, and second-order materials for frequency conversion and electrooptics.

  1. Studies on Development of Polymeric Materials Using Gamma Irradiation for Contact and Intraocular Lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranshu Chhabra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the development of materials for contact lenses and intraocular lenses, the selection criteria is based on the (i capacity to absorb and retain water, (ii hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity, (iii refractive index and (iv hardness besides the other essential properties. Various monomers are being studied to develop suitable materials for such applications. Selection of suitable monomers that can be converted into optical materials of desired characteristics is the most essential step. In the present paper, an attempt has been made to develop suitable optical polymers based on 2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA, N-vinyl pyrrolidone (NVP, methyl methacrylate (MMA, methacrylic acid (MAA, and styrene. Compositions were prepared in such a way that polymers of varying hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity could be obtained keeping HEMA as the base (main monomer. For polymerization, gamma irradiation (Co-60 as a source was used. The results of the study showed that: (i an increase in NVP and MAA content brought in an increase in hydrophilicity of polymerized HEMA (pHEMA, while the addition of styrene and MMA decreased hydrophilicity of polymerized HEMA (pHEMA, (ii polymers for contact lenses with water retention capacity as high as >50 wt.% and as low as <10 wt% with varying content of suitable comonomers can be designed, (iii polymeric materials for contact lenses can be made by using radiation processing such as Co-60 and (iv a dose of 40 kGy was found to be ideal for purpose.

  2. Thermally Self-Healing Polymeric Materials : The Next Step to Recycling Thermoset Polymers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Youchun; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Picchioni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    We developed thermally self-healing polymeric materials on the basis of furan-functionalized, alternating thermosetting polyketones (PK-furan) and bis-maleimide by using the Diels-Alder (DA) and Retro-Diels-Alder (RDA) reaction sequence. PK-furan can be easily obtained under mild conditions by the

  3. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczek, Maciej; Herman, Katarzyna; Fita, Katarzyna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk-Zając, Małgorzata; Czajczyńska-Waszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Piesiak-Pańczyszyn, Dagmara; Kosior, Piotr; Dobrzyński, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved four composite restorative materials, one lining material and a dentine bonding agent. The polymerization was conducted with the use of a diode light-curing unit. The measurements of the external surface temperature of the samples were carried out using the Thermovision®550 thermal camera. Results. The examined materials significantly differed in terms of the maximum temperatures values they reached, as well as the time required for reaching the temperatures. A statistically significant positive correlation of the maximum temperature and the sample weight was observed. Conclusions. In clinical practice, it is crucial to bear in mind the risk of thermal damage involved in the application of light-cured materials. It can be reduced by using thin increments of composite materials.

  4. Assessment of Heat Hazard during the Polymerization of Selected Light-Sensitive Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Janeczek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Polymerization of light-cured dental materials used for restoration of hard tooth tissue may lead to an increase in temperature that may have negative consequence for pulp vitality. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine maximum temperatures reached during the polymerization of selected dental materials, as well as the time that is needed for samples of sizes similar to those used in clinical practice to reach these temperatures. Materials and Methods. The study involved four composite restorative materials, one lining material and a dentine bonding agent. The polymerization was conducted with the use of a diode light-curing unit. The measurements of the external surface temperature of the samples were carried out using the Thermovision®550 thermal camera. Results. The examined materials significantly differed in terms of the maximum temperatures values they reached, as well as the time required for reaching the temperatures. A statistically significant positive correlation of the maximum temperature and the sample weight was observed. Conclusions. In clinical practice, it is crucial to bear in mind the risk of thermal damage involved in the application of light-cured materials. It can be reduced by using thin increments of composite materials.

  5. Failure and damage analysis of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The papers in this volume present basic concepts and new developments in failure and damage analysis with focus on advanced materials such as composites, laminates, sandwiches and foams, and also new metallic materials. Starting from some mathematical foundations (limit surfaces, symmetry considerations, invariants) new experimental results and their analysis are shown. Finally, new concepts for failure prediction and analysis will be introduced and discussed as well as new methods of failure and damage prediction for advanced metallic and non-metallic materials. Based on experimental results the traditional methods will be revised.

  6. Materials for advanced power engineering 2010. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline; Contrepois, Quentin; Beck, Tilmann; Kuhn, Bernd (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The 9th Liege Conference on ''Materials for Advanced Power Engineering'' presents the results of the materials related COST Actions 536 ''Alloy Development for Critical Components of Environmentally Friendly Power Plants'' and 538 ''High Temperature Plant Lifetime Extension''. In addition, the broad field of current materials research perspectives for high efficiency, low- and zero- emission power plants and new energy technologies for the next decades are reported. The Conference proceedings are structured as follows: 1. Materials for advanced steam power plants; 2. Gas turbine materials; 3. Materials for nuclear fission and fusion; 4. Solid oxide fuel cells; 5. Corrosion, thermomechanical fatigue and modelling; 6. Zero emission power plants.

  7. Emerging materials by advanced processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaysser, W.A.; Weber-Bock, J.

    1989-01-01

    This volume contains 36 contributions with following subjects (selection): Densification of highly reactive aluminium titanate powders; influence of precursor history on carbon fiber characteristics; influence of water removal rate during calcination on the crystallization of ZrO2 from amorphous hydrous precipitates; tape casting of AlN; influence of processing on the properties of beta-SiC powders; corrosion of SiSiC by gases and basic slag at high temperature; influence of sintering and thermomechanical treatment on microstructure and properties of W-Ni-Fe alloys; mechanical alloying for development of sintered steels with high hard phase content (NbC); early stages of mechanical alloying in Ni-Ti and Ni-Al powder mixtures; growth and microstructural development of melt-oxidation derived Al2O3/Al-base composites; fabrication of RSBN composites; synthesis of high density coridierite bodies; comparative studies on post-HIP and sinter-HIP treatments on transformation thoughened ceramics; sinter HIP of SiC; precipitation mixing of Si3N4 with bimetallic oxides; temperature dependence of the interfacial energies in Al2O3-liquid metal systems; synthesis and microstructural examination of Synroc B; solid state investigation of ceramic-metal bonding; thermophysical properties of MgAl2O4; preparation, sintering and thermal expansion of MgAl2O4; microstructural studies on alumina-zirconia and metallized alumina ceramics; electrodeposition of metals (e.g. Ti, Mo, In) and metal oxides from molten salts; electrochemical deposition of Ti from nonaqueous media (DMSO, DMF); lithium as anode material in power sources (passivation); reduction of chromium(VI) when solar selective black chromium is deposited; thermodynamic optimization of phase diagrams (computer calculations); optimization of Na-Tl phase diagram; phase relations in the Y-Si-Al-O-N system: Controlled manufacturing of alpha/beta-SIALON composites. (MM)

  8. Advanced Materials and Processing 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Su, Chun Wei; Xia, Hui; Xiao, Pengfei

    2011-06-01

    Strain sensors made from MWNT/polymer nanocomposites / Gang Yin, Ning Hu and Yuan Li -- Shear band evolution and nanostructure formation in titanium by cold rolling / Dengke Yang, Peter D. Hodgson and Cuie Wen -- Biodegradable Mg-Zr-Ca alloys for bone implant materials / Yuncang Li ... [et al.] -- Hydroxyapatite synthesized from nanosized calcium carbonate via hydrothermal method / Yu-Shiang Wu, Wen-Ku Chang and Min Jou -- Modeling of the magnetization process and orthogonal fluxgate sensitivity of ferromagnetic micro-wire arrays / Fan Jie ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of silicon oxide nanowires on Ni coated silicon substrate by simple heating process / Bo Peng and Kwon-Koo Cho -- Deposition of TiOxNy thin films with various nitrogen flow rate: growth behavior and structural properties / S.-J. Cho ... [et al.] -- Observation on photoluminescence evolution in 300 KeV self-ion implanted and annealed silicon / Yu Yang ... [et al.] -- Facile synthesis of lithium niobate from a novel precursor H[symbol] / Meinan Liu ... [et al.] -- Effects of the buffer layers on the adhesion and antimicrobial properties of the amorphous ZrAlNiCuSi films / Pai-Tsung Chiang ... [et al.] -- Fabrication of ZnO nanorods by electrochemical deposition process and its photovoltaic properties / Jin-Hwa Kim ... [et al.] -- Cryogenic resistivities of NbTiAlVTaLax, CoCrFeNiCu and CoCrFeNiAl high entropy alloys / Xiao Yang and Yong Zhang -- Modeling of centrifugal force field and the effect on filling and solidification in centrifugal casting / Wenbin Sheng, Chunxue Ma and Wanli Gu -- Electrochemical properties of TiO[symbol] nanotube arrays film prepared by anodic oxidation / Young-Jin Choi ... [et al.] -- Effect of Ce additions on high temperature properties of Mg-5Sn-3Al-1Zn alloy / Byoung Soo Kang ... [et al.] -- Sono-electroless plating of Ni-Mo-P film / Atsushi Chiba, Masato Kanou and Wen-Chang Wu -- Diameter dependence of giant magneto-impedance effect in co-based melt extracted amorphous

  9. Materials performance in advanced fossil technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.

    1991-01-01

    A number of advanced technologies are being developed to convert coal into clean fuels for use as a feedstock in chemical plants and for power generation. From the standpoint of component materials, the environments created by coal conversion and combustion in these technologies and their interactions with materials are of interest. This article identifies several modes of materials degradation and possible mechanisms for metal wastage. Available data on the performance of materials in several of the environments are highlighted, and examples of promising research activities to improve the corrosion resistance of materials are presented

  10. Nanofabrication strategies for advanced electrode materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Kunfeng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced electrode materials for high-performance energy storage devices becomes more and more important for growing demand of portable electronics and electrical vehicles. To speed up this process, rapid screening of exceptional materials among various morphologies, structures and sizes of materials is urgently needed. Benefitting from the advance of nanotechnology, tremendous efforts have been devoted to the development of various nanofabrication strategies for advanced electrode materials. This review focuses on the analysis of novel nanofabrication strategies and progress in the field of fast screening advanced electrode materials. The basic design principles for chemical reaction, crystallization, electrochemical reaction to control the composition and nanostructure of final electrodes are reviewed. Novel fast nanofabrication strategies, such as burning, electrochemical exfoliation, and their basic principles are also summarized. More importantly, colloid system served as one up-front design can skip over the materials synthesis, accelerating the screening rate of highperformance electrode. This work encourages us to create innovative design ideas for rapid screening high-active electrode materials for applications in energy-related fields and beyond.

  11. Shelf life prediction of radiation sterilized polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandford, Craig; Woo, Lecon

    1988-01-01

    The functional properties of many polymers employed in medical disposables are unaffected by sterilizing doses of ionizing radiation. However, some materials (PVC, polypropylene, cellulosics, etc.) undergo undesirable changes which continue to occur for the shelf life of the product. In many cases, conventional accelerated aging techniques do not accurately predict the real time properties of the materials. As real time aging is not generally practical, it has become necessary to develop accelerated aging techniques which can predict the functional properties of a material for the shelf life of the product. This presentation will address issues involved in developing these tests. Real time physical property data is compared to data generated by various acceleration methods. (author)

  12. Artificial 3D hierarchical and isotropic porous polymeric materials

    KAUST Repository

    Chisca, Stefan; Musteata, Valentina-Elena; Sougrat, Rachid; Behzad, Ali Reza; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2018-01-01

    Hierarchical porous materials that replicate complex living structures are attractive for a wide variety of applications, ranging from storage and catalysis to biological and artificial systems. However, the preparation of structures with a high level of complexity and long-range order at the mesoscale and microscale is challenging. We report a simple, nonextractive, and nonreactive method used to prepare three-dimensional porous materials that mimic biological systems such as marine skeletons and honeycombs. This method exploits the concurrent occurrence of the self-assembly of block copolymers in solution and macrophase separation by nucleation and growth. We obtained a long-range order of micrometer-sized compartments. These compartments are interconnected by ordered cylindrical nanochannels. The new approach is demonstrated using polystyrene-b-poly(t-butyl acrylate), which can be further explored for a broad range of applications, such as air purification filters for viruses and pollution particle removal or growth of bioinspired materials for bone regeneration.

  13. Modeling of Slot Waveguide Sensors Based on Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettotti, Paolo; Pitanti, Alessandro; Rigo, Eveline; De Leonardis, Francesco; Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Slot waveguides are very promising for optical sensing applications because of their peculiar spatial mode profile. In this paper we have carried out a detailed analysis of mode confinement properties in slot waveguides realized in very low refractive index materials. We show that the sensitivity of a slot waveguide is not directly related to the refractive index contrast of high and low materials forming the waveguide. Thus, a careful design of the structures allows the realization of high sensitivity devices even in very low refractive index materials (e.g., polymers) to be achieved. Advantages of low index dielectrics in terms of cost, functionalization and ease of fabrication are discussed while keeping both CMOS compatibility and integrable design schemes. Finally, applications of low index slot waveguides as substitute of bulky fiber capillary sensors or in ring resonator architectures are addressed. Theoretical results of this work are relevant to well established polymer technologies. PMID:22164020

  14. Artificial 3D hierarchical and isotropic porous polymeric materials

    KAUST Repository

    Chisca, Stefan

    2018-05-11

    Hierarchical porous materials that replicate complex living structures are attractive for a wide variety of applications, ranging from storage and catalysis to biological and artificial systems. However, the preparation of structures with a high level of complexity and long-range order at the mesoscale and microscale is challenging. We report a simple, nonextractive, and nonreactive method used to prepare three-dimensional porous materials that mimic biological systems such as marine skeletons and honeycombs. This method exploits the concurrent occurrence of the self-assembly of block copolymers in solution and macrophase separation by nucleation and growth. We obtained a long-range order of micrometer-sized compartments. These compartments are interconnected by ordered cylindrical nanochannels. The new approach is demonstrated using polystyrene-b-poly(t-butyl acrylate), which can be further explored for a broad range of applications, such as air purification filters for viruses and pollution particle removal or growth of bioinspired materials for bone regeneration.

  15. Modeling of Slot Waveguide Sensors Based on Polymeric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pavesi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Slot waveguides are very promising for optical sensing applications because of their peculiar spatial mode profile. In this paper we have carried out a detailed analysis of mode confinement properties in slot waveguides realized in very low refractive index materials. We show that the sensitivity of a slot waveguide is not directly related to the refractive index contrast of high and low materials forming the waveguide. Thus, a careful design of the structures allows the realization of high sensitivity devices even in very low refractive index materials (e.g., polymers to be achieved. Advantages of low index dielectrics in terms of cost, functionalization and ease of fabrication are discussed while keeping both CMOS compatibility and integrable design schemes. Finally, applications of low index slot waveguides as substitute of bulky fiber capillary sensors or in ring resonator architectures are addressed. Theoretical results of this work are relevant to well established polymer technologies.

  16. Artificial 3D hierarchical and isotropic porous polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisca, Stefan; Musteata, Valentina-Elena; Sougrat, Rachid; Behzad, Ali Reza; Nunes, Suzana P

    2018-05-01

    Hierarchical porous materials that replicate complex living structures are attractive for a wide variety of applications, ranging from storage and catalysis to biological and artificial systems. However, the preparation of structures with a high level of complexity and long-range order at the mesoscale and microscale is challenging. We report a simple, nonextractive, and nonreactive method used to prepare three-dimensional porous materials that mimic biological systems such as marine skeletons and honeycombs. This method exploits the concurrent occurrence of the self-assembly of block copolymers in solution and macrophase separation by nucleation and growth. We obtained a long-range order of micrometer-sized compartments. These compartments are interconnected by ordered cylindrical nanochannels. The new approach is demonstrated using polystyrene- b -poly( t -butyl acrylate), which can be further explored for a broad range of applications, such as air purification filters for viruses and pollution particle removal or growth of bioinspired materials for bone regeneration.

  17. Apparatus and test method for characterizing the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Shan; Zhang, De-Pin

    2017-05-01

    In order to evaluate the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials such as fabrics treated with phase change material microcapsules, a new apparatus was developed. The apparatus and the test method can measure the heat flux, temperature, and displacement signals during the dynamic contact and then quickly give an evaluation for the temperature regulating properties by simulating the dynamic heat transfer and temperature regulating process when the materials contact the body skin. A series of indices including the psychosensory intensity, regulating capability index, and relative regulating index were defined to characterize the temperature regulating properties. The measurement principle, the evaluation criteria and grading method, the experimental setup and the test results discussion, and the gage capability analysis of the apparatus are presented. The new apparatus provides a method for the objective measurement and evaluation of the temperature regulating properties of thermal functional porous polymeric materials.

  18. Radiations effects on polymeric materials used in CERN particles accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavlet, M.

    1997-01-01

    For fundamental research on the basis structure of matter, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) operates several high-energy particle accelerators around which materials and components are exposed to ionizing radiation. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, the radiation behaviour of most of the components is systematically tested prior to their selection. The long-term radiation-test programme allows to assess the component lifetime in the environment or our accelerators where the absorbed doses are continuously recorded. This article presents organic materials in use at CERN, and some recent results are given on their behaviour under irradiation. (authors)

  19. Sustainable future alternatives to petroleum-based polymeric conservation materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Curran, Claire

    2017-01-01

    and coating formulations. Bio-polyethylenes, bio-polyesters and bio-cellulose-based products were evaluated against petroleum-based materials. Bio- and petroleum-based polyethylenes shared optical, chemical and thermal properties. Bamboo and sugarcane fibre containers were also chemically stable. Polyester...

  20. Two-photon polymerization technique for microfabrication of CAD-designed 3D scaffolds from commercially available photosensitive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Schlie, Sabrina; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Haverich, Axel; Chichkov, Boris N

    2007-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine constructs using a two-photon polymerization technique (2PP). 2PP is a novel CAD/CAM technology allowing the fabrication of any computer-designed 3D structure from a photosensitive polymeric material. The flexibility of this technology and the ability to precisely define 3D construct geometry allows issues associated with vascularization and patient-specific tissue fabrication to be directly addressed. The fabrication of reproducible scaffold structures by 2PP is important for systematic studies of cellular processes and better understanding of in vitro tissue formation. In this study, 2PP was applied for the generation of 3D scaffold-like structures, using the photosensitive organic-inorganic hybrid polymer ORMOCER (ORganically MOdified CERamics) and epoxy-based SU8 materials. By comparing the proliferation rates of cells grown on flat material surfaces and under control conditions, it was demonstrated that ORMOCER and SU8 are not cytotoxic. Additional tests show that the DNA strand breaking of GFSHR-17 granulosa cells was not affected by the presence of ORMOCER. Furthermore, gap junction conductance measurements revealed that ORMOCER did not alter the formation of cell-cell junctions, critical for functional tissue growth. The possibilities of seeding 3D structures with cells were analysed. These studies demonstrate the great potential of 2PP technique for the manufacturing of scaffolds with controlled topology and properties.

  1. Recent advances in polymeric microspheres for parenteral drug delivery--part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shirui; Guo, Chunqiang; Shi, Yi; Li, Luk Chiu

    2012-09-01

    Polymeric microspheres have been established as a valuable parenteral drug delivery system for sustained release of therapeutic agents via subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. Biodegradable polymers which are either synthetic or from natural sources are reviewed with respect to recent advances in exploring their applications for microsphere fabrications. New information on the impact of formulation variables on the properties of microspheres formed by an emulsion method was also presented. The characterization of microspheres using advanced physical analytical techniques was also reviewed and the utilization of the information in assessing in vivo performance of the product was also highlighted. The broad clinical use of microspheres for delivery of therapeutic agents in particular biologics such as proteins has not been realized commercially. The limited availability of biodegradable polymers with a long history of regulatory approval and the challenges in gaining regulatory approval of a new polymer have hindered the development of microspheres for parenteral drug delivery.

  2. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Polymeric Materials and Actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, Charles; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, Esta

    2009-06-16

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface.

  3. Considerations for Contractile Electroactive Polymeric Materials and Actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, L.; Erickson, Carl J.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, G.; Gentile, Charles A.; Tilson, C.; Bernasek, Stephen L.; Abelev, E.

    2009-01-01

    Ras Labs produces electroactive polymer (EAP) based materials and actuators that bend, swell, ripple and now contract (new development) with low electric input. This is an important attribute because of the ability of contraction to produce life-like motion. The mechanism of contraction is not well understood. Radionuclide-labeled experiments were conducted to follow the movement of electrolytes and water in these EAPs when activated. Extreme temperature experiments were performed on the contractile EAPs with very favorable results. One of the biggest challenges in developing these actuators, however, is the electrode-EAP interface because of the pronounced movement of the EAP. Plasma treatments of metallic electrodes were investigated in order to improve the attachment of the embedded electrodes to the EAP material. Surface analysis, adhesive testing, and mechanical testing were conducted to test metal surfaces and metal-polymer interfaces. The nitrogen plasma treatment of titanium produced a strong metal-polymer interface; however, oxygen plasma treatment of both stainless steel and titanium produced even stronger metal-polymer interfaces. Plasma treatment of the electrodes allows for the embedded electrodes and the EAP material of the actuator to work and move as a unit, with no detachment, by significantly improving the metal-polymer interface

  4. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Annual report 90. Institute for advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Annual Report 1990 of the Institute for Advanced Materials of the JRC highlights the Scientific Technical Achievements and presents in the Annex the Institute's Competence and Facilities available to industry for services and research under contract. The Institute executed in 1990 the R and D programme on advanced materials of the JRC and contributed to the programmes: reactor safety, radio-active waste management, fusion technology and safety, nuclear fuel and actinide research. The supplementary programme: Operation of the High Flux Reactor is presented in condensed form. A full report is published separately

  6. Plasma-wall interaction of advanced materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Coenen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DEMO is the name for the first stage prototype fusion reactor considered to be the next step after ITER. For the realization of fusion energy especially materials questions pose a significant challenge already today. Advanced materials solution are under discussion in order to allow operation under reactor conditions [1] and are already under development used in the next step devices. Apart from issues related to material properties such as strength, ductility, resistance against melting and cracking one of the major issues to be tackled is the interaction with the fusion plasma. Advanced tungsten (W materials as discussed below do not necessarily add additional lifetime issues, they will, however, add concerns related to erosion or surface morphology changes due to preferential sputtering. Retention of fuel and exhaust species are one of the main concerns. Retention of hydrogen will be one of the major issues to be solved in advanced materials as especially composites and alloys will introduce new hydrogen interactions mechanisms. Initial calculations show these mechanisms. Especially for Helium as the main impurity species material issues arise related to surfaces modification and embrittlement. Solutions are proposed to mitigate effects on material properties and introduce new release mechanisms.

  7. Surface Modification of Polymeric Materials by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Castro Vidaurre

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature plasma treatment has been used in the last years as a useful tool to modify the surface properties of different materials, in special of polymers. In the present work low temperature plasma was used to treat the surface of asymmetric porous substrates of polysulfone (PSf membranes. The main purpose of this work was to study the influence of the exposure time and the power supplied to argon plasma on the permeability properties of the membranes. Three rf power levels, respectively 5, 10 and 15 W were used. Treatment time ranged from 1 to 50 min. Reduction of single gas permeability was observed with Ar plasma treatments at low energy bombardment (5 W and short exposure time (20 min. Higher power and/or higher plasma exposition time causes a degradation process begins. The chemical and structural characterization of the membranes before and after the surface modification was done by AFM, SEM and XPS.

  8. Advancing Material Models for Automotive Forming Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegter, H.; An, Y.; Horn, C.H.L.J. ten; Atzema, E.H.; Roelofsen, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations in automotive industry need more advanced material models to achieve highly reliable forming and springback predictions. Conventional material models implemented in the FEM-simulation models are not capable to describe the plastic material behaviour during monotonic strain paths with sufficient accuracy. Recently, ESI and Corus co-operate on the implementation of an advanced material model in the FEM-code PAMSTAMP 2G. This applies to the strain hardening model, the influence of strain rate, and the description of the yield locus in these models. A subsequent challenge is the description of the material after a change of strain path.The use of advanced high strength steels in the automotive industry requires a description of plastic material behaviour of multiphase steels. The simplest variant is dual phase steel consisting of a ferritic and a martensitic phase. Multiphase materials also contain a bainitic phase in addition to the ferritic and martensitic phase. More physical descriptions of strain hardening than simple fitted Ludwik/Nadai curves are necessary.Methods to predict plastic behaviour of single-phase materials use a simple dislocation interaction model based on the formed cells structures only. At Corus, a new method is proposed to predict plastic behaviour of multiphase materials have to take hard phases into account, which deform less easily. The resulting deformation gradients create geometrically necessary dislocations. Additional micro-structural information such as morphology and size of hard phase particles or grains is necessary to derive the strain hardening models for this type of materials.Measurements available from the Numisheet benchmarks allow these models to be validated. At Corus, additional measured values are available from cross-die tests. This laboratory test can attain critical deformations by large variations in blank size and processing conditions. The tests are a powerful tool in optimising forming simulations prior

  9. Frontiers of advanced engineering materials (faem-06)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, S.; Mirza, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The second international conference on Frontiers of Advanced Engineering Materials was held on 04-06 December 2006 in Lahore, Pakistan. At a time of the rapid expending enormous potential for the wide spread development and usage of Advanced Engineering Materials. About 121 papers were presented by engineers and scientists from 30 organizations, academic institutions and foreign experts from six countries. on the recommendation of a panel after review, only 72 papers were included in this conference proceedings. The main areas of interest which remained under focus during the conference were structure property relationship, surface Modifications, Nano Technology, Super and semi conductors, Magnetic Materials, Materials Proceeding, Glass and Ceramics, Composite Materials. This Conference open a way to help in strengthening the bounds between our foreign guests local and delegates. The participants showed their keen interest in the poster sessions. Fruitful conclusions of these presentations will be helpful to give rise to new topics of research in the fields of advanced engineering Materials. (A.B.)

  10. Polymeric Materials for Conversion of Electromagnetic Waves from the Sun to Electric Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Manirul Haque

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar photoelectric energy converted into electricity requires large surface areas with incident light and flexible materials to capture these light emissions. Currently, sunlight rays are converted to electrical energy using silicon polymeric material with efficiency up to 22%. The majority of the energy is lost during conversion due to an energy gap between sunlight photons and polymer energy transformation. This energy conversion also depends on the morphology of present polymeric materials. Therefore, it is very important to construct mechanisms of highest energy occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and the lowest energy unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs to increase the efficiency of conversion. The organic and inorganic solar cells used as dyes can absorb more photons from sunlight and the energy gap will be less for better conversion of energy to electricity than the conventional solar cells. This paper provides an up-to-date review on the performance, characterization, and reliability of different composite polymeric materials for energy conversion. Specific attention has been given to organic solar cells because of their several advantages over others, such as their low-energy payback time, conversion efficiency and greenhouse emissions. Finally, this paper provides the recent progress on the application of both organic and inorganic solar cells for electric power generations together with several challenges that are currently faced.

  11. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumburg, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of molecular engineering is the `property directed' synthesis of large molecules and molecular assemblies. Synthetic expertise has advanced to a state which allows the assembly of supramolecules containing thousands of atoms using a `construction kit' of molecular building blocks. Expansion in the field is driven by the appearance of new building blocks and by an improved understanding of the rules for joining them in the design of nanometer-sized devices. Another aspect is the transition from supramolecules to materials. At present no single molecule (however large) has been demonstrated to function as a device, but this appears to be only a matter of time. In all of this research, which has a strongly multidisciplinary character, both existing and yet to be developed analytical techniques are and will remain indispensable. All this and more is discussed in Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials, which provides a masterly and up to date summary of one of the most challenging researc...

  12. Materials technologies for advanced nuclear energy concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.; Harms, B.

    1983-01-01

    High-performance, advanced nuclear power plant concepts have emerged with major emphasis on lower capital costs, inherent safety, and increased reliability. The materials problems posed by these concepts are discussed and how the scientists and technologists at ORNL plan to solve them is described

  13. Annual report 1991. Institute for Advanced Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Institute executed in 1991 the R and D programme on advanced materials of the Joint Research Centre and contributed to the programmes: reactor safety, radio-active waste management, fusion technology and safety, nuclear fuel and actinide research. The supplementary programme: Operation of the High Flux Reactor is presented in condensed form. A full report is published separately. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  14. Advanced quantum mechanics materials and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Dick, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    In this updated and expanded second edition of a well-received and invaluable textbook, Prof. Dick emphasizes the importance of advanced quantum mechanics for materials science and all experimental techniques which employ photon absorption, emission, or scattering. Important aspects of introductory quantum mechanics are covered in the first seven chapters to make the subject self-contained and accessible for a wide audience. Advanced Quantum Mechanics, Materials and Photons can therefore be used for advanced undergraduate courses and introductory graduate courses which are targeted towards students with diverse academic backgrounds from the Natural Sciences or Engineering. To enhance this inclusive aspect of making the subject as accessible as possible Appendices A and B also provide introductions to Lagrangian mechanics and the covariant formulation of electrodynamics. This second edition includes an additional 62 new problems as well as expanded sections on relativistic quantum fields and applications of�...

  15. Advanced quantum mechanics materials and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Dick, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Quantum Mechanics: Materials and Photons is a textbook which emphasizes the importance of advanced quantum mechanics for materials science and all experimental techniques which employ photon absorption, emission, or scattering. Important aspects of introductory quantum mechanics are covered in the first seven chapters to make the subject self-contained and accessible for a wide audience. The textbook can therefore be used for advanced undergraduate courses and introductory graduate courses which are targeted towards students with diverse academic backgrounds from the Natural Sciences or Engineering. To enhance this inclusive aspect of making the subject as accessible as possible, Appendices A and B also provide introductions to Lagrangian mechanics and the covariant formulation of electrodynamics. Other special features include an introduction to Lagrangian field theory and an integrated discussion of transition amplitudes with discrete or continuous initial or final states. Once students have acquir...

  16. Development of eco-friendly polymeric materials by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae-hak; Shim, Kihyung; Kim, Jaeyoung

    2012-12-01

    In this project, the core technologies such as fabrication of eco-friendly and high-performance bioplastics, anionic exchange membranes for the energy generation, and anisotropic conductive films (ACF) for the electronic devices were developed by using an eco-friendly and low-energy consumption radiation. In the 1 st project group, the fabrication technologies of biodegradable polymer-based blends, biocompoistes, and foam were developed using a radiation crosslinking technology, and the possibility of their commercialization was evaluated through the fabrication of prototype products (fruits packaging material and adhesive) in the practical production lines. In the 2 nd project group, the fabrication technology of the anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cell were prepared by utilizing the inherent property of radiation such as high ionizing energy and penetrating depth. The ion exchange capacity, ion conductivity, high ionizing energy and penetrating depth. The ion exchange capacity, ion conductivity, high ionizing energy and penetrating depth. The ion exchange capacity, ion conductivity, mechanical property, and chemical stability of the prepared membranes were measured. The results of the MEA performance test, the maximum power density of 115 mW and operation for 200 hours, indicates the possibility of the use of anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cell. In the 3rd project group, the electron beam-induced room temperature and fast curable epoxy was developed and the mechanism of electron beam-induced curing was investigated using various analytical methods. On the basis of the physical and electrical characterization, the prepared ACF exhibited lower resistance and higher tensile strength compared to that of the commercialized one

  17. Development of eco-friendly polymeric materials by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae-hak; Shim, Kihyung; Kim, Jaeyoung; and others

    2012-12-15

    In this project, the core technologies such as fabrication of eco-friendly and high-performance bioplastics, anionic exchange membranes for the energy generation, and anisotropic conductive films (ACF) for the electronic devices were developed by using an eco-friendly and low-energy consumption radiation. In the 1{sup st} project group, the fabrication technologies of biodegradable polymer-based blends, biocompoistes, and foam were developed using a radiation crosslinking technology, and the possibility of their commercialization was evaluated through the fabrication of prototype products (fruits packaging material and adhesive) in the practical production lines. In the 2{sup nd} project group, the fabrication technology of the anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cell were prepared by utilizing the inherent property of radiation such as high ionizing energy and penetrating depth. The ion exchange capacity, ion conductivity, high ionizing energy and penetrating depth. The ion exchange capacity, ion conductivity, high ionizing energy and penetrating depth. The ion exchange capacity, ion conductivity, mechanical property, and chemical stability of the prepared membranes were measured. The results of the MEA performance test, the maximum power density of 115 mW and operation for 200 hours, indicates the possibility of the use of anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cell. In the 3rd project group, the electron beam-induced room temperature and fast curable epoxy was developed and the mechanism of electron beam-induced curing was investigated using various analytical methods. On the basis of the physical and electrical characterization, the prepared ACF exhibited lower resistance and higher tensile strength compared to that of the commercialized one.

  18. Tunable polymeric sorbent materials for fractionation of model naphthenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed H; Wilson, Lee D; Headley, John V

    2013-04-04

    The sorption properties are reported for several examples of single-component carboxylic acids representing naphthenic acids (NAs) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based polyurethane sorbents. Seven single-component examples of NAs were chosen with variable z values, carbon number, and chemical structure as follows: 2-hexyldecanoic acid (z = 0 and C = 16; S1), n-caprylic acid (z = 0 and C = 8; S2), trans-4-pentylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (z = -2 and C = 12; S3), 4-methylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (z = -2 and C = 8; S4), dicyclohexylacetic acid (z = -4; C = 14; S5), 4-pentylbicyclo[2.2.2]octane-1-carboxylic acid (z = -4; C = 14; S6), and lithocholic acid (z = -6; C = 24; S7). The copolymer sorbents were synthesized at three relative β-CD:diisocyanate mole ratios (i.e., 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3) using 4,4'-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (CDI) and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents were characterized using equilibrium sorption isotherms in aqueous solution at pH 9.00 with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The equilibrium fraction of the unbound carboxylate anions was monitored in the aqueous phase. The sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents (i.e., Qm) were obtained from the Sips isotherm model. The Qm values generally decrease as the number of accessible β-CD inclusion sites in the copolymer framework decreases. The chemical structure of the adsorbates played an important role in their relative uptake, as evidenced by the adsorbate lipophilic surface area (LSA) and the involvement of hydrophobic effects. The copolymers exhibit molecular selective sorption of the single-component carboxylates in mixtures which suggests their application as sorbents for fractionation of mixtures of NAs. By comparison, granular activated carbon (GAC) and chitosan sorbents did not exhibit any significant molecular selective sorption relative to the copolymer materials; however, evidence of variable sorption capacity was

  19. Advanced power plant materials, design and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roddy, D. (ed.) [Newcastle University (United Kingdom). Sir Joseph Swan Institute

    2010-07-01

    The book is a comprehensive reference on the state of the art of gas-fired and coal-fired power plants, their major components and performance improvement options. Selected chapters are: Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant design and technology by Y. Zhu, and H. C. Frey; Improving thermal cycle efficiency in advanced power plants: water and steam chemistry and materials performance by B. Dooley; Advanced carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas separation membrane development for power plants by A. Basile, F. Gallucci, and P. Morrone; Advanced flue gas cleaning systems for sulphur oxides (SOx), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and mercury emissions control in power plants by S. Miller and B.G. Miller; Advanced flue gas dedusting systems and filters for ash and particulate emissions control in power plants by B.G. Miller; Advanced sensors for combustion monitoring in power plants: towards smart high-density sensor networks by M. Yu and A.K. Gupta; Advanced monitoring and process control technology for coal-fired power plants by Y. Yan; Low-rank coal properties, upgrading and utilisation for improving the fuel flexibility of advanced power plants by T. Dlouhy; Development and integration of underground coal gasification (UCG) for improving the environmental impact of advanced power plants by M. Green; Development and application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage for improving the environmental impact of advanced power plants by B. McPherson; and Advanced technologies for syngas and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production from fossil-fuel feedstocks in power plants by P. Chiesa.

  20. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-11-29

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  1. Computation of the mass attenuation coefficient of polymeric materials at specific gamma photon energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirji, Rajeshwari; Lobo, Blaise

    2017-06-01

    The gamma ray mass attenuation coefficients of ten synthetic polymeric materials, namely, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Polyethylene terephthalate (PET), Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), Polypropylene (PP) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have been calculated using second order polynomial equation and logarithmic interpolation formula at selected gamma photon energies, in the energy range starting from 14.4 keV up to 1332 keV. It is important to note that second order polynomial equation fits very well with NIST data for all the polymeric materials considered here, for gamma photon energies ranging from 300 keV up to 2000 keV. Third order polynomial fitting is best suited for lower gamma photon energies (from 10 keV up to 200 keV).

  2. Research work of radiation induced graft polymerization for synthesis and modification of polymer materials in CRICI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Fumin; Ma Xueming [Chenguan Research Institute of Chemical Industry, Chengdu (China)

    2000-03-01

    The direct and post radiation induced graft polymerization had been studied in CRICI (Chenguan Research Institute of Chemical Industry). The method consists of irradiation of various polymer substrates in the presence (or absence) of monomers in a liquid, saturated vapour or gaseous and non-saturated vapour. 1. Grafting of functional monomers. --- It is possible to divide the grafting into two main approaches for synthesis of functional polymer materials. The first is grafting of monomers attached required functional group such as unsaturated carboxylic acid (acrylic and methacrylic acid), unsaturated nitrogen containing (alkali) base (vinylpyridine), monomers with hydrophilic unionized and polar groups (acrylamide, N-vinylpyrrolidone glycidylmethacrylate) and so on. The second is grafting of monomers capable of continuing chemical modification after graft polymerization. This approach essentially expands synthetic possibility of RGP for preparing functional polymers. 2. The effect of some salts on aqueous solution graft polymerization. The grafting of AA or AAm onto PE by direct or post radiation method in the presence of Mohr's salt or cupric nitrate was studied in detail. 3. Radiation induced graft polymerization by gaseous phase of monomers. This method consists of irradiation or preirradiation of various polymer substrates in the presence (or absence for preirradiation) of monomer in a gaseous of nonsaturated vapour state. (J.P.N.)

  3. Research work of radiation induced graft polymerization for synthesis and modification of polymer materials in CRICI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Fumin; Ma Xueming

    2000-01-01

    The direct and post radiation induced graft polymerization had been studied in CRICI (Chenguan Research Institute of Chemical Industry). The method consists of irradiation of various polymer substrates in the presence (or absence) of monomers in a liquid, saturated vapour or gaseous and non-saturated vapour. 1. Grafting of functional monomers. --- It is possible to divide the grafting into two main approaches for synthesis of functional polymer materials. The first is grafting of monomers attached required functional group such as unsaturated carboxylic acid (acrylic and methacrylic acid), unsaturated nitrogen containing (alkali) base (vinylpyridine), monomers with hydrophilic unionized and polar groups (acrylamide, N-vinylpyrrolidone glycidylmethacrylate) and so on. The second is grafting of monomers capable of continuing chemical modification after graft polymerization. This approach essentially expands synthetic possibility of RGP for preparing functional polymers. 2. The effect of some salts on aqueous solution graft polymerization. The grafting of AA or AAm onto PE by direct or post radiation method in the presence of Mohr's salt or cupric nitrate was studied in detail. 3. Radiation induced graft polymerization by gaseous phase of monomers. This method consists of irradiation or preirradiation of various polymer substrates in the presence (or absence for preirradiation) of monomer in a gaseous of nonsaturated vapour state. (J.P.N.)

  4. Advanced Plasmonic Materials for Dynamic Color Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Lei; Zhuo, Xiaolu; Wang, Jianfang

    2018-04-01

    Plasmonic structures exhibit promising applications in high-resolution and durable color generation. Research on advanced hybrid plasmonic materials that allow dynamically reconfigurable color control has developed rapidly in recent years. Some of these results may give rise to practically applicable reflective displays in living colors with high performance and low power consumption. They will attract broad interest from display markets, compared with static plasmonic color printing, for example, in applications such as digital signage, full-color electronic paper, and electronic device screens. In this progress report, the most promising recent examples of utilizing advanced plasmonic materials for the realization of dynamic color display are highlighted and put into perspective. The performances, advantages, and disadvantages of different technologies are discussed, with emphasis placed on both the potential and possible limitations of various hybrid materials for dynamic plasmonic color display. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synthetic Light-Curable Polymeric Materials Provide a Supportive Niche for Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Kyle H; Scherba, Jacob C; Bever, Alaina M; Alexander, Morgan R; Celiz, Adam D; Mooney, David J

    2018-01-01

    Dental disease annually affects billions of patients, and while regenerative dentistry aims to heal dental tissue after injury, existing polymeric restorative materials, or fillings, do not directly participate in the healing process in a bioinstructive manner. There is a need for restorative materials that can support native functions of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), which are capable of regenerating dentin. A polymer microarray formed from commercially available monomers to rapidly identify materials that support DPSC adhesion is used. Based on these findings, thiol-ene chemistry is employed to achieve rapid light-curing and minimize residual monomer of the lead materials. Several triacrylate bulk polymers support DPSC adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation in vitro, and exhibit stiffness and tensile strength similar to existing dental materials. Conversely, materials composed of a trimethacrylate monomer or bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate, which is a monomer standard in dental materials, do not support stem cell adhesion and negatively impact matrix and signaling pathways. Furthermore, thiol-ene polymerized triacrylates are used as permanent filling materials at the dentin-pulp interface in direct contact with irreversibly injured pulp tissue. These novel triacrylate-based biomaterials have potential to enable novel regenerative dental therapies in the clinic by both restoring teeth and providing a supportive niche for DPSCs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. In Vitro Investigation of Wear of CAD/CAM Polymeric Materials Against Primary Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Won Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of polymeric computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing CAD/CAM materials on antagonistic primary tooth wear. Five CAD/CAM polymeric materials were examined: Vipi Block Monocolor (VBM, Yamahachi polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA (YAP, Mazic Duro (MZD, Vita Enamic (ENA, and Pekkton (PEK. All of the specimens were tested in a thermomechanical loading machine with the primary canine as the antagonist (50 N, 1.2 × 105 cycles, 1.7 Hz, 5/55 °C. The wear losses of the antagonist tooth and the restorative materials were calculated using reverse modelling software and an electronic scale. VBM and ENA showed significantly higher antagonist tooth wear than PEK (p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference observed among VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05. PEK showed the largest value in both material volumetric and weight losses. In terms of material volumetric losses, there was no significant difference between all of the groups (p > 0.05. In terms of material weight losses, PEK was significantly larger than ENA (p < 0.05, but there was no significant difference between VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05. Volumetric and weight losses of materials showed similar wear behaviour. However, the wear patterns of antagonists and materials were different, especially in PEK.

  7. Testing of Candidate Polymeric Materials for Compatibility with Pure Alternate Pretreat as Part of the Universal Waste Management System (UWMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, C. D.

    2018-01-01

    The Universal Waste Management System (UWMS) is an improved Waste Collection System for astronauts living and working in low Earth orbit spacecraft. Polymeric materials used in water recovery on International Space Station are regularly exposed to phosphoric acid-treated 'pretreated' urine. Polymeric materials used in UWMS are not only exposed to pretreated urine, but also to concentrated phosphoric acid with oxidizer before dilution known as 'pure pretreat.' Samples of five different polymeric materials immersed in pure pretreat for 1 year were tested for liquid compatibility by measuring changes in storage modulus with a dynamic mechanical analyzer.

  8. Adhesion of Pharmaceutical Binding Agents I-Adhesion to polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Orafai

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of three commonly used pharmaceutical binding agents, HPMC , PVP and Gelatin to five different polymeric sheet materials was studied. After conditioning, the bond strength of the specimens were measured by shear testing method using a suitablely designed apparatus. The results were correlated to the surface energies and the solubiiity parameters of the adherends. It is concluded that the thermodynamic properties and the solubility parameters are dominant when the mechanisms of adhesion are by adsorption and diffusion respectively.

  9. Polymeric Materials Models in the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan) Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) Tech Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    analytical model currently used by military vehicle analysts has been continuously updated to address the model’s inherent deficiencies and make the... model is a hyperelastic polymer model based upon statistical mechanics and the finite extensibility of a polymer chain.23 Its rheological ...ARL-TR-7927 ● JAN 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Polymeric Materials Models in the Warrior Injury Assessment Manikin (WIAMan

  10. Impregnation and Polymerization Methods and Systems Used in the Production of Wood-Polymer Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, W. E.; Rotariu, G. J. [United States Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC 20545 (United States)

    1968-10-15

    Studies on the radiation production of wood-polymer materials began in the United States in 1961 at West Virginia University and have continued until today. In this paper the impregnation and polymerization methods and systems that have evolved from these studies are reviewed. Included is a description of the procedures developed at the College of Forestry, Syracuse University, for producing wood-polymers via a thermal-catalytic process. (author)

  11. Radiation durability of polymeric materials in solid polymer electrolyzer for fusion tritium plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yasunori; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hiroki, Akihiro; Tamada, Masao

    2009-02-01

    This document presents the radiation durability of various polymeric materials applicable to a solid-polymer-electrolyte (SPE) water electrolyzer to be used in the tritium facility of fusion reactor. The SPE water electrolyzers are applied to the water detritiation system (WDS) of the ITER. In the ITER, an electrolyzer should keep its performance during two years operation in the tritiated water of 9TBq/kg, the design tritium concentration of the ITER. The tritium exposure of 9TBq/kg for two years is corresponding to the irradiation of no less than 530 kGy. In this study, the polymeric materials were irradiated with γ-rays or with electron beams at various conditions up to 1600 kGy at room temperature or at 343 K. The change in mechanical and functional properties were investigated by stress-strain measurement, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), and so on. Our selection of polymeric materials for a SPE water electrolyzer used in a radiation environment was Pt + Ir applied Nafion N117 ion exchange membrane, VITON O-ring seal and polyimide insulator. (author)

  12. Sensor calibration of polymeric Hopkinson bars for dynamic testing of soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martarelli, Milena; Mancini, Edoardo; Lonzi, Barbara; Sasso, Marco

    2018-02-01

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing is one of the most common techniques for the estimation of the constitutive behaviour of metallic materials. In this paper, the characterisation of soft rubber-like materials has been addressed by means of polymeric bars thanks to their reduced mechanical impedance. Due to their visco-elastic nature, polymeric bars are more sensitive to temperature changes than metallic bars, and due to their low conductance, the strain gauges used to measure the propagating wave in an SHPB may be exposed to significant heating. Consequently, a calibration procedure has been proposed to estimate quantitatively the temperature influence on strain gauge output. Furthermore, the calibration is used to determine the elastic modulus of the polymeric bars, which is an important parameter for the synchronisation of the propagation waves measured in the input and output bar strain gate stations, and for the correct determination of stress and strain evolution within the specimen. An example of the application has been reported in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique. Different tests at different strain rates have been carried out on samples made of nytrile butadyene rubber (NBR) from the same injection moulding batch. Thanks to the correct synchronisation of the measured propagation waves measured by the strain gauges and applying the calibrated coefficients, the mechanical behaviour of the NBR material is obtained in terms of strain-rate-strain and stress-strain engineering curves.

  13. Radiation durability and functional reliability of polymeric materials in space systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruvy, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Polymeric materials are preferred for the light-weight construction of space-systems. Materials in space systems are required to fulfill a complete set of specifications, at utmost reliability, throughout the whole period of service in space, while being exposed to the hazardous influence of the space environment. The major threats of the space environment in orbits at the geostationary altitude (GSO) arise from ionizing radiations, the main constituents of which are highly energetic protons (affecting mainly the surface) and fast electrons (which produce the main threat to the electronic components). The maximum dose of ionizing radiation (within the limits of uncertainty of the calculations) at the surface of a material mounted on a space system, namely the ''Skin-Dose'', is ca. 2500 Mrads/yr. Space systems such as telecommunication satellites are planned to serve for prolonged periods of 30 years and longer. The cumulative predicted dose of ionizing-radiation over such periods presents a severe threat of chemical degradation to most of the polymeric construction materials commonly utilized in space systems. The reliability of each of the polymeric materials must be evaluated in detail, considering each of the relevant typical threats, such as ionizing-radiation, UV radiation, meteoroides flux, thermal cycling and ultra-high vacuum. For each of the exposed materials, conservation of the set of functional characteristics such as mechanical integrity, electrical and thermo-optical properties, electrical conductivity, surface charging and outgassing properties, which may cause contamination of neighboring systems, is evaluated. The reliability of functioning of the materials exposed to the space environment can thus be predicted, utilizing data from the literature, experimental results reported from space flights and laboratory simulations, and by chemical similarity of untested polymers to others. (author)

  14. Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    circumvention of classic property-processing trade -offs. The laboratory task focuses on two primary objectives: (1) Creating the fundamental...processing trade -offs. To establish feasibility for military needs, current opportunities being examined include: 1. Electrically conductive...CINT Center for Intergrated Technologies NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology RF MEM Radio Frequency Microelectromechanical Systems SOA State of the Art TPA Two-photon Resonant

  15. On the Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Composite Material Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Jack

    During the period between 1993 and 2004, the author, as well as some colleagues and graduate students, had the honor to be supported by the Office of Naval Research to conduct research in several aspects of the behavior of structures composed of composite materials. The topics involved in this research program were numerous, but all contributed to increasing the understanding of how various structures that are useful for marine applications behaved. More specifically, the research topics focused on the reaction of structures that were made of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites when subjected to various loads and environmental conditions. This included the behavior of beam, plate/panel and shell structures. It involved studies that are applicable to fiberglass, graphite/carbon and Kevlar fibers imbedded in epoxy, polyester and other polymeric matrices. Unidirectional, cross-ply, angle ply, and woven composites were involved, both in laminated, monocoque as well as in sandwich constructions. Mid-plane symmetric as well as asymmetric laminates were studied, the latter involving bending-stretching coupling and other couplings that only can be achieved with advanced composite materials. The composite structures studied involved static loads, dynamic loading, shock loading as well as thermal and hygrothermal environments. One major consideration was determining the mechanical properties of composite materials subjected to high strain rates because the mechanical properties vary so significantly as the strain rate increases. A considerable number of references are cited for further reading and study for those interested.

  16. Photon CT scanning of advanced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems. Small size flaws (10 - 200 μm) and small nonuniformities in density distributions (0.1 -2%) present as long-range density gradients, are critical in most ceramics and their detection is of crucial importance. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging provides a means of obtaining a precise two-dimensional density map of a cross section through an object from which accurate information about small flaws and small density gradients can be obtained. With the use of high energy photon sources high contrast CT images can be obtained for both low and high density ceramics. In the present paper we illustrate the applicability of the photon CT technique to the examination of advanced ceramics. CT images of sintered alumina tiles are presented from which data on high-density inclusions, cracks and density gradients have been extracted

  17. Advancement in conductive cotton fabrics through in situ polymerization of polypyrrole-nanocellulose composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeish, A; Farag, S; Sharaf, S; Shaheen, Th I

    2016-10-20

    Current research was undertaking with a view to innovate a new approach for development of conductive - coated textile materials through coating cotton fabrics with nanocellulose/polypyrrole composites. The study was designed in order to have a clear understanding of the role of nanocellulose as well as modified composite thereof under investigation. It is anticipated that incorporation of nanocellulose in the pyrrole/cotton fabrics/FeCl3/H2O system would form an integral part of the composites with mechanical, electrical or both properties. Three different nanocellulosic substrates are involved in the oxidation polymerization reaction of polypyrrole (Ppy) in presence of cotton fabrics. Polymerization was subsequently carried out by admixing at various ratios of FeCl3 and pyrrole viz. Ppy1, Ppy2 and pp3. The conductive, mechanical and thermal properties of cotton fabrics coated independently with different nanocellulose/polypyrrole were investigated. FTIR, TGA, XRD, SEM and EDX were also used for further characterization. Results signify that, the conductivity of cotton fabrics increases exponentially with increasing the dose of pyrrole and oxidant irrespective of nanocellulose substrate used. While, the mechanical properties of cotton fabrics are not significantly affected by the oxidant treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dependence of the mechanical fracture energy of the polymeric composite material from the mixture of filler fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Nurullaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper for the first time presents an equation for calculating the mechanical fracture energy of the polymeric composite material (PCM with regard to the basic formulation parameters. By means of the developed computer program the authors calculated the mechanical fracture energy of the polymer binder of the 3D cross-linked plasticized elastomer filled with multifractional silica. The solution of the integral equation was implemented using the corresponding dependence of stress on relative elongation at uniaxial tension. Engineering application of the theory was considered with respect to asphalt road covering. The authors proposed a generalized dependence of ruptural deformation of the polymer binder from the effective concentration of chemical and physical (intermolecular bonds for calculating the mechanical fracture energy of available and advanced PCMs as filled elastomers.

  19. Radiation-Induced Graft Polymerization: Gamma Radiation and Electron Beam Technology for Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Cabalar, Patrick Jay; Lopez, Girlie Eunice; Abad, Lucille V.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of functional hybrid materials by attaching polymer chains with advantageous tailored properties to the surface of a base polymer with desirable bulk character is an attractive application of graft copolymerization. Radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP) has been a popular approach for surface modification of polymers because of its merits over conventional chemical processes. RIGP, which proceeds primarily via free radical polymerization process, has the advantages such as simplicity, low cost, control over process and adjustment of the materials composition and structure. RIGP can be performed using either electron beam or gamma radiation and it can be applied to both synthetic and natural polymers. These merits make RIGP a popular research topic worldwide. Moreover, the materials synthesized and produced via RIGP has found applications, and were proposed to produce continuous impact, in the fields of medicine, agriculture, pollution remediation, rare earth and valuable metals recovery, fuel cell membrane synthesis and catalysis to name a few. From 2012 our group has performed electron beam and gamma radiation-induced graft polymerization of various monomers onto polymers of natural and synthetic origins (e.g. monomers - glycidyl methacrylate, styrene, acrylonitrile, N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate; base polymers – polyethylene/polypropylene nonwoven fabric, polypropylene nonwoven fabric pineapple fibers, cellulose nonwoven fabric microcrystalline cellulose). We tested these grafted materials for heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu) and organic molecule removal from aqueous solutions and E. coli activity (using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer RAFT mediated grafting). The results clearly showed the success of materials modified via FIGP in these applications. Currently, we are studying the applications of grafted materials on treatment of waste waters from tanning industry, value addition to abaca nonwoven fabrics cell sheet

  20. Advanced materials for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titran, R.H.; Grobstein, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Research on monolithic refractory metal alloys and on metal matrix composites is being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in support of advanced space power systems. The overall philosophy of the research is to develop and characterize new high-temperature power conversion and radiator materials and to provide spacecraft designers with material selection options and design information. Research on three candidate materials (carbide strengthened niobium alloy PWC-11 for fuel cladding, graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix composites (Gr/Cu) for heat rejection fins, and tungsten fiber reinforced niobium matrix composites (W/NB) for fuel containment and structural supports) considered for space power system applications is discussed. Each of these types of materials offers unique advantages for space power applications

  1. Evaluation of solid polymeric organic materials for use in bioreactive sediment capping to stimulate the degradation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atashgahi, S.; Maphosa, F.; Vrieze, de J.; Haest, P.J.; Boon, N.; Smidt, H.; Springael, D.; Dejonghe, W.

    2014-01-01

    In situ bioreactive capping is a promising technology for mitigation of surface water contamination by discharging polluted groundwater. Organohalide respiration (OHR) of chlorinated ethenes in bioreactive caps can be stimulated through incorporation of solid polymeric organic materials (SPOMs) that

  2. Phospholipid Adsorption Polymeric Materials for Detection of Xylazine and Metabolite in Blood and Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have been used in different areas. Recently, polymeric material is favored in analytical area due to its high performance and high consistency, which was used in sample pretreatment in this study. Xylazine poisoning is often seen in body fluid samples obtained from various accidents or suicides. However, the content of xylazine is difficult to detect precisely due to matrix effect in testing practices. In this paper, a method application for phospholipid adsorption polymeric materials to determine xylazine in blood and urine samples was proposed, developed, and validated. Compared with existing method, this method using polymeric pretreatment has a wider linear range of 2.0–2000.0 ng/mL for xylazine and its metabolite 2,6-dimethylaniline in both blood and urine and lower detection limits of 0.3 ng/mL for 2,6-dimethylaniline and xylazine in blood and 0.2 ng/mL for 2,6-dimethylaniline and xylazine in urine. Therefore, this method is suggested to be applied in testing practices by academic groups and commercial organizations.

  3. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  4. [In Situ Polymerization and Characterization of Hydroxyapatite/polyurethane Implanted Material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Muqing; Xiao, Fengjuan; Liang, Ye; Yue, Lin; Li, Song; Li, Lanlan; Feng, Feifei

    2015-08-01

    In order to improve the interfacial bonding strength of hydroxyapatite/polyurethane implanted material and dispersion of hydroxyapatite in the polyurethane matrix, we in the present study synthesized nano-hydroxyapatite/polyurethane composites by in situ polymerization. We then characterized and analyzed the fracture morphology, thermal stability, glass transition temperature and mechanical properties. We seeded MG63 cells on composites to evaluate the cytocompatibility of the composites. In situ polymerization could improve the interfacial bonding strength, ameliorate dispersion of hydroxyapatite in the properties of the composites. After adding 20 wt% hydroxyapatite into the polyurethane, the thermal stability was improved and the glass transition temperatures were increased. The tensile strength and maximum elongation were 6.83 MPa and 861.17%, respectively. Compared with those of pure polyurethane the tensile strength and maximum elongation increased by 236.45% and 143.30%, respectively. The composites were helpful for cell adhesion and proliferation in cultivation.

  5. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  6. Advanced Electron Microscopy in Materials Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.; Jarausch, K.

    2009-01-01

    Aberration correction has opened a new frontier in electron microscopy by overcoming the limitations of conventional round lenses, providing sub-angstrom-sized probes and extending information limits. The imaging and analytical performance of these corrector-equipped microscopes affords an unprecedented opportunity to study structure-property relationships of matter at the atomic scale. This new generation of microscopes is able to retrieve high-quality structural information comparable to neutron and synchrotron x-ray experiments, but with local atomic resolution. These advances in instrumentation are accelerating the research and development of various functional materials ranging from those for energy generation, conversion, transportation and storage to those for catalysis and nano-device applications. The dramatic improvements in electron-beam illumination and detection also present a host of new challenges for the interpretation and optimization of experiments. During 7-9 November 2007, a workshop, entitled 'Aberration Corrected Electron Microscopy in Material Physics', was convened at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratories (BNL) to address these opportunities and challenges. The workshop was co-sponsored by Hitachi High Technologies, a leader in electron microscopy instrumentation, and BNL's Institute of Advanced Electron Microscopy, a leader in materials physics research using electron microscopy. The workshop featured presentations by internationally prominent scientists working at the frontiers of electron microscopy, both on developing instrumentation and applying it in materials physics. The meeting, structured to stimulate scientific exchanges and explore new capabilities, brought together ∼100 people from over 10 countries. This special issue complies many of the advances in instrument performance and materials physics reported by the invited speakers and attendees at the workshop.

  7. Advances in Functionalized Materials Research 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predoi, D.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Guegan, R.; Coustumer, L.Ph.

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, due to the rapid progress of technology, new materials at nano metric scale with special properties have become a flourishing field of research in materials science. The unique physicochemical properties of materials induced by various parameters such as mean size, shape, purity, crystallographic structure, and surface can generate effective solutions to challenging environmental and biomedical problems. As a result of this approach a large number of techniques were developed that enable obtaining novel materials at nano metric scale with specific and reproducible properties and parameters. Below will be highlighted studies on promising properties on the applicability of new materials that could lead to innovative applications in the medical field. Therefore, this special issue is focused on expected advances in the area of functionalized materials at nano metric scale. Due to multidisciplinarity of this topic, this special issue is comprised of a wide range of original research articles as well as review papers on the design and synthesis of functionalized nano materials, their structural, morphological, and biological characterization, and their potential uses in medical and environmental applications

  8. Ring-Opening Polymerization of N-Carboxyanhydrides for Preparation of Polypeptides and Polypeptide-Based Hybrid Materials with Various Molecular Architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Pahovnik, David; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Different synthetic approaches utilizing ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides for preparation of polypeptide and polypeptide-based hybrid materials with various molecular architectures are described. An overview of polymerization

  9. Development for advanced materials and testing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hishinuma, Akimichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Recent studies using a JMTR and research reactors of JRR-2 and JRR-3 are briefly summarized. Small specimen testing techniques (SSTT) required for an effective use of irradiation volume and also irradiated specimens have been developed focussing on tensile test, fatigue test, Charpy test and small punch test. By using the small specimens of 0.1 - several mm in size, similar values of tensile and fatigue properties to those by standard size specimens can be taken, although the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) depends strongly on Charpy specimen size. As for advanced material development, R and D about low activation ferritic steels have been done to investigate irradiation response. The low activation ferritic steel, so-called F82H jointly-developed by JAERI and NKK for fusion, has been confirmed to have good irradiation resistance within a limited dose and now selected as a standard material in the fusion material community. It is also found that TiAi intermetallic compounds, which never been considered for nuclear application in the past, have an excellent irradiation resistance under an irradiation condition. Such knowledge can bring about a large expectation for developing advanced nuclear materials. (author)

  10. Machining, joining and modifications of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Altenbach, Holm

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the latest advances in mechanical and materials engineering applied to the machining, joining and modification of modern engineering materials. The contributions cover the classical fields of casting, forming and injection moulding as representative manufacturing methods, whereas additive manufacturing methods (rapid prototyping and laser sintering) are treated as more innovative and recent technologies that are paving the way for the manufacturing of shapes and features that traditional methods are unable to deliver. The book also explores water jet cutting as an innovative cutting technology that avoids the heat build-up typical of classical mechanical cutting. It introduces readers to laser cutting as an alternative technology for the separation of materials, and to classical bonding and friction stir welding approaches in the context of joining technologies. In many cases, forming and machining technologies require additional post-treatment to achieve the required level of surface quali...

  11. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Williams, Tom; Wendelin, Tim

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  12. Short-term organic carbon migration from polymeric materials in contact with chlorinated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Hammes, Frederik

    2018-02-01

    Polymeric materials are widely used in drinking water distribution systems. These materials could release organic carbon that supports bacterial growth. To date, the available migration assays for polymeric materials have not included the potential influence of chlorination on organic carbon migration behavior. Hence, we established a migration and growth potential protocol specifically for analysis of carbon migration from materials in contact with chlorinated drinking water. Four different materials were tested, including ethylene propylene dienemethylene (EPDM), poly-ethylene (PEX b and PEX c) and poly-butylene (PB). Chlorine consumption rates decreased gradually over time for EPDM, PEXc and PB. In contrast, no free chlorine was detected for PEXb at any time during the 7 migration cycles. Total organic carbon (TOC) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) was evaluated in both chlorinated and non-chlorinated migrations. TOC concentrations for EPDM and PEXb in chlorinated migrations were significantly higher than non-chlorinated migrations. The AOC results showed pronounced differences among tested materials. AOC concentrations from chlorinated migration waters of EPDM and PB were higher compared to non-chlorinated migrations, whereas the opposite trend was observed for PEXb and PEXc. There was also a considerable difference between tested materials with regards to bacterial growth potential. The results revealed that the materials exposed to chlorine-influenced migration still exhibited a strong biofilm formation potential. The overall results suggested that the choice in material would make a considerable difference in chlorine consumption and carbon migration behavior in drinking water distribution systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Accelerated Aging Effect on Epoxy-polysiloxane Polymeric Insulator Material with Rice Husk Ash Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochmadi .

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The performances of outdoor polymeric insulators are influenced by environmental conditions. This paper presents the effect of artificial tropical climate on the hydrophobicity, equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD, surface leakage current, flashover voltage, and surface degradation on epoxy-polysiloxane polymeric insulator materials with rice husk ash (RHA. Test samples are made at room temperature vulcanized (RTV of various composition of epoxy-polysiloxane with rice husk ash as filler. The aging was carried out in test chamber at temperature from 50oC to 62oC, relative humidity of 60% to 80%, and ultraviolet (UV  radiation 21.28 w/cm2 in daylight conditions for 96 hours. The experiment results showed that the flashover voltage fluctuates from 34.13 kV up to 40.92 kV and tends to decrease on each variation of material composition. The surface leakage current fluctuates and tends to increase. Test samples with higher filler content result greater hydrophobicity, smaller equivalent salt deposit density, and smaller critical leakage current, which caused the increase of the flashover voltage. Insulator material (RTVEP3 showed the best performance in tropical climate environment. Artificial tropical aging for short duration gives less effect to the surface degradation of epoxy-polysiloxane insulator material.

  14. Two-photon polymerization of an epoxy-acrylate resin material system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, R.J.; O'Brien, S.

    2011-01-01

    Improved material systems are of great interest in the development of two-photon polymerization techniques for the fabrication of three dimensional micro- and nano-structures. The properties of the photosensitive resin are important in the realisation of structures with submicron dimensions. In this study investigation of a custom organic resin, cross-linked by a two-photon induced process, using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, is described. A structural, optical and mechanical analysis of the optimised material is presented. The influence of both material system and laser processing parameters on achievable micro-structure and size is presented as are representative structures. Parameters include: laser power, photo-initiator concentration and material composition.

  15. Influences of air pollutants on polymeric materials. Natural weathering of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, T.F.R. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie, Pfinztal-Berghausen (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Polymeric materials are affected during their entire service life by a number of environmental influences. These originate from both man made and natural sources. Such environmental influences include solar radiation, temperature, humidity and air pollutant effects. They all act together, some independently and some synergistically, to influence material properties, as well as functionality, service life, quality and reliability of the poly materials and systems. The main degradation process is chain scission with loss of molecular weight and oxidation, followed by fading of colours and loss of gloss and mechanical strength. Due to the large number of different types of polymers there are many types of degradation processes and it is difficult to generalise about the effects of the environment on organic materials. Materials, as opposed to organisms, have no self-repair mechanism which allows them to tolerate a certain level of stress. In principle, therefore, it is not possible to define critical levels for the effects of pollutants on materials below which no deterioration occurs. Material deterioration by weathering is normally a very slow process lasting some or more years. Therefore attempts have been made to produce deterioration in short-term experiments by using high stress levels. The limits for the high stress levels are given by the comparability of the obtained damage from artificially accelerated weathering with these from real natural weathering. To investigate the damage caused by air pollutants on polymeric materials, samples were natural weathered with some light exposed and some dark stored samples in different climatic and polluted areas of Germany. The weathering stations are closed to the continuously measuring stations for air quality

  16. Influences of air pollutants on polymeric materials. Natural weathering of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, T F.R. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie, Pfinztal-Berghausen (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    Polymeric materials are affected during their entire service life by a number of environmental influences. These originate from both man made and natural sources. Such environmental influences include solar radiation, temperature, humidity and air pollutant effects. They all act together, some independently and some synergistically, to influence material properties, as well as functionality, service life, quality and reliability of the poly materials and systems. The main degradation process is chain scission with loss of molecular weight and oxidation, followed by fading of colours and loss of gloss and mechanical strength. Due to the large number of different types of polymers there are many types of degradation processes and it is difficult to generalise about the effects of the environment on organic materials. Materials, as opposed to organisms, have no self-repair mechanism which allows them to tolerate a certain level of stress. In principle, therefore, it is not possible to define critical levels for the effects of pollutants on materials below which no deterioration occurs. Material deterioration by weathering is normally a very slow process lasting some or more years. Therefore attempts have been made to produce deterioration in short-term experiments by using high stress levels. The limits for the high stress levels are given by the comparability of the obtained damage from artificially accelerated weathering with these from real natural weathering. To investigate the damage caused by air pollutants on polymeric materials, samples were natural weathered with some light exposed and some dark stored samples in different climatic and polluted areas of Germany. The weathering stations are closed to the continuously measuring stations for air quality

  17. Precious-metal-base advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowicki, T.; Carbonnaux, C.

    1993-01-01

    Precious metals constitute also the base of several advanced materials used in the industry in hundreds of metric tons. Platinum alloys have been used as structural materials for equipments in the glass industry. The essential reason for this is the excellent resistance of platinum alloys to oxidation and electrolytical corrosion in molten glasses at temperatures as high as 1200-1500 C. The major drawback is a weak creep resistance. The unique way for significant improvement of platinum base materials creep resistance is a strengthening by an oxide dispersion (ODS). In the case of CLAL's patented ''Plativer'' materials, 0.05 wt% of Y 2 O 3 is incorporated within the alloy matrix by the flame spraying process. Further improvement of platinum base materials is related, in the authors opinion, to the development of precious metals base intermetallics. Another interesting applications of precious metals are silver base electrical contacts. They are in fact silver matrix composites containing varying amounts of well-dispersed particles of constituents such as CdO, SnO 2 , Ni, WC or C. In the case of such materials, particular properties are required and tested : resistance to arc erosion, resistance to welding and contact resistance. Many other technically fascinating precious metals base materials exist: brazing alloys for assembling metals, superconductors and ceramics; dental materials including magnetic biocompatible alloys; silver composites for superconductor wire jackets. The observation of current evolution indicates very clearly that precious metals cannot be replaced by common metals because of their unique characteristics due to their atomic level properties

  18. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Materials and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, D. B.; Dost, E. F.; Flynn, B. W.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Nelson, K. M.; Sawicki, A. J.; Walker, T. H.; Lakes, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of Boeing's Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) program was to develop the technology required for cost and weight efficient use of composite materials in transport fuselage structure. This contractor report describes results of material and process selection, development, and characterization activities. Carbon fiber reinforced epoxy was chosen for fuselage skins and stiffening elements and for passenger and cargo floor structures. The automated fiber placement (AFP) process was selected for fabrication of monolithic and sandwich skin panels. Circumferential frames and window frames were braided and resin transfer molded (RTM'd). Pultrusion was selected for fabrication of floor beams and constant section stiffening elements. Drape forming was chosen for stringers and other stiffening elements. Significant development efforts were expended on the AFP, braiding, and RTM processes. Sandwich core materials and core edge close-out design concepts were evaluated. Autoclave cure processes were developed for stiffened skin and sandwich structures. The stiffness, strength, notch sensitivity, and bearing/bypass properties of fiber-placed skin materials and braided/RTM'd circumferential frame materials were characterized. The strength and durability of cocured and cobonded joints were evaluated. Impact damage resistance of stiffened skin and sandwich structures typical of fuselage panels was investigated. Fluid penetration and migration mechanisms for sandwich panels were studied.

  19. Methods For Improving Polymeric Materials For Use In Solar Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2003-07-01

    A method of manufacturing a solar cell module includes the use of low cost polymeric materials with improved mechanical properties. A transparent encapsulant layer is placed adjacent a rear surface of a front support layer. Interconnected solar cells are positioned adjacent a rear surface of the transparent encapsulant layer to form a solar cell assembly. A backskin layer is placed adjacent a rear surface of the solar cell assembly. At least one of the transparent encapsulant layer and the backskin layer are predisposed to electron beam radiation.

  20. Magnetite Core-Shell Nanoparticles in Nondestructive Flaw Detection of Polymeric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetti, Mimi; Wei, Qiang; Pohl, Rainer; Casperson, Ralf; Bartusch, Matthias; Neu, Volker; Pospiech, Doris; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-10-04

    Nondestructive flaw detection in polymeric materials is important but difficult to achieve. In this research, the application of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) in nondestructive flaw detection is studied and realized, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time. Superparamagnetic and highly magnetic (up to 63 emu/g) magnetite core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by grafting bromo-end-group-functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (Br-PGMA) onto surface-modified Fe 3 O 4 NPs. These Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs are blended into bisphenol A diglycidylether (BADGE)-based epoxy to form homogeneously distributed magnetic epoxy nanocomposites (MENCs) after curing. The core Fe 3 O 4 of the Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs endows the MENCs with magnetic property, which is crucial for nondestructive flaw detection of the materials, while the shell PGMA promotes colloidal stability and prevents NP aggregation during curing. The eddy current testing (ET) technique is first applied to detect flaws in the MENCs. Through the brightness contrast of the ET image, surficial and subsurficial flaws in MENCs can be detected, even for MENCs with low content of Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs (1 wt %). The incorporation of Fe 3 O 4 -PGMA NPs can be easily extended to other polymer and polymer-based composite systems and opens a new and very promising pathway toward MNP-based nondestructive flaw detection in polymeric materials.

  1. Preparation and characterization of nano hydroxyapatite/polymeric composites materials. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Khaled R., E-mail: kh_rezk1966@yahoo.com [Biomaterials Dept., National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); El-Rashidy, Zenab M. [Biomaterials Dept., National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Salama, Aida A. [Biophysics Dept., Faulty of Science, El-Azhar Univ., Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} The formation and coating of CHA increased by increasing polymer content. {yields} The size of the prepared CHA was within nano-range scale. {yields} The composites had homogeneity and CHA formed within the polymeric matrix. - Abstract: The present study is focused on preparation of nano composite materials and the effect of citric acid on their different properties. The formation of nano HA and its interaction with chitosan (C), gelatin (G) polymers and citric acid (CA) materials were studied. The Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to characterize these composite materials. The compressive strength (CS) was also measured to know the reinforcement of the prepared composites. The results show that carboxylic and amino groups play crucial role for HA formation on chitosan-gelatin polymeric matrix in the presence of citric acid (CA). The formation of nano HA particles and its average size of crystallite is increased with increase of CG content and decreased with addition of CA. Also, the HA formation and binding strength between its particles are improved into the composites especially with CA. The nano-composites containing the best ratio of nHA (70%) with CA (0.2 M) are promising for medical applications in the future.

  2. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2005-03-01

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division

  3. Advanced Materials and Devices for Bioresorbable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seung-Kyun; Koo, Jahyun; Lee, Yoon Kyeung; Rogers, John A

    2018-05-15

    Recent advances in materials chemistry establish the foundations for unusual classes of electronic systems, characterized by their ability to fully or partially dissolve, disintegrate, or otherwise physically or chemically decompose in a controlled fashion after some defined period of stable operation. Such types of "transient" technologies may enable consumer gadgets that minimize waste streams associated with disposal, implantable sensors that disappear harmlessly in the body, and hardware-secure platforms that prevent unwanted recovery of sensitive data. This second area of opportunity, sometimes referred to as bioresorbable electronics, is of particular interest due to its ability to provide diagnostic or therapeutic function in a manner that can enhance or monitor transient biological processes, such as wound healing, while bypassing risks associated with extended device load on the body or with secondary surgical procedures for removal. Early chemistry research established sets of bioresorbable materials for substrates, encapsulation layers, and dielectrics, along with several options in organic and bio-organic semiconductors. The subsequent realization that nanoscale forms of device-grade monocrystalline silicon, such as silicon nanomembranes (m-Si NMs, or Si NMs) undergo hydrolysis in biofluids to yield biocompatible byproducts over biologically relevant time scales advanced the field by providing immediate routes to high performance operation and versatile, sophisticated levels of function. When combined with bioresorbable conductors, dielectrics, substrates, and encapsulation layers, Si NMs provide the basis for a broad, general class of bioresorbable electronics. Other properties of Si, such as its piezoresistivity and photovoltaic properties, allow other types of bioresorbable devices such as solar cells, strain gauges, pH sensors, and photodetectors. The most advanced bioresorbable devices now exist as complete systems with successful demonstrations of

  4. Recent advances in membrane materials: introductory remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayral, A.

    2007-01-01

    A lot of separation operations are currently performed using membranes both for production processes and for environmental applications. The main part of the used membranes are organic membranes but for specific conditions of utilization inorganic or organic-inorganic membranes have been also developed. Among the applications for gas separation, some examples are the removal of hydrogen from ammonia synthesis gas, the removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas and air separation. Environmental considerations like massive scale air and water pollution and also the gradual rarefaction of fossil energy resources gave rise to the concept of sustainable growth and to related strategies like process intensification, the reuse of water and solvents at their point of use, hydrogen as energy vector (requiring H 2 production...)..Membranes will have a key part to play in the new technologies associated with these strategies. Intensive efforts of research and development are now engaged everywhere in the world to develop high performance membranes for those emerging applications. Membrane science is a multidisciplinary scientific and technological domain covering mainly materials science, physical chemistry, chemical engineering, modeling. This issue (Annales de chimie - Science des materiaux, 2007 Vol.32 N.2) provides a wide review of recent advances in membrane materials. It is based on the contributions of experts in different fields of membrane materials (organic, organic-inorganic hybrid, composite, carbon, metallic, ceramic; dense, porous, surface modified materials). (O.M.)

  5. Advances in Integrated Computational Materials Engineering "ICME"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jürgen

    The methods of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering that were developed and successfully applied for Aluminium have been constantly improved. The main aspects and recent advances of integrated material and process modeling are simulations of material properties like strength and forming properties and for the specific microstructure evolution during processing (rolling, extrusion, annealing) under the influence of material constitution and process variations through the production process down to the final application. Examples are discussed for the through-process simulation of microstructures and related properties of Aluminium sheet, including DC ingot casting, pre-heating and homogenization, hot and cold rolling, final annealing. New results are included of simulation solution annealing and age hardening of 6xxx alloys for automotive applications. Physically based quantitative descriptions and computer assisted evaluation methods are new ICME methods of integrating new simulation tools also for customer applications, like heat affected zones in welding of age hardening alloys. The aspects of estimating the effect of specific elements due to growing recycling volumes requested also for high end Aluminium products are also discussed, being of special interest in the Aluminium producing industries.

  6. The diffusion bonding of advanced material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.I.

    2001-01-01

    As a joining process diffusion bonding has been used since early periods, and artifacts have been found which date back to 3000 years. However, over the last 20 years this joining process has been rediscovered and research has been carried out to understand the mechanisms of the process, and the application of the technique to advanced materials. This paper will review some of the reasons to why diffusion bonding may be preferred over other more conventional welding processes to join advanced alloy systems. It also describes in brief the different types of bonding processes, namely, solid-state and liquid phase bonding techniques. The paper demonstrates the application of diffusion bonding processes to join a range of dissimilar materials for instance: oxide dispersion strengthened superalloys, titanium to duplex stainless steels and engineering ceramics such as Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ to metal alloys. The research work highlights the success and limitations of the diffusion bonding process and is based on the experience of the author and his colleagues. (author)

  7. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaghiele, Marta; Demitri, Christian; Sannino, Alessandro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair), which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  8. Polymeric hydrogels for burn wound care: Advanced skin wound dressings and regenerative templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Madaghiele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound closure represents a primary goal in the treatment of very deep and/or large wounds, for which the mortality rate is particularly high. However, the spontaneous healing of adult skin eventually results in the formation of epithelialized scar and scar contracture (repair, which might distort the tissues and cause lifelong deformities and disabilities. This clinical evidence suggests that wound closure attained by means of skin regeneration, instead of repair, should be the true goal of burn wound management. The traditional concept of temporary wound dressings, able to stimulate skin healing by repair, is thus being increasingly replaced by the idea of temporary scaffolds, or regenerative templates, able to promote healing by regeneration. As wound dressings, polymeric hydrogels provide an ideal moisture environment for healing while protecting the wound, with the additional advantage of being comfortable to the patient, due to their cooling effect and non-adhesiveness to the wound tissue. More importantly, recent advances in regenerative medicine demonstrate that bioactive hydrogels can be properly designed to induce at least partial skin regeneration in vivo. The aim of this review is to provide a concise insight on the key properties of hydrogels for skin healing and regeneration, particularly highlighting the emerging role of hydrogels as next generation skin substitutes for the treatment of full-thickness burns.

  9. Surviving the space environment - An overview of advanced materials and structures development at the CWRU CCDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John F.; Zdankiewicz, Edward M.; Schmidt, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    The development of advanced materials and structures for long-term use in space is described with specific reference given to applications to the Space Station Freedom and the lunar base. A flight-testing program is described which incorporates experiments regarding the passive effects of space travel such as material degradation with active materials experiments such as the Materials Exposure Flight Experiment. Also described is a research and development program for materials such as organic coatings and polymeric composites, and a simulation laboratory is described which permits the analysis of materials in the laboratory. The methods of investigation indicate that the NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space facilitates the understanding of material degradation in space.

  10. Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical steam turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgert, Robert [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Shingledecker, John [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Saha, Deepak [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Thangirala, Mani [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Booras, George [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Powers, John [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Riley, Colin [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Hendrix, Howard [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have sponsored a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired power plants capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction for boilers and for steam turbines. The overall project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F)/35MPa (5000 psi). This final technical report covers the research completed by the General Electric Company (GE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), with support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) – Albany Research Center, to develop the A-USC steam turbine materials technology to meet the overall project goals. Specifically, this report summarizes the industrial scale-up and materials property database development for non-welded rotors (disc forgings), buckets (blades), bolting, castings (needed for casing and valve bodies), casting weld repair, and casting to pipe welding. Additionally, the report provides an engineering and economic assessment of an A-USC power plant without and with partial carbon capture and storage. This research project successfully demonstrated the materials technology at a sufficient scale and with corresponding materials property data to enable the design of an A-USC steam turbine. The key accomplishments included the development of a triple-melt and forged Haynes 282 disc for bolted rotor construction, long-term property development for Nimonic 105 for blading and bolting, successful scale-up of Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 castings using

  11. The Polymerization of MMA and ST to Prepare Material with Gradient Refractive Index in Electric Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering material with gradient refractive index was prepared under the electrical field by taking methyl methacrylate (MMA monomer as the matrix with the addition of a little preheated styrene (ST and peroxidation benzoin formyl (BPO. The material obtained under electrical field presented different transmittance and molecular weight at different parts of the cylindrical sample along the axis of the direction of electric field which led to the layering phenomenon and gradient refractive index. The disparity of molecular weight between different layers can be as much as 230 thousand. There were several peaks in the figure of GPC test of the sample under electric field. This proved that there were polymers with different molecular weights in the sample. Therefore, it can be concluded that electrical field has a significant effect on polymerization.

  12. The Effect of Plasma Surface Treatment on a Porous Green Ceramic Film with Polymeric Binder Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun Jeong Woo

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and energy during thermal binder removal in the ceramic process, plasma surface treatment was applied before the lamination process. The adhesion strength in the lamination films was enhanced by oxidative plasma treatment of the porous green ceramic film with polymeric binding materials. The oxygen plasma characteristics were investigated through experimental parameters and weight loss analysis. The experimental results revealed the need for parameter analysis, including gas material, process time, flow rate, and discharge power, and supported a mechanism consisting of competing ablation and deposition processes. The weight loss analysis was conducted for cyclic plasma treatment rather than continuous plasma treatment for the purpose of improving the film's permeability by suppressing deposition of the ablated species. The cyclic plasma treatment improved the permeability compared to the continuous plasma treatment.

  13. Functional materials in amperometric sensing polymeric, inorganic, and nanocomposite materials for modified electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Seeber, Renato; Zanardi, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Amperometric sensors, biosensors included, particularly rely on suitable electrode materials. Progress in material science has led to a wide variety of options that are available today. For the first time, these novel functional electrode coating materials are reviewed in this monograph, written by and for electroanalytical chemists. This includes intrinsically conducting, redox and ion-exchange polymers, metal and carbon nanostructures, silica based materials. Monolayers and relatively thick films are considered. The authors critically discuss preparation methods, in addition to chemical and

  14. Advanced materials for integrated optical waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Tong Ph D, Xingcun Colin

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to integrated optical waveguides for information technology and data communications. Integrated coverage ranges from advanced materials, fabrication, and characterization techniques to guidelines for design and simulation. A concluding chapter offers perspectives on likely future trends and challenges. The dramatic scaling down of feature sizes has driven exponential improvements in semiconductor productivity and performance in the past several decades. However, with the potential of gigascale integration, size reduction is approaching a physical limitation due to the negative impact on resistance and inductance of metal interconnects with current copper-trace based technology. Integrated optics provides a potentially lower-cost, higher performance alternative to electronics in optical communication systems. Optical interconnects, in which light can be generated, guided, modulated, amplified, and detected, can provide greater bandwidth, lower power consumption, ...

  15. Advanced neutron source materials surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavilin, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be composed of several different materials, one of which is 6061-T6 aluminum. Among other components, the reflector vessel and the core pressure boundary tube (CPBT), are to be made of 6061-T6 aluminum. These components will be subjected to high thermal neutron fluences and will require a surveillance program to monitor the strength and fracture toughness of the 6061-T6 aluminum over their lifetimes. The purpose of this paper is to explain the steps that were taken in the summer of 1994 toward developing the surveillance program. The first goal was to decide upon standard specimens to use in the fracture toughness and tensile testing. Second, facilities had to be chosen for specimens representing the CPBT and the reflector vessel base, weld, and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) metals. Third, a timetable had to be defined to determine when to remove the specimens for testing

  16. Imidazolium-Based Polymeric Materials as Alkaline Anion-Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Reddy, Prakash V.; Nair, Nanditha

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes that conduct hydroxide ions have potential use in fuel cells. A variety of polystyrene-based quaternary ammonium hydroxides have been reported as anion exchange fuel cell membranes. However, the hydrolytic stability and conductivity of the commercially available membranes are not adequate to meet the requirements of fuel cell applications. When compared with commercially available membranes, polystyrene-imidazolium alkaline membrane electrolytes are more stable and more highly conducting. At the time of this reporting, this has been the first such usage for imidazolium-based polymeric materials for fuel cells. Imidazolium salts are known to be electrochemically stable over wide potential ranges. By controlling the relative ratio of imidazolium groups in polystyrene-imidazolium salts, their physiochemical properties could be modulated. Alkaline anion exchange membranes based on polystyrene-imidazolium hydroxide materials have been developed. The first step was to synthesize the poly(styrene-co-(1-((4-vinyl)methyl)-3- methylimidazolium) chloride through a free-radical polymerization. Casting of this material followed by in situ treatment of the membranes with sodium hydroxide solutions provided the corresponding hydroxide salts. Various ratios of the monomers 4-chloromoethylvinylbenzine (CMVB) and vinylbenzine (VB) provided various compositions of the polymer. The preferred material, due to the relative ease of casting the film, and its relatively low hygroscopic nature, was a 2:1 ratio of CMVB to VB. Testing confirmed that at room temperature, the new membranes outperformed commercially available membranes by a large margin. With fuel cells now in use at NASA and in transportation, and with defense potential, any improvement to fuel cell efficiency is a significant development.

  17. NATO Conference on Materials for Advanced Batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Broadhead, J; Steele, B

    1980-01-01

    The idea of a NATO Science Committee Institute on "Materials for Advanced Batteries" was suggested to JB and DWM by Dr. A. G. Chynoweth. His idea was to bring together experts in the field over the entire spectrum of pure research to applied research in order to familiarize everyone with potentially interesting new systems and the problems involved in their development. Dr. M. C. B. Hotz and Professor M. N. Ozdas were instrumental in helping organize this meeting as a NATO Advanced Science Institute. An organlzlng committee consisting of the three of us along with W. A. Adams, U. v Alpen, J. Casey and J. Rouxel organized the program. The program consisted of plenary talks and poster papers which are included in this volume. Nearly half the time of the conference was spent in study groups. The aim of these groups was to assess the status of several key aspects of batteries and prospects for research opportunities in each. The study groups and their chairmen were: Current status and new systems J. Broadhead Hig...

  18. Cladding and Duct Materials for Advanced Nuclear Recycle Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, Todd R.; Busby, J. T.; Klueh, R. L.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2008-01-01

    This is a review article that provides an overview of the reactor core structural materials and clad and duct needs for the GNEP advanced burner reactor design. A short history of previous research on structural materials for irradiation environments is provided. There is also a section describing some advanced materials that may be candidate materials for various reactor core structures

  19. Materials for advanced high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    Materials are studied in advanced applications of high temperature reactors: helium gas turbine and process heat. Long term creep behavior and corrosion tests are conducted in simulated HTR helium up to 1000 deg C with impurities additions in the furnace atmosphere. Corrosion studies on AISI 321 steels at 800-1000 deg C have shown that the O 2 partial pressure is as low as 10 -24+-3 atm, Ni and Fe cannot be oxidised above about 500 and 600 deg C, Cr cease to oxidise at 800 to 900 deg C and Ti at 900 to 1000 deg C depending on alloy composition γ' strengthened superalloys must depend on a protective corrosion mechanism assisted by the presence of Ti and possibly Cr. Carburisation has been identified metallographically in several high temperature materials: Hastelloy X and M21Z. Alloy TZM appears to be inert in HTR Helium at 900 and 1000 deg C. In alloy 800 and Inconel 625 surface cracks initiation is suppressed but crack propagation is accelerated but this was not apparent in AISI steels, Hastelloy X or fine grain Inconel at 750 deg C

  20. Advances in superconducting materials and electronics technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    Technological barriers blocking the early implementation of ceramic oxide high critical temperature [Tc] and LHe Nb based superconductors are slowly being dismantled. Spearheading these advances are mechanical engineers with diverse specialties and creative interests. As the technology expands, most engineers have recognized the importance of inter-disciplinary cooperation. Cooperation between mechanical engineers and material and system engineers is of particular importance. Recently, several problems previously though to be insurmountable, has been successfully resolved. These accomplishment were aided by interaction with other scientists and practitioners, working in the superconductor research and industrial communities, struggling with similar systems and materials problems. Papers published here and presented at the 1990 ASME Winter Annual Meeting held in Dallas, Texas 25-30 November 1990 can be used as a bellwether to gauge the progress in the development of both ceramic oxide and low temperature Nb superconducting device and system technologies. Topics are focused into two areas: mechanical behavior of high temperature superconductors and thermal and mechanical problems in superconducting electronics

  1. Advanced physical protection systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1975-10-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of terrorism, there is growing concern that nuclear materials and facilities need improved physical protection against theft, diversion, or sabotage. Physical protection systems for facilities or transportation which have balanced effectiveness include information systems, access denial systems, adequate and timely response, recovery capability, and use denial methods for despoiling special nuclear materials (SNM). The role of these elements in reducing societal risk is described; however, it is noted that, similar to nuclear war, the absolute risks of nuclear theft and sabotage are basically unquantifiable. Sandia Laboratories has a major Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) role in developing advanced physical protection systems for improving the security of both SNM and facilities. These activities are surveyed. A computer simulation model is being developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative physical protection systems under various levels of threat. Improved physical protection equipment such as perimeter and interior alarms, secure portals, and fixed and remotely-activated barriers is being developed and tested. In addition, complete prototype protection systems are being developed for representative nuclear facilities. An example is shown for a plutonium storage vault. The ERDA safe-secure transportation system for highway shipments of all significant quantities of government-owned SNM is described. Adversary simulation as a tool for testing and evaluating physical protection systems is discussed. A list of measures is given for assessing overall physical protection system performance. (auth)

  2. Advanced physical protection systems for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.E.

    1976-01-01

    Because of the increasing incidence of terrorism, there is growing concern that nuclear materials and facilities need improved physical protection against theft, diversion, or sabotage. Physical protection systems for facilities or transportation which have balanced effectiveness include information systems, access denial systems, adequate and timely response, recovery capability, and use denial methods for despoiling special nuclear materials (SNM). The role of these elements in reducing societal risk is described; however, it is noted that, similar to nuclear war, the absolute risks of nuclear theft and sabotage are basically unquantifiable. Sandia Laboratories has a major US Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) role in developing advanced physical protection systems for improving the security of both SNM and facilities. These activities are surveyed in this paper. A computer simulation model is being developed to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative physical protection systems under various levels of threat. Improved physical protection equipment such as perimeter and interior alarms, secure portals, and fixed and remotely activated barriers is being developed and tested. In addition, complete prototype protection systems are being developed for representative nuclear facilities. An example is shown for a plutonium storage vault. The ERDA safe-secure transportation system for highway shipments of all significant quantities of government-owned SNM is described. Adversary simulation as a tool for testing and evaluating physical protection systems is discussed. Finally, a list of measures is given for assessing overall physical protection system performance. (author)

  3. Advanced materials for thermal protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Sangvavann; Sherman, Andrew J.

    1996-03-01

    Reticulated open-cell ceramic foams (both vitreous carbon and silicon carbide) and ceramic composites (SiC-based, both monolithic and fiber-reinforced) were evaluated as candidate materials for use in a heat shield sandwich panel design as an advanced thermal protection system (TPS) for unmanned single-use hypersonic reentry vehicles. These materials were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration (CVD/CVI) and evaluated extensively for their mechanical, thermal, and erosion/ablation performance. In the TPS, the ceramic foams were used as a structural core providing thermal insulation and mechanical load distribution, while the ceramic composites were used as facesheets providing resistance to aerodynamic, shear, and erosive forces. Tensile, compressive, and shear strength, elastic and shear modulus, fracture toughness, Poisson's ratio, and thermal conductivity were measured for the ceramic foams, while arcjet testing was conducted on the ceramic composites at heat flux levels up to 5.90 MW/m2 (520 Btu/ft2ṡsec). Two prototype test articles were fabricated and subjected to arcjet testing at heat flux levels of 1.70-3.40 MW/m2 (150-300 Btu/ft2ṡsec) under simulated reentry trajectories.

  4. Synthesis and testing of a conducting polymeric composite material for lightning strike protection applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katunin, A.; Krukiewicz, K.; Turczyn, R.; Sul, P.; Łasica, A.; Catalanotti, G.; Bilewicz, M.

    2017-02-01

    Lightning strike protection is one of the important issues in the modern maintenance problems of aircraft. This is due to a fact that the most of exterior elements of modern aircraft is manufactured from polymeric composites which are characterized by isolating electrical properties, and thus cannot carry the giant electrical charge when the lightning strikes. This causes serious damage of an aircraft structure and necessity of repairs and tests before returning a vehicle to operation. In order to overcome this problem, usually metallic meshes are immersed in the polymeric elements. This approach is quite effective, but increases a mass of an aircraft and significantly complicates the manufacturing process. The approach proposed by the authors is based on a mixture of conducting and dielectric polymers. Numerous modeling studies which are based on percolation clustering using kinetic Monte Carlo methods, finite element modeling of electrical and mechanical properties, and preliminary experimental studies, allow achieving an optimal content of conducting particles in a dielectric matrix in order to achieve possibly the best electrical conductivity and mechanical properties, simultaneously. After manufacturing the samples with optimal content of a conducting polymer, mechanical and electrical characterization as well as high-voltage testing was performed. The application of such a material simplifies manufacturing process and ensures unique properties of aircraft structures, which allows for minimizing damage after lightning strike, as well as provide electrical bounding and grounding, interference shielding, etc. The proposed solution can minimize costs of repair, testing and certification of aircraft structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  5. Technological physics and special materials: wood-plastic composites obtained by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peteu, Gh.; Iliescu, V.

    1995-01-01

    General estimates and references are made in connection with the role of technological physics in obtaining materials with specific features. The first part of the paper presents the modification of weak wood essences as well as technological processes at bench-scale and semi industrial scale of wood-plastic composites, under various irradiation conditions. Two technological installations for the fabrication of wood-plastic composites on both scales with technical and practical specifications of their performances are presented. Experimental data for different wood-plastic composite systems using some local wood essences in combination with several polymer and copolymer systems are given. Impregnation and polymerization levels are mentioned for every specific system. The radiation dose rate and integrated dose are given for every experimental polymerization system. The features of the wood-plastic composites are compared with the initial wood essences. Finally, a few technical and economic assessments of wood-plastic composites and their implications in the domestic economy are presented. (author)

  6. Pin-on-disk apparatus for tribological studies of polymeric materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ølholm Larsen, Thomas; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Thorning, Bent

    2009-01-01

    polymeric materials under dry-sliding conditions. The different main parts of the apparatus are described in a way which partly explains the choice of construction and partly makes it possible to produce a similar apparatus. Furthermore, a limited amount of tribological data is presented mainly to exemplify......The purpose of this paper is to describe the construction of a custom-built pin-on-disk (POD) apparatus based on a simple design and on important guidelines. The POD apparatus is built as a part of the main author's PhD project. The apparatus is built at a low cost and is suited for testing...... weave. The data presented in this paper are limited since the main objective is to describe the construction of a POD apparatus. The paper is intended to be a source of inspiration for industrial or academic laboratories who want to establish their own tailor-suited tribological test-equipment, instead...

  7. National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) open facilities for scientific community: new methods for polymeric materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Cristiane A.; Santos, Ramon H.Z. dos; Bernardes, Juliana S.; Gouveia, Rubia F.

    2015-01-01

    National Nanotechnology Laboratory (LNNano) at the National Center for Energy and Materials (CNPEM) presents open facilities for scientific public in some areas. In this work will be discussed the facilities for mainly the polymeric community, as well as new methods for the characterization. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) surfaces were characterized by X-ray microtomography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results obtained by microtomography have shown that these surfaces present different contrasts when compared with the bulk. These differences are correlated with the formation of an oxidized layer at the polymer surface, which consequently have a greater X-ray attenuation. This hypothesis is confirmed by XPS, which shows LDPE surface layers are richer in carbonyl, carboxyl and vinyl groups than the bulk. This work presents that microtomography can be used as a new method for detection and characterization of polymer surface oxidation. (author)

  8. Broadband Terahertz Refraction Index Dispersion and Loss of Polymeric Dielectric Substrate and Packaging Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaharifar, E.; Pierce, R. G.; Islam, R.; Henderson, R.; Hsu, J. W. P.; Lee, Mark

    2018-01-01

    In the effort to push the high-frequency performance of electronic circuits and signal interconnects from millimeter waves to beyond 1 THz, a quantitative knowledge of complex refraction index values and dispersion in potential dielectric substrate, encapsulation, waveguide, and packaging materials becomes critical. Here we present very broadband measurements of the real and imaginary index spectra of four polymeric dielectric materials considered for use in high-frequency electronics: benzocyclobutene (BCB), polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), the photoresist SU-8, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Reflectance and transmittance spectra from 3 to 75 THz were made using a Fourier transform spectrometer on freestanding material samples. These data were quantitatively analyzed, taking into account multiple partial reflections from front and back surfaces and molecular bond resonances, where applicable, to generate real and imaginary parts of the refraction index as a function of frequency. All materials showed signatures of infrared active organic molecular bond resonances between 10 and 50 THz. Low-loss transmission windows as well as anti-window bands of high dispersion and loss can be readily identified and incorporated into high-frequency design models.

  9. Method of polymerizing ethylenically unsaturated materials by irradiation and composition for use therein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemcek, J.; Heap, N.

    1976-01-01

    This patent concerns photopolymerizable compositions consisting essentially of at least one polymerizable ethylenically unsaturated material and a photosensitive catalyst comprising (a) from 0.5 to 5 percent based on the ethylenically unsaturated material of at least one photosensitizer having the structure Ph(CO)C 2 A(CO)Ph, where Ph is phenyl, halogen-substituted phenyl, phenylene or halogen-substituted phenylene and A is a cyclic hydrocarbyl group, a halogen-substituted cyclic hydrocarbyl group, or a group of the formula X(NR)COCONRY, where X and Y each is hydrogen, a hydrocarbyl, or a halogen-substituted hydrocarbyl group, and (b) from 1 to 5 percent by weight based on the ethylenically unsaturated material of a reducing agent capable of reducing the photosensitizer when the photosensitizer is in an excited state. Also described is a process of preparing polymeric materials by irradiating the foregoing polymerizable composition at a wavelength capable of exciting the photosensitizer to an excited state

  10. Investigation of metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials for engineered barrier applications in nuclear-waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, R.E.

    1980-10-01

    An effort to develop licensable engineered barrier systems for the long-term (about 1000 yr) containment of nuclear wastes under conditions of deep continental geologic disposal has been underway at Pacific Northwest Laboratory since January 1979, under the auspices of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program. In the present work, the barrier system comprises the hard or structural elements of the package: the canister, the overpack(s), and the hole sleeve. A number of candidate metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials were put through mechanical, corrosion, and leaching screening tests to determine their potential usefulness in barrier-system applications. Materials demonstrating adequate properties in the screening tests will be subjected to more detailed property tests, and, eventually, cost/benefit analyses, to determine their ultimate applicability to barrier-system design concepts. The following materials were investigated: two titanium alloys of Grade 2 and Grade 12; 300 and 400 series stainless steels, Inconels, Hastelloy C-276, titanium, Zircoloy, copper-nickel alloys and cast irons; total of 14 ceramic materials, including two grades of alumina, plus graphite and basalt; and polymers such as polyamide-imide, polyarylene, polyimide, polyolefin, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, fluoropolymer, epoxy, furan, silicone, and ethylene-propylene terpolymer (EPDM) rubber. The most promising candidates for further study and potential use in engineered barrier systems were found to be rubber, filled polyphenylene sulfide, fluoropolymer, and furan derivatives

  11. Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liby, Alan L [ORNL; Rogers, Hiram [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    The goal of this activity was to carry out program implementation and technical projects in support of the ARRA-funded Advanced Materials in Support of EERE Needs to Advance Clean Energy Technologies Program of the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) (formerly the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP)). The work was organized into eight projects in four materials areas: strategic materials, structural materials, energy storage and production materials, and advanced/field/transient processing. Strategic materials included work on titanium, magnesium and carbon fiber. Structural materials included work on alumina forming austentic (AFA) and CF8C-Plus steels. The advanced batteries and production materials projects included work on advanced batteries and photovoltaic devices. Advanced/field/transient processing included work on magnetic field processing. Details of the work in the eight projects are available in the project final reports which have been previously submitted.

  12. Affects of Microgravity on the Polymerization and Material Properties of Biomedical Grade Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah J.

    2002-01-01

    the material of choice in the production of acetabular cups for hip and tibial cradles for knee orthopeadic implant components for over 30 years. Although UHMWPE is used for more than 1.5 million implants a year in the United States alone and more than 3 million implant surgeries a year worldwide, problems with debris particle formation, pitting and fracture continue to induce premature failure of implant components. chains produced during polymerization are capable of packing into crystalline structures called lamellae, which are embedded within randomly oriented amorphous regions. Crosslinks, or tie molecules bridge the crystalline structures, which contribute to the materials' toughness and strength as a biomedical material. Research has been conducted providing evidence that a crosslinked gradient at the articulating surface of the polymer component provides resistance to surface degradation and subsequent debris formation. Recently, the introduction of highly crosslinked UHMWPE had proven to reduce some of the problems associated with the applications of this polymer as a biomedical material and was seen as the answer to solving the continuing problems associated with UHMWPE implant components. Yet current research into the fatigue characteristics of highly crosslinked UHMWPE has shown that subsurface crack propagation and subsequent delamination continues to produce problematic debris generation. Studies have shown that various sterilization and accelerated aging (to emulate natural oxidation rates) protocols adversely effects the material properties. Additional research has shown that alignment of the lamellae, caused by processing technique, fabrication or surface articulation may be the precursor to debris particle formation. Processing techniques performed under high pressure has proven to effect the width of the crystalline lamellae and therefore, the material's response to wear and fracture. UHMWP due to a microgravity environment, which could be

  13. Evaluation of the in vitro biocompatibility of polymeric materials for the regeneration of cutaneous tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero Castellanos, A.

    2016-01-01

    The problems associated with medical cases of functional tissue loss or organ failure are destructive and expensive, even more frequent than could be perceived, sometime if not properly treated, even deathly. Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that emerged to address these clinical problems, it is based on researching and development of biomaterials that have evolved along with areas such as cell biology, molecular and materials science and engineering. Today, the technique is based on seeding cells onto prefabricated scaffold biomaterials, like the hydrogels, that are three-dimensional networks with hydrophilic properties. These materials are characterized as being porous and sticky, favoring the support for the proliferation of certain cells in order to lead the regeneration of injured tissue. As a prerequisite for the use of materials in tissue engineering is testing biocompatibility which is the ability of the bio material to allow contact with any tissue, existing a favorable host response, accepting it as their own and restoring previously lost function. The first step for evaluating biocompatibility is to perform the in vitro assays. These assays have been demonstrated more reproducibility and predictability than in vivo assays, therefore the in vitro assays are used to produce high quality scaffolds and testing on animals as less as possible. This test is essential to establish the benefits and limitations of biomaterials tested in order to improve the scaffolds. This work will focus on assessing the biocompatibility of three polymeric materials with potential use in tissue engineering by means of cytological compatibility tests and hemo compatibility tests. Furthermore, disinfection techniques and gamma sterilization were evaluated to produce sterile materials that can be used in tissue engineering. (Author)

  14. Micromechanical Properties of a New Polymeric Microcapsule for Self-Healing Cementitious Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyang Lv

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-healing cementitious materials containing a microencapsulated healing agent are appealing due to their great application potential in improving the serviceability and durability of concrete structures. In this study, poly(phenol–formaldehyde (PF microcapsules that aim to provide a self-healing function for cementitious materials were prepared by an in situ polymerization reaction. Size gradation of the synthesized microcapsules was achieved through a series of sieving processes. The shell thickness and the diameter of single microcapsules was accurately measured under environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. The relationship between the physical properties of the synthesized microcapsules and their micromechanical properties were investigated using nanoindentation. The results of the mechanical tests show that, with the increase of the mean size of microcapsules and the decrease of shell thickness, the mechanical force required to trigger the self-healing function of microcapsules increased correspondingly from 68.5 ± 41.6 mN to 198.5 ± 31.6 mN, featuring a multi-sensitive trigger function. Finally, the rupture behavior and crack surface of cement paste with embedded microcapsules were observed and analyzed using X-ray computed tomography (XCT. The synthesized PF microcapsules may find potential application in self-healing cementitious materials.

  15. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: Macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentovich Elad D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Method Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Results and conclusions One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC, which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  16. DNA-nanoparticle assemblies go organic: macroscopic polymeric materials with nanosized features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentovich, Elad D; Livanov, Konstantin; Prusty, Deepak K; Sowwan, Mukules; Richter, Shachar

    2012-05-30

    One of the goals in the field of structural DNA nanotechnology is the use of DNA to build up 2- and 3-D nanostructures. The research in this field is motivated by the remarkable structural features of DNA as well as by its unique and reversible recognition properties. Nucleic acids can be used alone as the skeleton of a broad range of periodic nanopatterns and nanoobjects and in addition, DNA can serve as a linker or template to form DNA-hybrid structures with other materials. This approach can be used for the development of new detection strategies as well as nanoelectronic structures and devices. Here we present a new method for the generation of unprecedented all-organic conjugated-polymer nanoparticle networks guided by DNA, based on a hierarchical self-assembly process. First, microphase separation of amphiphilic block copolymers induced the formation of spherical nanoobjects. As a second ordering concept, DNA base pairing has been employed for the controlled spatial definition of the conjugated-polymer particles within the bulk material. These networks offer the flexibility and the diversity of soft polymeric materials. Thus, simple chemical methodologies could be applied in order to tune the network's electrical, optical and mechanical properties. One- two- and three-dimensional networks have been successfully formed. Common to all morphologies is the integrity of the micelles consisting of DNA block copolymer (DBC), which creates an all-organic engineered network.

  17. Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for a PMMA/glass Concentrator Photovoltaic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Kempe, Michael D.; Muller, Matthew T; Gray, Matthew H.; Araki, Kenji; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2014-04-08

    The durability of polymeric encapsulation materials was examined using outdoor exposure at the nominal geometric concentration of 500 suns. The results for 36 months cumulative field deployment are presented for materials including: poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate), (EVA); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); ionomer; polyethylene/ polyoctene copolymer (PO); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS); poly(diphenyl dimethyl siloxane) (PDPDMS); and poly(phenyl-methyl siloxane) (PPMS). Measurements of the field conditions including ambient temperature and ultraviolet (UV) dose were recorded at the test site during the experiment. Measurements for the experiment included optical transmittance (with subsequent analysis of solar-weighted transmittance, UV cut-off wavelength, and yellowness index), mass, visual photography, photoelastic imaging, and fluorescence spectroscopy. While the results to date for EVA are presented and discussed, examination here focuses more on the siloxane materials. A specimen recently observed to fail by thermal decomposition is discussed in terms of the implementation of the experiment as well as its fluorescence signature, which was observed to become more pronounced with age. Modulated thermogravimetry (allowing determination of the activation energy of thermal decomposition) was performed on a subset of the siloxanes to quantify the propensity for decomposition at elevated temperatures. Supplemental, Pt-catalyst- and primer-solutions as well as peroxide-cured PDMS specimens were examined to assess the source of the luminescence. The results of the study including the change in optical transmittance, observed failure modes, and subsequent analyses of the failure modes are described in the conclusions.

  18. 3D printing processes for photocurable polymeric materials: technologies, materials, and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Gabriele; Sciancalepore, Corrado; Messori, Massimo; Bondioli, Federica

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this review is a faithful report of the panorama of solutions adopted to fabricate a component using vat photopolymerization (VP) processes. A general overview on additive manufacturing and on the different technologies available for polymers is given. A comparison between stereolithography and digital light processing is also presented, with attention to different aspects and to the advantages and limitations of both technologies. Afterward, a quick overview of the process parameters is given, with an emphasis on the necessities and the issues associated with the VP process. The materials are then explored, starting from base matrix materials to composites and nanocomposites, with attention to examples of applications and explanations of the main factors involved.

  19. An evaluation of the effect of various gloves on polymerization inhibition of elastomeric impression materials: An In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinuta Hiremath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Latex protective barriers such as gloves and rubber dam material have been used widely in restorative procedures for crown and bridge. However, the chemical used during latex glove fabrication is thought to inhibit the polymerization of elastomeric impression materials used for impression making which has a detrimental effect on the dimensional accuracy and surface definition of resultant casts used for restorative procedures. The objectives of the study were to examine the surface of different elastomeric impressions on contact with various gloves. Materials and Methods: This clinical study included a total of eighty specimens of two types of the putty elastomeric impression material were hand manipulated by wearing three different gloves materials and is placed on a marked area of a clean and alcohol-treated glass slab at room temperature. The specimens examined for any signs of polymerization inhibition. The specimen will be rated as being “inhibited” if any residue remains on the glass slab and absence of the above will result as “no inhibition.” Results: The results showed no interference with the polymerization inhibition of the selected elastomers followed by the nitrile glove. The latex gloves showed inhibited set of the elastomeric impression material but set after sometime confirming time-dependent inhibition of the impression material. Conclusion: This study shows that the use of latex and sometime nitrile gloves during crown and bridge procedures should be contraindicated and the use of vinyl gloves should be stressed when working with elastomeric impression materials.

  20. Engineered Materials for Advanced Gas Turbine Engine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop innovative composite powders and composites that will surpass the properties of currently identified materials for advanced gas turbine...

  1. An Evaluation of the Effect of Various Gloves on Polymerization Inhibition of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Vinuta; Vinayakumar, G; Ragher, Mallikarjuna; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Bembalagi, Mahantesh; Ashwini, B L

    2017-11-01

    Latex protective barriers such as gloves and rubber dam material have been used widely in restorative procedures for crown and bridge. However, the chemical used during latex glove fabrication is thought to inhibit the polymerization of elastomeric impression materials used for impression making which has a detrimental effect on the dimensional accuracy and surface definition of resultant casts used for restorative procedures. The objectives of the study were to examine the surface of different elastomeric impressions on contact with various gloves. This clinical study included a total of eighty specimens of two types of the putty elastomeric impression material were hand manipulated by wearing three different gloves materials and is placed on a marked area of a clean and alcohol-treated glass slab at room temperature. The specimens examined for any signs of polymerization inhibition. The specimen will be rated as being "inhibited" if any residue remains on the glass slab and absence of the above will result as "no inhibition." The results showed no interference with the polymerization inhibition of the selected elastomers followed by the nitrile glove. The latex gloves showed inhibited set of the elastomeric impression material but set after sometime confirming time-dependent inhibition of the impression material. This study shows that the use of latex and sometime nitrile gloves during crown and bridge procedures should be contraindicated and the use of vinyl gloves should be stressed when working with elastomeric impression materials.

  2. Advanced insider threat mitigation workshop instructional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Larsen, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O Brien, Mike [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edmunds, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Insiders represent a formidable threat to nuclear facilities. This set of workshop materials covers methodologies to analyze and approaches to mitigate the threat of an insider attempting abrupt and protracted theft of nuclear materials. This particular set of materials is a n update of a January 2008 version to add increased emphasis on Material Control and Accounting and its role with respect to protracted insider nuclear material theft scenarios.

  3. Flexible Polymeric Materials Prepared by Radiation Copolymerization of MMA/ Pyridene in the Presence of Acrylic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegazy, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation initiated copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and pyridine (Py) was carried out at room temperature.To improve the obtained copolymer functionality and molecular weight, acrylic acid (AA) was incorporated into the mixture during irradiation. The samples were characterized by thermal analysis techniques (DSC and TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-VIS spectrometry. Molecular weight of the obtained copolymers was determined using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The variation of refractive index and surface hardness with the molecular weight were also investigated. The results obtained show a decrease in glass transition temperature and the hardness (shore D) of the supporting matrix for P(MMA/Py) copolymers with a pronounced increase of the molecular weight. The addition of PAA into the matrix enhanced the hardness and shifts the glass transition temperature to a little higher temperature with a pronounced decrease in the melting temperature. The obtained materials maintain good structural order and flexibility resulting from the softening effect of pyridine onto MMA matrix. The studies performed made possible the selection of experimental conditions to be adequate for the production of new co polymeric materials with high molecular weight that having good flexibility and transparent properties.

  4. Crack initiation and propagation on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Domínguez Almaraz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack initiation and propagation have been investigated on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing. Three controlled actions were implemented in order to carry out fatigue tests at very high frequency on this material of low thermal conductivity, they are: a The applying load was low to limit heat dissipation at the specimen neck section, b The dimensions of testing specimen were small (but fitting the resonance condition, in order to restraint the temperature gradient at the specimen narrow section, c Temperature at the specimen neck section was restrained by immersion in water or oil during ultrasonic fatigue testing. Experimental results are discussed on the basis of thermo-mechanical behaviour: the tail phenomenon at the initial stage of fatigue, initial shear yielding deformation, crazed development on the later stage, plastic strain on the fracture surface and the transition from low to high crack growth rate. In addition, a numerical analysis is developed to evaluate the J integral of energy dissipation and the stress intensity factor K, with the crack length

  5. Advanced Magnetic Materials for Aircraft Power Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McHenry, Michael

    2003-01-01

    ... new materials with improved magnetic and mechanical properties at high temperature. The group worked on the refinement of existing soft bulk materials while conducting research on novel nanocrystalline magnets in parallel...

  6. New screening methodology for selection of polymeric materials for transdermal drug delivery devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Roberto P.

    As medical advances extend the human lifespan, the level of chronic illnesses will increase and thus straining the needs of the health care system that, as a result, governments will need to balance expenses without upsetting national budgets. Therefore, the selection of a precise and affordable drug delivery technology is seen as the most practical solution for governments, health care professionals, and consumers. Transdermal drug delivery patches (TDDP) are one of the best economical technologies that are favored by pharmaceutical companies and physicians alike because it offers fewer complications when compared to other delivery technologies. TDDP provides increased efficiency, safety and convenience for the patient. The TDDP segment within the US and Global drug delivery markets were valued at 5.6 and 12.7 billion respectively in 2009. TDDP is forecasted to reach $31.5 billion in 2015. The present TDDP technology involves the fabrication of a patch that consists of a drug embedded in a polymeric matrix. The diffusion coefficient is determined from the slope of the cumulative drug release versus time. It is a trial and error method that is time and labor consuming. With all the advantages that TDDPs can offer, the methodology used to achieve the so-called optimum design has resulted in several incidents where the safety and design have been put to question in recent times (e.g. Fentanyl). A more logical screening methodology is needed. This work shows the use of a modified Duda Zielinsky equation (DZE). Experimental release curves from commercial are evaluated. The experimental and theoretical Diffusion Coefficient values are found to be within the limits specified in the patent literature. One interesting finding is that the accuracy of the DZE is closer to experimental values when the type of Molecular Shape and Radius are used. This work shows that the modified DZE could be used as an excellent screening tool to determine the optimal polymeric matrices that

  7. Proceedings of the second international conference on advanced functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This conference deals with the functional materials which have been an essential enabling ingredient in the aerospace industry. Advanced functional materials coupled with he enormous possibilities of nanotechnology have the potential to revolutionize applications across several domains like infrastructure, aerospace, energy storage, advanced electronics and biomedical technology. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  8. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh NQ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nguyen Quoc Vinh,1 Shigeyuki Naka,1 Horacio Cabral,2 Hiroyuki Murayama,1 Sachiko Kaida,1 Kazunori Kataoka,2 Shigehiro Morikawa,3 Tohru Tani4 1Department of Surgery, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; 2Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Nursing, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; 4Biomedical Innovation Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexaneplatinum(II (DACHPt] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or

  9. Advanced Insider Threat Mitigation Workshop Instructional Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Philip [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Larsen, Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Brien, Mike [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edmunds, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Insiders represent a formidable threat to nuclear facilities. This set of workshop materials covers methodologies to analyze and approaches to mitigate the threat of an insider attempting abrupt and protracted theft of nuclear materials. This particular set of materials is an update of a January 2008 version to add increased emphasis on Material Control and Accounting and its role with respect to protracted insider nuclear material theft scenarios. This report is a compilation of workshop materials consisting of lectures on technical and administrative measures used in Physical Protection (PP) and Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) and methods for analyzing their effectiveness against a postulated insider threat. The postulated threat includes both abrupt and protracted theft scenarios. Presentation is envisioned to be through classroom instruction and discussion. Several practical and group exercises are included for demonstration and application of the analysis approach contained in the lecture/discussion sessions as applied to a hypothetical nuclear facility.

  10. Recent advances in multi-layer composite polymeric membranes for CO2 separation: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongde Dai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of multilayer composite membranes for CO2 separation has gained increasing attention due to the desire for energy efficient technologies. Multilayer composite membranes have many advantages, including the possibility to optimize membrane materials independently by layers according to their different functions and to reduce the overall transport resistance by using ultrathin selective layers, and less limitations on the material mechanical properties and processability. A comprehensive review is required to capture details of the progresses that have already been achieved in developing multilayer composite membranes with improved CO2 separation performance in the past 15–20 years. In this review, various composite membrane preparation methods were compared, advances in composite membranes for CO2/CH4 separation, CO2/N2 and CO2/H2 separation were summarized with detailed data, and challenges facing for the CO2 separation using composite membranes, such as aging, plasticization and long-term stability, were discussed. Finally the perspectives and future research directions for composite membranes were presented. Keywords: Composite membrane, CO2 separation, Membrane fabrication, Membrane aging, Long-term stability

  11. Recent advances in protein and Peptide drug delivery: a special emphasis on polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly em- ployed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transder mal, and ocular administrations.

  12. Nanocomposites as Advanced Materials for Aerospace Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George PELIN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymer nanocomposites, consisting of nanoparticles dispersed in polymer matrix, have gained interest due to the attractive properties of nanostructured fillers, as carbon nanotubes and layered silicates. Low volume additions (1- 5% of nanoparticles provide properties enhancements comparable to those achieved by conventional loadings (15- 40% of traditional fillers.Structural nanocomposites represent reinforcement structures based on carbon or glass fibers embedded into polymeric matrix modified with nanofillers.Structural composites are the most important application of nanaocomposites, in aerospace field, as, laminates and sandwich structures. Also, they can by used as anti-lightning, anti-radar protectors and paints. The paper presents the effects of sonic dispersion of carbon nanotubes and montmorrilonite on the mechanical, electrical, rheological and trybological properties of epoxy polymers and laminated composites, with carbon or glass fiber reinforcement, with nanoadditivated epoxy matrix. One significant observation is that nanoclay contents higher than 2% wt generate an increase of the resin viscosity, from 1500 to 50000- 100000 cP, making the matrix impossible to use in high performance composites.Also, carbon nanotubes provide the resin important electrical properties, passing from dielectric to semi- conductive class. These effects have also been observed for fiber reinforced composites.Contrarily to some opinions in literature, the results of carbon nanotubes or nanoclays addition on the mechanical characteristics of glass or carbon fiber composites seem to be rather low.

  13. Design and fabrication hazard stakes golf course polymeric foam material empty bunch (EFB) fiber reinforced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfahmi; Syam, B.; Wirjosentono, B.

    2018-02-01

    A golf course with obstacles in the forms of water obstacle and lateral water obstacle marked with the stakes which are called golf course obstacle stake in this study. This study focused on the design and fabrication of the golf course obstacle stake with a solid cylindrical geometry using EFB fiber-reinforced polimeric foam composite materials. To obtain the EFB fiber which is free from fat content and other elements, EFB is soaked in the water with 1% (of the watre total volume) NaOH. The model of the mould designed is permanent mould that can be used for the further refabrication process. The mould was designed based on resin-compound paste materials with talc powder plus E-glass fiber to make the mould strong. The composition of polimeric foam materials comprised unsaturated resin Bqtn-Ex 157 (70%), blowing agent (10%), fiber (10%), and catalyst (10%). The process of casting the polimeric foam composit materials into the mould cavity should be at vertical casting position, accurate interval time of material stirring, and periodical casting. To find out the strength value of the golf course obstacle stake product, a model was made and simulated by using the software of Ansys workbench 14.0, an impact loading was given at the height of 400 mm and 460 mm with the variation of golf ball speed (USGA standard) v = 18 m/s, v = 35 m/s, v = 66.2 m/s, v = 70 m/s, and v = 78.2 m/s. The clarification showed that the biggest dynamic explicit loading impact of Fmax = 142.5 N at the height of 460 mm with the maximum golf ball speed of 78.2 m/s did not experience the hysteresis effect and inertia effect. The largest deformation area occurred at the golf ball speed v = 66.2 mm/s, that is 18.029 mm (time: 2.5514e-004) was only concentrated around the sectional area of contact point of impact, meaning that the golf course obstacle stakes made of EFB fiber-reinforced polymeric foam materials have the geometric functional strength that are able to absorb the energy of golf ball

  14. Concise N-doped Carbon Nanosheets/Vanadium Nitride Nanoparticles Materials via Intercalative Polymerization for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yongtao; Liu, Ying; Tang, Zhenghua; Wang, Zhe; Kong, Lingbin; Kang, Long; Liu, Zhen; Ran, Fen

    2018-02-13

    N-doped carbon nanosheets/vanadium nitride nanoparticles (N-CNS/VNNPs) are synthesized via a novel method combining surface-initiated in-situ intercalative polymerization and thermal-treatment process in NH 3 /N 2 atmosphere. The pH value of the synthesis system plays a critical role in constructing the structure and enhancing electrochemical performance for N-CNS/VNNPs, which are characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, and XPS, and measured by electrochemical station, respectively. The results show that N-CNS/VNNPs materials consist of 2D N-doped carbon nanosheets and 0D VN nanoparticles. With the pH value decreasing from 2 to 0, the sizes of both carbon nanosheets and VN nanoparticles decreased to smaller in nanoscale. The maximum specific capacitance of 280 F g -1 at the current density of 1 A g -1 for N-CNS/VNNPs is achieved in three-electrode configuration. The asymmetric energy device of Ni(OH) 2 ||N-CNS/VNNPs offers a specific capacitance of 89.6 F g -1 and retention of 60% at 2.7 A g -1 after 5000 cycles. The maximum energy density of Ni(OH) 2 ||N-CNS/VNNPs asymmetric energy device is as high as 29.5 Wh kg -1 .

  15. Barrier Properties of Polymeric Packaging Materials to Major Aroma Volatiles in Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelaphiwat Pattarin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the main transport coefficients (diffusion, solubility and permeability of key aroma compounds present in tropical herbs (eucalyptol and estragol through low‒density polyethylene (LDPE, polypropylene (PP, nylon (Nylon, polyethylene terephthalate (PET, metalized‒polyethylene terephthalate (MPET and poly(lactic acid (PLA films at 15 and 25 °C. The concentration of aroma compounds permeating through the films were evaluated at various time intervals using a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector (GC–FID. Results showed that the diffusion coefficients of aroma compounds were highest in LDPE whereas the solubility coefficients were highest in PLA at both temperatures. PLA had the highest permeability coefficients for estragol at both temperatures. PP and LDPE had the highest permeability coefficients for eucalyptol at 15 and 25 °C, respectively. MPET had the lowest permeability for both aroma compounds studied. Aroma barrier properties can be used when selecting polymeric packaging materials to prevent aroma loss in various food and consumer products.

  16. Recent developments in curcumin and curcumin based polymeric materials for biomedical applications: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Kashif; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Salman, Mahwish; Anjum, Muhammad Naveed

    2015-11-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a popular Indian spice that has been used for centuries in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety of ailments such as rheumatism, diabetic ulcers, anorexia, cough and sinusitis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid present in turmeric and responsible for its yellow color. Curcumin has been shown to possess significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, anticoagulant and anti-infective effects. This review summarizes and discusses recently published papers on the key biomedical applications of curcumin based materials. The highlighted studies in the review provide evidence of the ability of curcumin to show the significant vitro antioxidant, diabetic complication, antimicrobial, neuroprotective, anti-cancer activities and detection of hypochlorous acid, wound healing, treatment of major depression, healing of paracentesis, and treatment of carcinoma and optical detection of pyrrole properties. Hydrophobic nature of this polyphenolic compound along with its rapid metabolism, physicochemical and biological instability contribute to its poor bioavailability. To redress these problems several approaches have been proposed like encapsulation of curcumin in liposomes and polymeric micelles, inclusion complex formation with cyclodextrin, formation of polymer-curcumin conjugates, etc. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Removal of DLC film on polymeric materials by low temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daichi; Tanaka, Fumiyuki; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Sahara, Junki; Asai, Tomohiko; Hiratsuka, Masanori; Takatsu, Mikio; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2017-10-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin film has various excellent functions. For example, high hardness, abrasion resistance, biocompatibility, etc. Because of these functionalities, DLC has been applied in various fields. Removal method of DLC has also been developed for purpose of microfabrication, recycling the substrate and so on. Oxygen plasma etching and shot-blast are most common method to remove DLC. However, the residual carbon, high cost, and damage onto the substrate are problems to be solved for further application. In order to solve these problems, removal method using low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet has been developed in this work. The removal effect of this method has been demonstrated for DLC on the SUS304 substrate. The principle of this method is considered that oxygen radical generated by plasma oxidize carbon constituting the DLC film and then the film is removed. In this study, in order to widen application range of this method and to understand the mechanism of film removal, plasma irradiation experiment has been attempted on DLC on the substrate with low heat resistance. The DLC was removed successfully without any significant thermal damage on the surface of polymeric material.

  18. Vapor phase polymerization deposition of conducting polymer/graphene nanocomposites as high performance electrode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yajie; Li, Shibin; Zhang, Luning; Xu, Jianhua; Yang, Wenyao; Jiang, Yadong

    2013-05-22

    In this paper, we report chemical vapor phase polymerization (VPP) deposition of novel poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)/graphene nanocomposites as solid tantalum electrolyte capacitor cathode films. The PEDOT/graphene films were successfully prepared on porous tantalum pentoxide surface as cathode films through the VPP procedure. The results indicated that the high conductivity nature of PEDOT/graphene leads to the decrease of cathode films resistance and contact resistance between PEDOT/graphene and carbon paste. This nanocomposite cathode film based capacitor showed ultralow equivalent series resistance (ESR) ca. 12 mΩ and exhibited better capacitance-frequency performance than the PEDOT based capacitor. The leakage current investigation revealed that the device encapsulation process does not influence capacitor leakage current, indicating the excellent mechanical strength of PEDOT-graphene films. The graphene showed a distinct protection effect on the dielectric layer from possible mechanical damage. This high conductivity and mechanical strength graphene based conducting polymer nanocomposites indicated a promising application future for organic electrode materials.

  19. Cellular responses of bioabsorbable polymeric material and Guglielmi detachable coil in experimental aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Yuichi; Viñuela, Fernando; Tateshima, Satoshi; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Song, Joon K; Mahdavieh, Haleh; Iruela-Arispe, Luisa

    2002-04-01

    Acceleration of healing mechanisms is a promising approach to improve current limitations of endovascular aneurysm therapy with the use of platinum coils. We evaluated a new endovascular therapeutic, bioabsorbable polymeric material (BPM), which may promote cellular reaction in the aneurysms. Four different concentrations of lactide/glycolic acid copolymer [poly(D-L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)] (PLGA), 85/15, 75/25, 65/35, and 50/50, were used as BPMs. Sixteen experimental aneurysms were created in 8 swine. Eight-millimeter-long spiral-shaped BPMs were surgically implanted in the aneurysms without tight packing (n=3 for each BPM). Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs) were used as control (n=4). The animals were killed 14 days after embolization, and angiographic, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Despite loose packing of aneurysms with BPMs, faster BPMs such as 50/50 or 65/35 PLGA demonstrated more mature collagen formation and fibrosis in the sac and neck of the aneurysm. One aneurysm treated with 65/35 PLGA, 1 treated with 75/25 PLGA, and all 3 treated with 85/15 PLGA showed a neck remnant on angiography. There was a linear relationship between collagen levels and polymer degradation properties (r=-0.9513). This preliminary animal study indicates that acceleration of aneurysm healing with the use of BPM is feasible. This concept can be applied to decrease and perhaps prevent aneurysmal recanalization after endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms.

  20. Mechanical Behavior of Advanced Aerospace Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashbaugh, Noel

    1997-01-01

    .... For a gamma titanium aluminide alloy, the coarse and refined lamellar materials with colony sizes equal to 700 and 280 micrometers, respectively, have substantially greater crack growth resistance...

  1. Modeling the Behaviour of an Advanced Material Based Smart Landing Gear System for Aerospace Vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varughese, Byji; Dayananda, G. N.; Rao, M. Subba

    2008-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a substantial rise in the use of advanced materials such as polymer composites for aerospace structural applications. In more recent years there has been a concerted effort to integrate materials, which mimic biological functions (referred to as smart materials) with polymeric composites. Prominent among smart materials are shape memory alloys, which possess both actuating and sensory functions that can be realized simultaneously. The proper characterization and modeling of advanced and smart materials holds the key to the design and development of efficient smart devices/systems. This paper focuses on the material characterization; modeling and validation of the model in relation to the development of a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) based smart landing gear (with high energy dissipation features) for a semi rigid radio controlled airship (RC-blimp). The Super Elastic (SE) SMA element is configured in such a way that it is forced into a tensile mode of high elastic deformation. The smart landing gear comprises of a landing beam, an arch and a super elastic Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) SMA element. The landing gear is primarily made of polymer carbon composites, which possess high specific stiffness and high specific strength compared to conventional materials, and are therefore ideally suited for the design and development of an efficient skid landing gear system with good energy dissipation characteristics. The development of the smart landing gear in relation to a conventional metal landing gear design is also dealt with

  2. Advanced Mechanical Testing of Sandwich Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Jenstrup, Claus

    2008-01-01

    An advanced digital optical system has been used to measure surface strains on sandwich face and core specimens tested in a project concerned with improved criteria for designing sandwich X-joints. The face sheet specimens were of glass reinforced polyester and were tested in tension. The core sp...

  3. Materials science at an Advanced Hadron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.

    1988-01-01

    The uses of neutron scattering as a probe for condensed matter phenomena are described briefly and some arguments are given to justify the community's desire for more powerful neutron sources. Appropriate design parameters for a neutron source at an Advanced Hadron Facility are presented, and such a source is compared with other existing and planned spallation neutron sources. 5 refs

  4. Novel Polymeric Dielectric Materials for the Additive Manufacturing of Microwave Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Shamus E.

    The past decade has seen a rapid increase in the deployment of additive manufacturing (AM) due to the perceived benefits of lower cost, higher quality, and a smaller environmental footprint. And while the hardware behind most of AM processes is mature, the study and development of material feedstock(s) are in their infancy, particularly so for niche areas. In this dissertation, we look at novel polymeric materials to support AM for microwave devices. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the benefits of AM, followed by the specific motivation for this work, and finally a scope defining the core objectives. Chapter 2 delves into a higher-level background of dielectric theory and includes a brief overview of the two common dielectric spectroscopy techniques used in this work. The remaining chapters, summarized below, describe experiments in which novel polymeric materials were developed and their microwave dielectric properties measured. Chapter 3 describes the successful synthesis of polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE)/polyacrylate (PA) core-shell nanoparticles and their measured microwave dielectric properties. PTFE/PA core-shell nanoparticles with spherical morphology were successfully made by aerosol deposition followed by a brief annealing. The annealing temperature is closely controlled to exceed the glass transition (Tg) of the PA shell yet not exceed the Tg of the PTFE core. Furthermore, the annealing promotes coalescence amongst the PA shells of neighboring nanoparticles and results in the formation of a contiguous PA matrix that has excellent dispersion of PTFE cores. The measured dielectric properties agree well with theoretical predictions and suggest the potential of this material as a feedstock for AM microwave devices. Chapter 4 delves into the exploration of various polyimide systems with the aim of replacing the PA in the previously studied PTFE/PA core-shell nanoparticles. Fundamental relationships between polymer attributes (flexibility/rigidity and

  5. Materials of 13. conference: ATM'92 - Advanced materials and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    13th conference on metal science, modern materials and technologies (ATM'92) has been held in Popowo near Warsaw, Poland in September 1992. The conference has been divided into 9 sections. There are: Plenary section (7 lectures); Functional materials (12 lectures); Methods of material microstructure shaping (5 lectures and 14 posters); Surface engineering (5 lectures and 27 posters); Composites (5 lectures and 9 posters); Iron alloys A (7 lectures and 8 posters); Iron alloys B (7 lectures and 18 posters); Non-ferrous metal alloys (7 lectures and 11 posters) and Methods for materials research (5 lectures and 23 posters). The new materials preparation, their properties and structure as well as a methods for obtaining a desirable properties of material or their surface have been broadly referred and discussed

  6. Trends in a aerospace technology advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogren, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss recent trends in aerospace technology and to discuss as they relate to recent trends in the materials technologies. We shall do this within the framework of a large new activity that is, in fact, underway at the present, namely, MISSION TO THE PLANET EARTH. Mission requirements will be described in a hierarchical order. It will be shown that materials technology, in one form or another, is an identified critical technology for every single aspect of the mission. Other critical aspects exist, primarily in the areas of data processing and data management. International cooperation in aerospace-materials activities will be described. (author)

  7. Living Polycondensation: Synthesis of Well-Defined Aromatic Polyamide-Based Polymeric Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alyami, Mram Z.

    2016-01-01

    Chain growth condensation polymerization is a powerful tool towards the synthesis of well-defined polyamides. This thesis focuses on one hand, on the synthesis of well-defined aromatic polyamides with different aminoalkyl pendant groups with low

  8. Electrochromism for organic materials in polymeric all-solid-state systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yoshihiko; Tani, Chizuka

    1983-10-01

    This letter reports a new electrochromic polymeric film system consisting of a polymer, an electrochromic (EC) dye which is pyrazoline or tetrathiafulvalene (TTF), and lithium perchlorate (LiClO4). The electrochromic cell structure is glass/ITO/polymeric EC film/Au film. The cell using pyrazoline as an EC dye exhibited yellow coloration at 1.0 V and the cell with TTF exhibited red coloration at 3.5 V. These cells exhibited memory.

  9. Polymeric Luminescent Compositions Doped with Beta-Diketonates Boron Difluoride as Material for Luminescent Solar Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrebtov, A. A.; Fedorenko, E. V.; Reutov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we investigated polymeric luminescent compositions based on polystyrene doped with beta diketonates boron difluoride. Transparent films with effective absorption in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectrum were obtained. Polymeric luminescent compositions based on the mixture of dyes allow expanding the absorption region and increase the radiation shift. A luminescent solar concentrator consisting of a glass plate coated with such film can be used for photovoltaic window application.

  10. Automated Fiber Placement of Advanced Materials (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benson, Vernon M; Arnold, Jonahira

    2006-01-01

    .... ATK has been working with the Air Force Research Laboratory to foster improvements in the BMI materials and in the fiber placement processing techniques to achieve rates comparable to Epoxy placement rates...

  11. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  12. Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S.

    1998-05-07

    This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

  13. Advances in Materials for Recent Low-Profile Implantable Bioelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfei Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of micro/nanofabrication technologies to engineer a variety of materials has enabled new types of bioelectronics for health monitoring and disease diagnostics. In this review, we summarize widely used electronic materials in recent low-profile implantable systems, including traditional metals and semiconductors, soft polymers, biodegradable metals, and organic materials. Silicon-based compounds have represented the traditional materials in medical devices, due to the fully established fabrication processes. Examples include miniaturized sensors for monitoring intraocular pressure and blood pressure, which are designed in an ultra-thin diaphragm to react with the applied pressure. These sensors are integrated into rigid circuits and multiple modules; this brings challenges regarding the fundamental material’s property mismatch with the targeted human tissues, which are intrinsically soft. Therefore, many polymeric materials have been investigated for hybrid integration with well-characterized functional materials such as silicon membranes and metal interconnects, which enable soft implantable bioelectronics. The most recent trend in implantable systems uses transient materials that naturally dissolve in body fluid after a programmed lifetime. Such biodegradable metallic materials are advantageous in the design of electronics due to their proven electrical properties. Collectively, this review delivers the development history of materials in implantable devices, while introducing new bioelectronics based on bioresorbable materials with multiple functionalities.

  14. Advances in Materials for Recent Low-Profile Implantable Bioelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Soung; Tillman, Bryan W.; Chun, Youngjae

    2018-01-01

    The rapid development of micro/nanofabrication technologies to engineer a variety of materials has enabled new types of bioelectronics for health monitoring and disease diagnostics. In this review, we summarize widely used electronic materials in recent low-profile implantable systems, including traditional metals and semiconductors, soft polymers, biodegradable metals, and organic materials. Silicon-based compounds have represented the traditional materials in medical devices, due to the fully established fabrication processes. Examples include miniaturized sensors for monitoring intraocular pressure and blood pressure, which are designed in an ultra-thin diaphragm to react with the applied pressure. These sensors are integrated into rigid circuits and multiple modules; this brings challenges regarding the fundamental material’s property mismatch with the targeted human tissues, which are intrinsically soft. Therefore, many polymeric materials have been investigated for hybrid integration with well-characterized functional materials such as silicon membranes and metal interconnects, which enable soft implantable bioelectronics. The most recent trend in implantable systems uses transient materials that naturally dissolve in body fluid after a programmed lifetime. Such biodegradable metallic materials are advantageous in the design of electronics due to their proven electrical properties. Collectively, this review delivers the development history of materials in implantable devices, while introducing new bioelectronics based on bioresorbable materials with multiple functionalities. PMID:29596359

  15. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Halogen-Free Polymeric Materials on Nylon/Cotton Blend for Flame Retardant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection...BY-LAYER ASSEMBLY OF HALOGEN-FREE POLYMERIC MATERIALS ON NYLON/COTTON BLEND FOR FLAME RETARDANT APPLICATIONS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911NF-11-D-0001...Tensile strength and dynamic mechanical analysis. Malaysian Polymer Journal 2009; 4(2):52–61. 29. Hardin IR, Hsieh Y. Thermal conditions and

  16. Synthesis, characterization and polymerization of methacrylates of copper (II), cobalt (II) and molybdenum (II). Generation of new materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas Bolanos, Omar

    2006-01-01

    Coordination compounds of the species copper (II), cobalt (II) and molybdenum (II) with methacrylic acid were synthesized and characterized. Besides, it realized reactions of bromine addition to the doubles links of the species obtained previously, also too like reactions with dry HCl. Finally, it got hybrids materials by polymerization of the first compounds in an acrylic matrix. Research concluded with the characterization of all the products. (author) [es

  17. Operational advanced materials control and accountability system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanify, J.J.; Bearse, R.C.; Christensen, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    An accountancy system based on the Dynamic Materials Accountability (DYMAC) System has been in operation at the Plutonium Processing Facility at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) since January 1978. This system, now designated the Plutonium Facility/Los Alamos Safeguards System (PF/LASS), has enhanced nuclear material accountability and process control at the LASL facility. The nondestructive assay instruments and the central computer system are operating accurately and reliably. As anticipated, several uses of the system have developed in addition to safeguards, notably scrap control and quality control. The successes of this experiment strongly suggest that implementation of DYMAC-based systems should be attempted at other facilities. 20 refs

  18. Flow chemistry meets advanced functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rebecca M; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2014-09-22

    Flow chemistry and continuous processing techniques are beginning to have a profound impact on the production of functional materials ranging from quantum dots, nanoparticles and metal organic frameworks to polymers and dyes. These techniques provide robust procedures which not only enable accurate control of the product material's properties but they are also ideally suited to conducting experiments on scale. The modular nature of flow and continuous processing equipment rapidly facilitates reaction optimisation and variation in function of the products. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Recent advances in mass transport in materials

    CERN Document Server

    Ochsner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The present topical volume presents a representative cross-section of some recent advances made in the area of diffusion. The range of topics covered is very large, and, this reflects the enormous breadth of the topic of diffusion. The areas covered include diffusion in intermetallics, phenomenological diffusion theory, diffusional creep, kinetics of steel-making, diffusion in thin films, precipitation, diffusional phase transformations, atomistic diffusion simulations, epitaxial growth and diffusion in porous media. Review from Book News Inc.: In 13 invited and peer-reviewed papers, scientist

  20. Biocompatibility evaluations and biomedical sensing applications of nitric oxide-releasing/generating polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiduo

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent signaling molecule secreted by healthy vascular endothelial cells (EC) that is capable of inhibiting the activation and adhesion of platelets, preventing inflammation and inducing vasodilation. Polymeric materials that mimic the EC through the continuous release or generation of NO are expected to exhibit enhanced biocompatibility in vivo. In this dissertation research, the biocompatibility of novel NO-releasing/generating materials has been evaluated via both in vitro and in vivo studies. A new in vitro platelet adhesion assay has been designed to quantify platelet adhesion on NO-releasing/generating polymer surfaces via their innate lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) content. Using this assay, it was discovered that continuous NO fluxes of up to 7.05 x10-10 mol cm-2 min-1 emitted from the polymer surfaces could reduce platelet adhesion by almost 80%. Such an in vitro biocompatibility assay can be employed as a preliminary screening method in the development of new NO-releasing/generating materials. In addition, the first in vivo biocompatibility evaluation of NO-generating polymers was conducted in a porcine artery model for intravascular oxygen sensing catheters. The Cu(I)-catalyzed decomposition of endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) generated NO in situ at the polymer/blood interface and offered enhanced biocompatibility to the NO-generating catheters along with more accurate analytical results for intra-arterial measurements of PO2 levels. NO-generating polymers can also be utilized to fabricate electrochemical RSNO sensors based on the amperometric detection of NO generated by the reaction of RSNOs with immobilized catalysts. Unlike conventional methodologies employed to measure labile RSNO, the advantage of the RSNO sensor method is that measurement in whole blood samples is possible and this minimizes sample processing artifacts in RSNO measurements. An electrochemical RSNO sensor with organoselenium crosslinked polyethylenimine (RSe

  1. Preparation of epoxy/zirconia hybrid materials via in situ polymerization using zirconium alkoxide coordinated with acid anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Mitsukazu; Nii, Daisuke; Harada, Miyuki

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Novel epoxy/zirconia hybrid materials were synthesized via in situ polymerization using zirconium alkoxide coordinated with acid anhydride. → The half-ester compound of acid anhydride desorbed from zirconium played as curing agent of epoxy resin. → The zirconia was uniformly dispersed in the epoxy matrix on the nanometer or sub-nanometer scale by synchronizing the epoxy curing and sol-gel reactions. → The refractive indices of the hybrid materials significantly improved with an increase in the zirconia content. - Abstract: Novel epoxy/zirconia hybrid materials were synthesized using a bisphenol A epoxy resin (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; DGEBA), zirconium(IV)-n-propoxide (ZTNP), and hexahydrophthalic anhydride (HHPA) via in situ polymerization. HHPA played two roles in this system: it acted as a modifier to control the hydrolysis and condensation reactions of zirconium alkoxide and also as a curing agent - the half-ester compound of HHPA desorbed from zirconium reacted with the epoxy resin to form the epoxy network. As a result, both the sol-gel reaction and epoxy curing occurred simultaneously in a homogeneous solution, and organic-inorganic hybrid materials were readily obtained. Further, the zirconia produced by the in situ polymerization was uniformly dispersed in the epoxy matrix on the nanometer or sub-nanometer scale; thus, hybrid materials that exhibited excellent optical transparency were obtained. Furthermore, the heat resistance of the hybrid materials could be improved by hybridization with zirconia. And, the refractive indices of the hybrid materials significantly improved with an increase in the zirconia content.

  2. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the NASA solicitation Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9-01, "Long Term Cryogenic...

  3. Research and development of advanced materials using ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Susumu [Nagasaki Inst. of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A wide range of research and development activities of advanced material synthesis using ion beams will be discussed, including ion beam applications to the state-of-the-art electronics from giant to nano electronics. (author)

  4. Advanced organic composite materials for aircraft structures: Future program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Revolutionary advances in structural materials have been responsible for revolutionary changes in all fields of engineering. These advances have had and are still having a significant impact on aircraft design and performance. Composites are engineered materials. Their properties are tailored through the use of a mix or blend of different constituents to maximize selected properties of strength and/or stiffness at reduced weights. More than 20 years have passed since the potentials of filamentary composite materials were identified. During the 1970s much lower cost carbon filaments became a reality and gradually designers turned from boron to carbon composites. Despite progress in this field, filamentary composites still have significant unfulfilled potential for increasing aircraft productivity; the rendering of advanced organic composite materials into production aircraft structures was disappointingly slow. Why this is and research and technology development actions that will assist in accelerating the application of advanced organic composites to production aircraft is discussed.

  5. Advancing Sustainable Materials Management: Facts and Figures Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year EPA releases the Advancing Sustainable Materials Management: Facts and Figures report, formerly called Municipal Solid Waste in the United States: Facts and Figures. It includes information on Municipal Solid Waste generation, recycling, an

  6. Proceedings of the two day national workshop on advanced materials for engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Alexis, S.; Jayakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    The subjects like material preparation, material forming, material properties, materials testing, material mechanics, material structure, metal materials, non-metallic materials, composite materials, medical materials, chemical materials, food materials, electrician/electrical materials, building materials, biological materials, electronic/magnetic/optical materials, advanced materials applications in engineering are included in the workshop. Processing of advanced materials, studies on novel ceramic coatings, high strength, light weight and nanostructured materials are discussed in this proceedings. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. PREFACE: Advanced Materials for Demanding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Alison; Schofield, Stephen; Kelly, Michael

    2015-02-01

    This was a special conference. It was small enough (60+ delegates) but covering a wide range of topics, under a broad end-use focussed heading. Most conferences today either have hundreds or thousands of delegates or are small and very focussed. The topics ranged over composite materials, the testing of durability aspects of materials, and an eclectic set of papers on radar screening using weak ionized plasmas, composites for microvascular applications, composites in space rockets, and materials for spallation neutron sources etc. There were several papers of new characterisation techniques and, very importantly, several papers that started with the end-user requirements leading back into materials selection. In my own area, there were three talks about the technology for the ultra-precise positioning of individual atoms, donors, and complete monolayers to take modern electronics and optoelectronics ideas closer to the market place. The President of the Institute opened with an experience-based talk on translating innovative technology into business. Everyone gave a generous introduction to bring all-comers up to speed with the burning contemporary issues. Indeed, I wish that a larger cohort of first-year engineering PhD students were present to see the full gamut of what takes a physics idea to a success in the market place. I would urge groups to learn from Prof Alison McMillan (a Vice President of the Institute of Physics) and Steven Schofield, to set up conferences of similar scale and breadth. I took in more than I do from mega-meetings, and in greater depth. Professor Michael Kelly Department of Engineering University of Cambridge

  8. Polymers Advance Heat Management Materials for Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For 6 years prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle Program, the shuttles carried an onboard repair kit with a tool for emergency use: two tubes of NOAX, or "good goo," as some people called it. NOAX flew on all 22 flights following the Columbia accident, and was designed to repair damage that occurred on the exterior of the shuttle. Bill McMahon, a structural materials engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center says NASA needed a solution for the widest range of possible damage to the shuttle s exterior thermal protection system. "NASA looked at several options in early 2004 and decided on a sealant. Ultimately, NOAX performed the best and was selected," he says. To prove NOAX would work effectively required hundreds of samples manufactured at Marshall and Johnson, and a concerted effort from various NASA field centers. Johnson Space Center provided programmatic leadership, testing, tools, and crew training; Glenn Research Center provided materials analysis; Langley Research Center provided test support and led an effort to perform large patch repairs; Ames Research Center provided additional testing; and Marshall provided further testing and the site of NOAX manufacturing. Although the sealant never had to be used in an emergency situation, it was tested by astronauts on samples of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) during two shuttle missions. (RCC is the thermal material on areas of the shuttle that experience the most heat, such as the nose cone and wing leading edges.) The material handled well on orbit, and tests showed the NOAX patch held up well on RCC.

  9. Radiation Processing of Advanced Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Jeun, Joonpyo; Nho, Young Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics, are being used widely for many applications. Carbon fiber/epoxies composites have attracted special attention from the aircraft, aerospace, marine engineering, sporting goods and transportation industries, because they have useful mechanical properties including high strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios, a corrosion resistant, impact and damage tolerance characteristics and wear properties. Thermal curing has been the dominant industrial process for advanced composites until now, however, a radiation curing process using UV, microwave x-ray, electron-beam(E-beam) and {gamma}-ray has emerged as a better alternative in recent years. These processes are compatible with the manufacturing of composites using traditional fabrication methods including a filament/tape winding, pultrusion, resin transfer moulding and hand lay-up. In this study, E-beam curable carbon fiber/epoxy composites were manufactured, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Two epoxy resins (bisphenol-A, bisphenol-F) containing photo-initiators (tri aryl sulfonium hexafluorophosphate, tri aryl sulfonium hexafluoroantimonate) were used as a matrix and a 4H-satin carbon woven fabric was used as a reinforcement. And then an electron beam irradiated the composites up to 200 kGy in a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The cure cycle was optimized and the properties of composites were evaluated and analyzed via a differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, sol-gel extractions, FT-NIR, universal test machine, and an impact tester. The gel content, glass transition temperature and mechanical strength of the irradiated composites were increased with an increasing radiation dose.

  10. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 4 covers articles on single crystal compound semiconductors and complex polycrystalline materials. The book discusses narrow gap semiconductors and solid state batteries. The text then describes the advantages of hot-pressed microcrystalline compacts of oxygen-octahedra ferroelectrics over single crystal materials, as well as heterostructure junction lasers. Solid state physicists, materials scientists, electrical engineers, and graduate students studying the subjects being discussed will find the book invaluable.

  11. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10 −6 on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure

  12. Effect of conventional and experimental gingival retraction solutions on the tensile strength and inhibition of polymerization of four types of impression materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Sábio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, two types of tests (tensile strength test and polymerization inhibition test were performed to evaluate the physical and chemical properties of four impression materials [a polysulfide (Permlastic, a polyether (Impregum, a condensation silicone (Xantopren and a polyvinylsiloxane (Aquasil ,3; when polymerized in contact with of one conventional (Hemostop and two experimental (Vislin and Afrin gingival retraction solutions. For the tensile strength test, the impression materials were mixed and packed into a steel plate with perforations that had residues of the gingival retraction solutions. After polymerization, the specimens were tested in tensile strength in a universal testing machine. For the polymerization inhibition test, specimens were obtained after taking impressions from a matrix with perforations that contained 1 drop of the gingival retraction solutions. Two independent examiners decided on whether or not impression material remnants remained unpolymerized, indicating interference of the chemical solutions. Based on the analysis of the results of both tests, the following conclusions were reached: 1. The tensile strength of the polysulfide decreased after contact with Hemostop and Afrin. 2. None of the chemical solutions inhibited the polymerization of the polysulfide; 3. The polyether presented lower tensile strength after polymerization in contact with the three gingival retraction agents; 4. The polyether had its polymerization inhibited only by Hemostop; 5. None of the chemical solutions affected the tensile strength of the condensation silicone; 6. Only Hemostop inhibited the polymerization of the condensation silicone; 7. The polyvinylsiloxane specimens polymerized in contact with Hemostop had significantly lower tensile strength; 8. Neither of the chemical solutions (Afrin and Vislin affected the tensile strength of the polyvinylsiloxane and the condensation silicone; 9. Results of the tensile strength

  13. Advanced ceramic materials and their potential impact on the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laren, M.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the types of advanced ceramic materials that are being used today and their potential for even greater utilization in the future. Market analysis and projections have been developed from a number of sources both foreign and domestic are referenced and given in the text. Projection on the future use of advanced ceramics to the year 2000 indicate a potential growth of the total world market approaching 187 billion dollars. This paper describes advanced ceramic materials by their functionality, i.e. structural, electronic, chemical, thermal, biological, nuclear, etc. It also refers to specific engineering uses of advanced ceramics and include automotive ceramic materials with physical data for the most likely ceramic materials to be used for engine parts. This family of materials includes silicon carbides, silicon nitride, partially stabilized zirconia and alumina. Fiber reinforced ceramic composites are discussed with recognition of the research on fiber coating chemistry and the compatibility of the coating with the fiber and the matrix. Another class of advanced ceramics is toughened ceramics. The transformation toughened alumina is recognized as an example of this technology. The data indicate that electronic ceramic materials will always have the largest portion of the advanced ceramic market and the critical concepts of a wide range of uses is reviewed. (Auth.)

  14. Nanoparticles and nonlinear thermal radiation properties in the rheology of polymeric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Awais

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present analysis is related to the dynamics of polymeric liquids (Oldroyd-B model with the presence of nanoparticles. The rheological system is considered under the application of nonlinear thermal radiations. Energy and concentration equations are presented when thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are present. Bidirectional form of stretching is considered to interpret the three-dimensional flow dynamics of polymeric liquid. Making use of the similarity transformations, problem is reduced into ordinary differential system which is approximated by using HAM. Influence of physical parameters including Deborah number, thermophoresis and Brownian motion on velocity, temperature and mass fraction expressions are plotted and analyzed. Numerical values for local Sherwood and Nusselt numbers are presented and discussed. Keywords: Nanoparticles, Polymeric liquid, Oldroyd-B model, Nonlinear thermal radiation

  15. Rapid Prototyping: Technologies, Materials and Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudek P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of product development, the term rapid prototyping (RP is widely used to describe technologies which create physical prototypes directly from digital data. Recently, this technology has become one of the fastest-growing methods of manufacturing parts. The paper provides brief notes on the creation of composites using RP methods, such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering or melting, laminated object modelling, fused deposition modelling or three-dimensional printing. The emphasis of this work is on the methodology of composite fabrication and the variety of materials used in these technologies.

  16. An advanced material science payload for GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensson, R.; Wallin, S.; Loeth, K.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to study solidification of different compositions of lead-tin. The weight of the material is quite high: 8 kilograms. Nearly 10% of the payload is sample weight. The dendritic growth and the effect of the absence of natural convection are of particular interest. The results from the flight processed samples will be compared with results from Earth processed samples in order to investigate the influence of the natural convection on the solidification process. The power systems, heat storage and rejection, and mechanical support are discussed in relationship to the scientific requirements.

  17. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  18. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  19. Materials for advanced high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    The results recently obtained from the Dragon program are presented to illustrate materials behavior: (a) effect of temperature on oxidation and carburisation in HTR helium (variation in oxide depth and in C content of AISI 321 after 5000 hours in HTR helium; effect of temperature on surface scale formation in the γ' strengthened alloys Nimonic 80A and 713LC); (b) effect of alloy composition on oxidation and carburisation behavior (influence of Nb and Ti on the corrosion of austenitic steels; influence of Ti and Al in IN-102; weight gain of cast high Ni alloys); (c) effect of environment on creep strength (results of tests for hastelloy X, grade I inconel 625, grade II inconel 625 and inconel 617 in He and air between 750 and 800 0 C)

  20. Contact Mechanics and Failure Modes of Compliant Polymeric Bearing Materials for Knee Cartilage Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohfafarosh, Mariya Shabbir

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of disability affecting millions of people worldwide. Total knee replacement is the current state-of-the-art treatment to alleviate pain and improve mobility among patients in the late stage of knee OA. The current gold standard materials for total knee arthroplasty are cobalt-chromium and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). However, wear debris and implant loosening-related revision persists; consequently, total knee replacements are not universally recommended for all patient subgroups with OA. This work explores the potential of using compliant polymeric materials in knee cartilage replacement devices, which are closer in lubrication and mechanical properties of articular cartilage, to prevent excessive removal of underlying bone and prolong the need for a total knee replacement. Two materials investigated in this thesis are polycarbonate urethane, Bionate 80A, and a novel hydrogel, Cyborgel, both of which have shown promising wear and lubrication properties under physiological loads. Polycarbonate urethane has been previously tested for the effects of gamma sterilization and has shown no significant changes in its mechanical strength or chemical bonds. Since an important aspect of medical device development is the sterilization process, this thesis first evaluated the effect of 30-35 kGy electron beam and gamma radiation on the polymer swell ratio, and the mechanical, chemical and tribological behavior of the novel hydrogel. Three different formulations were mechanically tested, and biphasic material properties were identified using finite element analysis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate chemical changes, while the wear properties were tested for 2 million cycles in bovine serum. The results showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the swell ratio, mechanical and tribological properties of the electron beam and gamma sterilized hydrogel sample as compared to the

  1. Economic benefits of advanced materials in nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    A key obstacle to the commercial deployment of advanced fast reactors is the capital cost. There is a perception of higher capital cost for fast reactor systems than advanced light water reactors. However, cost estimates come with a large uncertainty since far fewer fast reactors have been built than light water reactor facilities. Furthermore, the large variability of industrial cost estimates complicates accurate comparisons. Reductions in capital cost can result from design simplifications, new technologies that allow reduced capital costs, and simulation techniques that help optimize system design. It is plausible that improved materials will provide opportunities for both simplified design and reduced capital cost. Advanced materials may also allow improved safety and longer component lifetimes. This work examines the potential impact of advanced materials on the capital investment cost of fast nuclear reactors.

  2. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  3. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-09-22

    The work described in this grant report was focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T = Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x = 0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which were published in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Materials Chemistry and Physics. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of

  4. Comb-like thermoresponsive polymeric materials : Synthesis and effect of macromolecular structure on solution properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, D. A. Z.; Riemsma, E.; Picchioni, F.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    A series of comb-like block and random copolymers based on acrylamide (AM) and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) have been prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The number of side-arms, the length of the AM and NIPAM blocks as well as the distribution of the two monomers (block or

  5. Finite element analysis of the high strain rate testing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorwade, C V; Ashcroft, I A; Silberschmidt, V V; Alghamdi, A S; Song, M

    2012-01-01

    Advanced polymer materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. Ultra-high molecular weight polymers (UHMWPE) are already used in lightweight body armour because of their good impact resistance with light weight. However, a broader use of such materials is limited by the complexity of the manufacturing processes and the lack of experimental data on their behaviour and failure evolution under high-strain rate loading conditions. The current study deals with an investigation of the internal heat generation during tensile of UHMWPE. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the tensile test is developed and validated the with experimental work. An elastic-plastic material model is used with adiabatic heat generation. The temperature and stresses obtained with FE analysis are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. The model can be used as a simple and cost effective tool to predict the thermo-mechanical behaviour of UHMWPE part under various loading conditions.

  6. Finite element analysis of the high strain rate testing of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, C. V.; Alghamdi, A. S.; Ashcroft, I. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.; Song, M.

    2012-08-01

    Advanced polymer materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. Ultra-high molecular weight polymers (UHMWPE) are already used in lightweight body armour because of their good impact resistance with light weight. However, a broader use of such materials is limited by the complexity of the manufacturing processes and the lack of experimental data on their behaviour and failure evolution under high-strain rate loading conditions. The current study deals with an investigation of the internal heat generation during tensile of UHMWPE. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the tensile test is developed and validated the with experimental work. An elastic-plastic material model is used with adiabatic heat generation. The temperature and stresses obtained with FE analysis are found to be in a good agreement with the experimental results. The model can be used as a simple and cost effective tool to predict the thermo-mechanical behaviour of UHMWPE part under various loading conditions.

  7. International workshop on advanced materials for high precision detectors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicquevert, B.; Hauviller, C.

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings gather together the contributions to the Workshop on Advanced Materials for High Precision Detectors, which was held from 28-30 September 1994 in Archamps, Haute-Savoie, France. This meeting brought together international experts (researchers, physicists and engineers) in the field of advanced materials and their use in high energy physics detectors or spacecraft applications. Its purpose was to discuss the status of the different materials currently in use in the structures of detectors and spacecraft, together with their actual performances, technological implications and future prospects. Environmental effects, such as those of moisture and radiation, were discussed, as were design and manufacturing technologies. Some case studies were presented. (orig.)

  8. Advanced Material Strategies for Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinke; He, Jiankang; Zhou, Wenxing; Lei, Qi; Li, Xiao; Li, Dichen

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has drawn tremendous attention in various fields. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop novel additive manufacturing processes such as micro-/nano-scale 3D printing, bioprinting, and 4D printing for the fabrication of complex 3D structures with high resolution, living components, and multimaterials. The development of advanced functional materials is important for the implementation of these novel additive manufacturing processes. Here, a state-of-the-art review on advanced material strategies for novel additive manufacturing processes is provided, mainly including conductive materials, biomaterials, and smart materials. The advantages, limitations, and future perspectives of these materials for additive manufacturing are discussed. It is believed that the innovations of material strategies in parallel with the evolution of additive manufacturing processes will provide numerous possibilities for the fabrication of complex smart constructs with multiple functions, which will significantly widen the application fields of next-generation additive manufacturing. PMID:29361754

  9. Advanced Material Strategies for Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jinke; He, Jiankang; Mao, Mao; Zhou, Wenxing; Lei, Qi; Li, Xiao; Li, Dichen; Chua, Chee-Kai; Zhao, Xin

    2018-01-22

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has drawn tremendous attention in various fields. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop novel additive manufacturing processes such as micro-/nano-scale 3D printing, bioprinting, and 4D printing for the fabrication of complex 3D structures with high resolution, living components, and multimaterials. The development of advanced functional materials is important for the implementation of these novel additive manufacturing processes. Here, a state-of-the-art review on advanced material strategies for novel additive manufacturing processes is provided, mainly including conductive materials, biomaterials, and smart materials. The advantages, limitations, and future perspectives of these materials for additive manufacturing are discussed. It is believed that the innovations of material strategies in parallel with the evolution of additive manufacturing processes will provide numerous possibilities for the fabrication of complex smart constructs with multiple functions, which will significantly widen the application fields of next-generation additive manufacturing.

  10. Advanced Material Strategies for Next-Generation Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinke Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM has drawn tremendous attention in various fields. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop novel additive manufacturing processes such as micro-/nano-scale 3D printing, bioprinting, and 4D printing for the fabrication of complex 3D structures with high resolution, living components, and multimaterials. The development of advanced functional materials is important for the implementation of these novel additive manufacturing processes. Here, a state-of-the-art review on advanced material strategies for novel additive manufacturing processes is provided, mainly including conductive materials, biomaterials, and smart materials. The advantages, limitations, and future perspectives of these materials for additive manufacturing are discussed. It is believed that the innovations of material strategies in parallel with the evolution of additive manufacturing processes will provide numerous possibilities for the fabrication of complex smart constructs with multiple functions, which will significantly widen the application fields of next-generation additive manufacturing.

  11. Status Report on Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Asayama, T.; Pouchon, M.; Busby, J.T.; Maloy, S.; Park, J.Y.; Fazio, C.; Dai, Y.; Agostini, P.; Chevalier, J.P.; Marrow, J.

    2013-01-01

    Materials performance is critical to the safe and economic operation of any nuclear system. As the international community pursues the development of Generation IV reactor concepts and accelerator-driven transmutation systems, it will be increasingly necessary to develop advanced materials capable of tolerating the more challenging environments of these new systems. The international community supports numerous materials research programmes, with each country determining its individual focus on a case-by-case basis. In many instances, similar alloys of materials systems are being studied in several countries, providing the opportunity for collaborative and cross-cutting research that benefits different systems. This report is a snapshot of the current materials programmes supporting the development of advanced concepts. The descriptions of the research are grouped by concept, and national programmes are described within each concept. The report provides an overall sense of the importance of materials research worldwide and the opportunities for synergy among the countries represented in this overview. (authors)

  12. Advances in thermoelectric materials research: Looking back and moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Tritt, Terry M

    2017-09-29

    High-performance thermoelectric materials lie at the heart of thermoelectrics, the simplest technology applicable to direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion. In its recent 60-year history, the field of thermoelectric materials research has stalled several times, but each time it was rejuvenated by new paradigms. This article reviews several potentially paradigm-changing mechanisms enabled by defects, size effects, critical phenomena, anharmonicity, and the spin degree of freedom. These mechanisms decouple the otherwise adversely interdependent physical quantities toward higher material performance. We also briefly discuss a number of promising materials, advanced material synthesis and preparation techniques, and new opportunities. The renewable energy landscape will be reshaped if the current trend in thermoelectric materials research is sustained into the foreseeable future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  13. Advanced materials and coatings for energy conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St Pierre, George R. [Ohio State Univ., Materials Science and Engineering Dept., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Following an historical review of the development of high-temperature alloys for energy conversion systems including turbine engines, some of the current advances in single crystal materials, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites are discussed. Particular attention is directed at creep phenomena, fatigue properties and oxidation resistance. Included within the discussions is the current status of carbon/carbon composites as potential high-temperature engineering materials and the development of coating systems for thermal barrier and oxidation protection. The specific influences of combustion gas compositions, i.e., oxidation potential, sulfur, halides, etc. are discussed. A current list of eligible advanced materials and coatings systems is presented and assessed. Finally, the critical failure mechanism and life-prediction parameters for some of the new classes of advanced structural materials are elaborated with the view to achieving affordability and extended life with a high degree of reliability. Examples are drawn from a variety of energy conversion systems. (Author)

  14. Recent advances in the development of aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Chen, Yongjun; Hu, Junling

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made on the development of aerospace materials for structural and engine applications. Alloys, such as Al-based alloys, Mg-based alloys, Ti-based alloys, and Ni-based alloys, are developed for aerospace industry with outstanding advantages. Composite materials, the innovative materials, are taking more and more important roles in aircrafts. However, recent aerospace materials still face some major challenges, such as insufficient mechanical properties, fretting wear, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion. Consequently, extensive studies have been conducted to develop the next generation aerospace materials with superior mechanical performance and corrosion resistance to achieve improvements in both performance and life cycle cost. This review focuses on the following topics: (1) materials requirements in design of aircraft structures and engines, (2) recent advances in the development of aerospace materials, (3) challenges faced by recent aerospace materials, and (4) future trends in aerospace materials.

  15. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  16. Evaluation and development of advanced nuclear materials: IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inozemtsev, V.; Basak, U.; Killeen, J.; Dyck, G.; Zeman, A.; )

    2011-01-01

    Economical, environmental and non-proliferation issues associated with sustainable development of nuclear power bring about a need for optimization of fuel cycles and implementation of advanced nuclear systems. While a number of physical and design concepts are available for innovative reactors, the absence of reliable materials able to sustain new challenging irradiation conditions represents the real bottle-neck for practical implementation of these promising ideas. Materials performance and integrity are key issues for the safety and competitiveness of future nuclear installations being developed for sustainable nuclear energy production incorporating fuel recycling and waste transmutation systems. These systems will feature high thermal operational efficiency, improved utilization of resources (both fissile and fertile materials) and reduced production of nuclear waste. They will require development, qualification and deployment of new and advanced fuel and structural materials with improved mechanical and chemical properties combined with high radiation and corrosion resistance. The extensive, diverse, and expensive efforts toward the development of these materials can be more effectively organized within international collaborative programmes with wide participation of research, design and engineering communities. IAEA carries out a number of international projects supporting interested Member States with the use of available IAEA program implementation tools (Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings, Expert Reviews, etc). The presentation summarizes the activities targeting material developments for advanced nuclear systems, with particular emphasis on fast reactors, which are the focal topics of IAEA Coordinated Research Projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modelling of Radiation Effects' (on-going), 'Benchmarking of Structural Materials Pre-Selected for Advanced Nuclear Reactors', 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core

  17. Generalized continua as models for classical and advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This volume is devoted to an actual topic which is the focus world-wide of various research groups. It contains contributions describing the material behavior on different scales, new existence and uniqueness theorems, the formulation of constitutive equations for advanced materials. The main emphasis of the contributions is directed on the following items - Modelling and simulation of natural and artificial materials with significant microstructure, - Generalized continua as a result of multi-scale models, - Multi-field actions on materials resulting in generalized material models, - Theories including higher gradients, and - Comparison with discrete modelling approaches.

  18. Recent Progress in Advanced Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajun Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and commercialization of lithium ion batteries is rooted in material discovery. Promising new materials with high energy density are required for achieving the goal toward alternative forms of transportation. Over the past decade, significant progress and effort has been made in developing the new generation of Li-ion battery materials. In the review, I will focus on the recent advance of tin- and silicon-based anode materials. Additionally, new polyoxyanion cathodes, such as phosphates and silicates as cathode materials, will also be discussed.

  19. Nanoscale Radiation Engineering of Advanced Materials for Potential Biomedical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Allan S., E-mail: hoffman@u.washington.edu [Bioengineering Department, Box 355061—Foege, room N530R 1705 NE Pacific St., University of Washington Seattle WA 98195-5061 (United States)

    2010-07-01

    We are using RAFT polymerization to synthesize smart polymer nanocarriers for intracellular delivery of protein, peptide and nucleic acid drugs. In the coming program period we plan to synthesize these carriers using radiation to initiate the RAFT polymerizations. In this way we will avoid the need to add free radical initiators to initiate this polymerization, yielding a purer polymer-drug nanocarrier. (author)

  20. Nanoscale Radiation Engineering of Advanced Materials for Potential Biomedical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Allan S.

    2010-01-01

    We are using RAFT polymerization to synthesize smart polymer nanocarriers for intracellular delivery of protein, peptide and nucleic acid drugs. In the coming program period we plan to synthesize these carriers using radiation to initiate the RAFT polymerizations. In this way we will avoid the need to add free radical initiators to initiate this polymerization, yielding a purer polymer-drug nanocarrier. (author)

  1. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  2. A novel donor-acceptor polymeric electrochromic material containing carbazole and 1,8-naphtalimide as subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyuncu, Fatma Baycan, E-mail: fatmabaycan@hotmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey); Koyuncu, Sermet [Can Vocational School, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17400 Canakkale (Turkey); Ozdemir, Eyup, E-mail: eozdemir@comu.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey)

    2010-07-01

    We report here the synthesis of a novel polymeric electrochromic material containing carbazole (Cbz)-donor and 1,8-napthalimide-acceptor as subunit. The band gap E{sub g} was measured using UV-vis spectroscopy and compared with that obtained by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Due to intramolecular electron transfer from Cbz-donor to 1,8-napthalimide-acceptor, the fluorescence quenching was observed. When the spectro-electrochemical and electrochromic properties of polymer film were investigated, various tones of green color were obtained on the polymeric film. In the positive regime, the polymer film obtained thereby is dark green resulting from the association of carbazolylium cation radicals at oxidized state and then it can be bleached by electrochemical reduction. Besides, in the negative regime, yellowish green color of film converted to blue attributed to reduction of the 1,8-napthalimide moiety. Finally, the polymeric electrochromic exhibits multi-electrochromic behavior, high redox stability, high coloration efficiency and reasonable response time.

  3. A novel donor-acceptor polymeric electrochromic material containing carbazole and 1,8-naphtalimide as subunit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyuncu, Fatma Baycan; Koyuncu, Sermet; Ozdemir, Eyup

    2010-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of a novel polymeric electrochromic material containing carbazole (Cbz)-donor and 1,8-napthalimide-acceptor as subunit. The band gap E g was measured using UV-vis spectroscopy and compared with that obtained by cyclic voltammetry (CV). Due to intramolecular electron transfer from Cbz-donor to 1,8-napthalimide-acceptor, the fluorescence quenching was observed. When the spectro-electrochemical and electrochromic properties of polymer film were investigated, various tones of green color were obtained on the polymeric film. In the positive regime, the polymer film obtained thereby is dark green resulting from the association of carbazolylium cation radicals at oxidized state and then it can be bleached by electrochemical reduction. Besides, in the negative regime, yellowish green color of film converted to blue attributed to reduction of the 1,8-napthalimide moiety. Finally, the polymeric electrochromic exhibits multi-electrochromic behavior, high redox stability, high coloration efficiency and reasonable response time.

  4. Advanced Nano hybrid Materials: Surface Modification and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.H.; Metivier, R.; Wang, Sh.; Wang, Sh.; Hui Wang

    2012-01-01

    The field of functional nano scale hybrid materials is one of the most promising and rapidly emerging research areas in materials chemistry. Nano scale hybrid materials can be broadly defined as synthetic materials with organic and inorganic components that are linked together by noncovalent bonds (Class I, linked by hydrogen bond, electrostatic force, or van der Waals force) or covalent bonds (Class II) at nanometer scale. The unlimited possible combinations of the distinct properties of inorganic, organic, or even bioactive components in a single material, either in molecular or nano scale dimensions, have attracted considerable attention. This approach provides an opportunity to create a vast number of novel advanced materials with well-controlled structures and multiple functions. The unique properties of advanced hybrid nano materials can be advantageous to many fields, such as optical and electronic materials, biomaterials, catalysis, sensing, coating, and energy storage. In this special issue, the breadth of papers shows that the hybrid materials is attracting attention, because of both growing fundamental interest, and a route to new materials. Two review articles and seven research papers that report new results of hybrid materials should gather widespread interest.

  5. Advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.; Stringer, J. (eds.)

    1979-12-01

    The first conference on advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines was held at the Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and the Electric Power Research Institute, (Division of Fossil Fuel and Advanced Systems). Forty-four papers from the proceedings have been entered into EDB and ERA and one also into EAPA; three had been entered previously from other sources. The papers are concerned with US DOE research programs in this area, coal gasification, coal liquefaction, gas turbines, fluidized-bed combustion and the materials used in these processes or equipments. The materials papers involve alloys, ceramics, coatings, cladding, etc., and the fabrication and materials listing of such materials and studies involving corrosion, erosion, deposition, etc. (LTN)

  6. Novel biocompatible polymeric blends for bone regeneration: Material and matrix design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng

    The first part of the work presented in this dissertation is focused on the design and development of novel miscible and biocompatible polyphosphazene-polyester blends as candidate materials for scaffold-based bone tissue engineering applications. Biodegradable polyesters such as poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) are among the most widely used polymeric materials for bone tissue engineering. However, acidic degradation products resulting from the bulk degradation mechanism often lead to catastrophic failure of the structure integrity, and adversely affect biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo. One promising approach to circumvent these limitations is to blend PLAGA with other macromolecules that can buffer the acidic degradation products with a controlled degradation rate. Biodegradable polyphosphazenes (PPHOS), a new class of biomedical materials, have proved to be superior candidate materials to achieve this objective due to their unique buffering degradation products. A highly practical blending approach was adopted to develop novel biocompatible, miscible blends of these two polymers. In order to achieve this miscibility, a series of amino acid ester, alkoxy, aryloxy, and dipeptide substituted PPHOS were synthesized to promote hydrogen bonding interactions with PLAGA. Five mixed-substituent PPHOS compositions were designed and blended with PLAGA at different weight ratios producing candidate blends via a mutual solvent method. Preliminary characterization identified two specific side groups namely glycylglycine dipeptide and phenylphenoxy that resulted in improved blend miscibility and enhanced in vitro osteocompatibility. These findings led to the synthesis of a mixed-substituent polyphosphazene poly[(glycine ethyl glycinato)1(phenylphenoxy)1phosphazene] (PNGEGPhPh) for blending with PLAGA. Two dipeptide-based blends having weight ratios of PNGEGPhPh to PLAGA namely 25:75 (Matrix1) and 50:50 (Matrix2) were fabricated. Both of the blends were

  7. Nanoparticles and nonlinear thermal radiation properties in the rheology of polymeric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, M.; Hayat, T.; Muqaddass, N.; Ali, A.; Aqsa; Awan, Saeed Ehsan

    2018-03-01

    The present analysis is related to the dynamics of polymeric liquids (Oldroyd-B model) with the presence of nanoparticles. The rheological system is considered under the application of nonlinear thermal radiations. Energy and concentration equations are presented when thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects are present. Bidirectional form of stretching is considered to interpret the three-dimensional flow dynamics of polymeric liquid. Making use of the similarity transformations, problem is reduced into ordinary differential system which is approximated by using HAM. Influence of physical parameters including Deborah number, thermophoresis and Brownian motion on velocity, temperature and mass fraction expressions are plotted and analyzed. Numerical values for local Sherwood and Nusselt numbers are presented and discussed.

  8. Micro gravity - an important tool for development of advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, S.

    1995-01-01

    Microgravity provides the researchers the opportunity to investigate and improve the methods of creating advanced materials on earth. This can in turn assist in the advanced of economically significant technologies and technology infusement into the private sector. In some unique cases, involving inherently expensive materials that must have high purity, such as composites, high grade alloys etc. small amounts be made in space commercially and viably. A number of developed countries have gained sufficient expertise in material processing and other experiments under microgravity conditions, and their progress has been quite tremendous in this vital area of space research. The four important modes of platform, i.e., space shuttle/satellite, rocket flights, aircraft and drop tower tests have been employed for this purpose. Processing of materials in all such cases differs from the point of view of its cost effectiveness, time required to perform the expertise, instrumentation set up etc. In region of Far East and South East Asia, only one or two countries have made some advances in material processing experiments under microgravity conditions both in the upper atmosphere as well as using Drop Tower Test, but limited experimental means have made these countries to strive in this research area compared to work done in author advanced countries. The paper describes a brief history of microgravity experiments, their types and mode of transport employed for processing of novel materials under extreme low gravity or zero gravity conditions. This will definitely be useful and beneficial to developing nations of this region have entered an era of sophisticated and advanced materials processing and its utilization for industries such as aerospace, nuclear power plants, strategic materials, electronics, biological communication etc. (author)

  9. Living Polycondensation: Synthesis of Well-Defined Aromatic Polyamide-Based Polymeric Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alyami, Mram Z.

    2016-11-01

    Chain growth condensation polymerization is a powerful tool towards the synthesis of well-defined polyamides. This thesis focuses on one hand, on the synthesis of well-defined aromatic polyamides with different aminoalkyl pendant groups with low polydispersity and controlled molecular weights, and on the other hand, on studying their thermal properties. In the first project, well-defined poly (N-octyl-p-aminobenzoate) and poly (N-butyl-p-aminobenzoate) were synthesized, and for the first time, their thermal properties were studied. In the second project, ethyl4-aminobenzoate, ethyl 4-octyl aminobenzoate and 4-(hydroxymethyl) benzoic acid were used as novel efficient initiators of ε-caprolactone with t-BuP2 as a catalyst. Macroinitiator and Macromonomer of poly (ε-caprolactone) were synthesized with ethyl 4-octyl aminobenzoate and ethyl 4-aminobenzoate as initiators to afford polyamide-block-poly (ε-caprolactone) and polyamide-graft-poly (ε-caprolactone) by chain growth condensation polymerization (CGCP). In the third project, a new study has been done on chain growth condensation polymerization to discover the probability to synthesize new polymers and studied their thermal properties. For this purpose, poly (N-cyclohexyl-p-aminobenzoate) and poly (N-hexyl-p-aminobenzoate) were synthesized with low polydispersity and controlled molecular weights.

  10. Electrospun nanofibers: New generation materials for advanced applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thenmozhi, S. [Inorganic & Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); DRDO-BU CLS, Bharathiar University Campus, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Dharmaraj, N., E-mail: dharmaraj@buc.edu.in [Inorganic & Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Kadirvelu, K. [DRDO-BU CLS, Bharathiar University Campus, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Kim, Hak Yong [Department of Textile Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Chonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • A review covering important aspects of electrospinning technique is presented. • Applications of nanofibers in various fields are reviewed. • Possibility to up-scale electrospinning technique to industry also included. - Abstract: Electrospinning (E-spin) is a unique technique to fabricate polymeric as well as metal oxide nanofibers. Research on electrospun nanofibers is a very active field in material science owing to their novel applications in diverse domains. The main focus of this review is to provide an insight into E-spin technique by understanding the working principle, influencing parameters and applications of nanofibers in different walks of life. Several hundreds of papers are published on the preparation, modification and applications of nanofibers produced by E-spin technique in the areas like sensor development, decontamination, energy storage, biomedical and catalysis etc. Details on the industrial scale development of E-spin technique, current scenario and future developments are also covered in this review.

  11. ROMP-Derived cyclooctene-based monolithic polymeric materials reinforced with inorganic nanoparticles for applications in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Weichelt

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous monolithic inorganic/polymeric hybrid materials have been prepared via ring-opening metathesis copolymerization starting from a highly polar monomer, i.e., cis-5-cyclooctene-trans-1,2-diol and a 7-oxanorborn-2-ene-derived cross-linker in the presence of porogenic solvents and two types of inorganic nanoparticles (i.e., CaCO3 and calcium hydroxyapatite, respectively using the third-generation Grubbs initiator RuCl2(Py2(IMesH2(CHPh. The physico-chemical properties of the monolithic materials, such as pore size distribution and microhardness were studied with regard to the nanoparticle type and content. Moreover, the reinforced monoliths were tested for the possible use as scaffold materials in tissue engineering, by carrying out cell cultivation experiments with human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells.

  12. Design of advanced materials for linear and nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Niels Morten Marslev

    to reveal the fundamental dynamic characteristics and thus the relevant design parameters.The thesis is built around the characterization of two one-dimensional, periodic material systems. The first is a nonlinear mass-spring chain with periodically varying material properties, representing a simple......The primary catalyst of this PhD project has been an ambition to design advanced materials and structural systems including, and possibly even exploiting, nonlinear phenomena such as nonlinear modal interaction leading to energy conversion between modes. An important prerequisite for efficient...... but general model of inhomogeneous structural materials with nonlinear material characteristics. The second material system is an “engineered” material in the sense that a classical structural element, a linear elastic and homogeneous rod, is “enhanced” by applying a mechanism on its surface, amplifying...

  13. Proceedings of national workshop on advanced methods for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    During the past two decades there had been tremendous growth in the field of material science and a variety of new materials with user specific properties have been developed such as smart shape memory alloys, hybrid materials like glass-ceramics, cermets, met-glasses, inorganic- organic composite layered structures, mixed oxides with negative thermal expansion, functional polymer materials etc. Study of nano-particles and the materials assembled from such particles is another area of active research being pursued all over the world. Preparation and characterization of nano-sized materials is a challenge because of their dimensions and size dependent properties. This has led to the emergence of a variety of advanced techniques, which need to be brought to the attention of the researchers working in the field of material science which requires the expertise of physics, chemistry and process engineering. This volume deals with above aspects and papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  14. Proceedings of the second international conference on advances in nuclear materials: abstract booklet and souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear materials form special class of materials which either act as fuel for the nuclear reactors or form the structure of the reactors and the allied systems. The topics covered in this conference are: materials challenges for thermal and fast reactors, technological advances in nuclear fuels and components, materials for future reactors, fuel cycles and materials challenges, materials degradation and life management, advanced materials development, modelling and simulation, advanced materials- II, advanced materials for future reactors, development of advanced fuel and structural materials, zirconium alloy developments, irradiation effects and PIE, advanced nuclear fuels, corrosion and materials characterization. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  15. Advances in Organic and Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Polymeric Supports for Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Pia Salvo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review, the most recent advances (2014–2016 on the synthesis of new polymer-supported catalysts are reported, focusing the attention on the synthetic strategies developed for their preparation. The polymer-supported catalysts examined will be organic-based polymers and organic-inorganic hybrids and will include, among others, polystyrenes, poly-ionic liquids, chiral ionic polymers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, as well as silica and halloysite-based catalysts. Selected examples will show the synthesis and application in the field of organocatalysis and metal-based catalysis both for non-asymmetric and asymmetric transformations.

  16. Soft computing in design and manufacturing of advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Baaklini, George Y; Vary, Alex

    1993-01-01

    The potential of fuzzy sets and neural networks, often referred to as soft computing, for aiding in all aspects of manufacturing of advanced materials like ceramics is addressed. In design and manufacturing of advanced materials, it is desirable to find which of the many processing variables contribute most to the desired properties of the material. There is also interest in real time quality control of parameters that govern material properties during processing stages. The concepts of fuzzy sets and neural networks are briefly introduced and it is shown how they can be used in the design and manufacturing processes. These two computational methods are alternatives to other methods such as the Taguchi method. The two methods are demonstrated by using data collected at NASA Lewis Research Center. Future research directions are also discussed.

  17. Wear resistance of thick diamond like carbon coatings against polymeric materials used in single screw plasticizing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzenbacher, G.; Liu, K.; Forsich, C.; Heim, D.

    2015-05-01

    Wear on the screw and barrel surface accompany polymer single screw plasticizing technology from the beginning. In general, wear on screws can be reduced by using nitrided steel surfaces, fused armour alloys on the screw flights and coatings. However, DLC-coatings (Diamond Like Carbon) comprise a number of interesting properties such as a high hardness, a low coefficient of friction and an excellent corrosion resistance due to their amorphous structure. The wear resistance of about 50 µm thick DLC-coatings against polyamide 6.6, polybutylene terephthalate and polypropylene is investigated in this paper. The tribology in the solids conveying zone of a single screw extruder until the beginning of melting is evaluated using a pin on disc tribometer and a so called screw tribometer. The polymeric pins are pressed against coated metal samples using the pin on disc tribometer and the tests are carried out at a defined normal force and sliding velocity. The screw tribometer is used to perform tribological experiments between polymer pellets and rotating coated metal shafts simulating the extruder screw. Long term experiments were performed to evaluate the wear resistance of the DLC-coating. A reduction of the coefficient of friction can be observed after a frictional distance of about 20 kilometers using glass fibre reinforced polymeric materials. This reduction is independent on the polymer and accompanied by a black layer on the wear surface of the polymeric pins. The DLC-coated metal samples show an up to 16 µm deep wear track after the 100 kilometer test period against the glass fiber filled materials only.

  18. Surface PEGylation of mesoporous silica materials via surface-initiated chain transfer free radical polymerization: Characterization and controlled drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Huang, Qiang; Huang, Hongye; Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-12-01

    As a new type of mesoporous silica materials with large pore diameter (pore size between 2 and 50nm) and high specific surface areas, SBA-15 has been widely explored for different applications especially in the biomedical fields. The surface modification of SBA-15 with functional polymers has demonstrated to be an effective way for improving its properties and performance. In this work, we reported the preparation of PEGylated SBA-15 polymer composites through surface-initiated chain transfer free radical polymerization for the first time. The thiol group was first introduced on SBA-15 via co-condensation with γ-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS), that were utilized to initiate the chain transfer free radical polymerization using poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and itaconic acid (IA) as the monomers. The successful modification of SBA-15 with poly(PEGMA-co-IA) copolymers was evidenced by a series of characterization techniques, including 1 H NMR, FT-IR, TGA and XPS. The final SBA-15-SH- poly(PEGMA-co-IA) composites display well water dispersity and high loading capability towards cisplatin (CDDP) owing to the introduction of hydrophilic PEGMA and carboxyl groups. Furthermore, the CDDP could be released from SBA-15-SH-poly(PEGMA-co-IA)-CDDP complexes in a pH dependent behavior, suggesting the potential controlled drug delivery of SBA-15-SH-poly(PEGMA-co-IA). More importantly, the strategy should be also useful for fabrication of many other functional materials for biomedical applications owing to the advantages of SBA-15 and well monomer adoptability of chain transfer free radical polymerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Advanced materials for thermal management of electronic packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2011-01-01

    The need for advanced thermal management materials in electronic packaging has been widely recognized as thermal challenges become barriers to the electronic industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. With increased performance requirements for smaller, more capable, and more efficient electronic power devices, systems ranging from active electronically scanned radar arrays to web servers all require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires that the materials have high capability of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility

  20. Interregional technology transfer on advanced materials and renewable energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrianidis, P.; David, C.; Anthymidis, K.; Ekhrawat, M.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced materials are used in most industrial sectors and human activities and all developing and developed countries as well as international organizations eg. United Nations have established work groups, which survey the national and global state and developments in the area of advanced materials trying to establish strategies on that crucial technology sector. These strategies are focused on research and technology activities including education and vocation training, as well as stimulus for the starting up of new industrial applications. To introduce such a concept in Greece and especially in Northern Greece, the Technological Education Institute of Serres has initiated an Interregional technology transfer project in this scientific field. This project includes mod topics of advanced materials technology with emphasison specific industrial applications (renewable energy systems). The project demonstrates the development of a prototype photovoltaic thermal system in terms of a new industrial product. The product development procedure consists of steps such as initial product design, materials selection and processing, prototype design and manufacturing, quality control, performance optimization, but also control of materials ecocompatibility according to the national trends of life cycle design and recycling techniques. Keywords: Interregional technology transfer, materials, renewable energy systems

  1. Interregional technology transfer on advanced materials and renewable energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrianidis, P.; David, C.; Anthymidis, K.; Ekhrawat, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Serres, Serres (Greece)

    2008-07-01

    Advanced materials are used in most industrial sectors and human activities and all developing and developed countries as well as international organizations eg. United Nations have established work groups, which survey the national and global state and developments in the area of advanced materials trying to establish strategies on that crucial technology sector. These strategies are focused on research and technology activities including education and vocation training, as well as stimulus for the starting up of new industrial applications. To introduce such a concept in Greece and especially in Northern Greece, the Technological Education Institute of Serres has initiated an Interregional technology transfer project in this scientific field. This project includes mod topics of advanced materials technology with emphasison specific industrial applications (renewable energy systems). The project demonstrates the development of a prototype photovoltaic thermal system in terms of a new industrial product. The product development procedure consists of steps such as initial product design, materials selection and processing, prototype design and manufacturing, quality control, performance optimization, but also control of materials ecocompatibility according to the national trends of life cycle design and recycling techniques. Keywords: Interregional technology transfer, materials, renewable energy systems.

  2. Physical chemistry research for engineering and applied sciences, v.2 polymeric materials and processing

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Eli M; Pethrick, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    PrefaceInvestigation on the Influence of a Strong Electric Field on the Electrical, Transport and Diffusion Properties of Carbon Nanostructures; S. A. Sudorgin and N. G. LebedevA Study Thermal Stability of Polyurethane Elastomers; I. A. Novakov, M. A. Vaniev, D. V. Medvedev, N. V. Sidorenko, G. V. Medvedev, and D. O. GusevTrends in Aromatic Polyesters; Z. S. Khasbulatova and G. E. ZaikovMicroheterogeneous Titanium Ziegler-Natta Catalysts: 1,3-Diene Polymerization Under Ultrasound Irradiations; V. P. Zakharov, V. Z. Mingaleev, I. D. Zakirov

  3. Carbon The Future Material for Advanced Technology Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Messina, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    Carbon-based materials and their applications constitute a burgeoning topic of scientific research among scientists and engineers attracted from diverse areas such as applied physics, materials science, biology, mechanics, electronics and engineering. Further development of current materials, advances in their applications, and discovery of new forms of carbon are the themes addressed by the frontier research in these fields. This book covers all the fundamental topics concerned with amorphous and crystalline C-based materials, such as diamond, diamond-like carbon, carbon alloys, carbon nanotubes. The goal is, by coherently progressing from growth - and characterisation techniques to technological applications for each class of material, to fashion the first comprehensive state-of-the-art review of this fast evolving field of research in carbon materials.

  4. Advanced materials for application in the aerospace and automotive industries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Damm, O

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR conducts research and development (R&D) involving advanced materials with applications in the local automotive and aerospace industries. The relevance of these R&D programmes is illustrated by positioning them in the context of key industry...

  5. Fiscal 1994 technological survey report. Research study on polymer materials by precision polymerization; 1994 nendo seimitsu jugo kobunshi zairyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    In the paradigm that propelled polymer chemistry, there are involved the establishment of polymer concept, engineering plastics, regulation of higher ordered structure, and precision polymerization. The first two produced the polymer chemistry era in the 20th century. The regulation of higher ordered structure and the precision polymerization are the fundamental technologies supporting the polymer chemistry of the 21st century. The precision polymerization is a technology for regulating the stereospecificity, sequential structure, and molecular weight of polymers by regulating atoms and molecules and is referred to the following important techniques to be concrete. In the precision addition polymerization, stereospecific regulation and purification of active site to give living polymers are required while, in the precision condensation polymerization, regulation of condensation probability process to be secondary Marcov chain is necessary, as is the establishment of non-defect condensation condition avoiding high temperature deterioration and the like. In the biomimetic precision polymerization, key issues are the method of incorporating molecular recognition control and sequential structure control by living organs into an industrial process. If the higher ordered structure can be regulated by the precision polymerization, it is possible to obtain numerous high performance/high functional materials such as superconductors. (NEDO)

  6. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A., E-mail: osadik@binghamton.ed [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States); Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Sensors and Environmental Monitoring (CASE), State University of New York-Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, NY 13902 (United States)

    2010-05-30

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  7. Smart electrochemical biosensors: From advanced materials to ultrasensitive devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadik, Omowunmi A.; Mwilu, Samuel K.; Aluoch, Austin

    2010-01-01

    The specificity, simplicity, and inherent miniaturization afforded by advances in modern electronics have allowed electrochemical sensors to rival the most advanced optical protocols. One major obstacle in implementing electrochemistry for studying biomolecular reaction is its inadequate sensitivity. Recent reports however showed unprecedented sensitivities for biomolecular recognition using enhanced electronic amplification provided by new classes of electrode materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, metal nanoparticles, and quantum dots). Biosensor technology is one area where recent advances in nanomaterials are pushing the technological limits of electrochemical sensitivities, thus allowing for the development of new sensor chemistries and devices. This work focuses on our recent work, based on metal-enhanced electrochemical detection, and those of others in combining advanced nanomaterials with electrochemistry for the development of smart sensors for proteins, nucleic acids, drugs and cancer cells.

  8. A total cost perspective on use of polymeric materials in solar collectors – Importance of environmental performance on suitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Bo; Persson, Helena; Meir, Michaela; Rekstad, John

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A polymeric solar collector system was compared with two traditional ones. • It was found the best in terms of climatic performance per solar heat collected. • The differences in climatic cost between the systems compared however are small. • The low climatic cost makes solar heating better compared to natural gas heating. • Use of Ecoindicator 99 for environmental cost makes solar heating even better. - Abstract: To assess the suitability of solar collector systems in which polymeric materials are used versus those in which more traditional materials are used, a case study was undertaken. In this case study a solar heating system with polymeric solar collectors was compared with two equivalent but more traditional solar heating systems: one with flat plate solar collectors and one with evacuated tube solar collectors. To make the comparison, a total cost accounting approach was adopted. The life cycle assessment (LCA) results clearly indicated that the polymeric solar collector system is the best as regards climatic and environmental performance when they are expressed in terms of the IPPC 100 a indicator and the Ecoindicator 99, H/A indicator, respectively. In terms of climatic and environmental costs per amount of solar heat collected, the differences between the three kinds of collector systems were small when compared with existing energy prices. With the present tax rates, it seems unlikely that the differences in environmental and climatic costs will have any significant influence on which system is the most favoured, from a total cost point of view. In the choice between a renewable heat source and a heat source based on the use of a fossil fuel, the conclusion was that for climatic performance to be an important economic factor, the tax or trade rate of carbon dioxide emissions must be increased significantly, given the initial EU carbon dioxide emission trade rate. The rate would need to be at least of the same order of magnitude

  9. A living foundry for Synthetic Biological Materials: A synthetic biology roadmap to new advanced materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A. Le Feuvre

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Society is on the cusp of harnessing recent advances in synthetic biology to discover new bio-based products and routes to their affordable and sustainable manufacture. This is no more evident than in the discovery and manufacture of Synthetic Biological Materials, where synthetic biology has the capacity to usher in a new Materials from Biology era that will revolutionise the discovery and manufacture of innovative synthetic biological materials. These will encompass novel, smart, functionalised and hybrid materials for diverse applications whose discovery and routes to bio-production will be stimulated by the fusion of new technologies positioned across physical, digital and biological spheres. This article, which developed from an international workshop held in Manchester, United Kingdom, in 2017 [1], sets out to identify opportunities in the new materials from biology era. It considers requirements, early understanding and foresight of the challenges faced in delivering a Discovery to Manufacturing Pipeline for synthetic biological materials using synthetic biology approaches. This challenge spans the complete production cycle from intelligent and predictive design, fabrication, evaluation and production of synthetic biological materials to new ways of bringing these products to market. Pathway opportunities are identified that will help foster expertise sharing and infrastructure development to accelerate the delivery of a new generation of synthetic biological materials and the leveraging of existing investments in synthetic biology and advanced materials research to achieve this goal. Keywords: Synthetic biology, Materials, Biological materials, Biomaterials, Advanced materials

  10. Provisional materials: advances lead to extensive options for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comisi, John C

    2015-01-01

    The progression of provisional materials to bis-acrylics has lead to such improvements as easier handling, improved compressive and tensile strength, less water sorption, and less shrinkage. The end-result is more options for clinicians for high-quality chairside provisional restorations. Newer provisional materials are easy to manipulate and bring increased comfort to the patient. This review of current products affirms that the choices of provisional materials available for the dental professional today are quite extensive and have advanced the quality of interim restorations.

  11. Effective Interfacially Polymerized Polyester Solvent Resistant Nanofiltration Membrane from Bioderived Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Abdellah, Mohamed H.

    2018-05-18

    Utilization of sustainable and environmentally friendly solvents for the preparation of membranes has attracted growing interest in recent years. In this work, a polyester thin film composite solvent resistant nanofiltration (SRNF) membrane is prepared by interfacial polymerization on a cellulose support. The cellulose support is prepared by nonsolvent‐induced phase separation from a dope solution containing an ionic liquid as an environmentally friendly solvent (negligible vapor pressure). The polyester film is formed via the interfacial reaction between quercetin, a plant‐derived polyphenol, and terephthaloyl chloride. Alpha‐pinene is used as a green alternative solvent to dissolve terephthaloyl chloride (TPC) while quercetin is dissolved in a 0.2 m NaOH solution. The interfacial polymerization reaction is successfully confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy while scanning electron and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the membrane structure. The composite membrane shows an outstanding performance with a molecular weight cut‐off around 330 Da combined with a dimethylformamide (DMF) permeance up to 2.8 L m−2 bar−1 h−1. The membrane is stable in strong aprotic solvents such as DMF offering potential application in the pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries.

  12. Syringyl Methacrylate, a Hardwood Lignin-Based Monomer for High-Tg Polymeric Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Angela L; Reno, Kaleigh H; Nguyen, Ngoc A; Wool, Richard P; Epps, Thomas H

    2016-05-17

    As viable precursors to a diverse array of macromolecules, biomass-derived compounds must impart wide-ranging and precisely controllable properties to polymers. Herein, we report the synthesis and subsequent reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization of a new monomer, syringyl methacrylate (SM, 2,6-dimethoxyphenyl methacrylate), that can facilitate widespread property manipulations in macromolecules. Homopolymers and heteropolymers synthesized from SM and related monomers have broadly tunable and highly controllable glass transition temperatures ranging from 114 to 205 °C and zero-shear viscosities ranging from ∼0.2 kPa·s to ∼17,000 kPa·s at 220 °C, with consistent thermal stabilities. The tailorability of these properties is facilitated by the controlled polymerization kinetics of SM and the fact that one vs two o -methoxy groups negligibly affect monomer reactivity. Moreover, syringol, the precursor to SM, is an abundant component of depolymerized hardwood (e.g., oak) and graminaceous (e.g., switchgrass) lignins, making SM a potentially sustainable and low-cost candidate for tailoring macromolecular properties.

  13. Materials choices for the advanced LWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, J.P.N.; Shoemaker, C.E.; McIlree, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Current light water reactor (LWR) steam generators have been affected by a variety of corrosion and mechanical damage degradation mechanisms. Included are wear caused by tube vibration, intergranular corrosion, pitting, and thinning or wastage of the steam generator tubing and accelerated corrosion of carbon steel supports (denting). The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Steam Generator Owners Groups (I, II) have sponsored laboratory and field studies to provide ameliorative actions for the majority of the damage forms experienced to date. Some of the current corrosion mechanisms are aggravated or caused by unique materials choices or materials interactions. New materials have been proposed and at least partially qualified for use in replacement model steam generators, including an advanced LWR design. In so far as possible, the materials choices for the advanced LWR steam generator avoid the corrosion pitfalls seemingly inherent in the current designs. The EPRI Steam Generator Project staff has recommended materials and design choices for a new steam generator. Based on these recommendations we believe that the advanced LWR steam generators will be much less affected by corrosion and mechanical damage mechanisms than are now experienced

  14. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  15. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  16. Advanced engineering materials and thick film hybrid circuit technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal, S.; Aslam, M.; Mehmood, K.

    2006-01-01

    The use of Thick Film hybrid Technology to manufacture electronic circuits and passive components continues to grow at rapid rate. Thick Film Technology can be viewed as a means of packaging active devices, spanning the gap between monolithic integrated circuit chips and printed circuit boards with attached active and passive components. An advancement in engineering materials has moved from a formulating art to a base of greater understanding of relationship of material chemistry to the details of electrical and mechanical performance. This amazing advancement in the field of engineering materials has brought us up to a magnificent standard that we are able to manufacture small size, low cost and sophisticated electronic circuits of Military, Satellite systems, Robotics, Medical and Telecommunications. (author)

  17. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  18. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  19. Advanced Materials and Nano technology for Sustainable Energy Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Z.; Wu, Ch.H.; Zhu, Z.; Zhao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Energy is the material foundation of human activities and also the single most valuable resource for the production activities of human society. Materials play a pivotal role in advancing technologies that can offer efficient renewable energy solutions for the future. This special issue has been established as an international foremost interdisciplinary forum that aims to publish high quality and original full research articles on all aspects of the study of materials for the deployment of renewable and sustainable energy technologies. The special issue covers experimental and theoretical aspects of materials and prototype devices for sustainable energy conversion, storage, and saving, together with materials needed for renewable energy production. It brings together stake holders from universities, industries, government agents, and businesses that are involved in the invention, design, development, and implementation of sustainable technologies. The research work has already been published in this special issue which discusses comprehensive technologies for wastewater treatment, strategies for controlling gaseous pollutant releases within chemical plant, evaluation of FCC catalysis poisoning mechanism, clean technologies for fossil fuel use, new-type photo catalysis material design with controllable morphology for solar energy conversion, and so forth. These studies describe important, intriguing, and systematic investigations on advanced materials and technologies for dealing with the key technologies and important issues that continue to haunt the global energy industry. They also tie together many aspects of current energy transportation science and technology, exhibiting outstanding industrial insights that have the potential to encourage and stimulate fresh perspectives on challenges, opportunities, and solutions to energy and environmental sustainability

  20. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  1. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Savannah River National Laboratory Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2011-10-29

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme

  2. The compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with simulated double-shell slurry feed at 90 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Hymas, C.R.

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with a low-level radioactive waste slurry called double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). The evaluation was necessary as part of the permitting process authorized by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL-94-580. Materials that were examined included five flexible membrane liners (Hytrel reg sign polyester, polyurethane, 8130 XR5 reg sign, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The liner and pipe samples were immersed for 120 days in the synthetic DSSE at 90 degree C, the maximum expected temperature in the waste disposal scenario. Physical properties of the liner and pipe samples were measured before immersion and every 30 days after immersion, in accordance with EPA Method 9090. In addition, some of the materials were exposed to four different radiation doses after 30 days of immersion. Physical properties of these materials were measured immediately after exposure and after an additional 90 days of immersion to determine each material's response to radiation, and whether radiation exposure affected the chemical compatibility of the material. 20 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs

  3. Advances in electrode materials for Li-based rechargeable batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hui [China Academy of Space Technology (CAST), Beijing (China); Mao, Chengyu [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Li, Jianlin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Chen, Ruiyong [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology (KIST), Saarbrucken (Germany); Saarland Univ., Saarbrucken (Germany)

    2017-07-05

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries store energy as chemical energy in electrode materials during charge and can convert the chemical energy into electrical energy when needed. Tremendous attention has been paid to screen electroactive materials, to evaluate their structural integrity and cycling reversibility, and to improve the performance of electrode materials. This review discusses recent advances in performance enhancement of both anode and cathode through nanoengineering active materials and applying surface coatings, in order to effectively deal with the challenges such as large volume variation, instable interface, limited cyclability and rate capability. We also introduce and discuss briefly the diversity and new tendencies in finding alternative lithium storage materials, safe operation enabled in aqueous electrolytes, and configuring novel symmetric electrodes and lithium-based flow batteries.

  4. Study of fracture and stress-induced morphological instabilities in polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen

    We study the phenomena of fracture in polymers at the molecular and continuum level. At a molecular level, we study the failure of polymer/polymer interfaces. Our main focus is on a specific mode of failure known as chain pull-out fracture, which is common to weak adhesive junctions, and polymer blends and mixtures. In the case of the interface between incompatible polymers, reinforcement is achieved by adding a block copolymer to the interface. We introduce a microscopic model based on Brownian dynamics to investigate the effect of the polymerization index N, of the block connector chain, on fracture toughness of such reinforced polymeric junctions. We consider the mushroom regime, where connector chains are grafted with low surface density, for the case of large pulling velocity. We find that for short chains the interface fracture toughness depends linearly on the polymerization index N of the connector chains, while for longer chains the dependence becomes N 3/2. We propose a scaling argument, based on the geometry of the initial configuration, that accounts for both short and long chains and the crossover between them. At the continuum level, we study the pattern selection mechanism of finger-like crack growth phenomena in gradient driven growth problems in general, and the structure of stress-induced morphological instabilities in crazing of polymer glasses in particular. We simulate solidification in a narrow channel through the use of a phase-field model with an adaptive grid. By tuning a dimensionless parameter, the Peclet number, we show a continuous crossover from a free dendrite at high Peclet numbers to anisotropic viscous fingering at low Peclet numbers. At low Peclet numbers we find good agreement between our results, theoretical predictions, and experiment, providing the first quantitative test of solvability theory for anisotropic viscous fingers. For high undercoolings, we find new phenomena, a solid forger which satisfies stability and

  5. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  6. Solid-phase extraction of the alcohol abuse biomarker phosphatidylethanol using newly synthesized polymeric sorbent materials containing quaternary heterocyclic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Mariana; Jagadeesan, Kishore Kumar; Billing, Johan; Yilmaz, Ecevit; Laurell, Thomas; Ekström, Simon

    2017-10-13

    Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is an interesting biomarker finding increased use for detecting long term alcohol abuse with high specificity and sensitivity. Prior to detection, sample preparation is an unavoidable step in the work-flow of PEth analysis and new protocols may facilitate it. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) is a versatile sample preparation method widely spread in biomedical laboratories due to its simplicity of use and the possibility of automation. In this work, SPE was used for the first time to directly extract PEth from spiked human plasma and spiked human blood. A library of polymeric SPE materials with different surface functionalities was screened for PEth extraction in order to identify the surface characteristics that control PEth retention and recovery. The plasma samples were diluted 1:10 (v/v) in water and spiked at different concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 5μM. The library of SPE materials was then evaluated using the proposed SPE method and detection was done by LC-MS/MS. One SPE material efficiently retained and recovered PEth from spiked human plasma. With this insight, four new SPE materials were formulated and synthesized based on the surface characteristics of the best SPE material found in the first screening. These new materials were tested with spiked human blood, to better mimic a real clinical sample. All the newly synthetized materials outperformed the pre-existing commercially available materials. Recovery values for the new SPE materials were found between 29.5% and 48.6% for the extraction of PEth in spiked blood. A material based on quaternized 1-vinylimidazole with a poly(trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) backbone was found suitable for PEth extraction in spiked blood showing the highest analyte recovery in this experiment, 48.6%±6.4%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced Electrical Materials and Components Development: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2005-01-01

    The primary means to develop advanced electrical components is to develop new and improved materials for magnetic components (transformers, inductors, etc.), capacitors, and semiconductor switches and diodes. This paper will give an update of the Advanced Power Electronics and Components Technology being developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center for use in future Power Management and Distribution subsystems used in space power systems for spacecraft and lunar and planetary surface power. The initial description and status of this technology program was presented two years ago at the First International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference held at Portsmouth, Virginia, August 2003. The present paper will give a brief background of the previous work reported and a summary of research performed the past several years on soft magnetic materials characterization, dielectric materials and capacitor developments, high quality silicon carbide atomically smooth substrates, and SiC static and dynamic device characterization under elevated temperature conditions. The rationale for and the benefits of developing advanced electrical materials and components for the PMAD subsystem and also for the total power system will also be briefly discussed.

  8. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  9. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrell, C.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the Department of Energy. The mission of the AIM Program is to conduct applied research, development, and applications engineering work, in partnership with industry, to commercialize new or improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. AIM is responsible for identifying, supporting, and coordinating multidisciplinary projects to solve identified industrial needs and transferring the technology to the industrial sector. Program investigators in the DOE National Laboratories are working closely with approximately 100 companies, including 15 partners in Cooperative Research and Development Agreements. Work is being done in a wide variety of materials technologies, including intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The Program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy consuming process industries, including forest products, glass, steel, aluminum, foundries, chemicals, and refineries. To support OITs {open_quotes}Industries of the Future{close_quotes} initiatives and to improve the relevance of materials research, assessments of materials needs and opportunities in the process industries are being made. These assessments are being used for program planning and priority setting; support of work to satisfy those needs is being provided. Many new materials that have come into the marketplace in recent years, or that will be available for commercial use within a few more years, offer substantial benefits to society. This document contains 28 reports on advanced materials research. Individual reports have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  10. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH and light-emitting diode (LED units (LCUs. Materials and Methods Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12 during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey, a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE, and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH, was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05. Conclusions Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  11. Recent Advances in Analytical Pyrolysis to Investigate Organic Materials in Heritage Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degano, Ilaria; Modugno, Francesca; Bonaduce, Ilaria; Ribechini, Erika; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2018-06-18

    The molecular characterization of organic materials in samples from artworks and historical objects traditionally entailed qualitative and quantitative analyses by HPLC and GC. Today innovative approaches based on analytical pyrolysis enable samples to be analysed without any chemical pre-treatment. Pyrolysis, which is often considered as a screening technique, shows previously unexplored potential thanks to recent instrumental developments. Organic materials that are macromolecular in nature, or undergo polymerization upon curing and ageing can now be better investigated. Most constituents of paint layers and archaeological organic substances contain major insoluble and chemically non-hydrolysable fractions that are inaccessible to GC or HPLC. To date, molecular scientific investigations of the organic constituents of artworks and historical objects have mostly focused on the minor constituents of the sample. This review presents recent advances in the qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of organic materials in heritage objects based on analytical pyrolysis coupled with mass spectrometry. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  13. Advanced Bioinks for 3D Printing: A Materials Science Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimene, David; Lennox, Kimberly K; Kaunas, Roland R; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2016-06-01

    Advanced bioinks for 3D printing are rationally designed materials intended to improve the functionality of printed scaffolds outside the traditional paradigm of the "biofabrication window". While the biofabrication window paradigm necessitates compromise between suitability for fabrication and ability to accommodate encapsulated cells, recent developments in advanced bioinks have resulted in improved designs for a range of biofabrication platforms without this tradeoff. This has resulted in a new generation of bioinks with high print fidelity, shear-thinning characteristics, and crosslinked scaffolds with high mechanical strength, high cytocompatibility, and the ability to modulate cellular functions. In this review, we describe some of the promising strategies being pursued to achieve these goals, including multimaterial, interpenetrating network, nanocomposite, and supramolecular bioinks. We also provide an overview of current and emerging trends in advanced bioink synthesis and biofabrication, and evaluate the potential applications of these novel biomaterials to clinical use.

  14. Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) Advanced Integration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkee, Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cipiti, Ben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fallgren, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jarman, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Shelly [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Meier, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Osburn, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ticknor, Lawrence O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yoo, Tae-Sic [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The development of sustainable advanced nuclear fuel cycles is a long-term goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy’s (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies program. The Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) campaign is supporting research and development (R&D) of advanced instrumentation, analysis tools, and integration methodologies to meet this goal (Miller, 2015). This advanced R&D is intended to facilitate safeguards and security by design of fuel cycle facilities. The lab-scale demonstration of a virtual facility, distributed test bed, that connects the individual tools being developed at National Laboratories and university research establishments, is a key program milestone for 2020. These tools will consist of instrumentation and devices as well as computer software for modeling, simulation and integration.

  15. Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) Advanced Integration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cipiti, Ben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Durkee, Jr., Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fallgren, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jarman, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Shelly [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meier, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Osburn, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ticknor, Lawrence O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yoo, Tae-Sic [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-30

    The development of sustainable advanced nuclear fuel cycles is a long-term goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy’s (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies program. The Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) campaign is supporting research and development (R&D) of advanced instrumentation, analysis tools, and integration methodologies to meet this goal (Miller, 2015). This advanced R&D is intended to facilitate safeguards and security by design of fuel cycle facilities. The lab-scale demonstration of a virtual facility, distributed test bed, that connects the individual tools being developed at National Laboratories and university research establishments, is a key program milestone for 2020. These tools will consist of instrumentation and devices as well as computer software for modeling, simulation and integration.

  16. Advanced Electric and Magnetic Material Models for FDTD Electromagnetic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Brian R; Nelson, Scott D

    2005-01-01

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which requires nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes an...

  17. [Advances of poly (ionic liquid) materials in separation science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuicui; Guo, Ting; Su, Rina; Gu, Yuchen; Deng, Qiliang

    2015-11-01

    Ionic liquids, as novel ionization reagents, possess beneficial characteristics including good solubility, conductivity, thermal stability, biocompatibility, low volatility and non-flammability. Ionic liquids are attracting a mass of attention of analytical chemists. Poly (ionic liquid) materials have common performances of ionic liquids and polymers, and have been successfully applied in separation science area. In this paper, we discuss the interaction mechanisms between the poly(ionic liquid) materials and analytes including hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions, hydrogen bond, ion exchange, π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions, and summarize the application advances of the poly(ionic liquid) materials in solid phase extraction, chromatographic separation and capillary electrophoresis. At last, we describe the future prospect of poly(ionic liquid) materials.

  18. Novel Nanocomposite Materials for Advanced Li-Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Cai

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured materials lie at the heart of fundamental advances in efficient energy storage and/or conversion, in which surface processes and transport kinetics play determining roles. Nanocomposite materials will have a further enhancement in properties compared to their constituent phases. This Review describes some recent developments of nanocomposite materials for high-performance Li-ion rechargeable batteries, including carbon-oxide nanocomposites, polymer-oxide nanocomposites, metal-oxide nanocomposites, and silicon-based nanocomposites, etc. The major goal of this Review is to highlight some new progress in using these nanocomposite materials as electrodes to develop Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability.

  19. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-05-05

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes.

  20. ADVANCED ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC MATERIAL MODELS FOR FDTD ELECTROMAGNETIC CODES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, B R; Nelson, S D; Langdon, S

    2005-01-01

    The modeling of dielectric and magnetic materials in the time domain is required for pulse power applications, pulsed induction accelerators, and advanced transmission lines. For example, most induction accelerator modules require the use of magnetic materials to provide adequate Volt-sec during the acceleration pulse. These models require hysteresis and saturation to simulate the saturation wavefront in a multipulse environment. In high voltage transmission line applications such as shock or soliton lines the dielectric is operating in a highly nonlinear regime, which require nonlinear models. Simple 1-D models are developed for fast parameterization of transmission line structures. In the case of nonlinear dielectrics, a simple analytic model describing the permittivity in terms of electric field is used in a 3-D finite difference time domain code (FDTD). In the case of magnetic materials, both rate independent and rate dependent Hodgdon magnetic material models have been implemented into 3-D FDTD codes and 1-D codes

  1. Mishap risk control for advanced aerospace/composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Although advanced aerospace materials and advanced composites provide outstanding performance, they also present several unique post-mishap environmental, safety, and health concerns. The purpose of this paper is to provide information on some of the unique hazards and concerns associated with these materials when damaged by fire, explosion, or high-energy impact. Additionally, recommended procedures and precautions are addressed as they pertain to all phases of a composite aircraft mishap response, including fire-fighting, investigation, recovery, clean-up, and guidelines are general in nature and not application-specific. The goal of this project is to provide factual and realistic information which can be used to develop consistent and effective procedures and policies to minimize the potential environmental, safety, and health impacts of a composite aircraft mishap response effort.

  2. Sol-gel Technology and Advanced Electrochemical Energy Storage Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-tse; Zheng, Haixing

    1996-01-01

    Advanced materials play an important role in the development of electrochemical energy devices such as batteries, fuel cells, and electrochemical capacitors. The sol-gel process is a versatile solution for use in the fabrication of ceramic materials with tailored stoichiometry, microstructure, and properties. This processing technique is particularly useful in producing porous materials with high surface area and low density, two of the most desirable characteristics for electrode materials. In addition,the porous surface of gels can be modified chemically to create tailored surface properties, and inorganic/organic micro-composites can be prepared for improved material performance device fabrication. Applications of several sol-gel derived electrode materials in different energy storage devices are illustrated in this paper. V2O5 gels are shown to be a promising cathode material for solid state lithium batteries. Carbon aerogels, amorphous RuO2 gels and sol-gel derived hafnium compounds have been studied as electrode materials for high energy density and high power density electrochemical capacitors.

  3. Combinatorial methods for advanced materials research and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, R.; Dondorf, S.; Hauck, M.; Horbach, D.; Kaiser, M.; Krysta, S.; Kyrylov, O.; Muenstermann, E.; Philipps, M.; Reichert, K.; Strauch, G. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Huettenkunde

    2001-10-01

    The applicability of combinatorial methods in developing advanced materials is illustrated presenting four examples for the deposition and characterization of one- and two-dimensionally laterally graded coatings, which were deposited by means of (reactive) magnetron sputtering and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. To emphasize the advantages of combinatorial approaches, metastable hard coatings like (Ti,Al)N and (Ti,Al,Hf)N respectively, as well as Ge-Sb-Te based films for rewritable optical data storage were investigated with respect to the relations between structure, composition, and the desired materials properties. (orig.)

  4. Nanostructured materials for advanced energy conversion and storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Antonino Salvatore; Bruce, Peter; Scrosati, Bruno; Tarascon, Jean-Marie; van Schalkwijk, Walter

    2005-05-01

    New materials hold the key to fundamental advances in energy conversion and storage, both of which are vital in order to meet the challenge of global warming and the finite nature of fossil fuels. Nanomaterials in particular offer unique properties or combinations of properties as electrodes and electrolytes in a range of energy devices. This review describes some recent developments in the discovery of nanoelectrolytes and nanoelectrodes for lithium batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. The advantages and disadvantages of the nanoscale in materials design for such devices are highlighted.

  5. Dancing with light advances in photofunctional liquid-crystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in this field indicates that integrating photochromic molecules into LC materials enables one to photo-manipulate unique features such as photoinduced phase transition, photocontrolled alignment and phototriggered molecular cooperative motion, leading to their novel applications beyond displays. This book introduces readers to this field, from the primary- to the advanced level in photoresponsive LC materials. The subject is introduced step-by-step, including the basic knowledge of LCs, photoresponsive properties of LCs, and their detailed performances in the form of low-molecu

  6. Ultrasonic and radiographic evaluation of advanced aerospace materials: Ceramic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    Two conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques were used to evaluate advanced ceramic composite materials. It was shown that neither ultrasonic C-scan nor radiographic imaging can individually provide sufficient data for an accurate nondestructive evaluation. Both ultrasonic C-scan and conventional radiographic imaging are required for preliminary evaluation of these complex systems. The material variations that were identified by these two techniques are porosity, delaminations, bond quality between laminae, fiber alignment, fiber registration, fiber parallelism, and processing density flaws. The degree of bonding between fiber and matrix cannot be determined by either of these methods. An alternative ultrasonic technique, angular power spectrum scanning (APSS) is recommended for quantification of this interfacial bond.

  7. Technology readiness levels for advanced nuclear fuels and materials development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, W.J., E-mail: jon.carmack@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, L.A.; Wigeland, R.A. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Todosow, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Definition of nuclear fuels system technology readiness level. • Identification of evaluation criteria for nuclear fuel system TRLs. • Application of TRLs to fuel systems. - Abstract: The Technology Readiness process quantitatively assesses the maturity of a given technology. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) pioneered the process in the 1980s to inform the development and deployment of new systems for space applications. The process was subsequently adopted by the Department of Defense (DoD) to develop and deploy new technology and systems for defense applications. It was also adopted by the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the maturity of new technologies in major construction projects. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is needed to improve the performance and safety of current and advanced reactors, and ultimately close the nuclear fuel cycle. Because deployment of new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the assessment process to advanced fuel development is useful as a management, communication, and tracking tool. This article provides definition of technology readiness levels (TRLs) for nuclear fuel technology as well as selected examples regarding the methods by which TRLs are currently used to assess the maturity of nuclear fuels and materials under development in the DOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Program within the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC).

  8. Cyclic stress-strain behavior of polymeric nonwoven structures for the use as artificial leaflet material for transcatheter heart valve prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbeiter Daniela

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Xenogenic leaflet material, bovine and porcine pericardium, is widely used for the fabrication of surgically implanted and transcatheter heart valve prostheses. As a biological material, long term durability of pericardium is limited due to calcification, degeneration and homogeneity. Therefore, polymeric materials represent a promising approach for a next generation of artificial heart valve leaflets with improved durability. Within the current study we analyzed the mechanical performance of polymeric structures based on elastomeric materials. Polymeric cast films were prepared and nonwovens were manufactured in an electrospinning process. Analysis of cyclic stress-strain behavior was performed, using a universal testing machine. The uniaxial cyclic tensile experiments of the elastomeric samples yielded a non-linear elastic response due to viscoelastic behavior with hysteresis. Equilibrium of stress-strain curves was found after a specific number of cycles, for cast films and nonwovens, respectively. In conclusion, preconditioning was found obligatory for the evaluation of the mechanical performance of polymeric materials for the use as artificial leaflet material for heart valve prostheses.

  9. Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The grant focused on the purchase of a Renishaw InVia Raman microscope to support and enhance the research in...laser. The system includes an accessory for polarization (for 785 nm) and an optical cable that allows external Raman measurements. The manufacturer...UU 18-04-2016 1-Feb-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Raman Spectrometer for the Characterization of Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials The views

  10. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 1 presents articles about junction electroluminescence; metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) physics; ion implantation in semiconductors; and electron transport through insulating thin films. The book describes the basic physics of carrier injection; energy transfer and recombination mechanisms; state of the art efficiencies; and future prospects for light emitting diodes. The text then discusses solid state spectroscopy, which is the pair spectra observed in gallium phosphide photoluminescence. The extensive studies

  11. Durable and Washable Antibacterial Copper Nanoparticles Bridged by Surface Grafting Polymer Brushes on Cotton and Polymeric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chufeng Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the durability of antibacterial coating on cotton and polymeric substrates, surface initiated grafting polymer brushes are introduced onto the substrates surface to bridge copper nanoparticles coatings and substrate. The morphologies of the composites consisting of the copper nanoparticles and polymer brushes were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was found that copper nanoparticles were uniformly and firmly distributed on the surfaces of the substrates by the polymer brushes; meanwhile, the reinforced concrete-like structures were formed in the composite materials. The substrates coated by the copper nanoparticles showed the efficient antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and Escherichia coli (E. coli even after washing by 30 cycles. The copper nanoparticles were tethered on the substrates by the strong chemical bonds, which led to the excellent washable fitness and durability. The change of the phase structure of the copper was analyzed to investigate the release mechanism of copper ions.

  12. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavinasab, Sayed-Mostafa; Khoroushi, Maryam; Moharreri, Mohammadreza; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs) increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs) of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) units (LCUs). Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12) during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey), a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE), and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH), was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p 0.05). Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU.

  14. Advanced composite structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Advanced material concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kreisler S. Y.; Landis, Abraham L.; Chow, Andrea W.; Hamlin, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    To achieve acceptable performance and long-term durability at elevated temperatures (350 to 600 F) for high-speed transport systems, further improvements of the high-performance matrix materials will be necessary to achieve very long-term (60,000-120,000 service hours) retention of mechanical properties and damage tolerance. This report emphasizes isoimide modification as a complementary technique to semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (SIPN's) to achieve greater processibility, better curing dynamics, and possibly enhanced thermo-mechanical properties in composites. A key result is the demonstration of enhanced processibility of isoimide-modified linear and thermo-setting polyimide systems.

  15. Energy materials. Advances in characterization, modelling and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Eldrup, M.; Hansen, N.; Juul Jensen, D.; Nielsen, E.M.; Nielsen, S.F.; Soerensen, B.F.; Pedersen, A.S.; Vegge, T.; West, S.S.

    2008-01-01

    Energy-related topics in the modern world and energy research programmes cover the range from basic research to applications and structural length scales from micro to macro. Materials research and development is a central part of the energy area as break-throughs in many technologies depend on a successful development and validation of new or advanced materials. The Symposium is organized by the Materials Research Department at Risoe DTU - National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy. The Department concentrates on energy problems combining basic and applied materials research with special focus on the key topics: wind, fusion, superconductors and hydrogen. The symposium is based on these key topics and focus on characterization of materials for energy applying neutron, X-ray and electron diffraction. Of special interest is research carried out at large facilities such as reactors and synchrotrons, supplemented by other experimental techniques and modelling on different length scales that underpins experiments. The Proceedings contain 15 key note presentations and 30 contributed presentations, covering the abovementioned key topics relevant for the energy materials. The contributions clearly show the importance of materials research when developing sustainable energy technologies and also that many challenges remain to be approached. (BA)

  16. Polyurethane/organo clay nano composite materials via in-situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehab, A.; Agag, T; Akelah, A.; Shalaby, N.

    2005-01-01

    Polyurethane/organo clay nano composites have been synthesized via in situ polymerization. The organo clay firstly prepared by intercalation of lyamine or amino lauric acid into montmorillonite-clay (MMT) through ion exchange process. The syntheses of polyurethane/organo clay hybrid films containing different ratio of clay were carried out by swelling the organo clay, into diol and diamine or into different kinds of diols, followed by addition of diisocyanate. The nano composites with dispersed structure of MMT was obtained as evidence by scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. X-ray analysis showed that the d-spacing increased to more than 44A since there is no peaks corresponding to do spacing in organo clay with all the ratios (1, 5, 10, 20%). Also, SEM results confirm the dispersion of nanometer silicate layers in the polyurethane matrix. This indicated that the clay was completely exfoliated and homogeneous dispersion in the polyurethane matrix. Also, it was found that the presence of organo clay leads to improvement the mechanical properties. Since, the tensile strength increased with increasing the organo clay contents to 20% by the ratio 194% in compared to the 1H: with 0% organo clay. Also, the elongation is a decreases with increasing the organo clay contents. The results shown the tensile strength of PU/SMA/ALA-MMT nano composites is high by 6-7 times than the corresponding to PU/Tvr-MMT

  17. Preparation and biological evaluation of a fibroblast growth factor-2-apatite composite layer on polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Kenkichi; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ioku, Koji [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Aoba 6-6-20, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Oyane, Ayako [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Hyodo, Koji [Human Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8564 (Japan); Ito, Atsuo; Sogo, Yu, E-mail: a-oyane@aist.go.j [Human Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central 6, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    A polymeric percutaneous device with good biocompatibility and resistance to bacterial infection is required clinically. In this study, a fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-hydroxyapatite (HAp) composite layer (FHAp layer) was formed on the surfaces of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH) specimens using a coating process in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution supplemented with FGF-2. FGF-2 in the FHAp layer retained its biological activity to promote proliferation of fibroblasts. The EVOH specimens coated with HAp and FHAp layers were percutaneously implanted in the scalp of rats. Not only the HAp layer but also the FHAp layer showed good biocompatibility, and FGF-2 showed no harmful effects on the skin tissue responses to the implanted specimen as long as 14 d. No significantly higher infection resistance was verified for the FHAp layer over the HAp layer, although an FHAp layer coated on a metallic percutaneous device for bone fixation demonstrated higher resistance to bacterial infection over an HAp layer in the previous study. The efficacy of FHAp layers coated on percutaneous implants in resistance to bacterial infection depends on physical factors including fixation condition, stiffness and movement of implants.

  18. Recent Advances in Porous Carbon Materials for Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libin; Hu, Xianluo

    2018-06-18

    Climate change and the energy crisis have promoted the rapid development of electrochemical energy-storage devices. Owing to many intriguing physicochemical properties, such as excellent chemical stability, high electronic conductivity, and a large specific surface area, porous carbon materials have always been considering as a promising candidate for electrochemical energy storage. To date, a wide variety of porous carbon materials based upon molecular design, pore control, and compositional tailoring have been proposed for energy-storage applications. This focus review summarizes recent advances in the synthesis of various porous carbon materials from the view of energy storage, particularly in the past three years. Their applications in representative electrochemical energy-storage devices, such as lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors, and lithium-ion hybrid capacitors, are discussed in this review, with a look forward to offer some inspiration and guidelines for the exploitation of advanced carbon-based energy-storage materials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Development of Novel Polymeric Materials for Gene Therapy and pH-Sensitive Drug Delivery: Modeling, Synthesis, Characterization, and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Brian Curtis [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The underlying theme of this thesis is the use of polymeric materials in bioapplications. Chapters 2-5 either develop a fundamental understanding of current materials used for bioapplications or establish protocols and procedures used in characterizing and synthesizing novel materials. In chapters 6 and 7 these principles and procedures are applied to the development of materials to be used for gene therapy and drug delivery. Chapter one is an introduction to the ideas that will be necessary to understand the subsequent chapters, as well as a literature review of these topics. Chapter two is a paper that has been published in the ''Journal of Controlled Release'' that examines the mechanism of drug release from a polymer gel, as well as experimental design suggestions for the evaluation of water soluble drug delivery systems. Chapter three is a paper that has been published in the ''Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences'' that discusses the effect ionic salts have on properties of the polymer systems examined in chapter two. Chapter four is a paper published in the Materials Research Society Fall 2000 Symposium Series dealing with the design and synthesis of a pH-sensitive polymeric drug delivery device. Chapter five is a paper that has been published in the journal ''Biomaterials'' proposing a novel polymer/metal composite for use as a biomaterial in hip arthroplasty surgery. Chapter six is a paper that will appear in an upcoming volume of the Journal ''Biomaterials'' dealing with the synthesis of a novel water soluble cationic polymer with possible applications in non-viral gene therapy. Chapter seven is a paper that has been submitted to ''Macromolecules'' discussing several novel block copolymers based on poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(diethylamino ethyl methacrylate) that possess both pH-sensitive and temperature sensitive properties. Chapter eight contains a

  20. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    to heat-sinking units. This dissertation presents results of the experimental investigation and theoretical interpretation of thermal transport in the advanced engineered materials, which include thin films for thermal management of nanoscale devices, nanostructured superlattices as promising candidates for high-efficiency thermoelectric materials, and improved TIMs with graphene and metal particles as fillers providing enhanced thermal conductivity. The advanced engineered materials studied include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and microcrystalline diamond (MCD) films on Si substrates, directly integrated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on GaN, free-standing polycrystalline graphene (PCG) films, graphene oxide (GOx) films, and "pseudo-superlattices" of the mechanically exfoliated Bi2Te3 topological insulator films, and thermal interface materials (TIMs) with graphene fillers.

  1. Collimation Cleaning at the LHC with Advanced Secondary Collimator Materials

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085459; Bruce, Roderik; Mereghetti, Alessio; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, A

    2015-01-01

    The LHC collimation system must ensure efficient beam halo cleaning in all machine conditions. The first run in 2010-2013 showed that the LHC performance may be limited by collimator material-related concerns, such as the contribution from the present carbon-based secondary collimators to the machine impedance and, consequently, to the beam instability. Novel materials based on composites are currently under development for the next generation of LHC collimators to address these limitations. Particle tracking simulations of collimation efficiency were performed using the Sixtrack code and a material database updated to model these composites. In this paper, the simulation results will be presented with the aim of studying the effect of the advanced collimators on the LHC beam cleaning.

  2. Computational modeling, optimization and manufacturing simulation of advanced engineering materials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents recent research work focused in the development of adequate theoretical and numerical formulations to describe the behavior of advanced engineering materials.  Particular emphasis is devoted to applications in the fields of biological tissues, phase changing and porous materials, polymers and to micro/nano scale modeling. Sensitivity analysis, gradient and non-gradient based optimization procedures are involved in many of the chapters, aiming at the solution of constitutive inverse problems and parameter identification. All these relevant topics are exposed by experienced international and inter institutional research teams resulting in a high level compilation. The book is a valuable research reference for scientists, senior undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for engineers acting in the area of computational material modeling.

  3. Advanced fluoride-based materials for energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Fluoride-Based Materials for Energy Conversion provides thorough and applied information on new fluorinated materials for chemical energy devices, exploring the electrochemical properties and behavior of fluorinated materials in lithium ion and sodium ion batteries, fluoropolymers in fuel cells, and fluorinated carbon in capacitors, while also exploring synthesis applications, and both safety and stability issues. As electronic devices, from cell phones to hybrid and electric vehicles, are increasingly common and prevalent in modern lives and require dependable, stable chemical energy devices with high-level functions are becoming increasingly important. As research and development in this area progresses rapidly, fluorine compounds play a critical role in this rapid progression. Fluorine, with its small size and the highest electronegativity, yields stable compounds under various conditions for utilization as electrodes, electrolytes, and membranes in energy devices. The book is an ideal reference f...

  4. A literature survey on gas turbines materials - recent advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The 9001F gas turbine (rating of about 200 MW) is one of the most recent versions of the 9000 series, benefitting from the developments and technological advances, notably in regard to structural materials. In the framework of the EDF gas turbine engineering and construction program, evaluating the nature of these developments can provide guidance in appraising the construction materials proposed by other manufacturers. After a brief comparison between the Gennevilliers 9001F engine and the 85 MW 9000B gas turbine at Bouchain, ordered by EDF in 1971, various research aspects for optimizing gas turbine refractory material mechanical properties and corrosion resistance (superalloys, monolithic ceramics and composite ceramics) are presented; present current and future trends for high power equipment of this type are also discussed

  5. Advances in wind turbine blade design and materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind energy is gaining critical ground in the area of renewable energy, with wind energy being predicted to provide up to 8% of the world’s consumption of electricity by 2021. Advances in wind turbine blade design and materials reviews the design and functionality of wind turbine rotor blades...... as well as the requirements and challenges for composite materials used in both current and future designs of wind turbine blades. Part one outlines the challenges and developments in wind turbine blade design, including aerodynamic and aeroelastic design features, fatigue loads on wind turbine blades......, and characteristics of wind turbine blade airfoils. Part two discusses the fatigue behavior of composite wind turbine blades, including the micromechanical modelling and fatigue life prediction of wind turbine blade composite materials, and the effects of resin and reinforcement variations on the fatigue resistance...

  6. Review on advanced composite materials boring mechanism and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Runping; Wang, Chengyong

    2011-05-01

    With the rapid development of aviation and aerospace manufacturing technology, advanced composite materials represented by carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) and super hybrid composites (fibre/metal plates) are more and more widely applied. The fibres are mainly carbon fibre, boron fibre, Aramid fiber and Sic fibre. The matrixes are resin matrix, metal matrix and ceramic matrix. Advanced composite materials have higher specific strength and higher specific modulus than glass fibre reinforced resin composites of the 1st generation. They are widely used in aviation and aerospace industry due to their high specific strength, high specific modulus, excellent ductility, anticorrosion, heat-insulation, sound-insulation, shock absorption and high&low temperature resistance. They are used for radomes, inlets, airfoils(fuel tank included), flap, aileron, vertical tail, horizontal tail, air brake, skin, baseboards and tails, etc. Its hardness is up to 62~65HRC. The holes are greatly affected by the fibre laminates direction of carbon fibre reinforced composite material due to its anisotropy when drilling in unidirectional laminates. There are burrs, splits at the exit because of stress concentration. Besides there is delamination and the hole is prone to be smaller. Burrs are caused by poor sharpness of cutting edge, delamination, tearing, splitting are caused by the great stress caused by high thrust force. Poorer sharpness of cutting edge leads to lower cutting performance and higher drilling force at the same time. The present research focuses on the interrelation between rotation speed, feed, drill's geometry, drill life, cutting mode, tools material etc. and thrust force. At the same time, holes quantity and holes making difficulty of composites have also increased. It requires high performance drills which won't bring out defects and have long tool life. It has become a trend to develop super hard material tools and tools with special geometry for drilling

  7. Functional organic materials based on polymerized liquid-crystal monomers: supramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Debije, M.G.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Functional organic materials are of great interest for a variety of applications. To obtain precise functional properties, well-defined hierarchically ordered supramolecular materials are crucial. The self-assembly of liquid crystals has proven to be an extremely useful tool in the development of

  8. Micro Engineering: Experiments conducted on the use of polymeric materials in micro injection moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, Christian; Tosello, Guido; Nestler, Joerg

    2008-01-01

    To advance micro injection moulding it is necessary to study systematically the factors affecting process and tooling reliability. This paper reviews the main findings of Cardiff Universities 4M and SEMOFS research in this field. In particular, the factors affecting the manufacturability of micro...

  9. A manufacturing database of advanced materials used in spacecraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Han P.

    1994-12-01

    Cost savings opportunities over the life cycle of a product are highest in the early exploratory phase when different design alternatives are evaluated not only for their performance characteristics but also their methods of fabrication which really control the ultimate manufacturing costs of the product. In the past, Design-To-Cost methodologies for spacecraft design concentrated on the sizing and weight issues more than anything else at the early so-called 'Vehicle Level' (Ref: DOD/NASA Advanced Composites Design Guide). Given the impact of manufacturing cost, the objective of this study is to identify the principal cost drivers for each materials technology and propose a quantitative approach to incorporating these cost drivers into the family of optimization tools used by the Vehicle Analysis Branch of NASA LaRC to assess various conceptual vehicle designs. The advanced materials being considered include aluminum-lithium alloys, thermoplastic graphite-polyether etherketone composites, graphite-bismaleimide composites, graphite- polyimide composites, and carbon-carbon composites. Two conventional materials are added to the study to serve as baseline materials against which the other materials are compared. These two conventional materials are aircraft aluminum alloys series 2000 and series 7000, and graphite-epoxy composites T-300/934. The following information is available in the database. For each material type, the mechanical, physical, thermal, and environmental properties are first listed. Next the principal manufacturing processes are described. Whenever possible, guidelines for optimum processing conditions for specific applications are provided. Finally, six categories of cost drivers are discussed. They include, design features affecting processing, tooling, materials, fabrication, joining/assembly, and quality assurance issues. It should be emphasized that this database is not an exhaustive database. Its primary use is to make the vehicle designer

  10. Simultaneous sound velocity and thickness measurement by the ultrasonic pitch-catch method for corrosion-layer-forming polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Masahiro; Takizawa, Shota; Sakai, Tetsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko; Kubouchi, Masatoshi

    2018-01-01

    Since thermosetting resins have excellent resistance to chemicals, fiber reinforced plastics composed of such resins and reinforcement fibers are widely used as construction materials for equipment in chemical plants. Such equipment is usually used for several decades under severe corrosive conditions so that failure due to degradation may result. One of the degradation behaviors in thermosetting resins under chemical solutions is "corrosion-layer-forming" degradation. In this type of degradation, surface resins in contact with a solution corrode, and some of them remain asa corrosion layer on the pristine part. It is difficult to precisely measure the thickness of the pristine part of such degradation type materials by conventional pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, because the sound velocity depends on the degree of corrosion of the polymeric material. In addition, the ultrasonic reflection interface between the pristine part and the corrosion layer is obscure. Thus, we propose a pitch-catch method using a pair of normal and angle probes to measure four parameters: the thicknesses of the pristine part and the corrosion layer, and their respective sound velocities. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by measuring a two-layer sample and a sample including corroded parts. The results demonstrate that the pitch-catch method can successfully measure the four parameters and evaluate the residual thickness of the pristine part in the corrosion-layer-forming sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-05-16

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux

  12. Corrosion performance of advanced structural materials in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Li, M.; Rink, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    This report gives a description of the activities in design, fabrication, construction, and assembling of a pumped sodium loop for the sodium compatibility studies on advanced structural materials. The work is the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) portion of the effort on the work project entitled, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials,' and is a part of Advanced Materials Development within the Reactor Campaign. The objective of this project is to develop information on sodium corrosion compatibility of advanced materials being considered for sodium reactor applications. This report gives the status of the sodium pumped loop at Argonne National Laboratory, the specimen details, and the technical approach to evaluate the sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. This report is a deliverable from ANL in FY2010 (M2GAN10SF050302) under the work package G-AN10SF0503 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Fast Reactor Materials.' Two reports were issued in 2009 (Natesan and Meimei Li 2009, Natesan et al. 2009) which examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design specifications for the ANL pumped loop for testing advanced structural materials. Available information was presented on solubility of several metallic and nonmetallic elements along with a discussion of the possible mechanisms for the accumulation of impurities in sodium. That report concluded that the solubility of many metals in sodium is low (<1 part per million) in the temperature range of interest in sodium reactors and such trace amounts would not impact the mechanical integrity of structural materials and components. The earlier report also analyzed the solubility and transport mechanisms of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen in laboratory sodium loops and in reactor systems such as Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, Fast Flux Test Facility, and

  13. A living foundry for Synthetic Biological Materials: A synthetic biology roadmap to new advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Feuvre, Rosalind A; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2018-06-01

    Society is on the cusp of harnessing recent advances in synthetic biology to discover new bio-based products and routes to their affordable and sustainable manufacture. This is no more evident than in the discovery and manufacture of Synthetic Biological Materials , where synthetic biology has the capacity to usher in a new Materials from Biology era that will revolutionise the discovery and manufacture of innovative synthetic biological materials. These will encompass novel, smart, functionalised and hybrid materials for diverse applications whose discovery and routes to bio-production will be stimulated by the fusion of new technologies positioned across physical, digital and biological spheres. This article, which developed from an international workshop held in Manchester, United Kingdom, in 2017 [1], sets out to identify opportunities in the new materials from biology era. It considers requirements, early understanding and foresight of the challenges faced in delivering a Discovery to Manufacturing Pipeline for synthetic biological materials using synthetic biology approaches. This challenge spans the complete production cycle from intelligent and predictive design, fabrication, evaluation and production of synthetic biological materials to new ways of bringing these products to market. Pathway opportunities are identified that will help foster expertise sharing and infrastructure development to accelerate the delivery of a new generation of synthetic biological materials and the leveraging of existing investments in synthetic biology and advanced materials research to achieve this goal.

  14. Research and development project in fiscal 1989 for fundamental technologies for next generation industries. Achievement report on research and development on electrically conductive polymeric materials; 1989 nendo dodensei kobunshi zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-03-01

    With an objective to develop electric and electronic materials characterized by light weight, high corrosion resistance, and easy-to-process performance, and by having functions different from electricity conduction mechanism of metals, researches have been performed on fundamental technologies for electrically conductive polymeric materials. This paper summarizes the achievements in fiscal 1989. In new hydrocarbon conjugate polymers, researches were performed for the purpose of fabricating the conjugate system polymer and dopant complex system conductive thin films, and polyacene system polymer thin films. In developing the vehicular conjugate conductive materials, discussions were given on enhancing the molecular weight dependence and the conductivity by cross-linking the conjugate system, with regard to hydrocarbon system polymers that go through vehicular polymeric intermediates. In the research of vehicular graphite materials, it was discovered that mono-axial mono-plane PPV films and PTV films are graphitized. In developing the hetero aromatic system polymers, researches were advanced on the correlation among the gegen ions, high-order structures, and electric conductivity, mainly on polypyrrole. (NEDO)

  15. Preparation, characterization and thermal properties of nanocapsules containing phase change material n-dodecanol by miniemulsion polymerization with polymerizable emulsifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Fei; Zeng, Xing-Rong; Zhang, Zheng-Guo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We prepare nanocapsules containing n-dodecanol via miniemulsion polymerization. ► Polymerizable emulsifier plays important role in the preparation of nanocapsules. ► Adding co-emulsifier into water phase is helpful to encapsulate n-dodecanol. ► The phase change latent heat of nanocapsule is 98.8 J/g with temperature of 18.2 °C. -- Abstract: Nanocapsules containing phase change material (PCM) n-dodecanol as core and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) as shell were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization with polymerizable emulsifier DNS-86 and co-emulsifier hexadecane (HD). The nanocapsules were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and laser particle diameter analyzer. The effects of polymerizable emulsifier and co-emulsifier on the properties of nanocapsules were studied. The results show that thermal properties of nanocapsules are affected greatly by the addition methods of HD and the amounts of DNS-86 and HD. Adding HD into water phase is helpful for the encapsulation of n-dodecanol. When the mass ratios of DNS-86 to n-dodecanol and the mass ratios of HD to n-dodecanol were 3% and 2%, the phase change latent heat and the encapsulation efficiency of nanocapsules reached to the maximum value of 98.8 J/g and 82.2%, respectively. Spherical nanocapsules with mean diameter of 150 nm and phase change temperature of 18.2 °C are obtained, which are sure to have a good potential for energy storage.

  16. Testing Systems and Results for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Griffith, G.W.; Garnier, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development (ALFD) Pathway. Development and testing of high performance fuel cladding identified as high priority to support: enhancement of fuel performance, reliability, and reactor safety. One of the technologies being examined is an advanced fuel cladding made from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) utilizing silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural material supplementing a commercial Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) tube. A series of out-of-pile tests to fully characterize the SiC CMC hybrid design to produce baseline data. The planned tests are intended to either produce quantitative data or to demonstrate the properties required to achieve two initial performance conditions relative to standard zircaloybased cladding: decreased hydrogen uptake (corrosion) and decreased fretting of the cladding tube under normal operating and postulated accident conditions. These two failure mechanisms account for approximately 70% of all in-pile failures of LWR commercial fuel assemblies

  17. Effects of irradiation temperature on polarisation and relaxation characteristics of polymeric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, Marcel; Dutz, Hartmut; Goertz, Stefan; Reeve, Scott; Runkel, Stefan [Physikalisches Institut, Bonn Univ. (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    To achieve significant enhancement of polarisation of solid target materials one must use the principles of dynamic nuclear polarisation and utilise the coupling of the nuclear and electron spins. The unpaired electrons needed can be created as paramagnetic structural defects by irradiation of the material. Polyethylene and polypropylene materials were irradiated at various temperatures and subsequently polarised with microwaves of approximately 70 GHz at temperatures around 1 K. Additionally the samples were investigated with respect to the nature of the created paramagnetic defects using a X-band EPR spectrometer. It was found that the irradiation temperature has a significant effect on the polarisation values achieved and also on the relaxation times of the materials in the 2.5 T magnetic field. The EPR line shape is clearly dominated by the well known alkyl radical structure.

  18. Functional organic materials based on polymerized liquid-crystal monomers: supramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, Dirk J; Bastiaansen, Cees M W; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2012-07-16

    Functional organic materials are of great interest for a variety of applications. To obtain precise functional properties, well-defined hierarchically ordered supramolecular materials are crucial. The self-assembly of liquid crystals has proven to be an extremely useful tool in the development of well-defined nanostructured materials. We have chosen the illustrative example of photopolymerizable hydrogen-bonding mesogens to show that a wide variety of functional materials can be made from a relatively simple set of building blocks. Upon mixing these compounds with other reactive mesogens, nematic, chiral nematic, and smectic or columnar liquid-crystalline phases can be formed that can be applied as actuators, sensors and responsive reflectors, and nanoporous membranes, respectively. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Biodegradability of biobased polymeric materials in natural environments: Structures and Chemistry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Muniyasamy, S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of biobased polymer materials from renewable resources meets the concept of sustainability, offering the potential of renewability, biodegradation, and a path away from the problems associated with plastic derived from nonrenewable...

  20. Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchane, David V.; Barthell, Barry L.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  1. Aspects Concerning Modelling Contact Pressure of Polymeric Materials Used in Robotic Soft Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina-Carmen Ciornei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Compliant materials are used in applications of robotics for final elements of robotic systems. Contact pressure between a spherical indenter and a linear viscoelastic halfspace is modeled for a cosine normal load. The Maxwell viscoelastic halfspace is described by relaxation function and creep function. For the working frequency domain, the material does not present obvious relaxation. Only for very low frequencies, the pressure variation presents a maximum during approaching delayed with respect to maximum force

  2. Polymeric materials and formulation technologies for modified-release tablet development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, J; Igartua, M; Hernández, R M; Pedraz, J L

    2009-11-01

    Over the last years significant advances have been made in the area of drug delivery with the development of modified-release (MR) dosage forms. The present review is divided into two parts, one dealing with technologies for the design of modified-release drug delivery tablets and the other with the use of synthetic and natural polymers that are capable of controlling drug release.

  3. Organo-Aluminate Polymeric Materials as Advanced Erosion/Corrosion Resistant Thin Film Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ...) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The coating system is based on the development of carboxylato- alumoxane precursors for fabrication of corrosion resistant oxide barrier layers and alumoxane-epoxy based primer coats...

  4. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. McGrath

    2005-10-26

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 °C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and

  5. Advanced Materials for PEM-Based Fuel Cell Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. McGrath; Donald G. Baird; Michael von Spakovsky

    2005-10-26

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are quickly becoming attractive alternative energy sources for transportation, stationary power, and small electronics due to the increasing cost and environmental hazards of traditional fossil fuels. Two main classes of PEMFCs include hydrogen/air or hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The current benchmark membrane for both types of PEMFCs is Nafion, a perfluorinated sulfonated copolymer made by DuPont. Nafion copolymers exhibit good thermal and chemical stability, as well as very high proton conductivity under hydrated conditions at temperatures below 80 degrees C. However, application of these membranes is limited due to their high methanol permeability and loss of conductivity at high temperatures and low relative humidities. These deficiencies have led to the search for improved materials for proton exchange membranes. Potential PEMs should have good thermal, hydrolytic, and oxidative stability, high proton conductivity, selective permeability, and mechanical durability over long periods of time. Poly(arylene ether)s, polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes are among the most widely investigated candidates for PEMs. Poly(arylene ether)s are a promising class of proton exchange membranes due to their excellent thermal and chemical stability and high glass transition temperatures. High proton conductivity can be achieved through post-sulfonation of poly(arylene ether) materials, but this most often results in very high water sorption or even water solubility. Our research has shown that directly polymerized poly(arylene ether) copolymers show important advantages over traditional post-sulfonated systems and also address the concerns with Nafion membranes. These properties were evaluated and correlated with morphology, structure-property relationships, and states of water in the membranes. Further improvements in properties were achieved through incorporation of inorganic

  6. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  8. Development of Advanced Nuclear Materials for Extreme Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jinsung; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2011-09-01

    One of the critical paths to develop and deploy the Generation IV nuclear systems is to procure the materials necessary to the key components of the systems. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor, which is anticipated to run at the reactor out-let temperature of about 900 .deg. C. Therefore high temperature materials that can sustain the system at that high temperature region for long design life such as tens of years is pre-requisite. Commercial high temperature materials could be a first consideration, but some improvement by modification is essential for the development of the system, and development of advanced new materials is anticipated to be eventually required. Materials development, however, need a long lead time compared with other research and development areas. In this project NC (nano cluster) strengthened Ni-base alloys are attempted for the development for the very high temperature applications. Three commercial Ni-base high temperature alloys were used as the matrix phase, and nano-sized yttria particles are dispersed by mechanical alloying. Alternative methods to prepare the nano-sized composite powders were investigated. Ni-base nano composite powders, which were characterized by one of the methods, were characterized and confirmed to be useful

  9. Evaluation of ceramic and polymeric materials for use in engineered barrier systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullam, H.T.; Skiens, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    Ceramic materials evaluated in the screening studies were Al 2 O 3 (99.8%), mullite, vitreous silica, BaTiO 3 , CaTiO 3 , CaZrO 3 , CaTiSiO 5 , TiO 2 , ZrSiO 4 , basalt, Pyroceram 9617, and Marcor code 9658 machinable glass ceramic. One grade of graphite (Toyotanso IB-11) was also evaluated. Demineralized water, a synthetic Hanford groundwater, and a synthetic NaCl brine solution were used in the screening tests. Demineralized water was used in all five of the leach tests, but the other solutions were only used in the static leach tests at 150 and 250 0 C. Based on the results obtained, graphite appears to be the most leach resistant of the materials tested with the two grades of alumina being the best of the ceramic materials. Titanium dioxide and ZrO 2 are the most leach resistant of the remaining materials. Candidate materials from all three general classes of polymers (thermoplastics, thermosets, and elastomers) were considered in the selection of materials. Selected groups of polymers were tested in the flowing autoclave at 150, 200, and 250 0 C with some polymers being further tested at the next higher temperature. Next, selected samples were exposed to gamma radiation. These samples were then submitted for tensile and elongation measurements. Selected samples which appeared promising from both autoclave and radiation testing were further evaluated by impact tests. The materials that appeared most promising after autoclave testing were the EPDM rubbers, polyphenylene sulfide, poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) copolymer, and polyfurfuryl alcohol. The radiation dose had little effect on polyfurfuryl alcohol and polyphenylene sulfide samples; very significant decreases in elongation were observed for the fluorocarbon copolymer and the EPDM rubbers. While the polyphenylene sulfide and polyfurfuryl alcohol showed little change in impact strength, poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) decreased in impact strength

  10. Raw materials for advanced ceramics: rare earths separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricci, D.R.; Nobre, J.S.M.; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of obtaining purified rare earths oxidesis related, mainly to the increasing use of these compounds as raw materials for advanced ceramics. Processes of rare earths separation and purification are almost always based on the solvent extraction, fractional precipitation and ion exchange chromatography techniques, whose association depends on the initial concentrate and on the desired purity. This paper describes some steps of fractionation of didymium carbonate by using the solvent extraction and fractional precipitation techniques. The experimental conditions presented here have enable the production of lantanium, neodimium - praseodimium, samarium - gadolinium and ytrium concentrates, which constitute the intermediate fractions of the overall process to obtain high purity rare earths. (author) [pt

  11. Innovations in Advanced Materials and Metals Manufacturing Project (IAM2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Elizabeth [Columbia River Economic Development Council, Vancouver, WA (United States)

    2017-01-06

    This project, under the Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge, Innovations in Advanced Materials and Metals Manufacturing Project, contracted with Cascade Energy to provide a shared energy project manager engineer to work with five different companies throughout the Portland metro grant region to implement ten energy efficiency projects and develop a case study to analyze the project model. As a part of the project, the energy project manager also looked into specific new technologies and methodologies that could change the way energy is consumed by manufacturers—from game-changing equipment and technology to monitor energy use to methodologies that change the way companies interact and use their machines to reduce energy consumption.

  12. New era of neutron scattering research on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Susumu

    2001-01-01

    The projects of the next generation of pulsed spallation neutron source are planed in USA, Europe and Japan. They are one order of magnitude more powerful than the most powerful existing neutron source, ISIS in UK. They offer the exciting prospects for the future, and will open the new era of neutron scattering research on advanced materials. The Japanese project is named as the 'Joint project' between JAERI and KEK on high-intensity proton accelerators. The details of the neutron science facility in the 'Joint project' and the sciences to be developed are summarized. (author)

  13. Advances in High Temperature Materials for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Nurul Amira Binti; Johar, Muhammad Akmal Bin; Ibrahim, Mohd Halim Irwan Bin; Marwah, Omar Mohd Faizan bin

    2017-08-01

    In today’s technology, additive manufacturing has evolved over the year that commonly known as 3D printing. Currently, additive manufacturing have been applied for many industries such as for automotive, aerospace, medical and other commercial product. The technologies are supported by materials for the manufacturing process to produce high quality product. Plus, additive manufacturing technologies has been growth from the lowest to moderate and high technology to fulfil manufacturing industries obligation. Initially from simple 3D printing such as fused deposition modelling (FDM), poly-jet, inkjet printing, to selective laser sintering (SLS), and electron beam melting (EBM). However, the high technology of additive manufacturing nowadays really needs high investment to carry out the process for fine products. There are three foremost type of material which is polymer, metal and ceramic used for additive manufacturing application, and mostly they were in the form of wire feedstock or powder. In circumstance, it is crucial to recognize the characteristics of each type of materials used in order to understand the behaviours of the materials on high temperature application via additive manufacturing. Therefore, this review aims to provide excessive inquiry and gather the necessary information for further research on additive material materials for high temperature application. This paper also proposed a new material based on powder glass, which comes from recycled tempered glass from automotive industry, having a huge potential to be applied for high temperature application. The technique proposed for additive manufacturing will minimize some cost of modelling with same quality of products compare to the others advanced technology used for high temperature application.

  14. Test methods for the dynamic mechanical properties of polymeric materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.K.

    1980-06-01

    Various test geometries and procedures for the dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers employing a mechanical spectrometer have been evaluated. The methods and materials included in this work are forced torsional pendulum testing of Kevlar/epoxy laminates and rigid urethane foams, oscillatory parallel plate testing to determine the kinetics of the cure of VCE with Hylene MP, oscillatory compressive testing of B-3223 cellular silicone, and oscillatory tensile testing of Silastic E and single Kevlar filaments. Fundamental dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage and loss moduli and loss tangent of the materials tested, were determined as a function of temperature and sometimes of frequency.

  15. Si K-edge XANES study of SiOxCyHz amorphous polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboy, J.; Barranco, A.; Yanguas-Gil, A.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    This work reports on x-ray absorption spectroscopy study at the Si K edge of several amorphous SiO x C y H z polymers prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition with different C/O ratios. SiO 2 and SiC have been used as reference materials. The comparison of the experimental Si K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra with theoretical computations based on multiple scattering theory has allowed us to monitor the modification of the local coordination around Si as a function of the overall C/O ratio in this kind of materials

  16. High-Pressure Design of Advanced BN-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr O. Kurakevych

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to highlight the state of the art in high-pressure design of new advanced materials based on boron nitride. Recent experimental achievements on the governing phase transformation, nanostructuring and chemical synthesis in the systems containing boron nitride at high pressures and high temperatures are presented. All these developments allowed discovering new materials, e.g., ultrahard nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride (nano-cBN with hardness comparable to diamond, and superhard boron subnitride B13N2. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of high-pressure synthesis are described based on the data obtained by in situ and ex situ methods. Mechanical and thermal properties (hardness, thermoelastic equations of state, etc. are discussed. New synthetic perspectives, combining both soft chemistry and extreme pressure–temperature conditions are considered.

  17. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  18. Advanced materials for critical components in industrial gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, T.B. (Div. of Materials Metrology, National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom))

    1992-06-01

    Combined-cycle plant for power production has advantages in terms of capital costs and flexibility compared to large power plants either nuclear of fossil-fired, used for base load. In combined-cycle plant the overall efficiency is highly dependent on the performance of the gas turbine and turbine entry temperatures of > 1200deg C will be required to obtain attractive levels of efficiency. Bearing in mind the need for reliability and longterm performance from components such as turbine blades, the challenge to the materials enginer is formidable. In this paper some of the recent developments in Ni - Cr-base alloys are described and the potential for advanced materials such as ceramics and intermetallics is briefly considered. Development in coating technology to provide effective thermal barriers and good resistance to aggressive environments are discussed. (orig./MM).

  19. Investigation of advanced materials for fusion alpha particle diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonheure, G., E-mail: g.bonheure@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association “Euratom-Belgian State”, Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30 Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Van Wassenhove, G. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Association “Euratom-Belgian State”, Royal Military Academy, Avenue de la Renaissance, 30 Kunstherlevinglaan, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Strivay, D. [Centre Européen d’Archéométrie, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Université de Liège (Belgium); Vermaercke, P. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Delvigne, T. [DSI SPRL, 3 rue Mont d’Orcq, Froyennes B-7503 (Belgium); Chene, G.; Delhalle, R. [Centre Européen d’Archéométrie, Institut de Physique Nucléaire, Atomique et de Spectroscopie, Université de Liège (Belgium); Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.; Neubauer, O. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We examine the feasibility of alpha particle measurements in ITER. ► We test advanced material detectors borrowed from the GERDA neutrino experiment. ► We compare experimental results on TEXTOR tokamak with our detector response model. ► We investigate the detector response in ITER full power D–T plasmas. ► Advanced materials show good signal to noise ratio and alpha particle selectivity. -- Abstract: Fusion alpha particle diagnostics for ITER remain a challenging task. Standard escaping alpha particle detectors in present tokamaks are not applicable to ITER and techniques suitable for fusion reactor conditions need further research and development [1,2]. The activation technique is widely used for the characterization of high fluence rates inside neutron reactors. Tokamak applications of the neutron activation technique are already well developed [3] whereas measuring escaping ions using this technique is a novel fusion plasma diagnostic development. Despite low alpha particle fluence levels in present tokamaks, promising results using activation technique combined with ultra-low level gamma-ray spectrometry [4] were achieved before in JET [5,6]. In this research work, we use new advanced detector materials. The material properties beneficial for alpha induced activation are (i) moderate neutron cross-sections (ii) ultra-high purity which reduces neutron-induced background activation and (iii) isotopic tailoring which increases the activation yield of the measured activation product. Two samples were obtained from GERDA[7], an experiment aimed at measuring the neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 76}Ge. These samples, made of highly pure (9 N) germanium highly enriched to 87% in isotope Ge-76, were irradiated in real D–D fusion plasma conditions inside the TEXTOR tokamak. Comparison of the calculated and the experimentally measured activity shows good agreement. Compared to previously investigated high temperature ceramic material [8

  20. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) program. Annual progress report. FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven `Vision Industries` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. These are: aluminium; chemical; forest products; glass; metal casting; refineries; and steel. OIT is working with these industries, through appropriate organizations, to develop Visions of the desired condition of each industry some 20 or 25 years in the future and then to prepare Road Maps and Implementation Plans to enable them to reach their goals. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to `Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is necessary that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the energy database for articles from this report.

  1. Plasma dye coating as straightforward and widely applicable procedure for dye immobilization on polymeric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Lieselot; Vancoillie, Gertjan; Minshall, Peter; Lava, Kathleen; Steyaert, Iline; Schoolaert, Ella; Van De Walle, Elke; Dubruel, Peter; De Clerck, Karen; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2018-03-16

    Here, we introduce a novel concept for the fabrication of colored materials with significantly reduced dye leaching through covalent immobilization of the desired dye using plasma-generated surface radicals. This plasma dye coating (PDC) procedure immobilizes a pre-adsorbed layer of a dye functionalized with a radical sensitive group on the surface through radical addition caused by a short plasma treatment. The non-specific nature of the plasma-generated surface radicals allows for a wide variety of dyes including azobenzenes and sulfonphthaleins, functionalized with radical sensitive groups to avoid significant dye degradation, to be combined with various materials including PP, PE, PA6, cellulose, and PTFE. The wide applicability, low consumption of dye, relatively short procedure time, and the possibility of continuous PDC using an atmospheric plasma reactor make this procedure economically interesting for various applications ranging from simple coloring of a material to the fabrication of chromic sensor fabrics as demonstrated by preparing a range of halochromic materials.

  2. Micromechanical properties of a new polymeric microcapsule for self-healing cementitious materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lv, Leyang; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Yang, Z.; Xing, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Self-healing cementitious materials containing a microencapsulated healing agent are appealing due to their great application potential in improving the serviceability and durability of concrete structures. In this study, poly(phenol-formaldehyde) (PF) microcapsules that aim to provide a

  3. Modification of polymeric materials for 3D printing of external panels of nanosatellites

    OpenAIRE

    Isaeva Dariya; Simankin Fedor; Doncov Yuriy; Simankin Arkadiy

    2017-01-01

    The results of mechanical testing of plastic samples, produced by injection molding and 3D printing are shown. Strength properties of filled and non-filled polymers are compared. The applicability of 3D printing technology with filled polymer materials of external panels is evaluated.

  4. Modification of polymeric materials for 3D printing of external panels of nanosatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva Dariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of mechanical testing of plastic samples, produced by injection molding and 3D printing are shown. Strength properties of filled and non-filled polymers are compared. The applicability of 3D printing technology with filled polymer materials of external panels is evaluated.

  5. (TMTSF)2X materials and structural implications for low-dimensional polymeric and disordered molecular semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Krebs, Frederik C

    2000-01-01

    The structural characteristics and the relation to the electronic properties of three types of molecular materials are discussed. In TMTSF2X salts a triclinic unit cell it suggested to be important in avoiding a 2k(F) Peierls distortion. In polythiophenes appropriate ordering of microcrystallites...

  6. Surface Modifications of Polymeric Materials for Application in Artificial Heart and Circulatory Assist Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijen, J.; Engbers, G.H.M.; Terlingen, J.G.A.; van Delden, C.J.; Poot, A.A.; Vaudaux, P.; Akutsu, Tetsuzo; Koyanagi, Hitoshi

    1996-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to modify the surfaces of materials used in artificial hearts and circulatory assist devices to suppress the host response, especially with respect to the occurrence of clotting, cellular damage, and infections. In this review, special attention is paid to

  7. Effect of time-dependent material properties on the crack behavior in the interface of two polymeric materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zouhar, Michal; Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2011), s. 203-210 ISSN 0191-5665 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC101/09/J027; GA ČR GD106/09/H035; GA ČR GA106/09/0279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : multilayer plastic pipes * bimaterial interface * stability criteria * critical stress * time -depended material properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.409, year: 2011

  8. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  9. Recent Advances in Material and Geometrical Modelling in Dental Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed M. S. Al Qahtani

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This article touched, in brief, the recent advances in dental materials and geometric modelling in dental applications. Most common categories of dental materials as metallic alloys, composites, ceramics and nanomaterials were briefly demonstrated. Nanotechnology improved the quality of dental biomaterials. This new technology improves many existing materials properties, also, to introduce new materials with superior properties that covered a wide range of applications in dentistry. Geometric modelling was discussed as a concept and examples within this article. The geometric modelling with engineering Computer-Aided-Design (CAD system(s is highly satisfactory for further analysis or Computer-Aided-Manufacturing (CAM processes. The geometric modelling extracted from Computed-Tomography (CT images (or its similar techniques for the sake of CAM also reached a sufficient level of accuracy, while, obtaining efficient solid modelling without huge efforts on body surfaces, faces, and gaps healing is still doubtable. This article is merely a compilation of knowledge learned from lectures, workshops, books, and journal articles, articles from the internet, dental forum, and scientific groups' discussions.

  10. Advances in superconductivity: new materials, critical currents and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Malik, S.K.; Grover, A.K.; Ayyub, P.

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in the cuprates produced an explosive growth in research, driven by the quest for higher and higher superconducting transition temperatures. In the initial stages, the excitement was tremendous both in the physical sciences and in engineering. However, the complexity of the new materials on the one hand, and the absence of a viable theory on the other, have made further developments much more difficult. It is to be expected therefore, that the early excitement and the subsequent rapid advances have paved the way for more systematic and detailed studies of all aspects of superconductivity. The International Symposium was intended to provide a forum to review the progress in selected areas in superconductivity. The emphasis was on experimental and theoretical studies of the new superconductors, advances in the theoretical understanding, progress in studies of flux pinning and vortex dynamics which affect critical currents, and developments of novel material synthesis methods. Recent developments in the twin areas of thin films and devices were extensively discussed during the symposium. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. Ionic systems in materials research : new materials and processes based on ionic polymerizations and/or ionic liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrero-Sanchez, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Systems based on ionic interactions are usually related to reversible processes and/or transitory chemical states and, nowadays, they are believed to be key factors for the understanding and for the development of processes in several branches of chemistry and materials research. During the last

  12. Research and development project in fiscal 1988 for fundamental technologies for next generation industries. Achievement report on research and development on electrically conductive polymeric materials; 1988 nendo dodensei kobunshi zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-03-01

    With an objective to develop electric and electronic materials characterized by light weight, high corrosion resistance and easy-to-process performance, and having functions different from those of electricity conduction mechanism of metals, research and development has been performed on fundamental technologies related to electrically conductive polymeric materials. This paper summarizes the achievement in fiscal 1988. In the research of the new hydrocarbon conjugate system polymers, fabrication was performed on the LB film mixed with different dopant molecules and photo-polymerized LB molecules. Discussions were given on their effects on the order and electric conductivity of the film cumulative structure. In the research on the vehicular conjugate system conductive materials, conduction improvement was advanced on PPV and PTV by purification of the primary structure and by identification of the effects of the higher-order structure. Basic knowledge was obtained on continuous manufacture of the graphite film. In the research on thin graphite film synthesized at low temperatures, entire design was made on the thin graphite film low-temperature synthesizing device, whereas the synthesized sections were completed excepting the laser assisted section. In the research of hetero aromatic system polymers, investigation was executed on polypyrrole as to its correlation with gegen ions, higher-order structure, and conductivity. (NEDO)

  13. 4D printing of polymeric materials for tissue and organ regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Shida; Castro, Nathan; Nowicki, Margaret; Xia, Lang; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Zhu, Wei; Lee, Se-Jun; Sarkar, Kausik; Vozzi, Giovanni; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Fisher, John; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-12-01

    Four dimensional (4D) printing is an emerging technology with great capacity for fabricating complex, stimuli-responsive 3D structures, providing great potential for tissue and organ engineering applications. Although the 4D concept was first highlighted in 2013, extensive research has rapidly developed, along with more-in-depth understanding and assertions regarding the definition of 4D. In this review, we begin by establishing the criteria of 4D printing, followed by an extensive summary of state-of-the-art technological advances in the field. Both transformation-preprogrammed 4D printing and 4D printing of shape memory polymers are intensively surveyed. Afterwards we will explore and discuss the applications of 4D printing in tissue and organ regeneration, such as developing synthetic tissues and implantable scaffolds, as well as future perspectives and conclusions.

  14. Compatibility of polymeric materials with the radiosterilization of disposable medical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    The semiindustrial plant of irradiation located at the Atomic Center of Ezeiza entered into operation 20 years ago. This plant has a nominal activity of 3.7 x 10 16 Bq (10 6 Ci) and is presently operating with 1.78 x 10 16 Bq (4.8 x 10 5 Ci). The facility allows working in pilot plant scale for the study of industrial applications and also performs commercial services, the most important of which considering its volume, economic significance and social function is the radiosterilization of disposable medical products. Approximately 29,000 m 3 have been processed in this period, most of the materials being polymers, as component parts of the products as well as packaging. To validate the process of radiosterilization the materials compatibility with ionizing radiation must be known. In the department that operates the irradiation plant, the polymer laboratory is involved in the development of industrial applications and also in the subject of compatibility of polymers with radiosterilization. The laboratory gives advice on request about selection of materials as well as relevant information for the evaluation of radiation resistance and stability, including exposition doses for the samples and mechanical, physical or chemical tests according to the kind of product. In many occasions this laboratory has had to undertake these tests because local manufacturers of medical products not always have adequate facilities for quality control. Among mechanical tests the area under the stress-strain curve as a measure of the strain the material can undergo without fracture is perhaps the best for the evaluation of degradation. Among physical properties it is important to evaluate discoloration, usual in plastics irradiation, and concerning chemical tests the detection of migration of components from the polymer proves important in some cases. Although the irradiator cannot assume any responsibility concerning compatibility, local experience has shown the importance of having a

  15. STUDY STRUCTURE OF THREE-COMPONENT POLYMERIC MATERIAL UNDER INFLUENCE OF γ-IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. Tarasyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The polymer material (РА/РЕ/Eva with a width of 55 μm was studied. Sterilization was carried out on the unit GU–200 at doses from 3 to 18 kGy in the Research Institute of Technical Physics and Automation, Rosatom, Moscow, Russia. The structure of the polymermaterial samples was studied by IR spectroscopy before and after irradiation in a range of 400–5000 сm–1. According to the results of the analysis of the IR spectrum structure, the changes in the structure were insignificant upon irradiation at doses up to 6 kGy. Upon irradiation at doses from 9 kGy and higher, an increase in quantity of ester groups (2340 сm–1 and insignificant increase in other functional groups were observed, which can suggest a simultaneous process of intra-molecular cross-linking with the intermediatestage of cross-linking occurring with formation of vinylene groups. This causes destruction of a polymer material and radiation oxidation. These disorders can lead to changes in physico-mechanical and barrier parameters of a polymer material, which can be notably reflected in the shelf life of agricultural products.

  16. Thermosetting materials of the radiation-modified polymer compositions. 3. Development of thermoplastic thermosetting materials from polymeric blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkis, V.; Zicans, J.; Bocoka, T.; Ivanova, T.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental studies of blends consisting of chemically and radiation modified polyethylene and ethylene-propylene-diene copolymers have been carried out. Measurements of crystallinity, toughness, viscoelastic, adhesion and thermorelaxation properties as well as scanning electron-microscopic studies have shown that the blends chemically vulcanized by elastomer phase crosslinking system possess a typical double-phase structure within the whole composition range and characteristics specific for rubber, whereas, in radiation-vulcanized blends where crosslinking of both disperse phases takes part, formation of chemical bonds between these phases was observed. Consequently, the radiation treatment improves the properties of the blends, and materials formed by such a system can be successfully used, e.g., as elastic and adhesion active thermosetting materials if the polymer is previously oriented. (author)

  17. PREFACE Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMAN 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aidy

    2011-02-01

    This special issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials science and Engineering contains papers contributed to the Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (CAMAN 2009) held on 3-5 November 2009 in Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of the congress is to provide a platform for professionals, academicians and researchers to exchange views, findings, ideas and experiences on advanced science and technology. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 50 papers were selected for publications in this issue. The policy of editing was the content of the material and its rapid dissemination was more important than its form. In 2009, the conference received close to 120 papers from leading researchers and participants from countries such as Iran, India, Switzerland, Myanmar, Nigeria, Canada, Yemen and Malaysia. We strongly hope the new ideas and results presented will stimulate and enhance the progress of research on the above conference theme. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this conference. They are also the ones who help make this conference possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We wish to thank all the authors who contributed papers to the conference and all reviewers for their efforts to review the papers as well as the sponsors. We would also like to thank the members of the CAMAN 2009 Organising Committee and the International Advisory Committee for their efforts in making the conference a success. Thank you very much indeed. Guest Editor Aidy Ali

  18. Fabrication and application of advanced functional materials from lignincellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sixiao

    This dissertation explored the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into advanced functional materials and their potential applications. Lignocellulosic biomass represents an as-of-yet underutilized renewable source for not only biofuel production but also functional materials fabrication. This renewable source is a great alternative for fossil fuel based chemicals, which could be one of the solutions to energy crisis. In this work, it was demonstrated a variety of advanced materials including functional carbons, metal and silica nanoparticles could be derived from lignocellulosic biomass. Chapter 1 provided overall reviewed of the lignin structures, productions and its utilizations as plastics, absorbents and carbons, as well as the preparation of nano-structured silver, silica and silicon carbide/nitride from biomass. Chapter 2, 3 and 4 discussed the fabrication of highly porous carbons from isolated lignin, and their applications as electric supercapacitors for energy storage. In chapter 2, ultrafine porous carbon fibers were prepared via electrospinning followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation. Chapter 3 covered the fabrication of supercapacitor based on the porous carbon fibers and the investigation of their electrochemical performances. In chapter 4, porous carbon particulates with layered carbon nano plates structures were produced by simple oven-drying followed by simultaneous carbonization and activation. The effects of heat processing parameters on the resulting carbon structures and their electrochemical properties were discussed in details. Chapter 5 and 6 addressed the preparation of silver nanoparticles using lignin. Chapter 5 reported the synthesis, underlying kinetics and mechanism of monodispersed silver nanospheres with diameter less than 25 nm in aqueous solutions using lignin as dual reducing and capping agents. Chapter 6 covered the preparation of silver nanoparticles on electrospun celluloses ultrafine fibers using lignin as both

  19. The utilize of gamma radiation on the examination of mechanical properties of polymeric materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Greškovič

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals about the application area of radiation crosslinking of plastics, which follows after the injection moulding. The main objective of the presented article is the research of influence irradiation dosage on mechanical properties of materials: PP filled by 15 % of mineral filler – talc. Mechanical properties - tensile strength and impact strength by Charpy were examined in dependence on absorbed dose of the gamma rays on various conditions and were compared with non-irradiated samples. Radiation processing involves mainly the use of either electron beams from electron accelerators or gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 sources.

  20. Evaluation of nonuniformity of polymeric membrane materials by positron annihilation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shantarovich, V.P.; Kevdina, I.B.; Yampol'skij, Yu.P.

    2000-01-01

    Time distribution of annihilation radiation of positrons in some glass-like polymers including polymer membrane materials in the air and in nitrogen atmosphere was studied experimentally. Main attention is paid to long-lived component of distribution, i.e. ortho-positronium annihilation (positron-electron bound system). Influence of atmospheric oxygen on positronium annihilation characteristics was detected. The conceived notions on the mechanisms of positronium formation, localization and annihilation in the polymers suggest irregularity of distribution of free volumes of different size in the polymer matrix. The concentration and size of the elementary free volumes, as well as sizes of micro heterogeneities containing the volumes are evaluated [ru