WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced pharmacy practice

  1. Active-Learning Diabetes Simulation in an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience to Develop Patient Empathy

    OpenAIRE

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop and integrate an active-learning diabetes simulation into an advanced pharmacy practice experience to improve pharmacy students’ empathy toward patients with diabetes mellitus.

  2. Adopting an Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experiential Educational Model Across Colleges of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Rodis, Pharm.D., BCPS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the experience of sharing an experiential model of education and practice development between two colleges of pharmacy and to provide a framework to guide faculty in this type of collaboration.Case Study: The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy (OSU COP Partner for Promotion (PFP program was developed in response to the need for advancing practice in the community pharmacy setting. After successful implementation of this program, the PFP program design and materials were shared, adapted, and implemented at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy (Utah COP. Collaborating faculty developed a framework based on lessons learned through this experience which proposes key guiding strategies as considerations to address prior to embarking on sharing any aspect of an educational program or model between institutions. Each step of the framework is described and applied to the process followed by The OSU COP and Utah COP in sharing the PFP program. Additional considerations related to transfer of educational models are discussed.Results/Conclusion: Sharing the education model and materials associated with the PFP program between institutions has enhanced experiential opportunities for students and helped develop residency training sites in the community setting. In addition, the relationship between the two colleges has contributed to faculty development, as well as an increase in community pharmacy service development with community pharmacy partners at each institution. It is hoped this experience will help guide collaborations between other colleges of pharmacy to enhance education of future pharmacists while positively impacting pharmacy practice, teaching, and research by faculty.

  3. Canadian Educational Approaches for the Advancement of Pharmacy Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Frankel, Grace; Louizos, Christopher; Austin, Zubin

    2014-01-01

    Canadian faculties (schools) of pharmacy are actively engaged in the advancement and restructuring of their programs in response to the shift in pharmacy to pharmacists having/assuming an advanced practitioner role. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of evidence outlining optimal strategies for accomplishing this task. This review explores several educational changes proposed in the literature to aid in the advancement of pharmacy education such as program admission requirements, critical-thin...

  4. Student Pharmacists’ Clinical Interventions in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences at a Community Nonteaching Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shogbon, Angela O.; Lundquist, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess student pharmacists’ clinical interventions in advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) at a community nonteaching hospital and evaluate completed interventions based on the type of documentation method used.

  5. The Offering, Scheduling and Maintenance of Elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex O. Brown

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE provides standards for colleges of pharmacy to assist in the provision of pharmacy education to student pharmacists. An integral part of all college educational programs includes the provision of experiential learning. Experiential learning allows students to gain real-world experience in direct patient care during completion of the curriculum. All college of pharmacy programs provide several Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs, which include a balance between the four required experiences and a number of other required or elective APPEs. Required APPEs include advanced community, advanced institutional, ambulatory care, and general medicine. The elective APPEs include a myriad of opportunities to help provide a balanced education in experiential learning for student pharmacists. These unique opportunities help to expose student pharmacists to different career tracks that they may not have been able to experience otherwise. Not all colleges offer enough elective APPEs to enable the student pharmacist to obtain experiences in a defined area. Such an approach is required to produce skilled pharmacy graduates that are capable to enter practice in various settings. Elective APPEs are scheduled logically and are based upon student career interest and site availability. This article describes the offering, scheduling and maintenance of different elective APPEs offered by The University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy.

  6. Swedish Students' and Preceptors' Perceptions of What Students Learn in a Six-Month Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wallman, Andy; Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Gustavsson, Maria; Kettis Lindblad, Åsa; Johansson, Markus; Ring, Lena

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To identify what pharmacy students learn during the 6-month advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 pharmacy APPE students and 17 pharmacist preceptors and analyzed in a qualitative directed content analysis using a defined workplace learning typology for categories. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. The Swedish APPE provides students with ...

  7. Planning a pharmacy-led medical mission trip, part 3: development and implementation of an elective medical missions advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dana A; Ferrill, Mary J

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of new pharmacy schools/colleges and expansion of existing ones, pharmacy schools/colleges are often in need of elective rotation experiences as part of the final year advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) program. Offering a medical missions elective APPE in either a domestic or international setting is a unique opportunity to expose pharmacy students to direct patient care. APPE students can be involved in triaging patients, compounding and dispensing medications, and providing patient education. As part of this APPE, pharmacy students are expected to complete projects such as formulary development, case presentations, book club discussions, journal reflections, manuscript preparations, and trip logistics planning. An elective APPE focused on medical missions facilitates the learning process and promotes the emergence of team leaders and leadership skills in general.

  8. Impact of Instruction and Feedback on Reflective Responses during an Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teply, Robyn; Spangler, Mikayla; Klug, Laura; Tilleman, Jennifer; Coover, Kelli

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To investigate whether instruction and feedback on reflective responses are beneficial in developing pharmacy students to become more reflective practitioners. Methods. Students on an advanced pharmacy practice experience answered weekly reflection questions and were randomly assigned to either an intervention (received instruction and feedback on reflection) or control group. The final week's responses were de-identified and two blinded faculty members independently categorized them as reflective or nonreflective. The primary outcome measure was comparing the number of "reflective" responses in each group. Results. The responses were classified as reflective in 83.3% of students in the intervention group (n=18) compared to 37.5% of the control group (n=16). The odds that the response was categorized as reflective were 8.3 times higher in the intervention group. Conclusion. Providing instruction and feedback to students improved the likelihood that their work was reflective. PMID:27402984

  9. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-04-25

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education.

  10. Current Practices in Global/International Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences: Home/Host Country or Site/Institution Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsharif, Naser Z; Dakkuri, Adnan; Abrons, Jeanine P; Williams, Dennis; Ombengi, David N; Zheng, HaiAn; Al-Dahir, Sara; Tofade, Toyin; Gim, Suzanna; O'Connell, Mary Beth; Ratka, Anna; Dornblaser, Emily

    2016-04-25

    International outreach by schools and colleges of pharmacy is increasing. In this paper, we provide current practice guidelines to establish and maintain successful global/international advanced pharmacy practice experiences (G/I APPEs) with specific recommendations for home/host country and host site/institution. The paper is based on a literature review (2000-2014) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms. Educational documents such as syllabi and memoranda of understanding (MoUs) from pharmacy programs were also examined. In addition, a preliminary draft was developed and the findings and recommendations were reviewed in a 90-minute roundtable discussion at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Annual Meeting. Recommendations for the host country include travel considerations (eg, passport, visa, air travel), safety, housing, transportation, travel alerts and warnings, health issues, and financial considerations. For the home country, considerations for establishment of G/I APPE site (eg, vetting process, MoU, site expectations) are described. The paper is a resource for development of new G/I APPEs and provides guidance for continuous quality improvement of partnerships focusing on G/I pharmacy education. PMID:27170809

  11. An Evidence-based Medicine Elective Course to Improve Student Performance in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudisill, Celeste N.; Bickley, A. Rebecca; McAbee, Catherine; Miller, April D.; Piro, Christina C.; Schulz, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement and evaluate the impact of an elective evidence-based medicine (EBM) course on student performance during advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). Design A 2-hour elective course was implemented using active-learning techniques including case studies and problem-based learning, journal club simulations, and student-driven wiki pages. The small class size (15 students) encouraged independent student learning, allowing students to serve as the instructors and guest faculty members from a variety of disciplines to facilitate discussions. Assessment Pre- and posttests found that students improved on 83% of the core evidence-based medicine concepts evaluated. Fifty-four APPE preceptors were surveyed to compare the performance of students who had completed the EBM course prior to starting their APPEs with students who had not. Of the 38 (70%) who responded, the majority (86.9%) agreed that students who had completed the course had stronger skills in applying evidence-based medicine to patient care than other students. The 14 students who completed the elective also were surveyed after completing their APPEs and the 11 who responded agreed the class had improved their skills and provided confidence in using the medical literature. Conclusions The skill set acquired from this EBM course improved students' performance in APPEs. Evidence-based medicine and literature search skills should receive more emphasis in the pharmacy curriculum. PMID:21451761

  12. Revitalization of Community Pharmacy Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Wiryanto; Harahap, Urip; Karsono; Mawengkang, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Majority of community pharmacy practice in Indonesia was described as practices that have not been standard fulfilling. This research have an aim to design a model of community pharmacy practice as instrument for fulfilling standard. Design of model of community pharmacy practice comprised practice standard, model of determining practice criteria, and model of improving practice criteria. Model of improving practice criteria used Nolan model, consisting of Plan, Do, Check, and ...

  13. Motivational theory applied to hospital pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, M

    1980-12-01

    In recent years a great deal of attention has been paid to motivation and job satisfaction among hospital pharmacy practitioners. Institutional pharmacy managers should become more aware of ways in which they can motivate members of their staff. Specifically, Frederick Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory is discussed in reference to its origination, major tenets, and practical applications in institutional pharmacy practice settings. Principally, Herzberg's theory explains needs of workers in terms of extrinsic factors called "hygienes" and intrinsic factors called "motivators." The theory suggests that job satisfaction and dissatisfaction are not opposites but two separate dimensions. According to this theory, an employee will be motivated if the task allows for the following: 1)actual achievement, 2) recognition for achievement, 3) increased responsibility, 4) opportunity for growth (professionally), and 5) chance for advancement. It is concluded that some of these suggested applications can be useful to managers who are faced with low morale among the members of their staff.

  14. Community pharmacy practice in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nousheen Aslam

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: This study concludes that the current status of community pharmacy practice is below par. There is a need to involve more pharmacists at community level and develop awareness programs to counter patients′ routine drug issues and reducing the burden of disease from society.

  15. Action research in pharmacy practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2015-01-01

    -based study. Concepts related to AR are described; in addition, the multifaceted role of the action researcher is described, along with a set of data quality criteria for evaluating the quality of an AR-based study. Then follows a thorough description of a Danish AR-based pharmacy practice study. The chapter...

  16. Collaborative pharmacy practice: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law AV

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anandi V Law, Eric K Gupta, Micah Hata, Karl M Hess, Roger S Klotz, Quang A Le, Emmanuelle Schwartzman, Bik-Wai Bilvick Tai Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative practice among health professionals is slowly coming of age, given the global focus on efficiency and effectiveness of care to achieve positive patient outcomes and to reduce the economic burden of fragmented care. Collaborative pharmacy practice (CPP is accordingly evolving within different models including: disease management, medication therapy management, patient centered medical home, and accountable care organizations. Pharmacist roles in these models relate to drug therapy management and include therapy introduction, adjustment, or discontinuation, patient counseling and education, and identification, resolution, and prevention of problems leading to drug interactions and adverse reactions. Most forms of CPP occur with physicians in various settings. Collaborative practice agreements exist in many states in the US and are mentioned in the International Pharmaceutical Federation policy statement. Impetus for CPP comes from health system and economic concerns, as well as from a regulatory push. There are positive examples in community, ambulatory care, and inpatient settings that have well documented protocols, indicators of care, and measurement and reporting of clinical, economic, and patient reported outcomes; however, implementation of the practice is still not widespread. Conceptual and implementation challenges include health professional training, attitudes, confidence and comfort levels, power and communication issues, logistic barriers of time, workload, proximity, resistance to establish and adopt regulations, and importantly, payment models. Some of the attitudinal and perceptual challenges can be mitigated by incorporation of interprofessional concepts and

  17. Opportunities and challenges in social pharmacy and pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy practice and social pharmacy are two important research areas within pharmaceutical and health sciences. As the disciplines have undergone and are still undergoing changes, it is useful to reflect on the current state of their research as the basis for discussing further development....... The two areas are currently beset by a lack of consensus and charged all too often with evaluating narrowly focused pharmacy services. With the added challenge of diminished funding for research and the pressures to publish results, these fields have to accommodate a much broader research framework than...

  18. Factors influencing pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmacy practice research and strategies for promoting research interest in pharmacy practice

    OpenAIRE

    Kritikos VS; Saini B; Carter S; Moles RJ; Krass I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To (1) investigate the relationships between students’ characteristics and their (a) perceptions of research in general and (b) attitudes towards pharmacy practice research; (2) identify strategies that could be used by pharmacy educators to promote research interest in pharmacy practice; and (3) identify perceived barriers to the pursuit or completion of a pharmacy practice research degree. Methods: A survey was administered to all students enrolled in each year of the four-y...

  19. The future of pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babar, Zaheer Ud Din; Almarsdottir, Anna Birna

    2015-01-01

    diversity. It concludes by drawing attention to methodologies that would be most commonly used in future pharmacy practice research. Some of the future methodological challenges could be the emergence of big and complex data sets, dealing with electronic health records and pharmacy practice researchers...

  20. Pharmacy practice in Qatar: challenges and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Kheir, Nadir; Fahey, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The State of Qatar is a small oil and gas-rich Gulf country that is experiencing rapid development in health care services, including pharmaceutical services. To date, there is no autonomous professional pharmacy association or society that regulates or promotes the practice of pharmacy in Qatar, and the challenges that face the profession of pharmacy in Qatar mirror the challenges facing the profession in all other Middle Eastern countries. However, a set of initiatives and projects that inc...

  1. Qualitative methods in pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2015-01-01

    research attempts to answer the “why” questions, it is useful for describing, in rich detail, complex phenomena that are situated and embedded in local contexts. Typical methods include interviews, observation, document analysis, and netnography. Qualitative research has to live up to a set of rigid......Qualitative research within pharmacy practice is concerned with understanding the behavior of actors such as pharmacy staff, pharmacy owners, patients, other healthcare professionals, and politicians to explore various types of existing practices and beliefs in order to improve them. As qualitative...... quality criteria of research conduct to provide trustworthy results that contribute to the further development of the area....

  2. Future methods in pharmacy practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarsdottir, A B; Babar, Z U D

    2016-06-01

    This article describes the current and future practice of pharmacy scenario underpinning and guiding this research and then suggests future directions and strategies for such research. First, it sets the scene by discussing the key drivers which could influence the change in pharmacy practice research. These are demographics, technology and professional standards. Second, deriving from this, it seeks to predict and forecast the future shifts in use of methodologies. Third, new research areas and availability of data impacting on future methods are discussed. These include the impact of aging information technology users on healthcare, understanding and responding to cultural and social disparities, implementing multidisciplinary initiatives to improve health care, medicines optimization and predictive risk analysis, and pharmacy as business and health care institution. Finally, implications of the trends for pharmacy practice research methods are discussed. PMID:27209486

  3. Communication Capacity Building through Pharmacy Practice Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejzic, Jasmina; Barker, Michelle; Hills, Ruth; Priddle, Alannah

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To examine the effectiveness of simulated learning modules (SLMs) encompassing EXcellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership (EXCELL) core competencies in enhancing pharmacy students' professional communication skills. Methods. Students completed three hours of preparatory lectures and eight hours of workshops comprising six SLMs themed around pharmacy practice and pharmacy placements. Each SLM comprised role-plays with actors, facilitation using EXCELL Social Interaction Maps (SIMs), and debriefing. Evaluations of SLMs included quantitative and qualitative survey responses collected before, during and after workshops, and after placements. Facilitators reflected on SLMs as a pedagogic modality. Results. Student feedback was positive about SLMs as an effective learning tool. The majority indicated areas of new learning and found SLMs enhanced their professional skills and confidence. Facilitator feedback was positive, and suggested SLM optimization strategies. Conclusion. Student and teaching team recommendations will inform future curriculum development including the optimization of SLMs in pharmacy education. PMID:27073281

  4. Factors influencing pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmacy practice research and strategies for promoting research interest in pharmacy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritikos VS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To (1 investigate the relationships between students’ characteristics and their (a perceptions of research in general and (b attitudes towards pharmacy practice research; (2 identify strategies that could be used by pharmacy educators to promote research interest in pharmacy practice; and (3 identify perceived barriers to the pursuit or completion of a pharmacy practice research degree. Methods: A survey was administered to all students enrolled in each year of the four-year pharmacy undergraduate program, University of Sydney, Australia. Perceptions of research in general were measured using 4 items on a five-point semantic-differential scale and attitudes towards pharmacy practice research were measured using 16 items on a five-point Likert scale. Student characteristics were also collected as were responses to open-ended questions which were analysed using content analysis. Results: In total 853 students participated and completed the survey (83% response rate. Participants’ characteristics were associated with some but not all aspects of research and pharmacy practice research. It appeared that positive attitudes and perspectives were influenced strongly by exposure to the ‘research’ process through projects, friends or mentors, previous degrees or having future intentions to pursue a research degree. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest positive attitudes and perceptions of research can be nurtured through the formal inclusion in research processes, particularly the utility of practice research in clinical practice across the four years of study. Participants indicated there was a lack of awareness of the needs, benefits and career opportunities associated with pharmacy practice research and voiced clear impediments in their career path with respect to the choice of practice research-related careers. Conclusions: Future research should investigate changes in perceptions and attitudes in a

  5. The need for redesigned pharmacy practice courses in Pakistan: the perspectives of senior pharmacy students

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    Muhammad Umair Khan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In Pakistan, courses in pharmacy practice, which are an essential component of the PharmD curriculum, were launched with the aim of strengthening pharmacy practice overall and enabling pharmacy students to cope with the challenges involved in meeting real-world healthcare needs. Since very little research has assessed the efficacy of such courses, we aimed to evaluate students’ perceptions of pharmacy practice courses and their opinions about whether their current knowledge of the topics covered in pharmacy practice courses is adequate for future practice. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted over two months among the senior pharmacy students of two pharmacy colleges. A content- and face-validated questionnaire was used to collect data, which were then analysed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression were performed. Results: Research in pharmacy practice (30.2%, applied drug information (34.4%, health policy (38.1%, public health and epidemiology (39.5%, pharmacovigilance (45.6%, and pharmacoeconomics (47.9% were the major courses that were covered to the least extent in the PharmD curriculum. However, hospital pharmacy practice (94.4%, pharmacotherapeutics (88.8%, and community pharmacy practice (82.8% were covered well. Although 94% of students considered these courses important, only 37.2% considered themselves to be competent in the corresponding topics. Of the participants, 87.9% agreed that the pharmacy courses in the present curriculum should be redesigned. Conclusion: Our results showed that the pharmacy practice courses in the current PharmD curriculum do not encompass some important core subjects. A nationwide study is warranted to further establish the necessity for remodelling pharmacy practice courses in Pakistan.

  6. A Pharmaceutical Industry Elective Course on Practice Experience Selection and Fellowship Pursuit by Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Rhea; Blustein, Leona; Morel, Diane; Davis, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To design and implement 2 pharmaceutical industry elective courses and assess their impact on students’ selection of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) and pursuit of pharmaceutical industry fellowships.

  7. Evaluation of pharmacy students’ clinical interventions on a general medicine practice experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones JD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As colleges of pharmacy prepare a new generation of practitioners, it is important that during practice experiences students learn the impact of clinical interventions. For over ten years, pharmacy students have been a vital part of the multidisciplinary team at the military treatment facility. The overall impact of the student interventions on patient care has not been evaluated. To evaluate the impact, the students began documenting their clinical interventions in Medkeeper RxInterventions™, an online database. The program is used to document faculty and fourth year pharmacy students’ pharmaceutical interventions.Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the interventions completed by fourth year pharmacy students during a general medicine advanced pharmacy practice experience at a military treatment facility.Methods: The students completing their general medicine advanced pharmacy practice experience at the military treatment facility are responsible for self reporting all interventions made during clinical rounds into the Medkeeper RxIntervention™ database. The researchers retrospectively collected and analyzed interventions made from June 2008 to June 2009.Results: The total number of interventions recorded by 8 fourth year pharmacy students was 114. Students averaged a number of 14.3 interventions during an eight week practice experience. Students spent an average of 5 minutes per intervention. Ninety- five percent of the interventions were accepted.Conclusion: Fourth year pharmacy students’ recommendations were accepted at a high rate by resident physicians. The high acceptance rate may have the ability to positively impact patient care.

  8. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes. PMID:24877189

  9. Certificate Program in Self-Care for Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jerome W.; Popovich, Nicholas G.

    The Purdue University School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences initiated a Certificate Program in Self-Care for Pharmacy Practice. The program aimed to enable pharmacists to develop their practice to better serve the self-care needs of customers. In a pilot group 26 participating pharmacists took a sequence of home study modules and workshops…

  10. PRACTICING HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS MENTORING PHARMACY STUDENTS IN CLINICAL PHARMACY: AN EXPERIENCE FROM DOW UNIVERSITY OF HEALTH SCIENCES (DUHS) PAKISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Syed Shaukat Ali Muttaqi; Sumbul Shamim; Mustapha Omer

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacy education has been an important and integral part of the education system of a country. Pharmacy education in Pakistan has grown significantly through the ages and there are quite a few number of pharmacy schools providing education to the students. The academia and practice had always been disjointed in the country. Dow College of Pharmacy (DCOP) at DUHS was established in the year 2008, with the vision to provide exemplary pharmacy education to the students and bridging the gap bet...

  11. Communication Capacity Building through Pharmacy Practice Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Fejzic, Jasmina; Barker, Michelle; Hills, Ruth; Priddle, Alannah

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effectiveness of simulated learning modules (SLMs) encompassing EXcellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership (EXCELL) core competencies in enhancing pharmacy students’ professional communication skills.

  12. Reflective Practice and Its Implications for Pharmacy Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tsingos, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy students require critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to integrate theory learned in the classroom with the complexities of practice, yet many pharmacy students fall short of acquiring these skills.1-2 Reflective practice activities encourage learning from the student’s own experiences and those of others, and offer a possible solution for the integration of knowledge-based curricula with the ambiguities of practice, as well as enhance communication and collaboration within a...

  13. Private pharmacy staff in Hanoi dispensing steroids - theory and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson M

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate self reported practice and actual practice of private pharmacy staff in relation to drug regulations and provision of prednisolone (a prescription-only corticosteroid on request to treat lower back pain. Method: Sixty private pharmacies in Hanoi were randomly selected. Self reported practice was assessed through interviews with pharmacy staff using a questionnaire; actual practice was assessed with the Simulated Client Method with 5 encounters in each pharmacy (a total of 295 encounters. Results: Sixty percent of the pharmacy staff interviewed said that they would not dispense corticosteroids without prescription and 60% could mention some adverse effects. In practice all but one pharmacy dispensed corticosteroids without prescription in 76 % of all the encounters. Questions and advice given to the clients were associated with significantly lower dispensing of corticosteroids. Conclusion: The low compliance with prescription regulations and the discrepancy between stated practice and actual practice raises concerns. This study indicates that commercial pressures exceed the deterrent effect of current drug regulations and their implementation and hence enforcement of regulations needs to be improved.

  14. Organisational culture: an important concept for pharmacy practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Shane; Harrison, Jeff; Carswell, Peter; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2009-10-01

    Throughout the developed world, community pharmacy is under considerable pressure to play a greater part in delivering effective primary health care. The requirement to adopt new roles continues to challenge community pharmacy and drive change. The factors that determine the ability of community pharmacy to effectively deliver services for health gain are complex and include; policy, professional, financial and structural elements. There is also evidence to suggest that organisational culture may influence the effectiveness of an organisation. In order to address this there is a need to understand the dimensions of organisational culture that lead to successful implementation of the change necessary for community pharmacy to become a more effective primary health care organisation. In this commentary, we introduce the concept of organisational culture, outline two frameworks for studying culture, and argue the benefits of pursuing an organisational culture research agenda for the evolution of pharmacy practice and research.

  15. Pharmacists’ social authority to transform community pharmacy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy McPherson, PhD, RPh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaders in the profession of pharmacy have articulated a vision of pharmacists as providers of patient-centered care (PCC services and the Doctor of Pharmacy was established as the required practice degree to achieve this vision. Pharmacist-provided PCC services have been shown to reduce medication costs and improve patient compliance with therapies. While community pharmacists are capable of, and are ideally placed for, providing PCC services, in fact they devote most of their time to prescription dispensing rather than direct patient care. As professionals, community pharmacists are charged with protecting society by providing expert services to help consumers manage risks associated with drug therapies. Historically pharmacists fulfilled this responsibility by accurately dispensing prescription medications, verifying doses, and allergy checking. This limited view of pharmacy practice is insufficient in light of the modern view of pharmacists as providers of PCC. The consumers’ view of community pharmacy as a profession represents a barrier to transforming the basis of community pharmacy from product distribution to providing PCC services. Community pharmacists are conferred with social authority to dictate the manner in which their professional services are provided. Pharmacists can therefore facilitate the transition to PCC as the primary function of community pharmacy by exercising their social authority to engage consumers in their roles in the new patient-pharmacist relationship. Each pharmacist must decide to provide PCC services. Suggestions for initiating PCC services in community pharmacy are offered.

  16. Pharmacies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Pharmacies in the United States and Territories A pharmacy is a facility whose primary function is to store, prepare and legally dispense prescription drugs under...

  17. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research: a network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Philbert, Daphne; Rump, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-08-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This paper presents the characteristics and benefits of the Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research, a practice based research network affiliated with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Utrecht University. Yearly, this network is used to realize approximately 600 student internships (in hospital and community pharmacies) and 20 research projects. To date, most research has been performed in community pharmacy and research questions frequently concerned prescribing behavior or adherence and subjects related to uptake of regulations in the pharmacy setting. Researchers gain access to different types of data from daily practice, pharmacists receive feedback on the functioning of their own pharmacy and students get in depth insight into pharmacy practice.

  18. Professional liability for pharmacists: a focus on pharmacy practice acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, M A; Green, J A; Greve, P A; Lovejoy, L S

    1988-11-01

    The increased complexity of pharmacotherapeutics and the expanded role of pharmacists in the drug-use process may bring about an increased liability exposure for failure to conform to a professional standard of care. Therefore, a survey of 51 state pharmacy practice acts was conducted: (1) to establish a nationwide statutory definition of pharmacy practice, and (2) to outline possible use of the statutes in civil and administrative law. Twenty percent of state statutes contain no definition of pharmacy practice. Of the remaining 41 states, dispensing (97.5 percent), compounding (92.5 percent), interpretation and evaluation of prescriptions (68.2 percent), and consultation (73 percent) are legally defined. Pharmacokinetic consultation, drug administration, pharmacist prescribing, and pharmaceutical research are defined in one, seven, four, and one state(s), respectively. Pharmacists may face legal responsibilities from both the courts and state boards of medical and pharmacy practice. Aggressively updating the statutes and regulations to reflect contemporary pharmacy practice may provide a mechanism for a defense in court litigation and regulatory action.

  19. A 5-Year Analysis of Peer-Reviewed Journal Article Publications of Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A.; Spivey, Christina; Martin, Jennifer R.; Wyles, Christina; Ehrman, Clara; Schlesselman, Lauren S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate scholarship, as represented by peer-reviewed journal articles, among US pharmacy practice faculty members; contribute evidence that may better inform benchmarking by academic pharmacy practice departments; and examine factors that may be related to publication rates.

  20. Adverse Drug Reactions: Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Etminani-Isfahani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and contribute to excessive health care costs. Detection and reporting of ADRs could decrease these consequences. The present study was designed to assess the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP of pharmacy students towards ADRs monitoring and reporting.Methods: A questionnaire was prepared to investigate the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP of pharmacy students regarding ADR reporting. The questionnaire consisting of 17 questions (7 questions on knowledge, 5 on attitudes and 5 on practice were given to pharmacy students randomly.Results: A total of 71 respondents participated in the study. 70% of participants had favorable general knowledge about ADRs but more than 60% of their professional knowledge was not satisfying. 60% of respondent believed that educational intervention will improve participating of health care professional in ADRs reporting. 63% of respondent observed ADRs cases but about 95% of them had never reported an ADR.Conclusion: In overall, pharmacy students have poor knowledge, attitude and practice towards ADRs reporting and pharmacovigilance. This suggests the need of suitable changes in the undergraduate teaching curriculum and additional training among the students regarding ADRs.

  1. Pharmaceutical care in community pharmacies: practice and research in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herborg, Hanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Frøkjaer, Bente

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the current status of Danish community pharmacy in both practice and research and discuss future trends. FINDINGS: Denmark has a social welfare system that provides health care, social services, and pensions to its population. Medical care and surgery are free. Prescription...

  2. Attitudes of First-Year Pharmacy Students and Preceptors to a "Mini-Externship" in Hospital and Community Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Michael P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The University of Montana School of Pharmacy has included a miniexternship experience in a required introductory course. Goals of a survey of 67 first year students and 17 preceptors included students' demographic profile and prior exposure to pharmacy practice, assessment of the influence of the externship on career goals, etc. (MLW)

  3. Uptake of Quality-Related Event Standards of Practice by Community Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Overmars, Craig; MacMaster, Kaleigh; Mahaffey, Thomas; Zwicker, Bev; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2015-10-01

    Quality-related events (QREs), including medication errors and near misses, are an inevitable part of community pharmacy practice. As QREs have significant implications for patient safety, pharmacy regulatory authorities across North America are increasing their expectations regarding QRE reporting and learning. Such expectations, commonly encapsulated as standards of practice (SoP), vary greatly between pharmacy jurisdictions and may range from the simple requirement to document QREs occurring within the pharmacy, all the way to requiring that quality improvement plans have been put in place. This research explores the uptake of QRE reporting and learning SoP and how this uptake varies based on pharmacy characteristics including location, prescription volume, and pharmacy type. Secondary data analysis of 91 community pharmacy assessments in Nova Scotia, Canada, was used to explore uptake of QRE standards. Overall, pharmacies are performing relatively well on reporting QREs. However, despite initial success with basic QRE reporting, community pharmacy uptake of QRE learning activities is lagging. PMID:24532822

  4. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Nuffer, Wesley; Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program.

  5. Towards good pharmacy practice in Hanoi : A multi-intervention study in private sector

    OpenAIRE

    Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the quality of private pharmacy practice and assesses the effects of an intervention package on knowledge and practice of private pharmacy staff in Hanoi, Vietnam. The study types used were a case study and a randomised controlled trial. In the case study, two private pharmacies were included. Interviews, observations and drug inventory were used for data collection. In the intervention study, 68 private pharmacies participated. A Simulated Client M...

  6. The changing face of pharmacy practice and the need for a new model of pharmacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Hussain, Azhar

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacy profession has evolved from its conventional and traditional drug focused basis to an advanced patient focused basis over the years. In the past century the pharmacists were more involved in compounding and manufacturing of medicines, but this role has significantly reduced over time. This advancement in the role of pharmacist calls for them to be the part of the broader health care team working for providing better health care for the patients, thus contributing in achieving the global millennium development goals. To match up, the role of today's pharmacists needs to be expanded to include pharmaceutical care concepts, making the pharmacist a health care professional rather than a drug seller in a commercial enterprise. Therefore, pharmacy schools should prepare a program that has competence with the changing role of the pharmacist. The education should provide ability for critical thinking, improve problem-solving skills and decision making during pharmacotherapy. The student should be trained to create, transmit, and apply new knowledge based on cutting-edge research in the pharmaceutical, social, and clinical sciences; collaborate with other health professionals and learn to enhance the quality of life through improved health for the people of local society and as well as the global community. PMID:24023452

  7. The changing face of pharmacy practice and the need for a new model of pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Zerrin; Hussain, Azhar

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacy profession has evolved from its conventional and traditional drug focused basis to an advanced patient focused basis over the years. In the past century the pharmacists were more involved in compounding and manufacturing of medicines, but this role has significantly reduced over time. This advancement in the role of pharmacist calls for them to be the part of the broader health care team working for providing better health care for the patients, thus contributing in achieving the global millennium development goals. To match up, the role of today's pharmacists needs to be expanded to include pharmaceutical care concepts, making the pharmacist a health care professional rather than a drug seller in a commercial enterprise. Therefore, pharmacy schools should prepare a program that has competence with the changing role of the pharmacist. The education should provide ability for critical thinking, improve problem-solving skills and decision making during pharmacotherapy. The student should be trained to create, transmit, and apply new knowledge based on cutting-edge research in the pharmaceutical, social, and clinical sciences; collaborate with other health professionals and learn to enhance the quality of life through improved health for the people of local society and as well as the global community. PMID:24023452

  8. Linking a Pharmaceutical Chemistry Workshop to Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morral, Jordi; Culshaw, Margaret; Morral, Kim; Conway, Barbara; Adams, Sylvia; Adams, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a workshop to enhance pharmacy students' appreciation of the importance of chemistry for pharmacy practice. The workshop was designed to form part of the practical work of two modules taught in the second year of the MPharm degree. In this mandatory workshop, second year pharmacy students were required to spot in the dispensary drugs based on their chemical properties like chirality, their origin and chemical structure. The lecturers involved in the workshop showed examples of the application of chemistry in the day to day work of the dispensary (e.g. calculating the dose for a patient in millimoles or how small modifications from a natural product can change its ability to cross the blood-brain-barrier). Feedback from participating students was collected via two survey instruments to examine the impact of the intervention. The survey results showed a clear shift towards a more positive perception by students of the chemistry taught in the MPharm curriculum. PMID:26839806

  9. Big data in pharmacy practice: current use, challenges, and the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolyn Ma, Helen Wong Smith, Cherie Chu, Deborah T JuarezDepartment of Pharmacy Practice, The Daniel K Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawai'i at Hilo, Hilo, HI, USAAbstract: Pharmacy informatics is defined as the use and integration of data, information, knowledge, technology, and automation in the medication-use process for the purpose of improving health outcomes. The term “big data” has been coined and is often defined in three V's: volume, velocity, and variety. This paper describes three major areas in which pharmacy utilizes big data, including: 1 informed decision making (clinical pathways and clinical practice guidelines; 2 improved care delivery in health care settings such as hospitals and community pharmacy practice settings; and 3 quality performance measurement for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid and medication management activities such as tracking medication adherence and medication reconciliation.Keywords: clinical pharmacy data base, pharmacy informatics, patient outcomes

  10. An Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience to Improve Pertussis Immunization Rates in Mothers of Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Cheryl; Wall, Geoff C.; Soltis, Denise A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To implement an introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) involving discharge counseling on postpartum pertussis immunization recommendations and evaluate its impact on student learning and patient immunization rates.

  11. A Study on How Industrial Pharmacists Rank Competences for Pharmacy Practice: A Case for Industrial Pharmacy Specialization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey; De Paepe, Kristien; Pozo, Antonio Sánchez; Rekkas, Dimitrios; Volmer, Daisy; Hirvonen, Jouni; Bozic, Borut; Skowron, Agnieska; Mircioiu, Constantin; Marcincal, Annie; Koster, Andries; Wilson, Keith; van Schravendijk, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the way in which industrial pharmacists rank the fundamental competences for pharmacy practice. European industrial pharmacists (n = 135) ranked 68 competences for practice, arranged into 13 clusters of two types (personal and patient care). Results show that, compared to communi

  12. A Modular Pharmacy Practice Laboratory Course Integrating Role-Playing Scenarios with Community and Hospital Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, John W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evolution of a modular pharmacy practice course that uses practitioners as role-model instructors in prepared and impromptu scenarios. The course reviews the top 200 drug products while introducing students to both community and institutional practice settings. Appendices include a summary of the…

  13. Critical thinking in the context of clinical practice: The need to reinvent pharmacy education

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas, Erika Lourenço; Ramalho-de-Oliveira, Djenane

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand how pedagogical practices influence pharmacy students’ development of critical thinking skills, we used critical ethnography and the methods of participant observation, focus groups and in-depthinterviews with students and faculty from one of the top ten Colleges of Pharmacy in the United States. The results that emerged from two semesters of fieldwork engagement suggested that the traditionally taught pharmaceutical knowledge isn’t enough to prepare pharmacy students f...

  14. Pharmacists’ views on involvement in pharmacy practice research: Strategies for facilitating participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armour C

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In order for community pharmacy practice to continue to evolve, pharmacy practice research on potential new services is essential. This requires the active participation of community pharmacists. At present the level of involvement of community pharmacists in pharmacy practice research is minimal. Objectives: To ascertain the attitudes of a group of research-experienced community pharmacists towards participating in research; to investigate the barriers and facilitators to participation; to identify potential strategies to increase the involvement of community pharmacists in research. Methods: A focus group was conducted with a purposive sample of 11 research-experienced community pharmacists. A pharmacist academic moderated the focus group using a semi-structured interview guide. The participants were asked about their attitudes towards research, previous involvement in research, barriers to their involvement and strategies to overcome these barriers. The session was audio-taped and notes were taken by an observer. Thematic analysis of the notes and audio-tape transcripts was conducted.Results: Three themes emerged around pharmacists’ attitudes towards research: pharmacists’ perception of the purpose of research, pharmacists’ motivation for involvement in research, and pharmacists’ desired role in research. Barriers to research participation were grouped into four themes: pharmacists’ mindset, communication, infrastructure (time, money and staff, and skills/knowledge. Strategies to address each of these barriers were suggested.Conclusions: Participants recognised the importance of research towards advancing their profession and this was a motivating factor for involvement in research. They perceived their role in research primarily as data collection. A series of practical strategies to overcome the barriers to participation were offered that researchers may wish to consider when promoting research outcomes and designing research

  15. Alternative Methods by Which Basic Science Pharmacy Faculty Can Relate to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Hugh F.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A panel of pharmacy faculty ranked a broad inventory of basic pharmaceutical science topics in terms of their applicability to clinical pharmacy practice. The panel concluded that basic pharmaceutical sciences are essentially applications of foundation areas in biological, physical, and social sciences. (Author/MLW)

  16. A European Competence Framework for Industrial Pharmacy Practice in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The PHAR-IN (“Competences for industrial pharmacy practice in biotechnology” looked at whether there is a difference in how industrial employees and academics rank competences for practice in the biotechnological industry. A small expert panel consisting of the authors of this paper produced a biotechnology competence framework by drawing up an initial list of competences then ranking them in importance using a three-stage Delphi process. The framework was next evaluated and validated by a large expert panel of academics (n = 37 and industrial employees (n = 154. Results show that priorities for industrial employees and academics were similar. The competences for biotechnology practice that received the highest scores were mainly in: “Research and Development”, ‘“Upstream” and “Downstream” Processing’, “Product development and formulation”, “Aseptic processing”, “Analytical methodology”, “Product stability”, and “Regulation”. The main area of disagreement was in the category “Ethics and drug safety” where academics ranked competences higher than did industrial employees.

  17. [Clinical pharmacy practice education in master's course of Meijo University in affiliation with medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuba, Kazuhisa

    2009-08-01

    In 2003, Meijo University has developed a new program to train students in master's degree in the field of clinical practice. This new curriculum has three big pillars of educational goal: Problem-Based Learning (PBL), communication skill and clinical pharmacy practice training. Before exposing students to clinical training, they must learn first how to solve various patients' problems through PBL and enhance their communication skill. To provide a clinical environment, education and training, the Faculty of Pharmacy cooperated with the School of Medicine of Fujita Health University. Master's students together with other members of the healthcare team observe patient's disease state and most especially monitor pharmacotherapy. At first, students will be trained for a month at the pharmacy division and experience one week-nursing job. Next, they will be trained at the clinical divisions such as General Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Respiratory Medicine, Hematology, Chemotherapy, Gastroenterological Surgery, Psychiatry, and Emergency Unit. Students rotate three-month training on four clinical divisions during one year. The head physicians of the medical department hold concurrent post as professors and share responsibility with the pharmacy faculty in training the students. To have its venue where students, faculty and physicians conduct their discussion on clinical cases, a pharmacy satellite seminar class room was set up at Fujita Health University hospital. Through this, pharmacy students and faculty had more opportunities to exchange knowledge on medicine and pharmacy. Master's students are expected to acquire professionalism, ethical knowledge and pharmaceutical care skills through the clinical pharmacy practice program. PMID:19652496

  18. Minimum Requirements for Core Competency in Pediatric Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Elizabeth A; Burke, Margaret M; Johnson, Peter N; Klein, Kristin C; Miller, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    Colleges of pharmacy provide varying amounts of didactic and clinical hours in pediatrics resulting in variability in the knowledge, skills, and perceptions of new graduates toward pediatric pharmaceutical care. The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the application of a minimum set of core competencies for all pharmacists involved in the care of hospitalized children. PMID:26766938

  19. Perceptions, use and attitudes of pharmacy customers on complementary medicines and pharmacy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Michael

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary medicines (CMs are popular amongst Australians and community pharmacy is a major supplier of these products. This study explores pharmacy customer use, attitudes and perceptions of complementary medicines, and their expectations of pharmacists as they relate to these products. Methods Pharmacy customers randomly selected from sixty large and small, metropolitan and rural pharmacies in three Australian states completed an anonymous, self administered questionnaire that had been pre-tested and validated. Results 1,121 customers participated (response rate 62%. 72% had used CMs within the previous 12 months, 61% used prescription medicines daily and 43% had used both concomitantly. Multivitamins, fish oils, vitamin C, glucosamine and probiotics were the five most popular CMs. 72% of people using CMs rated their products as 'very effective' or 'effective enough'. CMs were as frequently used by customers aged 60 years or older as younger customers (69% vs. 72% although the pattern of use shifted with older age. Most customers (92% thought pharmacists should provide safety information about CMs, 90% thought they should routinely check for interactions, 87% thought they should recommend effective CMs, 78% thought CMs should be recorded in customer's medication profile and 58% thought pharmacies stocking CMs should also employ a complementary medicine practitioner. Of those using CMs, 93% thought it important for pharmacists to be knowledgeable about CMs and 48% felt their pharmacist provides useful information about CMs. Conclusions CMs are widely used by pharmacy customers of all ages who want pharmacists to be more involved in providing advice about these products.

  20. The role of community pharmacy-based vaccination in the USA: current practice and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach AT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Albert T Bach, Jeffery A Goad School of Pharmacy, Chapman University, Irvine, California, USA Abstract: Community pharmacy-based provision of immunizations in the USA has become commonplace in the last few decades, with success in increasing rates of immunizations. Community pharmacy-based vaccination services are provided by pharmacists educated in the practice of immunization delivery and provide a convenient and accessible option for receiving immunizations. The pharmacist's role in immunization practice has been described as serving in the roles of educator, facilitator, and immunizer. With a majority of pharmacist-provided vaccinations occurring in the community pharmacy setting, there are many examples of community pharmacists serving in these immunization roles with successful outcomes. Different community pharmacies employ a number of different models and workflow practices that usually consist of a year-round in-house service staffed by their own immunizing pharmacist. Challenges that currently exist in this setting are variability in scopes of immunization practice for pharmacists across states, inconsistent reimbursement mechanisms, and barriers in technology. Many of these challenges can be alleviated by continual education; working with legislators, state boards of pharmacy, stakeholders, and payers to standardize laws; and reimbursement design. Other challenges that may need to be addressed are improvements in communication and continuity of care between community pharmacists and the patient centered medical home. Keywords: immunization, pharmacy practice, pharmacists, continuity of care 

  1. Sequencing of Simulation and Clinic Experiences in an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Leon, Nicholas; Hajjar, Emily; DeSevo Bellottie, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine how the intrasemester sequencing of a simulation component, delivered during an ambulatory care introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE), affects student performance on a series of 3 assessments delivered during the second professional (P2) year.

  2. Pharmacists’ journey to clinical pharmacy practice in Ethiopia: Key informants’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemayehu B Mekonnen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients and providing medication consultation to staff. This area of practice is at the infant stage in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to explore key informants’ perspective in the implementation of clinical pharmacy practice in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Method: A qualitative study was conducted through in-depth interviews with the heads of departments (internal medicine, paediatrics, surgery, nurse, pharmacy, medical director, administration and pharmacy student representatives. Qualitative data analysis was done after audiotapes were transcribed verbatim and notes were compiled. Results: All of the respondents interviewed express diverse and conflicting perspectives on pharmacists’ role, varying from a health-care professional to a business man. Despite this, the current pace of change worldwide takes the professions’ mission to that of a provider of clinical pharmacy services. The data ascertained the change in pharmacy practice, and integrating clinical pharmacy services within the health-care system should be seen as a must. Pharmacists should delineate from a business perspective and focus on widening the scope of the profession of pharmacy and should come close to the patient to serve directly. Conclusions: Although the perception of people on traditional roles of pharmacists was weak, there were promising steps in developing clinical pharmacy practice within the health-care system. Moreover, the results of this study revealed a high demand for this service among health-care providers.

  3. A Study on How Industrial Pharmacists Rank Competences for Pharmacy Practice: A Case for Industrial Pharmacy Specialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the way in which industrial pharmacists rank the fundamental competences for pharmacy practice. European industrial pharmacists (n = 135 ranked 68 competences for practice, arranged into 13 clusters of two types (personal and patient care. Results show that, compared to community pharmacists (n = 258, industrial pharmacists rank competences centering on research, development and production of drugs higher, and those centering on patient care lower. Competences centering on values, communication skills, etc. were ranked similarly by the two groups of pharmacists. These results are discussed in the light of the existence or not of an “industrial pharmacy” specialization.

  4. Collaboration with pharmacy services in a family practice for the medically underserved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pharmacist-managed collaborative services in a family practice setting are described, and diabetes and hypertension outcomes are assessed.Methods: Pharmacist-managed clinics, pharmacotherapy consultations, and drug information services are provided for a medically underserved, predominantly African American population. A pharmacy residency director, an ambulatory care pharmacy resident and three PharmD candidate student pharmacists work directly with physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and social workers to form an interdisciplinary health care team. Providers utilize pharmacy services through consultations and referrals. Collaboration outcomes were evaluated in twenty-two patients with diabetes and thirty hypertensive patients. Patients were retrospectively followed throughout their history with pharmacy service. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C was tracked before referral to pharmacy services, 3 to 6 months after, and as the most current measure after at least 6 months. Blood pressure (BP was observed before pharmacy involvement, 2 to 4 months later, and then currently for at least 4 months with the service. The mean of the most current markers was calculated, and the percent of patients at their goal marker was compared to national averages.Results: Fifty percent of pharmacy service patients met the American Diabetes Association hemoglobin A1c goal of less than 7% in our evaluation compared to the national mean of 49.8% overall and 44% in African Americans. Thirty percent of patients were at their BP goal while 33.1% of patients without diabetes and 33.2% of patients with diabetes nationally are at goal. Conclusion: The medically underserved patients under the care of pharmacy services achieved a higher percentage at their A1C goal than the national mean. The percentage of patients who achieved their BP goals was comparable to the national average. Increasing utilization of pharmacy services in the family practice setting allows for

  5. Medication adherence: a review of pharmacy education, research, practice and policy in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Bell JS; Enlund H; Vainio K

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To describe pharmacy education, research, practice and policy related to medication adherence in Finland since the year 2000.Methods: The three universities that provide pharmacy education (Åbo Akademi, University of Eastern Finland, and University of Helsinki) completed a structured pro-forma questionnaire regarding education related to medication adherence. A MEDLINE and EMBASE literature search was performed to identify English language peer-reviewed research that reported medication...

  6. Part-time and job-share careers among pharmacy practice faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brooke; Vest, Kathleen; Pohl, Shaunte; Mazan, Jennifer; Winkler, Susan

    2014-04-17

    Part-time and job-share policies may allow pharmacy practice faculty members to achieve work/life balance while pursuing their professional goals. Precedent for alternative work schedules within the health professions community can be found throughout the literature; however, little is known about part-time roles in academic pharmacy. The design and implementation of 3 different alternative faculty appointments are described and department chair and faculty perspectives are shared. Teaching, service, and scholarship responsibilities, as well as outcomes before and after changes in appointment, are described. Advantages and disadvantages, including advice for other colleges of pharmacy, are presented. Alternate appointments may be a key factor in retaining highly qualified faculty members who continue to bring their expertise to teaching, precepting, and scholarship within a college or school of pharmacy. PMID:24761010

  7. [Pharmacists' Behavior in Clinical Practice: Results from a Questionnaire Survey of Pharmacy Students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Akiko; Akagawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Hitomi; Kato, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was performed to obtain pharmacy students' impressions of pharmacists' behavior, to classify these based on professionalism, and to analyze the relationship between these experiences and students' satisfaction with their clinical practice in Japan. The questionnaire was answered by 327 5th-year pharmacy school students upon completing clinical practice at community pharmacies from 2011 to 2012. They rated their satisfaction with their clinical practice using a 6-point Likert scale, and provided descriptions of their experience such as, "This health provider is professional", or "What a great person he/she is as a health provider". We counted the words and then categorized the responses into 10 traits, as defined by the American Pharmaceutical Association Academy of Students of Pharmacy-American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Council of Deans Task Force on Professionalism 1999, using text mining. We analyzed the relationship between their experiences with respectful persons, and satisfaction, using the Mann-Whitney U-test (significance leveltext mining analysis after excluding unsuitable responses. The word most used was "patient" (121 times). Many students noted their impression that the pharmacists had answered patients' questions. Of the 10 trait categories, "professional knowledge and skills" was mentioned most often (151 students). PMID:26831812

  8. BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTATION OF PERFORMANCE-BASED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN PHARMACIES IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Maharaj et al

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to conduct a survey and determine the barriers to implement performance-based management in pharmacies in Trinidad. PBM is defined as “a systematic approach to performance improvement through an on-going process of establishing strategic performance objectives, measuring performance, collecting, analyzing, reviewing, and reporting performance data, and using that data to drive performance improvement”(Performance Management Handbook. A questionnaire was conducted, with respect to the presence or absence of barriers to implementation of performance-based management at pharmacies along the East-West corridor of Trinidad. A twenty-two (22 question survey was administered to sixteen (16 pharmacies to be assessed. This region was chosen because of its close proximity and convenience. Fourteen (14 of the twenty-two (22 questions were based on a Likert-type scale, so that respondents were able to specify their level of agreement or disagreement of applicability on a symmetric “strongly agree - strongly disagree” scale for a series of statements based on the barriers of PBM implementation. Pharmacies were selected in a non-randomized manner. The SPSS statistical computer software was used to estimate a model that would best describe the barriers to the implementation of PBM in pharmacies of Trinidad. While Performance Based Management (PBM is implemented in various pharmacies throughout Trinidad, it is usually found in those of larger companies with more staff employed and also with the infrastructure and funding available to support this type of management. Since most pharmacies operate with smaller staff, most aspects of PBM are not practised but this does not mean that the management are unaware of PBM. Some pharmacists and pharmacy owners have expressed intentions of employing PBM in the future and do follow some of its practices such as employee documentation and giving performance feedback. However with the

  9. Implementing simulated learning modules to improve students’ pharmacy practice skills and professionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejzic J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective communication enables healthcare professionals and students to practise their disciplines in a professional and competent manner. Simulated-based education (SBE has been increasingly used to improve students’ communication and practice skills in Health Education. Objective: Simulated learning modules (SLMs were developed using practice-based scenarios grounded in effective communication competencies. The effect of the SLMs on Pharmacy students’ (i Practice skills and (ii Professionalism were evaluated. Methods: SLMs integrating EXCELL competencies were applied in the classroom to study their effect on a number of learning outcomes. EXcellence in Cultural Experiential Learning and Leadership (EXCELL Program is a schematic, evidence-based professional development resource centred around developing participants’ self-efficacy and generic communication competencies. Students (N=95 completed three hours of preliminary lectures and eight hours of SLM workshops including six scenarios focused on Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Placements. Each SLM included briefing, role-plays with actors, facilitation, and debriefing on EXCELL social interaction maps (SIMs. Evaluations comprised quantitative and qualitative survey responsed by students before and post-workshops, and post-placements, and teachers’ reflections. Surveys examine specific learning outcomes by using pharmacy professionalism and pharmacy practice effectiveness scales. Responses were measured prior to the commencement of SLMs, after completion of the two workshops and after students completed their block placement. Self-report measures enabled students to self-assess whether any improvements occurred. Results: Student responses were overwhelmingly positive and indicated significant improvements in their Pharmacy practice and professionalism skills, and commitment to professional ethics. Qualitative feedback strongly supported students’ improved communication

  10. Work Environment Practice Attitudes of Recent Black and Chicano Doctor of Pharmacy Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Ansfried B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A study of work environments of graduates of the University of California School of Pharmacy indicates that minority pharmacists pursue different types of practice in different locations and receive different incomes than nonminority pharmacists, and that minority programs increase minority pharmacist representation in underserved areas. (JMD)

  11. Drug dispensing practices at pharmacies in Bengaluru: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumya, R.; Devarashetty, Vijayalakshmi; Jayanthi, C. R.; Sushma, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Pharmacists are one of the crucial focal points for health care in the community. They have tremendous outreach to the public as pharmacies are often the first-port-of-call. With the increase of ready-to-use drugs, the main health-related activity of a pharmacist today is to assure the quality of dispensing, a key element to promote rational medicine use. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 200 pharmacies, 100 each in various residential (R) and commercial (C) areas of Bengaluru, was conducted using a prevalidated questionnaire administered to the chief pharmacist or the person-in-charge by the investigators. Results: Dispensing without prescription at pharmacies was 45% of the total dispensing encounters and significantly higher (χ2 = 15.2, P educational campaigns are a prerequisite to improve dispenser's knowledge and dispensing practices.

  12. Acute care clinical pharmacy practice: unit- versus service-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Curtis E; Eckel, Stephen; Arif, Sally; Beringer, Paul M; Blake, Elizabeth W; Lardieri, Allison B; Lobo, Bob L; Mercer, Jessica M; Moye, Pamela; Orlando, Patricia L; Wargo, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    This commentary from the 2010 Task Force on Acute Care Practice Model of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy was developed to compare and contrast the "unit-based" and "service-based" orientation of the clinical pharmacist within an acute care pharmacy practice model and to offer an informed opinion concerning which should be preferred. The clinical pharmacy practice model must facilitate patient-centered care and therefore must position the pharmacist to be an active member of the interprofessional team focused on providing high-quality pharmaceutical care to the patient. Although both models may have advantages and disadvantages, the most important distinction pertains to the patient care role of the clinical pharmacist. The unit-based pharmacist is often in a position of reacting to an established order or decision and frequently is focused on task-oriented clinical services. By definition, the service-based clinical pharmacist functions as a member of the interprofessional team. As a team member, the pharmacist proactively contributes to the decision-making process and the development of patient-centered care plans. The service-based orientation of the pharmacist is consistent with both the practice vision embraced by ACCP and its definition of clinical pharmacy. The task force strongly recommends that institutions pursue a service-based pharmacy practice model to optimally deploy their clinical pharmacists. Those who elect to adopt this recommendation will face challenges in overcoming several resource, technologic, regulatory, and accreditation barriers. However, such challenges must be confronted if clinical pharmacists are to contribute fully to achieving optimal patient outcomes.

  13. The role of commercial nuclear pharmacy in the future practice of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, R J

    1996-04-01

    It has been estimated that today 70% to 80% of all radiopharmaceutical doses are dispensed through commercial nuclear pharmacy channels. These services are provided by the approximately 250 facilities in the United States, with some multisite corporations dispensing in excess of 20,000 unit-dose prescriptions per day. As pressures mount within health care institutions to reduce manpower, increase cost-effectiveness, increase participation in managed care contracts, and to seek outside vendors for many services that were previously provided in-house, the future role of the commercial nuclear pharmacy in the practice of nuclear medicine will only continue to increase. The essence of nuclear pharmacy practice is the dispensing of a full range of high quality radiopharmaceuticals in patient-specific unit doses. These doses must be delivered in a timely and cost effective manner, without compromising quality or patient safety. Commercial nuclear pharmacies have expanded to provide such varied functions as radiation safety and waste management, as well as consultative and marketing activities directed towards clinicians within a nuclear medicine practitioners own facility. In-service continuing education programs directed towards physicians and technologists are frequently offered by many commercial nuclear pharmacies. Changes in health care economics, merging and down-sizing in the hospital industry, and the overall impact of managed care on the viability of hospitals in general has resulted in slow growth, or even a small decline in the number of institutionally based nuclear pharmacists. As a result, nuclear medicine practitioners will be looking to the commercial nuclear pharmacies to meet a larger portion of their radiopharmaceutical needs, as well as to value added services, such as education and research and development. Specialized practice settings, such as nuclear cardiology and free-standing nuclear medicine clinics, are especially well suited to the services

  14. Service Scripts: A Tool for Teaching Pharmacy Students How to Handle Common Practice Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes the use of service scripts to teach pharmacy students how to manage specific practice situations by learning and following scripted behaviors. Design Based upon role theory, service scripts require specific behaviors for a broad range of practice problems and communicate consistent messages about the responsibilities of all people involved. Service scripts are developed by (1) identifying scenarios for the script, (2) eliciting the script's structure and content, and (3) documenting the reasoning behind the steps in the script. Assessment Students in a nontraditional doctor of pharmacy program developed scripts for their practice settings. They concluded that scripts were useful for quickly learning new, routine tasks, but expressed concern that scripts could be misused by pharmacists and managers. The process of script development itself was useful in gaining feedback about common practice problems. Conclusion By mastering managerial, clinical, and communication scripts, students can develop capabilities to provide professional services. PMID:17136145

  15. Improving Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students Through Effective Precepting

    OpenAIRE

    McDonough, Randy P.; Bennett, Marialice S

    2006-01-01

    Pharmacy students should be given opportunities to learn and practice interpersonal communication skills during their community advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Preceptors have the responsibility of setting the stage for the pharmacy students during their initial encounter. During this orientation to the site, students should become familiar with the history of the practice, the types of services provided, and the staff members. Once the orientation is completed, preceptors can d...

  16. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Explain the Intention of Final-year Pharmacy Students to Undertake a Higher Degree in Pharmacy Practice Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stephen R; Moles, Rebekah J; Krass, Ines; Kritikos, Vicki S

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To develop and test a conceptual model that hypothesized student intention to undertake a higher degree in pharmacy practice research (PPR) would be increased by self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the social influence of faculty members. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys were completed by 387 final-year pharmacy undergraduates enrolled in 2012 and 2013. Structural equation modeling was used to explore relationships between variables and intention. Results. Fit indices were good. The model explained 55% of the variation in intention. As hypothesized, faculty social influence increased self-efficacy and indirectly increased outcome expectancy and intention. Conclusion. To increase pharmacy students' orientation towards a career in PPR, faculty members could use their social influence by highlighting PPR in their teaching.

  17. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Explain the Intention of Final-year Pharmacy Students to Undertake a Higher Degree in Pharmacy Practice Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stephen R; Moles, Rebekah J; Krass, Ines; Kritikos, Vicki S

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To develop and test a conceptual model that hypothesized student intention to undertake a higher degree in pharmacy practice research (PPR) would be increased by self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the social influence of faculty members. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys were completed by 387 final-year pharmacy undergraduates enrolled in 2012 and 2013. Structural equation modeling was used to explore relationships between variables and intention. Results. Fit indices were good. The model explained 55% of the variation in intention. As hypothesized, faculty social influence increased self-efficacy and indirectly increased outcome expectancy and intention. Conclusion. To increase pharmacy students' orientation towards a career in PPR, faculty members could use their social influence by highlighting PPR in their teaching. PMID:27667832

  18. Mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice: basics and beyond (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Alldred, David Phillip; Closs, S José; Briggs, Michelle

    2013-10-01

    This is the first of two papers which explore the use of mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice. In an era of evidence-based medicine and policy, high-quality research evidence is essential for the development of effective pharmacist-led services. Over the past decade, the use of mixed-methods research has become increasingly common in healthcare, although to date its use has been relatively limited in pharmacy practice research. In this article, the basic concepts of mixed-methods research including its definition, typologies and advantages in relation to pharmacy practice research are discussed. Mixed-methods research brings together qualitative and quantitative methodologies within a single study to answer or understand a research problem. There are a number of mixed-methods designs available, but the selection of an appropriate design must always be dictated by the research question. Importantly, mixed-methods research should not be seen as a 'tool' to collect qualitative and quantitative data, rather there should be some degree of 'integration' between the two data sets. If conducted appropriately, mixed-methods research has the potential to generate quality research evidence by combining strengths and overcoming the respective limitations of qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

  19. Community Pharmacists’ Views and Practices Regarding Natural Health Products Sold in Community Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necyk, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Background Reports of regulatory and evidentiary gaps have raised concerns about the marketing and use of natural health products (NHPs). The majority of NHPs offered for sale are purchased at a community pharmacy and pharmacists are “front-line” health professionals involved in the marketing and provision of NHPs. To date, the involvement of pharmacists in pharmacy care involving NHPs and the degree to which concerns over the safety, efficacy, marketing and regulation of NHPs are addressed in pharmacy care in Canada have not been studied. Methods Using Qualtrics, a web-based data collection and analysis software, and a study instrument made up of fifteen (15) open-ended, closed and rating scale questions, we surveyed the attitudes and practices of 403 community pharmacists in the Canadian province of Alberta regarding NHPs offered for sale in community pharmacies. Results The majority of pharmacists surveyed (276; 68%) recommend NHPs to clients sometimes to very often. Vitamin D, calcium, multivitamins, prenatal vitamins, probiotics and fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids were the most frequently recommended NHPs. The most common indications for which NHPs are recommended include bone and musculoskeletal disorders, maintenance of general health, gastrointestinal disorders and pregnancy. Review articles published in the Pharmacist’s Letter and Canadian Pharmacists Journal were the primary basis for recommending NHPs. The majority of pharmacists surveyed (339; 84%) recommend the use of NHPs concurrently with conventional drugs, while a significant number and proportion (125; 31%) recommend alternative use. Pharmacists in the study overwhelmingly reported providing counselling on NHPs to clients based on information obtained mainly from the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. Conclusions The study findings indicate a high prevalence of pharmacy care relating to NHPs among study participants. Although pharmacists’ practices around NHPs are consistent with

  20. Mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice: recommendations for quality reporting. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Alldred, David Phillip; Closs, S José; Briggs, Michelle

    2014-02-01

    This is the second of two papers that explore the use of mixed-methods research in pharmacy practice. This paper discusses the rationale, applications, limitations and challenges of conducting mixed-methods research. As with other research methods, the choice of mixed-methods should always be justified because not all research questions require a mixed-methods approach. Mixed-methods research is particularly suitable when one dataset may be inadequate in answering the research question, an explanation of initial results is required, generalizability of qualitative findings is desired or broader and deeper understanding of a research problem is necessary. Mixed-methods research has its own challenges and limitations, which should be considered carefully while designing the study. There is a need to improve the quality of reporting of mixed-methods research. A framework for reporting mixed-methods research is proposed, for researchers and reviewers, with the intention of improving its quality. Pharmacy practice research can benefit from research that uses both 'numbers' (quantitative) and 'words' (qualitative) to develop a strong evidence base to support pharmacy-led services.

  1. Incorporating Pharmacy Scholarship to Management Responsibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hertig, John B.; Weber, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Practice advancement demands innovation. Amidst professional change, pharmacy leaders have the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to develop transformational ideas, implement these solutions, and share those successes with professionals around the state, country, and world. Scholarship, defined as contributing to the literature through publications, presentations, and other writings, is an ideal way to advance innovation within the profession. It is critical for pharmacy leaders to bu...

  2. Patients’ blood pressure knowledge, perceptions and monitoring practices in community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam JY

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite this, patients often cannot or inaccurately estimate their risk factors.Objectives: In order to improve pharmacist interventions, we sought to: 1 find out patients’ knowledge about blood pressure (BP and their self- monitoring behaviors and 2 identify the relationships between these two elements. Specifically, if evaluation of BP control were related to knowledge of one’s BP level and self-monitoring habits, and if knowledge of one’s target and BP level varied with monitoring habits. Methods: Final year pharmacy students were trained and interviewed patients in community pharmacies as a required exercise in their pharmacy clerkship. Each student recruited a convenience sample of 5-10 patients who were on hypertension medication, and surveyed them regarding their BP targets, recent BP levels as well as monthly and home BP monitoring practices. Results: One third of the 449 patients interviewed were able to report a blood pressure target with 26% reporting a JNC 7 recognized target. Three quarters of patients who reported a blood pressure target were able to report a blood pressure level, with 12% being at their self- reported target. Roughly two thirds of patients perceived their BP to be “about right”, and slightly less than a third thought it to be “high”. Sixty percent of patients monitor their BP monthly, but less than 50% of patients practice home BP monitoring. Conclusions: This study along with others before it point to the knowledge and self-management gaps in patients with chronic conditions. Furthermore, pharmacy students were able to use a brief intervention to screen patients during routine care. Pharmacists can help improve patient understanding and promote increased self-management through regular BP monitoring.

  3. MEDICAL AND PHARMACY STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE GRADING AND ASSESSMENT PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoré eMITONGA KABWEBWE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many students at the University of Namibia have frequently complained about ineffective assessment practices used at the institution. On many occasions, these complaints have not been substantiated with evidence of any kind. The purpose of this study was to obtain some empirical evidence that would ascertain undergraduate students’ perceptions of the University of Namibia’s grading and assessment practices. Using a structured scaled questionnaire, data were obtained from a representative sample of the University’s undergraduate students studying for Medical and Pharmacy degrees. The questionnaire items covered matters related to students’ experiences of assessment practices, feedback on assessment tasks, reliability and validity of assessment tools used by lecturers, efficacy of processes of administering examinations, perceptions of irregular and unfair assessment practices, impact of assessment regimes on students’ cost of studies, motivation, morale, rate of progression in studies and graduation, the degree of compliance with assessment ethics and on academic quality assurance.According to the data reported in this article, the majority of the respondents perceived that the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Namibia applied assessment practices that yielded reliable and valid results. This was the case because most lecturers in the two schools used appropriate assessment tools and provided their students with prompt and informative feedback on the results of assignments, tests and examinations. In addition, most respondents reported that whereas examination procedures used in the two schools were efficient and effective, lecturers graded examination scripts fairly. These and other results are discussed in the article to communicate the message that the assessment procedures used in the Schools of Medicine and Pharmacy at the University of Namibia would promote effective learning and understanding amongst students

  4. Self medication practice among undergraduate pharmacy students in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirajan Bhattarai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Self medication is practice by a pharmacist or lay person to treat minor health problem or symptoms without prescription. The study was conducted to evaluate the medication pattern, behaviour, practice and attitude among undergraduate pharmacy students on self medication. Methods Descriptive cross sectional questionnaire based study was conducted among 175 pharmacy undergraduates in different institutions within Kathmandu valley, Nepal using prevalidated, five sectional and structured questionnaires. Results Non steroidal analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic drugs (n=235, 38.29% were mostly preferred for the treatment of fever (n=94, 55.29% and headaches (n=89, 52.35%, mainly paracetamol (n=144, 23.8%.Community pharmacies (n=136, 80.00% and pharmacist recommendation (n=76, 44.70% were main sources of obtaining and selecting particular medicine and its dose (n=108, 63.54% while friends and family (n=75, 44.11% remained main source of information. 128(75.29%always checked up the information on package label or insert, mainly date of manufacturing (n=96, 56.47% . 70(41.17% respondents fully and 71(41.76% of them partly understood the information. 161(94.30%respondent always checked the expiry date before medicating. Significant proportion perceived it as unacceptable practice with main reasons of being unsafe (n=64, 37.64% and potential adverse reaction (n=21, 12.35%.52(30.58% of them faced adverse reactions or side effects. Allopathic system (n=114, 67.05% was preferable medication system for self medication. Conclusion Most common drugs were NSAIDs, primly paracetamol, cough and cold reliever and GI infection ailments. Students and their profession interrelationship were predominant shaping their attitude and behaviour on self medication.

  5. Alternative Methods by Which Basic Science Pharmacy Faculty Can Relate to Clinical Practice, Executive Summary and Final Report, October 1, 1978 - March 15, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Hugh F.; And Others

    The areas of basic science pharmacy instruction and clinical pharmacy practice and their interrelationships were identified in order to help develop didactic and clinical experience alternatives. A 10-member advisory committee ranked basic pharmaceutical science topical areas in terms of their applicability to clinical practice utilizing a Delphi…

  6. Pharmacy Education Reaction to Presentations on Bridging the Gap Between the Basic Sciences and Clinical Practice: Teaching, Research, and Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluisio, James T.

    1980-01-01

    Issues in the conflict between clinical practice and basic research in pharmacy are reviewed: professional associations' role, curriculum needs and traditions, internal strains and diversity in the profession, computer use, scholarly work of faculty, using the medical profession as a model, and misperceptions of what clinical and basic sciences…

  7. Does the Subject Content of the Pharmacy Degree Course Influence the Community Pharmacist’s Views on Competencies for Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Do community pharmacists coming from different educational backgrounds rank the importance of competences for practice differently—or is the way in which they see their profession more influenced by practice than university education? A survey was carried out on 68 competences for pharmacy practice in seven countries with different pharmacy education systems in terms of the relative importance of the subject areas chemical and medicinal sciences. Community pharmacists were asked to rank the competences in terms of relative importance for practice; competences were divided into personal and patient-care competences. The ranking was very similar in the seven countries suggesting that evaluation of competences for practice is based more on professional experience than on prior university education. There were some differences for instance in research-related competences and these may be influenced, by education.

  8. Evaluation of a Continuing Professional Development program for first year student pharmacists undergoing an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Toyin Tofade, MS, PharmD, BCPS, CPCC, Pharmacotherapy Director, Wake Area Health Education Center and Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education; Brianna Franklin, student, fourth professional year; Bennett Noell, student, fourth professional year 1; Kim Leadon, MEd, Clinical Assistant Professor and Director of Experiential Education, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a live and online training program for first year pharmacy students in implementing Continuing Professional Development (CPD) principles (Reflect, Plan, Act, and Evaluate), writing SMART learning objectives, and documenting learning activities prior to and during a hospital introductory professional practice experience.Design: Cohort Study. Setting: Introductory professional practice experience. Participants: First year (PY1) students at th...

  9. The Vision and Challenges of Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University's Affiliated Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norose, Takahiko; Manabe, Tomohiro; Furuta, Seiichi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University (HPU), according to its educational mission, seeks to "develop medical professionals who contribute to community medicine", and it has produced more than 6300 graduates since 1974. With recent medical advancements and a progressively aging society, the role of the pharmacist in community medicine has diversified and is increasing in importance. Therefore, in April 2012, the Hokkaido Pharmaceutical University Affiliated Pharmacy was established as a for-profit business of the Educational Foundation of the Hokkaido University of Science, the parent body of HPU. The pharmacy is located near the Sapporo station; it is operated by six pharmacists and four clerks, and supported by three faculty members who are engaged in providing HPU student education such as on-site clinical training, in addition to their pharmacy duties such as home care pharmaceutics. For the first two years it was open, the pharmacy focused on the establishment of pharmacy administration and fiscal consolidation. In April 2015, the Pharmacy Management Committee set the pharmacy's future vision, as well as its mid-term strategy, which consists of the four main components of pharmacy practices, education, research, and social contribution, in order for the pharmacy to serve as a model of community pharmacy.

  10. The Utilization of Computers in Community and Hospital Practice: The Role of the Colleges of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Alan E.; Travers, Terry J.

    1981-01-01

    The approach taken by an Australian college of pharmacy to provide its students with a working knowledge of pharmacy computer systems is described. Hands-on experience with a microcomputer and a program developed within the college are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  11. A Survey of Practices in Hospital Pharmacies. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Thomas D.; Henrich, Robert R.

    A survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine what procedures are used in health care facility pharmacies for the performance of tasks previously selected for inclusion in a proposed curriculum for pharmacy technicians. Questionnaires were distributed to a national sample of 48 health care facilities,…

  12. [Practice and experience about construction of pharmacy automation at general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minya; Xia, Yong; Shi, Jiayi

    2011-03-01

    This paper introduce how to combining the whole package automatic dispensing machine with intelligent storage cabinets at outpatient pharmacy. Furthermore, this paper introduce how to integrated this system with hospital information systems which can provide references for the construction of automatic hospital pharmacy in our country. PMID:21706808

  13. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for education and research : A network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.S.; Blom, A.T.G.; Philbert, D.; Rump, H.H.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This p

  14. ASSESSMENT OF PRACTICE AT RETAIL PHARMACIES IN PAKISTAN: EXTENT OF COMPLIANCE WITH THE PREVAILING DRUG LAW OF PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Hanif; Zada, Wahid; Khan, Muhammad Sona; Iqbal, Muhammad; Chohan, Osaam; Raza, Naeem; Khawaja, Naeem Raza; Abid, Syed Mobasher Ali; Murtazai, Ghulam

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the practice at retail pharmacies in Pakistan and to compare the same in rural and urban areas. The maintenance of pharmacy and drug inspectors' visit was also assessed. This cross sectional study was conducted in Abbottabad, Pakistan during October-November, 2012. A sample of 215 drug sellers or drug stores was selected by employing convenient sampling method. With a response rate of 91.6%, 197 drug sellers participated in this study. All the drug sellers were male. Overall, 35% (n = 197) of the drug sellers did not have any professional qualification. A majority of the drug sellers were involved in various malpractices like selling of medicines without prescription (80.7%), prescribing practice (60.9%), prescription intervention (62.4%) and selling of controlled substances (66%) without a license for selling it. These malpractices were significantly higher in rural area than that in urban area. PMID:27476300

  15. Attitude of fourth year Doctor of Pharmacy students towards pharmacy profession and their career preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Saad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Fourth year students believed that pharmacy education and practice affect the health care system. Their favorite career areas were clinical pharmacy, industrial pharmacy, and hospital pharmacy. Personal interest was the most important factor involved in this selection. Most of them were interested in pharmacy-related research activities.

  16. Pharmacy Education in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wazaify, Mayyada; Matowe, Lloyd; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Al-Omran, Ola A.

    2006-01-01

    The practice of pharmacy, as well as pharmacy education, varies significantly throughout the world. In Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, the profession of pharmacy appears to be on the ascendance. This is demonstrated by an increase in the number of pharmacy schools and the number of pharmacy graduates from pharmacy programs. One of the reasons pharmacy is on the ascendance in these countries is government commitment to fund and support competitive, well-run pharmacy programs.

  17. Impact of an Elective Course in Community and Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practices on Student Perception of Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kelli D; Maguire, Michelle; Bennett, Marialice S

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To determine the impact of an elective course on students' perception of opportunities and of their preparedness for patient care in community and ambulatory pharmacy settings. Design. Each course meeting included a lecture and discussion to introduce concepts and active-learning activities to apply concepts to patient care or practice development in a community or ambulatory pharmacy setting. Assessment. A survey was administered to students before and after the course. Descriptive statistics were used to assess student responses to survey questions, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used to analyze the improvement in student responses with an alpha level set at 0.05. Students felt more prepared to provide patient care, develop or improve a clinical service, and effectively communicate recommendations to other health care providers after course completion. Conclusion. This elective course equipped students with the skills necessary to increase their confidence in providing patient care services in community and ambulatory settings. PMID:27168617

  18. A Preliminary Study on the Practice Teaching of Phar-macy Marketing Major%药品营销专业实践教学初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李端; 常悦; 胡嘉琦

    2014-01-01

    The particularity of pharmacy and pharmacy marketing determines the need of overall practice teaching in the education of pharmacy marketing major. In practice teaching, students' quality of going into pharmacy marketing should be highlighted from the micro aspect, and students' overall cognition of the role of professional knowledge in enterprise running should be culti-vated from the macro aspect.%药品和药品营销的特殊性决定了药品营销专业教育中需要开展全方位的实践教学,在实践教学中,从微观层面要突出培养学生从事药品营销的素质,从宏观层面则要培养学生从整体角度认识专业知识在企业经营中的作用。

  19. Development of a virtual patient record mobile app for pharmacy practice education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Weiyi Toh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healthcare students are generally not exposed in the school curriculum to the workings of electronic health records (EHRs and the types of patient health information (PHI from EHRs that are relevant to clinical practices. A prototype virtual patient record (VPR mobile app was created on two Samsung Galaxy Tab tablets to educate pharmacy students on the types of PHI available from EHRs. Materials and Methods: A pilot study was conducted from March-April 2013, whereby students used the app to solve counseling case scenarios. Respondents′ demographics, mobile app usage patterns, perceptions regarding the app′s usefulness, and its relevance as an EHR simulation tool, were determined through an online 14-item survey. Descriptive statistics, Chi-square tests, Fisher′s exact tests and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to analyze the results. Results: Response rate was 100% (n = 31. Medical and healthcare apps were most commonly used (93.5%, and 67.7% of students used apps more than 5 times a day over the past 6 months. The app had 4 features ("PHR", "Case Questions", "Statutes" and "Useful Links". Most students felt that the app features were understandable and self-explanatory (96.7%. Majority agreed that "PHR" (100% and "Case Questions" (83.9% were the most useful features. Majority (90.3% found the app useful as a teaching aid. Conclusion: A VPR app has been successfully created and implemented as a teaching aid. Future development will involve migrating its features to the mobile web. Resources for health-related and medication-related information will be added. Furthermore, the app will be introduced to lower-year undergraduates before their hospital preceptorship attachments.

  20. [Rationalization in 20th-century czechoslovak pharmacy practice - commission for rationalization and standardization in medicine, veterinary medicine and pharmacy - part 2*].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babica, Jan; Rusek, Václav

    2014-08-01

    In interwar Czechoslovakia health care, an increased attention paid to the new ideas of scientific management (Taylorism), work rationalization and standardization led to the establishment of the Commission for Rationalization and Standardization in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Pharmacy (RANOK) within the Department of Natural Science and Medicine of the Masaryk Academy of Work. Within RANOK, the group for pharmacy worked between 1928 and 1932. The first part of the paper described the scientific management and standardization movement in interwar Czechoslovakia, the establishment of Masaryk Academy of Work and RANOK, and work objectives of RANOK and its group for pharmacy. The second part deals with the work results, relative failure and importance of the group for pharmacy.

  1. Tobacco Cessation through Community Pharmacies: Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices and Perceived Barriers among Pharmacists in Penang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Nur Akmar; Tee, Ooi Guat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Tobacco cessation is the primary goal of tobacco control measures. Community pharmacists are possible providers of tobacco cessation counselling due to their close contact with the public and the availability of non-prescription nicotine replacement therapies in pharmacies. However, community pharmacists often do not provide tobacco…

  2. Pharmacy Education and the Role of the Local Pharmacy at Gifu Pharmaceutical University Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramachi, Hitomi

    2016-01-01

    Gifu Pharmaceutical University Pharmacy was established in front of Gifu University Hospital (GUH) as a pharmacy attached to the university, the first in Japan in 1998. When GUH moved in 2004, Gifu Pharmaceutical University Pharmacy was built in its current location. One of the priorities of the design of the new facility was easy access to those with disabilities. For example, ramps, wheelchair accessible restrooms, and handicap-friendly waiting-room chairs were installed. In cooperation with GUH, we introduced a two-dimensional bar code system for prescriptions. This promoted the efficiency of compounding medicines. In addition, starting in 2006, we introduced digital drug-history records at Gifu Pharmaceutical University Pharmacy. We also increased the staff of the affiliated pharmacy in 2006. We designed the system of the affiliated pharmacy for long-term pharmacy practice. Currently, we accept pharmacy students visiting pharmacy of early exposure and long-term pharmacy practice. Today, the pharmacy fills an average of 80 prescriptions a day, primarily from GUH. Our staff consists of six pharmacists, one full-time office manager, and three part-time office assistants. In keeping with our role as a community pharmacy, we hold regular lectures and an education forum for pharmacists. We also carry out clinical studies. PMID:27150929

  3. PHARMACY PRACTICE IN VIEW OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS IN JIMMA UNIVERSITY SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Dagim Ali Hussen et al.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pharmacists are drug therapy experts and primary health professionals who optimize medication management to produce positive health outcomes. Clearly there are still misconception and confusion among the public on the function of pharmacists. Sometimes even the pharmacy personnel themselves seemed to be unaware of the importance of their profession.Objective: The study tried to assess the attitude of health professionals about the role of pharmacists as a professional.Methodology:...

  4. The use of sunscreen products among final year medicine and pharmacy students: A cross-sectional study of knowledge, attitude, practice, and perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadh, Ammar Ihsan; Jamshed, Shazia; Elkalmi, Ramadan M.; Hadi, Hazrina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the knowledge, attitude, perception, and practice of medical and pharmacy students toward the usage of sunscreen as protection for the skin against ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among final year medical and pharmacy undergraduates at the International Islamic University Malaysia. Validated questionnaires were distributed to 134 medical students and 100 pharmacy students. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used where appropriate. Findings: One hundred and sixty-one out of 234 participants completed the questionnaires. The participants comprised 101 medical students (75.4%) and sixty pharmacy students (60.0%). The majority of the respondents were females (102; 63.4%), and 59 (36.6%) were males. The median of the knowledge scores of the final year medical students was significantly lower than that of the final year pharmacy students (P influenced by the media to use sunscreen, whereas 35 (34.7%) medical students were influenced the most by friends to use sunscreen. The final year pharmacy students had a better perception compared to the medical students, with the total perception score of the final year pharmacy students being significantly higher than that of the final year medical students (P = 0.020). Most of the participants were also aware of the harmful effects of UV radiation and had a positive reaction toward the usage of sunscreen to prevent those harmful effects. Conclusion: The knowledge and perception of final year pharmacy students were significantly higher than the knowledge and perception of final year medical students with regard to the usage of sunscreen. PMID:27512711

  5. Analysis of the pharmaceutical care activities practiced by private homeopathic pharmacies located in Rio de Janeiro North Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Aguiar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of homeopathic treatment delegates to the Pharmacist the need and the responsibility of pharmaceutical care. This paper had the objective of verifying the practices of pharmaceutical care in homeopathy. The study was conducted in homeopathic pharmacies situated in Rio de Janeiro North Zone, during March and April, 2011, where 15 pharmacists were interviewed, with the help of a semi-open questionary self-administered. For the survey were investigated variables related to pharmaceutical: sex, age, nature of the institution where he graduated, having completed post-graduate and working ties. Information professionals for the pharmaceutical care were collected in 14 questions grouped into three areas: attitudes, perceptions and satisfaction. Attending the ethical aspects, the study was submitted to and approved by the Ethics Committee of University Estácio de Sá. The results demonstrated that 33% of the pharmacists have less than 5 years of professional practice, and 53% are specialists graduated by the Hahnemann’s Institutite of Brasil. All Pharmacists claim to orient patients, mostly during dispensation and through phone contacts. Most pharmacists oriented patients passively and actively. The elderly were pointed as the ones, who most often sought orientation. During dispensation of homeopathic drugs, all patients elicit some orientation. 67% of the pharmacies keep material for pharmaceutical guidance to the patients, usually leaflets. The verbal and written orientation was predominanted on homeopathic pharmacist. Posology and instructions of use for the pharmaceutical form dispensed were described as the most common doubts of the patients. Of all pharmacists interviewed, 67% pointed to self-medication practices in the pharmacy. The questions which measure the position and perception of the pharmacists related to pharmaceutical assistance scored over 3. The question which scored higher was related to

  6. UPAYA MENCAPAI AKREDITASI GOOD PHARMACY PRACTICE (GPP PT. KIMIA FARMA APOTEK (STUDI KASUS DI UNIT BISNIS JAYA 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Dwiastuti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tulisan ini bertujuan untuk mengindentifikasi, mengukur serta menganalisa kesenjangan yuang terjadi saat implementasi Good Pharmacy Practice (GPP di PT. Kimia Farma Apotek, Unit Bisnis Jaya 2 Business Unit. Selain itu, proses perencanaan aksi dalam rangka pencapaian nilai tertinggi.Metode penelitian yang dilakukan adalah analisa deskripsi kualitatif, pencarian data melalui audit, observasi dan interview. Teknik analisa yang digunakan adalah analisa tulang ikan untuk mendapatkan akar penyebab dan sesi pencerahan dalam rangka perancangan peningkatan aksi perencanaan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan kesenjangan terjadi disebabkan oleh keterlambatan aktifitas manajemen mutu, siklus PDSA, seperti perancangan tata letak dan infrastruktur farmasi, sosialisasi tentang GPP, pembahasan deskripsi kerja, audit hasil evaluasi dan peningkatan kerja secara komprehensif. Rekomendasi rencana aksi untuk sebagai sebuah upaya improvisasi juga disampaikan pada bagian akhir dari tulisan ini.

  7. Experience of the Teaching Methods of Special Pharmacy Practice%药学专题实习带教方法探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢茂; 王琴; 胡雪莲; 雷健

    2013-01-01

    目的:提高药学专题实习带教质量.方法:以我科药学专题实习带教为例,从药学专题实习生日常管理、教学方案制订和教学计划实施等各个方面进行总结.结果:通过加强查阅资料和撰写综述能力的培养、实验操作技能的训练及实习全过程的质量控制等方法,能够提高药学实习带教质量.结论:专题实习是药学本科生实践性教学的重要内容,通过合理的教学方案和科学的带教方法可提高药学专题实习带教质量,培养学生的科研思维和科研能力.%OBJECTIVE:To provide reference for the improvement of the teaching quality of pharmacy practice.METHODS:The practice of pharmacy was explored in respects of trainee daily management,the formulation of teaching programs and the implementation of teaching plan were explored.RESULTS:Through the strengthening the ability of searching and reading literatures and writing review,skills training of experimental operation and quality control of whole process,the quality of pharmacy teaching for trainee could be improved.CONCLUSIONS:The special practice is an important part of practice teaching of pharmacy undergraduates.Reasonable teaching plan and scientific teaching method improve the teaching quality of special pharmacy practice and culture students' scientific thinking and ability of research.

  8. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  9. Measuring change in health-system pharmacy over 50 years: "reflecting" on the mirror, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J; Stevenson, James; Ng, Christine; White, Sara

    2013-12-01

    The Director's Forum guides pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. August 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Mirror to Hospital Pharmacy, which was a comprehensive study of hospital pharmacy services in the United States. This iconic textbook was co-authored by Donald Francke, Clifton J. Latiolais, Gloria N. Francke, and Norman Ho. The Mirror profiled hospital pharmacy of the 1950s and established goals for the profession in 6 paradigms: (1) professional philosophy and ethics, (2) scientific and technical expansion of health-system pharmacy, (3) development of administrative and managerial acumen, (4) increased practice competence, (5) wage and salary compensation commensurate with professional responsibilities, and (6) health-system pharmacy as a vehicle for advancing the profession as a whole. This article critically reviews the profession's progress on the first 3 goals; an article in the January 2014 issue of Hospital Pharmacy will review the final 3 goals. An understanding of the profession's progress on these goals since the seminal work of the Mirror provides directors of pharmacy a platform from which to develop strategies to enhance patient-centered pharmacy services.

  10. Community Pharmacy: an untapped patient data resource

    OpenAIRE

    Wright DJ; Twigg MJ

    2016-01-01

    David John Wright, Michael James Twigg School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Abstract: As community pharmacy services become more patient centered, they will be increasingly reliant on access to good quality patient information. This review describes how the information that is currently available in community pharmacies can be used to enhance service delivery and patient care. With integration of community pharmacy and medical practice records on the horizon, the opport...

  11. Development and implementation of a multitiered health informatics curriculum in a college of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeden, Elizabeth A; Clauson, Kevin A

    2016-07-01

    Standards requiring education in informatics in pharmacy curricula were introduced in the last 10 years by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education. Mirroring difficulties faced by other health professions educators, implementation of these requirements remains fragmented and somewhat limited across colleges of pharmacy in the US. Clinical practice and workforce metrics underline a pronounced need for clinicians with varying competencies in health informatics. In response to these challenges, a multitiered health informatics curriculum was developed and implemented at a college of pharmacy in the Southeast. The multitiered approach is structured to ensure that graduating pharmacists possess core competencies in health informatics, while providing specialized and advanced training opportunities for pharmacy students, health professions students, and working professionals interested in a career path in informatics. The approach described herein offers institutions, administrators, faculty, residents, and students an adaptable model for selected or comprehensive adoption and integration of a multitiered health informatics curriculum. PMID:27121611

  12. Evaluation of a Continuing Professional Development program for first year student pharmacists undergoing an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Tofade, MS, PharmD, BCPS, CPCC, Pharmacotherapy Director, Wake Area Health Education Center and Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a live and online training program for first year pharmacy students in implementing Continuing Professional Development (CPD principles (Reflect, Plan, Act, and Evaluate, writing SMART learning objectives, and documenting learning activities prior to and during a hospital introductory professional practice experience.Design: Cohort Study. Setting: Introductory professional practice experience. Participants: First year (PY1 students at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Intervention: Live training or online training to introduce the concept of Continuing Professional Development in practice. Main Outcomes: Implementation of CPD principles through 1 completed pre-rotation education action plans with specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound (SMART learning objectives; and 2 completed learning activity worksheets post-rotation indicating stimuli for learning, resources used and accomplished learning. objectives; and 3 documented suggestions and content feedback for future lectures and pharmaceutical care lab experiences. Results: Out of the whole cohort (N=154, 14 (87.5% live (in person trainees and 122 (88% online trainees submitted an education action plan. Objectives were scored using a rubric on a scale of 1-5. A rating of 5 means “satisfactory”, 3 means “work in progress” and 1 means “unacceptable”. There were significant differences between the mean live trainee scores and the mean online trainee scores for the following respective section comparisons: Specific 4.7 versus 3.29 (p<0.001; Measurable 3.9 versus 2.05 (p<0.001; number of objectives 3.6 versus 4.6 (p<0.001; and average grade 92.9 versus 77.7 (p<0.001. Of the 396 learning activity worksheets reviewed, 75% selected discussion with peers and/or health providers as a stimulus for learning. Students reported spending an average of 50.2 hours completing the learning objectives. All

  13. The Faculties of Pharmacy Schools Should Make an Effort to Network with Community Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    By law, medical faculties are mandated to have a designated partner hospital for the purposes of student practical training. In contrast, pharmacy faculties do not have such a legal requirement for student training in a community pharmacy setting. Nevertheless, there are several public and private universities that do have community pharmacies. However, there is no national university that has established both an educational hospital and a community pharmacy. When Kanazawa University (KU) established a graduate school with a clinical pharmacy course, the faculty of KU deemed it necessary to set up an independent community pharmacy for the purpose of practical training. Thus, in 2003, the Acanthus Pharmacy was set up as the first educational community pharmacy in Japan, managed by a nonprofit organization, with the permission of the Ishikawa Pharmaceutical Association and local community pharmacists. Since that time, Acanthus has managed a clinical pharmacy practice for students from both the undergraduate and graduate schools of KU. From 2006, the undergraduate pharmacy program was changed to a 6-year program, and the Acanthus Pharmacy has continued its roles in educating undergraduate pharmaceutical students, medical students, and as a site of early exposure for KU freshmen. From our experience, it is important to have a real clinical environment available to university pharmacy faculty and students, especially in training for community pharmacy practices.

  14. Advanced radiographic practice - the legal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allied health and nursing professionals are continuing to expand their responsibilities into clinical areas outside their traditional spheres of interest; typically, many of these new responsibilities are found within the medical (doctor) domain. Such responsibilities are often at an advanced clinical level and consequently higher demands are placed upon the professionals, not least in terms of clinical updating, competence to practice and also legal liability. This article explores the legal implications of practising at an advanced clinical level with particular reference to legal claims. The first part of the article commences with an outline of pertinent law in England and Wales. The latter part of the article explores actual cases from which allied health professionals (eg radiographers) can gain valuable information. Throughout the article suggestions for good practice are indicated. Examples of good practice include: the need to base your practice on evidence and peer practice; the need to keep detailed records (protocols) of such practice; the need to know when you are at the limit of your ability; and as such when to ask for advice from a medical practitioner/radiologist

  15. Pharmacy alternatives (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common source for obtaining prescriptions is the local pharmacy. Usually the pharmacy is located in a drug or grocery store. ... some insurance companies have chosen is mail-order pharmacy. Once a pharmacy has been chosen it is ...

  16. Use of clinical practice as a motivating tool of radioprotection teaching and radiopharmacology in early semesters of pharmacy course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research teaching methods aimed at the success of the higher education student in pharmacology and medicine courses in technical expertise in the fields of radiological protection, radiopharmacology and interventional radiology is extremely important in view of the progress of these sectors. The objective of this work is to propose a methodological sequence of teaching work with first-year students of pharmacy and medicine courses within a biophysical discipline where the integrated knowledge to clinical practice can be used for this purpose. The methodology was to assess individual learning of a group of N = 49 students of the first half in the age group of 17-19 years through conceptual acquisition by the traditional method of 'blackboard and chalk' and developed method that includes four pedagogical moments focused on the area health. An analysis of the evaluation student performance through Variance Analysis of a pathway showed improved scores with respect to the performance of application issues of knowledge concerning radiation protection and biological mechanisms of radiation with respect to the method of 'blackboard and chalk' with p < 0.05. Therefore, work with students with respect to the content in the form of six steps of clinical interest are a promising technique for radiation protection education in the early grades of college courses with experimental effectiveness

  17. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients’ quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. Objective: To investigate pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126 was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. Results: The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%, lack of pharmacist time (83.3%, organizational obstacles (82.6%, and pharmacists’ physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%. Conclusion: Pharmacy students’ attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University

  18. Clinical Pharmacy Education in a Dental Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Dennis K.; Walker, John A.

    1978-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy training program for undergraduate students developed at the University of Iowa provides conjoint training of pharmacy and dental students in the clinic areas and pharmacy at the College of Dentistry. (LBH)

  19. Measuring Change in Health-System Pharmacy Over 50 Years: "Reflecting" on the Mirror, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J; Stevenson, James G; White, Sara J

    2014-01-01

    The Director's Forum guides pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. 2013 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of the Mirror to Hospital Pharmacy, which was a comprehensive study of hospital pharmacy services in the United States. This iconic textbook was co-authored by Donald Francke, Clifton J. Latiolais, Gloria N. Francke, and Norman Ho. The Mirror's results profiled hospital pharmacy of the 1950s; these results established goals for the profession in 6 paradigms: (1) professional philosophy and ethics; (2) scientific and technical expansion of health-system pharmacy; (3) development of administrative and managerial acumen; (4) increased practice competence; (5) wage and salary commensurate with professional responsibilities; and (6) health-system pharmacy as a vehicle for advancing the profession as a whole. This article critically reviews our progress on the last of 3 goals. An understanding of the profession's progress on these goals since the seminal work of the Mirror provides directors of pharmacy a platform from which to develop strategies to enhance patient-centered pharmacy services.

  20. Advancing practice relating to SEA alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Ainhoa, E-mail: agonzal@tcd.ie [School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Thérivel, Riki, E-mail: levett-therivel@phonecoop.coop [Levett-Therivel Sustainability Consultants (United Kingdom); Fry, John, E-mail: john.fry@ucd.ie [School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Foley, Walter, E-mail: walterfoley@gmail.com [School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2015-07-15

    Developing and assessing alternatives is a key and central stage to Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). However, research has repeatedly reported this stage as one of the most poorly undertaken aspects of the SEA process. Current practice limitations include belated consideration of reasonable alternatives, narrow scope of alternatives that often include unrealistic or retrofitted options, limited stakeholder and public involvement in their identification, assessment and selection, lack of systematic approaches to their assessment and comparison, and inadequate reporting of the ‘storyline’ on how they were identified, what the potential impacts are and why the preferred alternative was selected. These issues have resulted in objections and judicial reviews. On the positive side, a number of good practice case studies enable extraction of key lessons and formulation of a set of general recommendations to advance practice in SEA alternatives. In this paper, practical guidance on the identification and development of alternatives, their assessment and comparison, selection of the preferred option, and documentation of the process and the reasons for selection is provided and discussed to frame good practice approaches. - Highlights: • Alternatives are one of the most poorly completed aspects of Strategic Environmental Assessment. • Current practice limitations need to be addressed to enhance SEA effectiveness. • A set of recommendations are extracted from good practice case studies. • These recommendations can be applied across jurisdictions and sectors and tailored as necessary.

  1. Advancing practice relating to SEA alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing and assessing alternatives is a key and central stage to Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). However, research has repeatedly reported this stage as one of the most poorly undertaken aspects of the SEA process. Current practice limitations include belated consideration of reasonable alternatives, narrow scope of alternatives that often include unrealistic or retrofitted options, limited stakeholder and public involvement in their identification, assessment and selection, lack of systematic approaches to their assessment and comparison, and inadequate reporting of the ‘storyline’ on how they were identified, what the potential impacts are and why the preferred alternative was selected. These issues have resulted in objections and judicial reviews. On the positive side, a number of good practice case studies enable extraction of key lessons and formulation of a set of general recommendations to advance practice in SEA alternatives. In this paper, practical guidance on the identification and development of alternatives, their assessment and comparison, selection of the preferred option, and documentation of the process and the reasons for selection is provided and discussed to frame good practice approaches. - Highlights: • Alternatives are one of the most poorly completed aspects of Strategic Environmental Assessment. • Current practice limitations need to be addressed to enhance SEA effectiveness. • A set of recommendations are extracted from good practice case studies. • These recommendations can be applied across jurisdictions and sectors and tailored as necessary

  2. Towards an operational definition of pharmacy clinical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Charles Allen

    The scope of pharmacy practice and the training of future pharmacists have undergone a strategic shift over the last few decades. The pharmacy profession recognizes greater pharmacist involvement in patient care activities. Towards this strategic objective, pharmacy schools are training future pharmacists to meet these new clinical demands. Pharmacy students have clerkships called Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs), and these clerkships account for 30% of the professional curriculum. APPEs provide the only opportunity for students to refine clinical skills under the guidance of an experienced pharmacist. Nationwide, schools of pharmacy need to evaluate whether students have successfully completed APPEs and are ready treat patients. Schools are left to their own devices to develop assessment programs that demonstrate to the public and regulatory agencies, students are clinically competent prior to graduation. There is no widely accepted method to evaluate whether these assessment programs actually discriminate between the competent and non-competent students. The central purpose of this study is to demonstrate a rigorous method to evaluate the validity and reliability of APPE assessment programs. The method introduced in this study is applicable to a wide variety of assessment programs. To illustrate this method, the study evaluated new performance criteria with a novel rating scale. The study had two main phases. In the first phase, a Delphi panel was created to bring together expert opinions. Pharmacy schools nominated exceptional preceptors to join a Delphi panel. Delphi is a method to achieve agreement of complex issues among experts. The principal researcher recruited preceptors representing a variety of practice settings and geographical regions. The Delphi panel evaluated and refined the new performance criteria. In the second phase, the study produced a novel set of video vignettes that portrayed student performances based on recommendations of

  3. Advanced nursing practice: old hat, new design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grasse, C; Nicklin, W

    2001-01-01

    Advanced practice nurses positively impact the delivery of healthcare and client outcomes. However, in the past these positions have been seen to have variable value and were often vulnerable during budget cuts. Lack of a clear advanced nursing practice (ANP) framework probably contributed to the compromised effectiveness of these roles and evolution of roles with different titles, scopes of practice and reporting structures. To build the foundation for developing an ANP framework, a task force at The Ottawa Hospital (TOH) conducted a literature review related to ANP roles and completed a review of all clinical nursing roles at TOH. In addition, focus groups with nurses and other health professionals elicited ANP perceptions. The ANP framework includes a standardized job description that details competencies under five role components: clinical practice; consultation; research; education; and, leadership. Recommendations for assessment, implementation and evaluation of ANP roles are identified. The process undertaken by our ANP task force proved to be thorough and sound in developing a framework within which to move forward with ANP role implementation throughout TOH. This article, describing the process, may assist other organizations in defining ANP roles to better meet patient needs in changing health care environments. PMID:11803945

  4. Interprofessional collaborative practice for medication safety: Nursing, pharmacy, and medical graduates' experiences and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Amanda Jane; Palmer, Lorinda; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor; Outram, Sue

    2016-09-01

    Medication errors are the second most prevalent cause of adverse patient incidents in Australian hospital settings. Although numerous strategies to address this patient safety issue have been implemented, the impact of interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) on medication safety has received limited attention. The aim of this article is to report the perspectives and experiences of recently graduated, currently practicing Australian nurses, pharmacists, and doctors in relation to IPCP and medication safety. Sixty-eight graduates from three Australian states participated in focus groups. Thematic analysis of transcripts was conducted using an iterative process. The findings from this study illustrate how knowing about and valuing the skills and responsibilities of other team members and respecting each person's unique contribution to the work of the team can lead to more effective communication and collaboration in the context of medication safety. Although collaborative practice is critical to safe medication prescribing, dispensing, and administration, there are recurring and pervasive challenges to its achievement. This study indicated the need for improved preparation of graduates to equip them with the knowledge and skills needed to participate in an interprofessional team; and we advocate that deliberate, structured, and meaningful interprofessional clinical education initiatives are required. PMID:27351385

  5. Drug assessment by a Pharmacy and Therapeutics committee: from drug selection criteria to use in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Blázquez A; Calvo-Pita C; Carbajales-Álvarez M; Suárez-Gil P; Martínez-Martínez F; Calleja-Hernández MA

    2014-01-01

    Ana Lozano-Blázquez,1 Cecilia Calvo-Pita,2 Mónica Carbajales-Álvarez,1 Patricio Suárez-Gil,3 Fernando Martínez-Martínez,4 Miguel Ángel Calleja-Hernández51Pharmacy Department, Hospital de Cabueñes, Gijón, Spain; 2Pharmacy Department, Primary Health Care, Servicio Madrileño de Salud, Dirección Asistencial Oeste, Madrid, Spain; 3Research Unit Área V, Hosp...

  6. Quality indicators to compare accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkaravichien, Wiwat; Wongpratat, Apichaya; Lertsinudom, Sunee

    2016-08-01

    Background Quality indicators determine the quality of actual practice in reference to standard criteria. The Community Pharmacy Association (Thailand), with technical support from the International Pharmaceutical Federation, developed a tool for quality assessment and quality improvement at community pharmacies. This tool has passed validity and reliability tests, but has not yet had feasibility testing. Objective (1) To test whether this quality tool could be used in routine settings. (2) To compare quality scores between accredited independent and accredited chain pharmacies. Setting Accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies in the north eastern region of Thailand. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in 34 accredited independent pharmacies and accredited chain pharmacies. Quality scores were assessed by observation and by interviewing the responsible pharmacists. Data were collected and analyzed by independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U test as appropriate. Results were plotted by histogram and spider chart. Main outcome measure Domain's assessable scores, possible maximum scores, mean and median of measured scores. Results Domain's assessable scores were close to domain's possible maximum scores. This meant that most indicators could be assessed in most pharmacies. The spider chart revealed that measured scores in the personnel, drug inventory and stocking, and patient satisfaction and health promotion domains of chain pharmacies were significantly higher than those of independent pharmacies (p pharmacies and chain pharmacies in the premise and facility or dispensing and patient care domains. Conclusion Quality indicators developed by the Community Pharmacy Association (Thailand) could be used to assess quality of practice in pharmacies in routine settings. It is revealed that the quality scores of chain pharmacies were higher than those of independent pharmacies. PMID:27118461

  7. Medicinal Chemistry and the Pharmacy Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Faruk Khan, M.O.; Deimling, Michael J.; Philip, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The origins and advancements of pharmacy, medicinal chemistry, and drug discovery are interwoven in nature. Medicinal chemistry provides pharmacy students with a thorough understanding of drug mechanisms of action, structure-activity relationships (SAR), acid-base and physicochemical properties, and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) profiles. A comprehensive understanding of the chemical basis of drug action equips pharmacy students with the ability to answ...

  8. An Evaluation of the Education of Hospital Pharmacy Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Robert S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hospital pharmacy directors ranked their academic needs as: personnel and financial management (greatest), computers, hospital organization, clinical pharmacy practice, traditional pharmacy practice, and statistics. Those with MBAs perceived themselves stronger in these areas than did those with other degrees. Only MBAs and MSs felt adequately…

  9. Net Income of Pharmacy Faculty Compared to Community and Hospital Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatwood, Justin; Spivey, Christina A.; Dickey, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare the net cumulative income of community pharmacists, hospital pharmacists, and full-time pharmacy faculty members (residency-trained or with a PhD after obtaining a PharmD) in pharmacy practice, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacology, and social and administrative sciences. Methods. Markov modeling was conducted to calculate net projected cumulative earnings of career paths by estimating the costs of education, including the costs of obtaining degrees and student loans. Results. The economic model spanned 49 years, from ages 18 to 67 years. Earning a PharmD and pursuing an academic career resulted in projected net cumulative lifetime earnings ranging from approximately $4.7 million to $6.3 million. A pharmacy practice faculty position following public pharmacy school and one year of residency resulted in higher net cumulative income than community pharmacy. Faculty members with postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) training also had higher net income than other faculty and hospital pharmacy career paths, given similar years of prepharmacy education and type of pharmacy school attended. Faculty members with either a PharmD or PhD in the pharmacology discipline may net as much as $5.9 million and outpace all other PhD graduates by at least $75 000 in lifetime earnings. Projected career earnings of postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) trained faculty and PharmD/PhD faculty members were lower than those of community pharmacists. Findings were more variable when comparing pharmacy faculty members and hospital pharmacists. Conclusion. With the exception of PGY1 trained academic pharmacists, faculty projected net cumulative incomes generally lagged behind community pharmacists, likely because of delayed entry into the job market as a result of advanced training/education. However, nonsalary benefits such as greater flexibility and autonomy may enhance the desirability of academic pharmacy as a career path. PMID:27756925

  10. Role of Pharmacy Residency Training in Career Planning: A Student's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Ashley; Weber, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacy students typically become more focused on career planning and assessment in the final year of their PharmD training. Weighing career options in the advanced pharmacy practice experience year can be both exciting and stressful. The goal of this article is to provide a primer on how pharmacy students can assess how a residency can fit into career planning. This article will describe the various career paths available to graduating students, highlight ways in which a residency can complement career choices, review the current state of the job market for pharmacists, discuss the current and future plans for residency programs, and present thoughts from some current and former residents on why they chose to complete a residency. Most career paths require some additional training, and a residency provides appropriate experience very quickly compared to on-the-job training. Alternative plans to residency training must also be considered, as there are not enough residency positions for candidates. Directors of pharmacy must consider several factors when giving career advice on pharmacy residency training to pharmacy students; they should provide the students with an honest assessment of their work skills and their abilities to successfully complete a residency. This assessment will help the students to set a plan for improvement and give them a better chance at being matched to a pharmacy residency.

  11. A Roadmap for Educational Research in Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Dean, Meredith J.; Mumper, Russell J.; Blouin, Robert A.; Roth, Mary T.

    2013-01-01

    Educational research must play a critical role in informing practice and policy within pharmacy education. Understanding the educational environment and its impact on students, faculty members, and other stakeholders is imperative for improving outcomes and preparing pharmacy students to meet the needs of 21st century health care. To aid in the design and implementation of meaningful educational research within colleges and schools of pharmacy, this roadmap addresses philosophy and educationa...

  12. Nuclear pharmacy education: international harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Education of nuclear pharmacists exists in many countries around the world. The approach and level of education varies between countries depending upon the expectations of the nuclear pharmacist, the work site and the economic environment. In Australia, training is provided through distance learning. In Europe and Canada, nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists receive postgraduate education in order to engage in the small-scale preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals as well as research and development. In the U.S.A., nuclear pharmacy practitioners obtain basic knowledge primarily through undergraduate programs taken when pursuit the first professional degree in pharmacy. Licensed practitioners in pharmacy enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy through distance learning programs or short courses. While different approaches to education exist, there is a basic core of knowledge and a level of competence required of all nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists providing radiopharmaceutical products and services. It was with this realization that efforts were initiated to develop harmonization concepts and documents pertaining to education in nuclear pharmacy. The benefits of international harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education are numerous. Assurance of the availability of quality professionals to provide optimal products and care to the patient is a principle benefit. Spanning national barriers through the demonstration of self governance and unification in education will enhance the goal of increased freedom of employment between countries. Harmonization endeavors will improve existing education programs through sharing of innovative concepts and knowledge between educators. Documents generated will benefit new educational programs especially in developing nations. A committee on harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education was formed consisting of educators and practitioners from the international community. A working document on education was

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF PHARMACY SERVICES BY PHARMACIST IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Up to now there are more than 60 schools of pharmacy with a variety of accreditation level in lndonesia. Previous study found that the standard of pharmaceutical services at various service facilities (hospitals, primary health care and community pharmacy can not be fully implemented because of the limited competency of pharmacist. This study was conducted to identify the qualification of pharmacist who delivers services in community pharmacy in compliance with the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009. As mandated in the Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the government is obliged to establish minimum requirements that must be possessed. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in 2010 at 2 community pharmacies in each of 3 cities, i.e. Bandung, DI Yogyakarta and Surabaya. Other than ten pharmacists delivering services in community pharmacies, there were pharmacists as informants from 4 institutions in each city selected, i.e. six pharmacists from two Schools of Pharmacy, three pharmacists from three Regional Indonesian Pharmacists Association,six pharmacists from three District Health Offices and three Provincial Health Offices. Primary data collection through in-depth interviews and observation as well as secondary data collection concerning standard operating procedures, monitoring documentation and academic curricula has been used. Descriptive data were analysed qualitatively Results: The findings indicate that pharmacists' qualification to deliver services in a community pharmacy in accordance with the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009, Standards of Pharmacy Services in Community Pharmacy and Good Pharmaceutical Practices (GPP was varied. Most pharmacists have already understood their roles in pharmacy service, but to practice it in accordance with the standards or guidelines they are still having problems. It is also acknowledged by pharmacists in other institutions, including School of Pharmacy, Regional

  14. Assessment of Self-Medication Practices Among Medical, Pharmacy, and Health Science Students in Gondar University, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Abay; Amelo, W

    2010-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the magnitude and factors of self-medication among medical, pharmacy, and health science students of GCMHS (Gondar College of Medicine and Health Sciences). A cross-sectional study with two-month illness recall was conducted. A Questionnaire consisting of demographic questions and questions on illnesses in the last two months prior to the interview and treatment strategies was prepared and administered to the 414 students, selected as the sample population, fr...

  15. ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF DRUG INFORMATION SERVICE PROVIDED BY PHARMACY PRACTICE DEPARTMENT BASED ON ENQUIRER’S PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Jeevangi V M; Neelkantreddy Patil; Anand B Geni; Hinchageri SS; Manjunath G; Shantveer H

    2012-01-01

    Drug information service refers to activities carried out by pharmacists in providing any drug related information to healthcare professionals to provide better patient care. Providing drug information is a clinical pharmacy service and delivered as part of the multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Accurate information about safety of drugs is very essential for health care professionals in identifying, preventing and managing Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs), thereby ensuring safe use of ...

  16. “Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting” Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Community Pharmacy Dispensers in Dar es salaam, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Shimwela, Grace Mng’ong’o

    2011-01-01

    Under reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) by healthcare personnel is a common problem of many Pharmacovigilence programs. Lack of involvement of healthcare professionals such as pharmacists and other pharmaceutical dispensers has been cited as one of the reasons for under reporting. Pharmaceutical dispensers in the community pharmacies are in unique position by virtue of their training and profession to observe ADRs in patients, as many patients often try to avoid doctor consultation f...

  17. Motivating pharmacy employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J; Generali, J A

    1984-07-01

    Concepts from theories of motivation are used to suggest methods for improving the motivational environment of hospital pharmacy departments. Motivation--the state of being stimulated to take action to achieve a goal or to satisfy a need--comes from within individuals, but hospital pharmacy managers can facilitate motivation by structuring the work environment so that it satisfies employees' needs. Concepts from several theories of motivation are discussed, including McGregor's theory X and theory Y assumptions, Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg's motivation hygiene theory, and Massey's value system theory. Concepts from the Japanese style of management that can be used to facilitate motivation, such as quality circles, also are described. The autocratic, participative, and laissez faire styles of leadership are discussed in the context of the motivation theories, and suggested applications of theoretical concepts to practice are presented.

  18. Practice on the Teaching of Inorganic Chemistry for Pharmacy Students%药学专业无机化学教学探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仲维清; 周长江; 林德昌

    2011-01-01

    无机化学是药学专业学生进入大学的第一门专业基础课,为了提高无机化学的教学质量,针对无机化学的特点,结合药学专业对学生的要求,从无机化学与中学化学知识之间的衔接、化学史知识在无机化学教学中的运用、无机化学知识与医药学科之间的联系、科研前沿对无机化学教学过程的渗透等方面进行了一些思考和改革,取得了较好的教学效果。%Inorganic Chemistry is the first professional foundation lesson of the first year undergraduate students of pharmacy specialty.To raise the teaching quality,we have carried out some practice and reform on the Inorganic Chemistry teaching program from the characteristics of Inorganic Chemistry, the request for the pharmacy student,the linkage of the knowledge between Inorganic Chemistry and the high school chemistry,the application of the history of chemistry in the teaching progress,the relationship of Inorganic Chemistry to the Medical and Pharmacy, and the pervasion of present research results of science and technology in Inorganic Chemistry teaching process, and have achieved some satisfying effects.

  19. What Is "Advanced" in Generalist Practice? A Conceptual Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavitt, Melissa R.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced generalist practice is the fastest growing area of concentration for Master of Social Work (MSW) programs in the United States, yet a definition remains elusive. This article proposes that three key elements should be included within a conceptual schema of advanced generalist practice. Multidimensional problem-setting, self-reflective…

  20. Advanced practice for therapy radiographers - A discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this discussion paper is to explore issues related to advanced practice for therapy radiographers. Key themes: The paper will focus on key themes that have impacted on advanced practice for therapy radiographers such as government initiatives and policy, confounding terminology associated with advanced practice such as role extension, role expansion, role development, and expert practice. The theory and development of expert practice is explored and paralleled to existing roles in therapy using the Benner model to define stages of professional development and competence. Evidence for advanced practice, and education and training will also be explored. All of these issues will be considered within the perspective of the current clinical and political environment that therapy radiographers operate in. Conclusions: The application of advanced practice can and should incorporate elements of role extension and role development, with some tangible skills ladder to guide and shape the development of potential consultant practitioners. There is a need to identify the current position of advanced practice nationally, and to monitor existing and emerging roles, possibly though a longitudinal study. The skill mix as a whole within departments need to be part of an ongoing evaluation with close collaboration between the professional body, departmental managers and higher education institutes to develop curricula to support existing and emerging roles. There are also key lessons to be learned from other professions with more experience with advanced practitioners if recruitment and retention is not going to continue to be a problem

  1. [Design of spiral curriculum for pharmacy students to reach the outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The third advanced workshop of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan for pharmaceutical teachers was held from October 12th to 14th, 2013, and participants discussed an outcome-based approach to curriculum development in pharmacy education. In this article, I report the outcome-based spiral curriculum model of group 2A, which was designed to enable pharmacy students to understand a patient's condition, and to provide a basic practical ability in medical therapy. In the curriculum, pharmacy students will learn biochemistry and functional morphology in the first and second years, skills to interview patients in the third year, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapeutics in the third and fourth years, skills to estimate patient disease from physical examination in the fourth year, and practice in understanding real patient conditions in a clinical clerkship in the fifth year. The curriculum also included learning and evaluation methods.

  2. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zug, Keri Elizabeth; Cassiani, Silvia Helena De Bortoli; Pulcini, Joyce; Garcia, Alessandra Bassalobre; Aguirre-Boza, Francisca; Park, Jeongyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. PMID:27508923

  3. Community pharmacy: an untapped patient data resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright DJ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available David John Wright, Michael James Twigg School of Pharmacy, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Abstract: As community pharmacy services become more patient centered, they will be increasingly reliant on access to good quality patient information. This review describes how the information that is currently available in community pharmacies can be used to enhance service delivery and patient care. With integration of community pharmacy and medical practice records on the horizon, the opportunities this will provide are also considered. The community pharmacy held patient medication record, which is the central information repository and has been used to identify non-adherence, prompts the pharmacist to clinically review prescriptions, identify patients for additional services, and identify those patients at greater risk of adverse drug events. While active recording of patient consultations for treatment over the counter may improve the quality of consultations and information held, the lost benefits of anonymity afforded by community pharmacies need to be considered. Recording of pharmacy staff activities enables the workload to be monitored, remuneration to be justified, critical incidents to be learned from, but is not routine practice. Centralization of records between community pharmacies enables practices to be compared and consistent problems to be identified. By integrating pharmacy and medical practice records, patient behavior with respect to medicines can be more closely monitored and should prevent duplication of effort. When using patient information stored in a community pharmacy, it is, however, important to consider the reason why the information was recorded in the first instance and whether it is appropriate to use it for a different purpose without additional patient consent. Currently, community pharmacies have access to large amounts of information, which, if stored and used appropriately, can significantly enhance the

  4. The Future of Clinical Pharmacy: Developing a Holistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Shane

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This concept paper discusses the untapped promise of often overlooked humanistic skills to advance the practice of pharmacy. It highlights the seminal work that is, increasingly, integrated into medical and nursing education. The work of these educators and the growing empirical evidence that validates the importance of humanistic skills is raising questions for the future of pharmacy education and practice. To potentiate humanistic professional competencies, e.g., compassion, empathy, and emotional intelligence, how do we develop a more holistic model that integrates reflective and affective skills? There are many historical and current transitions in the profession and practice of pharmacy. If our education model is refocused with an emphasis on pharmacy’s therapeutic roots, the field has the opportunity to play a vital role in improving health outcomes and patient-centered care. Beyond the metrics of treatment effects, achieving greater patient-centeredness will require transformations that improve care processes and invest in patients’ experiences of the treatment and care they receive. Is layering on additional science sufficient to yield better health outcomes if we neglect the power of empathic interactions in the healing process?

  5. Meeting Abstracts - Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy Nexus 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) Abstracts program provides a forum through which authors can share their insights and outcomes of advanced managed care practice through publication in AMCP's Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy (JMCP). Poster presentations are Tuesday, October 4, at 4:00 pm. The posters will also be displayed on Wednesday, October 5. The reviewed abstracts are published in the JMCP Meeting Abstracts supplement. The AMCP Nexus 2016 Meeting in National Harbor, Maryland, is expected to attract more than 2,000 managed care pharmacists and other health care professionals who manage and evaluate drug therapies, develop and manage networks, and work with medical managers and information specialists to improve the care of all individuals enrolled in managed care programs. PMID:27611065

  6. Course experiences, satisfaction and career intent of final year pre-registration Australian pharmacy students

    OpenAIRE

    Shen G; Fois R; Nissen L; Saini B

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Australia, the profession of pharmacy has undergone many changes to adapt to the needs of the community. In recent years, concerns have been raised with evidence emerging of workforce saturation in traditional pharmacy practice sectors. It is not known how current final year pharmacy students’ perceive the different pharmacy career paths in this changing environment. Hence investigating students’ current experiences with their pharmacy course, interaction with the profession an...

  7. Pharmacy in a New Frontier - The First Five Years at the Johnson Space Center Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, Tina

    2008-01-01

    A poster entitled "Space Medicine - A New Role for Clinical Pharmacists" was presented in December 2001 highlighting an up-and-coming role for pharmacists at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. Since that time, the operational need for the pharmacy profession has expanded with the administration s decision to open a pharmacy on site at JSC to complement the care provided by the Flight Medicine and Occupational Medicine Clinics. The JSC Pharmacy is a hybrid of traditional retail and hospital pharmacy and is compliant with the ambulatory care standards set forth by the Joint Commission. The primary charge for the pharmacy is to provide medication management for JSC. In addition to providing ambulatory care for both clinics, the pharmacists also practice space medicine. A pharmacist had been involved in the packing of both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station Medical Kits before the JSC Pharmacy was established; however, the role of the pharmacist in packing medical kits has grown. The pharmacists are now full members of the operations team providing consultation for new drug delivery systems, regulations, and patient safety issues. As the space crews become more international, so does the drug information provided by the pharmacists. This presentation will review the journey of the JSC Pharmacy as it celebrated its five year anniversary in April of 2008. The implementation of the pharmacy, challenges to the incorporation of the pharmacy into an existing health-care system, and the current responsibilities of a pharmacist at the Johnson Space Center will be discussed.

  8. Effectiveness of educational technology to improve patient care in pharmacy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Benedict, Neal

    2015-02-17

    A review of the literature on the effectiveness of educational technologies to teach patient care skills to pharmacy students was conducted. Nineteen articles met inclusion criteria for the review. Seven of the articles included computer-aided instruction, 4 utilized human-patient simulation, 1 used both computer-aided instruction and human-patient simulation, and 7 utilized virtual patients. Educational technology was employed with more than 2700 students at 12 colleges and schools of pharmacy in courses including pharmacotherapeutics, skills and patient care laboratories, drug diversion, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) orientation. Students who learned by means of human-patient simulation and virtual patients reported enjoying the learning activity, whereas the results with computer-aided instruction were mixed. Moreover, the effect on learning was significant in the human-patient simulation and virtual patient studies, while conflicting data emerged on the effectiveness of computer-aided instruction.

  9. Pharmaceutical policy and the pharmacy profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Marie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna

    2005-01-01

    as a health care profession, as well as what it means when we view pharmaceutical policy in the context of the health sector labour market, is discussed. The authors also discuss how factors external to the profession are affecting its purpose and realm of practice, including the current trend...... in managerialism, and how the division of labour with other health professionals such as physicians and pharmacy assistants is affecting the pharmacy profession's position in the labour market. Next the authors look at ways in which the pharmacy profession has affected policy. Pharmacists have been instrumental...

  10. A roadmap for educational research in pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Dean, Meredith J; Mumper, Russell J; Blouin, Robert A; Roth, Mary T

    2013-12-16

    Educational research must play a critical role in informing practice and policy within pharmacy education. Understanding the educational environment and its impact on students, faculty members, and other stakeholders is imperative for improving outcomes and preparing pharmacy students to meet the needs of 21st century health care. To aid in the design and implementation of meaningful educational research within colleges and schools of pharmacy, this roadmap addresses philosophy and educational language; guidelines for the conduct of educational research; research design, including 4 approaches to defining, collecting, and analyzing educational data; measurement issues; ethical considerations; resources and tools; and the value of educational research in guiding curricular transformation.

  11. Predictors of Practice Patterns for Lymphedema Care Among Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Joanne C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Mei R. Fu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphedema, a debilitating and chronic condition, is considered to be one of the most distressing adverse effects of cancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to understand the practice patterns in lymphedema care and identify predictors influencing those patterns among oncology nurses, with a focus on advanced practice nurses. Random and purposive sampling was utilized to recruit 238 oncology nurses who completed the Web-based study. Participants included advanced practice nurses (nurs...

  12. ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF DRUG INFORMATION SERVICE PROVIDED BY PHARMACY PRACTICE DEPARTMENT BASED ON ENQUIRER’S PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevangi V M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Drug information service refers to activities carried out by pharmacists in providing any drug related information to healthcare professionals to provide better patient care. Providing drug information is a clinical pharmacy service and delivered as part of the multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Accurate information about safety of drugs is very essential for health care professionals in identifying, preventing and managing Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs, thereby ensuring safe use of medications. The aim of the study was to assess and evaluate the drug information service from enquirer’s perspective. The data was collected from drug information centre through drug information request forms and feedback questionnaires form. A nine months hospital based prospective study was carried out at Basaveshwar Teaching and General Hospital (BTGH, Gulbarga. A total number of 122 queries were received during the study period. Most of the queries were received from general medicine department 82(67.21% and least were from general surgery 2(1.64%. Most of the queries were for update of knowledge 69 (56.56% and time frame for reply was within a day 83 (68.03%, answers were given in printed format 77(63.11%. The majority of queries were regarding dose and administration of drug 49 (36.03% and most preferred resource was Micromedex 75 (52.45%. The quality of the services provided by the centre was appreciated by majority of its users. However there is a need to bring greater awareness about the service in the hospital and to encourage the healthcare professionals to utilize the services for better patient care.

  13. REST advanced research topics and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, Erik; Alarcon, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This book serves as a starting point for people looking for a deeper principled understanding of REST, its applications, its limitations, and current research work in the area and as an architectural style. The authors focus on applying REST beyond Web applications (i.e., in enterprise environments), and in reusing established and well-understood design patterns. The book examines how RESTful systems can be designed and deployed, and what the results are in terms of benefits and challenges encountered in the process. This book is intended for information and service architects and designers who are interested in learning about REST, how it is applied, and how it is being advanced.

  14. Radiation protection optimization. Advances in practical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the Community, protection against the dangers of ionizing radiation is regulated in conformity with the provisions of two Council Directives. One is of general application for all activities involving a hazard arising from ionizing radiation and lays down the basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation. The other is derived from the abovementioned one and lays down the basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment. The Commission, in collaboration with the Spanish Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo, the Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear and the Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, organized on 12, 13 and 14 September 1988 in Madrid, the third scientific seminar on the optimization principle (Alara) which is a key element of the two abovementioned Council Directives. The seminar allowed an analysis of the progress made since the previous seminars of 1979 and 1983, in the practical implementation of the optimization principle, in relation to the design and operation of nuclear and industrial installations, natural radioactivity, medical practices and countermeasures. The report contains the 20 original contributions presented and some general considerations on the results of the seminar

  15. Promoting residencies to pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, K K

    1991-08-01

    A program for promoting pharmacy residency training to pharmacy students at the University of the Pacific (UOP) is described. A residency club was started in 1982 to increase UOP students' interest in residency training and to provide them with relevant information. Some students needed to be convinced that residencies were primarily educational rather than staffing experiences. Students were made aware of pharmacists' practice in specialty areas, for which residency training is needed, and were taught how to prepare themselves for selection for residencies. The club was formed to encourage mutual support among the students, which would be less likely to occur if residencies were promoted only through work with individual students. Club meetings provide information about available residencies, the application process, and the value of residency training to a career in pharmacy. Students are taught how to prepare curricula vitae, how to interview, and how to select programs to which to apply. Applications for residencies increased. Although the rate of acceptance was low at first, it was expected to increase as more UOP students demonstrated their interest in and qualification for residency training. The promotion of residencies as part of a balanced career planning and placement program for pharmacy students is encouraged.

  16. Integrated Clinical Geriatric Pharmacy Clerkship in Long Term, Acute and Ambulatory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Isabel; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A clinical geriatric pharmacy clerkship containing three separate practice areas (long-term, acute, and ambulatory care) is described. The program follows the medical education clerkship protocol, with a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy practice resident, and student. Participation in medical rounds, interdisciplinary conferences, and…

  17. An Educational Tool for Teaching Medication History Taking to Pharmacy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Sando, Karen R.; Elliott, Jennifer; Stanton, Melonie L.; Doty, Randell

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate the use of a situated-learning experience to prepare second-year pharmacy students to conduct medication history interviews in preparation for introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPE) at ambulatory clinic sites.

  18. An overview of Medicare reimbursement regulations for advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakes, Michael A; Evans, Tracylain

    2006-01-01

    The federal government spends nearly 15% of the budget on Medicare services annually, and advanced practice nurses are eligible for reimbursement from that pool. The regulations governing reimbursement are complex because of the social, political, and financial pressures involved in their development. Although economic viability and due diligence considerations make it incumbent on advanced practice nurses to understand the rules, the profession, as a whole, has knowledge deficits in this area. The essentials of regulatory development and structure are reviewed and considerations for optimizing reimbursement are described. PMID:16676748

  19. Offering Clinical Pharmacy Clerkship in Hospital for Pharmacy Student: A Successful Cooperation between Medical and Pharmacy Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Eslami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacy education has been changed in recent years. Pharmacy students need more practical and clinical skills which come from direct interaction with patients and other health care providers. To achieve this, students need more effective courses and clerkships. In this paper we describe our method to design and evaluate clinical pharmacy clerkship for the first time in Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS.Methods: To  determine  the  most  beneficial way  of  education  we  designed  a  pilot  study  in educational hospital of AJUMS. After analyzing the conclusions from pilot study, 40 fifth year pharmacy student divided in ten groups and each group had a six week rotation in three different wards under supervision of medical residents. Each student was asked to provide evaluations during six total weeks of three different rotation sites.Results and Discussion: Clinical pharmacy clerkship led to successfully improved clinical skills for students such as being familiar with different practice environments, direct communication whit patients and medical team and participation in direct patient care activities. All the students participate in the course could pass the final exam and 85% of students believed this would be a necessary education course in their clerkship programs. Although there were some problems but pharmacy students benefited from this course and it gives them advantages in clinical knowledge and professional communication skills.

  20. Health literacy in the pharmacy setting: defining pharmacotherapy literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King SR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: All currently available definitions of health literacy may be considered quite general. Given the complex nature of the patient-pharmacy encounter and the varying tasks required to properly and successfully consume or administer medication or to adhere to a pharmaceutical care regimen, these available definitions may describe inadequately a patient’s health literacy for the purpose of pharmacotherapy and pharmacist intervention. Therefore, the objective of this research was to conceptualize the Pharmacotherapy Literacy construct.Methods: Licensed pharmacists (n=2,368 were mailed a questionnaire providing them with the Healthy People 2010 definition of health literacy and asked, “Given this definition, how would you define Pharmacotherapy Literacy?” A total of 420 usable surveys were returned of which 176 (42% included responses to the open-ended question concerning pharmacotherapy literacy. Responses were reviewed independently and collectively by the authors. Common themes were identified, compared and discussed until consensus was reached. An initial definition was formulated and distributed to six doctoral-trained academicians and practicing pharmacists who were asked to offer their opinions of the definition as well as suggestions for its improvement. The definition was modified and subjected to further review from 15 additional doctoral-trained academicians and practicing pharmacists who provided feedback concerning its improvement.Results: Based on the recommendations received from the academicians and pharmacists, the following, definition was formulated by the authors: Pharmacotherapy Literacy – An individual’s capacity to obtain, evaluate, calculate, and comprehend basic information about pharmacotherapy and pharmacy related services necessary to make appropriate medication-related decisions, regardless of the mode of content delivery (e.g. written, oral, visual images and symbols.Conclusions: As the ever

  1. Nuclear pharmacy certificate program: distance learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Pharmacy Certificate Program (NPCP) was developed to meet the need for licensed pharmacists wishing to change career paths and enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy. Additionally, the NPCP benefits employers that wish to employ a nuclear pharmacist in lieu of waiting for graduates that are available only at one time yearly from a college of pharmacy. The NPCP is not intended to replace traditional nuclear pharmacy education in academic institutions, but to offer an another option to pharmacists and potential employers. The NPCP is divided into two components. One component involves over 130 hours of instruction through videotapes and accompanying workbooks. This component is completed while working in a nuclear pharmacy and with the assistance of a nuclear pharmacist serving as a supervisor. The nuclear pharmacist is available to answer questions and to administer examinations over the videotape material. Examinations are prepared by Purdue faculty and returned for grading. Scores on exams must reflect learning to the same degree as in an academic environment. In the second component of the NPCP, the trainee attends a two-week session in the School of Pharmacy at Purdue University. the trainee must complete a significant portion of the videotape material before the on-campus session. In the on-campus component, videotape material is reinforced and expanded by laboratory exercises and lectures in dedicated, fully-equipped laboratories employed in the School of Pharmacy undergraduate program in nuclear pharmacy. Nuclear pharmacy faculty and consultants provide individualized instruction to each trainee. Assimilation of lecture and laboratory material is determined through several examinations. A comprehensive examination is administered which includes content from the videotape-workbook component of the NPCP. Certification is awarded to trainees who have completed the program and demonstrated their knowledge and competence by examination. Almost 200

  2. Using Bourdieu’s Theoretical Framework to Examine How the Pharmacy Educator Views Pharmacy Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore how different pharmacy educators view pharmacy knowledge within the United Kingdom MPharm program and to relate these findings to Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical framework. Methods. Twelve qualitative interviews were conducted with 4 faculty members from 3 different types of schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom: a newer school, an established teaching-based school, and an established research-intensive school. Selection was based on a representation of both science-based and practice-based disciplines, gender balance, and teaching experience. Results. The interview transcripts indicated how these members of the academic community describe knowledge. There was a polarization between science-based and practice-based educators in terms of Bourdieu’s description of field, species of capital, and habitus. Conclusion. A Bourdieusian perspective on the differences among faculty member responses supports our understanding of curriculum integration and offers some practical implications for the future development of pharmacy programs. PMID:26889065

  3. Self-medication among medical and pharmacy students in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Naznin; Saffoon, Nadia; Uddin, Riaz

    2015-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional survey examined the pattern of self-medication and factors associated with this practice among medical and pharmacy students in context to Bangladesh. Methods The study used a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 500; 250 medical and 250 pharmacy, students participated in the study. As it is a comparative analysis between the medical and pharmacy students, we used independent t test and Chi square test. Results The findings indicated that the impact of s...

  4. Global Health Education in Doctor of Pharmacy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lydia C.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this Review is to characterize content related to global health in didactic and experiential curricula of doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs in the United States. The review was completed through a systematic website search of 133 US PharmD programs accredited or currently in the process of obtaining accreditation to identify global health dual degrees, minors/concentrations, required and elective courses, and experiential opportunities. Programs’ course catalogs were referenced as needed to find more specific course listings/descriptions. More than 50 programs offered an elective course related to global health; eight had a required course; eight offered a minor or certification for global health; three offered dual degrees in pharmacy and global health. Fourteen institutions had a center for global health studies on campus. More than 50 programs offered experiential education opportunities in global health including international advanced pharmacy practice experiences or medical mission trips. Inclusion of and focus on global health-related topics in US PharmD programs was widely varied. PMID:27293238

  5. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board

  6. Practical Implementations of Advanced Process Control for Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jørgen K . H.; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    Most advanced process control systems are based on Model Predictive Control (MPC). In this paper we discuss three critical issues for the practical implementation of linear MPC for process control applications. The rst issue is related to oset free control and disturbance models; the second issue...

  7. Training Advanced Writing Skills: The Case for Deliberate Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Ronald T.; Whiteford, Alison P.

    2009-01-01

    The development of advanced writing skills has been neglected in schools of the United States, with even some college graduates lacking the level of ability required in the workplace (National Commission on Writing, 2003, 2004). The core problem, we argue, is an insufficient degree of appropriate task practice distributed throughout the secondary…

  8. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  9. Educating advanced level practice within complex health care workplace environments through transformational practice development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sally; Jackson, Carrie; Webster, Jonathan; Manley, Kim

    2013-10-01

    Over the past 20 years health care reform has influenced the development of advanced level practitioner roles and expectations. How advanced level practitioners work to survive the highly stimulating, yet sometimes overwhelming aspects of balancing high quality provision with political reform agendas, amidst economic constraint is considered. Transformational approaches (encompassing education and practice led service development) can provide, promote and 'provoke' a harnessing of complex issues workplace environment to produce creative solutions. Transformational Practice Development provides a structured, rigorous, systematic approach that practitioners, teams and health care consumers alike can utilise to achieve skills and attributes needed for successful innovation. The authors present case study materials from action orientated locally delivered Practice Development, as a complex strategic intervention approach to influence and promote advanced level practice expertise. Initiated through facilitation of transformational leadership, and resultant team based improvements, we present how strategic collaborative processes can harness work chaos and complexity to provide sustainable and productive workplace cultures of effectiveness. PMID:23453607

  10. Immeasurable Benefits of Professional Pharmacy Community Service

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, Brittany A

    2015-01-01

    Community service provides pharmacy students with invaluable opportunities for professional growth in communication, organization, and practice skills. Furthermore, students develop relationships with practicing pharmacists, which leads to influential mentoring and networking opportunities. While building students’ confidence and skills, these endeavors can have significant impact on community members’ lives.

  11. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yielder, Jill, E-mail: j.yielder@auckland.ac.nz [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen [University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  12. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ

  13. Substance abuse and pharmacy practice: what the community pharmacist needs to know about drug abuse and dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasello Anthony C

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmacists, the most accessible of health care professionals, are well positioned to help prevent and treat substance use disorders and should prepare themselves to perform these functions. New research improves our knowledge about the pharmacological and behavioral risks of drug abuse, supports the clinical impression that drug dependence is associated with long-lasting neurochemical changes, and demonstrates effective pharmacological treatments for certain kinds of drug dependencies. The profession is evolving. Pharmacists are engaging in new practice behaviors such as helping patients manage their disease states. Collaborative practice agreements and new federal policies set the stage for pharmacists to assist in the clinical management of opioid and other drug dependencies. Pharmacists need to be well informed about issues related to addiction and prepared not only to screen, assess, and refer individual cases and to collaborate with physicians caring for chemically dependent patients, but also to be agents of change in their communities in the fight against drug abuse. At the end of this article the pharmacist will be better able to: 1. Explain the disease concept of chemical dependence 2. Gather the information necessary to conduct a screen for chemical dependence 3. Inform patients about the treatment options for chemical dependence 4. Locate resources needed to answer questions about the effects of common drugs of abuse (alcohol, marijuana, narcotics, "ecstasy", and cocaine 5. Develop a list of local resources for drug abuse treatment 6. Counsel parents who are concerned about drug use by their children 7. Counsel individuals who are concerned about drug use by a loved one. 8. Counsel individuals who are concerned about their own drug use

  14. Advanced practice nursing in performing arts health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weslin, Anna T; Silva-Smith, Amy

    2010-06-01

    Performing arts medicine is a growing health care profession specializing in the needs of performing artists. As part of the performing arts venue, the dancer, a combination of athlete and artist, presents with unique health care needs requiring a more collaborative and holistic health care program. Currently there are relatively few advanced practice nurses (APNs) who specialize in performing arts health care. APNs, with focus on collaborative and holistic health care, are ideally suited to join other health care professionals in developing and implementing comprehensive health care programs for the performing artist. This article focuses on the dancer as the client in an APN practice that specializes in performing arts health care.

  15. Practical Implementations of Advanced Process Control for Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jørgen K . H.; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    This paper describes some practical problems encountered, when implementing Advanced Process Control, APC, schemes on linear processes. The implemented APC controllers discussed will be LQR, Riccati MPC and Condensed MPC controllers illustrated by simulation of the Four Tank Process and a lineari...... on pilot plant equipment on the department of Chemical Engineering DTU Lyngby.......This paper describes some practical problems encountered, when implementing Advanced Process Control, APC, schemes on linear processes. The implemented APC controllers discussed will be LQR, Riccati MPC and Condensed MPC controllers illustrated by simulation of the Four Tank Process...... cannot be achieved without violation of process constraints. A target calculation function can be used to calculate the optimal achievable target for the process. The use of hard and soft constraints for process input constraints in the MPC controllers, ensures feasible solutions. The computational load...

  16. 加强中药专业本科生基本实验技能的探索与实践%Exploration and practice on strengthening students' practical skills in higher education of Chinese Pharmacy Specialty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹海艳; 陈忻; 龚慕辛; 王秀娟; 吴霞; 刘长利; 王满元; 李佳; 赵晖

    2015-01-01

    Students' practical skill is very important in higher education of Chinese Pharmacy Specialty. To improve undergraduates' professional skill, experimental courses are needed to be reformed. Taking the students as the main body and the teachers as the leading force, we strengthen the basic experimental skill training in lab teaching and evaluate student achievement through formative assessment. These approaches are effective in motivating students' initiative in studying, improving the level of practical skill and cultivating their scientific attitude.%在中药学专业高等教育中,培养学生的实践技能是非常重要的环节.为提高中药专业本科生的科研实践能力,我们对中药专业实验课进行了改革,在教学中以学生为主体,教师为指导,强化基本实验技能训练,并通过形成性评价,综合评定学生的实验课成绩,提高学生的学习积极性和实验技能水平,培养学生严谨的科研态度,为科研创新能力的提高奠定基础.

  17. 基于优质护理服务药事管理实践%The Practice of High Quality Care Related Pharmacy Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周权; 朱玲玲

    2012-01-01

    从护理部与药剂科的关系定位、平台建设、用药安全和作业效率等方面,介绍了落实优质护理服务相关的药事管理经验.指出药剂科的优质药学服务可为优质护理服务的开展提供强大的技术支撑;护理团队与药师团队应紧密合作,共同为提高医疗品质而努力.%From the relationship between Department of Nursing and Department of Pharmacy, platform construction, pharmacy usage safety and operating efficiency, the paper introduced the experience of implementation of high quality care related pharmacy management. The paper pointed out that the quality of pharmaceutical care of the Department of Pharmacy can provide strong technical support for the launching of high quality care. The nursing team and pharmacist team should work closely together for the quality improvement of medical care.

  18. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions...

  19. Refer-To-Pharmacy: Pharmacy for the Next Generation Now! A Short Communication for Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair Gray

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Refer-to-Pharmacy is the first fully integrated hospital to community pharmacy referral system. This article explains the importance of these referrals for patients and health economies to improve medicines optimisation, and how Refer-to-Pharmacy works in both hospital and community pharmacies.

  20. Refer-To-Pharmacy: Pharmacy for the Next Generation Now! A Short Communication for Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Alistair Gray

    2015-01-01

    Refer-to-Pharmacy is the first fully integrated hospital to community pharmacy referral system. This article explains the importance of these referrals for patients and health economies to improve medicines optimisation, and how Refer-to-Pharmacy works in both hospital and community pharmacies.

  1. [Advance Directives: theoretical concept and practical significance in the USA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmann, J; Pfaff, M

    2003-07-01

    The article examines on the basic of empirical data the discrepancy between the theoretical demand and the practical role of advance directives. Often advance directives have no influence on medical decision-making in clinical care of critically ill patients. The vague language of the widely used standard living wills and the lack of physician-patient communication in the process of delivering an advance directives are contributing factors. However, many physicians even disregard patients' preferences in concrete and meaningful living wills at the end of life. Besides the lack of information many even seriously ill patients do not deliver an advance because they misjudge their medical prognosis and life expectancy. Often the communication between patients and doctors are blocked because they expect from the each other the first step to talk about end of life decisions and advance directives. In this context physicians claim lack of time, training in communication skills and their discomfort in talking about death and dying with their patients.

  2. The advanced practice professionals' perspective: keys to a good working relationship between advanced practice professions and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Maura

    2013-01-01

    A strong working relationship between advanced practice professionals (APPs) and supervising oncologists is essential for reducing medical errors, retaining employees, and improving work environments. Although there is rather limited data on the unique relationship of the APP and physician, fundamental communication skills-including open communication, mutual respect, establishing expectations, and working with mutual purpose-should be the foundation of these relationships. This paper addresses various aspects of relationship building between APPs and physicians with suggestions for establishing successful working relationships.

  3. Evaluation of Clinical and Communication Skills of Pharmacy Students and Pharmacists with an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urteaga, Elizabeth M; Attridge, Rebecca L; Tovar, John M; Witte, Amy P

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To evaluate how effectively pharmacy students and practicing pharmacists communicate and apply knowledge to simulations of commonly encountered patient scenarios using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Design. Second-, third-, and fourth-year pharmacy students completed an OSCE as part of their required courses in 2012 and 2013. All students in both years completed identical OSCE cases. Licensed pharmacists were recruited to complete the OSCE and serve as controls in 2012. A survey assessed student perception and acceptance of the OSCE as well as student confidence in performance. Assessment. Licensed pharmacists had significantly higher clinical and communication skills scores than did pharmacy students. Student progression in communication and clinical skills improved significantly over time. Survey results indicated that students felt the OSCE was well-structured and assessed clinical skills taught in pharmacy school; 86% of students felt confident they could provide these skills. Conclusion. Objective structured clinical examinations can evaluate clinical competence and communication skills among professional students. Implementation of OSCEs may be an effective tool for assessment of the Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education domains.

  4. Pharmacy cases in Second Life: an elective course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronin, Michael A; Daniels, Lacy; Demps, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Interactive pharmacy case studies are an essential component of the pharmacy curriculum. We recently developed an elective course at the Rangel College of Pharmacy in pharmacy case studies for second- and third-year Doctor of Pharmacy students using Second Life® (SL), an interactive three-dimensional virtual environment that simulates the real world. This course explored the use of SL for education and training in pharmacy, emphasizing a case-based approach. Virtual worlds such as SL promote inquiry-based learning and conceptual understanding, and can potentially develop problem-solving skills in pharmacy students. Students were presented ten case scenarios that primarily focused on drug safety and effective communication with patients. Avatars, representing instructors and students, reviewed case scenarios during sessions in a virtual classroom. Individually and in teams, students participated in active-learning activities modeling both the pharmacist's and patient's roles. Student performance and learning were assessed based on SL class participation, activities, assignments, and two formal, essay-type online exams in Blackboard 9. Student course-evaluation results indicated favorable perceptions of content and delivery. Student comments included an enhanced appreciation of practical issues in pharmacy practice, flexibility of attendance, and an increased ability to focus on course content. Excellent student participation and performance in weekly active-learning activities translated into positive performance on subsequent formal assessments. Students were actively engaged and exposed to topics pertinent to pharmacy practice that were not covered in the required pharmacy curriculum. The multiple active-learning assignments were successful in increasing students' knowledge, and provided additional practice in building the communication skills beneficial for students preparing for experiential clinical rotations. PMID:23762008

  5. Pharmacy in medieval Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, J

    2007-06-01

    A survey of the state of pharmacy in medieval Bulgaria is done, analyzing written records of various origin and content. Written documents are reviewed separately in chronological order. They all seem to lend support to the conclusion that realism is a characteristic feature of pharmacy in medieval Bulgaria. Mysticism and superstition are relatively rarely resorted to, precedence is given to real treatment with suitable and not so suitable medical plants, minerals and animal products. Relatively weak is the impact of West-European medicine and pharmacy because of the different influence of the Eastern and the Western Orthodox religion, and partly because of the territorial remoteness. During the High Middle Ages Bulgarian pharmacy developed under the influence of Hellenic ancient culture. Later, after the 15 century, the influence of the Arabian culture and medicine is also felt as a result of the complex compilation between the Bulgarian and Ottoman culture during the 500-year Turkish yoke. PMID:17663197

  6. Managing the gap: balancing advances in technology with advances in management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, D

    1997-01-01

    Expenditure on information systems is widely anticipated to lead to improved management of health care resources. Despite large investments in hardware and software, these expectations are difficult to realise. Part of the difficulty lies in the manner in which information systems are applied to, rather than integrated within, organisations. This paper considers some of the the personal and organisational issues that need to be addressed to 'manage the gap' in balancing advances in information technology with advances in management practice. The issues identified are consistent with the concept of a learning organisation dealing with environmental change.

  7. Life in a fishbowl: accountability and integrity in pharmacy leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumschild, Ryan J; Weber, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The Director's Forum is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems by providing practical information on various leadership topics. Pharmacists are bound to practice in the best interest of the patient and are obligated to act with integrity and in an ethical manner. Pharmacy directors and their leadership staff are additionally bound to manage their department with integrity. Staff often scrutinize the pharmacy director's actions, giving the director a feeling of "life in a fishbowl." Every action of the leader is judged in the context of personal integrity or their individual commitment to moral, spiritual, and ethical values. The objective of this article is to describe how a pharmacy leader manages this responsibility. This article addresses the pharmacy leader's obligations to act with integrity, reviews key integrity concerns in pharmacy leadership, and provides guidance for leading and managing in the context of ethics and integrity. Pharmacy directors must always be aware that they are open to both department and public scrutiny if they do not conduct themselves in a professional manner. Being accountable for their actions and maintaining a high standard of integrity, leaders can keep the focus of their departments on the goal of patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:25477587

  8. Life in a fishbowl: accountability and integrity in pharmacy leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumschild, Ryan J; Weber, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The Director's Forum is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems by providing practical information on various leadership topics. Pharmacists are bound to practice in the best interest of the patient and are obligated to act with integrity and in an ethical manner. Pharmacy directors and their leadership staff are additionally bound to manage their department with integrity. Staff often scrutinize the pharmacy director's actions, giving the director a feeling of "life in a fishbowl." Every action of the leader is judged in the context of personal integrity or their individual commitment to moral, spiritual, and ethical values. The objective of this article is to describe how a pharmacy leader manages this responsibility. This article addresses the pharmacy leader's obligations to act with integrity, reviews key integrity concerns in pharmacy leadership, and provides guidance for leading and managing in the context of ethics and integrity. Pharmacy directors must always be aware that they are open to both department and public scrutiny if they do not conduct themselves in a professional manner. Being accountable for their actions and maintaining a high standard of integrity, leaders can keep the focus of their departments on the goal of patient-centered pharmacy services.

  9. Combined biological fluidized bed-advanced catalytic oxidation process used for pharmacy wastewater treatment%生物流化床—高级催化氧化工艺处理制药废水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜家绪; 买文宁; 王敏; 唐启

    2016-01-01

    采用生物流化床—高级催化氧化工艺处理制药废水,介绍了制药废水处理工程的工艺流程、工艺设计、调试方法、处理效果和工程效益.运行结果表明,该系统处理效果好且运行稳定,出水水质满足《混装制剂类制药工业水污染物排放标准》(GB 21908—2008)表2标准.%The combined biological fluidized bed-advanced catalytic oxidation process has been designed for the treatment of pharmacy wastewater. The process flow,process design,debugging methods,treatment effect and engi-neering benefit of the pharmacy wastewater treatment project are introduced. The running results show that the treat-ment effect of the system is good,it runs steadily,and the effluent quality meets the requirements specified in Tab. 2 of the Discharge Standards of Water Pollutants for Pharmaceutical Industry Mixing/Compounding and Formulati on Category(GB 21908—2008).

  10. Practical Implementation of Cooperative RRM for IMT-Advanced Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihovska, Albena D.; Tragos, Elias; Kyriazakos, Sofoklis;

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a practical implementation of a radio resource management (RRM) framework for support of cooperation between radio access networks (RANs). The platform supports the inter-working between a next generation RAN and legacy systems (i.e., WLAN, UMTS). The platform is based on real......-time monitoring of the RANs, and support of service requests and user-/system-initiated intra- and inter-system handover, as well as congestion management and QoS guarantees. The platform is based on the common radio resource management (CRRM) approach to exploit the advanced properties of the next generation RAN...

  11. A Comparison of Community and Hospital Pharmacy Preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charles H.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study that seeks to determine, quantitatively and qualitatively, the effectiveness of externship preceptors in training Purdue University students to practice pharmacy in community and hospital environments is described. Variables that can effect externships are appended. (JMD)

  12. Teaching practice and thinking on Introduct ion to Pharmacy%药学概论的教学实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成蹊; 杨帆

    2014-01-01

    IntroductiontoPharmacyis an important course for students who do not major in pharmacy in pharmaceutical colleges. It is of great significance and necessity to open the course of Introduction to Pharmacy. After discussion on the current teaching status of IntroductiontoPharmacy, the study explored improving teaching pattern, inspiring learning interest of students and integrating curricular contents based on internet and multimedia technologies to guide student learning and improve teaching efficiency and quality.%药学概论是高等药学院校非药学专业学生学习的重要课程之一。开设该课程具有一定的重要性和必要性,本文探讨了目前药学概论课程教学现状,并就以后教学工作中如何改进教学模式、激发学生的学习兴趣、使用网络和多媒体技术整合课程内容来引导学生学习,提高教学效果和教学质量进行探讨。

  13. An investigation on pharmacy functions and services affecting satisfaction of patients with prescriptions in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Fumio; Tada, Yuichirou; Yoshikawa, Emi; Iwahashi, Yoshiki; Fujita, Kenji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Various functions expected by patient expects are needed with progress in the system for separation of dispensing and prescribing functions. In this investigation, the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy function were analyzed quantitatively. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 178 community pharmacies. Questions on pharmacy functions and services totaled 87 items concerning information service, amenities, safety, personnel training, etc. The questionnaires for patients had five-grade scales and composed 11 items (observed variables). Based on the results, "the percentage of satisfied patients" was determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy functions or services provided, to confirm patient's evaluation of the pharmacy, and how factors affected comprehensive satisfaction. In correlation analysis, "the number of pharmacists" and "comprehensive satisfaction" had a negative correlation. Other interesting results were obtained. As a results of factor analysis, three latent factors were obtained: the "human factor," "patients' convenience," and "environmental factor," Multiple regression analysis showed that the "human factor" affected "comprehensive satisfaction" the most. Various pharmacy functions and services influence patient satisfaction, and improvement in their quality increases patient satisfaction. This will result in the practice of patient-centered medicine. PMID:19420889

  14. Community pharmacy incident reporting: a new tool for community pharmacies in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Certina; Hung, Patricia; Lee, Gary; Kadija, Medina

    2010-01-01

    Incident reporting offers insight into a variety of intricate processes in healthcare. However, it has been found that medication incidents are under reported in the community pharmacy setting. The Community Pharmacy Incident Reporting (CPhIR) program was created by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada specifically for incident reporting in the community pharmacy setting in Canada. The initial development of key elements for CPhIR included several focus-group teleconferences with pharmacists from Ontario and Nova Scotia. Throughout the development and release of the CPhIR pilot, feedback from pharmacists and pharmacy technicians was constantly incorporated into the reporting program. After several rounds of iterative feedback, testing and consultation with community pharmacy practitioners, a final version of the CPhIR program, together with self-directed training materials, is now ready to launch. The CPhIR program provides users with a one-stop platform to report and record medication incidents, export data for customized analysis and view comparisons of individual and aggregate data. These unique functions allow for a detailed analysis of underlying contributing factors in medication incidents. A communication piece for pharmacies to share their experiences is in the process of development. To ensure the success of the CPhIR program, a patient safety culture must be established. By gaining a deeper understanding of possible causes of medication incidents, community pharmacies can implement system-based strategies for quality improvement and to prevent potential errors from occurring again in the future. This article highlights key features of the CPhIR program that will assist community pharmacies to improve their drug distribution system and, ultimately, enhance patient safety.

  15. Community pharmacy incident reporting: a new tool for community pharmacies in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Certina; Hung, Patricia; Lee, Gary; Kadija, Medina

    2010-01-01

    Incident reporting offers insight into a variety of intricate processes in healthcare. However, it has been found that medication incidents are under reported in the community pharmacy setting. The Community Pharmacy Incident Reporting (CPhIR) program was created by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada specifically for incident reporting in the community pharmacy setting in Canada. The initial development of key elements for CPhIR included several focus-group teleconferences with pharmacists from Ontario and Nova Scotia. Throughout the development and release of the CPhIR pilot, feedback from pharmacists and pharmacy technicians was constantly incorporated into the reporting program. After several rounds of iterative feedback, testing and consultation with community pharmacy practitioners, a final version of the CPhIR program, together with self-directed training materials, is now ready to launch. The CPhIR program provides users with a one-stop platform to report and record medication incidents, export data for customized analysis and view comparisons of individual and aggregate data. These unique functions allow for a detailed analysis of underlying contributing factors in medication incidents. A communication piece for pharmacies to share their experiences is in the process of development. To ensure the success of the CPhIR program, a patient safety culture must be established. By gaining a deeper understanding of possible causes of medication incidents, community pharmacies can implement system-based strategies for quality improvement and to prevent potential errors from occurring again in the future. This article highlights key features of the CPhIR program that will assist community pharmacies to improve their drug distribution system and, ultimately, enhance patient safety. PMID:20959726

  16. Service preferences differences between community pharmacy and supermarket pharmacy patrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Angela; Weck Marciniak, Macary; Jarvis, Janice

    2005-01-01

    Differences in service preferences between patrons of supermarket and chain pharmacies were determined. Subjects fell into two groups: patrons of a supermarket chain's pharmacies and patrons of the same supermarket chain who patronized other community chain pharmacies for prescription drug purchases. Subjects were asked to prioritize services in terms of convenience and impact on pharmacy selection. Differences in service preferences emerged. Community pharmacy patrons were more likely to rate easy navigation through a pharmacy and 24 X 7 hours of operation as key services. Supermarket pharmacy patrons were more likely to rate one-stop shopping and adequate hours of operation as priorities. Both groups rated basic services such as maintenance of prescription and insurance information as priorities. Pharmacies should stress the delivery of basic services when trying to attract customers.

  17. Pharmacy cases in Second Life: an elective course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronin MA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Veronin,1,2 Lacy Daniels,1,2 Elaine Demps21Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, 2Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, TX, USAAbstract: Interactive pharmacy case studies are an essential component of the pharmacy curriculum. We recently developed an elective course at the Rangel College of Pharmacy in pharmacy case studies for second- and third-year Doctor of Pharmacy students using Second Life® (SL, an interactive three-dimensional virtual environment that simulates the real world. This course explored the use of SL for education and training in pharmacy, emphasizing a case-based approach. Virtual worlds such as SL promote inquiry-based learning and conceptual understanding, and can potentially develop problem-solving skills in pharmacy students. Students were presented ten case scenarios that primarily focused on drug safety and effective communication with patients. Avatars, representing instructors and students, reviewed case scenarios during sessions in a virtual classroom. Individually and in teams, students participated in active-learning activities modeling both the pharmacist’s and patient’s roles. Student performance and learning were assessed based on SL class participation, activities, assignments, and two formal, essay-type online exams in Blackboard 9. Student course-evaluation results indicated favorable perceptions of content and delivery. Student comments included an enhanced appreciation of practical issues in pharmacy practice, flexibility of attendance, and an increased ability to focus on course content. Excellent student participation and performance in weekly active-learning activities translated into positive performance on subsequent formal assessments. Students were actively engaged and exposed to topics pertinent to pharmacy practice that were not covered in the required pharmacy curriculum. The multiple

  18. Teaching Practice for Fundamental and Experimental Chemistry in Pharmacy Based on the Innovative Thinking%基于创新思维的《药学基础实验化学》教学实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晔

    2015-01-01

    《药用基础实验化学》是基础化学类课程结合药学类专业特色独立开设的一门实验课程,在药学人才培养中起着至关重要的地位。笔者结合教学实践,从“加强实验预习环节,鼓励学生质疑”、“实验教学过程中以启发式教学为主”、“将学生的创新思维融入到实验成绩考核中”、“开设开放性实验,引导学生进行创新性实验”、“建设虚拟仿真实验室”五个方向将创新思维融入到实验教学环节,提高了学生的创新能力,取得了较好的教学效果。%The course of Fundamental and Experimental Chemistry in Pharmacy is a combination of the basic chemistry courses and the pharmacy. It plays an important role in the cultivating of students’ ability. Several ways of“Strength of the preview and encouragement of doubt”, “Heuristic education”, “Scoring of the innovative thinking into experiment testing”, “Setting up the opening experiment and guiding the innovative experiment”, and “Modeling of virtual simulation lab” were combined with the education practice, and the innovation ability of pharmacy students were improved and better education effect were achieved.

  19. Integration of advanced practice providers into the Israeli healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Eliana Marcus; Andrews, Caryn Scheinberg

    2016-01-01

    Many countries around the world have integrated various types of Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) into their healthcare systems. The main motivating factors for recognizing and developing APPs worldwide include physician shortages and the need for improved access or delivery (US, France, Belgium, Scotland, Switzerland), reduced residency hours (US, UK), shortages in underserved regions (US, Canada, Finland, Australia), and cost containment (Germany, Netherlands, UK, US). Israel is experiencing a shortage of physicians in peripheral geographic regions and in critical medical specialties. Recent by-laws approved by the Knesset (Parliament), combined with Israel Ministry of Health (MOH) policies, have thus far been unable to fully address the shortages. To understand the potential contribution of APPs in Israel, we evaluated the international historical foundations and development of APP roles. We assessed how APPs have impacted healthcare in other countries by analyzing public data and published international research about APP education, safety, quality of care, motivators, barriers, and impact. We found that APPs are recognized in dozens of countries, and have similar scopes of practice, graduate level education requirements (in developed countries), and clinical training. At the same time, there is wide variability among countries in the actual function and independence of the advanced practice nurse (APN), particularly the nurse practitioner (NP). APPs have been established as cost effective, safe healthcare providers who improve healthcare access. Israel has begun to introduce APPs, specifically NPs, in a variety of fields, including geriatrics, palliative care and diabetic care. We recommend a rapid expansion of existing and new APP roles into the Israeli healthcare system based on evidence and the recommendations of international evaluations by non-government organizations. By shifting the education to a university setting, mirroring successful, evidence

  20. Educational Changes to Support Advanced Practice Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFlore, Judy L.; Thomas, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational factors limit the number of advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) graduates to meet the growing workforce demands. Healthcare dynamics are necessitating a shift in how nursing education envisions, creates, and implements clinical learning opportunities. The current clinical education model in APRN programs continues to be the same as it was 45 years ago when the student numbers were much smaller. New approaches in graduate nursing education are needed to address the shortage of APRNs in primary and acute care areas. Determining competency based on the number of clinical hours can be inefficient, ineffective, and costly and limits the ability to increase capacity. Little research exists in graduate nursing education to support the effectiveness and efficiency of current hours of clinical required for nurse practitioner students. Simulation and academic-practice partnership models can offer innovative approaches to nurse practitioner education for clinical training, with the goal of producing graduates who can provide safe, quality care within the complex practice-based environment of the nation's evolving healthcare system. PMID:27465446

  1. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs. PMID:27298063

  2. 医院药剂科文化的构建与实践%Cultural Construction and Practice of the Pharmacy Department in Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜淑娴; 程红勤; 王育琴

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To explore the influence of the cultural construction on the management of the pharmacy department and the level of pharmaceutical care.METHODS:The experience of the construction of department culture in our hospital was introduced,i.g.establishing same values of pharmacy department by building up the service concept of "patient-centered" and the contents of "quality,learning,team,sharing and performance".RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS:The cultural construction of pharmacy department is developed by insisting quality management,building up learning organization,enhancing team construction and learning and communication,carrying out performance management.All pharmacist's enthusiasm and initiative are mobilized,cohesion of sections is enhanced,which contribute to the sustainable development of the department of pharmacy and the level of pharmaceutical care.%目的:探讨文化建设对药剂科管理和药学服务水平的影响.方法:介绍该院科室文化建设的经验,内容包括通过树立“以患者为中心”的服务理念,结合“质量、学习、团队、分享、绩效”等具体内容,确立了药剂科的共同价值观.结果与结论:通过坚持质量管理、构建学习型组织、加强团队建设、加强学习交流、实施绩效管理等进行药剂科的文化建设,调动了全体药师工作的积极性和主动性,科室的凝聚力得以加强,从而促进了药剂科的持续发展和药学服务水平的提升.

  3. Pharmaceutical Compounding in Portuguese Community Pharmacies: CHARACTERIZATION AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Rita; Macedo, Marina; Machado, Rita M; Pacheco, Ana Filipa; Palmeira-de-Oliveira, Ana; Martinez-de-Oliveira, José; Duarte, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    A study of compounding practices among Portuguese community pharmacies from 2008 to 2011 and pharmacists' perspectives concerning compounding was conducted. The retrospective study was based on an online questionnaire developed to gather information on pharmacies characteristics frequency, and type of compounded preparations. Additionally, difficulties, motivations, and pharmacist's perspectives regarding compounding were assessed. Up to 1,450 Portuguese pharmacies were contacted, and 250 completed questionnaires obtained. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS Version 21. Frequency and cross-tab analysis was used to describe data. Chi-square test was used to assess statistical significant differences between compounding and non-compounding pharmacies' characteristics. Among all pharmacies, 75.2% reported compounding practices, although the majority prepared less than 50 preparations per year, corresponding to less than 10 different formulations. Those pharmacies' with a higher lifetime activity, number of customers, and team members were associated to compounding practices. Dermatological preparations were the most frequently prepared formulations, followed by oral solutions, and otorhinolaryngological preparations. Dermatologists and pediatricians were the most frequent prescribers of compounded medicines. Regarding future perspectives, 51.4% of pharmacists believed that compounding will decrease. However, 79.1% indicated that they will continue to compound, and 70.7% considered that compounded prescriptions should be encouraged. Patient satisfaction (66.1%) and improvement of the pharmacy image (63.8%) were considered the main advantages of compounding services. Compounded medicines are still prepared in the community pharmacy setting to fulfill special patients' therapeutic needs, especially following dermatologists' and pediatricians' prescriptions. Offering compounding services is perceived by pharmacists as an important factor for high

  4. Performance of retail pharmacies in low- and middle-income Asian settings: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, R.; Goodman, C

    2016-01-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Asia, pharmacies are often patients' first point of contact with the health care system and their preferred channel for purchasing medicines. Unfortunately, pharmacy practice in these settings has been characterized by deficient knowledge and inappropriate treatment. This paper systematically reviews both the performance of all types of pharmacies and drug stores across Asia's LMIC, and the determinants of poor practice, in order to reflect on how...

  5. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring. PMID:27249776

  6. Harnessing competence and confidence: Dimensions in education and development for advanced and consultant practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consultant and advanced practice are relatively new concepts in radiography. There is evidence to show that as the career progression framework is being adopted the numbers of consultant and advanced practitioners in radiography are growing with the latter growing at a faster rate. The article considers the concept of advanced and consultant practice and the education requirements to support development. Preparation for an advanced practice role begins at the practitioner stage. Masters' level programmes are available to support the development of advanced practice. Education needs to be flexible as new advanced practice roles emerge. It is necessary to take practitioners beyond a defined modality to include leadership and people skills. These are essential for those aspiring to become consultants. Consultants require a high level of clinical knowledge for expert practice but also strategic vision and interpersonal intelligence to facilitate leadership and practice innovation. A model for developing leadership skills for consultants focussing on competence, confidence and capacity is proposed

  7. Harnessing competence and confidence: Dimensions in education and development for advanced and consultant practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Richard C. [School of Health and Emergency Professions, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.c.price@herts.ac.uk; Edwards, Hazel M. [School of Health and Emergency Professions, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Consultant and advanced practice are relatively new concepts in radiography. There is evidence to show that as the career progression framework is being adopted the numbers of consultant and advanced practitioners in radiography are growing with the latter growing at a faster rate. The article considers the concept of advanced and consultant practice and the education requirements to support development. Preparation for an advanced practice role begins at the practitioner stage. Masters' level programmes are available to support the development of advanced practice. Education needs to be flexible as new advanced practice roles emerge. It is necessary to take practitioners beyond a defined modality to include leadership and people skills. These are essential for those aspiring to become consultants. Consultants require a high level of clinical knowledge for expert practice but also strategic vision and interpersonal intelligence to facilitate leadership and practice innovation. A model for developing leadership skills for consultants focussing on competence, confidence and capacity is proposed.

  8. Proceedings of the International Congress on Clinical Pharmacy Education. (1st, Minneapolis, Minnesota, July 13-16, 1976).

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Bethesda, MD.

    The proceedings of the First International Congress on Clinical Pharmacy Education, which introduced pharmacy educators from outside of North America to the U.S. clinical pharmacy component of education and practice are presented in more than 20 separate papers. The program's objectives were: (1) to provide a historical overview of the development…

  9. Proof of Learning Outcome by the Advanced Clinical Competency Examination Trial after the Long-term Student's Practice in Pharmaceutical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Koji; Kataoka, Makoto; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Tsuji, Takumi; Nakatani, Takafumi; Yasuhara, Tomohisa; Mitamura, Shinobu; Hane, Yumiko; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2016-01-01

    At Setsunan University, a debrief session (a poster session) is commonly performed by the students who have completed the long-term students' practice. Since the valuable changes in practical competency of the students cannot be evaluated through this session, we specified items that can help evaluate and methods that can help estimate the students' competency as clinical pharmacists. We subsequently carried out a trial called the "Advanced Clinical Competency Examination". We evaluated 103 students who had concluded the students' practice for the second period (Sep 1, 2014, to Nov 16, 2014): 70 students (called "All finish students") who had completed the practice in a hospital and pharmacy, and 33 students (called "Hospital finish students") who had finished the practice at a hospital only. The trial was executed in four stages. In the first stage, students drew pictures of something impressive they had learned during the practice. In the second stage, students were given patient cases and were asked, "What is this patient's problem?" and "How would you solve this problem?". In the third stage, the students discussed their answers in a group. In the fourth stage, each group made a poster presentation in separate rooms. By using a rubric, the teachers evaluated each student individually, the results of which showed that the "All finish students" could identify more problems than the "Hospital finish students". PMID:27592830

  10. Working Mode and Practice of Clinical Pharmacists Involved in Management of Inpatient Pharmacy%临床药师纳入病房药房管理的工作模式及实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐晓涟; 唐静; 刘宁; 褚燕琦; 王淑洁; 程红勤; 闫素英; 林晓兰; 王育琴

    2011-01-01

    目的:探索临床药师的工作模式.方法:结合我院工作实际,采用实证案例研究的方法,从临床药师与病房药房药师相互配合的角度,总结临床药师切实可行的工作模式.结果与结论:将临床药师的编制纳入病房药房中,临床药师采用每天在责任科室参与临床实践、积累临床用药经验的同时,对需要会诊的其他科室的病例给予用药监护和回访的工作方式,为医师、护士和患者提供全程化的药学服务,并将临床实践延伸到临床药学的教学和科研工作中,由此形成的临床药师工作模式有利于保证患者用药安全、有效,实现药师自身的工作价值.%OBJECTIVE: To explore the working mode of clinical pharmacists. METHODS: Based on the practice of our hospital, feasible working mode of clinical pharmacists was summarized in the view of cooperation between clinical pharmacists and pharmacists of wards and pharmacy by means of case study. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: The personnel posts of clinical pharmacists should be included in the management of inpatient pharmacy. Clinical pharmacists provide whole course pharmaceutical care for doctors, nurses and patients by means of participating in clinical practice of responsibility department, accumulating experience of clinical drug use, providing pharmaceutical care and returning visit for cases of other departments requiring consultations. Clinical practice is extended to teaching and research of clinical pharmacy. Established working mode of clinical pharmacists contributes to safe and effective drug use and the achievement of work value of clinical pharmacists.

  11. 临床药学纳入医院“质控”体系的实践与体会%Practice and Experience of Incorporating Clinical Pharmacy into Hospital Quality Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁建强; 朱军; 祁小乐; 程晶晶

    2013-01-01

    目的:探索将临床药学纳入医院综合质量目标责任管理(简称“质控”)体系的工作模式.方法:介绍我院的“质控”体系及将临床药学纳入“质控”体系的方法,并分析从2012年初起实践半年后的效果,总结体会.结果:我院“质控”体系包括组织机构及管理制度、考评结果汇总分析及奖惩三部分;我院将临床药师合理化建议评价管理、临床药师参与科室会诊及意见、医院药品不良反应监测和报告制度、抗菌药物合理应用情况纳入“质控”体系.经过半年实践,全院会诊病例临床药师参与率已达100%,临床药师用药合理化建议被采纳率达90%,5名临床药师2012年撰写药学专业论文20篇.结论:临床药师自身综合素质的提高是临床药学开展的基础,恰当合理的行政干预方式是临床药学发展的保障,将临床药学纳入医院“质控”体系可有力推动临床药学规范、快速地发展.%OBJECTIVE:To explore a new work mode of incorporating clinical pharmacy into hospital comprehensive quality objective responsibility management (called quality control in short) system. METHODS: The quality control system of our hospital was introduced, as well as the method of incorporating clinical pharmacy into quality control system. Experience and practice effect of the system were analyzed and summarized after half year of practice since early 2012. RESULTS: The quality control system of our hospital included 3 parts: i.e. organization and institution, summary and analysis of evaluation results, encouragements and penalties. Quality control system of our hospital included reasonable suggestion and evaluation management, participation of clinical pharmacist in consultation of department, ADR monitoring and reporting system and rational use of antibiotics. After half year, the ratio of clinical pharmacists attending consultations reached 100%. The ratio of clinical pharmacists' reasonable

  12. Impact of utilizing pharmacy students as workforce for Hawai'i Asthma Friendly Pharmacy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Carolyn S; Nett, Blythe; Kishaba, Gregg; Gomez, Lara

    2015-02-01

    A partnership was formed between the University of Hawai'i at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) and the Department of Health to carry out the Hawai'i Asthma Friendly Pharmacy Project (HAFPP), which utilizes pharmacy students as a workforce to administer Asthma Control Tests™ (ACT), and provide Asthma Action Plans (AAP) and inhaler technique education. Evaluation of data from a pilot project in 2008 with first and second year students prompted more intensive training in therapeutics, inhaler medication training, and communication techniques. Data collection began when two classes of students were first and second year students and continued until the students became fourth year students in their advanced experiential ambulatory care clinic and retail community pharmacy rotations. Patients seen included pediatric (32%) and adult (68%) aged individuals. Hawai'i County was the most common geographic site (50%) and most sites were retail pharmacies (72%). Administered ACT surveys (N=96) yielded a mean score of 19.64 (SD +/-3.89). In addition, 12% of patients had received previous ACT, and 47% had previous AAPs. Approximately 83% of patients received an additional intervention of AAP and inhaler education with 73% of these patients able to demonstrate back proper inhaler technique. Project challenges included timing of student training, revising curriculum and logistics of scheduling students to ensure consistent access to patients.

  13. Analysis of the Marketing Mix of a Chosen Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Trnka, Štěpán

    2011-01-01

    This Bachelor's Thesis studies application of marketing to a pharmacy in a small to medium sized town. The theoretical part addresses marketing elements that are relevant for this field of entrepreneurship. I also add the specifics of marketing in the field of medical care. The analysis deals mainly with marketing mix in a traditional sense and competiton in the area. The Theoretical part also includes specifics of operation of a pharmacy. The Practical part contains basic information about t...

  14. Pharmacy Leader’s Role in Hospital Emergency Preparedness Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Christopher,; Daniel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The Director’s Forum column is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. Environmental disasters and terrorist attacks demonstrate that it is imperative for both a hospital and community to have an emergency preparedness plan. The goal of this article is to provide health-system pharmacy leaders with a practical approach in developing an emergency operations plan (EOP) that can be activated in the event of a disaster. Pharmac...

  15. Providing a navigable route for acute medicine nurses to advance their practice: a framework of ascending levels of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Deutsch, Liz; Christian, Jan; Setchfield, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This article conveys concerns raised by delegates at the International SAM Conference (Manchester, 2015) regarding how to advance nursing practice in acute medicine. It endeavors to capture the essence of 'how to advance practice' and 'how to integrate advanced practice' within the workforce structures of an acute medicine unit (AMU). It addresses the production of tacit knowledge and the recognition and integration of this to developing the nursing workforce. The current context of NHS efficiencies and recruitment issues emphasize the value of retaining tacit knowledge. Uniquely, this article offers an early conceptual framework through which levels of advancement and potential transition points to advance nursing practice in acute medicine are articulated. Determining how to advance requires identification of prior accomplishments such as, tacit knowledge, experiential learning, CPD, specialist courses and management experience. This requires nurses to make judicious decisions to advance their practice and the distinction between 'amassing experience' and 'career progression'. It aims to stimulate thinking around the practicalities of advancement, the value of tacit knowledge and potential realization through the framework trajectory. PMID:27441313

  16. 北京大学药学院研究生生涯辅导精致化工作研究及思考%Practice of and suggestion on refined career guidance for pharmacy graduate students in Peking University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈欣; 崔博华; 张红梅

    2013-01-01

    Based on theories of career guidance and refined management,this paper introduced the investigation and practice of refined career planning and guidance for pharmacy graduate students in Peking University,and puts forward some ideas to improve the career planning and guidance in the future.%本文以生涯辅导和精细化管理理论为基础,以北京大学药学院为例,介绍了学院研究生生涯辅导精致化工作的研究和实践,提出了进一步完善科研型研究生生涯辅导精致化工作的建议.

  17. [Evolution of the hospital pharmacies in public and private hospitals in the cancer network in Lorraine: Oncolor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, I; Paulus, C; Vigneron, J; Watelet, M; Veyrier, B; Bichet, F; Bideaux, S; Bey, P

    2001-04-01

    With the objective of improvement of quality in oncology, an assessment of chemotherapy practice in hospital pharmacies in public and private hospitals was carried out by the regional committee of oncology in Lorraine. The 36 hospitals reporting using chemotherapy, had varied practices. The results of this survey lead to the elaboration of guideline for hospital pharmacies in the oncology regional network Oncolor. This paper describes the different aspects of the hospital pharmacies in public and private hospitals included in the network Oncolor from 1996 to 2000. In 1996, 9 hospital pharmacies had centralized preparation for chemotherapy, whereas at the end of 2000, 26 pharmacies on 28 will fulfill the guidelines. PMID:11371380

  18. Consumer views of community pharmacy services in Bangalore city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakash G

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The opinion about pharmacy services was studied using an instrument which measured satisfaction with pharmacy services. The main focus of the instrument was to assess patients’ opinion and expectation of the present pharmacy services. Method: The instrument contained 20 items, which were grouped based on their similarity into eight dimensions, namely, General satisfaction, Interpersonal Skill, Evaluation, Gathering non-medical information, Trust, Helping Patients, Explanation, and Finance. Chance random sampling was done and the participants were the general public above the age of 18 years. The main outcome measure was to study participants’ opinion regarding the current and desired pharmacy services. Descriptive statistics are presented for the satisfaction dimension score. The level of satisfaction with the different dimensions was compared across the different demographic characteristics.Result: The study results revealed significant difference in the General satisfaction and Interpersonal skill amongst the gender. Significant difference was seen in the Helping patients, Evaluation and Explanation skill among the various age groups. Education background showed significant difference in evaluation, Gathering-non-medical information, Helping patients and Explanation skills of the pharmacist. There was an overall satisfaction dimension score of 56.83% in the current practice and 68.83% in the desired practice. Conclusion: Awareness about pharmacy service continuing education programme for practicing pharmacist will heighten the pharmacy profession in our country.

  19. The WHO UNESCO FIP Pharmacy Education Taskforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouse Mike

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmacists' roles are evolving from that of compounders and dispensers of medicines to that of experts on medicines within multidisciplinary health care teams. In the developing country context, the pharmacy is often the most accessible or even the sole point of access to health care advice and services. Because of their knowledge of medicines and clinical therapeutics, pharmacists are suitably placed for task shifting in health care and could be further trained to undertake functions such as clinical management and laboratory diagnostics. Indeed, pharmacists have been shown to be willing, competent, and cost-effective providers of what the professional literature calls "pharmaceutical care interventions"; however, internationally, there is an underuse of pharmacists for patient care and public health efforts. A coordinated and multifaceted effort to advance workforce planning, training and education is needed in order to prepare an adequate number of well-trained pharmacists for such roles. Acknowledging that health care needs can vary across geography and culture, an international group of key stakeholders in pharmacy education and global health has reached unanimous agreement that pharmacy education must be quality-driven and directed towards societal health care needs, the services required to meet those needs, the competences necessary to provide these services and the education needed to ensure those competences. Using that framework, this commentary describes the Pharmacy Education Taskforce of the World Health Organization, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the International Pharmaceutical Federation Global Pharmacy and the Education Action Plan 2008–2010, including the foundation, domains, objectives and outcome measures, and includes several examples of current activities within this scope.

  20. Clinical risk management in community pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Buurma, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, several studies are presented providing information about frequency, nature and determinants of drug therapy related problems as they occur in daily pharmaceutical practice, including unavailability, drug-drug interactions and heavy use of psychotropic medicines. These studies especially focused on the pharmacist and his contribution and quality to the 'solution' of these problems. - In 2001 Dutch community pharmacies still compound more than 13,000 medicines per day (2.3% of ...

  1. Providing nuclear pharmacy education via the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -based learning. Almost 80% of students thought that the program made a significant impact on their understanding of radiopharmacy practice. Conclusion: Nuclear pharmacy education is being delivered asynchronously to students via the Internet without the additional expense and inconvenience of travel. Student evaluations and test performance reveal a positive learning environment

  2. Impact of clinical pharmacy services on renal transplant recipients’ adherence and outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Marie A Chisholm-Burns1, Christina A Spivey1, Charlene Garrett2, Herbert McGinty2, Laura L Mulloy31Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tuscon, AZ, USA; 2Medication Access Program (MAP), University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, Athens, GA, USA; 3Section of Nephrology, Hypertension and Transplantation Medicine, Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, Augusta, GA, USAAbstract: The purpose of this article is to provide a description...

  3. "Pharmacy counselling": a study of the pharmacist/patient encounter using conversation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pilnick, Alison

    1997-01-01

    Pharmacy as a profession is changing rapidly in the UK. Over recent years, the increased utilization of ready-prepared drugs has led to a decline in the need for the traditional skills of formulation, while computerization has resulted in a situation where much of the routine dispensing work can be undertaken by less qualified personnel. The decline in the traditional aspects of pharmacy has been matched by the emergence of a much greater advisory role. Pharmacy practice researchers have been...

  4. Effectiveness of E-learning in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Sandra M; Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-05-15

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

  5. Advances in computer technology: impact on the practice of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth-Vasselli, B; Singh, K; Farnsworth, P N

    1995-01-01

    Advances in computer technology provide a wide range of applications which are revolutionizing the practice of medicine. The development of new software for the office creates a web of communication among physicians, staff members, health care facilities and associated agencies. This provides the physician with the prospect of a paperless office. At the other end of the spectrum, the development of 3D work stations and software based on computational chemistry permits visualization of protein molecules involved in disease. Computer assisted molecular modeling has been used to construct working 3D models of lens alpha-crystallin. The 3D structure of alpha-crystallin is basic to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lens fiber cell maturation, stabilization of the inner nuclear region, the maintenance of lens transparency and cataractogenesis. The major component of the high molecular weight aggregates that occur during cataractogenesis is alpha-crystallin subunits. Subunits of alpha-crystallin occur in other tissues of the body. In the central nervous system accumulation of these subunits in the form of dense inclusion bodies occurs in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis and toxoplasmosis (Iwaki, Wisniewski et al., 1992), as well as neoplasms of astrocyte origin (Iwaki, Iwaki, et al., 1991). Also cardiac ischemia is associated with an increased alpha B synthesis (Chiesi, Longoni et al., 1990). On a more global level, the molecular structure of alpha-crystallin may provide information pertaining to the function of small heat shock proteins, hsp, in maintaining cell stability under the stress of disease.

  6. Exploring Knowledge, Attitudes and Abuse Concerning Doping in Sport among Syrian Pharmacy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen El-Hammadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess pharmacy students’ knowledge about doping substances used in sport, explore their attitudes toward doping and investigate their misuse of doping drugs. A questionnaire was developed and employed to collect data from bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm students at the International University for Science and Technology (IUST. Two-hundred and eighty students participated in this self-administrated, paper-based survey. Around 90% of the students did not appear to know that narcotics, β-blockers and diuretics were used in sport as doping agents. Additionally, proportions between 60% and 80% considered vitamins, energy drinks and amino acids as substances that possess performance-enhancing effects. The main reason for doping, based on students’ response, was to improve muscular body appearance. The vast majority of students agreed that pharmacists should play a major role in promoting awareness about risks of doping. While students showed negative attitudes toward doping, approximately 15% of them, primarily males, had already tried a doping drug or might do so in the future. More than 60% of the students believed that sports-mates and friends are the most influential in encouraging them to take a doping agent. The study highlights the need to provide pharmacy students with advanced theoretical background and practical training concerning doping. This can be achieved by adopting simple, but essential, changes to the current curricula.

  7. Motivational Orientations: Evaluation of the Education Participation Scale in a Nontraditional Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garst, William C.; Ried, L. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated the Education Participation Scale (EPS) in determining motivational orientations of nontraditional doctor of pharmacy students (n=17) compared to continuing education pharmacists (n=83). Nontraditional pharmacy students were significantly different from the continuing education pharmacists on the "professional advancement" and…

  8. Advances in endodontics: Potential applications in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Kishen; Peters, Ove A.; Matthias Zehnder; Anibal R Diogenes; Nair, Madhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary endodontics has seen an unprecedented advance in technology and materials. This article aimed to review some of the challenges and advances in the following sections: (1) endodontic imaging, (2) root canal preparation, (3) root canal disinfection, (4) root canal filling, and (4) regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Jointly, these advances are aimed at improving the state of the art and science of root canal treatment.

  9. Implementation of Advanced Access in a Family Medicine Residency Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ann; Wiser, Eric; Barclay, Emily; Aiello, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Several models of scheduling have been documented in the literature, including the traditional model, the carve-out model, and the advanced access model. We describe the implementation of the advanced access model in our clinic, which has been very successful. Advanced access has decreased third next available appointments to less than seven days for many of our providers and has increased individual primary care physician continuity for 40% of our providers. Interestingly, we had no gains in patient satisfaction, which is consistent with other previously published studies on advanced access. PMID:26665471

  10. ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process.

  11. Action research methodology in clinical pharmacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2016-01-01

    by establishing partnerships with staff. On the background of the authors' widespread action research (AR)-based experiences, recommendations and comments for how to conduct an AR-study is described, and one of their AR-based studies illustrate the methodology and the research methods used. Methodology AR......Introduction The focus in clinical pharmacy practice is and has for the last 30-35 years been on changing the role of pharmacy staff into service orientation and patient counselling. One way of doing this is by involving staff in change process and as a researcher to take part in the change process...... is defined as an approach to research which is based on a problem-solving relationship between researchers and clients, which aims at both solving a problem and at collaboratively generating new knowledge. Research questions relevant in AR-studies are: what was the working process in this change oriented...

  12. The relevance of political prestudies for implementation studies of cognitive services in community pharmacies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine Marie; Søndergaard, Birthe;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of cognitive services implementation in the pharmacy sector traditionally focus on individual and/or organizational factors to explain why some pharmacies are successful and others are not. The social and political context of the origins of these services is rarely part...... of the analysis. Researchers and practitioners in the field of pharmacy practice research are increasingly being encouraged to take into account the specific political and societal climate which often plays a defining role in the success or failure of cognitive services implementation in community pharmacies...

  13. Challenges to counseling customers at the pharmacy counter - why do they exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2012-01-01

    Challenges to engage pharmacy customers in medicine dialogues at the counter have been identified comprising a new and extended clinical role for pharmacists in the health care system. This article seeks to expand understanding of factors involved in successful interaction at the pharmacy counter...... between customers and pharmacy staff to develop their relationship further. Practical challenges to customer encounters experienced by community pharmacists are discussed using theory from the field of mainly inter-relational communication and particular studies on pharmacy communication. Preconceived...... expectation of customers, the type of question asked by pharmacy staff, and differences in perception of illness and medicines between staff and customers are discussed. Both staff and customer influence the outcome of attempts by pharmacy staff to engage customers in dialogue about their medicine use through...

  14. Individualizing Instruction in Pharmacy Jurisprudence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, William N.

    1978-01-01

    Students at Creighton University's School of Pharmacy were offered the option of taking a pharmacy jurisprudence course by a self-taught, self-paced mode or by the traditional lecture mode. Comparasions were made of students in each group. Topics of the learning module and NABPLEX propositions for examining competency are included. (SW)

  15. Course experiences, satisfaction and career intent of final year pre-registration Australian pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Australia, the profession of pharmacy has undergone many changes to adapt to the needs of the community. In recent years, concerns have been raised with evidence emerging of workforce saturation in traditional pharmacy practice sectors. It is not known how current final year pharmacy students’ perceive the different pharmacy career paths in this changing environment. Hence investigating students’ current experiences with their pharmacy course, interaction with the profession and developing an understanding of their career intentions would be an important step, as these students would make up a large proportion of future pharmacy workforce Objective: The objective of this study was thus to investigate final year students’ career perspectives and the reasons for choosing pharmacy, satisfaction with this choice of pharmacy as a tertiary course and a possible future career, factors affecting satisfaction and intention of future career paths. Methods: A quantitative cross sectional survey of final year students from 3 Australian universities followed by a qualitative semi-structured interview of a convenience sample of final year students from the University of Sydney. Results: ‘Interest in health and medicine’ was the most important reason for choosing pharmacy (n=238. The majority of students were ‘somewhat satisfied’ with the choice of pharmacy (35.7% as a course and possible future career. Positive associations were found between satisfaction and reasons for joining pharmacy such as ‘felt pharmacy is a good profession’ (p=0.003 while negative associations included ‘joined pharmacy as a gateway to medicine or dentistry’ (p=0.001. Quantitate and qualitative results showed the most frequent perception of community pharmacy was ‘changing’ while hospital and pharmaceutical industry was described as ‘competitive’ and ‘research’ respectively. The highest career intention was community followed by hospital

  16. Branding a college of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2012-11-12

    In a possible future of supply-demand imbalance in pharmacy education, a brand that positively differentiates a college or school of pharmacy from its competitors may be the key to its survival. The nominal group technique, a structured group problem-solving and decision-making process, was used during a faculty retreat to identify and agree on the core qualities that define the brand image of Midwestern University's College of Pharmacy in Glendale, AZ. Results from the retreat were provided to the faculty and students, who then proposed 168 mottos that embodied these qualities. Mottos were voted on by faculty members and pharmacy students. The highest ranked 24 choices were submitted to the faculty, who then selected the top 10 finalists. A final vote by students was used to select the winning motto. The methods described here may be useful to other colleges and schools of pharmacy that want to better define their own brand image and strengthen their organizational culture.

  17. Development of an instrument to assess the impact of an enhanced experiential model on pharmacy students' learning opportunities, skills and attitudes: A retrospective comparative-experimentalist study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins John B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacy schools across North America have been charged to ensure their students are adequately skilled in the principles and practices of pharmaceutical care. Despite this mandate, a large percentage of students experience insufficient opportunities to practice the activities, tasks and processes essential to pharmaceutical care. The objective of this retrospective study of pharmacy students was to: (1 as "proof of concept", test the overall educational impact of an enhanced advanced pharmacy practice experiential (APPE model on student competencies; (2 develop an instrument to measure students' and preceptors' experiences; and (3 assess the psychometric properties of the instrument. Methods A comparative-experimental design, using student and preceptor surveys, was used to evaluate the impact of the enhanced community-based APPE over the traditional APPE model. The study was grounded in a 5-stage learning model: (1 an enhanced learning climate leads to (2 better utilization of learning opportunities, including (3 more frequent student/patient consultation, then to (4 improved skills acquisition, thence to (5 more favorable attitudes toward pharmaceutical care practice. The intervention included a one-day preceptor workshop, a comprehensive on-site student orientation and extending the experience from two four-week experiences in different pharmacies to one eight-week in one pharmacy. Results The 35 student and 38 preceptor survey results favored the enhanced model; with students conducting many more patient consultations and reporting greater skills improvement. In addition, the student self-assessment suggested changes in attitudes favoring pharmaceutical care principles. Psychometric testing showed the instrument to be sensitive, valid and reliable in ascertaining differences between the enhanced and traditional arms. Conclusion The enhanced experiential model positively affects learning opportunities and competency

  18. Self-Reported Digital Literacy of the Pharmacy Workforce in North East Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie MacLure

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In their day-to-day practice, pharmacists, graduate (pre-registration pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, dispensing assistants and medicines counter assistants use widely available office, retail and management information systems alongside dedicated pharmacy management and electronic health (ehealth applications. The ability of pharmacy staff to use these applications at home and at work, also known as digital literacy or digital competence or e-skills, depends on personal experience and related education and training. The aim of this research was to gain insight into the self-reported digital literacy of the pharmacy workforce in the North East of Scotland. A purposive case sample survey was conducted across NHS Grampian in the NE of Scotland. Data collection was based on five items: sex, age band, role, pharmacy experience plus a final question about self-reported digital literacy. The study was conducted between August 2012 and March 2013 in 17 community and two hospital pharmacies. With few exceptions, pharmacy staff perceived their own digital literacy to be at a basic level. Secondary outcome measures of role, age, gender and work experience were not found to be clear determinants of digital literacy. Pharmacy staff need to be more digitally literate to harness technologies in pharmacy practice more effectively and efficiently.

  19. Pharmacy students' attitudes toward pharmaceutical care in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hajj MS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maguy Saffouh El Hajj,1 Ayat S Hammad,1 Hebatalla M Afifi2 1College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2National Centre for Cancer Care and Research (NCCCR, Doha, Qatar Objectives: The study objectives were to investigate Qatar pharmacy students’ attitudes toward pharmaceutical care (PC, to identify the factors that influence their attitudes, and to recognize their perceived barriers for PC provision. Methods: A cross-sectional and online survey of Qatar pharmacy students was conducted. Results: Over 4 weeks, 46 surveys were submitted (88% response rate. All respondents agreed that the pharmacist’s primary responsibility is to prevent and resolve medication therapy problems. Most respondents believed that PC provision is professionally rewarding and that all pharmacists should provide PC (93% and 91% of respondents, respectively. Highly perceived barriers for PC provision included lack of access to patient information (76%, inadequate drug information sources (55%, and time constraints (53%. Professional year and practical experience duration were inversely significantly associated with four and five statements, respectively, out of the 13 Standard Pharmaceutical Care Attitudes Survey statements, including the statements related to the value of PC, and its benefit in improving patient health and pharmacy practitioners’ careers. Conclusion: Qatar pharmacy students had positive attitudes toward PC. Efforts should be exerted to overcome their perceived barriers. Keywords: Qatar, pharmaceutical care, pharmacy, student

  20. Identifying components of advanced-level clinical nutrition practice: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The dietetics profession lacks a comprehensive definition of advanced-level practice. Using a three-round Delphi study with mailed surveys, expert consensus on four dimensions of advanced-level practice that define advanced practice registered dietitians (RDs) in clinical nutrition was explored. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDs who met advanced-level practice criteria. In round 1, experts rated the essentiality of statements on a 7-point ordinal scale and generated open-ended practice activity statements regarding the following four dimensions of advanced-level practice: professional knowledge, abilities and skills, approaches to practice, roles and relationships, and practice behaviors. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 was neutral, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. In rounds 2 and 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus by evaluating their previous responses, group median rating, and comments. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to a statement was ≤2.0. Eighty-five experts enrolled (72.6%); 76 (89.4%) completed all rounds. In total, 233 statements were rated, with 100% achieving consensus; 211 (90.6%) were essential to advanced practice RD clinical practice. Having a master's degree; completing an advanced practice residency; research coursework; and advanced continuing education were essential, as were having 8 years of experience; clinical nutrition knowledge/expertise; specialization; participation in research activities; and skills in technology and communication. Highly essential approaches to practice were systematic yet adaptable and used critical thinking and intuition and highly essential values encompassed professional growth and service to patients. Roles emphasized patient care and leadership. Essential practice activities within the nutrition care process included provision of complex patient-centered nutrition care using application of advanced knowledge/expertise and

  1. Identifying components of advanced-level clinical nutrition practice: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The dietetics profession lacks a comprehensive definition of advanced-level practice. Using a three-round Delphi study with mailed surveys, expert consensus on four dimensions of advanced-level practice that define advanced practice registered dietitians (RDs) in clinical nutrition was explored. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDs who met advanced-level practice criteria. In round 1, experts rated the essentiality of statements on a 7-point ordinal scale and generated open-ended practice activity statements regarding the following four dimensions of advanced-level practice: professional knowledge, abilities and skills, approaches to practice, roles and relationships, and practice behaviors. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 was neutral, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. In rounds 2 and 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus by evaluating their previous responses, group median rating, and comments. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to a statement was ≤2.0. Eighty-five experts enrolled (72.6%); 76 (89.4%) completed all rounds. In total, 233 statements were rated, with 100% achieving consensus; 211 (90.6%) were essential to advanced practice RD clinical practice. Having a master's degree; completing an advanced practice residency; research coursework; and advanced continuing education were essential, as were having 8 years of experience; clinical nutrition knowledge/expertise; specialization; participation in research activities; and skills in technology and communication. Highly essential approaches to practice were systematic yet adaptable and used critical thinking and intuition and highly essential values encompassed professional growth and service to patients. Roles emphasized patient care and leadership. Essential practice activities within the nutrition care process included provision of complex patient-centered nutrition care using application of advanced knowledge/expertise and

  2. 从校外短期科研训练谈药学本科生实践教学改革%The Exploration of Practice Teaching Reform of Pharmacy Undergraduates from the Point of Short-term off-campus Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高建青; 韩峰; 朱卡林; 曹晶晶; 陈小冰; 杨波

    2015-01-01

    In order to highlight the practical teaching link in pharmacy student training program ,it is nec-essary to enhance the diversification of practical education , and train the high-end talents that meet the industry demand .By widening the channels of practical education , our college carried out the reform of short-term off-campus research practice for pharmacy undergraduates ,providing an example of pharmacy undergraduates teaching reform for other research universities .%为凸显药学专业培养方案中的实践教学环节,需要加强药学本科生多元化实践教育,以培养适应行业需求的高端药学人才. 通过多方拓宽实践渠道,学院开展了药学本科生校外科研实践教学改革,为研究型大学的药学专业本科生教学改革提供一条可供借鉴的思路.

  3. 21 CFR 1304.05 - Records of authorized central fill pharmacies and retail pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... retail pharmacies. 1304.05 Section 1304.05 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... fill pharmacies and retail pharmacies. (a) Every retail pharmacy that utilizes the services of a... number, that are authorized to fill prescriptions on its behalf. The retail pharmacy must also verify...

  4. Succession planning in US pharmacy schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Amburgh, Jenny; Surratt, Christopher K; Green, James S; Gallucci, Randle M; Colbert, James; Zatopek, Shara L; Blouin, Robert A

    2010-06-15

    The deans, associate and assistant deans, and department chairs of a college or school of pharmacy retain historic memories of the institution and share the responsibility for day-to-day operation, sustainability, and future planning. Between the anticipated retirement of baby boomers who are senior administrative faculty members and the steady increase in number of colleges and schools of pharmacy, the academy is facing a shortage of qualified successors. Succession planning involves planning for the effective transition of personnel in leadership positions within an organization. This paper describes the subject of succession planning at a sample population of AACP institutions by obtaining perspectives on the subject from the deans of these institutions via standardized interview instruments. The instruments were utilized with 15 deans; all interview data were blinded and analyzed using analyst triangulation. The majority of deans responded that some level of succession planning was desirable and even necessary; however, none claimed to have a formal succession planning structure in place at his or her home institution. Although widely accepted and well-recognized in the corporate and military sectors, succession planning within pharmacy schools and colleges is neither universally documented nor implemented. Differences exist within the administrative structure of these non-academic and academic institutions that may preclude a uniform succession planning format. While the evidence presented suggests that succession planning is needed within the academy, a concerted effort must be made towards implementing its practice.

  5. Analysis of the Practice of Pharmacy Service Quality of Clinical Promotion%临床提升西药房药学服务质量的实践分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊龙

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical analysis pharmacy pharmacy practiceto enhance the quality of service.Methods In our hospital from June 2011 to June 2012 in the west pharmacy issues,divided into three groups. Otherwise our hospitalfrom July 2012 to July 2013 in the West pharmacy issues, divided into two groups. Depending on the implementation method,the control group using traditional pharmacy management system,the observation group to raise the overal quality of service pharmacy pharmacy. Two pharmaceutical care in our hospital pharmacy were analysed.Results Pharmacy error event rate and patient satisfaction in the observation group were significantly better than the control group,P< 0.05. The difference was statisticaly significant. Conclusion For a comprehensive upgrade pharmacy pharmacy service quality,greatly reducing the incidence of pharmacy error events, significantly improved patient satisfaction.%目的:探讨临床提升西药房药学服务质量的实践分析。方法选取我院2011年6月~2012年6月的西药房工作事宜,为对照组;另行选取我院2012年7月~2013年7月的西药房工作事宜,为观察组。依据不同的实施方法,对照组采用传统西药房管理制度,观察组采用全面提升西药房药学服务质量,对比分析本院两组西药房药学服务的情况。结果观察组的西药房差错事件发生率和患者满意度优于对照组,P<0.05,差异具有统计学意义。结论对于西药房进行全面提升药学服务质量,降低了西药房差错事件的发生率,提高了患者的满意度。

  6. The Effect of Advanced Management Accounting Practices on the Competitive Strategies and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Yücel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on a sample of 300 managers from the production industry of West Marmara Region. The goal of this study is to examine the interaction among advanced management accounting practices, competitive strategies and company performance. As a result of study, it is found that advanced accounting management practices have a positive effect on the company performance and competitive strategies. In addition, competitive strategies have an effect on the company performance positively. Furthermore, there is a positive and significant relation between long-term strategy based on management accounting practices and non-financial company performance and between activity based on management accounting practices and financial performance.

  7. [Ancient history of Indian pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Jun; Natsume, Yohko

    2010-01-01

    The study of the ancient history of Indian medicine has recently been revived due to the publication of polyglot translations. However, little is known of ancient Indian pharmacy. Archaeological evidence suggests the Indus people lived a settled life approximately in 2500 B.C. Their cities were enjoying the cleanest and most hygienic daily life with elaborate civic sanitation systems. The whole conception shows a remarkable concern for health. Then, the early Aryans invaded India about 1500 B.C. and the Vedic age started. The Rgveda texts contain the hymns for Soma and those for herbs. The term Ayurveda (i.e., science of life) is found in some old versions of both Ramāyana and Mahābhārata and in the Atharvaveda. Suśruta had the credit of making a breakthrough in the field of surgery. The Ayurveda, a work on internal medicine, gives the following transmission of sages: Brahmā-->Daksa-->Prajāpati-->Aśivinau-->Indra-->Caraka. On the other hand, the Suśruta-samhitā, which deals mainly with surgical medicine, explains it as follows; Indra-->Dhanvantari-->Suśruta Both Caraka and Suśruta were medical doctors as well as pharmacists, so they studied more than 1000 herbs thoroughly. The Ayurveda had been used by his devotees for medical purposes. It eventually spread over Asia with the advanced evolution of Buddhism.

  8. [Ancient history of Indian pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Jun; Natsume, Yohko

    2010-01-01

    The study of the ancient history of Indian medicine has recently been revived due to the publication of polyglot translations. However, little is known of ancient Indian pharmacy. Archaeological evidence suggests the Indus people lived a settled life approximately in 2500 B.C. Their cities were enjoying the cleanest and most hygienic daily life with elaborate civic sanitation systems. The whole conception shows a remarkable concern for health. Then, the early Aryans invaded India about 1500 B.C. and the Vedic age started. The Rgveda texts contain the hymns for Soma and those for herbs. The term Ayurveda (i.e., science of life) is found in some old versions of both Ramāyana and Mahābhārata and in the Atharvaveda. Suśruta had the credit of making a breakthrough in the field of surgery. The Ayurveda, a work on internal medicine, gives the following transmission of sages: Brahmā-->Daksa-->Prajāpati-->Aśivinau-->Indra-->Caraka. On the other hand, the Suśruta-samhitā, which deals mainly with surgical medicine, explains it as follows; Indra-->Dhanvantari-->Suśruta Both Caraka and Suśruta were medical doctors as well as pharmacists, so they studied more than 1000 herbs thoroughly. The Ayurveda had been used by his devotees for medical purposes. It eventually spread over Asia with the advanced evolution of Buddhism. PMID:21032887

  9. Collaborative learning through advanced Web2.0 practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos;

    2010-01-01

    Latest advances in ICT have started impacting also the field of education and training. Social computing and Web2.0 technologies have brought vigorous opportunities for learning and have realised a shift of the web‟s role in learning from an information carrier to a facilitator for the creation...

  10. Position Paper: General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry Programs: Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Robert E.

    1983-01-01

    The currently used internal and external program evaluation processes for general practice residency and advanced education in general dentistry programs are discussed, noting accrediting and evaluation groups, criteria, and designs. A generalized evaluation plan is proposed. (MSE)

  11. Pharmacy Students' Self-Identified Interests in a Hospital Pharmacy Internship Course in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ranjbar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After revision of pharmacy curriculum by, Iranian Health and Education Ministry reviewed in 2005, it was decided that pharmacy students need extra internship courses such as hospital internship course. Hospital internship course could provide students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and master the skills required for current pharmacy practices in community and hospital setting. The aim of this study was to identify and analyze pharmacy students’ experiences during hospital internship. Methods: Each student attended in 3 wards and provided a logbook for each ward. Students were asked to document at least one topic interesting for them on each day. The collected information was divided into sections and analyzed using SPSS ver 14. Results: Seventeen students enrolled in the course. Endocrinology and nephrology wards had the highest and neurology the lowest number of attended students. Seven hundred and one reported learning subjects were divided into 24 areas. The highest numbers of reported topics were the drugs indications, adverse drug reactions and diagnosis of diseases while the lowest number was pretreatment laboratory tests, pharmacoeconomy, counseling medical staffs and off label use of medications. Gastroenterology and endocrinology wards with 210 reports had the highest and neurology ward with 12 had the lowest number of reports. Conclusion: Completing the logbooks was an encouragement for students to seek and document and learn new topics and also a major feature of the clinical assessment scheme of the course. The majority of the reported topics were learning objectives but not the interventional ones. The present study showed us some areas of pharmacy education which need further attention.

  12. Use of clinical practice as a motivating tool of radioprotection teaching and radiopharmacology in early semesters of pharmacy course; Uso da pratica clinica como ferramenta motivadora de ensino de radioprotecao e radiofarmacologia em semestres iniciais em cursos de farmacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrighetto, Daniela; Lüdke, Everton, E-mail: daniela.andrighetto@hotmail.com, E-mail: evertonludke@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (CCNE/DEFIS/UFSM), RS (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica

    2014-07-01

    The research teaching methods aimed at the success of the higher education student in pharmacology and medicine courses in technical expertise in the fields of radiological protection, radiopharmacology and interventional radiology is extremely important in view of the progress of these sectors. The objective of this work is to propose a methodological sequence of teaching work with first-year students of pharmacy and medicine courses within a biophysical discipline where the integrated knowledge to clinical practice can be used for this purpose. The methodology was to assess individual learning of a group of N = 49 students of the first half in the age group of 17-19 years through conceptual acquisition by the traditional method of 'blackboard and chalk' and developed method that includes four pedagogical moments focused on the area health. An analysis of the evaluation student performance through Variance Analysis of a pathway showed improved scores with respect to the performance of application issues of knowledge concerning radiation protection and biological mechanisms of radiation with respect to the method of 'blackboard and chalk' with p < 0.05. Therefore, work with students with respect to the content in the form of six steps of clinical interest are a promising technique for radiation protection education in the early grades of college courses with experimental effectiveness.

  13. 人文管理在静脉用药调配中心管理中的探索和实践%Exploration and practice of humanistic management in pharmacy intravenous admixture service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘荣; 丁仕华; 董平

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the practical effectiveness of humanistic management in pharmacy intravenous admixture service (PIVAS). Methods: Through the access of enhancing brand awareness, intensifying system management, adhering to full-staff training, perfecting incentive innovation mechanism and creating a safe and comfortable working environment, humanistic management was integrated into the administration of PIVAS from the levels of personal management and team management. Results: Through humanistic management, the working enthusiasm and management compliance in the PIVAS staff obviously increased, work error rate decreased, and satisfaction of work in the clinical department was greatly improved. Conclusion: Humanistic management helps to promote the administration of PIVAS.%目的:探讨人文管理在静脉药物配置中心(PIVAS)管理中的实践效果.方法:从个人管理和团队管理两个层面,通过树立品牌意识,强化制度管理,坚持全员培训,健全创新激励机制,营造安全、舒适的工作环境等方式,将人文管理融入PIVAS管理中.结果:通过实施人文管理,PIVAS员工的工作积极性和管理依从性明显提高,工作差错率下降,临床科室满意度上升.结论:人文管理有助于提高PIVAS的管理水平.

  14. The Effect of Advanced Management Accounting Practices on the Competitive Strategies and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi Yücel; Kayhan Ahmetoğulları

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on a sample of 300 managers from the production industry of West Marmara Region. The goal of this study is to examine the interaction among advanced management accounting practices, competitive strategies and company performance. As a result of study, it is found that advanced accounting management practices have a positive effect on the company performance and competitive strategies. In addition, competitive strategies have an effect on the company performance positively....

  15. Restrictions to Pharmacy Ownership and Vertical Integration in Estonia—Perception of Different Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Gross

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: From 2020, the ownership of community pharmacies in Estonia will be limited to the pharmacy profession, and the vertical integration of wholesale companies and community pharmacies will not be allowed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of different stakeholders in primary healthcare toward the new regulations of the community pharmacy sector in Estonia. Methods: A qualitative electronic survey was distributed to the main stakeholders in primary healthcare and higher education institutions providing pharmacy education (n = 40 in May 2015. For data analysis, the systematic text condensation method was used. Results: The study participants described two opposing positions regarding the development of community pharmacies in the future. Reform supporters emphasized increased professional independence and more healthcare-oriented operation of community pharmacies. Reform opponents argued against these ideas as community pharmacists do not have sufficient practical experience and finances to ensure sustainable development of the community pharmacy sector in Estonia. Conclusion: Based on the current perception of all respondents, the future operation of the community pharmacy sector in Estonia is unclear and there is urgent need for implementation criteria for the new regulations.

  16. What is known about community pharmacy supply of naloxone? A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Van Hout, Marie Claire

    2016-06-01

    There is growing evidence that expanded supply of take-home naloxone to prevent opioid overdose deaths is needed. Potential routes for expansion of naloxone provision include through community pharmacies. The aim of this scoping review is to establish what is known about community pharmacy supply of naloxone, in light of unique challenges and opportunities present in pharmacy settings. A scoping review methodology was employed using the six stage iterative process advocated by Arksey and O'Malley (2005) and Levac et al. (2010). Searches used key words and terms such as 'naloxone'; 'overdose prevention/drug overdose/opiate overdose'; 'community/retail pharmacy'; 'pharmacist/pharmacy/community pharmacy/pharmaceutical services'; 'professional practice/role'; 'community care'; attitude of health personnel'; 'training/supply/cost'. Appropriate search terms were selected for each database. After initial exploratory searches, comprehensive searches were conducted with Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, Medline in Process, Embase, PsycINFO and CINAHL. Eligibility criteria centered on whether studies broadly described supply of naloxone in community pharmacy or had content relating to community pharmacy supply. The search identified 95 articles, of which 16 were related to pharmacy supply of naloxone. Five themes were presented after initial review of the data and consultation with the project Expert Group, and are; 'Pharmacists Perceptions of Naloxone: Facilitators and Barriers', 'Patient Populations: Identification and Recruitment', 'Supply Systems and Cost', 'Legal Issues', and 'Training of Pharmacists and Community Pharmacy Naloxone Recipients'. Findings from this scoping review suggest that community pharmacy based supply of take-home naloxone warrants the community pharmacy based route for distribution of take home naloxone provision warrants further consideration and development. Existing strengths include a range of established supply models, and

  17. An Assessment of State Board of Pharmacy Legal Documents for Public Health Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Heath; Trent, Shane; Wickizer, Stephen

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To estimate pharmaceutical emergency preparedness of US states and commonwealth territories. Methods. A quantitative content analysis was performed to evaluate board of pharmacy legal documents (ie, statutes, rules, and regulations) for the presence of the 2006 Rules for Public Health Emergencies (RPHE) from the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy's (NABP) Model Pharmacy Practice Act. Results. The median number of state-adopted RPHE was one, which was significantly less than the hypothesized value of four. Rule Two, which recommended policies and procedures for reporting disasters, was adopted significantly more than other RPHE. Ten states incorporated language specific to public health emergency refill dispensing, and among these, only six allowed 30-day refill quantities. Conclusion. Based on the 2006 NABP model rules, it does not appear that states are prepared to expedite an effective pharmaceutical response during a public health emergency. Boards of pharmacy should consider adding the eight RPHE to their state pharmacy practice acts. PMID:27073273

  18. 基于JCI标准开设手术药房管理模式的实践%Practice of Opening Operation Pharmacy Management Mode Based on Joint Commission International Ac-creditation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董红妮; 蒲文; 许晶晶; 滕亮; 王建华

    2015-01-01

    目的:规范手术室药品管理,促进手术用药安全。方法:介绍我院基于JCI标准中药品管理的相关原则建立手术药房的实践,并主要从工作模式和实施效果两方面进行描述。结果:通过明确药师、麻醉医师和联络员的职责和工作流程,形成了我院手术药房的工作模式;设立手术药房后,将手术用药品纳入全院药品统一管理体系中,节约了人力、提高了工作效率;细化了各环节药品的使用管理,提高了药品安全管理水平;加强了药品效期管理;落实了药品不良反应(事件)、用药(潜在)差错收集上报工作。建立的工作模式符合JCI标准中对药品的准备、发放、贮存及不良反应收集的相关规定。结论:手术药房的建立促进了手术药品的规范管理,保障了患者的用药安全性。%OBJECTIVE:To regulate the management of operation drug and promote medication security. METHODS:Based on the relevant principles in the standard of JCI,the practice about establishment of operation pharmacy in our hospital was intro-duced,and it were stated from two aspects which included working mode and effects. RESULTS:The working mode were format-ed by definiting the duties and working flow of pharmacist,anesthetist and liaison man. The establishment of operation pharmacy, which brought operation drugs into the unified management system of our hospital,saved manpower and improved work efficien-cy,refined the management of drugs in all aspects,improved the management of drug safety level,strengthened drug expiration date management,implemented the reporting of adverse drug reactions(event)and collecting of medication(potential)errors. The established mode conformed to the relative standard of JCI including preparation,grant,storage and collection of ADR of drug. CONCLUSIONS:The established drug management of operation pharmacy promotes standardized administration of surgery drug, which

  19. Practice of Opening Operation Pharmacy Management Mode Based on Joint Commission International Ac-creditation%基于JCI标准开设手术药房管理模式的实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董红妮; 蒲文; 许晶晶; 滕亮; 王建华

    2015-01-01

    目的:规范手术室药品管理,促进手术用药安全。方法:介绍我院基于JCI标准中药品管理的相关原则建立手术药房的实践,并主要从工作模式和实施效果两方面进行描述。结果:通过明确药师、麻醉医师和联络员的职责和工作流程,形成了我院手术药房的工作模式;设立手术药房后,将手术用药品纳入全院药品统一管理体系中,节约了人力、提高了工作效率;细化了各环节药品的使用管理,提高了药品安全管理水平;加强了药品效期管理;落实了药品不良反应(事件)、用药(潜在)差错收集上报工作。建立的工作模式符合JCI标准中对药品的准备、发放、贮存及不良反应收集的相关规定。结论:手术药房的建立促进了手术药品的规范管理,保障了患者的用药安全性。%OBJECTIVE:To regulate the management of operation drug and promote medication security. METHODS:Based on the relevant principles in the standard of JCI,the practice about establishment of operation pharmacy in our hospital was intro-duced,and it were stated from two aspects which included working mode and effects. RESULTS:The working mode were format-ed by definiting the duties and working flow of pharmacist,anesthetist and liaison man. The establishment of operation pharmacy, which brought operation drugs into the unified management system of our hospital,saved manpower and improved work efficien-cy,refined the management of drugs in all aspects,improved the management of drug safety level,strengthened drug expiration date management,implemented the reporting of adverse drug reactions(event)and collecting of medication(potential)errors. The established mode conformed to the relative standard of JCI including preparation,grant,storage and collection of ADR of drug. CONCLUSIONS:The established drug management of operation pharmacy promotes standardized administration of surgery drug, which

  20. Assuming a Pharmacy Organization Leadership Position: A Guide for Pharmacy Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Blake; Weber, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Important and influential pharmacy organization leadership positions, such as president, board member, or committee chair, are volunteer positions and require a commitment of personal and professional time. These positions provide excellent opportunities for leadership development, personal promotion, and advancement of the profession. In deciding to assume a leadership position, interested individuals must consider the impact on their personal and professional commitments and relationships, career planning, employer support, current and future department projects, employee support, and personal readiness. This article reviews these factors and also provides an assessment tool that leaders can use to determine their readiness to assume leadership positions. By using an assessment tool, pharmacy leaders can better understand their ability to assume an important and influential leadership position while achieving job and personal goals.

  1. Assuming a Pharmacy Organization Leadership Position: A Guide for Pharmacy Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Blake; Weber, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Important and influential pharmacy organization leadership positions, such as president, board member, or committee chair, are volunteer positions and require a commitment of personal and professional time. These positions provide excellent opportunities for leadership development, personal promotion, and advancement of the profession. In deciding to assume a leadership position, interested individuals must consider the impact on their personal and professional commitments and relationships, career planning, employer support, current and future department projects, employee support, and personal readiness. This article reviews these factors and also provides an assessment tool that leaders can use to determine their readiness to assume leadership positions. By using an assessment tool, pharmacy leaders can better understand their ability to assume an important and influential leadership position while achieving job and personal goals. PMID:27621512

  2. Management of locally advanced breast cancer: Evolution and current practice

    OpenAIRE

    Rustogi Ashish; Budrukkar Ashwini; Dinshaw Ketayun; Jalali Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) accounts for a sizeable number (30-60%) of breast cancer cases and is a common clinical scenario in developing countries. The treatment of LABC has evolved from single modality treatment, consisting of radical mutilating surgery or higher doses of radiotherapy in inoperable disease to multimodality management, which along with the above two included systemic therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has made a tremendous impact on the management of ...

  3. Plato's Pharmacy and Derrida's Drugstore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Chris

    2000-01-01

    In a long essay titled "Plato's Pharmacy, Jacques Derrida attacked Western metaphysics. This article undertakes to defend Western philosophy from Derrida's arguments. It is shown that Derrida's arguments are very unsatisfactory. (Author/VWL)

  4. Special Risks of Pharmacy Compounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serious eye infections in the Miami area. A pharmacy had repackaged the Avastin from single-use vials into multiple single-use syringes, distributing them to multiple eye clinics, and infecting at least 12 patients. Some patients ...

  5. What clinical activities do advanced-practice registered dietitian nutritionists perform? Results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Rebecca A; Byham-Gray, Laura; Touger-Decker, Riva; Passannante, Marian R; Rothpletz Puglia, Pamela; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Activities performed by advanced-practice registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have yet to be clearly elucidated. The study aimed to gain consensus on the practice activities of advanced-practice RDNs who provide direct clinical nutrition care. A three-round Delphi study was conducted. Purposive sampling identified 117 RDN experts working as clinicians and/or managers in direct care settings that met inclusion criteria for advanced-level practice. In Round 1, 85 experts provided open-ended advanced-level practice activities linked to the Nutrition Care Process sections. Using content analysis, the responses were coded into activity statements. In Round 2, experts rated the essentiality of these activities. In Round 3, experts re-rated statements not reaching consensus while viewing their previous rating, the group median, and comments. Median ratings of 1.0 to 3.0 were defined as essential, 4.0 were neither essential nor nonessential, and 5.0 to 7.0 were nonessential. Consensus was reached when the interquartile range of responses to each question was <2.0. Seventy-six (89.4%) experts completed all rounds. From 770 comments, 129 activity statements were generated. All statements reached consensus: 97.7% as essential; 0.8% as nonessential; and 1.5% as neither. Of essential activities, 67.5% were highly essential with limited variability (median=1.0; interquartile range≤2.0). Advanced-practice RDNs' tasks are patient-centered and reflect complex care; involve a comprehensive and discriminating approach; are grounded in advanced knowledge and expertise in clinical nutrition; include use of advanced interviewing, education, and counseling strategies; and require communication with patient, families, and the health care team. The high-level of consensus from experts suggest advanced-level clinical nutrition practice exists and can be defined.

  6. Progress Examinations in Pharmacy Education

    OpenAIRE

    Plaza, Cecilia M.

    2007-01-01

    Interest in the use of the progress examination has grown in the current culture of accountability in higher education. The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education's (ACPE's) Standards 2007 calls for comprehensive, knowledge- and performance-based examinations as part of a school or college of pharmacy's evaluation and assessment of student learning. Progress examinations have been used primarily in medical education. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the litera...

  7. [Gods, women and pharmacy in Greek Mythology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vons, J

    2001-01-01

    The study of Greek Mythology fully justifies Herophilus's phrase: "Medicines are the hands of Gods" (third cent. B.C.). A number of Gods are said to be the inventors of the drugs which are useful to men. Their names are still alive in the scholarly or popular appellations of a great many medicinal herbs. However, insofar as the action of a drug (of a Pharmakon) remains mysterious, one finds it in essentially female practices as well as in medicine. The study of these ancient beliefs, which have survived in spite of the progress of twentieth century science, can develop the history of epistemology of pharmacy by stimulating interdisciplinary research. PMID:11944656

  8. [Gods, women and pharmacy in Greek Mythology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vons, J

    2001-01-01

    The study of Greek Mythology fully justifies Herophilus's phrase: "Medicines are the hands of Gods" (third cent. B.C.). A number of Gods are said to be the inventors of the drugs which are useful to men. Their names are still alive in the scholarly or popular appellations of a great many medicinal herbs. However, insofar as the action of a drug (of a Pharmakon) remains mysterious, one finds it in essentially female practices as well as in medicine. The study of these ancient beliefs, which have survived in spite of the progress of twentieth century science, can develop the history of epistemology of pharmacy by stimulating interdisciplinary research.

  9. Integrating Social Neuroscience and Social Work: Innovations for Advancing Practice-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly C.; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is…

  10. Advancement in Sensing Technology New Developments and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jayasundera, Krishanthi; Fuchs, Anton

    2013-01-01

    The book presents the recent advancements in the area of sensors and sensing technology, specifically in environmental monitoring, structural health monitoring, dielectric, magnetic, electrochemical, ultrasonic, microfluidic, flow, surface acoustic wave, gas, cloud computing and bio-medical.   This book will be useful to a variety of readers, namely, Master and PhD degree students, researchers, practitioners, working on sensors and sensing technology. The book will provide an opportunity of a dedicated and a deep approach in order to improve their knowledge in this specific field.

  11. Advanced hemodynamic monitoring: principles and practice in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaridis, Christos

    2012-02-01

    Advanced hemodynamic monitoring is necessary for many patients with acute brain and/or spinal cord injury. Optimizing cerebral and systemic physiology requires multi-organ system function monitoring. Hemodynamic manipulations are cardinal among interventions to regulate cerebral perfusion pressure and cerebral blood flow. The pulmonary artery catheter is not any more the sole tool available; less invasive and potentially more accurate methodologies have been developed and employed in the operating room and among diverse critically ill populations. These include transpulmonary thermodilution, arterial pressure pulse contour, and waveform analysis and bedside critical care ultrasound. A thorough understanding of hemodynamics and of the available monitoring modalities is an essential skill for the neurointensivist.

  12. Advancing evidence-based practice in primary care physiotherapy : Guideline implementation, clinical practice, and patient preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Research on physiotherapy treatment interventions has increased dramatically in the past 25 years and it is a challenge to transfer research findings into clinical practice, so that patients benefit from effective treatment. Development of clinical practice guidelines is a potentially useful strategy to implement research evidence into practice. However, the impact of guideline implementation in Swedish primary care physiotherapy is unknown. To achieve evidence-based practice (EBP), research ...

  13. Diversification strategies for hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J E; Phillips, D J; Meyer, G E

    1984-09-01

    Several ways used by the pharmacy department of a large university hospital to generate revenue through diversification are described. The department offers its facilities and staff as a resource in training medical service representatives for several pharmaceutical manufacturers, which is projected to provide $85,000 in net income for fiscal year (FY) 1983-84. The pharmacy department also conducts a six-month program for training pharmacy technicians, which yields a small net profit. The pharmacy department actively participates in educational programs such as college courses and clerkships earning extra income. An apothecary-style outpatient pharmacy was set up under a for-profit corporation. Services have been expanded to include the preparation of i.v. solutions that support home care. A durable medical equipment (DME) business is planned. The ambulatory and home-care programs are expected to generate approximately $165,000 in net profit next year. Contract pharmaceutical services are provided to another hospital. The net income generated through diversification in this pharmacy department will exceed $250,000 in FY 1983-84.

  14. Advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners’ ideas and needs for supervision in private practice in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Temane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supervision forms an integral part of psychiatric nursing. The value of clinical supervision has been demonstrated widely in research. Despite efforts made toward advanced psychiatric nursing, supervision seems to be non-existent in this field. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners’ ideas and needs with regard to supervision in private practice in order to contribute to the new efforts made in advanced psychiatric nursing in South Africa. Method: A qualitative, descriptive, exploratory, and contextual design using a phenomenological approach as research method was utilised in this study. A purposive sampling was used. Eight advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice described their ideas and needs for supervision during phenomenological interviews. Tesch’s method of open coding was utilised to analyse data. After data analysis the findings were recontextualised within literature. Results: The data analysis generated the following themes – that the supervisor should have or possess: (a professional competencies, (b personal competencies and (c specific facilitative communication skills. The findings indicated that there was a need for supervision of advanced psychiatric nurse practitioners in private practice in South Africa. Conclusion: This study indicates that there is need for supervision and competent supervisors in private practice. Supervision can be beneficial with regard to developing a culture of support for advanced psychiatric practitioners in private practice and also psychiatric nurse practitioners.

  15. Practice and prospect of advanced fuel management and fuel technology application in PWR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since Daya Bay nuclear power plant implemented 18-month refueling strategy in 2001, China has completed a series of innovative fuel management and fuel technology projects, including the Ling Ao Advanced Fuel Management (AFM) project (high-burnup quarter core refueling) and the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. First, this paper gives brief introduction to China's advanced fuel management and fuel technology experience. Second, it introduces practices of the advanced fuel management in China in detail, which mainly focuses on the implementation and progress of the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. Finally, the paper introduces the practices of advanced fuel technology in China and gives the outlook of the future advanced fuel management and fuel technology in this field. (author)

  16. Practical advance in obtaining an emergency airway via cricothyroidotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, William G; Dahman, Marc H; Thomas, Deanna; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2007-05-01

    By the time a cricothyroidotomy is deemed necessary, the patient is in critical need of an emergency airway before anoxic damage ensues. Two things are necessary for the delivery of the requisite oxygen. First, an airway must be rapidly established. Second, the airway must be large enough to facilitate ventilation. Present methods for emergency cricothyroidotomy include needle cricothyroidotomy, which suffers from difficulties in both establishment and ventilation. We describe here a practical and widely available method for establishing a timely effective airway that has been used successfully for five patients since 1992.

  17. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here. PMID:27174131

  18. Sensors advancements in modeling, design issues, fabrication and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhash Chandra

    2008-01-01

    Sensors are the most important component in any system and engineers in any field need to understand the fundamentals of how these components work, how to select them properly and how to integrate them into an overall system. This book has outlined the fundamentals, analytical concepts, modelling and design issues, technical details and practical applications of different types of sensors, electromagnetic, capacitive, ultrasonic, vision, Terahertz, displacement, fibre-optic and so on. The book: addresses the identification, modeling, selection, operation and integration of a wide variety of se

  19. Advancing the Practice of Health Coaching: Differentiation From Wellness Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Melinda H

    2016-09-01

    The increasing demand for health coaches and wellness coaches in worksite health promotion and the marketplace has resulted in a plethora of training programs with wide variations in coaching definitions, content, attributes, and eligibility of those who may train. It is in the interest of public awareness and safety that those in clinical practice take the lead in this discussion and offer a reasonable contrast and comparison focusing on the risks and responsibilities of health coaching in particular. With the endorsement of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN), the National Society of Health Coaches, whose membership is primarily nurses, discusses the issue and states its position here.

  20. 药学及相关专业实习促就业模式初探%Pharmacy and Relevant Specialty Practice Employment Promotion Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵君嫦; 刘阳; 刘俊峰; 吴宜艳; 丁晶; 徐岩

    2012-01-01

    Graduation practice is an important link of undergraduate teaching work. It is the focus of teaching goal that how to improve the practice quality of the medicine, pharmaceutical engineering, and drug agents, and get a dream job. The practice quality of students is close to the employment and work cognitive, and also measures the education quality.%毕业实习是本科教学工作中的重要环节,如何提高药学、制药工程、药物制剂等药学相关专业学生的毕业实习质量,保证学生学有所成,在毕业后找到一份理想的工作,并在工作中学以致用,成为教学目的中最重要的落脚点.学生实习的好坏直接影响就业的成败和对工作的认知,也直接拷问我们教育的成效.

  1. Impact of advanced manufacturing technology on prosthetic and orthotic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D

    1988-04-01

    Radical changes in the technology applied to prosthetics and orthotics are being proposed. This paper attempts to define the scope and character of advanced manufacturing technology and examines the rehabilitation problems which are or could be tackled. Lower-limb prosthetics has been the major area under investigation so far, but orthopaedic footwear, spinal orthotics and custom seating for the disabled have also been investigated using similar technological approaches. The whole process of patient measurement, device design, and component manufacture is conceived as an integrated system relying upon shape or tissue property sensing, computer based device design and computer-numerically-controlled or robot manufacturing processes. The aim is to retain flexibility for custom design which is necessary to provide for individual patients, and yet improve the rapidity and precision of overall device manufacture and service delivery.

  2. Review: Coastal groundwater optimization—advances, challenges, and practical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabchi, Hamed; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad

    2015-09-01

    Decision models are essential tools for coastal groundwater management (CGM). A combined simulation-optimization framework is employed to develop these models. One of the main barriers in the widespread application of these models for real-world cases is their large computational burden. Recent advances in efficient computational approaches and robust optimization methods can crack this barrier. This study surveys the scientific basis of CGM to provide an overview on this subject and reviews the-state-of-the-art to clarify recent developments and to outline ideas for improving the computational performance. Key details are presented on the performance and choice of possible robust tools such as efficient evolutionary algorithms (EAs), surrogate models, and parallel processing techniques. Then, the potential challenges remaining in this context are scrutinized, demonstrating open fields for further research, which include issues related to advances in simulating and optimizing phases such as introducing new robust algorithms and considering multi-objective purposes, implementing novel and high-performance tools, considering global concerns (e.g. climate change impacts), enhancing the existing models to fit the real world, and taking into account the complexities of real-world applications (e.g. uncertainties in the modeling parameters, and data acquisition). Finally, the outcomes of the systematic review are applied to solve a real-world CGM problem in Iran, to quantitatively examine the performance of combined implementation of some of the suggested tools. It is revealed that the required computational time is considerably reduced by as much as three orders of magnitude when correct combinations of robust EAs, surrogate model, and parallelization technique are utilized.

  3. Fostering and managing diversity in schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Nancy T; Youmans, Sharon L; Agness, Chanel F; Assemi, Mitra

    2009-12-17

    Organizational benefits of diversity in the workplace have been well documented. In health professions, however, diversity-related research traditionally has focused on the effect of diversity on health care disparities. Few tools exist describing the benefits of diversity from an organizational standpoint to guide pharmacy administrators and faculty members in nurturing and developing a culture of diversity. Given the scarcity of pharmacy specific data, experience from other academic areas and national/international diversity reports were incorporated into this manuscript to supplement the available pharmacy evidence base. This review summarizes the benefits of diversity from an academic organizational standpoint, discusses the issues administrators and faculty members must consider when developing programs, and provides guidance on best practices in fostering and managing diversity.

  4. Ensuring rigour and trustworthiness of qualitative research in clinical pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; José Closs, S

    2016-06-01

    The use of qualitative research methodology is well established for data generation within healthcare research generally and clinical pharmacy research specifically. In the past, qualitative research methodology has been criticized for lacking rigour, transparency, justification of data collection and analysis methods being used, and hence the integrity of findings. Demonstrating rigour in qualitative studies is essential so that the research findings have the "integrity" to make an impact on practice, policy or both. Unlike other healthcare disciplines, the issue of "quality" of qualitative research has not been discussed much in the clinical pharmacy discipline. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of rigour in qualitative research, present different philosophical standpoints on the issue of quality in qualitative research and to discuss briefly strategies to ensure rigour in qualitative research. Finally, a mini review of recent research is presented to illustrate the strategies reported by clinical pharmacy researchers to ensure rigour in their qualitative research studies.

  5. Fostering and managing diversity in schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Nancy T; Youmans, Sharon L; Agness, Chanel F; Assemi, Mitra

    2009-12-17

    Organizational benefits of diversity in the workplace have been well documented. In health professions, however, diversity-related research traditionally has focused on the effect of diversity on health care disparities. Few tools exist describing the benefits of diversity from an organizational standpoint to guide pharmacy administrators and faculty members in nurturing and developing a culture of diversity. Given the scarcity of pharmacy specific data, experience from other academic areas and national/international diversity reports were incorporated into this manuscript to supplement the available pharmacy evidence base. This review summarizes the benefits of diversity from an academic organizational standpoint, discusses the issues administrators and faculty members must consider when developing programs, and provides guidance on best practices in fostering and managing diversity. PMID:20221345

  6. Pharmacy Education Development In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Peymani

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in 1922, a pharmacy division was set up atthe school of medicine. In 1926, the first union of Iranianpharmacy students who had graduated in France and returnedto Iran. Duration of this course was 3 years. In 1939 this coursechanges to 4-years program and 140 Credits. After that TehranUniversity changed the Pharmacy degree from Masters todoctorate (Pharm.D. and the duration of the study wasincreased to 5 years [1, 2].During all these years pharmacy department were belongto faculty of medicine. In 1956 the first faculty of pharmacywas established. Then, in 1973 each academic year waschanged into two semesters. After this modification, Pharmacystudents would get their Pharm.D degree after writing thesesand taking an oath [1]. Graduates need to present and defendtheir theses in different fields of pharmacy and this addsanother year to their studies and generally after 6 yearsstudents can graduate as Doctor in Pharmacy. The Pharm.Ddegree program requires at least 2-years of specific preprofessional(undergraduate coursework followed by 4-academic years of professional study. Pharmacy colleges andschools accept students directly from high school for Pharm.Dprogram [3].When Iranian students finished eight years of primaryschool and four years of high school in natural sciences(Experimental Sciences Diploma, can attend a nationalentrance exam for universities. At now, we have 16 faculty ofpharmacy in university of medical sciences. After Fivesemesters which is equal to 90-100 credits of general and basicsciences study, students entrance National test named “thebasic sciences exam” which is held for pharmacy students[3].

  7. Advances and Practices of Bioprocess Scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jianye; Wang, Guan; Lin, Jihan; Wang, Yonghong; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2016-01-01

    : This chapter addresses the update progress in bioprocess engineering. In addition to an overview of the theory of multi-scale analysis for fermentation process, examples of scale-up practice combining microbial physiological parameters with bioreactor fluid dynamics are also described. Furthermore, the methodology for process optimization and bioreactor scale-up by integrating fluid dynamics with biokinetics is highlighted. In addition to a short review of the heterogeneous environment in large-scale bioreactor and its effect, a scale-down strategy for investigating this issue is addressed. Mathematical models and simulation methodology for integrating flow field in the reactor and microbial kinetics response are described. Finally, a comprehensive discussion on the advantages and challenges of the model-driven scale-up method is given at the end of this chapter. PMID:25636486

  8. Management of locally advanced breast cancer: Evolution and current practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustogi Ashish

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC accounts for a sizeable number (30-60% of breast cancer cases and is a common clinical scenario in developing countries. The treatment of LABC has evolved from single modality treatment, consisting of radical mutilating surgery or higher doses of radiotherapy in inoperable disease to multimodality management, which along with the above two included systemic therapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT has made a tremendous impact on the management of LABC. NACT was initiated to institute systemic therapy upfront at the earliest in this group of patients with a high risk of micrometastasis burden. While NACT did not yield a survival advantage, it has however made breast conservation possible in selected group of cases. Large number of studies and many randomised trials have been done in women with LABC in order to improve the therapeutic decisions and also the local control and survival. With this background we have reviewed various treatment options in patients with LABC which should possibly help in guiding the clinicians for optimal management of LABC.

  9. Factors influencing the detection rate of drug-related problems in community pharmacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, T; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Melander, A

    1999-01-01

    This study analyzes relationships between the number of drug-related problems detected in community pharmacy practice and the educational level and other characteristics of pharmacy personnel and their work sites. Random samples of pharmacists, prescriptionists and pharmacy technicians were drawn....... Previous participation in a study or activity on drug-related problems and the size of the pharmacy also had statistically significant effects on the problem detection rate. The use of open-ended questions to create a dialogue with the patient seemed to be a successful means to discover problems....... The results of this study indicate the importance of education and training of pharmacy personnel in detection of drug-related problems. This findings speaks in favor of increasing the pharmacist to other personnel ratio, provided the higher costs will be offset by societal benefits....

  10. Caring for patients with chronic kidney disease: a joint opinion of the ambulatory care and the nephrology practice and research networks of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Saseen, Joseph J; Dehart, Renee M; Dumo, Peter; Grabe, Darren W; Gilmartin, Cheryl; Hachey, David M; Hudson, Joanna Q; Pruchnicki, Maria C; Joy, Melanie S

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Appropriate care for patients with CKD must occur in the earliest stages, preferably before CKD progresses to more severe stages. Therefore, recognition and treatment of CKD and its associated complications must occur in primary care settings. Patients with CKD often have comorbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, creating specific considerations when treating these diseases. Also, these patients have CKD-related conditions, including anemia and renal osteodystrophy, that are not traditionally evaluated and monitored by the primary care practitioner. Collectively, many opportunities exist for pharmacists who practice in the primary care setting to improve the care of patients with CKD. PMID:15767229

  11. Translating advances in reading comprehension research to educational practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle S. McNAMARA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors review five major findings in reading comprehension and their implications for educational practice. First, research suggests that comprehension skills are separable from decodingprocesses and important at early ages, suggesting that comprehension skills should be targeted early, even before the child learns to read. Second, there is an important distinction between readingprocesses and products, as well as their causal relationship: processes lead to certain products. Hence, instructional approaches and strategies focusing on processes are needed to improve students’reading performance (i.e., product. Third, inferences are a crucial component of skilled comprehension. Hence, children need scaffolding and remediation to learn to generate inferences, even when they know little about the text topic. Fourth, comprehension depends on a complex interaction between the reader, the characteristics of the text, and the instructional task, highlighting the need for careful selection of instructional materials for individual students and specific groups of students. Finally, educators may benefit from heightened awareness of the limitations and inadequacies of standardized reading comprehension assessments, as well as the multidimensionality of comprehension to better understand their students’ particular strengths and weaknesses.

  12. The foundation and development of the department of pharmacy of the Faculty of Medicine in Novi Sad (2000-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Jovan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Department of Pharmacy. The first 50 pharmacy students were enrolled at the Faculty of Medicine in Novi Sad in the academic year 2000/2001. The Institute of Pharmacy was established on July 10, 2001. The Department of Pharmacy was established on December 18, 2001, with more than 150 faculty members. Since then, 82 students have graduated with honours. Visiting professors from Athens, Skopje, Reading (Great Britain and Banja Luka, and professors of the Faculty of Science and Mathematics and the Faculty of Technical Sciences in Novi Sad, together with the professors and associates of the Faculty of Medicine, are members of the Faculty of the Department of Pharmacy. Activities of the Department of Pharmacy. The Department offers a 5-year undergraduate program in pharmacy, practical courses in pharmacy, takes part in higher education reform in accordance with the Bologna objectives, organizes visits to European centers of the pharmaceutical industry, and provides mentoring activities in relation to writing a graduation paper. The First Balkan Congress of Pharmacy Students was held March 7-12, 2006 in Novi Sad. The Department of Pharmacy of the Faculty of Medicine in Novi Sad has achieved the objectives set for it when it was Established.

  13. Branding a college of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2012-11-12

    In a possible future of supply-demand imbalance in pharmacy education, a brand that positively differentiates a college or school of pharmacy from its competitors may be the key to its survival. The nominal group technique, a structured group problem-solving and decision-making process, was used during a faculty retreat to identify and agree on the core qualities that define the brand image of Midwestern University's College of Pharmacy in Glendale, AZ. Results from the retreat were provided to the faculty and students, who then proposed 168 mottos that embodied these qualities. Mottos were voted on by faculty members and pharmacy students. The highest ranked 24 choices were submitted to the faculty, who then selected the top 10 finalists. A final vote by students was used to select the winning motto. The methods described here may be useful to other colleges and schools of pharmacy that want to better define their own brand image and strengthen their organizational culture. PMID:23193330

  14. 药学管理引入ISO质量管理体系的实践及体会%The Practice and Experience of Applying ISO Quality Management Systems to the Hospital Pharmacy Manage-ment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玉刚; 陈淑媛; 付小平

    2009-01-01

    医院药学管理工作中引入ISO质量管理体系.探讨了提高药学管理水平的途径和方法 .结果 表明药学事业迅速发展,工作有章可循,药学管理的制度化、程序化程度提高.%The way of improving the pharmacy management level was discussed in the article, through the ISO quantity man-agement system being applied to the hospital pharmacy management and the plan being executed according to the system's request The results showed that the pharmacy developed rapidly and the degree of institutionalized process was increased.

  15. PATIENT SATISFACTION ON GENERAL, INTERVENTION AND COGNITIVE SERVICES AMONG RETAIL PHARMACIES IN KOTA KINABALU, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molugulu Nagashekhara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The services of retail pharmacies in Malaysia are still lagging behind compared to those in some developed countries. Doctors are allowed to dispense prescription medication to their patients. Besides that, traditional Chinese practices and other retailers, are allowed to sell their medical products and over the counter medications. Thus, retail pharmacies have to compete with all the above medicine outlets to win the customers. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient satisfaction on retail pharmacy services such as general, intervention and cognitive services. Data was collected using convenience sampling from 250 respondents using structured questionnaire which consisted of 30 items. Reliability test was conducted using Cronbach’s alpha values and are of 0.643, 0.695 and 0.674 for General, Intervention and Cognitive services respectively. The results revealed that respondents were adequately satisfied with general, intervention and cognitive services. In addition there is no difference in opinion among male and female respondents. In Malaysia, there are three different types of retail pharmacies exist, namely independent pharmacies, chain pharmacies and franchised pharmacies. Further investigations in details are required to find out the relationship between services provided by different types of retail pharmacies and patient satisfaction.

  16. 计算机技术在药库规范化管理中的实践与探讨%Practice and discussion of computer technology in pharmacy store standardized management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄旭

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过在药库规范化管理中应用计算机技术,总结应用过程中的问题与对策。方法使用专门的计算机数据处理系统对我院药品入库验收、出入库管理、有效期管理、库存管理、药品信息查询、药品采购计划等日常药库管理工作进行处理。结果在医院药库规范化管理中,计算机技术方便、快捷,提高了工作效率,可合理配置医药资源,保证药品质量。结论将计算机技术应用于药库的规范化管理过程中是现代化医院药库发展的必然趋势,使药库管理更科学、更系统、更合理。%Objective To summary the problems and countermeasures for used computer technology in pharmacy store standardized management. Methods Used specialized computer data processing system to deal with the daily pharmacy store management such as drugs warehousing acceptance, storage management, valid management, inventory management and drug information inquiry. Results Computer technology was more convenient, quickly and improved word efficiency, also could realized the rational allocation of medical resources, and ensured the quality of drugs in pharmacy store standardized management. Conclusion It is the development trend of modern hospital pharmacy store to use computer technology in pharmacy store standardized management, the pharmacy store management would be more scientific, more systematic, and more reasonable.

  17. Performance of retail pharmacies in low- and middle-income Asian settings: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rosalind; Goodman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    In low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Asia, pharmacies are often patients’ first point of contact with the health care system and their preferred channel for purchasing medicines. Unfortunately, pharmacy practice in these settings has been characterized by deficient knowledge and inappropriate treatment. This paper systematically reviews both the performance of all types of pharmacies and drug stores across Asia’s LMIC, and the determinants of poor practice, in order to reflect on how this could best be addressed. Poor pharmacy practice in Asia appears to have persisted over the past 30 years. We identify a set of inadequacies that occur at key moments throughout the pharmacy encounter, including: insufficient history taking; lack of referral of patients who require medical attention; illegal sale of a wide range of prescription only medicines without a prescription; sale of medicines that are either clinically inappropriate and/or in doses that are outside of the therapeutic range; sale of incomplete courses of antibiotics; and limited provision of information and counselling. In terms of determinants of poor practice, first knowledge was found to be necessary but not sufficient to ensure correct management of patients presenting at the pharmacy. This is evidenced by large discrepancies between stated and actual practice; little difference in the treatment behaviour of less and more qualified personnel and the failure of training programmes to improve practice to a satisfactory level. Second, we identified a number of profit maximizing strategies employed by pharmacy staff that can be linked to poor practices. Finally, whilst the research is relatively sparse, the regulatory environment appears to play an important role in shaping behaviour. Future efforts to improve the situation may yield more success than historical attempts, which have tended to concentrate on education, if they address the profit incentives faced by pharmacy personnel and the

  18. The Effect of Reflective Activities on Reflective Thinking Ability in an Undergraduate Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsingos-Lucas, Cherie; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Schneider, Carl R; Smith, Lorraine

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To determine the effectiveness of integrating reflective practice activities into a second-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum and their impact on reflective thinking ability. Design. A cross-over design with repeated measures was employed. Newly developed reflective modules based on real hospital and community pharmacy cases were integrated into the second-year pharmacy practice curriculum. A novel strategy, the Reflective Ability Clinical Assessment (RACA), was introduced to enhance self- and peer reflection. Assessment. Student responses (n=214) to the adapted Kember et al(1) Reflective Thinking Questionnaire (RTQ) were compared before and after reflective activities were undertaken. Significant improvement in three indicators of reflective thinking was shown after students engaged in reflective activities. Conclusion. Integration of reflective activities into a pharmacy curriculum increased the reflective thinking capacity of students. Enhancing reflective thinking ability may help students make better informed decisions and clinical judgments, thus improving future practice. PMID:27293232

  19. Development and Implementation of the Advanced Practice Nurse Worldwide With an Interest in Geriatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougère, Bertrand; Morley, John E; Decavel, Frédérique; Nourhashémi, Fati; Abele, Patricia; Resnick, Barbara; Rantz, Marilyn; Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Moyle, Wendy; Pédra, Maryse; Chicoulaa, Bruno; Escourrou, Emile; Oustric, Stéphane; Vellas, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Many countries are seeking to improve health care delivery by reviewing the roles of health professionals, including nurses. Developing new and more advanced roles for nurses could improve access to care in the face of a limited or diminishing supply of doctors and growing health care demand. The development of new nursing roles varies greatly from country to country. The United States and Canada established "nurse practitioners" (NPs) in the mid-1960s. The United Kingdom and Finland also have a long experience in using different forms of collaboration between doctors and nurses. In other countries, such as Australia, NPs were endorsed more recently in 2000. In France, Belgium, or Singapore, the formal recognition of advanced practice nurses is still in its infancy, whereas in other countries, such as Japan or China, advanced practice nurses are not licensed titles. The aims of this article were to define precisely what is meant by the term "advanced practice nurse (APN)," describe the state of development of APN roles, and review the main factors motivating the implementation of APN in different countries. Then, we examine the main factors that have hindered the development of APN roles. Finally, we explain the need for advanced practice roles in geriatrics. PMID:27321868

  20. Preparing Pharmacy Graduates for Traditional and Emerging Career Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Brazeau, Gayle A.; Meyer, Susan M.; Belsey, Michele; Bednarczyk, Edward M.; Bilic, Sanela; Bullock, Julie; DeLander, Gary E.; Fiese, E.F.; Giroux, Stephen L.; McNatty, Danny; Nemire, Ruth; Prescott, William A.; Traynor, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Educational programs in pharmacy must focus on educating pharmacists of the future who are prepared to serve as competent and confident health care “providers” whose “practice” can occur in any number of current and future settings; and whose expertise is essential to an interprofessional health care team. Graduates must be able to incorporate a scholarly approach to their practice in identifying patient care problems; practicing in an evidence-based manner; and ensuring safe, effective, and ...

  1. Pre-participation screening for athletes and the role of advanced practice providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickham, David; Chan, Garrett; Carey, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Pre-participation screening of athletes for underlying cardiovascular disease is recommended by the AHA/ACC. However, vigorous debate continues as to whether the ECG should be used as part of a broad-based screening program. The AHA/ACC "do not support national mandatory screening ECGs of athletes, because the logistics, manpower, financial and resource considerations make such a program inapplicable to US". In an effort to address these impediments and to increase access for communities, we explore the use of advanced practice providers (Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants) in providing pre-participation screening to athletes with ECG interpretation. In the current healthcare environment with limited primary care resources, advanced practice providers are an important new element in improving access to care. Pre-participation screening with ECG interpretation is currently within an advanced practice provider's scope of practice. Emerging data shows that advanced practice providers perform care that is within acceptable patient care standards, safely, and cost effectively, compared to physician counterparts. To further improve pre-participation screening, a national education and certification program on 12-lead ECG interpretation is needed. Standardized screening tools and mass screening protocols that include screening ECGs for targeted athlete populations who are at high risk for SCD are needed. These recommendations are aimed at addressing some of the barriers raised by the AHA/ACC group to pre-participation screening with ECG. PMID:25791248

  2. Conditions for building a community of practice in an advanced physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Irving, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the theory of communities of practice in the context of a physics college course and in particular the classroom environment of an advanced laboratory. We introduce the idea of elements of a classroom community being able to provide students with the opportunity to have an accelerated trajectory towards being a more central participant of the community of practice of physicists. This opportunity is a result of structural features of the course and a primary instructional choice which result in the development of a learning community with several elements that encourage students to engage in more authentic practices of a physicist. A jump in accountable disciplinary knowledge is also explored as a motivation for enculturation into the community of practice of physicists. In the advanced laboratory what students are being assessed on as counting as physics is significantly different and so they need to assimilate in order to succeed.

  3. 42 CFR 413.241 - Pharmacy arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pharmacy arrangements. 413.241 Section 413.241... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.241 Pharmacy arrangements. Effective January 1, 2011, an ESRD facility that enters into an arrangement with a pharmacy to furnish renal...

  4. 38 CFR 51.180 - Pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pharmacy services. 51.180... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.180 Pharmacy services. The facility... aspects of the provision of pharmacy services in the facility; (2) Establishes a system of records...

  5. 21 CFR 1311.200 - Pharmacy responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pharmacy responsibilities. 1311.200 Section 1311... ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) Electronic Prescriptions § 1311.200 Pharmacy responsibilities. (a) Before initially using a pharmacy application to process controlled substance prescriptions, the...

  6. 42 CFR 483.60 - Pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pharmacy services. 483.60 Section 483.60 Public... Care Facilities § 483.60 Pharmacy services. The facility must provide routine and emergency drugs and... the provision of pharmacy services in the facility; (2) Establishes a system of records of receipt...

  7. Practical Approach to Knowledge-based Question Answering with Natural Language Understanding and Advanced Reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    This research hypothesized that a practical approach in the form of a solution framework known as Natural Language Understanding and Reasoning for Intelligence (NaLURI), which combines full-discourse natural language understanding, powerful representation formalism capable of exploiting ontological information and reasoning approach with advanced features, will solve the following problems without compromising practicality factors: 1) restriction on the nature of question and response, and 2) limitation to scale across domains and to real-life natural language text.

  8. Analysis of Practice and Results of Quality Control Circle in Pharmacy Intravenous Admixture Services%品管圈在静脉用药调配中心的实践与结果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛进; 罗建华; 张先明

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Through carrying out quality control circle (QCC) in pharmacy intravenous admixture services (PIVAS),to reduce medicine configuration errors,ensure patients' medication safety and improve the level of pharmaceutical affairs management in hospital.Methods:Introduce concept of quality management,use a variety of statistical methods,and solve problems in practice work by seven QC gimmick.Results:Configuration errors in the process of PIVAS fell by an average of 34.00 per month to an average of 17.17 per month after implementation of QCC.Conclusions:Operating QCC on the management of medicine configuration and quality in PIVAS,can greatly exert the team cooperation ability of whole department,reduce the medicine configuration errors,improve the quality of the medicine,and reduce the risk in the process of practice.%目的:通过在静脉用药调配中心(PIVAS)推行品管圈活动,减少药物调配差错,保障患者用药安全,提高医院药事管理水平.方法:引入品质管理概念,运用多种统计方法,按照品管七大手法来解决实际工作中的问题.结果:PIVAS药物调配过程的差错由改善前的平均每月34.00例降低至改善后的平均每月17.17例.结论:将品管圈的改善方法运用于PIVAS的药物调配质量管理中,可以极大发挥整个科室团队协作能力,减少药物调配差错,提高药物调配质量,降低工作过程中的风险.

  9. Motivational interviewing and specialty pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bruce A; Bertram, Carl T

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented in substance abuse and health care literature that motivational interviewing is an evidenced-based and effective intervention for influencing patient behaviors and associated positive health outcomes. The introduction of motivational interviewing training in specialty pharmacy has great potential to increase patient and pharmacist satisfaction, maximize adherence rates, and improve health outcomes. This commentary examines the need for effective approaches for improving patient adherence and outcomes and briefly describes the history and efficacy of motivational interviewing. Case studies using traditional approaches to patient care and motivational interviewing are analysed, and real-world experience using motivational interviewing is presented in the form of a specialty pharmacy case study.

  10. Pharmacy education in India: strategies for a better future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishnu, V; Gilhotra, Rm; Mishra, Dn

    2011-10-01

    In this world of specialization and globalization the pharmacy education in India is suffering from serious backdrops and flaws. There is an urgent need to initiate an academic exercise aimed at attaining revamping of curriculum, keeping in pace with current and emerging trends in the field of pharmacy. Unfortunately all these years, enough emphasis was not laid on strengthening the components of Community Pharmacy, Hospital and Clinical pharmacy, while designing curriculum at diploma and degree levels of teaching. The curriculum followed by almost all universities in India are no were up to the world standards and students are still getting the 20-30 yrs older compounding practical exposure in labs during the graduation level. The article emphasises the concept of innovation ecosystems and quality management. Application of TQM to the educational system improves the present situation. The counseling system which serves to be the gateway of the students for entry into the profession should be brought under the scanner. Introducing specializations at the graduation level will result in professional expertise and excellence. Education is a customer focused industry and every student should be capable of evaluating themselves for continuously improving their quality and professionalism. Teacher focused mastery learning should give away to student focused smart learning. An educational institution should provide the student with a stress-free atmosphere for learning and developing his intellectual capabilities. Every college should have a counseling centre to address the problems of students in their academic and personal life. An emphasis on the concept of quality teacher is included. Revival of the pharmacy education in India is the need of the hour which in turn will pave the way for the up gradation of the pharmacy profession in the country.

  11. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and

  12. [Advanced nursing practice: a must for the quality of care and mental health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Nicole; Page, Claire; Laflamme, France

    2014-01-01

    New professional legislation and reorganization of mental health services have had a significant influence on mental health nursing practice. Many nurses have demonstrated clinical leadership and have been able to adapt their services to the needs of the population specially in the primary health care setting. However, many believe that the role of nurses is not sufficiently known and optimally utilized in mental health services. In this article we take a critical look at the mental health nursing practice in Quebec and at the essential requirements for its development. This review aims to: 1) describe current trends in the changing roles and the modernization of mental health nursing practice in Quebec, 2) provide an overview of the development of advanced nursing practice and its impact on the quality of mental health services; 3) clarify the concept of advanced nursing practice and position its development in Quebec and 4) propose various strategies for optimizing the role of nurses and their complementarity with other professionals providing mental health services. This review presents innovative practices developed by nurses in the context of the restructuring of mental health services. For example, new nursing roles have been developed to improve the collaboration with general practitioners groups in primary care settings and facilitate the evaluation and monitoring of patient presenting medical and psychological problems. Another interesting innovation was set up by nurses in developing a new service to allow timely access to integrated care for patients with substance abuse and mental health problems. The various testimonies reported in this article illustrate the potential contribution of these nursing innovations in improving the mental health services in Quebec. Also, in few countries, the reform of mental health services has been a good time to recognize this potential. Thus, some countries have repositioned the role of mental health nurses and

  13. Summative assessment in a doctor of pharmacy program: a critical insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur K

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Kerry Wilbur College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar Background: The Canadian-accredited post-baccalaureate Doctor of Pharmacy program at Qatar University trains pharmacists to deliver advanced patient care. Emphasis on acquisition and development of the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes lies in the curriculum’s extensive experiential component. A campus-based oral comprehensive examination (OCE was devised to emulate a clinical viva voce and complement the extensive formative assessments conducted at experiential practice sites throughout the curriculum. We describe an evaluation of the final exit summative assessment for this graduate program. Methods: OCE results since the inception of the graduate program (3 years ago were retrieved and recorded into a blinded database. Examination scores among each paired faculty examiner team were analyzed for inter-rater reliability and linearity of agreement using intraclass correlation and Spearman’s correlation coefficient measurements, respectively. Graduate student ranking from individual examiner OCE scores was compared with that of other relative ranked student performance. Results: Sixty-one OCEs were administered to 30 graduate students over 3 years by a composite of eleven different pairs of faculty examiners. Intraclass correlation measures demonstrated that examiner team reliability was low and linearity of agreements was inconsistent. Only one examiner team in each respective academic year was found to have statistically significant inter-rater reliability, and linearity of agreements was inconsistent in all years. No association was found between examination performance rankings and other academic parameters. Conclusion: Critical review of our final summative assessment implies it is lacking robustness and defensibility. Measures are in place to continue the quality improvement process and develop and implement an alternative means of evaluation within a more

  14. A Model of Small-Group Problem-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education: Teaching in the Clinical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsikiew, Jeerisuda; Donsamak, Sisira; Saeteaw, Manit

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) is an alternate method of instruction that incorporates basic elements of cognitive learning theory. Colleges of pharmacy use PBL to aid anticipated learning outcomes and practice competencies for pharmacy student. The purpose of this study were to implement and evaluate a model of small group PBL for 5th year pharmacy…

  15. Chance-constrained model predictive control applied to inventory management in hospitalary pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Maestre, Jose Maria; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This extended abstract addresses the preliminary results of applying uncertainty handling strategies and advanced control techniques to the inventary management of hospitality pharmacy. Inventory management is one of the main tasks that a pharmacy department has to carry out in a hospital. It is a complex problem because it requires to establish a tradeoff between contradictory optimization criteria. The final goal of the proposed research is to update the inventory management system of hospi...

  16. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  17. The prevalence and experience of Australian naturopaths and Western herbalists working within community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Michael

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturopaths and Western herbal medicine (WHM practitioners were surveyed to identify their extent, experience and roles within the community pharmacy setting and to explore their attitudes to integration of complementary medicine (CM practitioners within the pharmacy setting. Method Practising naturopaths and WHM practitioners were invited to participate in an anonymous, self-administered, on-line survey. Participants were recruited using the mailing lists and websites of CM manufacturers and professional associations. Results 479 practitioners participated. 24% of respondents (n = 111 reported they had worked in community pharmacy, three-quarters for less than 5 years. Whilst in this role 74% conducted specialist CMs sales, 62% short customer consultations, 52% long consultations in a private room and 51% staff education. This was generally described as a positive learning experience and many appreciated the opportunity to utilise their specialist knowledge in the service of both customers and pharmacy staff. 14% (n = 15 did not enjoy the experience of working in pharmacy at all and suggested pharmacist attitude largely influenced whether the experience was positive or not. Few practitioners were satisfied with the remuneration received. 44% of the total sample provided comment on the issue of integration into pharmacy, with the main concern being the perceived incommensurate paradigms of practice between pharmacy and naturopathy. Of the total sample, 38% reported that they would consider working as a practitioner in retail pharmacy in future. Conclusions The level of integration of CM into pharmacy is extending beyond the mere stocking of supplements. Naturopaths and Western Herbalists are becoming utilised in pharmacies

  18. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  19. Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT[R]: Advanced Skill Practice. Revised Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Delta's Key to the TOEFL iBT: Advanced Skill Practice is a revised and updated edition of Delta's Key to the Next Generation TOEFL Test. Since the introduction of the TOEFL iBT in 2005, there have been significant changes to some of the test questions, particularly the integrated writing and integrated speaking tasks. The new 2011 edition of…

  20. Conceptions of homeopathy teaching in the faculties of pharmacy in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    OpenAIRE

    Carla Holandino; Giovania Firmino Almeida

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Homeopathy is a pharmaceutical and medical specialty practiced in Brazil since 1840 and known by the Federal Council of Medicine since 1980. The homeopathic pharmacy is a recognized part of the pharmaceutical profession regulated and supervised by the Federal Council of Pharmacy (CFF) and the Regional Councils of Pharmacy throughout Brazil (CFF 319/97 and CFF 440/05). Despite the existence of a Federal Law (number 1552, published in 1952) which implemented the teaching of â€Å...

  1. Pharmacy and Chemistry in the Eighteenth Century: What Lessons for the History of Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    This essay questions the continuity of chemistry across the eighteenth century based on an analysis of its relationship to pharmacy in France. Comparing a text by Nicolas Lémery (1675) with one by Antoine Baumé (1773), the article argues for a key transformation in chemistry across this period. The elimination of the practical side of pharmacy (indications and dosages) from chemistry texts is symptomatic of a reorientation of chemistry toward more theoretical or philosophical concerns. The essay considers several possible explanations for this change in orientation, including developments within pharmacy, but in the end privileges an approach in terms of the changing publics for chemistry in eighteenth-century France.

  2. Quality-control: from record keeping to key performance indicators: manging quality in compounding pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Glaucia Karime; Fonseca, Maria Jose Viera

    2010-01-01

    Record keeping is fundamental in any quality-management system. Compounding pharmacies use a quality-management system that is based on the Good Compounding Practices, which emphasizes the necessity and therefore the importance of maintaining records. However, the activity of recording without conducting further data analysis does not assure continuous improvement of the preparations, services, and of the system itself. The purpose of this article is to suggest some nonfinancial key performance indicators that can be easily implemented by compounding pharmacies to assist in the development of an organizational procedure for measuring the quality of products and services. This is a new paradigm for managing quality in compounding pharmacies. PMID:23965425

  3. Defining Levels of Learning for Strengths Development Programs in Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin K. Janke, Ph.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Clifton StrengthsFinder® is an online measure of personal talent that identifies where an individual’s greatest potential for building strengths exists. This paper describes a framework for strengths education in pharmacy which includes introductory, intermediate and advanced levels of learning. The use of the StrengthsFinder® assessment and supporting workshops aids student pharmacists, pharmacy residents and practitioners in identifying and refining their talents and connecting talents to roles in the profession. Additional learning strategies support a learner’s progression to intermediate and advanced levels of learning, which focus on the application of strengths in teams, leadership, and organizational development. By articulating and recognizing levels of learning around strengths-related content and skills, strong instructional design is fostered. Optimal design includes development of a sequence of learning opportunities delivered over time, a roll-out plan and consideration of the instructional resources required.

  4. Legal issues in neonatal nursing: considerations for staff nurses and advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzman Hagedorn, M I; Gardner, S L

    1999-01-01

    A neonatal nurse is a professional with special training, skill, and knowledge in the care of newborns and their families. The neonatal nurse is accountable to the patient, profession, and employer. Failure of the neonatal nurse to meet these obligations can result in liability in the profession, liability in the employment, a civil suit, or a criminal conviction. Regardless of the health care setting, professional nurses, whether at the bedside or in advanced practice, are morally, ethically, and legally accountable for their nursing judgments and actions. Although most nurses assume they will never be named in a lawsuit, and it is true that few are, their professional actions can be the focus of a suit. An overview of the legal implications found within neonatal nursing practice is presented. Two recent legal cases are presented and discussed to illustrate neonatal nursing and advanced practice liability.

  5. Integrating social neuroscience and social work: innovations for advancing practice-based research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matto, Holly C; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica

    2010-04-01

    Throughout the social work profession, there is ongoing interest in building a social science agenda that can address the complex practice-based questions faced by social work professionals today. Methodological innovations and unique funding opportunities have already significantly advanced research on social work practice. Still, there is enthusiastic discussion of how to ensure that such capacity development helps the profession move forward in ways that make use of the biological sciences and that facilitate social work-specific contributions to the larger interdisciplinary scientific community. This article describes how the social work profession can make use of biomedical knowledge and technological advances from social neuroscience to inform psychosocial treatment development, and it illustrates an application to social work practice by giving an example of a substance abuse treatment development process built on social neuroscientific research.

  6. Discussion on standard use of warfarin and related clinical pharmacy practice%探讨华法林用药规范和开展相应临床药学工作的必要性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玥; 陈敏玲; 张顺国; 李岚; 蒋樾廉; 贡沁燕

    2011-01-01

    目的:提高临床医师对心脏人工机械瓣膜置换术后华法林抗凝用药规范的认识.方法:检索已有的华法林抗凝治疗循证医学文献,以此评价一名7个月先天性心脏病患儿换瓣术后,住院期间低分子量肝素、华法林和维生素K1的应用过程.结果:术后第1~4天国际标准化比值(international normalized ratio,INR)均在正常参考值范围内.术后第6天INR达抗凝目标值,静脉滴注维生素K12 mg后,INR降到正常参考值.结论:临床医师对华法林抗凝过度的误判以及应用维生素K1处置不妥,且该病例可能存在华法林抵抗现象,说明了制定华法林抗凝治疗用药规范的重要性及开展相应临床药学工作的必要性.%Objective: To enhance the understanding of guidelines for anticoagulant therapy with warfarin after mechanical valve replacement. Methods: We retrieved the evidence-based medicine literature of anticoagulant therapy with warfarin, so as to evaluate the management of a 7-month-old patient with congenital heart disease cured by low molecular weight heparin( LM-WH), warfarin and vitamin K, after mechanical valve replacement during in hospital. Results: The international normalized ra-tio(INR) of the patient was in the reference values from the first to fourth day after operation. The INR reached the target of anticoagulation at the sixth day after operation. Vitamin K, (2 mg) was given by intravenously guttae, then the INR dropped to the reference values. Conclusion: Clinical doctors have misjudged the over-anticoagulation of the warfarin and incorrectly used the vitamin Ki. Warfarin resistance may have existed in this case. So it is necessary to carry out clinical pharmacy practice and is important to carry out standard of anticoagulant therapy with warfarin.

  7. Antibiotic Self-Prescribing Trends, Experiences and Attitudes in Upper Respiratory Tract Infection among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students: A Study from Lahore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zikria Saleem

    Full Text Available Pharmacists are the custodians of drugs; hence their education, training, behaviors and experiences would affect the future use of drugs at community and hospital pharmacies. Therefore, we aimed at evaluating the self-prescribing antibiotic trends, knowledge and attitudes among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. We found that pharmacy students had higher risks of experiencing URIs related symptoms such as cough (RR; 1.7, p = 0.002, allergy (RR; 2.07, p = 0.03 and running nose (RR; 3.17, p<0.005, compared to non-pharmacy students -resulting in higher probabilities of selecting cough syrups (OR; 2.3, p<0.005, anti-histamines (OR; 1.8, p = 0.036 and anti-inflammatory/anti-pyretic (OR; 2.4, p<0.005 drugs. Likewise, bachelor's degree pupils (OR; 2, p = 0.045, urban area residents (OR; 2.44; p = 0.002 and pharmacy students (OR; 2.9, p<0.005 exhibited higher propensities of antibiotic self-use-notable classes include, b-lactams (45.9% followed by macrolides (26.5% and augmentin (28.94%, respectively. Surprisingly, pharmacy and non-pharmacy students had higher odds of using antibiotics in common cold (OR; 3.2, p<0.005 and pain (OR; 2.37, p = 0.015, respectively. Unlike non-pharmacy students, pharmacy students were likely to select alternative therapy, such as Joshanda (OR; 2.22, p = 0.011 and were well acquainted with antibiotic hazards, with 77% reduction in risk of antibiotics re-use. In conclusion, university students exhibited antibiotic self-prescribing trends in conditions that does not warrant their use, thus are irrational users. The pharmacy education confers very little benefit to rational self-prescribing practices among students, while non-pharmacy students are more vulnerable to repeated antibiotic usage. Thus, the educational and training modules should be designed for university students to disseminate targeted information regarding the potential hazards of antibiotic self-use and importance of consultation with qualified and registered

  8. Advanced clinical practice for radiographers in Great Britain: professional roles, accountability and the educational provision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A change in British health care has resulted in a broadening of roles and responsibilities beyond 'traditional boundaries' for a range of health care professionals. This has occurred because of staff shortages (particularly within the medical profession) and the recognition that many 'non-doctor' health care staff can make safe, competent and effective contributions outside their 'normal' sphere of responsibilities. In the context of advanced clinical practice, this paper will explain the current arrangements for radiographers' roles and responsibilities, their accountability and the educational provision that underpins the development of competencies at these higher clinical levels. Some advanced roles that British radiographers perform, within their current normal responsibilities, will be identified and some British legislation and professional body guidance that make role advancement possible will be outlined. The article will conclude with an indication of the educational level at which the advanced competencies are learned and assessed. (author)

  9. Implementing ward based clinical pharmacy services in an Ethiopian University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Mekonnen AB; Yesuf EA; Odegard PS; Wega SS

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinical pharmacy practice has developed internationally to expand the role of a pharmacist well beyond the traditional roles of compounding, dispensing and supplying drugs to roles more directly in caring for patients. Studies on the activities of the clinical pharmacist in an inpatient ward in resource constrained settings are scarce, however.Objective: To assess ward based clinical pharmacy services in an internal medicine ward of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Methods:...

  10. PATIENT SATISFACTION ON GENERAL, INTERVENTION AND COGNITIVE SERVICES AMONG RETAIL PHARMACIES IN KOTA KINABALU, MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Molugulu Nagashekhara; Ng Sze-Nee; Matanjun David; Urban John Arnold D’Souza; Balan Rathakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    The services of retail pharmacies in Malaysia are still lagging behind compared to those in some developed countries. Doctors are allowed to dispense prescription medication to their patients. Besides that, traditional Chinese practices and other retailers, are allowed to sell their medical products and over the counter medications. Thus, retail pharmacies have to compete with all the above medicine outlets to win the customers. The purpose of this study is to determine the patient satisfacti...

  11. Counselling in Swedish Community Pharmacies : Understanding the Process of a Pharmaceutical Care Service

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Community pharmacy practice is moving towards patient care and away from the mere dispensing of medicines. In this movement, which is guided by the philosophy of Pharmaceutical care (PC), new counselling services emerge. The purpose of the thesis was to add knowledge about the real-world provision of PC services by studying a defined PC service in Swedish pharmacies. Specific aims of this thesis were to investigate the experiences of professionals working with or close to the service and to d...

  12. Introduction to Pharmacy Education in Singapore%新加坡的药学教育模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林承翰; 李海瑞; 潘婧; 赵雅姿; 崔炜强; 康立峰

    2016-01-01

    新加坡的药学教育采用了以患者为中心的教育模式。该文对新加坡的药学教育及实践进行概括性介绍,分别从药学教育学位设置、本科生及研究生的课程设置及药学专业的就业领域三方面进行概述。%Pharmacy education in Singapore adopts a patient-orientated approach. This article provides a general introduction to the education and practice of Pharmacy in Singapore through 3 major aspects,①Professional pharmacy degree;②Curriculum of the undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy education;③Professional pharmacy practice and employment in Singapore.

  13. Portfolio use as a tool to demonstrate professional development in advanced nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespenheide, Molly; Cottingham, Talisha; Mueller, Gail

    2011-01-01

    A concrete way of recognizing and rewarding clinical leadership, excellence in practice, and personal and professional development of the advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) is lacking in the literature and healthcare institutions in the United States. This article presents the process of developing and evaluating a professional development program designed to address this gap. The program uses APRN Professional Performance Standards, Relationship-Based Care, and the Magnet Forces as a guide and theoretical base. A key tenet of the program is the creation of a professional portfolio. Narrative reflections are included that illustrate the convergence of theories. A crosswalk supports this structure, guides portfolio development, and operationalizes the convergence of theories as they specifically relate to professional development in advanced practice. Implementation of the program has proven to be challenging and rewarding. Feedback from APRNs involved in the program supports program participation as a meaningful method to recognize excellence in advanced practice and a clear means to foster ongoing professional growth and development. PMID:22016019

  14. Assessment of Family Planning Services at Community Pharmacies in San Diego, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Rafie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Levonorgestrel emergency contraception and other contraceptive methods are available over-the-counter (OTC; however youth continue to face a number of barriers in accessing healthcare services, including lack of knowledge of the method, fear of loss of privacy, difficulties in finding a provider, and cost. A descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study of a sample of 112 community pharmacies in San Diego, California was conducted between December 2009 and January 2010 to assess community pharmacy practices related to the availability and accessibility of family planning health pharmacy services and products, particularly to youth. A majority (n = 79/112, 70.5% of the pharmacies carried a wide selection of male condoms; however, the other OTC nonhormonal contraceptive products were either not available or available with limited selection. A majority of the pharmacies sold emergency contraception (n = 88/111, 78.6%. Most patient counseling areas consisted of either a public or a semi-private area. A majority of the pharmacy sites did not provide materials or services targeting youth. Significant gaps exist in providing family planning products and services in the majority of community pharmacies in San Diego, California. Education and outreach efforts are needed to promote provision of products and services, particularly to the adolescent population.

  15. Progress towards advanced practice roles in Australia, New Zealand and the Western Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the evolution and current status of advanced practice in medical imaging and radiation therapy in the Oceania region. To date development has been slow, largely ad hoc and based on local needs. Most advanced practice is informal or is regarded as part of the core skills of some individual practitioners. However, recently, there have been signs of change taking place, with a more coordinated and collaborative approach to role development becoming evident. In Australia, although a number of reports and papers have discussed extended clinical roles, especially for diagnostic Radiographers, no concrete action has yet taken place in either discipline. Stakeholders apparently agree that existing extended roles should be formalised, however, and that continuing education must underpin future role extension initiatives. A three-level professional structure, including an advanced practitioner level, has been accepted by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT), with the support of the District Health Boards of New Zealand (DHBNZ). Implementation is expected to begin before the end of 2008. Meanwhile, recognition of the serious lack of Radiologists in Western Pacific Island Nations led to the training of some Radiographers in radiological interpretation of images between 2004 and 2006. The aim was to up-skill the Radiographers so that they could more reliably flag abnormalities to doctors, a model that may be applicable elsewhere. It is argued that future practice models must include advanced practice roles in order to safely meet the growing demand for medical radiation services. Local factors, such as the structure of the health care system and the depth of engagement of the key stakeholders in planning and implementation, however, are expected to influence the evolution of new clinical practice models in the region

  16. Social Pharmacy: Its Performance and Promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Among private Universities of Pharmacy in Japan, Kyoritsu University of Pharmacy was the first to introduce courses in social pharmacy in 1991. Social pharmacy is a discipline driven by social needs. By studying the relationship between pharmacy and society, particularly through case studies, the impact of drugs and changes in societal expectation of them, as well as through historical background studies and surveys of current trends, this discipline acts to determine the roles of pharmacists and pharmacies expected by society. Social pharmacy requires a basic knowledge of pharmaceutical science, but an understanding from economic viewpoints of the current systems and structures in which healthcare functions is important as well. Once these are understood, the goal is to identify social problems, and to create and apply models for their resolution which connect pharmacy and society. So far, social pharmacy has played an important role in training programs for community-based pharmacists essential for a hyper-aged society, for community pharmacies' health management programs aimed at promoting the health of residents, and educational programs for elementary and middle school children.

  17. Optimizing music learning: Exploring how blocked and interleaved practice schedules affect advanced performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E Carter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Repetition is the most commonly used practice strategy by musicians. Although blocks of repetition continue to be suggested in the pedagogical literature, work in the field of cognitive psychology suggests that repeated events receive less processing, thereby reducing the potential for long-term learning. Motor skill learning and sport psychology research offer an alternative. Instead of using a blocked practice schedule, with practice completed on one task before moving on to the next task, an interleaved schedule can be used, in which practice is frequently alternated between tasks. This frequent alternation involves more effortful processing, resulting in increased long-term learning. The finding that practicing in an interleaved schedule leads to better retention than practicing in a blocked schedule has been labeled the contextual interference effect. While the effect has been observed across a wide variety of fields, few studies have researched this phenomenon in a music-learning context, despite the broad potential for application to music practice. This study compared the effects of blocked and interleaved practice schedules on advanced clarinet performance in an ecologically valid context. Ten clarinetists were given one concerto exposition and one technical excerpt to practice in a blocked schedule (twelve minutes per piece and a second concerto exposition and technical excerpt to practice in an interleaved schedule (three minutes per piece, alternating until a total of twelve minutes of practice were completed on each piece. Participants sight-read the four pieces prior to practice and performed them at the end of practice and again one day later. The sight-reading and two performance run-throughs of each piece were recorded and given to three professional clarinetists to rate using a percentage scale. Overall, whenever there was a ratings difference between the conditions, pieces practiced in the interleaved schedule were rated

  18. Optimizing Music Learning: Exploring How Blocked and Interleaved Practice Schedules Affect Advanced Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christine E.; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Repetition is the most commonly used practice strategy by musicians. Although blocks of repetition continue to be suggested in the pedagogical literature, work in the field of cognitive psychology suggests that repeated events receive less processing, thereby reducing the potential for long-term learning. Motor skill learning and sport psychology research offer an alternative. Instead of using a blocked practice schedule, with practice completed on one task before moving on to the next task, an interleaved schedule can be used, in which practice is frequently alternated between tasks. This frequent alternation involves more effortful processing, resulting in increased long-term learning. The finding that practicing in an interleaved schedule leads to better retention than practicing in a blocked schedule has been labeled the “contextual interference effect.” While the effect has been observed across a wide variety of fields, few studies have researched this phenomenon in a music-learning context, despite the broad potential for application to music practice. This study compared the effects of blocked and interleaved practice schedules on advanced clarinet performance in an ecologically valid context. Ten clarinetists were given one concerto exposition and one technical excerpt to practice in a blocked schedule (12 min per piece) and a second concerto exposition and technical excerpt to practice in an interleaved schedule (3 min per piece, alternating until a total of 12 min of practice were completed on each piece). Participants sight-read the four pieces prior to practice and performed them at the end of practice and again one day later. The sight-reading and two performance run-throughs of each piece were recorded and given to three professional clarinetists to rate using a percentage scale. Overall, whenever there was a ratings difference between the conditions, pieces practiced in the interleaved schedule were rated better than those in the blocked schedule

  19. Optimizing Music Learning: Exploring How Blocked and Interleaved Practice Schedules Affect Advanced Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christine E.; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Repetition is the most commonly used practice strategy by musicians. Although blocks of repetition continue to be suggested in the pedagogical literature, work in the field of cognitive psychology suggests that repeated events receive less processing, thereby reducing the potential for long-term learning. Motor skill learning and sport psychology research offer an alternative. Instead of using a blocked practice schedule, with practice completed on one task before moving on to the next task, an interleaved schedule can be used, in which practice is frequently alternated between tasks. This frequent alternation involves more effortful processing, resulting in increased long-term learning. The finding that practicing in an interleaved schedule leads to better retention than practicing in a blocked schedule has been labeled the “contextual interference effect.” While the effect has been observed across a wide variety of fields, few studies have researched this phenomenon in a music-learning context, despite the broad potential for application to music practice. This study compared the effects of blocked and interleaved practice schedules on advanced clarinet performance in an ecologically valid context. Ten clarinetists were given one concerto exposition and one technical excerpt to practice in a blocked schedule (12 min per piece) and a second concerto exposition and technical excerpt to practice in an interleaved schedule (3 min per piece, alternating until a total of 12 min of practice were completed on each piece). Participants sight-read the four pieces prior to practice and performed them at the end of practice and again one day later. The sight-reading and two performance run-throughs of each piece were recorded and given to three professional clarinetists to rate using a percentage scale. Overall, whenever there was a ratings difference between the conditions, pieces practiced in the interleaved schedule were rated better than those in the blocked schedule

  20. Optimizing Music Learning: Exploring How Blocked and Interleaved Practice Schedules Affect Advanced Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christine E; Grahn, Jessica A

    2016-01-01

    Repetition is the most commonly used practice strategy by musicians. Although blocks of repetition continue to be suggested in the pedagogical literature, work in the field of cognitive psychology suggests that repeated events receive less processing, thereby reducing the potential for long-term learning. Motor skill learning and sport psychology research offer an alternative. Instead of using a blocked practice schedule, with practice completed on one task before moving on to the next task, an interleaved schedule can be used, in which practice is frequently alternated between tasks. This frequent alternation involves more effortful processing, resulting in increased long-term learning. The finding that practicing in an interleaved schedule leads to better retention than practicing in a blocked schedule has been labeled the "contextual interference effect." While the effect has been observed across a wide variety of fields, few studies have researched this phenomenon in a music-learning context, despite the broad potential for application to music practice. This study compared the effects of blocked and interleaved practice schedules on advanced clarinet performance in an ecologically valid context. Ten clarinetists were given one concerto exposition and one technical excerpt to practice in a blocked schedule (12 min per piece) and a second concerto exposition and technical excerpt to practice in an interleaved schedule (3 min per piece, alternating until a total of 12 min of practice were completed on each piece). Participants sight-read the four pieces prior to practice and performed them at the end of practice and again one day later. The sight-reading and two performance run-throughs of each piece were recorded and given to three professional clarinetists to rate using a percentage scale. Overall, whenever there was a ratings difference between the conditions, pieces practiced in the interleaved schedule were rated better than those in the blocked schedule

  1. Decision-Making and Problem-Solving Approaches in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lindsay C; Donohoe, Krista L; Holdford, David A

    2016-04-25

    Domain 3 of the Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) 2013 Educational Outcomes recommends that pharmacy school curricula prepare students to be better problem solvers, but are silent on the type of problems they should be prepared to solve. We identified five basic approaches to problem solving in the curriculum at a pharmacy school: clinical, ethical, managerial, economic, and legal. These approaches were compared to determine a generic process that could be applied to all pharmacy decisions. Although there were similarities in the approaches, generic problem solving processes may not work for all problems. Successful problem solving requires identification of the problems faced and application of the right approach to the situation. We also advocate that the CAPE Outcomes make explicit the importance of different approaches to problem solving. Future pharmacists will need multiple approaches to problem solving to adapt to the complexity of health care.

  2. Impact of a Simulation Exercise on Pharmacy Student Attitude toward Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, Renee K.; Watson, Susan B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of a simulation on pharmacy student attitudes toward poverty using the Attitude toward Poverty (ATP) Short Form scale. Methods. Second-year pharmacy students participated in the 3-hour Missouri Association for Community Action Poverty Simulation. Students completed a survey of the ATP Short Form scale prior to and following participation in the simulation. Results. Significant improvements in attitude were noted in 15 of 21 ATP Short Form items. Improvements in the stigma and structural domains were significant while improvement in the personal deficiency domain was not significant. Conclusions. This poverty simulation exercise positively altered pharmacy student attitudes toward poverty. When combined with didactic and experiential curriculum, this simulation may enhance student achievement of the 2013 Center for the Advancement of Pharmacy Education (CAPE) outcome subdomain of cultural sensitivity. PMID:27073274

  3. Practice Investigation of PBL Teaching in Analytical Chemistry of Pharmacy%药学专业分析化学教学中实施PBL教学法的实践初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建荣

    2016-01-01

    Based on the actual situation of Pharmacy Vocational College Majors and market demand, to make a few of PBL in analytical chemistry application measures provided for information and reference.%本文基于高职院校药学专业学生的实际情况与市场需求,提出几点PBL教学法在分析化学中的应用措施,仅供参考与借鉴。

  4. Advancing the practice of health impact assessment in Canada: Obstacles and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallum, Lindsay C., E-mail: lindsay.mccallum@mail.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada); Intrinsik Environmental Sciences Inc., 6605 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, Ontario L5T0A3 (Canada); Ollson, Christopher A., E-mail: collson@intrinsik.com [Intrinsik Environmental Sciences Inc., 6605 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, Ontario L5T0A3 (Canada); Stefanovic, Ingrid L., E-mail: fenvdean@sfu.ca [Simon Fraser University, Faculty of Environment, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is recognized as a useful tool that can identify potential health impacts resulting from projects or policy initiatives. Although HIA has become an established practice in some countries, it is not yet an established practice in Canada. In order to enable broader support for HIA, this study provides a comprehensive review and analysis of the peer-reviewed and gray literature on the state of HIA practice. The results of this review revealed that, although there is an abundance of publications relating to HIA, there remains a lack of transparent, consistent and reproducible approaches and methods throughout the process. Findings indicate a need for further research and development on a number of fronts, including: 1) the nature of HIA triggers; 2) consistent scoping and stakeholder engagement approaches; 3) use of evidence and transparency of decision-making; 4) reproducibility of assessment methods; 5) monitoring and evaluation protocols; and, 6) integration within existing regulatory frameworks. Addressing these issues will aid in advancing the more widespread use of HIA in Canada. - Highlights: • Reviewed current state of practice in the field of HIA • Identified key obstacles and opportunities for HIA advancement • Major issues include lack of consistent approach and methodology. • No national regulatory driver hinders opportunity for widespread use of HIA. • Identified research opportunities vital to developing HIA practice in Canada.

  5. Advancing the practice of health impact assessment in Canada: Obstacles and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is recognized as a useful tool that can identify potential health impacts resulting from projects or policy initiatives. Although HIA has become an established practice in some countries, it is not yet an established practice in Canada. In order to enable broader support for HIA, this study provides a comprehensive review and analysis of the peer-reviewed and gray literature on the state of HIA practice. The results of this review revealed that, although there is an abundance of publications relating to HIA, there remains a lack of transparent, consistent and reproducible approaches and methods throughout the process. Findings indicate a need for further research and development on a number of fronts, including: 1) the nature of HIA triggers; 2) consistent scoping and stakeholder engagement approaches; 3) use of evidence and transparency of decision-making; 4) reproducibility of assessment methods; 5) monitoring and evaluation protocols; and, 6) integration within existing regulatory frameworks. Addressing these issues will aid in advancing the more widespread use of HIA in Canada. - Highlights: • Reviewed current state of practice in the field of HIA • Identified key obstacles and opportunities for HIA advancement • Major issues include lack of consistent approach and methodology. • No national regulatory driver hinders opportunity for widespread use of HIA. • Identified research opportunities vital to developing HIA practice in Canada

  6. BACHELOR OF PHARMACY INDUSTRIAL TRAINING: PERFORMANCE AND PRECEPTOR PERCEPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Nurlina M.A; Ku Aizuddin K.A; M. M. R. Meor. Mohd. Affandi; Ismail M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial training for undergraduates in Malaysian universities is widely practiced. It provide hands-on experience and up-to-date information to the graduates who are about to enter the competitive job market. Many researchers have reported the impact of industrial training on students’ performance. However, studies focusing on the preceptor perception of student performance are lacking. This study was done with the objective to evaluate UiTM’s Bachelor of Pharmacy student’s performance and...

  7. Academic Success and Initial Labor Market Outcomes for Pharmacy Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Sean Murphy, Ph.D.; Cynthia Naughton, Pharm.D; Dan Friesner, Ph.D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the relationship between academic success and labor market outcomes among graduating pharmacy students. Unlike previous studies, this paper characterizes labor market outcome not only as an individual’s starting salary, but also whether or not the student had a position secured at the time of graduation, whether or not a signing bonus was received, and the setting in which (s)he will practice. Methods: A standard exit survey was administered to graduating Doctor...

  8. Advanced practice role characteristics of the community/public health nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Julie Fisher; Baldwin, Karen Brandt

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing using their experiences and perspectives. The purposive sample consisted of 10 nurses who had master's degrees in community/public health nursing and were working in a variety of community health settings. Data were collected using audiotaped interviews and 1-day observations of study participants in their workplaces. An editing analysis technique was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that role characteristics included advocacy and policy setting at the organizational, community, and state levels; a leadership style centered on empowerment; a broad sphere of influence; and high-level skills in large-scale program planning, project management, and building partnerships. Results provide important descriptive data about significant aspects of the advanced practice role of nurses with master's degrees in community/public health nursing.

  9. Pharmacy Locations, Pharmacies, licensed - name, address, contact info, Published in 2006, Iowa Dept. of Public Health.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Pharmacy Locations dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'Pharmacies, licensed - name,...

  10. Reflections on ethnocentrism and racism: a challenge for advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S H; Cummings, S H

    1996-01-01

    As nurses and patient populations increasingly reflect the changing demographics of the United States, it will be necessary for nurses to address the critical issues surrounding a multicultural society. Nurses have been relatively quiet on the topic of ethnocentric and racist behavior. If advanced practice nurses are to be successful in assisting nurses and organizations to embrace cultural diversity, understanding ethnocentric and racist behaviors is key to developing strategies to facilitate the provision of culturally competent care. PMID:9447077

  11. Improving Transitions of Care With an Advanced Practice Nurse: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Martha; Dorcy, Kathleen

    2016-06-01

    Gaps in complex oncology care coordination between inpatient and outpatient settings can result in treatment and monitoring delays and omissions, which can negatively affect patient outcomes. Gaps also exist for patients facing complex treatment modalities and collaborations between multiple care teams working at geographically distant sites. A pilot advanced practice nurse care coordinator 
(APNCC) role to coordinate these complex care transitions and implement processes for safer and more efficient care has shown promise.
. PMID:27206289

  12. Succession planning for advanced nursing practice; contingency or continuity? The Scottish experience

    OpenAIRE

    Currie, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Kay CurrieDepartment of Adult Nursing and Health, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland, UKAim: Succession planning involves identifying key posts within an organization and supporting the ongoing development of individuals ready to move into these roles, thus ensuring continuity of the service. This paper presents an analysis of the succession planning process and illustrates the ways in which key principles may by applied in the case of advanced nursing practice.Background: An ar...

  13. Using the Rx for Change tobacco curriculum in advanced practice nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Frances J; Heath, Janie; Crowell, Nancy

    2006-03-01

    In today's health care system driven by quality outcome indicators and performance care measures, it is essential for nurses to know how to intervene with tobacco-dependent patients. This article discusses pilot results from the "Rx for Change: Clinician Assisted Tobacco Cessation Curriculum" intervention conducted at Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies using advanced practice students. The results reveal that 6 hours of tobacco-cessation training can increase knowledge and self-efficiency scores. PMID:16546016

  14. Customising chemotherapy in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer: daily practice and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, A C; Sorensen, J B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a daunting task but during recent years new options have emerged. By tailoring treatment using either information on histological subtypes of NSCLC or biomarkers it is now possible to improve outcome and maintain stable quality...... of life. We conducted a literature search of tailored treatment already implemented in advanced NSCLC in order to highlight the information required to decide on the optimal oncological treatment for individual patients. 16 studies were identified by literature review. Significantly improved outcome......, respectively. In conclusion, tailoring treatment according to either histological subtype or EGFR mutation status in advanced NSCLC should today be part of daily practice based on current evidence. Future biomarkers need optimisation of methodology and prospective validation before clinical implementation....

  15. Antibiotic Self-Prescribing Trends, Experiences and Attitudes in Upper Respiratory Tract Infection among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students: A Study from Lahore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Zikria; Saeed, Hamid; Ahmad, Mobasher; Yousaf, Mahrukh; Hassan, Hafsa Binte; Javed, Ayesha; Anees, Nida; Maharjan, Sonu

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists are the custodians of drugs; hence their education, training, behaviors and experiences would affect the future use of drugs at community and hospital pharmacies. Therefore, we aimed at evaluating the self-prescribing antibiotic trends, knowledge and attitudes among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. We found that pharmacy students had higher risks of experiencing URIs related symptoms such as cough (RR; 1.7, p = 0.002), allergy (RR; 2.07, p = 0.03) and running nose (RR; 3.17, pcough syrups (OR; 2.3, p<0.005), anti-histamines (OR; 1.8, p = 0.036) and anti-inflammatory/anti-pyretic (OR; 2.4, p<0.005) drugs. Likewise, bachelor’s degree pupils (OR; 2, p = 0.045), urban area residents (OR; 2.44; p = 0.002) and pharmacy students (OR; 2.9, p<0.005) exhibited higher propensities of antibiotic self-use–notable classes include, b-lactams (45.9%) followed by macrolides (26.5%) and augmentin (28.94%), respectively. Surprisingly, pharmacy and non-pharmacy students had higher odds of using antibiotics in common cold (OR; 3.2, p<0.005) and pain (OR; 2.37, p = 0.015), respectively. Unlike non-pharmacy students, pharmacy students were likely to select alternative therapy, such as Joshanda (OR; 2.22, p = 0.011) and were well acquainted with antibiotic hazards, with 77% reduction in risk of antibiotics re-use. In conclusion, university students exhibited antibiotic self-prescribing trends in conditions that does not warrant their use, thus are irrational users. The pharmacy education confers very little benefit to rational self-prescribing practices among students, while non-pharmacy students are more vulnerable to repeated antibiotic usage. Thus, the educational and training modules should be designed for university students to disseminate targeted information regarding the potential hazards of antibiotic self-use and importance of consultation with qualified and registered medical doctor/pharmacist before starting with antibiotics. PMID:26919465

  16. The 2011 PHARMINE report on pharmacy and pharmacy education in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson J; Rombaut B

    2011-01-01

    The PHARMINE consortium consists of 50 universities from European Union member states or other European countries that are members of the European Association of Faculties of Pharmacy (EAFP). EU partner associations representing community (PGEU), hospital (EAHP) and industrial pharmacy (EIPG), together with the European Pharmacy Students’ Association (EPSA) are also part of the consortium. The consortium surveyed pharmacies and pharmacists in different settings: community, hospital, industry ...

  17. A comparative evaluation of pharmacy services in single and no pharmacy towns

    OpenAIRE

    Sunderland, V Bruce; Burrows, Suzanne D; Joyce, Andrew W

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent attention has focused on access of communities to pharmacy services in rural areas. To increase access to pharmacy services in rural Western Australia some doctors have been granted a licence to dispense medication on the rationale that a pharmacy would not be economically viable in that community. However, there have been no studies conducted on whether a doctor dispensing service adequately provides a pharmacy service with respect to access and quality. Method Residents of...

  18. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Usage of Apitherapy for Disease Prevention and Treatment among Undergraduate Pharmacy Students in Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonata Trumbeckaite

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine therapies are historically used worldwide for disease prevention and treatment purposes. Apitherapy is part of the traditional medicine based on bee product use. Complementary medicine practices which incorporate use of some traditional herbal, mineral, or animal kind substances very often are discussed with pharmacy professionals because these products are often sold in pharmacies as dietary supplements. This study is aimed at determining the attitude, knowledge, and practices of apitherapy among undergraduated pharmacy students (Master of Pharmacy who already have a pharmacy technician diploma and from 1 to 20 years of practice working in a community pharmacy as pharmacy assistants. A method of questionnaire was chosen. The questions about attitudes, experience, knowledge, and practices for disease prevention and treatment of different bee products, their safety, and informational sources were included. Respondents shared opinion that use of bee product is part of the traditional medicine. Most of them had experience on honey product use for treatment and disease prevention for themselves and their family members (62% although the need of more evidence based information was expressed. The most known bee products were honey, propolis, and royal jelly. They are widely used for enhancing the immune system and prevention of respiratory tract infection.

  19. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation. PMID:21839552

  20. Advanced practice nursing for enduring health needs management: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Liisa; Mikkonen, Irma; Graham, Iain; Norman, Linda D; Richardson, Jim; Savage, Eileen; Schorn, Mavis

    2012-07-01

    Advanced practice nursing expertise has been acknowledged worldwide as one response to the challenges arising from changes in society and health care. The roots of advanced practice nursing education are at the University of Colorado where the first known programme started in 1965. In many countries advanced practice nurses (APNs) have taken responsibility for routine patient care formerly carried out by physicians in order to reduce their workload. However, more and more, APNs have taken responsibility for new service areas and quality programmes not previously provided. Chronic disease management is one of these new service areas because long-term diseases are increasingly challenging service systems globally. This article is based on an international APN partnership. The aim of the article is to describe how the partnership will design a 15 ECTS credit course on Enduring Health Need Management as a cross-cultural collaborative endeavour. The adaptation of an inquiry based learning framework will be described drawing on four main principles of the theory: authentic learning communities; student encouragement in analysing gradually more complicated problems; networking in knowledge creation and; student engagement and activity. The cross-cultural online course aims to increase APNs' intercultural competence as well as their global and international work orientation.

  1. A New Approach to Health Services and Pharmacy in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Alina M

    2015-12-01

    In December 17, 2014, U.S. President Barack Obama surprised the world by announcing his intention to enter into negotiations aimed at reestablishing diplomatic relations with Cuba. Since then, expectations and interest regarding the health system of that country have increased. This report focuses on the Cuban health and pharmacy systems from a practical and educational standpoint. Pharmaceutical services, strengths, opportunities, and challenges are described. Cuba's new trends toward patient-centered care are analyzed to provide insights for developing pharmaceutical care practice and implementing policies suitable for practice in all health care settings.

  2. A New Approach to Health Services and Pharmacy in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Alina M

    2015-12-01

    In December 17, 2014, U.S. President Barack Obama surprised the world by announcing his intention to enter into negotiations aimed at reestablishing diplomatic relations with Cuba. Since then, expectations and interest regarding the health system of that country have increased. This report focuses on the Cuban health and pharmacy systems from a practical and educational standpoint. Pharmaceutical services, strengths, opportunities, and challenges are described. Cuba's new trends toward patient-centered care are analyzed to provide insights for developing pharmaceutical care practice and implementing policies suitable for practice in all health care settings. PMID:26684551

  3. Taking the pulse of Internet pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z; Peterson, R T; Huang, L

    2001-01-01

    Like most businesses, online pharmacy companies will only be successful if they make sure customers are satisfied with the service they receive. But what attributes of service quality lead to satisfaction and dissatisfaction? This study identified 19 Internet pharmacy service quality dimensions in three categories: (1) product cost and availability, (2) customer service, and (3) the online information system. Our analysis uncovered attributes that tend to determine consumer satisfaction and points out ways to improve overall service quality in the Internet pharmacy arena.

  4. Financial evaluation of introduction of the electronic prescription for Latvian individual pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namatevs I.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Presently, there is a new paradigm for pharmacy practice defined and a concept of the “seven-star pharmacist”given. The establishment of a new pharmacy system is looking for introduction and development of the electronic prescription. The aim of the study: to provide a sound research for individual pharmacies on the bases of discovering necessary financials for introduction of the electronic prescription. Results of the study: Financial aspects of the research have been evaluated by calculating payback time, ROI, NPV, and IRR. On the bases of financial calculations, the primary investment for initial costs for hardware and software has been estimated. Finally, express evaluation model for possible introduction of the electronic prescription at individual pharmacies without additional investment has been created.

  5. Teaching the science of safety in US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdford, David A; Warholak, Terri L; West-Strum, Donna; Bentley, John P; Malone, Daniel C; Murphy, John E

    2011-05-10

    This paper provides baseline information on integrating the science of safety into the professional degree curriculum at colleges and schools of pharmacy. A multi-method examination was conducted that included a literature review, key informant interviews of 30 individuals, and in-depth case studies of 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Educators believe that they are devoting adequate time to science of safety topics and doing a good job teaching students to identify, understand, report, manage, and communicate medication risk. Areas perceived to be in need of improvement include educating pharmacy students about the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) role in product safety, how to work with the FDA in post-marketing surveillance and other FDA safety initiatives, teaching students methods to improve safety, and educating students to practice in interprofessional teams. The report makes 10 recommendations to help pharmacy school graduates be more effective in protecting patients from preventable drug-related problems.

  6. Teaching the science of safety in US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdford, David A; Warholak, Terri L; West-Strum, Donna; Bentley, John P; Malone, Daniel C; Murphy, John E

    2011-05-10

    This paper provides baseline information on integrating the science of safety into the professional degree curriculum at colleges and schools of pharmacy. A multi-method examination was conducted that included a literature review, key informant interviews of 30 individuals, and in-depth case studies of 5 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Educators believe that they are devoting adequate time to science of safety topics and doing a good job teaching students to identify, understand, report, manage, and communicate medication risk. Areas perceived to be in need of improvement include educating pharmacy students about the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) role in product safety, how to work with the FDA in post-marketing surveillance and other FDA safety initiatives, teaching students methods to improve safety, and educating students to practice in interprofessional teams. The report makes 10 recommendations to help pharmacy school graduates be more effective in protecting patients from preventable drug-related problems. PMID:21769153

  7. Perception of community pharmacists towards the barriers to enhanced pharmacy services in the healthcare system of Dubai: a quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayes IK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many developing countries, pharmacists are facing many challenges while they try to enhance the quality of services provided to patients approaching community pharmacies. Objective: To explore perception of community pharmacists in Dubai regarding the obstacles to enhanced pharmacy services using a part of the results from a nation-wide quantitative survey. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to 281 full-time licensed community pharmacists in Dubai. The questionnaire had 5 inter-linked sections: demographic information, information about the pharmacy, interaction with physicians, pharmacists’ current professional role, and barriers to enhanced pharmacy services. Results: About half of the respondents (45.4%, n=90 agreed that pharmacy clients under-estimate them and 52.5% (n=104 felt the same by physicians. About 47.5% (n=94 of the respondents felt that they are legally unprotected against profession’s malpractice. Moreover, 64.7% (n=128 stated that pharmacy practice in Dubai turned to be business-focused. In addition, 76.8% (n=252 found that one of the major barriers to enhanced pharmacy services is the high business running cost. Pharmacists screened tried to prove that they are not one of the barriers to optimized pharmacy services as 62.7% (n=124 disagreed that they lack appropriate knowledge needed to serve community and 67.7% (n=134 gave the same response when asked whether pharmacy staff lack confidence when treating consumers or not. Conclusions: Although being well established within the community, pharmacists in Dubai negatively perceived their own professional role. They stated that there are number of barriers which hinder optimized delivery of pharmacy services like under-estimation by pharmacy clients and other healthcare professionals, pressure to make sales, and high running cost.

  8. Factors affecting bargaining outcomes between pharmacies and insurers.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, J. M.; Doucette, W; Sorofman, B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To model the bargaining power of pharmacies and insurers in price negotiations and test whether it varies with characteristics of the pharmacy, insurer, and pharmacy market. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Data from four sources. Pharmacy/insurer transactions were taken from Medstat's universe of 6.8 million pharmacy claims in their 1994 Marketscan database. Sources Informatics, Inc. supplied a three-digit zip code-level summary database containing pharmacy payments and self-reported c...

  9. Knowledge, Skills, and Resources for Pharmacy Informatics Education

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Brent I.; Flynn, Allen J.; Fortier, Christopher R.; Clauson, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacy has an established history of technology use to support business processes. Pharmacy informatics education within doctor of pharmacy programs, however, is inconsistent, despite its inclusion as a requirement in the 2007 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards and Guidelines. This manuscript describes pharmacy informatics knowledge and skills that all graduating pharmacy students should possess, conceptualized within the framework of the medication use process. Addition...

  10. Financial performance of the teaching pharmacies in Isfahan: an economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzghabaee, A.M.; Etebari, M.; Sajjadi, H.; Badri, Sh.; Hosseini-Biuki, S.M.; Sheikhaboumasoudi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Teaching pharmacies are amongst the important cornerstones of a healthcare system for drug supplying, pharmacy education and pharmacy practice research. Assessment of the Iranian healthcare system costs shows that after personnel charges, drug outlay is the second expensive factor. This great financial mass requires integral audit and management in order to provide costumers satisfaction in addition to financial viability. Teaching pharmacies are required to realize financial viability as well as providing several educational and drug servicing goals, which makes microeconomic analysis important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the financial performance of the teaching pharmacies affiliated with the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (with the abrreviated names as: SHM, ISJ, AZH for the confidentialiy of the financial data). This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study done in 2008. The target pharmacies of this study were all the 3 teaching pharmacies affiliated with the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The data collecting template was prepared using the standard scientific methods according to the goals of this research The goals also nominated necessary items needed in economic profit evaluation. The data collection template was completed by reference to the teaching pharmacies financial documents and reports, used as a base for calculating the total income and the total costs in 2007-2008 financial year. The difference between these two balances showed the value of profits or loss. The profit/cost ratio was also calculated, using the proportion of the total income to the total costs. The collected data was statistically analyzed using the Excel software (Microsoft 2007). For the financial year 2007-2008, the difference between the total income and the total costs was -831.6 million Rials (excess costs to income) for the SHM pharmacy, + 25.4 billion Rials for the ISJ pharmacy and -429.5 million Rials for the AZH pharmacy. According to our

  11. 妇幼保健院药学管理中品管圈的应用实践%Application and practice of the pharmacy management of maternal and Child Health Hospital of coil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鑫

    2015-01-01

    Objective:the analysis of the application ef ect of quality control circle theory in the pharmacy management of maternal and child health hospital.Methods:according to the basic steps of quality control circle activity schedule activities,analyzes the existing problems in the pharmacy management in our hospital,work out solutions to the problems.Results:the im-plementation of QCC,the incidence of the problem of pharmacy management in pharmacy store was significantly decreased,the lack of communication and the bad project down the largest pro-portion,87.5%,in fact,prescription writing is not complete,80% pharmacists responsibility heart is not strong,the incidence rate of decline of 75%,ranked third;circle by means of quality control,work enthusiasm and the sense of responsibility of the members,communication and coordination,cohesion and the ability to solve problems and quality control methods have the capaci-ty to improve.Conclusion:the quality control circle activity can ef ectively improve the working enthusiasm of the pharmacy management,enhance the sense of responsibility,reduce the error rate in the pharmacy management,improve the quality of pharmaceutical care.%目的:分析品管圈理论在妇幼保健院药学管理中的应用效果。方法:按照品管圈活动的基本步骤安排各项活动,分析我院药学管理中存在的问题,针对问题制定对策。结果:实施品管圈活动后,药事管理中各项问题的发生率均有显著下降,其中与药库缺乏沟通这一不良项目的下降比例最大,为87.5%,其实为医师处方书写不完整,为80%,药师责任心不强发生率下降75%,位列第三;通过品管圈活动,各圈员的工作积极性、责任感、沟通配合、凝聚力、解决问题的能力、品管手法等能力均有所提高。结论:品管圈活动可有效提高药学管理人员的工作积极性,增强其责任心,降低药学管理中的差错率,提高药学服务质量。

  12. The future of pain pharmacy: driven by need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson TJ

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Timothy J Atkinson, Alev H Gulum, William G Forkum Veteran Affairs Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Murfreesboro, TN, USA Background: Opioid prescribing has increased by ~400% over the past 20 years in the US and has been correlated with dramatic increases in accidental overdose-related deaths. Emerging evidence of serious dose-dependent side effects of opioid analgesics has led to recommendations from multinational pain societies and governments to decrease opioid doses and increase referrals to pain specialists. Demand for pain specialists of all types has increased; however, training programs for health care professionals struggle to satisfy this need. Objective: The purpose of this article is to highlight the role of clinical pharmacy specialists in pain management and to discuss available residency training programs and subspecialties within each program. Methods: We surveyed all eleven accredited pharmacy postgraduate year two (PGY-2 Pain and Palliative Care Residency programs in the US. Program information was derived from interviews with residency directors, current residents, program brochures, and residency Web sites. Data collected included core, elective, and longitudinal rotations, with the time frame dedicated to each experience. Primary practice areas, as well as inpatient vs outpatient focus, were also documented. Additionally, a review of the available literature was completed to determine the areas in greatest need for future pain specialists. Results: Pharmacy pain specialists have been referenced as highly effective additions to interdisciplinary pain management teams. Pharmacists provide expertise in complex pain medication management, which remains the primary focus of most chronic pain encounters. The PGY-2 programs surveyed differ considerably, with the majority providing significant emphasis to either acute pain management or palliative care with brief or limited exposure to chronic pain management. Four of the eleven

  13. [Challenges and opportunities: contributions of the Advanced Practice Nurse in the chronicity. Learning from experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Christine; Camacho-Bejarano, Rafaela

    2014-01-01

    Undoubtedly, our society is facing new economic, political, demographic, social and cultural challenges that require healthcare services able to meet the growing health needs of the population, especially in dealing with chronic conditions. In this new context, some countries such as the United Kingdom have made a firm commitment to develop new models for chronic patients care based on the introduction of new figures of Advanced Practice Nurses, which includes 4 cornerstones of professional practice: advanced clinical skills, clinical management, teaching and research. The implementation of this new figures implies a redefinition of professional competencies and has its own accreditation system and a specific catalogue of services adapted to the population requirements, in order to provide chronic care support from Primary Care settings. This trajectory allows us analysing the process of design and implementation of these new models and the organizational structure where it is integrated. In Spain, there are already experiences in some regions such as Andalucia and the Basque Country, focused on the creation of new advanced nursing roles. At present, it is necessary to consider suitable strategic proposals for the complete development of these models and to achieve the best results in terms of overall health and quality of life of patients with chronic conditions, improving the quality of services and cost-effectiveness through a greater cohesion and performance of healthcare teams towards the sustainability of healthcare services and patient satisfaction. PMID:24468497

  14. Advancing geriatrics research, education, and practice: policy challenges after the great recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerzan, Judy T; Rich, Eugene C

    2014-06-01

    The series of articles in this JGIM issue provides a number of policy-relevant recommendations for advancing geriatrics research, education and practice. Despite the unprecedented pressure to reduce state and federal spending, policymakers must concurrently address the challenges of a growing population of older individuals with increasingly complex health care problems. Thus, there may be opportunities to advance this agenda in creative ways. For example, without new spending, federal research agencies can make changes to encourage needed new directions in aging research, and the ACA provides new funding opportunities such as the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute. States and the federal government have an increasing need for the health professions workforce to have collaborative care skills and geriatrics clinical competencies, and are finding ways to invest in relevant initiatives. On the clinical program side, state and federal governments are initiating programs to promote delivery system changes that improve the care of older adults. Nonetheless, in the face of the policy challenges that have persisted after the "great recession," academic geriatrics and general internal medicine will need to join forces with public and private interests to secure the resources needed to advance this ambitious agenda for geriatrics research, education and practice.

  15. Innovative scheduling to maintain clinical pharmacy services despite budget retrenchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, J; Schneider, P J; Moore, T D

    1984-02-01

    A process is described in which staff scheduling was adjusted to maintain pharmaceutical services while achieving a 7% cutback in personnel costs. The pharmacy department in a 1000-bed university hospital was unable to achieve the necessary cost savings through reductions in sick leave and overtime hours. The pharmacy administration developed a plan that required pharmacists to work four 10-hour shifts per week and resulted in reduced hours of service. The pharmacists objected and proposed an alternative plan in which clinical service was maintained for 16 hours on weekdays and 12 hours on weekends. Pharmacist teams worked one flexible shift per week. Pharmacists developed an innovative staffing plan that allowed them to maintain a high level of practice and acceptable working hours.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Understanding of Pictograms among Pharmacy and Non-Pharmacy Students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riffat Yasmin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate awareness and significance of pictograms among pharmacy and non-pharmacy students. The study was conducted in two public and private sector institutes of Karachi during July to Oct 2013. Altogether 306 pharmacy and non pharmacy students participated in the study. A self administered questionnaire was used for this purpose. Nineteen pictograms from the USP-DI and corresponding set of 19 locally developed pictograms conveying the same medication instructions or messages were evaluated. Respondents were evaluated for their interpretation of all 38 pictograms. More than 98% of the pharmacy students agreed that pictograms attracts attention of people to provide information about medicine use. 97% considered that pictograms are used as universal language that can be easily understood by everyone and they are effective tools for educating the illiterate patients. 97.87% non pharmacy students agreed that patients are unfamiliar with medical terminologies and pictograms may be used to convey the medically significant information to patients. Both pharmacy and non pharmacy students preferred USP-DI pictograms over the pictograms of local origin. It is a need of time to introduce pictograms as a topic in curriculum of Pharm -D courses like Dispensing Pharmacy, Hospital pharmacy and Community pharmacy so that during professional life pharmacist can use these tools to improve patient counseling techniques. It is a way to maximize patient care and provide patient education regardless of any barrier.

  17. Integrating first-line treatment options into clinical practice: what's new in advanced melanoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummer, Reinhard; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ascierto, Paolo A; Larkin, James; Lebbé, Celeste; Hauschild, Axel

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma remains a serious form of skin cancer in Europe and worldwide. Localized, early-stage melanomas can usually be treated with surgical excision. However, the prognosis is poorer for patients with advanced disease. Before 2011, treatment for advanced melanoma included palliative surgery and/or radiotherapy, and chemotherapy with or without immunotherapy, such as interleukin-2. As none of these treatments had shown survival benefits in patients with advanced melanoma, European guidelines had recommended that patients be entered into clinical trials. The lack of approved first-line options and varying access to clinical trials meant that European clinicians relied on experimental regimens and chemotherapy-based treatments when no other options were available. Since 2011, ipilimumab, an immuno-oncology therapy, and vemurafenib and dabrafenib, targeted agents that inhibit mutant BRAF, have been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of advanced melanoma. More recently, the MEK inhibitor, trametinib, received European marketing authorization for use in patients with BRAF mutation-positive advanced melanoma. In 2014, the anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab was approved as a first-line therapy in Japan. Whereas nivolumab and another anti-PD-1 antibody, pembrolizumab, were approved as second-line therapies in the USA, their recent approval in Europe are for first-line use based on new clinical trial data in this setting. Together these agents are changing clinical practice and making therapeutic decisions more complex. Here, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic options for the first-line treatment of advanced melanoma, and how these therapies can be optimized to provide the best possible outcomes for patients. PMID:26426764

  18. Two Approaches to Vocational Education and Training. A View from Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterfield, Jon

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the relationship between theoretical knowledge and professional practice within pharmacy education. The discussion takes two different approaches to examine the selected literature. The first approach is concerned with how curriculum changes may potentially contribute to the improvement of professional practice. This…

  19. Strategies for implementation of an effective pharmacogenomics program in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, U Subrahmanyeswara; Mayhew, Susan L; Rao, Prema S

    2015-07-01

    Sequencing of the human genome and the evidence correlating specific genetic variations to diseases have opened up the potential of genomics to more effective and less harmful interventions of human diseases. A wealth of pharmacogenomics knowledge is in place for the practice of precision medicine. However, this knowledge is not fully realized in clinical practice. One reason for this impasse is the lack of in-depth understanding of the potential of pharmacogenomics among the healthcare professionals. Pharmacists are the point-of-care providers and are expected to advise clinicians on matters relating to the implementation of pharmacogenomics in patient care. However, current pharmacogenomics instruction in pharmacy schools fails to produce pharmacists with the required knowledge or practical training in this discipline. In this perspective, we provide several strategies to overcome limitations faced by pharmacy schools. Once implemented, pharmacy schools will produce precision medicine-ready pharmacists.

  20. Preparation of faculty members and students to be citizen leaders and pharmacy advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leigh Ann; Janke, Kristin K; Boyle, Cynthia J; Gianutsos, Gerald; Lindsey, Cameron C; Moczygemba, Leticia R; Whalen, Karen

    2013-12-16

    To identify characteristics and quality indicators of best practices for leadership and advocacy development in pharmacy education, a national task force on leadership development in pharmacy invited colleges and schools to complete a phone survey to characterize the courses, processes, and noteworthy practices for leadership and advocacy development at their institution. The literature was consulted to corroborate survey findings and identify additional best practices. Recommendations were derived from the survey results and literature review, as well as from the experience and expertise of task force members. Fifty-four institutions provided information about lecture-based and experiential curricular and noncurricular components of leadership and advocacy development. Successful programs have a supportive institutional culture, faculty and alumni role models, administrative and/or financial support, and a cocurricular thread of activities. Leadership and advocacy development for student pharmacists is increasingly important. The recommendations and suggestions provided can facilitate leadership and advocacy development at other colleges and schools of pharmacy.

  1. Drugs: From prescription only to pharmacy only

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, N

    1993-01-01

    The range of medicines available over the pharmacy counter is set to increase. The Medicines Control Agency has revised its procedures to speed up the reclassification from prescription only medicine (POM) status to pharmacy only (P) status. In addition, the Medicines Act has recently been revised to ensure, by five yearly review, that the prescription only status of a medicine continues to be justified.

  2. Prevalence and determinants of pharmacy shopping behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, H.; Bouvy, M.L.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Floor-Schreudering, A.; Leufkens, H.G.; Egberts, A.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Discontinuity of care bears the risk of medication errors and poor clinical outcomes. Little is known about the continuity of care related to pharmacies. Therefore, we studied the prevalence and determinants of pharmacy shopping behaviour in the Netherlands. METHODS: Benefi

  3. Prevalence and determinants of pharmacy shopping behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvy, M. L.; De Smet, P. A. G. M.; Floor-Schreudering, A.; Leufkens, H. G. M.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Buurma, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective: Discontinuity of care bears the risk of medication errors and poor clinical outcomes. Little is known about the continuity of care related to pharmacies. Therefore, we studied the prevalence and determinants of pharmacy shopping behaviour in the Netherlands. Methods: Benefi

  4. Proposal of the Implementation of an International Pharmacy Graduate Preliminary Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyenghee Kwon

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, graduates of international pharmacy schools can apply to take the Korean Pharmacist Licensing Examination after passing a review by the Accreditation Board of the Pharmacy Schools and Licenses. However, since the educational content of different schools and the roles of pharmacists differ from country to country, a preliminary examination might be necessary before the Pharmacist Licensing Examination. To prepare to implement a preliminary examination for foreign pharmacy graduates in Korea, we summarized the preliminary examinations used in four other countries and presented a proposal for a preliminary examination. Data were collected via the internet and through telephone interviews with appropriate persons. The proposal was revised after a public forum. There are preliminary examinations in the USA, Canada, Australia, and the United Kingdom, and these involve written, oral, practice, and English proficiency tests. We proposed that the Korean preliminary examination consist of a written test on basic pharmacy, a test in the Korean language, and an interview. The preliminary examination should include suitable items that effectively evaluate international graduates. Graduates of international pharmacy schools who have an ability equivalent to graduates of Korean pharmacy schools should be eligible to write the Korean Licensing Examination.

  5. Attributes of advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Rhonda G; Kelly, Anne M; Finkelstein, Stanley M; Looman, Wendy S; Garwick, Ann W

    2014-01-01

    Care coordination is an essential component of the pediatric health care home. This study investigated the attributes of relationship-based advanced practice registered nurse care coordination for children with medical complexity enrolled in a tertiary hospital-based health care home. Retrospective review of 2,628 care coordination episodes conducted by telehealth over a consecutive 3-year time period for 27 children indicated that parents initiated the majority of episodes and the most frequent reason was acute and chronic condition management. During this period, care coordination episodes tripled, with a significant increase (p care coordination model has potential for changing the health management processes for children with medical complexity.

  6. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  7. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the K-12 Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. We emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluation of the most promising retrofit measure for each building type. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings.

  8. Advancing Research and Practice: The Revised APA Division 30 Definition of Hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Gary R; Barabasz, Arreed F; Council, James R; Spiegel, David

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the history, rationale, and guidelines for developing a new definition of hypnosis by the Society of Psychological Hypnosis, Division 30 of the American Psychological Association. The definition was developed with the aim of being concise, being heuristic, and allowing for alternative theories of the mechanisms (to be determined in empirical scientific study). The definition of hypnosis is presented as well as definitions of the following related terms: hypnotic induction, hypnotizability, and hypnotherapy. The implications for advancing research and practice are discussed. The definitions are presented within the article.

  9. Using Think Aloud Protocols to Assess E-Prescribing in Community Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmilola K. Odukoya, BPharm, MS

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Think aloud protocol has rarely been used as a method of data collection in community pharmacies.Purpose: The aim of the report is to describe how think aloud protocols were used to identify issues that arise when using e-prescribing technology in pharmacies. In this paper, we report on the benefits and challenges of using think aloud protocols in pharmacies to examine the use of e-prescribing systems.Methods: Sixteen pharmacists and pharmacy technicians were recruited from seven community pharmacies in Wisconsin. Data were collected using direct observation alongside think aloud protocol. Direct observations and think aloud protocols took place between January-February, 2011. Participants were asked to verbalize their thoughts as they process electronic prescriptions.Results: Participants identified weaknesses in e-prescribing that they had previously not conceived. This created heightened awareness for vigilance when processing e-prescriptions. The main challenge with using think aloud protocols was due to interruptions in the pharmacies. Also, a few participants found it challenging to remember to continue verbalizing their thought process during think aloud sessions.Conclusion: The use of think aloud protocols as method of data collection is a new way for understanding the issues related to technology use in community pharmacy practice. Think aloud protocol was beneficial in providing objective information on e-prescribing use not solely based on pharmacist’s or technician’s opinion of the technology. This method provided detailed information on a wide variety of real time challenges with e-prescribing technology use in community pharmacies. Using this data collection method can help identify potential patient safety issues when using e-prescribing and suggestions for redesign.

  10. Using focus groups to identify characteristics of an ideal work environment for Advanced Practice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Robert J; Mazzaccaro, Richard J; Burmeister, David B; Land, Samuel D; Boulay, Richard M; Chung, Heiwon; Deitrick, Lynn; Sumner, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Practice Clinicians (APCs) in collaborative practice represent a diverse and valuable group of health care professionals, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives. Because these healthcare professionals have been identified as part of the solution to physician shortages, it is critical for health networks to examine and address issues affecting collaborative relationships. We invited our network APCs to participate in focus group sessions to determine both attributes and barriers to an ideal work environment. Four major themes emerged: (1) compensation, (2) network representation, (3) employment structure, and (4) workplace culture. While issues relating to compensation and representation were prevalent, discussions also revealed the importance of relationships and communication. To ensure successful collaboration and, thereby, reduce clinician turnover, leaders must address gaps between the existing and ideal states in structural factors affecting job satisfaction (Themes 1-3) as well as the behavioral factors represented in workplace culture (Theme 4).

  11. Building the Clinical Bridge to Advance Education, Research, and Practice Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Svejda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The University of Michigan School of Nursing and the Health System partnered to develop an undergraduate clinical education model as part of a larger project to advance clinical education, practice, and scholarship with education serving as the clinical bridge that anchors all three areas. The clinical model includes clusters of clinical units as the clinical home for four years of a student's education, clinical instruction through team mentorship, clinical immersion, special skills preparation, and student portfolio. The model was examined during a one-year pilot with junior students. Stakeholders were largely positive. Findings showed that Clinical Faculty engaged in more role modeling of teaching strategies as Mentors assumed more direct teaching used more clinical reasoning strategies. Students reported increased confidence and competence in clinical care by being integrated into the team and the Mentor's assignment. Two new full time faculty roles in the Health System support education, practice, and research.

  12. Using an Informed Advocacy Framework to Advance the Practice of Family-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellus, Lenora; MacKinnon, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The philosophical framework of family-centered care (FCC) has been promoted consistently since the 1980s in perinatal and neonatal settings as a gold standard approach for developing programs and providing care that supports the meaningful involvement of parents in the care of their infants and children. Recent literature suggests that despite years of promotion, FCC remains an elusive practice. Sources frequently state that FCC is based on principles of communication and empowerment, but the literature overall does not suggest substantial underlying philosophical or theoretical underpinnings. There have been theoretical advances in nursing and other disciplines that hold potential for moving our practice of FCC forward. In this article, we describe the informed advocacy framework and apply the framework to FCC. PMID:27465458

  13. Advancing community stakeholder engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials: principles, practices and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Peter A; Rubincam, Clara

    2014-12-01

    Community stakeholder engagement is foundational to fair and ethically conducted biomedical HIV prevention trials. Concerns regarding the ethical engagement of community stakeholders in HIV vaccine trials and early terminations of several international pre-exposure prophylaxis trials have fueled the development of international guidelines, such as UNAIDS' good participatory practice (GPP). GPP aims to ensure that stakeholders are effectively involved in all phases of biomedical HIV prevention trials. We provide an overview of the six guiding principles in the GPP and critically examine them in relation to existing social and behavioral science research. In particular, we highlight the challenges involved in operationalizing these principles on the ground in various global contexts, with a focus on low-income country settings. Increasing integration of social science in biomedical HIV prevention trials will provide evidence to advance a science of community stakeholder engagement to support ethical and effective practices informed by local realities and sociocultural differences.

  14. Advancing the practice of online psychotherapy: An application of Rogers' diffusion of innovations theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, Travis I; Demireva, Petya D; Grayson, Jessica L; McNamara, John R

    2009-03-01

    With the advancements of technology and its increasing use in all spheres of life, clinicians too are faced with the decision of whether to adopt or refrain from adopting certain innovations in their practice. This article discusses the process of adopting clinical innovations within a theoretical framework, namely diffusion of innovations theory (DIT; Rogers, 2003). DIT constructs are applied to the example of online therapy adoption into clinical practice. Nine adoption barriers are identified, including issues of dehumanizing the therapeutic environment, start-up cost and reimbursement, infrastructure and training, licensure and jurisdiction concerns, ethical guidelines, both client and clinician suitability factors, and professional reputation and acceptance within the field. The authors conclude with a theory-based discussion of activities that may help to accelerate the adoption of online therapy among professional psychologists. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122574

  15. Using focus groups to identify characteristics of an ideal work environment for Advanced Practice Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Robert J; Mazzaccaro, Richard J; Burmeister, David B; Land, Samuel D; Boulay, Richard M; Chung, Heiwon; Deitrick, Lynn; Sumner, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Practice Clinicians (APCs) in collaborative practice represent a diverse and valuable group of health care professionals, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives. Because these healthcare professionals have been identified as part of the solution to physician shortages, it is critical for health networks to examine and address issues affecting collaborative relationships. We invited our network APCs to participate in focus group sessions to determine both attributes and barriers to an ideal work environment. Four major themes emerged: (1) compensation, (2) network representation, (3) employment structure, and (4) workplace culture. While issues relating to compensation and representation were prevalent, discussions also revealed the importance of relationships and communication. To ensure successful collaboration and, thereby, reduce clinician turnover, leaders must address gaps between the existing and ideal states in structural factors affecting job satisfaction (Themes 1-3) as well as the behavioral factors represented in workplace culture (Theme 4). PMID:27637819

  16. Factor analysis of a modified version of the California Brief Multicultural Competence Scale with minority pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Margarita; Brookover, Cecile; Kennedy, Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    While most of the more frequently used self-report measures of cultural competence in health professionals are targeted to practicing physicians and mental health providers from the majority-white population, no measures have been specifically developed for minority pharmacy students. With the objective to find a suitable tool to be used for curriculum development in cultural competence, this study applied a modified version of the California Brief Multicultural Competence Scale (CBMCS) to 467 pharmacy students at the Xavier University of Louisiana, a Historically Black University. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses were conducted to examine if the CBMCS factor structure was replicated using a modified tool and a different population and Cronbach alphas were calculated to determine internal consistency reliability. The CBMCS's original factor structure was not replicated, perhaps because of modifications introduced in the original tool or because of differences between the sample population in this study (minority pharmacy students) and the population used in the original CBMCS study (majority-white mental health providers). However, results show that a modified factor structure fits the data well. The primary difference between the factors found in this study and the CBMCS factors is the appearance of a new factor composed of three items related to interpersonal and racial dynamics, which includes racial discrimination, white privilege, and power imbalance. The significant relationships (p racism, prejudice and bias are not just issues of the majority-white health providers and point to the need for more racially diverse samples. The unique results in this study advance research on racial dynamics and self-assessment of cultural competence of minority health professionals. PMID:21290177

  17. [1913: A hundred years ago, the Society of the History of Pharmacy was born].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Thierry

    2014-10-01

    The "Société d'histoire de la pharmacie" was chronologically the first society for the history of pharmacy in the world. It was initiated by a triumvirate : Eugene-Humbert Guitard (1884-1976), a young graduate of the "Ecole des chartes", Charles Buchet (1848-1933), director of an important pharmaceutical cooperative named "Pharmacie central de France", and Paul Dorveaux (1851-1938), the librarian of the Superior School of Pharmacy of Paris. Those three men were perfectly complementary: the pharmacist Buchet was the "financial", the doctor Dorveaux was the "strategist" and Guitard was in charge of the practical realization. To carry out this project, they appealed to men of good will. Finally, on February 1, 1913, seventy founding members gave birth to the "Societe d'histoire de la pharmacie". These founders came from diverse backgrounds. Some of them, such Dorveaux, belonged to the "Société française d'histoire de la medecine", founded ten years ago. Others were members of the Supervisory Committee of the "Pharmacie centrale de France". A third group consisted of university teachers, as Leon Guignard, the former director of the Superior School of Pharmacy of Paris. There was also some archivists and writers, for example Camille Bloch, Ferdinand Brunot and, of course, Eugene-Humbert Guitard. The largest contingent was made up of French historians and collectors, like Antoine Balland and Charles-Henri Fialon. There was also four foreign founders: the Danish John William Schibbye Johnsson (1868-1929), the American Edward Kremers (1865-1941), and the Germans Hermann Emil Schelenz (1848-1922) and Karl Sudhoff (1853-1938). All of them were correspondents and friends of Paul Dorveaux. As Guitard wrote in 1938, Dorveaux office was, at that time, the "world center" of the studies ofhistory of pharmacy. Morever, according Guitard, the new group could have be called "Societe internationale d'histoire de la pharmacie". The term "international" seemed unfortunately too

  18. Research for the advancement of green chemistry practice: Studies in atmospheric and educational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullipher, Steven Gene

    Green chemistry is a philosophy of chemistry that emphasizes a decreasing dependence on limited non-renewable resources and an increasing focus on preventing pollution byproducts of the chemical industry. In short, it is the discipline of chemistry practiced through the lens of environmental stewardship. In an effort to advance the practice of green chemistry, three studies will be described that have ramifications for the practice. The first study examines the atmospheric oxidation of a hydrofluorinated ether, a third-generation CFC replacement compound with primarily unknown atmospheric degradation products. Determination of these products has the potential to impact decisions on refrigerant usage in the future. The second study examines chemistry students' development of understanding benefits-costs-risks analysis when presented with two real-world scenarios: refrigerant choice and fuel choice. By studying how benefits-costs-risks thinking develops, curricular materials and instructional approaches can be designed to better foster the development of an ability that is both necessary for green chemists and important in daily decision-making for non-chemists. The final study uses eye tracking technology to examine students' abilities to interpret molecular properties from structural information in the context of global warming. Such abilities are fundamental if chemists are to appropriately assess risks and hazards of chemistry practice.

  19. Prodiver数据挖掘系统下临床药学工作的实践应用%Practice and Application of Clinical Pharmacy Work in the Prodiver Data Mining System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎颖然; 郭少青; 杜生; 曹国威

    2015-01-01

    Prodiver system is a part of the hospital business intelligence analysis and decision support system, which developed for clinical pharmacy research. This data mining system is designed to collect, analyze and apply of medicine related data, that we can find out and solve problems, provide scientific basis for hospital decision-makers, and provide useful information for clinical pharmacy. System through the acquisition of data, analysis of information and finally transfer knowledge to end users. The user terminal includes a portal system and a custom system. Portal system is mainly used to monitor indicators and show the results, provide scientific basis for hospital decision-makers. Custom system is mainly used for extraction of medicine related data, provide useful information for clinical pharmacy. In the future we still need to speed up the data update process.%Prodiver系统是在中山市人民医院商业智能分析与决策支持系统下,针对临床药学工作开展研发的数据挖掘系统,旨在通过开发、运用以及分析与药品使用相关的数据,从中发现问题、解决问题,为医院决策层提供科学依据,为临床药学工作提供有用的药学信息。系统通过获取数据,分析信息并最终实现知识展现,用户终端包括门户系统和自定义系统。门户系统主要用于医院用药指标的监控和直观展现,为医院决策提供依据;自定义系统主要用于药物分析相关数据的提取,为临床工作提供药学信息。加快数据更新频率是产品未来的发展方向。

  20. 临床药师参与1例难治性哮喘患儿治疗的药学实践%Pharmacy practice of clinical pharmacist participating in the treatment of 1 child with refractory asthma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙美娟

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pharmaceutical care key points of clinical pharmacist participating in the treatment of child with refractory asthma, in order to guide clinical rational drug use. Clinical pharmacist took part in the treatment process of refractory asthma, so as to analyze pathogenesis of refractory asthma and explore the relation between medicine, dose and curative effect for formulating rational use of drug and dose. Clinical effects and condition changes of disease were needed to be considered for adjusting pharmacy scheme timely, and providing individualized pharmacy service. Through joining the pharmaceutical care for refractory asthma, clinical pharmacist could enhance safety and curative effect of pharmacy for children. The participation of clinical pharmacist in formulation of treating refractory asthma can make the treatment become standard and rational, and provide reference for the control and treatment of refractory asthma.%探讨临床药师参与难治性哮喘患儿治疗药学监护要点,以指导临床合理用药。临床药师参与难治性哮喘的治疗过程,分析产生难治性哮喘原因,寻找疗效与药物、剂量与疗效的关系,制定合理药物及合适剂量,并根据药物的临床疗效和病情变化及时调整用药方案,提供个体化的药学服务。临床药师通过对难治性哮喘的药学监护,可提高患儿的用药安全性及治疗效果。临床药师参与难治性哮喘的治疗的制定,使治疗更加规范、合理,为难治性哮喘的控制治疗提供参考。

  1. 45 CFR 162.1901 - Medicaid pharmacy subrogation transaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medicaid pharmacy subrogation transaction. 162... STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Medicaid Pharmacy Subrogation § 162.1901 Medicaid pharmacy subrogation transaction. The Medicaid pharmacy subrogation transaction is...

  2. The Relationship between Student Engagement and Professionalism in Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Anne Guerin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between student engagement (as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement benchmarks) and pharmacy student professionalism (as measured by the Pharmacy Professionalism Domain instrument) in first and third year pharmacy students at seven different schools of pharmacy. Engagement provides the…

  3. 78 FR 69441 - Wheatland Pharmacy; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... registration is in the public interest. East Main Street Pharmacy, 75 FR 66149, 66162 n.47 (2010); Nicholas A. Sychak, d/b/a Medicap Pharmacy, 65 FR 75959, 75967 (2000). `` he Controlled Substances Act requires that...) (quoting Medic-Aid Pharmacy, 55 FR 30043, 30044 (1990)); see also Frank's Corner Pharmacy, 60 FR...

  4. 21 CFR 1301.19 - Special requirements for online pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by means of the Internet as an online pharmacy (but continue its business activity as a non-online... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special requirements for online pharmacies. 1301... Special requirements for online pharmacies. (a) A pharmacy that has been issued a registration...

  5. REFLECTIONS ON THE ROLE OF THE PHARMACY REGULATORY AUTHORITY IN ENHANCING QUALITY RELATED EVENT REPORTING IN COMMUNITY PHARMACIESi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A.; Bishop, Andrea C.; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice Objective This study aims to better understand the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. Methods A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Results Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven deputy registrars/practice managers and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Conclusions Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may

  6. Herb-Herb Combination for Therapeutic Enhancement and Advancement: Theory, Practice and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Wai Kei Lam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Herb-herb combinations have been used in Chinese medicine practice for thousands of years, yet scientific evidence of their therapeutic benefits is lacking. With increasing interest in shifting from the one-drug-one-target paradigm to combination therapy or polypharmacy to achieve therapeutic benefits for a number of diseases, there is momentum to explore new knowledge by tapping the past empirical experiences of herb-herb combinations. This review presents an overview of the traditional concept and practice of herb-herb combination in Chinese medicine, and highlights the available scientific and clinical evidence to support the combined use of herbs. It is hoped that such information would provide a lead for developing new approaches for future therapeutic advancement and pharmaceutical product development. Very likely modern technologies combined with innovative research for the quality control of herbal products, identification of active components and understanding of the molecular mechanism, followed by well-designed animal and clinical studies would pave the way in advancing the wealth of empirical knowledge from herb-herb combination to new therapeutic modalities.

  7. Enhancing presentation skills for the advanced practice nurse: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Professional speaking is a component of the professional practice role of the advanced practice nurse (APN). The skills to communicate effectively to one person or an audience of 100 provide the APN with the essential tools for implementing change, collaborating effectively, presenting information at professional meetings, or communicating the impact of clinical outcomes in the boardroom. Public speaking skills, a professional image, and improved communication can facilitate advancement along any career ladder. The greater your fear, the more self-confidence you will gain by stepping up to a challenge and conquering it. This article describes strategies for organizing and presenting your message in a clear and concise format. Techniques to manage the anxiety produced when attempting to articulate your thoughts is essential for effective communication. Skills for enhancing the delivery of your message through effective body language, professional image, voice modulation, and use of audiovisual aids are addressed. Creative techniques for fielding questions are key in promoting a dynamic closure and provide consistent reinforcement of the key message content. PMID:15714019

  8. Academic Success and Initial Labor Market Outcomes for Pharmacy Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Murphy, Ph.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines the relationship between academic success and labor market outcomes among graduating pharmacy students. Unlike previous studies, this paper characterizes labor market outcome not only as an individual’s starting salary, but also whether or not the student had a position secured at the time of graduation, whether or not a signing bonus was received, and the setting in which (she will practice. Methods: A standard exit survey was administered to graduating Doctor of Pharmacy students at a Midwestern, public university within two weeks of graduation. The relationship between academic success and initial labor market outcome was assessed using cross-tabulations, chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results: There were no significant relationships between grade point averages and signing bonuses, starting salaries or employment offers. Students with higher grade point averages were less likely to work in chain community pharmacies, and more likely to work in a hospital or other health-system setting. Conclusions: The relationships between academic and direct measures of labor market outcomes (salary and bonuses were not necessarily positive, as standard economic theory predicts. Rather, the relationship is indirect, as it appears that students with greater academic success obtained employment in more clinical settings, which carry a different mix of pecuniary and non-pecuniary benefits. Keywords: grade point average, exit survey, labor market outcome

  9. ICON 2013: practical consensus recommendations for hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative advanced or metastatic breastcancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, P M; Gupta, S; Dawood, S; Rugo, H; Bhattacharyya, G S; Agarwal, A; Chacko, R; Sahoo, T P; Babu, G; Agarwal, S; Munshi, A; Goswami, C; Smruti, B K; Bondarde, S; Desai, C; Rajappa, S; Somani, N; Singh, M; Nimmagadda, R; Pavitran, K; Mehta, A; Parmar, V; Desai, S; Nair, R; Doval, D

    2014-01-01

    The management of hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative breast cancer patients with advanced or metastatic disease is a common problem in India and other countries in this region. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience, and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists, to arrive at practical consensus recommendations for use by the community oncologists.

  10. ICON 2013: Practical consensus recommendations for hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative advanced or metastatic breastcancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of hormone receptor-positive Her2-negative breast cancer patients with advanced or metastatic disease is a common problem in India and other countries in this region. This expert group used data from published literature, practical experience, and opinion of a large group of academic oncologists, to arrive at practical consensus recommendations for use by the community oncologists.

  11. Clinical and conventional pharmacy services in Polish hospitals: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Iga; Pawłowski, Leszek; Kocić, Ivan; Krzyżaniak, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Background Pharmacist-led care services within the hospital pharmacy setting have a significant impact on efficient drug management processes. The work of pharmacists is directly associated with the provision of drugs and medical supplies along with additional clinical, administrative, organizational and educational duties. Depending on the country, these practice roles may differ to a significant extent. Objective The aim of this research was to explore the role of the hospital pharmacist and the provision of both clinical and traditional pharmaceutical services for patients and medical staff in Polish general hospitals. Setting Hospital pharmacies from all general hospitals in Poland. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted, utilizing an anonymous questionnaire as the research instrument. Heads of hospital pharmacies were requested to participate in this study and complete the questionnaire. The survey was initially piloted to improve the research method. Main outcome measure The types of pharmaceutical services performed in Polish general hospitals. Results 166 hospital pharmacies took part in this survey. The overall response rate was 60.8 %. The total number of full-time equivalent (FTE) professionals employed within the surveyed hospital pharmacies was approximately 833. The procurement and distribution of drugs were identified as pharmaceutical services performed by most of the participants. The significant majority of pharmacists were also involved in compounding, adverse drug reaction monitoring and rational drug management services. Eleven (7 %) of the responding pharmacists had direct contact with patients and 7 (4 %) pharmacists took part in ward rounds. More precise legal regulations regarding hospital pharmacy practice were measures indicated by most pharmacists as necessary changes required in the hospital pharmacy system. Conclusion Polish hospital pharmacists provide various pharmaceutical services. Their work is closely related with direct

  12. 提高药学类本科实训教学质量的实践与探索%Practice and Exploration of Improving the Pharmacy Undergraduate Training Teaching Quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文

    2015-01-01

    新世纪我国医药行业发展迅猛,如何按药企标准培养符合需要的药学人才是一项艰巨和紧迫的任务。基于公用工程岗位的实训教学建设,文章对提高药学类本科实训教学质量的可行性作了探讨。%In the new century,China's pharmaceutical industry is developing rapidly,and the standard training with pharmaceutical companies pharmaceutical talents need becomes an arduous and urgent task. For the construction of public project is based on the post training teaching,the feasibility of improving the pharmacy undergraduate training teaching quality is explored.

  13. Pharmacy student driven detection of adverse drug reactions in the community pharmacy setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Troels; Søndergaard, Birthe; Honoré, Per Hartvig;

    2011-01-01

    of pharmacists in ADR reporting, although varies significantly among countries. Pharmacists in community pharmacies are in a unique position for detection of experienced ADRs by the drug users. The study reports from a study on community pharmacy internship students' proactive role in ADR detection through...... direct encountering and questioning with drug users. METHOD: Pharmacy students undertaking internship in a community pharmacy were approached. Thirteen students from nine community pharmacies participated in the project as data collectors. Prior to the study students attended an educational seminar...... focusing on ADR detection and reporting in general. Ibuprofen was chosen as the drug of study. Pharmacy students approached recurrent drug users purchasing the drug. Participating users were asked about experienced ADRs linked to ibuprofen use. Reported ADRs were collected and analysed. RESULTS: Hundred...

  14. Good practices in development of advanced assembly/core calculation methods and implementations of AEGIS/SCOPE2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the history of development of AEGIS/SCOPE2, an advanced in-core fuel management code for PWRs. The initial project, development of a proto-type code, was started in 1996 as a feasibility study of the advanced calculation method/algorithm for advanced computation environments such as distributed parallel computers like PC-clusters which are commonly used nowadays. With success of development of the prototype code, a production-level advanced core calculation code, SCOPE2, was developed followed by AEGIS, an advanced assembly calculation code. These codes have been developed on the basis of the object-oriented programming approach and the agile software development. The authors extracted the key factors for success of the project as good practices from the viewpoint of code design, implementation, project management and verification and validation. Those practices are universal and may be applicable to any projects in the future. (author)

  15. Improving Pharmacy Dispensing Performance Through Time Management

    OpenAIRE

    Shaat, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this project was to carry out a change model in one of Family Medicine Clinic’s Pharmacy in Abu Dhabi. While, the objectives of the project were to improve patient satisfaction through improving patient waiting time for medications collection, improving patient’s knowledge about the pharmacy services and then generalize the implemented change in all other six clinic’s pharmacies. The change was happened because of current system of dispensing patient’s prescription ‘in turn’, which...

  16. Advancing the quality of oncology nursing care: Interlink Community Cancer Nurses' model for reflective practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, D; Pelton, B

    2001-01-01

    Since 1996, Interlink Community Cancer Nurses have been using reflective practice as a team to share knowledge and experience amongst peers. The use of reflective practice enables the nurse to examine decision-making in patient situations and uncover the knowledge and artistry that is embedded in nursing practice. This article describes how reflection is practised by specialist cancer nurses to advance the quality of caregiving. The use of a structured framework for reflection which incorporates ways of knowing in nursing is an essential feature of the Interlink model for reflection. The development of a process for reflection within the Interlink program has at times been challenging. However, the Interlink nurses' experience with reflection is believed to be critical to the ongoing development of the program and the individual nurse. Interlink nurses have found that guided reflection, the creation of an environmental milieu for reflection and personal knowing, and self-evaluation are critical to the process of becoming a self-reflective practitioner. PMID:11842450

  17. Exploring the intentions of pharmacy students towards pharmacy ownership by using theory of planned behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    KHAN, Muhammad Umair; Ahmad, Akram; Fayyaz, Muhammad; Ashraf, Nida; Bhagavathula, Akshaya

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess the association of the constructs of theory of planned behaviour (behavioural beliefs, normative beliefs, control beliefs) and demographic variables with the intentions of pharmacy students to become pharmacy owner. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted between October and November, 2014, using a pretested, self-administered questionnaire delivered to a sample of 350 pharmacy students at a private university of Pakistan. Behavioural ...

  18. A STUDY TO EVALUATE THE PERCEPTION OF PHARMACY STUDENT’S TOWARDS THE PHARMACY PROFESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Yogesh Joshi

    2011-01-01

    The quality of education offered by Pharmacy institutions in the country varies widely. There are only a few institutions which maintain internationally recognized standard. A survey was conducted on the one hundred and twenty four (124) undergraduate Pharmacy students to determine their awareness and inclination towards Pharmacy as a career choice. Students were evaluated for the perception on their education and to share ideas for its improvement. A questionnaire survey that explored their ...

  19. Impact of Utilizing Pharmacy Students as Workforce for Hawai‘i Asthma Friendly Pharmacy Project

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Carolyn S; Nett, Blythe; Kishaba, Gregg; Gomez, Lara

    2015-01-01

    A partnership was formed between the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP) and the Department of Health to carry out the Hawai‘i Asthma Friendly Pharmacy Project (HAFPP), which utilizes pharmacy students as a workforce to administer Asthma Control Tests™ (ACT), and provide Asthma Action Plans (AAP) and inhaler technique education. Evaluation of data from a pilot project in 2008 with first and second year students prompted more intensive training in therape...

  20. Establishing the Medication Safety Research Network of Indiana (Rx-SafeNet): Perspectives of Community Pharmacy Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Seel, Lindsey V.; Hultgren, Kyle E.; Snyder, Margie E

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional survey was to determine community pharmacy employee research project priorities and assess interest levels, barriers, and facilitators to joining a new community pharmacy practice-based research network (PBRN) and use this information in subsequent PBRN development. One hundred forty pharmacists and 40 support staff responded. The majority (72%) of respondents were somewhat interested or needed more information to determine their level o...

  1. Selling Drugs or Providing Health Care? : The role of private pharmacies and drugstores, examples from Zimbabwe and Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Viberg, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Background: In low-income countries many people do not have access to formal health care because of poverty and weak health systems. Instead people seek care at private pharmacies and drugstores. Infectious diseases such as sexually transmitted infections (STI) and diarrhoea are common and access to correct management is of big importance. Assessing the quality and finding the potential for improvement of private pharmacy and drugstore practice is therefore of uttermost impo...

  2. A STUDY TO EVALUATE THE PERCEPTION OF PHARMACY STUDENT’S TOWARDS THE PHARMACY PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Joshi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of education offered by Pharmacy institutions in the country varies widely. There are only a few institutions which maintain internationally recognized standard. A survey was conducted on the one hundred and twenty four (124 undergraduate Pharmacy students to determine their awareness and inclination towards Pharmacy as a career choice. Students were evaluated for the perception on their education and to share ideas for its improvement. A questionnaire survey that explored their attitudes and views towards the Pharmacy profession was chosen for this study. Based on the evaluated data from questionnaire, the student’s perception towards Pharmacy education was seems to be very poor and survey also revealed poor inclination towards pharmacy as a profession. Student’s perception on scope and contribution was found to be unsatisfactory. Student’s learning tools, teaching methods and evaluation system were found unexpressive to the pharmacy students. Therefore, there is a need to change such a wrong perception and poor inclination from the minds of pharmacy students by providing professionalism through some educative seminars or programmes, or by including some education promotive, scope oriented and professional communicating subjects in course curriculum of Pharmacy education.

  3. ABC and VED Analysis of the Pharmacy Store of a Tertiary Care Teaching, Research and Referral Healthcare Institute of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devnani, M; Gupta, Ak; Nigah, R

    2010-04-01

    The ABC and VED (vital, essential, desirable) analysis of the pharmacy store of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, was conducted to identify the categories of items needing stringent management control. The annual consumption and expenditure incurred on each item of pharmacy for the year 2007-08 was analyzed and inventory control techniques, i.e. ABC, VED and ABC-VED matrix analysis, were applied. The drug formulary of the pharmacy consisted of 421 items. The total annual drug expenditure (ADE) on items issued in 2007-08 was Rs. 40,012,612. ABC analysis revealed 13.78%, 21.85% and 64.37% items as A, B and C category items, respectively, accounting for 69.97%, 19.95% and 10.08% of ADE of the pharmacy. VED analysis showed 12.11%, 59.38% and 28.51% items as V, E, and D category items, respectively, accounting for 17.14%, 72.38% and 10.48% of ADE of the pharmacy. On ABC-VED matrix analysis, 22.09%, 54.63% and 23.28% items were found to be category I, II and III items, respectively, accounting for 74.21%, 22.23% and 3.56% of ADE of the pharmacy. The ABC and VED techniques need to be adopted as a routine practice for optimal use of resources and elimination of out-of-stock situations in the hospital pharmacy.

  4. Evolution, current structure, and role of a primary care clinical pharmacy service in an integrated managed care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Rachel M F; Campbell, Stephanie M; Kroner, Beverly A; Proksel, Jenel R; Billups, Sarah J; Witt, Daniel M; Helling, Dennis K

    2013-01-01

    The impact of the declining number of primary care physicians is exacerbated by a growing elderly population in need of chronic disease management. Primary care clinical pharmacy specialists, with their unique knowledge and skill set, are well suited to address this gap. At Kaiser Permanente of Colorado (KPCO), primary care clinical pharmacy specialists have a long history of integration with medical practices and are located in close proximity to physicians, nurses, and other members of the health care team. Since 1992, Primary Care Clinical Pharmacy Services (PCCPS) has expanded from 4 to 30 full-time equivalents (FTEs) to provide services in all KPCO medical office buildings. With this growth in size, PCCPS has evolved to play a vital role in working with primary care medical teams to ensure that drug therapy is effective, safe, and affordable. In addition, PCCPS specialists provide ambulatory teaching sites for pharmacy students and pharmacy residents. There is approximately 1 specialist FTE for every 13,000 adult KPCO members and every 9 clinical FTEs of internal medicine and family medicine physicians. All clinical pharmacy specialists in the pharmacy department are required to have a PharmD degree, to complete postgraduate year 2 residencies, and, as a condition of employment, to become board certified in an applicable specialty. The evolution, current structure, and role of PCCPS at KPCO, including factors facilitating successful integration within the medical team, are highlighted. Patient and nonpatient care responsibilities are described.

  5. ABC and VED Analysis of the Pharmacy Store of a Tertiary Care Teaching, Research and Referral Healthcare Institute of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devnani, M; Gupta, Ak; Nigah, R

    2010-04-01

    The ABC and VED (vital, essential, desirable) analysis of the pharmacy store of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India, was conducted to identify the categories of items needing stringent management control. The annual consumption and expenditure incurred on each item of pharmacy for the year 2007-08 was analyzed and inventory control techniques, i.e. ABC, VED and ABC-VED matrix analysis, were applied. The drug formulary of the pharmacy consisted of 421 items. The total annual drug expenditure (ADE) on items issued in 2007-08 was Rs. 40,012,612. ABC analysis revealed 13.78%, 21.85% and 64.37% items as A, B and C category items, respectively, accounting for 69.97%, 19.95% and 10.08% of ADE of the pharmacy. VED analysis showed 12.11%, 59.38% and 28.51% items as V, E, and D category items, respectively, accounting for 17.14%, 72.38% and 10.48% of ADE of the pharmacy. On ABC-VED matrix analysis, 22.09%, 54.63% and 23.28% items were found to be category I, II and III items, respectively, accounting for 74.21%, 22.23% and 3.56% of ADE of the pharmacy. The ABC and VED techniques need to be adopted as a routine practice for optimal use of resources and elimination of out-of-stock situations in the hospital pharmacy. PMID:21264126

  6. Geographic Medical History: Advances in Geospatial Technology Present New Potentials in Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, F. S.; Finley, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes) and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour), but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, "Airs, Waters, Places", yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient's medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient's "Geographic Medical History". In order to accomplish this we need information on: a) relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b) location of the individual in that person's dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual's location can be tracked in real time if

  7. Reregulation of the Swedish pharmacy sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisell, Kristin; Winblad, Ulrika; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, a reregulation of the Swedish pharmacy sector took place, and a fundamental change in ownership and structure followed. The reregulation provides an opportunity to reveal the politicians' views on pharmacies. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze the political arguments...... for the reregulation of the Swedish pharmacy sector in 2009. The method used was a qualitative content analysis of written political documents regarding the reregulation. The primary rationales for the reregulation were better availability, efficiency, price pressure, and safe usage of medicines. During...... are better equipped to perform public activities. The results point to that the reform was done almost solely in order to introduce private ownership in the pharmacy sector, and was not initiated in order to solve any general problems, or to enhance patient outcomes of medicine use....

  8. Pharmacoeconomic Education in Egyptian Schools of Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Ahmed M.; Hussein, Mustafa; Abdulhalim, Abdulla M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the status of pharmacoeconomics education in Egyptian schools of pharmacy and compile and construct recommendations on how Egypt and similar countries could improve their educational infrastructure in pharmacoeconomics.

  9. Advanced Practice Nursing Committee on Process Improvement in Trauma: An Innovative Application of the Strong Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Sarah Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to summarize the successes and future implications for a nurse practitioner-driven committee on process improvement in trauma. The trauma nurse practitioner is uniquely positioned to recognize the need for clinical process improvement and enact change within the clinical setting. Application of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice proves to actively engage the trauma nurse practitioner in process improvement initiatives. Through enhancing nurse practitioner professional engagement, the committee aims to improve health care delivery to the traumatically injured patient. A retrospective review of the committee's first year reveals trauma nurse practitioner success in the domains of direct comprehensive care, support of systems, education, and leadership. The need for increased trauma nurse practitioner involvement has been identified for the domains of research and publication. PMID:27414145

  10. Opioid therapy for chronic low back pain: prescribing considerations for advanced practice registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Maureen Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common, disabling, and costly condition, and advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) must carefully evaluate patients before considering long-term opioid therapy as a management strategy. APRNs should refer patients suspected of having a serious condition, or identifiable etiology, for specialist evaluation, as many patients improve with physical therapy, interventional pain management procedures, or surgical intervention. For patients unresponsive to nonopioid treatment, APRNs with an understanding of opioids, and the experience to assess and manage the risks of opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion, may consider long-term opioid therapy as part of a multimodal management plan. Such prescribing necessitates careful patient selection; informed consent; prudent opioid dosing and titration; and monitoring for response to treatment, adverse effects, and aberrant drug-taking behavior. Treatment and regulatory guidelines can assist APRNs in providing safe and effective care to patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:25365050

  11. The Evolving Regulation of Internet Pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Gorlach, Igor

    2014-01-01

    This paper follows the rise of the Internet drug sale industry and the response to the trend by regulators, policymakers, and private companies. After discussing the existing laws and their enforcement to police rogue Internet pharmacies, the paper outlines in detail the 2008 Ryan Haight Act and its effect. Finally, the paper analyzes two of the ongoing efforts to tighten the regulation of Internet pharmacies further.

  12. The Need for an Aerospace Pharmacy Residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuse, T.; Schuyler, C.; Bayuse, Tina M.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph poster presentation reviews the rationale for a call for a new program in residency for aerospace pharmacy. Aerospace medicine provides a unique twist on traditional medicine, and a specialty has evolved to meet the training for physicians, and it is becoming important to develop such a program for training in pharmacy designed for aerospace. The reasons for this specialist training are outlined and the challenges of developing a program are reviewed.

  13. Teaching Management in a Community Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Calomo, Joseph M.

    2006-01-01

    Students need strong interpersonal skills to ensure application of their clinical skills and knowledge. Pharmacy schools across the nation must assess the quantity and quality of management skills instruction within their curriculums, including experiential education. The purpose of this article is to describe the importance of the development and utilization of business and people management skills within a community pharmacy, as well as how to incorporate these skills into a student's advan...

  14. Evaluation of HRSA's Clinical Pharmacy Demonstration Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Lindsay Harris; Meredith Lee; Rebecca Nyman

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated demonstration projects that aimed to expand access to needed pharmaceuticals through comprehensive pharmacy services and improve the health of the mostly low-income population served by HRSA-supported health centers. Researchers examined 18 networks that collaborated with a school of pharmacy to expand services at their health center sites, with a focus on disease management programs run by a clinical pharmacist for patients with diabetes. The demonstration showed substan...

  15. Pharmaceutical Consultation in UAE Community Pharmacies

    OpenAIRE

    Hamoudi, N. M.; Shirwaikar, A. A.; Ali, H. S.; Al Ayoubi, E. I.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the focus of pharmacists as traditional drug dispensers has shifted to more active and participative role in risk assessment, risk management, and other medication related consultation activities. Pharmacy profession is evolving steadily in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Pharmacists in UAE are so much occupied in their administrative and managerial duties that dispensing is mostly attended to by pharmacy technicians. Pharmacist-led patient counseling is limited to the dosage...

  16. Clinical Pharmacy Services in the Home

    OpenAIRE

    MacKeigan, Linda D.; Nissen, Lisa M

    2008-01-01

    Articles on clinical pharmacy services in the home began appearing 3 decades ago but numbers have greatly increased in the last decade. This overview of the English language literature identified 66 reports describing 57 home-based clinical pharmacy programs. Most programs were provided in the context of a time-limited research project. Medication reviews (defined as comprehensive assessment of the appropriateness of the medication regimen) and medication management (defined as assessment and...

  17. Professionalization in Pharmacy Education as a Matter of Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylrea, Martina F; Gupta, Tarun Sen; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-11-25

    Little research exists on the formation of professional identity in higher education health programs. Such programs may approach the teaching, learning, and assessment of professionalism based upon a suite of attitudes, values, and behaviors considered indicative of a practicing professional. During this transition, professional identity formation can be achieved through student engagement with authentic experiences and interaction with qualified professionals. This paper examines the shift toward identity formation as an essential element of professional education and considers its implications for pharmacy curriculum design. PMID:26839431

  18. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  19. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  20. Big Data: Implications for Health System Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Laura B; Rogers, Joseph W; Hertig, John B; Weber, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Big Data refers to datasets that are so large and complex that traditional methods and hardware for collecting, sharing, and analyzing them are not possible. Big Data that is accurate leads to more confident decision making, improved operational efficiency, and reduced costs. The rapid growth of health care information results in Big Data around health services, treatments, and outcomes, and Big Data can be used to analyze the benefit of health system pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide a perspective on how Big Data can be applied to health system pharmacy. It will define Big Data, describe the impact of Big Data on population health, review specific implications of Big Data in health system pharmacy, and describe an approach for pharmacy leaders to effectively use Big Data. A few strategies involved in managing Big Data in health system pharmacy include identifying potential opportunities for Big Data, prioritizing those opportunities, protecting privacy concerns, promoting data transparency, and communicating outcomes. As health care information expands in its content and becomes more integrated, Big Data can enhance the development of patient-centered pharmacy services.

  1. A Survey about Pharmacy Technicians in Eskisehir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozdemir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the current work, we aimed to carry out a research on the evaluation of pharmacy technicians from the perspective of pharmacists in Eskisehir. Methods: The pharmacists of this test were chosen by random sampling method and they were asked to answer the questionary. The data of this test was analysed with IBM SPSS Statistics 20 and Microsoft Excel programs in general and in subgroups, then those analysis were given in percentages and shown in graphs. Results: This survey revealed the expectation of pharmacists from their pharmacy technicians associated with their duties in the pharmacy and properties, education levels, professional experience, knowledge about medicines and pharmacy procedures. Conclusion: In this survey, similar results were obtained in general and in subgroups. Generally the most important part of pharmacy system for pharmacists is prescription and authorization system so they want pharmacy technicians to be most well-equipped in this field. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 670-691

  2. Big Data: Implications for Health System Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Laura B; Rogers, Joseph W; Hertig, John B; Weber, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Big Data refers to datasets that are so large and complex that traditional methods and hardware for collecting, sharing, and analyzing them are not possible. Big Data that is accurate leads to more confident decision making, improved operational efficiency, and reduced costs. The rapid growth of health care information results in Big Data around health services, treatments, and outcomes, and Big Data can be used to analyze the benefit of health system pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide a perspective on how Big Data can be applied to health system pharmacy. It will define Big Data, describe the impact of Big Data on population health, review specific implications of Big Data in health system pharmacy, and describe an approach for pharmacy leaders to effectively use Big Data. A few strategies involved in managing Big Data in health system pharmacy include identifying potential opportunities for Big Data, prioritizing those opportunities, protecting privacy concerns, promoting data transparency, and communicating outcomes. As health care information expands in its content and becomes more integrated, Big Data can enhance the development of patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:27559194

  3. 我院门诊药房绩效工资二次分配方案改革实践%Practice of Program Reform on Secondary Distribution of Performance-related Pay in Outpatient Pharmacy of Our Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    茅渊; 许建国

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce the establishment and effects of secondary distribution program of performance-related pay in outpatient pharmacy of our hospital. METHODS: Through changing the dispensing process, refining division of labor positions, defining job responsibilities, resetting coefficient of performance-related pay, formulating rewards and punishment rules, changing the accounting rules and so on, the secondary distribution program of performance-related pay had been established in outpatient pharmacy, and then the program was evaluated with waiting time and satisfaction as index. RESULTS & CONCLUSIONS: After the implementation of new distribution program, the average waiting time of patients who get the medicine is reduced from 8 min to 5 min. The satisfaction degree of patients to window service has been improved from about 91% to about 96%. New program manifests the principle of distribution according to work; the greater the contribution, the higher the pay; the better the contribution, the better the pay; give priority to efficiency with due consideration to fairness. The enthusiasm of pharmaceutical personnel's is fully aroused. Thereby the quality of service has been improved.%目的:介绍我院门诊药房绩效工资二次分配方案的改革与实施效果.方法:通过改变发药流程、细化岗位分工、明确岗位职责、重新设定绩效工资系数、制定奖惩考核细则、改变核算规则等建立门诊药房绩效工资二次分配方案,并以患者取药等候时间及窗口服务满意度等为指标进行评价.结果与结论:实施新的分配方案后,患者取药平均等待时间从8 min降到5min,药房窗口服务满意度从91%左右升到96%左右.新方案体现了按劳分配、多劳多得、优劳优得、效绩优先、兼顾公平的原则,调动了药剂人员积极性,从而提高了服务质量.

  4. [Development of advanced educational programs, including research programs, for undergraduate students in National Universities: the facts in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosaki, Yuji; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Santa, Tomofumi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes detailed facts obtained from the questionnaire conducted in 2010 at about 14 National Universities on the topic of "Research programs and advanced educational programs for undergraduate students". The contents of the questionnaire included: (1) Research programs based on the coalition of university and hospital and/or community pharmacy, other Graduate Schools, such as School of Medicine etc., and the University Hospital, (2) Educational systems for the achievement of research programs and their research outcomes, (3) Research programs based on pharmacist practices, (4) Ongoing advanced educational programs for undergraduate students, taking advantage of the coalition with Graduate School, School of Medicine (and Dentistry), and University Hospital. Some of the advanced educational programs outlined in this questionnaire will be carried out by our group in the coming years and the educational benefits together with associated problems shall as well be clarified. This approach will be informative for the development of the leader-oriented pharmacist programs for the college of Pharmacy.

  5. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance, K-12 Schools (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit energy efficiency measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. K-12 schools were selected as one of the highest priority building sectors, because schools affect the lives of most Americans. They also represent approximately 8% of the energy use and 10% of the floor area in commercial buildings nationwide. U.S. K-12 school districts spend more than $8 billion each year on energy - more than they spend on computers and textbooks combined. Most occupy older buildings that often have poor operational performance - more than 30% of schools were built before 1960. The average age of a school is about 42 years - which is nearly the expected serviceable lifespan of the building. K-12 schools offer unique opportunities for deep, cost-effective energy efficiency improvements, and this guide provides convenient and practical guidance for exploiting these opportunities in the context of public, private, and parochial schools.

  6. Non-physician practitioners in radiation oncology: advanced practice nurses and physician assistants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: With changes in reimbursement and a decrease in the number of residents, there is a need to explore new ways of achieving high quality patient care in radiation oncology. One mechanism is the implementation of non-physician practitioner roles, such as the advanced practice nurse (APN) and physician assistant (PA). This paper provides information for radiation oncologists and nurses making decisions about: (1) whether or not APNs or PAs are appropriate for their practice, (2) which type of provider would be most effective, and (3) how best to implement this role. Methods: Review of the literature and personal perspective. Conclusions: Specific issues addressed regarding APN and PA roles in radiation oncology include: definition of roles, regulation, prescriptive authority, reimbursement, considerations in implementation of the role, educational needs, and impact on resident training. A point of emphasis is that the non-physician practitioner is not a replacement or substitute for either a resident or a radiation oncologist. Instead, this role is a complementary one. The non-physician practitioner can assist in the diagnostic work-up of patients, manage symptoms, provide education to patients and families, and assist them in coping. This support facilitates the physician's ability to focus on the technical aspects of prescribing radiotherapy

  7. Impact of Facilitated Asynchronous Distance Education on Clinical Skills Development of International Pharmacy Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Zubin; Dean, Marie Rocchi

    2006-01-01

    The use of distance education for clinical skills development in the health professions has not been extensively described, due in part to the intensive nature of the relationship between the patient and practitioner. In the context of pharmacy practice, there are specific needs to develop new vehicles for clinical skills education due to growing…

  8. Advancing Efforts to Achieve Health Equity: Equity Metrics for Health Impact Assessment Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Heller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Equity is a core value of Health Impact Assessment (HIA. Many compelling moral, economic, and health arguments exist for prioritizing and incorporating equity considerations in HIA practice. Decision-makers, stakeholders, and HIA practitioners see the value of HIAs in uncovering the impacts of policy and planning decisions on various population subgroups, developing and prioritizing specific actions that promote or protect health equity, and using the process to empower marginalized communities. There have been several HIA frameworks developed to guide the inclusion of equity considerations. However, the field lacks clear indicators for measuring whether an HIA advanced equity. This article describes the development of a set of equity metrics that aim to guide and evaluate progress toward equity in HIA practice. These metrics also intend to further push the field to deepen its practice and commitment to equity in each phase of an HIA. Over the course of a year, the Society of Practitioners of Health Impact Assessment (SOPHIA Equity Working Group took part in a consensus process to develop these process and outcome metrics. The metrics were piloted, reviewed, and refined based on feedback from reviewers. The Equity Metrics are comprised of 23 measures of equity organized into four outcomes: (1 the HIA process and products focused on equity; (2 the HIA process built the capacity and ability of communities facing health inequities to engage in future HIAs and in decision-making more generally; (3 the HIA resulted in a shift in power benefiting communities facing inequities; and (4 the HIA contributed to changes that reduced health inequities and inequities in the social and environmental determinants of health. The metrics are comprised of a measurement scale, examples of high scoring activities, potential data sources, and example interview questions to gather data and guide evaluators on scoring each metric.

  9. Increase in Naloxone Prescriptions Dispensed in US Retail Pharmacies Since 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher M; Lurie, Peter G; Compton, Wilson M

    2016-04-01

    Distribution of naloxone, traditionally through community-based naloxone programs, is a component of a comprehensive strategy to address the epidemic of prescription opioid and heroin overdose deaths in the United States. Recently, there has been increased focus on naloxone prescription in the outpatient setting, particularly through retail pharmacies, yet data on this practice are sparse. We found an 1170% increase in naloxone dispensing from US retail pharmacies between the fourth quarter of 2013 and the second quarter of 2015. These findings suggest that prescribing naloxone in the outpatient setting complements traditional community-based naloxone programs. PMID:26890174

  10. Pharmaceutical Care Practice of Pharmacy Intravenous Admixture Services in Our Hospital%我院静脉药物配置中心的药学服务实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晓东

    2013-01-01

    我院静脉药物配置中心(PIVAS)成立以来,药师借助医院提供的医药信息服务软件、电子审方系统、出仓核对、轨道小车、例会学习等平台开展符合我院实际的药学服务工作。在医嘱审核、药品核对、输液配送等环节为医师、护士、患者提供更加专业的药学服务,保障临床合理用药,提升了自我价值。%Since the establishment of the pharmacy intravenous admixture services ( PIVAS ) , pharmaceutical ser-vices have been carried out by pharmacists in accordance with the actual situation of our hospital by means of the sup-portive platform provided by the hospital such as the medical information service software , electronic prescription sys-tem , warehouse release check and regular meetings , and so on . More professional pharmaceutical services were pro-vided to physicians , nurses and patients in the audit of doctor orders , medicine check and infusion distribution , etc . so as to guarantee the rational drug use and upgrade the self-value of pharmacist .

  11. The Economic, Social and Administrative Pharmacy (ESAP) Discipline in US Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M.; Latif, David A.; Adkins, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States have struggled over the past several decades with identifying a consistent title for the broad body of knowledge related to the social, economic, behavioral, and administrative aspects of pharmacy. This paper examines the educational background and professional experience of those teaching…

  12. Safety implications of standardized continuous quality improvement programs in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Ho, Certina; Mackinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Thomas; Taylor, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Standardized continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs combine Web-based technologies and standardized improvement processes, tools, and expectations to enable quality-related events (QREs) occurring in individual pharmacies to be shared with pharmacies in other jurisdictions. Because standardized CQI programs are still new to community pharmacy, little is known about how they impact medication safety. This research identifies key aspects of medication safety that change as a result of implementing a standardized CQI program. Fifty-three community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, adopted the SafetyNET-Rx standardized CQI program in April 2010. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Canada's Medication Safety Self-Assessment (MSSA) survey was administered to these pharmacies before and 1 year into their use of the SafetyNET-Rx program. The nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to explore where changes in patient safety occurred as a result of SafetyNETRx use. Significant improvements occurred with quality processes and risk management, staff competence, and education, and communication of drug orders and other information. Patient education, environmental factors, and the use of devices did not show statistically significant changes. As CQI programs are designed to share learning from QREs, it is reassuring to see that the largest improvements are related to quality processes, risk management, staff competence, and education. PMID:22842505

  13. Dual degree programs at the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senft, Sandra L; Thompson, Chad; Blumenschein, Karen

    2008-02-15

    The rapid growth and evolution of the pharmacy profession has created a wide array of opportunities for graduating pharmacists beyond traditional community pharmacy or hospital practice. Management and leadership positions in federal and state healthcare agencies, pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, retail pharmacies, academia and managed care organizations increasingly require the pharmaceutical knowledge obtained through a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree combined with financial, organizational, and management skills. In these innovative positions, pharmacists are being called upon to assume responsibilities as executives and administrators in systems providing pharmacist care services to patients. To endow students with knowledge and skills required to perform the duties required in these decision-making positions, the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy has established 3 joint degree programs: the PharmD/Master of Business Administration (PharmD/MBA), PharmD/Master of Public Administration (PharmD/MPA), and PharmD/Master of Science in Economics (PharmD/MS). This paper describes these joint degree programs. PMID:18322574

  14. Planning a pharmacy-led medical mission trip, part 2: servant leadership and team dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dana A; Brown, Daniel L; Yocum, Christine K

    2012-06-01

    While pharmacy curricula can prepare students for the cognitive domains of pharmacy practice, mastery of the affective aspects can prove to be more challenging. At the Gregory School of Pharmacy, medical mission trips have been highly effective means of impacting student attitudes and beliefs. Specifically, these trips have led to transformational changes in student leadership capacity, turning an act of service into an act of influence. Additionally, building team unity is invaluable to the overall effectiveness of the trip. Pre-trip preparation for teams includes activities such as routine team meetings, team-building activities, and implementation of committees, as a means of promoting positive team dynamics. While in the field, team dynamics can be fostered through activities such as daily debriefing sessions, team disclosure times, and provision of medical services.

  15. [Assistance for customers with sexually transmitted diseases at pharmacies in the Federal District, Brazil: an intervention study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Janeth de Oliveira Silva; Castro, Lia Lusitana Cardozo de; Melo, Gislane Ferreira de; Giavoni, Adriana; Merchán-Hamann, Edgar

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative survey was conducted to analyze the type of assistance provided by pharmacy employees for cases of STDs. Simulated customer visits and interviews were conducted in 70 pharmacies in Brasilia and Taguatinga, Brazil, randomly assigned to two groups, one of which participated in educational activities on STDs. There were 411 simulated client visits to the pharmacies, with the following results: recommendation to seek medical care in 30% of cases, while in 70% of cases the pharmacy employees themselves recommended some drug treatment (although only 16.4% admitted to such practice). None of these suggested treatments was appropriate, based on the syndromic approach. Recommendations for prevention and treatment of partners were rare. Pharmacists recommended consulting a physician more frequently than attendants, and the latter recommended medicines more frequently than the former. Pharmacy workers had only superficial knowledge of STDs. After an educational intervention, none of the indicators showed a significant improvement in either group. The observations point to the need for regulation and intervention to publicize educational practices for the control of diseases like STDs and for the rational use of medicines in pharmacies.

  16. Adherence: a review of education, research, practice, and policy in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown TA

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the education, research, practice, and policy related to pharmacist interventions to improve medication adherence in community settings in the United States.Methods: Authors used MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (since 1990 to identify community and ambulatory pharmacy intervention studies which aimed to improve medication adherence. The authors also searched the primary literature using Ovid to identify studies related to the pharmacy teaching of medication adherence. The bibliographies of relevant studies were reviewed in order to identify additional literature. We searched the tables of content of three US pharmacy education journals and reviewed the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy website for materials on teaching adherence principles. Policies related to medication adherence were identified based on what was commonly known to the authors from professional experience, attendance at professional meetings, and pharmacy journals.Results: Research and Practice: 29 studies were identified: 18 randomized controlled trials; 3 prospective cohort studies; 2 retrospective cohort studies; 5 case-controlled studies; and one other study. There was considerable variability in types of interventions and use of adherence measures. Many of the interventions were completed by pharmacists with advanced clinical backgrounds and not typical of pharmacists in community settings. The positive intervention effects had either decreased or not been sustained after interventions were removed. Although not formally assessed, in general, the average community pharmacy did not routinely assess and/or intervene on medication adherence. Education: National pharmacy education groups support the need for pharmacists to learn and use adherence-related skills. Educational efforts involving adherence have focused on students’ awareness of adherence barriers and communication skills needed to engage patients in behavioral

  17. Evaluating an online pharmaceutical education system for pharmacy interns in critical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Ting; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Cheng, Kuei-Ju; Hou, Ssu-An; Yen, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-02-01

    Incorporating electronic learning (eLearning) system into professional experimental programs such as pharmacy internships is a challenge. However, none of the current systems can fully support the unique needs of clinical pharmacy internship. In this study we enhanced a commercial eLearning system for clinical pharmacy internship (The Clinical Pharmacy Internship eLearning System, CPIES). The KAP questionnaire was used to evaluate the performance of group A with the traditional teaching model and group B with the CPIES teaching model. The CPIES teaching model showed significant improvement in interns' knowledge and practice (p = 0.002 and 0.031, respectively). The traditional teaching model only demonstrated significant improvement in practice (p = 0.011). Moreover, professionalism, such as attitudes on cooperating with other health professionals, is developed by learning from a good mentor. The on-line teaching and traditional teaching methods should undoubtedly be blended in a complete teaching model in order to improve learners' professional knowledge, facilitate correct attitude, and influence good practice. PMID:24315478

  18. Experience with a Drug Screening Program at a School of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Marshall E.; Hogue, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Substance use and abuse among pharmacy students is a concern of pharmacy schools, boards of pharmacy, and training sites alike. Pharmacy students must complete approximately 30% of their academic coursework in experiential settings such as community pharmacies, hospitals, and other health systems as part of any accredited pharmacy school's…

  19. 医院药学教学培训模式的探索实践%Exploration and Practice of Training and Teaching Mode of Pharmacy in a Hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安卓玲; 苏晔; 张东肃; 刘河; 刘丽宏

    2016-01-01

    总结医院药师培训的教学经验、体会和存在问题。针对不同培训对象开展层级培训,利用制度与绩效工具促进教学管理,在教学过程中科学设计教学内容与计划、通过基于问题教学与互动式教学方法巩固教学效果,并且强化评估考核。初步建立的系统化、规范化医院药学教学培训模式,保证了药师培训的质量,提升了师资的带教能力与团队整体知识水平,保障临床合理用药。%To summarize the teaching experience and problems existing in the training of pharmacists in the hospital. On the basis of strict implementation of standardized training requirements of the hospital pharmacists, we have developed multi level training for different training objects, using tools to promote the teaching management system and performance, design reasonable teaching content and plan, using interactive teaching method based on problem to strengthen teaching assessment. As a result, this study can provide reference for the establishment of standardized hospital pharmacy teaching and training model. And the models would improve the teaching ability and knowledge level of the team, as well as guarantee rational drug use.

  20. Comprehensive Healthcare module: medical and pharmacy students’ shared learning experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai-Eng Tan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Comprehensive Healthcare (CHC module was developed to introduce pre-clinical medical and pharmacy students to the concept of comprehensive healthcare. This study aims to explore their shared learning experiences within this module. Methodology: During this module, medical and pharmacy students conducted visits to patients’ homes and to related community-based organisations in small groups. They were required to write a reflective journal on their experiences regarding working with other professions as part of their module assessment. Highly scored reflective journals written by students from the 2011/2012 academic session were selected for analysis. Their shared learning experiences were identified via thematic analysis. We also analysed students’ feedback regarding the module. Results: Analysis of 25 selected reflective journals revealed several important themes: ‘Understanding of impact of illness and its relation to holistic care’, ‘Awareness of the role of various healthcare professions’ and ‘Generic or soft skills for inter-professional collaboration’. Although the primary objective of the module was to expose students to comprehensive healthcare, the students learnt skills required for future collaborative practice from their experiences. Discussion: The CHC module provided early clinical exposure to community-based health issues and incorporated some elements of inter-professional education. The students learnt about the roles of other healthcare professions and acquired soft skills required for future collaborative practice during this module.

  1. Inter-professional work based learning within an MSc in Advanced Practice: lessons from one UK higher education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Lynne; Beaton, Susan

    2010-09-01

    This paper will describe the implementation of inter-professional work based education (IPE) in one postgraduate Advanced Practitioner programme in the UK. The concept of Advanced Practice has developed as a response of a number of drivers including change in junior doctor training; government policy and increasing demands on the central government funded UK health service (the NHS). The programme was commissioned by the then greater Manchester Strategic Health Authority (now NHS North West) to meet service needs. The educational philosophy underpinning the MSc Advanced Practice (health and social care) provided by the University of Salford is IPE linked to work based learning. The process of work based learning (WBL) and inter-professional learning underpinning the programme will be discussed in relation to feedback from university staff, Advanced Practitioner (AP) students and employer feedback taken from programme and module evaluations. We argue that IPE at this level facilitates a greater understanding of the connectivity between professionals working in the health care system in the UK; a better understanding of the skills and knowledge base of colleagues; more inter-professional working and appropriate referrals in the work place. This has raised the profile of Advanced Practice (AP) in the region and ultimately resulted in better patient care with more effective and efficient use of resources (Acton Shapiro, 2006, 2008).

  2. Tobacco sales in pharmacies: a survey of attitudes, knowledge and beliefs of pharmacists employed in student experiential and other worksites in Western New York

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Danielle M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacies are venues in which patients seek out products and professional advice in order to improve overall health. However, many pharmacies in the United States continue to sell tobacco products, which are widely known to cause detrimental health effects. This conflict presents a challenge to pharmacists, who are becoming increasingly more involved in patient health promotion activities. This study sought to assess Western New York (WNY area pharmacists’ opinions about the sale of tobacco products in pharmacies, and pharmacists’ opinions on their role in patient smoking cessation. Methods Participants responded to two parallel surveys; a web-based survey was completed by 148 university-affiliated pharmacist preceptors via a list based sample, and a mail-based survey was completed by the supervising pharmacist in 120 area pharmacies via a list-based sample. The combined response rate for both surveys was 31%. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed to determine any significant differences between the preceptor and supervising pharmacist survey groups. Results Over 75% of respondents support legislation banning the sale of tobacco products in pharmacies. Over 86% of respondents would prefer to work in a pharmacy that does not sell tobacco products. Differences between preceptor and supervising pharmacist groups were observed. Action regarding counseling patients was uncommon among both groups. Conclusions Pharmacists support initiatives that increase their role in cessation counseling and initiatives that restrict the sale of tobacco products in pharmacies. These data could have important implications for communities and pharmacy practice.

  3. Feeding Tube Placement in Patients with Advanced Dementia: The Beliefs and Practice Patterns of Speech-Language Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Helen M.; Shega, Joseph W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the beliefs and practices of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) about the use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) among patients with advanced dementia and dysphagia. Method: A survey was mailed to a geographically stratified random sample of 1,050 medical SLPs. Results: The response rate was 57%, and 326 surveys met…

  4. Some Misconceptions in Meiosis Shown by Students Responding to an Advanced Level Practical Examination Question in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are problems revealed in student responses to a practical task which formed part of an advanced level examination. The frequencies with which some misconceptions about cell reproduction and genetics occurred are presented. The nature of these misconceptions is analyzed and their implications discussed. (CW)

  5. A conceptual framework for advanced practice nursing in a pediatric tertiary care setting: the SickKids' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrow, Karen; Hubley, Pam; McAllister, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) are pediatric healthcare providers who integrate principles and theories of advanced nursing with specialty knowledge to provide autonomous, independent, accountable, ethical and developmentally appropriate care in complex, often ambiguous and rapidly changing healthcare environments. Caring for children and adolescents requires culturally sensitive and family-centred approaches to care that incorporate a unique body of knowledge. Family-centred care is an approach to planning, delivery and evaluation of healthcare that is governed by the establishment of mutually beneficial partnerships among APNs, health professionals and children/families. The cornerstone of APN practice at SickKids is the recognition of "family" as the recipients of care. By valuing and developing relationships with families, APNs promote excellence in healthcare across the care continuum to optimize the child's and family's physical, emotional, social, psychological and spiritual well-being. This paper outlines the evolution of advanced practice nursing at SickKids, beginning with the introduction of APN roles in the 1970s and culminating in the current critical mass of APNs who have been integrated throughout the hospital's infrastructure. We describe the process used to create a common vision and a framework to guide pediatric advanced nursing practice.

  6. A conceptual framework for advanced practice nursing in a pediatric tertiary care setting: the SickKids' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGrow, Karen; Hubley, Pam; McAllister, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) are pediatric healthcare providers who integrate principles and theories of advanced nursing with specialty knowledge to provide autonomous, independent, accountable, ethical and developmentally appropriate care in complex, often ambiguous and rapidly changing healthcare environments. Caring for children and adolescents requires culturally sensitive and family-centred approaches to care that incorporate a unique body of knowledge. Family-centred care is an approach to planning, delivery and evaluation of healthcare that is governed by the establishment of mutually beneficial partnerships among APNs, health professionals and children/families. The cornerstone of APN practice at SickKids is the recognition of "family" as the recipients of care. By valuing and developing relationships with families, APNs promote excellence in healthcare across the care continuum to optimize the child's and family's physical, emotional, social, psychological and spiritual well-being. This paper outlines the evolution of advanced practice nursing at SickKids, beginning with the introduction of APN roles in the 1970s and culminating in the current critical mass of APNs who have been integrated throughout the hospital's infrastructure. We describe the process used to create a common vision and a framework to guide pediatric advanced nursing practice. PMID:20530994

  7. Diabetes and Hypertension Screening by Pharmacy Students in Thai Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Ploylearmsang, Chanuttha; Sookaneknun, Phayom; Poophalee, Thanapong; Pongruea, Piyatida

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To integrate pharmacy education into a diabetes and hypertension screening program to improve pharmacy student disease knowledge and screening skills and provide a valuable service to the community.

  8. Assessment of Hospital Pharmacy Preparedness for Mass Casualty Events

    OpenAIRE

    Awad, Nadia I.; Cocchio, Craig

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of hospital pharmacies in New Jersey demonstrates a lack of general consensus regarding hospital pharmacy preparedness for mass casualty scenarios despite individualized institutional protocols for disaster preparedness.

  9. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families. PMID:25397338

  10. Advanced practice nursing, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Ritchie, Judith A; Lamothe, Lise

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an extensive review of the organizational and health care literature of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, health care teams, and perceptions of team effectiveness. Teams have a long history in health care. Managers play an important role in mobilizing resources, guiding expectations of APN roles in teams and within organizations, and facilitating team process. Researchers have identified a number of advantages to the addition of APN roles in health care teams. The process within health care teams are dynamic and responsive to their surrounding environment. It appears that teams and perceptions of team effectiveness need to be understood in the broader context in which the teams are situated. Key team process are identified for team members to perceive their team as effective. The concepts of teamwork, perceptions of team effectiveness, and the introduction of APN roles in teams have been studied disparately. An exploration of the links between these concepts may further our understanding the health care team's perceptions of team effectiveness when APN roles are introduced. Such knowledge could contribute to the effective deployment of APN roles in health care teams and improve the delivery of health care services to patients and families.

  11. Engaging academia to advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosnider, Heather; Zhou, Ying; Balluz, Lina; Qualters, Judith

    2014-10-01

    Public health agencies at the federal, state, and local level are responsible for implementing actions and policies that address health problems related to environmental hazards. These actions and policies can be informed by integrating or linking data on health, exposure, hazards, and population. The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention׳s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is to provide information from a nationwide network of integrated health, environmental hazard, and exposure data that drives actions to improve the health of communities. The Tracking Program and federal, state, and local partners collect, integrate, analyze, and disseminate data and information to inform environmental public health actions. However, many challenges exist regarding the availability and quality of data, the application of appropriate methods and tools to link data, and the state of the science needed to link and analyze health and environmental data. The Tracking Program has collaborated with academia to address key challenges in these areas. The collaboration has improved our understanding of the uses and limitations of available data and methods, expanded the use of existing data and methods, and increased our knowledge about the connections between health and environment. Valuable working relationships have been forged in this process, and together we have identified opportunities and improvements for future collaborations to further advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking.

  12. Traumatic brain injury: advanced multimodal neuromonitoring from theory to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Sandy; Chen, Patrick M; Callaway, Sarah E; Rowland, Susan M; Adler, David E; Chen, Jefferson W

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury accounts for nearly 1.4 million injuries and 52 000 deaths annually in the United States. Intensive bedside neuromonitoring is critical in preventing secondary ischemic and hypoxic injury common to patients with traumatic brain injury in the days following trauma. Advancements in multimodal neuromonitoring have allowed the evaluation of changes in markers of brain metabolism (eg, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol) and other physiological parameters such as intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, cerebral blood flow, partial pressure of oxygen in brain tissue, blood pressure, and brain temperature. This article highlights the use of multimodal monitoring in the intensive care unit at a level I trauma center in the Pacific Northwest. The trends in and significance of metabolic, physiological, and hemodynamic factors in traumatic brain injury are reviewed, the technical aspects of the specific equipment used to monitor these parameters are described, and how multimodal monitoring may guide therapy is demonstrated. As a clinical practice, multimodal neuromonitoring shows great promise in improving bedside therapy in patients with traumatic brain injury, ultimately leading to improved neurological outcomes. PMID:20592189

  13. Conceptions of homeopathy teaching in the faculties of pharmacy in the State of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Holandino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homeopathy is a pharmaceutical and medical specialty practiced in Brazil since 1840 and known by the Federal Council of Medicine since 1980. The homeopathic pharmacy is a recognized part of the pharmaceutical profession regulated and supervised by the Federal Council of Pharmacy (CFF and the Regional Councils of Pharmacy throughout Brazil (CFF 319/97 and CFF 440/05. Despite the existence of a Federal Law (number 1552, published in 1952 which implemented the teaching of “Notions of Homeopathic Pharmaceutical Techniques” in all colleges of pharmacy, these lectures are still not present in the majority of Brazilian Pharmacy curricula. This reluctance in the implementation of the teaching of homeopathy consists in an obstacle to the formation of new pharmaceutical homeopaths in Rio de Janeiro. Aim: To evaluate how the teaching of homeopathy is being taught in undergraduate courses in pharmacy in Rio de Janeiro and register through a specific questionnaire, the students' interest, as well as the availability of internships in the field of homeopathy. Methodology: The survey was started in May 2011 with a sample of ten pharmacy colleges in the state of Rio de Janeiro (UNIG, UNIGRANRIO, UNIABEU, UNIPLI, Universo Niterói, Universo São Gonçalo, UFRJ, UNISUAM, Estácio de Sá and UFF. A specific previously developed questionnaire was applied to undergraduate students to register their interest and availability for internships in the field of homeopathy. Moreover, the students were interviewed for relevant information about their interests in the area of homeopathy. Results: Preliminary results showed that 57% of the respondents presented interest so far in qualifying in homeopathy pharmacy, 32% of them did not show any interest in the area and 11% reported not having a definite position. Regarding working with homeopathy, 51% expressed interest in working in this area, 36

  14. Pharmacy Education in India: Strategies for a Better Future

    OpenAIRE

    Jishnu, V; Gilhotra, RM; Mishra, DN.

    2011-01-01

    In this world of specialization and globalization the pharmacy education in India is suffering from serious backdrops and flaws. There is an urgent need to initiate an academic exercise aimed at attaining revamping of curriculum, keeping in pace with current and emerging trends in the field of pharmacy. Unfortunately all these years, enough emphasis was not laid on strengthening the components of Community Pharmacy, Hospital and Clinical pharmacy, while designing curriculum at diploma and deg...

  15. Infusing Swanson's Theory of caring into an advanced practice nursing model for an infectious diseases anal dysplasia clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Richard L; Corless, Inge B; Davis, Sheila M; Kwong, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing among HIV-infected men and women. The process of screening for anal dysplasia and the management of abnormal findings are currently and most often based on a medical model. The needs of these patients, however, go well beyond medical care. A more comprehensive and holistic approach to health care is, therefore, required. Given the scope of practice of advanced practice nurses who are involved in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with anal dysplasia, it is appropriate for them to assume leadership roles in addressing the needs of these patients. This article describes the application of a theory of caring to create an advanced practice nursing model of care for HIV-infected men and women in infectious diseases anal dysplasia clinics. PMID:22035527

  16. Internet pharmacy: Need to be implemented in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Anand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this era of science and technology, computer plays an important role in community. Today, computer is so ubiq-uitous in pharmaceutical research and development. The advent of the internet has had a significant impact on the formation of an information-driven, rapid-paced society. The number of internet users reached 150 million in only five years compared to 13 years for television and 38 years for radio. Consumer expectation for access, conven-ience, and speed has made the cyberspace superhighway a medium for knowledge exchange and for e-commerce. The internet offers a wide variety of health services and products to healthcare professionals as well as to the pub-lic. Online pharmaceutical sales have reached more than nearly $50 billion. This is a dramatic increase when com-pared to the $1.9 billion in 1999. At the click of the mouse, medications can be ordered and delivered conveniently to your door. Internet has evolved into a self-organizing media, capable of multiple interactions within. A large number of consumer products including drugs are being advertised and sold over the Internet. Though the market-ing of drugs over the Internet is an inevitable outcome of the booming e-economy, it poses unique ethical, legal and quality challenges- the prime cause being the anarchic structure of the Internet. These challenges are important from the consumer, physician and regulator perspectives. This paper begins with a summary of historical considera-tions and the shifting organization of internet pharmacy. The advantages and disadvantages of internet pharmacy practice are listed. Internet pharmacy is not only affordable but also can be source of easy availability of medicine.

  17. Internet Pharmacy: Need to be implemented in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Songara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

    In this era of science and technology, computer plays an important role in community. Today, computer is so ubiquitous in pharmaceutical research and development. The advent of the internet has had a significant impact on the formation of an information-driven, rapid-paced society. The number of internet users reached 150 million in only five years compared to 13 years for television and 38 years for radio. Consumer expectation for access, convenience, and speed has made the cyberspace superhighway a medium for knowledge exchange and for e-commerce. The internet offers a wide variety of health services and products to healthcare professionals as well as to the public. Online pharmaceutical sales have reached more than nearly $50 billion. This is a dramatic increase when compared to the $1.9 billion in 1999. At the click of the mouse, medications can be ordered and delivered conveniently to your door. Internet has evolved into a self-organizing media, capable of multiple interactions within. A large number of consumer products including drugs are being advertised and sold over the Internet. Though the marketing of drugs over the Internet is an inevitable outcome of the booming e-economy, it poses unique ethical, legal and quality challenges- the prime cause being the anarchic structure of the Internet. These challenges are important from the consumer, physician and regulator perspectives.This paper begins with a summary of historical considerations and the shifting organization of internet pharmacy. The advantages and disadvantages of internet pharmacy practice are listed. Internet pharmacy is not only affordable but also can be source of easy availability of medicine.

  18. Behavioral Studies Peptic Ulcer Patients Self-Medication by Visiting Pharmacy in Pontianak

    OpenAIRE

    Eka K. Untari; Siti N. Nurbaeti; Esy Nansy

    2013-01-01

    Self-medication practices is now considered as a component of self-care. Gastric ulcer is one of minor symptom that can be treated by self-medication. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, behavior, and appropriateness of self-medication practice for gastric ulcer or its related symptom amongst population. The population of this study attended community pharmacies in Pontianak of West Borneo province. This study was a cross sectional survey involving 98 adults who did se...

  19. Antibiotic sales in rural and urban pharmacies in northern Vietnam: an observational study.

    OpenAIRE

    Nga, DTT; Chuc, NT; Hoa, NP; Hoa, NQ; Nguyen, Nt; Loan, HT; Toan, TK; Phuc, HD; Horby, P.; Van Yen, N; Kinh, N. Van; Wertheim, HF

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The irrational overuse of antibiotics should be minimized as it drives the development of antibiotic resistance, but changing these practices is challenging. A better understanding is needed of practices and economic incentives for antibiotic dispensing in order to design effective interventions to reduce inappropriate antibiotic use. Here we report on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of antibiotic sales in private pharmacies in northern Vietnam. METHOD: A cross-sectional...

  20. The general pharmacy work explored in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency and nature of general pharmacy work at three Dutch community pharmacies. Methods In a purposive and convenience sample of three Dutch community pharmacies the general work was investigated. Multi-dimensional work sampling (MDWS) was used. The study took six weeks

  1. Balancing medicine prices and business sustainability: analyses of pharmacy costs, revenues and profit shed light on retail medicine mark-ups in rural Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddix Jason

    2010-07-01

    . Health systems researchers must document the positive and negative financial experiences of pharmacy initiatives to inform future projects and advance access to medicines goals.

  2. Community Pharmacy Marketing: Strategies for Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Rodis, Pharm.D., B.C.P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As community pharmacies are implementing increasingly more clinical services they are faced with a new challenge of marketing these services. This article discusses The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy Clinical Partners Program’s (Clinical Partners experiences in marketing clinical services to patients, barriers encountered through these experiences, and presents suggestions for future marketing of services.Experience: Clinical Partners developed two targeted marketing projects and evaluated impact on patient enrollment in services. In January 2008, the pharmacy ran a series of radio advertisements, newspaper print advertisements, and face to face marketing in the community with the focus of each being patient care services. During this project five individuals expressed interest in Clinical Partners’ services. Four indicated that they heard about Clinical Partners through the radio ad and one through the pharmacy website, though none chose to enroll in services. In 2009 Clinical Partners focused on marketing MTM in the form of a comprehensive medication review to current patients already enrolled in its anticoagulation management service. Following a three month period, 6 patients (8% of the 71 patients receiving the marketing intervention chose to enroll in MTM. Four additional patients have enrolled in MTM since conclusion of the project.Discussion: These projects and a review of available literature revealed barriers that pharmacies encounter when marketing clinical services to patients in an outpatient setting including patients’ unawareness of the role a pharmacist can play outside dispensing medications, patients’ belief they do not need clinical services, and patients’ unwillingness to pay a pharmacist out of pocket for services.Future Implications: To overcome these identified challenges, community pharmacies should consider integration of marketing techniques such as tailoring marketing to a target

  3. Singapore 2010 Youth Olympic Games: pharmacy handbook

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Le guide pharmaceutique des Jeux Olympiques de la Jeunesse Singapour 2010 doit être lu conjointement avec le guide des services médicaux des Jeux Olympiques de la Jeunesse Singapour 2010. Ce guide, approuvé par la commission médicale du CIO, contient la liste définitive des médicaments disponibles à la pharmacie de la clinique médicale du village olympique de la jeunesse. The Singapore 2010 Youth Olympic Games pharmacy handbook is to be read in conjunction with the Singapore 2010 Youth Oly...

  4. Costs of Loyalty Programmes Implementation in Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sierpińska

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Receiving the customer is in today’s market realities top marketing companies. The build a sustainable partnership relation between the seller and the buyer is decide on businesses, takings and profit potential. Increasingly, therefore, perpetuates the view that create lasting relationships is an essential factor in improving the effectiveness of marketing activities conducted by modern businesses. The paper presents the implementation costs of loyalty programmes in pharmacies. These costs are presented based on a study of one of the largest pharmacy loyalty programmes in Poland: “I care for health”.

  5. Job satisfaction among community pharmacy professionals in Mekelle city, Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belay YB

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yared Belete Belay Pharmacoepidemiology and Social Pharmacy Course and Research Team, Department of Pharmacy, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia Introduction: Job satisfaction is a multidimensional, enduring, important, and much-researched concept in the field of organizational behavior and has been identified as recognition in one’s field of work, level of salary, opportunities for promotion, and achievement of personal goals. Job satisfaction directly affects the labor market behavior and economic efficiency by means of the impact on productivity and turnover of staff. The aim of this study was to assess the satisfaction level of pharmacy professionals in Mekelle city. Methods: This institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted as a survey and only included voluntary participants. Those participants who did not volunteer to participate were excluded from the study. A structured questionnaire was used as a data collection tool; it was developed from different literature in the English language, and then the original tool was translated to the local language for the purpose of understanding. Results: In Mekelle, ~100 pharmacy professionals work in private medicine retail outlets. From those, only 60 volunteered to participate in this study. Significant difference in job satisfaction and job stress were observed between those working full-time and part-time, with P-values of 0.031 and 0.021, respectively. Conclusion: From the findings of the current study, it can be concluded that around two-thirds of pharmacy professionals in Mekelle city were satisfied with their professional practice. Keywords: job satisfaction, pharmacy professionals and retail outlets 

  6. 78 FR 57656 - S & S Pharmacy, Inc., d/b/a Platinum Pharmacy & Compounding; Decision and Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Pharmacy, Inc., 74 FR 10073, 10074 n.5 (2009); RX Direct Pharmacy, Inc., 72 FR 54070, 54072 n.3 (2007... FR 10073, 10074 n.5 (2009); RX Direct Pharmacy, Inc., 72 FR 54070, 54072 n.3 (2007). Registrant had... FR 67132, 67133 (1998), simultaneously with the issuance of the Show Cause Order, I also ordered...

  7. Trends in pharmacy staff’s perception of patient safety in Swedish community pharmacies after re-regulation of conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Nordén-Hägg, Annika

    2014-01-01

    pharmacies prior to and after the 2009 changes in regulation of the Swedish community pharmacy market. Methods: Questionnaires targeted at pharmacy staff before and after the changes in regulation (in 2008, 2011/12, and 2012/13 respectively) used four identical items, making comparisons of some aspects...

  8. Implementing Participatory Water Management: Recent Advances in Theory, Practice, and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Bots

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many current water planning and management problems are riddled with high levels of complexity, uncertainty, and conflict, so-called “messes” or “wicked problems.” The realization that there is a need to consider a wide variety of values, knowledge, and perspectives in a collaborative decision making process has led to a multitude of new methods and processes being proposed to aid water planning and management, which include participatory forms of modeling, planning, and decision aiding processes. However, despite extensive scientific discussions, scholars have largely been unable to provide satisfactory responses to two pivotal questions: (1 What are the benefits of using participatory approaches?; (2 How exactly should these approaches be implemented in complex social-ecological settings to realize these potential benefits? In the study of developing social-ecological system sustainability, the first two questions lead to a third one that extends beyond the one-time application of participatory approaches for water management: (3 How can participatory approaches be most appropriately used to encourage transition to more sustainable ecological, social, and political regimes in different cultural and spatial contexts? The answer to this question is equally open. This special feature on participatory water management attempts to propose responses to these three questions by outlining recent advances in theory, practice, and evaluation related to the implementation of participatory water management. The feature is largely based on an extensive range of case studies that have been implemented and analyzed by cross-disciplinary research teams in collaboration with practitioners, and in a number of cases in close cooperation with policy makers and other interested parties such as farmers, fishermen, environmentalists, and the wider public.

  9. Advancing the State-of-the-Practice for Liquid Rocket Engine Injector Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. K.; Kenny, R. J.; Richardson, B. R.; Anderso, W. E.; Austin, B. J.; Schumaker, S. A.; Muss, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Current shortcomings in both the overall injector design process and its underlying combustion stability assessment methodology are rooted in the use of empirically based or low fidelity representations of complex physical phenomena and geometry details that have first order effects on performance, thermal environments and combustion stability. The result is a design and analysis capability that is often inadequate to reliably arrive at a suitable injector design in an efficient manner. Specifically, combustion instability has been particularly difficult to predict and mitigate. Large hydrocarbon-fueled booster engines have been especially problematic in this regard. Where combustion instability has been a problem, costly and time-consuming redesign efforts have often been an unfortunate consequence. This paper presents an overview of a recently completed effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to advance the state-of-the-practice for liquid rocket engine injector design. Multiple perturbations of a gas-centered swirl coaxial (GCSC) element that burned gaseous oxygen and RP-1 were designed, assessed for combustion stability, and tested. Three designs, one stable, one marginally unstable and one unstable, were used to demonstrate both an enhanced overall injector design process and an improved combustion stability assessment process. High-fidelity results from state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics CFD simulations were used to substantially augment and improve the injector design methodology. The CFD results were used to inform and guide the overall injector design process. They were also used to upgrade selected empirical or low-dimensional quantities in the ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) stability assessment tool. Hot fire single element injector testing was used to verify both the overall injector designs and the stability assessments. Testing was conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory and at Purdue University. Companion papers

  10. BACHELOR OF PHARMACY INDUSTRIAL TRAINING: PERFORMANCE AND PRECEPTOR PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlina M.A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial training for undergraduates in Malaysian universities is widely practiced. It provide hands-on experience and up-to-date information to the graduates who are about to enter the competitive job market. Many researchers have reported the impact of industrial training on students’ performance. However, studies focusing on the preceptor perception of student performance are lacking. This study was done with the objective to evaluate UiTM’s Bachelor of Pharmacy student’s performance and to investigate preceptors’ perception towards them during industrial training. Questionnaires were distributed to selected pharmaceutical, cosmeceutical, traditional and complementary medicine industries (n=55. The outcome of these questionnaires was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. The analysis revealed that the preceptors have good viewpoint of these final year students. Nearly all respondents agreed that 82% of these students showed excellent performance during their industrial training. On the scale of 1-10, almost all elements tested showed the mean score of equal or more than 8. Nevertheless, students need to improve on their entrepreneurial and managerial skill. This study proved that the preceptors selected from various industries showed a favorable outlook towards the performance of UiTM pharmacy graduates, however more effort need to be done in order to improve their entrepreneurial and managerial skills.

  11. A Review on Different Virtual Learning Methods in Pharmacy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Noori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual learning is a type of electronic learning system based on the web. It models traditional in- person learning by providing virtual access to classes, tests, homework, feedbacks and etc. Students and teachers can interact through chat rooms or other virtual environments. Web 2.0 services are usually used for this method. Internet audio-visual tools, multimedia systems, a disco CD-ROMs, videotapes, animation, video conferencing, and interactive phones can all be used to deliver data to the students. E-learning can occur in or out of the classroom. It is time saving with lower costs compared to traditional methods. It can be self-paced, it is suitable for distance learning and it is flexible. It is a great learning style for continuing education and students can independently solve their problems but it has its disadvantages too. Thereby, blended learning (combination of conventional and virtual education is being used worldwide and has improved knowledge, skills and confidence of pharmacy students.The aim of this study is to review, discuss and introduce different methods of virtual learning for pharmacy students.Google scholar, Pubmed and Scupus databases were searched for topics related to virtual, electronic and blended learning and different styles like computer simulators, virtual practice environment technology, virtual mentor, virtual patient, 3D simulators, etc. are discussed in this article.Our review on different studies on these areas shows that the students are highly satisfied withvirtual and blended types of learning.

  12. Advanced grammar in use a self-study reference and practice book for advanced students of English : with answers and CD-ROM

    CERN Document Server

    Hewings, Martin

    2013-01-01

    An updated version of the highly successful Advanced Grammar in Use. This third edition, with answers and CD-ROM, is ideal for self-study. The book contains 100 units of grammar reference and practice materials, with illustrations in full colour and a user-friendly layout. It is ideal for learners preparing for the Cambridge Advanced, Proficiency or IELTS examinations, and is informed by the Cambridge International Corpus, which ensures the language is authentic and up-to-date. The CD-ROM includes 200 interactive exercises to reinforce the language learned in the book, plus customised tests and audio recordings to accompany the main exercises. Versions without answers and without the CD-ROM are available to purchase separately.

  13. 住院药房基于胜任力岗前培训模式的建立与实践%Establishment and practice of the competency based on pre-job training mode in hospital pharmacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴保香; 单文治; 徐艳萍; 张楠; 黄静; 龚虹霖; 孙艳; 郭代红

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To establish the competency based on pre-job training mode in hospital pharmacy and observe the effect.Methods: Detailed work index was developed, and pre-job training mode was established based on the index requirements as well as competency. The training content, training methods, assessment requirements, assessment methods and teaching process were written in the form of schedule. The training process was standardized and whole quantitative evaluation was taken. After one year, check and evaluation were carried out again according to the standardized schedules of pharmacists.Results: The training program was approved by both teaching staffs and trainees. Compared with the control group, trainees in the observed group were better in the theory and operation skill examination scores, pass rate and reevaluation scores.Conclusion:The training mode based on competency, combined with the reevaluation method, greatly improved the responsibility and initiative of new employees. The detailed and clear form was helpful for the pharmacists to master the training contents and cooperate with the trainers during the whole process. The training program played an important role in improving the integral level of the pharmaceutical group.%目的:建立住院药房基于胜任力的岗前培训模式,并观察实施效果。方法:制定详细工作指标,并围绕实现指标要求建立基于胜任力的培训方案。以日程表的形式将培训内容、培训方法、考核要求、考核方式及带教流程详细列入,实施全程量化测评的规范化培训。一年后以医院药学系列专业技术人员规范化培训考核细则要求进行再考评。结果:基于胜任力的培训方案得到带教与受训人员的认可;观察组理论、操作技能考核成绩、通过率和再评价成绩均高于对照组。结论:基于胜任力培训模式的实施和再考评相结合的方法,充分发挥了新员工的责任

  14. Profitability, third-party reimbursement, and access to community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, N V; Miederhoff, P A; Waters, L W

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the extent to which third-party reimbursement programs have affected the profitability and availability of community pharmacies. Data were taken from records maintained by the Virginia Board of Pharmacy and a survey of 177 community pharmacies. Between 1989 and 1994, 258 outpatient pharmacies opened and 342 closed. Chain and independent pharmacies suffered net losses, and supermarket and mass merchandiser pharmacies experienced net increases. Few significant changes occurred in the distribution of pharmacies over the study period. Fifty-nine chain and independent pharmacies and 1 supermarket pharmacy chain provided usable profit and reimbursement data. These pharmacies experienced declines in profits and increases in the percentage of prescriptions reimbursed by private third-party prescription programs over the last several years. Regression analyses indicated that higher ratios of sales of private third-party prescriptions to private-pay prescriptions were associated with lower profits. All respondents indicated that changes in private third-party reimbursement had substantially reduced profits over the past 5 years. The results indicate that the growth of private third-party payment has led to lower pharmacy profits but has not yet resulted in problems of consumer access.

  15. Who uses pharmacy for flu vaccinations? Population profiling through a UK pharmacy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Thornley, Tracey

    2016-04-01

    Background There is a need to increase influenza vaccination rates in England particularly among those who are under 65 years of age and at-risk because of other conditions and treatments. Objective To understand the profile of people accessing flu vaccination services within a large pharmacy chain. Method Pharmacists requested people who had been vaccinated in 2014/15 to complete a questionnaire. Data was captured electronically on vaccine delivery levels across 1201 pharmacies. Deprivation profiles were calculated using the Carstairs index. Results 1741 patients from a total of 55 pharmacies completed the survey. Convenience and accessibility remain the key reasons for attending pharmacy. Pharmacy services are accessed by people from all postcode areas, including some from the most deprived localities. Conclusion Pharmacy flu vaccination services complement those provided by general practitioners to help improve overall coverage and vaccination rates for patients in at-risk groups. These services are highly accessed by patients from all socio demographic areas, and seem to be particularly attractive to carers, frontline healthcare workers, and those of working age. PMID:26821372

  16. Rho Chi lecture. Pharmacy in a smaller world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, L C

    1986-09-01

    Health care is a business. Pharmacy is in the health business. The health care delivery system in the U.S. is rapidly becoming a managed system by corporations. Further, these corporations are moving toward international markets where some already have considerable experience. There are many parts of the world not participating in these developments in health care. Some are just off our shores in the Caribbean Basin. A review of activities occurring in recent years by various groups suggests that more could be done. Two modest approaches are presented. Support of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's "Pharmacy School Twinning Project" through which U.S. pharmacy schools would work with pharmacy schools in Central and South America is recommended. Also, national pharmacy associations jointly with pharmaceutical companies would work together using their expertise in continuing pharmacy education to develop new education models for the needy areas of the world. PMID:3757790

  17. The inclusion of a business management module within the master of pharmacy degree: a route to asset enrichment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleming H

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over the past decade the profession of pharmacy has steadily evolved. The New Pharmacy Contract exposed pharmacists to a fundamental change in traditional pharmacy business models. Objective: This study will consider whether community pharmacists, pharmacy undergraduates and academic staff within the United Kingdom believe it would be beneficial to incorporate a business management module within the Master of Pharmacy (MPharm undergraduate degree along with potential mechanisms of delivery.Methods: Further to ethical approval, the questionnaire was distributed to UK registered pharmacists (n=600, MPharm undergraduates (n=441 and academic staff at Liverpool John Moores University (n=44. The questions were formatted as multiple choice questions, Likert scales or the open answer type. On questionnaire completion and return, data were analysed using simple frequencies, cross tabulations and non-parametric techniques in the SPSS (v18.Results: The majority of pharmacists (84.9% confirmed that business skills affect their everyday responsibilities to a considerable extent. A high proportion of undergraduate students (92.8% believed that business management skills will impact on their future role. In total, 64.3% of this cohort declared that if a module were introduced they would study it. The majority of staff (79% agreed that business skills are gaining increased importance within the field of pharmacy. Conclusions: Data suggest that business skills are of relevance to the practice of pharmacy. Appropriate staff to deliver the taught material would include business owners / lecturers and teaching practitioners covering topics including management, leadership, interpersonal skills and regulation. We suggest the inclusion of a business module with the MPharm degree would be of great value in preparing individuals for practice within a modern day healthcare setting.

  18. Randomized, community-based pharmacy intervention to expand services beyond sale of sterile syringes to injection drug users in pharmacies in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Natalie D; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M

    2013-09-01

    Structural interventions may help reduce racial/ethnic disparities in HIV. In 2009 to 2011, we randomized pharmacies participating in a nonprescription syringe access program in minority communities to intervention (pharmacy enrolled and delivered HIV risk reduction information to injection drug users [IDUs]), primary control (pharmacy only enrolled IDUs), and secondary control (pharmacy did not engage IDUs). Intervention pharmacy staff reported more support for syringe sales than did control staff. An expanded pharmacy role in HIV risk reduction may be helpful.

  19. Blended Learning: Reflections on Teaching Experiences across the Pharmacy Education Continuum

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa J. Schindel; Hughes, Christine A.; Sadowski, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    Experiences with online learning in higher education have grown due to advancements in technology, technological savviness of students, changes in student expectations, and evolution of teaching approaches in higher education. Blended learning, the thoughtful fusion of face-to-face instruction with online learning, can enhance student learning and provide rewarding teaching experiences for faculty members. Pharmacy educators are beginning to employ blended learning across the continuum of pro...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.