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Sample records for advanced parkinsons disease

  1. Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Parkinson's Disease: The Newest Advances Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table ... number of genes that cause or contribute to Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as potential environmental risk factors. ...

  2. Treatment of Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Varanese

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients at late stage Parkinson's disease (PD develop several motor and nonmotor complications, which dramatically impair their quality of life. These complications include motor fluctuations, dyskinesia, unpredictable or absent response to medications, falls, dysautonomia, dementia, hallucinations, sleep disorders, depression, and psychosis. The therapeutic management should be driven by the attempt to create a balance between benefit and side effects of the pharmacological treatments available. Supportive care, including physical and rehabilitative interventions, speech therapy, occupational therapy, and nursing care, has a key role in the late stage of disease. In this review we discuss the several complications experienced by advance PD patients and their management. The importance of an integrative approach, including both pharmacological and supportive interventions, is emphasized.

  3. Treatment of Advanced Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Varanese; Zoe Birnbaum; Roger Rossi; Alessandro Di Rocco

    2010-01-01

    Patients at late stage Parkinson's disease (PD) develop several motor and nonmotor complications, which dramatically impair their quality of life. These complications include motor fluctuations, dyskinesia, unpredictable or absent response to medications, falls, dysautonomia, dementia, hallucinations, sleep disorders, depression, and psychosis. The therapeutic management should be driven by the attempt to create a balance between benefit and side effects of the pharmacological treatments avai...

  4. Bladder dysfunction in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, Kristian; Nielsen, Kurt K

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients often have lower urinary tract symptoms. Seventy-four percent of patients with early-to-moderate disease report more than one bladder disturbance symptom. Severe bladder symptoms are reported in 27-39% of PD patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  5. Duodopa pump treatment in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Korbo, Lise; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump...

  6. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: Advances and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delenclos, Marion; Jones, Daryl R; McLean, Pamela J; Uitti, Ryan J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor disturbances and affects more than 1% of the worldwide population. Despite considerable progress in understanding PD pathophysiology, including genetic and biochemical causes, diagnostic approaches lack accuracy and interventions are restricted to symptomatic treatments. PD is a complex syndrome with different clinical subtypes and a wide variability in disorder course. In order to deliver better clinical management of PD patients and discovery of novel therapies, there is an urgent need to find sensitive, specific, and reliable biomarkers. The development of biomarkers will not only help the scientific community to identify populations at risk, but also facilitate clinical diagnosis. Furthermore, these tools could monitor progression, which could ultimately deliver personalized therapeutic strategies. The field of biomarker discovery in PD has attracted significant attention and there have been numerous contributions in recent years. Although none of the parameters have been validated for clinical practice, some candidates hold promise. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of PD biomarkers and discusses new strategies for their utilization.

  7. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future.

  8. CareMAP: Caring for Someone with Advanced Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... awareness for the 1 million Americans living with Parkinson’s disease. Learn More > Our Impact Our Mission Our Team ...

  9. Recent advances in cell-based therapy for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Cooper, Oliver; Vinuela, Angel

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss recent advances in the field of cell therapy for Parkinson disease (PD). They compare and contrast recent clinical trials using fetal dopaminergic neurons. They attribute differences in cell preparation techniques, cell type specification, and immunosuppression...... as reasons for variable outcome and for some of the side effects observed in these clinical trials. To address ethical, practical, and technical issues related to the use of fetal cell sources, alternative sources of therapeutic dopaminergic neurons are being developed. The authors describe the progress...... in enrichment and purification strategies of stem cell-derived dopaminergic midbrain neurons. They conclude that recent advances in cell therapy for PD will create a viable long-term treatment option for synaptic repair for this debilitating disease....

  10. Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000755.htm Parkinson disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Parkinson disease causes certain brain cells to die. These are ...

  11. Advances in the genetics of Parkinson's disease1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serena ROSNER; Nir GILADI; Avi ORR-URTREGER

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting a significant proportion of the ageing population. The etiology is unknown and it is likely due to a multifactorial interaction of genes and the environment on the background of ageing. Findings in the last decade suggest that the contribution of genetics to familial forms of PD is much greater than previously appreciated. Twelve loci are now associated with highly penetrant autosomal dominant or recessive PD, and causative mutations have been identified in eight genes with mutation carriers often characterized by a phenotype indistinguishable from idiopathic disease. To date, PD pharmacotherapy is symptomatic only and does not slow disease progression. Understanding how genetic mutations cause familial PD is likely to clarify molecular mechanisms underlying PD in general and will provide a guide for the development of novel therapies, both preventative and palliative, appli-cable to all forms of parkinsonism. This review outlines the advances in the study of the genetic background of PD and their possible clinical implications.

  12. Serum adiponectin levels in advanced-stage Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Erica; Cancello, Raffaella; Cavanna, Ferruccio; Maestrini, Sabrina; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Liuzzi, Antonio; Pezzoli, Gianni; Barichella, Michela

    2011-01-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) experience body weight loss and reductions in the most common cardiovascular risk factors. At present, the pathogenetic mechanisms involved have not been elucidated. Increased serum concentrations of adiponectin, which possesses antiatherogenic and anti-inflammatory properties, are associated with a reduction in cardiovascular risk. The objective of this study was to determine adiponectin serum concentrations in PD patients. Thirty PD patients underwent a full nutritional status assessment, including the determination of adiponectin serum concentrations. Mean ± SD adiponectin concentrations were 9.59 ± 5.9 μg/mL (interquartile range: 5.92-12.9 μg/mL). In PD patients, adiponectin serum levels were similar to those in normal-weight, healthy, young subjects and significantly higher than that in an aged-matched group of morbidly obese subjects. Further studies are warranted to establish the role of adiponectin in the management of PD patients.

  13. James Parkinson: Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Harold

    2013-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a condition that anyone with a modicum of medical knowledge can recognise in the street--as indeed how it was studied by James Parkinson himself. Its three characteristic features are: 1. Increase in the tone of the voluntary muscles (rigidity). 2. Slowness of movement (bradykinesis). 3. Tremor (the characteristic 'pill rolling' movements of the fingers).

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CareMAP: Managing Advanced Parkinson's Website CareMAP: Managing Caregiver Stress CareMAP: Mealtime and Swallowing: Part 1 CareMAP: Mealtime ... Help Parkinson's Patients? How Does the DBS Device Work? How Is Parkinson's Disease Diagnosed? Interview with Nathan ...

  15. Treatment of Parkinson disease: a 64-year-old man with motor complications of advanced Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarsy, Daniel

    2012-06-06

    In early stages, Parkinson disease typically begins with asymmetric or unilateral motor symptoms due to combinations of mild bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor. In most cases, with progression, signs of more generalized bradykinesia appear, which include facial masking, reduced voice volume, and slowing of activities of daily living. In more advanced Parkinson disease, other disabling manifestations may follow, such as impaired balance, gait freezing, falls, speech disturbance, and cognitive impairment. Levodopa is the most effective medical treatment for Parkinson disease. However, motor complications uniquely related to levodopa treatment may emerge that may be difficult to manage. These include fluctuating levodopa responses and involuntary movements and postures known as dyskinesia and dystonia. Medication adjustments are usually effective, but in some cases surgical intervention with deep brain stimulation becomes necessary to alleviate motor complications. The case of Mr L, a man with an 11-year history of Parkinson disease, illustrates these emerging motor complications and the manner in which they may be managed both medically and surgically.

  16. Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's disease more than stretching and resistance training. Yoga. In yoga, gentle stretching movements and poses may increase your ... Disease Association. You and your family may also benefit from talking to a mental health professional (psychologist) ...

  17. Parkinson's disease and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaserman, Nathalie

    2005-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with an increased risk of falls. The risk is greatest in patients with advanced disease. Because Parkinson's disease usually occurs late in life, the risk factors related to the neurological impairments add to those associated with aging. The incidence of fractures is high in patients with Parkinson's disease, with femoral neck fractures in older women being particularly common. Risk factors for fractures include a low body mass index, limited exposure to sunlight, an inadequate vitamin D intake with low 25-OH vitamin D levels, and bone loss. Several studies found decreased bone mineral density values at the femoral neck and lumbar spine in patients with Parkinson's disease. Although this decrease is ascribable in part to factors unrelated with Parkinson's disease, such as older age and female gender, Parkinson's disease itself also plays a role, most notably in patients with severe neurological impairments (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV).

  18. Treatment of Parkinson's disease in the advanced stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossig, C; Reichmann, H

    2013-04-01

    Levodopa/Carbidopa, respectively, Levodopa/Benserazide is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease and during the progress of the disease, patients will inevitably need to be treated with it. Nonetheless, after a certain time period most of the patients experience side effects. Mainly disturbing are motor and non-motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Numerous options from changing the medication regimen, to continuos dopaminergic drug delivery via apomorphine or Duodopa pumps and stereotactical interventions are available. The physician's responsibility is to choose the right therapeutic procedure for each timepoint of the patient's disease. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the available strategies.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find your local chapter Join our online community Parkinson's Disease Dementia Parkinson's disease dementia is an impairment in ... disease. About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Parkinson's disease dementia The brain changes caused by Parkinson's disease ...

  20. Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses therapeutic challenges. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in noninvasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, although whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of noninvasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), targeting the motor cortex. Current studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential for rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible with regard to functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS include increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters that derive their rationale from studies on brain physiology. These novel parameters are intended to simulate normal firing patterns or to act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia with regard to motor control and its contribution to the pathogenesis of motor disorders. Noninvasive brain stimulation studies will enhance our understanding of PD pathophysiology and might provide further evidence for potential therapeutic applications.

  1. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    -derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...

  2. Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mean age of onset of Parkinson's disease is about 65 years, with a median time of 9 years between diagnosis and death. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of fetal cell or stem cell......-derived therapy in people with Parkinson's disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to September 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from...... relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). RESULTS: We found two studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. CONCLUSIONS...

  3. Effectiveness of the telemedical treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Doletschek, Christoph Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Besides treatment in the traditional in- and outpatient settings, patients with Parkinson`s desease (PD) may be enrolled in a telemedicine-based integrated care program (ICP), available in Germany for a couple of years now. The ICP covers 30 days during which the patients’ motor condition is regularly video-recorded. The videos are sent to the treating team via Internet, as a basis of therapeutic decisions of their prospective evaluation. Here, the data from 78 patients were a...

  4. Managing Your Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  5. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  6. Parkinson's Disease Foundation Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  7. Parkinson's Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  8. Complications of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy-jejunostomy for levodopa/carbidopa infusion in advanced Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Olivares

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous infusions of levodopa directly into the duodenum-yeyunum is an effective therapy to reduce daily off time in an advanced stage of Parkinson's disease, but it is not without complications, particularly device related problems. We present our experience in three Spanish hospitals with these complications, including a severe case with migration, several decubitus ulcers, and one case of perforation of the bowel and finally death.

  9. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding Centers of Excellence Parkinson's Outcomes Project Grants Telemedicine & Virtual Care Professional Training Expert Care & Research Our ... Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? How ...

  10. [Pharmacoeconomic study of the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos-Matellano, F; Garcia-Ruiz, A J; Garcia-Agua Soler, N

    2016-12-16

    Introduccion. Cuando el tratamiento farmacologico oral o transdermico de la enfermedad de Parkinson pierde eficacia, se dispone de tres terapias mediante dispositivos asistidos que pueden reducir las complicaciones motoras y no motoras: la apomorfina en infusion subcutanea (ASBI), la bomba de infusion duodenal continua de levodopa/carbidopa (IDL) y la estimulacion cerebral profunda (ECP). Objetivo. Efectuar un analisis farmacoeconomico comparativo del uso de ASBI con IDL y ECP; como objetivo secundario, discutir el perfil del candidato ideal para cada una de las tecnicas. Pacientes y metodos. Se extrajo informacion sobre datos de años de vida ganados y años de vida ganados ajustados por calidad (AVAC) segun la escala de Hoehn y Yahr, e informacion sobre costes y consumo de recursos para cada alternativa. La perspectiva del analisis fue la del Sistema Nacional de Salud, y el horizonte temporal fue de cinco años para los costes y toda la vida del paciente para las utilidades. Las medidas de resultado utilizadas fueron los años de vida ganados y AVAC, y en su comparacion se uso la ratio coste-utilidad incremental. Resultados. El coste-utilidad obtenido para cada opcion fue: 31.956 euros/AVAC para la ECP, 38.249 euros/AVAC para la ASBI y 75.206 euros/AVAC para la IDL. Conclusiones. Los resultados permiten evaluar la efectividad y utilidad de los diferentes tratamientos para la enfermedad de Parkinson avanzada, pues se presentan en ganancias de años vividos en plena salud. Los datos obtenidos contribuyen a la toma de decisiones que determinen la planificacion y gestion de cada caso, sin olvidar las preferencias del paciente y del neurologo, asi como las limitaciones presupuestarias.

  11. [Quantitative gait analysis in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadoniga, M; San Millan, A; Cabanes-Martinez, L; Aviles-Olmos, I; Del Alamo-De Pedro, M; Regidor, I

    2016-08-01

    Objetivo. Describir las alteraciones de la marcha e inestabilidad postural en un grupo de pacientes con enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) avanzada. Pacientes y metodos. Se analizo la marcha de pacientes con EP en estadio avanzado on medicacion. Por medio de un sistema de analisis computarizado del movimiento, se estudiaron las variables cinematicas: cadencia, numero de ciclos con apoyo correcto (ciclos HFPS), numero de ciclos totales, duracion de las fases del ciclo, electromiografia, y goniometria de rodilla y tobillo. La valoracion clinica del equilibrio y la inestabilidad postural se completo con los tests Tinetti y Timed Up and Go. Resultados. El analisis mostro alteraciones en los parametros espaciotemporales con respecto a los rangos de normalidad: disminucion de los ciclos HFPS, aumento del numero total de ciclos y alteracion de la cadencia en muchos pacientes, y conservacion de la cadencia media dentro de los limites de la normalidad, aumento de la duracion de la fase de apoyo, disminucion del apoyo monopodal y alteracion del rango articular de la rodilla y el tobillo. Asimismo, se observo una alteracion en las puntuaciones obtenidas en las escalas clinicas, que mostraban un aumento del factor de riesgo de caidas y dependencia leve. Conclusion. La cuantificacion mediante analisis objetivo de las variables cineticas y cinematicas en los pacientes con EP puede emplearse como herramienta para establecer la influencia de las distintas alternativas terapeuticas en el trastorno de la marcha.

  12. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  13. What Is Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources & more. Order Free Materials Today What is Parkinson’s Disease? Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive movement disorder, ... million people in the US are living with Parkinson's disease. The cause is unknown, and although there is ...

  14. Disease progression continues in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and effective subthalamic nucleus stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilker, R; Portman, AT; Voges, J; Staal, MJ; Burghaus, L; van Laar, T; Koulousakis, A; Maguire, RP; Pruim, J; de Jong, BM; Herholz, K; Sturm, [No Value; Heiss, WD; Leenders, KL

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Glutamate mediated excitotoxicity of the hyperactive subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been reported to contribute to nigral degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Deep brain stimulation of the STN (STN DBS), in its role as a highly effective treatment of severe PD motor complications, ha

  15. Advances in GBA-associated Parkinson's disease--Pathology, presentation and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, Melinda; Anderson, David G; Grobler, Anne F

    2016-02-01

    GBA mutations are to date the most common genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The GBA gene encodes the lysomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase. Whilst bi-allelic GBA mutations cause Gaucher disease, both mono- and bi-allelic mutations confer risk for Parkinson's disease. Clinically, Parkinson's disease patients with GBA mutations resemble idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. However, these patients have a modest reduction in age-of-onset of disease and a greater incidence of cognitive decline. In some cases, GBA mutations are also responsible for familial Parkinson's disease. The accumulation of α-synuclein into Lewy bodies is the central neuropathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Pathologic GBA mutations reduce enzymatic function. A reduction in glucocerebrosidase function increases α-synuclein levels and propagation, which in turn inhibits glucocerebrosidase in a feed-forward cascade. This cascade is central to the neuropathology of GBA-associated Parkinson's disease. The lysosomal integral membrane protein type-2 is necessary for normal glucocerebrosidase function. Glucocerebrosidase dysfunction also increases in the accumulation of β-amyloid and amyloid-precursor protein, oxidative stress, neuronal susceptibility to metal ions, microglial and immune activation. These factors contribute to neuronal death. The Mendelian Parkinson's disease genes, Parkin and ATP13A2, intersect with glucocerebrosidase. These factors sketch a complex circuit of GBA-associated neuropathology. To clinically interfere with this circuit, central glucocerebrosidase function must be improved. Strategies based on reducing breakdown of mutant glucocerebrosidase and increasing the fraction that reaches the lysosome has shown promise. Breakdown can be reduced by interfering with the ability of heat-shock proteins to recognize mutant glucocerebrosidase. This underlies the therapeutic efficacy of certain pharmacological chaperones and histone deacetylase inhibitors. These

  16. Learning about Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Glucocerebrosidase providing a molecular link between Parkinson and Gaucher diseases Journal of Biological Chemistry , June 9, 2011 Learning ... Glucocerebrosidase providing a molecular link between Parkinson and Gaucher diseases Journal of Biological Chemistry , June 9, 2011 Get ...

  17. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... our Helpline: 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) Staffed by nurses, social workers and therapists, our Helpline is here to ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We fight for people with Parkinson's and their families every day. We are in this together. Learn ... Sexual Functioning? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect ...

  20. Recent advances in biomarkers for Parkinson's disease focusing on biochemicals, omics and neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Rutong; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Pu, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, involving progressive loss of the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons. Cardinal symptoms including tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooping, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons have already been destroyed. Hence, reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis to measure disease progression and response to therapy. We review the current status of protein and small molecule biomarkers involved in oxidative stress, protein aggregation and inflammation etc. which are present in cerebrospinal fluid, human blood, urine or saliva. In recent years, advances in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and functional brain imaging techniques have led to new insights into the pathoetiology of PD. Further studies in the novel discovery of PD biomarkers will provide avenues to treat PD patients more effectively with few or no side effects.

  1. Pramipexole, a nonergot dopamine agonist, is effective against rest tremor in intermediate to advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Künig, G; Pogarell, O; Möller, J C; Delf, M; Oertel, W H

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the nonergot dopamine receptor agonist pramipexole in 16 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and marked rest tremor during an "on" period. The patients were drawn from a larger placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial, which was not originally designed to investigate the effect of pramipexole on tremor. Eleven patients received pramipexole. The first effects were seen with a pramipexole dose of 0.75 mg/d with a reduction of the tremor item A of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS III, "on" state) by 25% and of rigidity and akinesia by 22%. Under the highest dose, 4.5 mg/d, the tremor score was improved by 61% over baseline (p < 0.0056, Wilcoxon signed rank) and the sum of rigidity and akinesia items by 66% (p < 0.0038, Wilcoxon signed rank). Five patients received placebo and did not improve. Based on this sample of patients, the nonergot dopamine receptor agonist pramipexole appears to have a potent anti-rest tremor action while being effective against akinesia and rigidity.

  2. NIH Research: Advances In Parkinson's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapies. Of course, clinical trials involving people with Parkinson's disease are vital to the treatment and prevention of PD and make a difference in improving the quality of life for those with PD, now and in the ...

  3. Striatal FDOPA uptake and cognition in advanced non-demented Parkinson's disease : A clinical and FDOPA-PET study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, Marije; Portman, Axel T.; Kiers, Henk A. L.; Maguire, Ralph P.; Kaasinen, Valtteri; Koning, Marthe; Pruim, Jan; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to determine the nature of the relationship between cognition and striatal dopaminergic functioning in 28 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) using fluorodopa Positron emission tomography (FDOPA-PET) and neuropsychological test scores. Mental flexibility was related to

  4. Effects of DBS, premotor rTMS, and levodopa on motor function and silent period in advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäumer, Tobias; Hidding, Ute; Hamel, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a widely used and highly effective treatment for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Repetitive TMS (rTMS) applied to motor cortical areas has also been shown to improve symptoms in PD and modulate motor cortical...

  5. Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransmayr, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. There is significantly elevated risk of cognitive decline and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms. Dementia may develop insidiously several years after manifestation of Parkinson motor symptoms (dementia associated with Parkinson's disease; Parkinson's disease dementia) or in close temporal relationship (within one year) after onset of motor symptoms (Dementia with Lewy bodies). There are clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic similarities between these two conditions. Men are more frequently affected than women. Risk factor or indicators are advanced age at disease onset, disease duration, rigidity, akinesia and posture and gait impairment and falls as opposed to tremor dominance, and associated neuropsychiatric symptoms (depression, apathy, hallucinosis, delirium). Dementia is treatable with cholinesterase inhibitors (rivastigmine, donepezil), memantine, and adjustment of the pharmacological regimen of parkinsonian motor symptoms. Concomitant autonomic nervous system symptoms and neuropsychiatric complications warrant early clinical awareness and are accessible to pharmacological therapy.

  6. Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Medications for Parkinson's disease can help many patients live productive lives and ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Parkinson disease Parkinson disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Parkinson disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system. ...

  8. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone populations

  9. [Advances in the application of gene therapy for Parkinson's disease with adeno-associated virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Lü, Ying-Hui; Li, Zhao-Fa

    2014-05-01

    Vectors used to carry foreign genes play an important role in gene therapy, among which, the adeno-associated virus (AAV) has many advantages, such as nonpathogenicity, low immunogenicity, stable and long-term expression and multiple-tissue-type infection, etc. These advantages have made AAV one of the most potential vectors in gene therapy, and widely used in many clinical researches, for example, Parkinson's disease. This paper introduces the biological characteristics of AAV and the latest research progress of AAV carrying neurotrophic factor, dopamine synthesis related enzymes and glutamic acid decarboxylase gene in the gene therapy of Parkinson's disease.

  10. Xenotransplantation in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by loss of dopaminergic neurones in the substantia nigra pars compacta and subsequent shortage of dopamine in the striatum of the these patients causing the well known symptoms first described by James Parkinson in 1817. In this thesi

  11. Advances in nanomedicine for the treatment of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Sara; Gartziandia, Oihane; Herran, Enara; Pedraz, Jose Luis; Igartua, Manoli; Hernandez, Rosa Maria

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are the most common neurodegenerative diseases worldwide. Despite all the efforts made by the scientific community, current available treatments have limited effectiveness, without halting the progression of the disease. That is why, new molecules such as growth factors, antioxidants and metal chelators have been raised as new therapeutical approaches. However, these molecules have difficulties to cross the blood-brain barrier limiting its therapeutic effect. The development of nanometric drug delivery systems may permit a targeted and sustained release of old and new treatments offering a novel strategy to treat these neurodegenerative disorders. This review summarized the main investigated drug delivery systems as promising approaches to treat Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  12. Grammar improvement following deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic and the pedunculopontine nuclei in advanced Parkinson's disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Sergio; Moschella, Vincenzo; Stefani, Alessandro; Peppe, Antonella; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Galati, Salvatore; Costa, Alberto; Mazzone, Paolo; Stanzione, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    Combined deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic (STN) and pedunculopontine (PPN) nuclei has been recently proposed as surgical treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. STN stimulation alone has been shown to provide selective improvement of the grammatical aspect of language. We studied five advanced Parkinson's disease patients who underwent combined deep brain stimulation (STN + PPN). Overall cognitive profile did not change. On the contrary, an interesting trend towards reduction of ungrammatical errors (particularly substitution of free and inflectional morphemes) was found when stimulating the STN, and also the PPN, when the STN was switched off. These findings replicate previous observations on the STN, and provide the rationale for further investigation of the role of the PPN in processing linguistic grammar.

  13. A comparative study on neurochemistry of cerebrospinal fluid in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Iacono, R P; Schoonenberg, T; Kuniyoshi, S; Buchholz, J

    1999-02-01

    This study addresses two issues: (1) the comparative neurochemistry of classic tremor type of Parkinson's disease or PD-A and akinetic type of Parkinson's disease or PD-B; and (2) the neurochemistry of levodopa failure syndrome (LDFS). Cerebrospinal fluid from the lateral ventricle was collected from 50 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease of PD-A and PD-B. Levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and metabolites were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. We have found that (1) 5-hydroxylindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) level is significantly lower in PD-B than in PD-A; (2) 5-HIAA level is inversely associated with score of part one of United Parkinson's Disease Rating Score (UPDRS); (3) 5-HIAA level is inversely associated with score of part four of UPDRS; (4) 3-O-methyldopa (3-OMD) level is positively associated with levodopa failure syndrome (LDFS) assessed by part four of UPDRS and inversely associates with 5-HIAA. From these data, it can be inferred that serotonergic activity is decreased in PD-B to a greater extent than in PD-A and that decreased serotonergic activity plays a role in LDFS.

  14. Recent advances in the assessment and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Snijders, Anke H.; Nonnekes, Jorik; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2010-01-01

    Falls are among the most incapacitating features of Parkinson's disease. Prevention of falls requires a systematic assessment of all contributing factors (with emphasis on freezing of gait and frontal executive dysfunction), and a multidisciplinary treatment approach tailored to the specific pathophysiology of falls for each individual patient.

  15. Recent advances in the assessment and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, A.H.; Nonnekes, J.; Bloem, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Falls are among the most incapacitating features of Parkinson's disease. Prevention of falls requires a systematic assessment of all contributing factors (with emphasis on freezing of gait and frontal executive dysfunction), and a multidisciplinary treatment approach tailored to the specific pathoph

  16. Neuromolecular imaging, a nanobiotechnology for Parkinson's disease: advancing pharmacotherapy for personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, P A; Wenning, L; Li, Y-S

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating each patient and animal as its own control achieves personalized medicine, which honors the hippocratic philosophy, explaining that "it is far more important to know what person has the disease than what disease the person has." Similarly, individualizing molecular signaling directly from the patient's brain in real time is essential for providing prompt, patient-based treatment as dictated by the point of care. Fortunately, nanotechnology effectively treats many neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, the new medicinal frontier for the discovery of therapy for Parkinson's disease is nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Indeed, the unique nanotechnology of neuromolecular imaging combined with the series of nanobiosensors enables continuous videotracking of molecular neurotransmitters in both the normal physiologic and disease states with long-term electrochemical operational stability. This nanobiotechnology is able to track a signal in real time with excellent temporal and spatial resolution directly from each patient's brain to a computer as subjects are behaving during movement, normal and/or dysfunctional including prion-like Parkinson's behavioral biometrics. Moreover, the molecular signaling performed by these nanobiosensors live streams directly online and originates from precise neuroanatomic brain sites such as, in this case, the dorsal striatum in basal ganglia. Thus, the nanobiotechnology studies discussed herein imaged neuromolecules with and without L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) in dorsal striatal basal ganglia neurons. Parkinsonian and non-Parkinsonian animals were video-tracked, and images were readily seen on a laptop via a potentiostat using a semiderivative electrical circuit. Administered L-DOPA doses were 50 and 100 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip); the same experimental paradigm was used to image and then contrast data. Results showed that the baseline release of biogenic amine molecules was significantly above detection

  17. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  18. Consensus on the Definition of Advanced Parkinson's Disease: A Neurologists-Based Delphi Study (CEPA Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisevsky, Jaime; Tolosa, Eduardo S.

    2017-01-01

    To date, no consensus exists on the key factors for diagnosing advanced Parkinson disease (APD). To obtain consensus on the definition of APD, we performed a prospective, multicenter, Spanish nationwide, 3-round Delphi study (CEPA study). An ad hoc questionnaire was designed with 33 questions concerning the relevance of several clinical features for APD diagnosis. In the first-round, 240 neurologists of the Spanish Movement Disorders Group participated in the study. The results obtained were incorporated into the questionnaire and both, results and questionnaire, were sent out to and fulfilled by 26 experts in Movement Disorders. Review of results from the second-round led to a classification of symptoms as indicative of “definitive,” “probable,” and “possible” APD. This classification was confirmed by 149 previous participating neurologists in a third-round, where 92% completely or very much agreed with the classification. Definitive symptoms of APD included disability requiring help for the activities of daily living, presence of motor fluctuations with limitations to perform basic activities of daily living without help, severe dysphagia, recurrent falls, and dementia. These results will help neurologists to identify some key factors in APD diagnosis, thus allowing users to categorize the patients for a homogeneous recognition of this condition. PMID:28239501

  19. Special low-protein foods ameliorate postprandial off in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichella, Michela; Marczewska, Agnieszka; De Notaris, Roberta; Vairo, Antonella; Baldo, Cinzia; Mauri, Andrea; Savardi, Chiara; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2006-10-01

    Protein intake interferes with levodopa therapy. Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) should restrict daily protein intake and shift protein intake to the evening. For further reduction of protein intake in the first part of the day, special low-protein products (LPP) should be used instead of normal food products at breakfast and lunch. We studied the efficacy of LPP on postprandial off periods, in PD patients on levodopa therapy. The methods included a randomized, cross-over, single-blind, pilot clinical trial comparing a 2-month balanced diet with a 2-month LPP diet in 18 PD patients with motor fluctuations. The off phases were significantly shorter after LPP diet than after balanced diet (postprandial off, 49 +/- 73 min vs. 79 +/- 72 min and total off, 164 +/- 148 min vs. 271 +/- 174 min, both P < 0.0001). Moreover, a reduction in total off time during LPP diet (3.3 +/- 2.7 hr vs. 4.7 +/- 3.3 hr, P < 0.0001), occurred also in the 9 patients who did not experience subjective benefit. No significant changes in hematological and biochemical variables or body composition were recorded; a slight reduction in body weight (mean, -1.8%) was observed. Consumption of LPP in the first part of the day ameliorates off periods in PD patients, but additional studies including pharmacokinetics are needed.

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Its Treatment Affect Sexual Functioning? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How ... Behavior a Side Effect of PD Medications? Is Depression Under-Diagnosed in Patients with Parkinson's Disease? Is ...

  1. Progression of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's is the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). It is more comprehensive than the Hoehn and ... on movement symptoms. In addition to these, the UPDRS takes into account cognitive difficulties, ability to carry ...

  2. Validity and Responsiveness of At-Home Touch Screen Assessments in Advanced Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memedi, Mevludin; Nyholm, Dag; Johansson, Anders; Pålhagen, Sven; Willows, Thomas; Widner, Håkan; Linder, Jan; Westin, Jerker

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if a telemetry test battery can be used to measure effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment intervention and disease progression in patients with fluctuations. Sixty-five patients diagnosed with advanced PD were recruited in an open longitudinal 36-month study; 35 treated with levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) and 30 were candidates for switching from oral PD treatment to LCIG. They utilized a test battery, consisting of self-assessments of symptoms and fine motor tests (tapping and spiral drawings), four times per day in their homes during week-long test periods. The repeated measurements were summarized into an overall test score (OTS) to represent the global condition of the patient during a test period. Clinical assessments included ratings on unified PD rating scale (UPDRS) and 39-item PD questionnaire (PDQ-39) scales. In LCIG-naïve patients, the mean OTS compared to baseline was significantly improved from the first test period on LCIG treatment until month 24. In LCIG-nonnaïve patients, there were no significant changes in the mean OTS until month 36. The OTS correlated adequately with total UPDRS (rho = 0.59) and total PDQ-39 (0.59). Responsiveness measured as effect size was 0.696 and 0.536 for OTS and UPDRS, respectively. The trends of the test scores were similar to the trends of clinical rating scores but the dropout rate was high. Correlations between OTS and clinical rating scales were adequate indicating that the test battery contains important elements of the information of well-established scales. The responsiveness and reproducibility were better for OTS than for total UPDRS.

  3. Neurostimulation for Parkinson's disease with early motor complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuepbach, W.M.; Rau, J.; Knudsen, K.; Volkmann, J.; Krack, P.; Timmermann, L.; Halbig, T.D.; Hesekamp, H.; Navarro, S.M.; Meier, N.; Falk, D.; Mehdorn, M.; Paschen, S.; Maarouf, M.; Barbe, M.T.; Fink, G.R.; Kupsch, A.; Gruber, D.; Schneider, G.H.; Seigneuret, E.; Kistner, A.; Chaynes, P.; Ory-Magne, F.; Brefel Courbon, C.; Vesper, J.; Schnitzler, A.; Wojtecki, L.; Houeto, J.L.; Bataille, B.; Maltete, D.; Damier, P.; Raoul, S.; Sixel-Doering, F.; Hellwig, D.; Gharabaghi, A.; Kruger, R.; Pinsker, M.O.; Amtage, F.; Regis, J.M.; Witjas, T.; Thobois, S.; Mertens, P.; Kloss, M.; Hartmann, A.; Oertel, W.H.; Post, B.; Speelman, H.; Agid, Y.; Schade-Brittinger, C.; Deuschl, G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subthalamic stimulation reduces motor disability and improves quality of life in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease who have severe levodopa-induced motor complications. We hypothesized that neurostimulation would be beneficial at an earlier stage of Parkinson's disease. METHODS:

  4. Pramipexole extended release: in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwieduk, Claudine M; Curran, Monique P

    2010-04-01

    Pramipexole extended release (ER) is a non-ergolinic dopamine receptor agonist available for use as a once-daily oral treatment for the signs and symptoms of early and advanced idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Once-daily pramipexole ER and three times-daily pramipexole immediate release (IR) have similar exposure over 24 hours. The ER formulation is associated with fewer fluctuations in plasma pramipexole concentrations over this period. Pramipexole ER improved the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in three well designed trials in adults with early or advanced disease, as measured by changes from baseline in the sum of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II and III subtotal scores. In a 9-week study, the majority of patients with early Parkinson's disease who were receiving stable pramipexole IR treatment were successfully switched to pramipexole ER. Relative to placebo at week 18, pramipexole ER 0.375-4.5 mg (of the salt) once daily significantly decreased the sum of the UPDRS parts II and III subtotal scores from baseline in two trials in patients with early or advanced Parkinson's disease, and also reduced the percentage of off-time during waking hours in patients with advanced disease. The efficacy of pramipexole ER was maintained after 33 weeks of treatment in the trials in patients with early or advanced Parkinson's disease. Pramipexole ER was generally well tolerated in patients with Parkinson's disease, with the rate of adverse events being generally similar to that with pramipexole IR.

  5. Long-term treatment with high-dosage bromocriptine in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, E N; Meerwaldt, J D

    1987-01-01

    Long-term follow-up indicated that levodopa as a replacement therapy merely improves the parkinsonian symptoms, and does so for only a limited number of years. The reason for this tachyphylaxis or declining efficacy in levodopa therapy and the increasing number and intensity of various distressing difficulties in the management of Parkinson's disease, such as dyskinesias and on-off phenomena, is the main subject of many recent studies. It is still widely accepted that levodopa provides the best therapeutic tool for Parkinson's disease. Bromocriptine, an ergot derivative, is the main clinically used dopamine agonist, and it has been established as a valuable adjunct in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Bromocriptine is most useful in patients with a declining efficacy of levodopa treatment, in patients with diurnal oscillations in motor performance, especially in patients with wearing-off phenomena, and in patients with onset and end-of-dose dyskinesias. The question of bromocriptine dosage, required to obtain an optimal benefit and a decreased rate of late adverse reactions, is quite controversial. The trend has been to lower daily dosage of bromocriptine, i.e., low doses suffice in patients with mild, early disease. Higher doses of bromocriptine seem to be required in patients with severe parkinsonian deficits. In this retrospective study of 8 years experience with high dosage of bromocriptine in levodopa response-losing parkinsonian patients, the adjunction of bromocriptine had a clear-cut but short-lasting beneficial effect on the disability scores.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Autonomic nervous system response to L-dopa in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruonala, Verneri; Tarvainen, Mika P; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Pekkonen, Eero; Rissanen, Saara M

    2015-01-01

    Levodopa is the main treatment method for reducing the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Whereas it reduces the motor symptoms efficiently, its effect on autonomous nervous system is not clear. The information about effect of levodopa on heart rate variability is not coherent between the studies. In this study, ECG of 11 patients with Parkinson's disease was measured during levodopa challenge with pronounced dose of fast release levodopa to ensure the positive drug effect for deep brain stimulation treatment. Heart rate variability analysis was done at three time points, before administration of levodopa, 30 and 60 minutes after administration. After 30 minutes of administration, the HRV parameters show that parasympathetic nervous system activity is decreased and the sympatho-vagal balance is shifted towards sympathetic control. At 60 minutes after administration the parasympathetic nervous system activates slightly and causes a decrease in heart rate.

  7. Intraduodenal levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel infusion improves both motor performance and quality of life in advanced Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Florence C F; Kwan, Vu; van der Poorten, David; Mahant, Neil; Wolfe, Nigel; Ha, Ainhi D; Griffith, Jane M; Tsui, David; Kim, Samuel D; Fung, Victor S C

    2016-03-01

    We report the efficacy and adverse effect profile of intraduodenal levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) infusion from patients treated in a single Australian movement disorder centre. We conducted an open-label, 12 month prospective study of treatment with LCIG in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in a single tertiary referral hospital unit specialising in movement disorders. Patients with levodopa-responsive, advanced Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations despite optimal pharmacological treatment were enrolled and underwent a 16 hour daily infusion of LCIG for 12 months. Fifteen participants completed the trial. The mean (± standard deviation) improvement in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III was 37 ± 11%, mean daily "off" period reduced from 6.3 ± 2 to 1.9 ± 2 hours, total daily "on" time increased from 10.2 ± 3 to 13.7 ± 2 hours, "on" period without dyskinesia increased from 4.5 ± 3 to 7.5 ± 5 hours, and 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire Summary Index score improved by 32.5 ± 35%. The most common adverse event was reversible peripheral neuropathy secondary to vitamin B12 ± B6 deficiency (40%), local tube problems (40%), and impulse control disorder (ICD) (27%). No patient had stoma bleeding or peritonitis. All patients with ICD had a past psychiatric diagnosis of depression with or without anxiety and a higher daily levodopa intake at 6 and 12 months of LCIG infusion. Intraduodenal LCIG improves motor performance, quality of life and daily "on" period. Prior to and during duodenal LCIG infusion, clinicians should monitor for peripheral neuropathy and vitamin B12 and B6 deficiency, as supplementation can reverse peripheral neuropathy. This trial is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov as CT00335153.

  8. Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease Past Issues / Summer ... the disease itself. Read More "Parkinson's disease" Articles Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease / Unraveling Parkinson's: Three ...

  9. Osteoporosis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Marco; Carda, Stefano; Viscontini, Giovanni Sguazzini; Cisari, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Patients affected by Parkinson's disease are at a high risk for fractures, mainly of the hip. These fractures are caused by falls due to postural imbalance, neurological impairment and reduced bone mass. The purpose of this study was (1) to investigate the correlations and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone loss in Parkinson's disease and appraise bone loss or fracture risk reduction interventions; (2) to develop a research agenda that informs the design and development of risk reduction strategies. Osteoporosis and osteopenia are very common findings in patients with Parkinson's disease, affecting up to 91% of women and 61% of men. Reduced bone mass in Parkinsonian patients seems to be caused mainly by reduced mobility through a mechanism similar to that observed in other neurological diseases. Endocrine (such as vitamin D deficiency), nutritional and iatrogenic factors also play an important role in bone mass depletion. Female gender, disease duration and severity (Hoehn and Yahr stages III and IV), old age and low body mass index are related to more severe osteoporosis. Vitamin D supplementation and bisphosphonates seem to be effective in reducing the risk of nonvertebral fractures in patients affected by Parkinson's disease. Prevention and evaluation of osteoporosis through bone mass density assessment should be considered in all patients with Parkinson's disease.

  10. Recent developments in biomarkers in Parkinson disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer disease, and current demographic trends indicate a life-time risk approaching 4% and predict a doubling of prevalence by 2030. Strategies are being developed to apply recent advances in our understanding of the cause of Parkinson disease to the development of biomarkers that will enable the identification of at-risk individuals, enable early diagnosis and reflect the progression of disease....

  11. Protagonists with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex disorder with many fascinating features. Its onset is creeping, the progression is slow but inevitable. There are motor symptoms, such as a tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, mask-like facial expression, and postural abnormalities, but also hallucinations, cognitive deterioration, and depression. In many novels, fictive patients with Parkinson's disease play a role. It seems that authors have used many aspects of the disease to emphasize their messages. Their narratives include themes such as rigidity, petrifaction, confusion, dementia, and hallucinations. In this chapter, as examples, several protagonists with Parkinson's disease will be described from works of John Updike, Jonathan Franzen, Sue Miller, J.M. Coetzee, and John Harding, among others.

  12. How Is Parkinson's Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parkinson's There is a lot to know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and ... awareness for the 1 million Americans living with Parkinson’s disease. Learn More > Our Impact Our Mission Our Team ...

  13. Oxysterols and Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkhem, Ingemar; Lövgren-Sandblom, Anita; Leoni, Valerio

    2013-01-01

    Oxysterols are important for cholesterol homeostasis in the brain and may be affected in neurodegenerative diseases. The levels of the brain-derived oxysterol 24S-hydroxycholesterol (24S-OH) have been reported to be markedly reduced in the circulation of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) (Lee...

  14. Parkinson Disease and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Kramberger, Milica G

    2016-09-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson disease (PD) with a yearly incidence of around 10% of patients with PD. Lewy body pathology is the most important factor in the development of Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and there is evidence for a synergistic effect with β-amyloid. The clinical phenotype in PDD extends beyond the dysexecutive syndrome that is often present in early PD and encompasses deficits in recognition memory, attention, and visual perception. Sleep disturbances, hallucinations, neuroleptic sensitivity, and fluctuations are often present. This review provides an update on current knowledge of PDD including aspects of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, management, and prognosis.

  15. Recent imaging advances in the diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David J; Pavese, Nicola

    2009-10-29

    In this review we report novel sensitive imaging biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD) and its atypical variants. Diffusion tensor imaging and transcranial brain sonography are potentially promising techniques that can differentiate typical PD from atypical variants (multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy) and from benign tremor disorders. Non-motor symptoms, such as dementia, depression, and sleep disruption, are often more distressing to PD patients than their slowness and stiffness. Dopamine replacement treatment can also lead to complications such as dyskinesias, impulse control disorders, and psychosis. Recent positron emission tomography studies have helped to clarify the physiopathological mechanisms underlying dementia and compulsive gambling in PD and provide a rationale for therapeutic strategies.

  16. Parkinson disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazewood, John D; Richards, D Roxanne; Clebak, Karl

    2013-02-15

    Parkinson disease is a progressive neurologic disorder afflicting approximately 1 percent of Americans older than 60 years. The cardinal features of Parkinson disease are bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor, and postural instability. There are a number of neurologic conditions that mimic the disease, making it difficult to diagnose in its early stages. Physicians who rarely diagnose Parkinson disease should refer patients suspected of having it to physicians with more experience in making the diagnosis, and should periodically reevaluate the accuracy of the diagnosis. Treatment is effective in reducing motor impairment and disability, and should be started when a patient begins to experience functional impairment. The combination of carbidopa and levodopa is the most effective treatment, but dopamine agonists and monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors are also effective, and are less likely to cause dyskinesias. For patients taking carbidopa/levodopa who have motor complications, adjunctive therapy with a dopamine agonist, a monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor, or a catechol O-methyltransferase inhibitor will improve motor symptoms and functional status, but with an increase in dyskinesias. Deep brain stimulation is effective in patients who have poorly controlled symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Occupational, physical, and speech therapy improve patient function. Fatigue, sleep disturbances, dementia, and depression are common in patients with Parkinson disease. Although these conditions are associated with significantly lower quality of life, they may improve with treatment.

  17. Advances in levodopa therapy for Parkinson disease: Review of RYTARY (carbidopa and levodopa) clinical efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhall, Rohit; Kreitzman, David L

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a slowly progressive, incurable, neurodegenerative disorder with progressive motor symptoms that can be managed with treatments. Levodopa is generally recognized as the most effective and widely used treatment for PD. It improves function and quality of life, morbidity, and mortality, and therefore reduces individual and societal costs. Levodopa has a relatively short half-life, however, and is quickly metabolized in the plasma, leading to fluctuations, including wearing-off of effect and inconsistent symptomatic relief as well as development of dyskinesias, with both wearing off and dyskinesias worsening with advancing disease. Immediate-release and controlled-release formulations have been used with success, but motor fluctuations remain a problem. RYTARY (levodopa and carbidopa, IPX066) is an oral extended-release therapy composed of carbidopa-levodopa microbeads designed to dissolve at various rates that allows for quick absorption and sustained levodopa release over an extended period. In development studies, RYTARY improved symptoms in patients with both early and advanced PD and offered significantly improved Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale scores and "on" times, without worsening troublesome dyskinesias when compared to other levodopa formulations. Tolerability and safety were comparable to other formulations. This section reviews the data that support the use of RYTARY in the treatment of PD.

  18. Nondipping in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sita Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to identify patients with Parkinson's disease who showed loss or decrease of nocturnal blood pressure fall (nondipper patients as a marker of autonomic dysfunction. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was considered to investigate whether alterations in circadian blood pressure pattern are associated with posture-related dysregulation of blood pressure. Methods. 40 patients with Parkinson's disease underwent 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. 21 patients were diagnosed with arterial hypertension and received anti-hypertensive drugs. Nondipper patients were defined as having nocturnal decrease of mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure less than 10%. Presence or absence of orthostatic hypotension was determined by Schellong's test. Results. We identified 35 nondipper patients (88%. Nondipping was detected in 20 patients with orthostatic hypotension (95% and in 15 patients without orthostatic hypotension (79%. 18 patients with hypertensive and 22 patients with normal blood pressure values were detected. Conclusions. In conclusion 24-hour blood pressure monitoring showed a high prevalence of nondipping in 40 patients with Parkinson's disease with and without orthostatic hypotension independent of coexisting arterial hypertension and antihypertensive treatment. 24-hour blood pressure monitoring may be useful to identify non-dipping as a marker of autonomic dysfunction in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... know about Parkinson's disease. Learn about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and what treatment options are available. ... Travel and Transportation: Part 2 CareMAP: When Is It Time to Get Help? CareMAP: Where to Find ...

  20. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Are There Any Interactions With Non-Parkinson's Disease Medications? Are There Any Tips to Use for Freezing? ... y la Salud en General, Parte 2 CareMAP: Medications and General Health Part 1 CareMAP: Medications and ...

  1. Postural deformities in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, K.M.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Peralta, M.C.; Silveira-Moriyama, L.; Azulay, J.P.; Gershanik, O.S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Postural deformities are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. These deformities include camptocormia, antecollis, Pisa syndrome, and scoliosis. Recognition of specific postural syndromes might have differential diagnostic value in patients prese

  2. Biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Todd B

    2011-04-20

    Biomarkers for detecting the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) could accelerate development of new treatments. Such biomarkers could be used to identify individuals at risk for developing PD, to improve early diagnosis, to track disease progression with precision, and to test the efficacy of new treatments. Although some progress has been made, there are many challenges associated with developing biomarkers for detecting PD in its earliest stages.

  3. Current management of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease treated chronically with levodopa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, E; Zoldan, J; Galili-Mosberg, R; Ziv, I; Djaldetti, R

    1999-01-01

    effective pharmacological treatment for Parkinson's disease (Melamed, 1987). Undoubtedly, the outstanding therapeutic success of levodopa represents a dramatic and revolutionary breakthrough in medicine, in general, and in neurology, in particular. Although, since the introduction of levodopa, there have been many additional pharmacological and even surgical anti-parkinsonian strategies, it still stands out as a mandatory axis of treatment in the majority of patients (Steigler and Quinn, 1992). Indeed, levodopa therapy improves, sometimes markedly, the motor signs and symptoms of the illness, the functional capacity and quality of life and perhaps also life expectancy of the afflicted patients. It is therefore unfortunate that after an initial problem-free period of successful, smooth and stable clinical benefit from levodopa that lasts about two to five years, the responsiveness of many patients worsens with the emergence of a variety of complications (Marsden et al., 1982; Hardie et al., 1984). These adverse reactions include dyskinesias and dystonias, psychotic problems and, particularly, the troublesome motor fluctuations (Marsden and Parkes, 1977; Marsden, 1994). The latter phenomenon may be particularly complex, limiting and disabling. It is believed that most patients on long-term levodopa therapy will, sooner or later, develop response fluctuations of varying types and severity (Riley and Lang, 1993). Because of the serious impact of these phenomena on the quality of life and function of the patients, many efforts are now being undertaken to identify the responsible mechanisms and to devise preventive and therapeutic measures.

  4. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanvi, B R; Lo, T C N; Harsh, D P

    2005-10-01

    Psychosis is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly in its later stages. The symptoms range from comparatively minor illusions, vivid dreams, and occasional, non-disturbing visual hallucinations to frank psychosis. The pathogenesis of psychosis in PD is not fully known. Management of psychosis in PD requires a multidisciplinary approach. Some of the newer atypical antipsychotics are effective against psychosis with no significant worsening of PD. Psychosis in PD is associated with poor quality of life for patients and the carers.

  5. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thanvi, B; Lo, T.; Harsh, D

    2005-01-01

    Psychosis is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly in its later stages. The symptoms range from comparatively minor illusions, vivid dreams, and occasional, non-disturbing visual hallucinations to frank psychosis. The pathogenesis of psychosis in PD is not fully known. Management of psychosis in PD requires a multidisciplinary approach. Some of the newer atypical antipsychotics are effective against psychosis with no significant worsening of PD. Psychosis in PD is associated with p...

  6. Long-term efficacy and safety of pramipexole in advanced Parkinson's disease: results from a European multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, J Carsten; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Köster, Jürgen; Pezzoli, Gianni; Provinciali, Leandro

    2005-05-01

    A double-blind, placebo-controlled study with a subsequent open-label phase was conducted in 354 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and motor fluctuations under individually adjusted therapy with levodopa. During the double-blind phase 174 patients received pramipexole and 180 placebo. In agreement with previous studies, pramipexole treatment improved UPDRS sum scores of parts II and III by 30% and off times by approximately 2.5 hours per day. Differences between the treatment groups became significant at a daily dose of 0.75 mg of pramipexole dihydrochloride. We, furthermore, performed post hoc analyses with respect to resting tremor and depression. Patients with pronounced resting tremor derived a clear benefit from pramipexole treatment compared with placebo. In addition, pramipexole significantly improved the subitems motivation/initiative and depression in a subpopulation with increased Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale I scores at the time of inclusion. There were 262 patients who were subsequently enrolled into the open-label study featuring a maximum duration of up to 57 months. Statistical analysis revealed good long-term efficacy and tolerability of pramipexole. Overall, only a low prevalence of somnolence was found. In summary, this study provides additional level I evidence of the usefulness of pramipexole, suggests a particular tremorlytic and a possible antidepressant action of this compound, and addresses for the first time its efficacy and safety during long-term administration in advanced PD.

  7. Improvement of Advanced Parkinson's Disease Manifestations with Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus: A Single Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, Ahmed; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Fakhry, Mazen; Eassa, Ayman Youssef Ezeldin; Fouad, Wael; Shakal, Ahmed; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2016-12-13

    We present our experience at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), describing our surgical technique, and reporting our clinical results, and morbidities. Twenty patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent bilateral STN-DBS were studied. Patients were assessed preoperatively and followed up for one year using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in "on" and "off" medication and "on" and "off" stimulation conditions. At one-year follow-up, we calculated significant improvement in all the motor aspects of PD (UPDRS III) and in activities of daily living (UPDRS II) in the "off" medication state. The "off" medication UPDRS improved by 49.3%, tremors improved by 81.6%, rigidity improved by 50.0%, and bradykinesia improved by 39.3%. The "off" medication UPDRS II scores improved by 73.8%. The Levodopa equivalent daily dose was reduced by 54.1%. The UPDRS IVa score (dyskinesia) was reduced by 65.1%. The UPDRS IVb score (motor fluctuation) was reduced by 48.6%. Deep brain stimulation of the STN improves the cardinal motor manifestations of the idiopathic PD. It also improves activities of daily living, and reduces medication-induced complications.

  8. Recent advances in PET imaging for evaluation of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sioka, Chrissa [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ioannina (Greece); University of Ioannina School of Medicine, University Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ioannina (Greece); Fotopoulos, Andreas [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ioannina (Greece); Kyritsis, Athanassios P. [University Hospital of Ioannina, Department of Neurology, Ioannina (Greece); University of Ioannina, Neurosurgical Research Institute, Ioannina (Greece)

    2010-08-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) consists of loss of pigmented dopamine-secreting neurons in the pars compacta of the midbrain substantia nigra. These neurons project to the striatum (putamen and caudate nucleus) and their loss leads to alterations in the activity of the neural circuits that regulate movement. In a simplified model, two dopamine pathways are involved: the direct pathway, which is mediated through facilitation of the D{sub 1} receptors, and the indirect pathway through D{sub 2} receptors (inhibitory). Positron emission tomography (PET) tracers to image the presynaptic sites of the dopaminergic system include 6-[{sup 18}F]FDOPA and 6-[{sup 18}F]FMT, [{sup 11}C]dihydrotetrabenazine, [{sup 11}C]nomifensine and various radiolabelled cocaine derivatives. Postsynaptically, for the dopamine D{sub 1} subtype the most commonly used ligands are [{sup 11}C]SCH 23390 or [{sup 11}C]NNC 112 and for the D{sub 2} subtype [{sup 11}C]raclopride, [{sup 11}C]MNPA and [{sup 18}F]DMFP. PET is a sensitive and specific non-invasive molecular imaging technique that may be helpful for evaluation of PD and its differential diagnosis from other parkinsonian syndromes. (orig.)

  9. Recent machine learning advancements in sensor-based mobility analysis: Deep learning for Parkinson's disease assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskofier, Bjoern M; Lee, Sunghoon I; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Golabchi, Fatemeh N; Ferreira-Carvalho, Gabriela; Vergara-Diaz, Gloria; Sapienza, Stefano; Costante, Gianluca; Klucken, Jochen; Kautz, Thomas; Bonato, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The development of wearable sensors has opened the door for long-term assessment of movement disorders. However, there is still a need for developing methods suitable to monitor motor symptoms in and outside the clinic. The purpose of this paper was to investigate deep learning as a method for this monitoring. Deep learning recently broke records in speech and image classification, but it has not been fully investigated as a potential approach to analyze wearable sensor data. We collected data from ten patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease using inertial measurement units. Several motor tasks were expert-labeled and used for classification. We specifically focused on the detection of bradykinesia. For this, we compared standard machine learning pipelines with deep learning based on convolutional neural networks. Our results showed that deep learning outperformed other state-of-the-art machine learning algorithms by at least 4.6 % in terms of classification rate. We contribute a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of deep learning for sensor-based movement assessment and conclude that deep learning is a promising method for this field.

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Search Disorders ...

  11. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, C.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Borm, G.F.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Leenders, K.L.; Eshuis, S.; Booij, J.; Dluzen, D.E.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate gender differences in basic disease characteristics, motor deterioration and nigrostriatal degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: We studied 253 consecutive PD patients who were not receiving levodopa or dopamine agonists (disease duration < or = 10 years). W

  12. [The Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A metabolic disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, I; Boirie, Y; Morio, B; Derost, P; Ulla, M; Marques, A; Debilly, B; Bannier, S; Durif, F

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by motor impairments (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability) associated or not with non-motor complications (cognitive disorders, dysautonomia). Most of patients loose weight during evolution of their disease. Dysregulations of hypothalamus, which is considered as the regulatory center of satiety and energy metabolism, could play a major role in this phenomenon. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (NST) is an effective method to treat patients with advanced Parkinson's disease providing marked improvement of motor impairments. This chirurgical procedure also induces a rapid and strong body weight gain and sometimes obesity. This post-operative weight gain, which exceeds largely weight lost recorded in non-operated patient, could be responsible of metabolic disorders (such as diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes body weight variations generated by Parkinson' disease and deep brain stimulation of the NST, and focuses on metabolic disorders capable to explain them. Finally, this review emphasizes on the importance of an adequate nutritional follow up care for parkinsonian patient.

  13. [Neurochemistry of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism plus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, J; Misiego, M

    1997-08-01

    The neurochemistry of Parkinson's disease and other degenerative parkinsonisms is reviewed, emphasizing the changes described in the dopaminergic system. Presynaptic dopaminergic markers are reduced over the striatum in all these degenerative parkinsonisms, dopamine receptor changes being more heterogeneous. While in Parkinson's disease D1 and D2 receptors remain preserved as compared to controls, in progressive supranuclear palsy there is a loss of nigral D1 receptors and of striatal D2 receptors. This finding has also been described in striatonigral degeneration. There are no clear data about the status of D3, D4 and D5 dopamine receptors in these conditions. The alterations in other neurotransmission systems, cholinegic, adrenergic, serotoninergic and peptidergic are, in general, less dramatic, although they have not been studied in detail. To conclude, further studies are necessary in these field, in these moment, however, the preservation of striatal D2 dopamine receptors is the neurochemical finding with the best correlation with the response to levodopa or other dopaminergic agonists.

  14. Constipation in parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Karoline; Krogh, Klaus; Østergaard, Karen;

    2016-01-01

    , and the same is probably true for de novo PD patients. Thus, the prevalence of objective colonic dysfunction exceeds the prevalence of subjective constipation. Colonic transit time measures are simple, widely available, and hold promise as a useful biomarker in manifest PD. More research is needed to elucidate...... the role of gastrointestinal dysfunction in disease progression of PD. Moreover, colonic transit measures may have utility as a more accurate risk factor for predicting PD in the prodromal phase. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society....

  15. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John C; Mehta, Shyamal H; Sethi, Kapil D

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers are objectively measured characteristics that are indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or responses to therapeutic interventions. To date, clinical assessment remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and clinical rating scales are well established as the gold standard for tracking progression of PD. Researchers have identified numerous potential biomarkers that may aid in the differential diagnosis of PD and/or tracking disease progression. Clinical, genetic, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics), and neuroimaging biomarkers may provide useful tools in the diagnosis of PD and in measuring disease progression and response to therapies. Some potential biomarkers are inexpensive and do not require much technical expertise, whereas others are expensive or require specialized equipment and technical skills. Many potential biomarkers in PD show great promise; however, they need to be assessed for their sensitivity and specificity over time in large and varied samples of patients with and without PD.

  16. Profile of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel and its potential in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skodda S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sabine SkoddaDepartment of Neurology, Knappschaftskrankenhaus, Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bochum, GermanyAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by a progression of symptoms in the course of time which typically leads to the occurrence of motor complications in the advanced stages of disease. In this stage of “motor complication”, conventional oral polypharmacotherapy often fails to preserve sufficiently stable motor function during the course of the day. Continuous infusions of levodopa/carbidopa gel (LCIG delivered directly into the small intestine by a portable pump have been shown to stabilize levodopa plasma levels and to ameliorate motor fluctuations and troublesome dyskinesias in patients in the advanced stages of PD. Furthermore, there are also some first indications for beneficial effects on dopamine-related nonmotor symptoms of PD and an amelioration of overall quality of life. On the other hand, LCIG is an elaborate and expensive therapy, which requires the assured access to a medical team who are experienced with the management of adverse events and technical problems related to the tube and pump delivery system. This review focuses on the principle of LCIG infusion therapy and gives a comprehensive summary of the existing data on therapeutic effects and adverse events and possible complications.Keywords: motor complications, continuous dopaminergic stimulation, dyskinesia, nonmotor symptoms, quality of life

  17. Motivational modes and learning in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerde, Karin; Braun, Erin Kendall; Higgins, E Tory; Shohamy, Daphna

    2015-08-01

    Learning and motivation are intrinsically related, and both have been linked to dopamine. Parkinson's disease results from a progressive loss of dopaminergic inputs to the striatum and leads to impairments in motivation and learning from feedback. However, the link between motivation and learning in Parkinson's disease is not well understood. To address this gap, we leverage a well-established psychological theory of motivation, regulatory mode theory, which distinguishes between two functionally independent motivational concerns in regulating behavior: a concern with having an effect by initiating and maintaining movement (Locomotion) and a concern with establishing what is correct by critically evaluating goal pursuit means and outcomes (Assessment). We examined Locomotion and Assessment in patients with Parkinson's disease and age-matched controls. Parkinson's disease patients demonstrated a selective decrease in Assessment motivation but no change in Locomotion motivation, suggesting that Parkinson's disease leads to a reduced tendency to evaluate and monitor outcomes. Moreover, weaker Assessment motivation was correlated with poorer performance on a feedback-based learning task previously shown to depend on the striatum. Together, these findings link a questionnaire-based personality inventory with performance on a well-characterized experimental task, advancing our understanding of how Parkinson's disease affects motivation with implications for well-being and treatment outcomes.

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for PD: Depression, Anxiety & Psychosis Out of the Park for Parkinson's: Gordon Beckham Leads Stretches Overview of ... Can Make A Difference Your donation to the National Parkinson Foundation goes directly to support and develop ...

  19. Parkinson's Disease: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease? Parkinson's disease occurs when nerve cells, or neurons, in the brain die or become impaired. Although many brain areas ... Understanding Sleep The Life and Death of a Neuron Order Publications Brain for Life Support Resources Patient Organizations Professional Societies ...

  20. 2015 Update on Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Hubert H

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson disease is still diagnosed by clinical signs, and its most effective treatment is still levodopa. However, an improved understanding of the disease is leading to new diagnostic tools and treatments.

  1. Misperceptions and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joseph H

    2017-03-15

    Most of the neurobehavioral aspects of Parkinson's disease have been well established and studied, but many are not well known, and hardly studied. This article focuses on several behavioral abnormalities that are common, and frequently cause difficulty for the patient and family due to lack of recognition as part of the disease. While it is well known that L-Dopa dyskinesias are frequently not recognized or under appreciated by patients, a similar lack of recognition may affect the patient's own speech volume, where their center of gravity is located, whether they are tilted to one side, and their under-recognition of others' emotional displays. In addition, PD patients are often misperceived by others incorrect impression of their emotional and cognitive state based purely on facial expression. These changes and others are briefly reviewed.

  2. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Tang, Bei-Sha; Guo, Ji-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice.

  3. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bei-sha

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterized by the hallmarks of motor symptoms, such as tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural instability. However, through clinical investigations in patients and experimental findings in animal models of Parkinson's disease for years, it is now well recognized that Parkinson's disease is more than just a motor-deficit disorder. The majority of Parkinson's disease patients suffer from nonmotor disabilities, for instance, cognitive impairment, autonomic dysfunction, sensory dysfunction, and sleep disorder. So far, anti-PD prescriptions and surgical treatments have been mainly focusing on motor dysfunctions, leaving cognitive impairment a marginal clinical field. Within the nonmotor symptoms, cognitive impairment is one of the most common and significant aspects of Parkinson's disease, and cognitive deficits such as dysexecutive syndrome and visuospatial disturbances could seriously affect the quality of life, reduce life expectancy, prolong the duration of hospitalization, and therefore increase burdens of caregiver and medical costs. In this review, we have done a retrospective study of the recent related researches on epidemiology, clinical manifestation and diagnosis, genetics, and potential treatment of cognitive deficits in Parkinson's disease, aiming to provide a summary of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease and make it easy for clinicians to tackle this challenging issue in their future practice. PMID:28058128

  4. [Proteomic biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrés, Sara; Durán, Raquel; Barrero, Francisco; Ramírez, Manuel; Vives, Francisco

    2014-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement and is caused by the death of the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of the substantia nigra. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical, but although the signs and symptoms of PD are well known, the rate of diagnostic error is relatively high. It is estimated that 10-30% of patients initially diagnosed with PD are later reclassified. This disease has a high prevalence beyond the age of 60, and one of its biggest problems is that it is diagnosed when the degenerative process is already at a very advanced stage. Therefore, it is necessary to look for other biomarkers that make it possible to carry out an early diagnosis of PD, follow up its development, distinguish it from other related pathologies (parkinsonisms) and help monitor the effect of novel therapies. The fact that there are mutations that lead to PD, as well as polygenetic combinations that can act as risk factors, suggests the possibility of measuring the proteins resulting from the expression of these genes in peripheral tissues. And once their sensitivity and specificity have been proved they could be used as biomarkers for PD, even in the early phases of the disease. The aim of this work is to focus on a detailed review of the main candidate proteomic biomarkers researched to date by discussing the most recent literature.

  5. Cellular models for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenburger, Björn H; Saridaki, Theodora; Dinter, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Developing new therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease requires cellular models. Current models reproduce the two most salient changes found in the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease: The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of protein aggregates consisting mainly of α-synuclein. Cultured cells offer many advantages over studying Parkinson's disease directly in patients or in animal models. At the same time, the choice of a specific cellular model entails the requirement to focus on one aspect of the disease while ignoring others. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. It might also be helpful for researchers from other fields consulting literature on cellular models of Parkinson's disease. Important models for the study of dopaminergic neuron degeneration include Lund human mesencephalic cells and primary neurons, and a case is made for the use of non-dopaminergic cells to model pathogenesis of non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. With regard to α-synuclein aggregates, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. Cellular models reproduce the two most salient changes of Parkinson's disease, the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and the existence of α-synuclein aggregates. This article is intended for researchers planning to use cellular models for their studies. It describes for commonly used cell types and treatments the aspects of Parkinson's disease they model along with technical advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this article describes strategies to induce and measure aggregates with a focus on fluorescent techniques. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  6. Impact of Duodopa on Quality of Life in Advanced Parkinson's Disease: A UK Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Foltynie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options in advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD include subcutaneous apomorphine, pallidal or subthalamic nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS, or levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG/Duodopa. In this study, we describe the outcome of 12 PD patients with PD related complications started on LCIG, with respect to their quality of life measured by a disease specific validated scale—the PDQ39, together with diaries recording time spent “On,” “Off,” “Dyskinetic,” or “Asleep.” At the time of latest follow up, improvements were observed in both the PDQ39 Summary index as well as diary reports of PD symptom control following introduction of LCIG, supporting its use in well selected patients. The use of a trial period of LCIG via naso-jejunal administration allows objective evaluation of improvement in PD symptom control in advance of the placement of the more invasive percutaneous jejunostomy procedure. The decision to embark on LCIG, apomorphine or DBS should be supported by input from centres with experience of all 3 approaches. Since LCIG is an expensive option, development of the most appropriate future commissioning of this therapy in the absence of Class 1 evidence requires careful scrutiny of the outcomes of its use in a broad range of published series.

  7. Spinal Surgery Complications and Failures in Patients with Parkinsons Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkas, George S; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papastathis, Elias; Tsiavos, Kostas; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Galanopoulos, Ioannis; Soultanis, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Elias C; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system affecting the substantia nigra in the midbrain. It accounts for 1.5% of the population in Europe over 60 years of age. Recent advances in the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease have improved the quality of life and life expectancy of the patients. However, it remains a debilitating disease. Spinal disorders are frequent in these patients, and as the population ages, more patients with Parkinson's disease are expected to require spinal surgery. Spinal surgery in patients with Parkinson's disease has been associated with an exceptionally high rate of complications; failures and reoperations are common, and patient outcomes are dismal.

  8. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  9. [Biotherapies and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, P; Fenelon, G; Remy, P

    2009-11-01

    In the last years, several experimental biotherapies have been developed to treat Parkinson's disease. Initially, fetal dopaminergic transplants were proposed. Although a proof of concept and encouraging results have been provided, limitations of this treatment emerged over the years and the failure of controlled trials have conducted to a pause in the development of strategies based on fetal cells. Alternative approaches such as the use of retinal pigmented cells recently provided disappointing results in patients and much hope has now been reported on other sources of dopaminergic neurons such as those originating from stem cells. This strategy is however not yet ready for clinical trials in patients. Eventually, gene therapy is a new original experimental technique which has elicited several trials in the last few years some of them being promising.

  10. RNA metabolism in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bingwei; Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao

    2014-10-10

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson׳s disease are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. While most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause, a small percentage of disease cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations. The identification of genes associated with the familial forms of the diseases and subsequent studies of proteins encoded by the disease genes in cellular or animal models have offered much-needed insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Recent studies of the familial Parkinson׳s disease genes have emphasized the importance of RNA metabolism, particularly mRNA translation, in the disease process. It is anticipated that continued studies on the role of RNA metabolism in Parkinson׳s disease will offer unifying mechanisms for understanding the cause of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and facilitate the development of novel and rational strategies for treating this debilitating disease.

  11. Argentine tango in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    This article reports on a meta-analysis of 13 studies of the effects of Argentine tango (AT) as a music-based movement therapy for people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Nine studies involved randomised controlled trials.

  12. The temporary and accumulated effects of transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Lei, Xiaoguang; Yan, Ting; Li, Hongwei; Huang, Baihui; Li, Ling; Xu, Liqi; Liu, Li; Chen, Nanhui; Lü, Longbao; Ma, Yuanye; Xu, Lin; Li, Jiali; Wang, Zhengbo; Zhang, Baorong; Hu, Xintian

    2015-07-29

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a useful noninvasive technique of cortical brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological disorders. Clinical research has demonstrated tDCS with anodal stimulation of primary motor cortex (M1) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients significantly improved their motor function. However, few studies have been focused on the optimization of parameters which contributed significantly to the treatment effects of tDCS and exploration of the underline neuronal mechanisms. Here, we used different stimulation parameters of anodal tDCS on M1 for the treatment of aged advanced PD monkeys induced with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) administration, and then analyzed the temporary and accumulated effects of tDCS treatment. The results indicated anodal tDCS on M1 very significantly improved motor ability temporarily; importantly, the treatment effects of anodal tDCS on M1 were quantitatively correlated to the accumulated stimulation instead of the stimuli intensity or duration respectively. In addition, c-fos staining showed tDCS treatment effects activated the neurons both in M1 and substantia nigra (SN). Therefore, we propose that long time and continue anodal tDCS on M1 is a better strategy to improve the motor symptoms of PD than individual manipulation of stimuli intensity or duration.

  13. Abnormal Bidirectional Plasticity-Like Effects in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Rothwell, John C.; Lu, Chin-Song; Chuang, Wen-Li; Chen, Rou-Shayn

    2011-01-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia is a major complication of long-term dopamine replacement therapy for Parkinson's disease that becomes increasingly problematic in advanced Parkinson's disease. Although the cause of levodopa-induced dyskinesias is still unclear, recent work in animal models of the corticostriatal system has suggested that…

  14. Nutraceuticals in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Liting; Basil, Adeline Henry; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2016-09-01

    Current pharmacological strategies for Parkinson's disease (PD), the most common neurological movement disorder worldwide, are predominantly symptom relieving and are often plagued with undesirable side effects after prolonged treatment. Despite this, they remain as the mainstay treatment for PD due to the lack of better alternatives. Nutraceuticals are compounds derived from natural food sources that have certain therapeutic value and the advent of which has opened doors to the use of alternative strategies to tackle neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. Notably, nutraceuticals are able to position themselves as a "safer" strategy due to the fact that they are naturally derived compounds, therefore possibly having less side effects. Significant efforts have been put into better comprehending the role of nutraceuticals in PD, and we will look at some of them in this review. Broadly speaking, these compounds execute their positive effects via modulating signalling pathways, inhibiting oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, as well as regulating mitochondrial homoeostasis. Importantly, we will highlight how a component of green tea, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), confers neuroprotection in PD via its ability to activate AMP kinase and articulate how its beneficial effects in PD are possibly due to enhancing mitochondrial quality control.

  15. Noradrenaline and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eDelaville

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and motor symptoms including bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor at rest. These symptoms are manifest when around 70% of striatal DA is lost. In addition to motor deficits, PD is also characterized by the manifestation of non-motor symptoms. However, depletion of DA alone in animal models has failed to simultaneously elicit both the motor and non-motor deficits of PD because the disease is a multi-system disorder that features a profound loss of other neurotransmitter systems. There is growing evidence that additional loss of noradrenaline (NA neurons of the locus coeruleus, the principal source of NA in the brain, could be involved in the clinical expression of motor as well as in non-motor deficits. In the present review, we analyzed the latest data obtained from animal models of parkinsonism and from parkinsonian patients providing evidence for the implication of NA in the pathophysiology of PD. Recent studies have shown that NA depletion alone or combined with DA depletion resulted in motor as well as in non-motor dysfunctions. In addition, by using selective agonists and antagonists of alpha receptors we, and others, have shown that α2 receptors are implicated in the control of motor activity and that α2 receptor antagonists can improve PD motor symptoms as well as L-Dopa-induced dyskinesia. Here we provide arguments that the loss of NA neurons in PD has an impact on all PD symptoms and that the association of NAergic agents to dopaminergic medication can be beneficial in the treatment of the disease.

  16. Parkinson's Disease Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... embryonic stem cells and therapeutic cloning without engendering political or ethical controversy. Inflammation The nonspecific immune response ... called von Economo encephalitis. See also: parkinsonism Postural instability Uncontrollable problems with standing or walking, or impaired ...

  17. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Warning Signs Motor Symptoms Non-Motor Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Newly Diagnosed Living Well Caregiving Understanding Parkinson's There ... about symptoms, how it is diagnosed and what treatment options are available. Learn More > Find Help NPF ...

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Day to Day? Ask the Helpline: Why Is Exercise Important for People with Parkinson's? Aware in Care: ... with PD? What Are the Neuroprotective Benefits of Exercise for PD Patients? What Are the Risks and ...

  19. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  20. Camptocormia in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Abe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Abnormalities of posture represent one of the main features of Parkinson's disease (PD. Among them, camptocormia has been considered as rare in PD. We investigated frequency and clinical features of camptocormia in PD patients. Methods. 153 PD patients (mean 68.5±10.7 years old, duration 5.9±2.4 years outpatiently recruited. After neurologic examination, patients were rated on the Unified PD Rating Scale motor scale (UPDRS Part III, minimental state examination (MMSE. Also we evaluated patients with camptocormia by MRI. Of the 153 PD patients, 27 had camptocormia (mean age, 67.9±7.9 years old; disease duration, 6.1±3.9 years. For further evaluation, we recruited age- and sex-matched 27 PD patients without camptocormia (11 men and 16 women; mean age ±SD, 69.2±10.1 years, duration 6.0±2.7 years These selected 54 patients completed several self-assessments. Lumbar and thoracic paraspinal muscles were studied by EMG. Results. There were no significant differences in age, duration, severity, and drug dose between patients with and without camptocormia. Analysis of NMSS subitems indicated that PD patients tended to show lower scores for sleep/fatigue, attention/memory, and miscellaneous items. Conclusions. We found significant differences concerning nonmotor signs and symptoms evaluated by FAB, PDQ-8, FSQ, VAS-F, and NMSS between patients with and without camptocormia. Our findings indicate that camptocormia is a relatively common sign in PD and that patients with camptocormia scores on the PDQ-8 compared with PD patients without camptocormia. This suggests that improvements in camptocormia of PD patients may improve their QOL.

  1. Camptocormia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Eldad; Djaldetti, Ruth

    2006-12-01

    Camptocormia is defined as an abnormal, severe and involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine, which becomes manifest during standing and walking and subsides in the recumbent position. It was originally described as a psychogenic disorder, particularly in soldiers involved in long-term trench service during World War 1. It is becoming increasingly recognized as a prominent and disabling phenomenon during the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). In our experience, there is no clear correlation between camptocormia and levodopa treatment. In a few patients, the abnormal posture improved and in others it was unaltered or even became worse following levodopa administration. In a minority of fluctuating patients, there was a temporary deterioration during the "off" periods, but in most, the severity of camptocormia was unchanged during the "on" and "off" phases. In some patients it is associated with back pains, whereas in others it is painless. It occurs in sporadic PD as well as in postencephalitic and parkin-gene mutation PD and in other parkinsonian syndromes such as MSA. The pathogenesis of this striking clinical sign is unknown. It is definitely not due to a primary vertebral disease causing kyphosis such as ankylosing spondylitis, as the bent spine disappears when the patient lies on his back. The muscles involved may be the abdominal, paravertebral or both. It may by due to a peculiar dystonia or to an extreme form of rigidity. Local myopathic changes were suggested as a possible cause, but these may rather be a secondary phenomenon. Treatment is currently unsatisfactory in most cases. Occasional patients may benefit from intramuscular botulinum toxin injections or from deep brain stimulation.

  2. Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_163751.html Could Parkinson's Disease Raise Stroke Risk? Or is the link the other way ... link between Parkinson's disease and the risk for stroke. However, the study can't prove that one ...

  3. Approach to the patient with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin E

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with motor, nonmotor, and behavioral findings. Imaging technology advances have allowed the characterization of the underlying pathologic changes to the brain and identification of specific lesions in dopaminergic neurons. Although certain imaging techniques allow for detection up to 20 years before the onset of motor symptoms, these advances have yet to produce meaningful treatments to halt the disease or reverse its course. Current treatments are directed at optimizing symptomatic management. Referral to a movement disorder specialist familiar with PD should be considered for providers with limited familiarity in diagnosis or treatment.

  4. Glycation in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Miranda, Hugo; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-06-01

    Glycation is a spontaneous age-dependent posttranslational modification that can impact the structure and function of several proteins. Interestingly, glycation can be detected at the periphery of Lewy bodies in the brain in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, α-synuclein can be glycated, at least under experimental conditions. In Alzheimer's disease, glycation of amyloid β peptide exacerbates its toxicity and contributes to neurodegeneration. Recent studies establish diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying this connection remain unclear. We hypothesize that hyperglycemia might play an important role in the development of these disorders, possibly by also inducing protein glycation and thereby dysfunction, aggregation, and deposition. Here, we explore protein glycation as a common player in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and propose it may constitute a novel target for the development of strategies for neuroprotective therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  5. The role of autophagy in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Yaru Dong; Xiaoheng Xu; Zhong Xu

    2012-01-01

    Although Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, the mechanisms of pathogenesis remain poorly understood. Recent findings have shown that deregulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. This review summarizes the most recent findings and discusses the unique role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson's disease to highlight the possibility of Parkinson's disease treatment strategies that incorporate autophagy-lysosome pathway modulation.

  6. A community survey of Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    In a rural community of 80,000 people 69 patients were identified as having a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. After interview and examination we found that 55 met the generally accepted diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease, 4 had possible Parkinson's disease, 6 had essential tremor, 2 had dementia and 2 had other conditions. The patients with Parkinson's disease had clinical and epidemiologic characteristics similar to those of patients in previous, mainly hospital-based, studies. Th...

  7. Adjunctive therapy in Parkinson's disease: the role of rasagiline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaines KD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn D Gaines,1 Vanessa K Hinson21Department of Neurology, Aurora Advanced Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, 2Department of Neurosciences, Movement Disorders Program, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, currently affecting 1.5 million people in the US. In this review, we describe the diagnostic and pathological features of Parkinson's disease, as well as its clinical course. We then review pharmacologic treatments for the disease, with a particular focus on therapies adjunctive to levodopa and specifically the role of rasagiline. We review the four pivotal rasagiline trials, and discuss rasagiline and its use as adjunctive therapy for Parkinson's disease. Finally, we discuss potential side effects, drug interactions, and other practical aspects concerning the use of rasagiline in Parkinson's disease.Keywords: Parkinson's disease, treatment, rasagiline, clinical trials

  8. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  9. Development of Parkinson's disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Kumar M; Tan, Eng-King

    2010-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative movement disorder, affecting over 6 million people worldwide. It is anticipated that the number of affected individuals may increase significantly in the most populous nations by 2030. During the past 20 years, much progress has been made in identifying and assessing various potential clinical, biochemical, imaging and genetic biomarkers for PD. Despite the wealth of information, development of a validated biomarker for PD is still ongoing. It is hoped that reliable and well-validated biomarkers will provide critical clues to assist in the diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease patients in the near future.

  10. Test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III, dyskinesia scales, and timed motor tests in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: an argument against multiple baseline assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metman, Leo Verhagen; Myre, Brian; Verwey, Niek; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Arzbaecher, Jean; Sierens, Diane; Bakay, Roy

    2004-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The secondary objective was to assess the intra-rater reliability of standard timed motor tests and dyskinesia scales to determine the necessity of multiple baseline core evaluations before surgery for PD. We carried out two standardized preoperative core evaluations of patients with advanced PD scheduled to undergo deep brain stimulation. Patients were examined in the defined off and on conditions by the same rater. UPDRS-III, timed tests, and dyskinesia scores from the two evaluations were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Differences in UPDRS-III scores for the two visits were clinically and statistically nonsignificant, and the ICC was 0.9. Similarly, there were no significant differences in timed motor tests or dyskinesia scores, with a median ICC of 0.8. The results indicate that previous findings of high test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III in early untreated PD patients can now be extended to those with advanced disease complicated by motor fluctuations. In addition, test-retest reliability of dyskinesia scales and timed motor tests was high. Taken together, these findings challenge the need for multiple baseline assessments as currently stipulated in core assessment protocols for surgical intervention in PD.

  11. Imaging biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, David J; Pavese, Nicola

    2011-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons associated with intracellular Lewy inclusion bodies. The result is poverty of movement, increased muscle rigidity, and tremor at rest and on posture. Midbrain/nigral structural abnormalities can be demonstrated in vivo with both transcranial sonography (TCS) and diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) while positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) ligands exist to demonstrate dopamine terminal dysfunction. These radiotracers are markers of dopamine storage capacity, vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporter availability. While loss of putamen dopaminergic function leads to motor disability, Lewy bodies not only target dopamine neurons but have also been observed in serotoninergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic neurons. As a consequence, non-dopaminergic neurotransmission is also impaired resulting in non-motor symptoms including sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, dementia, and autonomic dysfunction. PET and SPECT ligands exist to interrogate the function of monoaminergic and cholinergic neurons. Cortical and limbic Lewy body disease is seen in more advanced PD and this can be detected with FDG PET as abnormal covariance between levels of resting brain metabolism in these regions. Additionally, widespread microglial activation can be detected in PD with PET. This review discusses the role of structural and functional imaging for understanding parkinsonian syndromes and aiding in their diagnosis and management.

  12. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marisa De Rose; Giusy Guzzi; Domenico Bosco; Mary Romano; Serena Marianna Lavano; Massimiliano Plastino; Giorgio Volpentesta; Rosa Marotta; Angelo Lavano

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment...

  13. Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S K; Sontakke, Ajit V

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson's disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitric oxide in the form of nitrite & nitrate. Enzymatic antioxidants in the form of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin and non enzymatic antioxidant vitamins e.g. vitamin E and C in either serum or plasma or erythrocyte in 40 patients of Parkinson's disease in the age group 40-80 years. Trace elements e.g. copper, zinc and selenium were also estimated. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide levels were Significantly high but superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, copper, zinc and selenium levels were significantly low in Parkinson's disease when compared with control subjects. Present study showed that elevated oxidative stress may be playing a role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in substentia nigra pars compacta and involved in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease.

  14. Parkinson's Disease: A Traffic Jam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, Michael J; Rochin, Leila

    2016-04-25

    Recent large-scale proteomic analyses of two protein kinases that are linked to Parkinson's disease have identified a remarkable convergence between their respective impacts on the phosphoproteome: activation of both LRRK2 and PINK1 leads to phosphorylation of several members of the Rab family of small GTPases, which regulate membrane trafficking.

  15. Genetic predisposition to Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Jónrit; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the genetic variants of CYP2D6 and HFE are more frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with controls in a population where the prevalence of these variants and PD are increased. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 79 PD patients and 154...

  16. Sweating dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinn, L; Schrag, A; Viswanathan, R; Lees, A; Quinn, N; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence and nature of sweating disturbances in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and investigated their correlation with other clinical features and with Quality of Life (QoL) measures. A questionnaire on symptoms and consequences of sweating dysfunction was compl

  17. Physical inactivity in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimwegen, M.L. van; Speelman, A.D.; Hofman-van Rossum, E.J.; Overeem, S.; Deeg, D.J.G.; Borm, G.F.; Horst, M.H. van der; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are likely to become physically inactive, because of their motor, mental, and emotional symptoms. However, specific studies on physical activity in PD are scarce, and results are conflicting. Here, we quantified daily physical activities in a large cohort of PD

  18. Stimulus Timing by People with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearden, J. H.; Smith-Spark, J. H.; Cousins, Rosanna; Edelstyn, N. M. J.; Cody, F. W. J.; O'Boyle, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that Parkinson's disease is marked by deficits in timed behaviour. However, the majority of studies of central timing mechanisms in patients with Parkinson's disease have used timing tasks with a motor component. Since the motor abnormalities are a defining feature of the condition, the status of timing in Parkinson's…

  19. Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spent, browse our financial information. Learn More Gambling, Sex, and…Parkinson's Disease? By Laura Marsh, M.D. ... and, in people with Parkinson's, most typically involve sex, gambling and abuse of anti-parkinsonian medications. Pathological ...

  20. Team management of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J C

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of Parkinson's disease. By using published sources, the disease process, clinical findings, and medical management of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. The continual change in the clinical picture as well as the therapeutic needs require that clinicians have a full understanding of the disease and drugs used. This is followed by a description of a group program, including the evaluation process, treatment goals, and individual and group activities employed. Rehabilitation services are needed as medical management alone is not sufficient to maintain patient's daily living skills. The occupational therapist is skilled in assessment and training of activities for daily living. As a result, occupational therapy can be an integral part of the treatment program.

  1. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Andre Y; Biagioni, Milton C; Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49-85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association.

  2. Parkinson's Disease and Cryptogenic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Dorian; Gurevich, Alec; Stone, Britt; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is an uncommon comorbidity of Parkinson's disease (PD) and has been considered not directly associated with PD. We present five patients (3 men and 2 women; ages 49–85) who had concomitant PD and cryptogenic epilepsy. Although rare, epilepsy can coexist with PD and their coexistence may influence the progression of PD. While this may be a chance association, an evolving understanding of the neurophysiological basis of either disease may suggest a mechanistic association. PMID:27688919

  3. Gait analysis in patients with advanced Parkinson disease: different or additive effects on gait induced by levodopa and chronic STN stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubik, S; Fogel, W; Tronnier, V; Krause, M; König, J; Jost, W H

    2006-02-01

    The aim of our study was to observe the effects on gait parameters induced by STN stimulation and levodopa medication in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in order to determine different or additive effects. Therefore we examined 12 patients with advanced Parkinson disease after bilateral implantation of DBS into the STN. We assessed the motor score of the UPDRS and quantitative gait analysis under 4 treatment conditions: with and without stimulation as well as with and without levodopa. The mean improvement of the UPDRS motor score was almost the same with levodopa and DBS. Combining both therapies we saw a further improvement of the motor score. Gait parameters of patients with PD treated either with levodopa or STN stimulation were greatly improved. A significant difference between levodopa and STN stimulation could only be shown for the parameters velocity and step length. These parameters improved more with levodopa than with stimulation. The combination of both therapeutic methods showed the best results on the UPDRS motor score and gait parameters.

  4. [Physical therapy for parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, M

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex neurologic and progressive incapacitating disease. Parkinson's disease severely threatens the quality of live and the number of patients worldwide is expected to rise considerably in the coming decade due to aging of the population. Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients are faced with progressively increasing impairments (e.g. in speech, mental and movement related functions), and restrictions in participation (e.g. domestic life and social activities). Physical therapy is often prescribed next to medical treatment but there is a lack of uniform treatment. A systematic literature search for guidelines, systematic reviews, trials, and expert opinions lead to a better understanding. The key question: Is physiotherapy able to optimally treat the Parkinson's disease symptoms? In which way, how and on which scientific bases can the physiotherapist participate to improve autonomy and to help them living independently and avoid, as long as possible, institutionalization? This article has integrated clinical research findings to provide clinicians with an overview to physical therapist management of disorders in people with Parkinson's disease. An Evidence-Based Physical Therapy Guideline providing practice recommendations was developed by the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF). Evidence from research was supplemented with clinical expertise and patients values. Randomized clinical trials reflect specific core areas of physical therapy, that is, transfer, posture, balance, reaching and grasping, gait and physical condition. Another aspect is that of educating patients (as well as their partners and family) about the disease process and the benefits of exercise therapy. Alternative therapies can be helpful like Tai Chi, virtual games, dancing, yoga, ball games for example.

  5. Nutritional therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evatt, Marian L

    2007-05-01

    Advise patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) to consume a balanced diet, with special attention to adequate intake of dietary fiber, fluids, and macro- and micronutrients. Regularly reassess patients' nutritional history and anthropomorphic measures (height and weight), particularly in patients with advanced disease. PD-related psychosocial as well as physical and cognitive limitations increase susceptibility to subacute and chronic malnutrition. Nutritional requirements may change with PD progression or after surgical therapy for PD. Patients and caregivers may benefit from counseling by a dietician who is knowledgeable about the nutritional risks and needs of PD. Regularly inquire about dysphagia symptoms, and consider speech therapy consultation for clinical and modified barium-swallowing evaluations and management recommendations. Although non-oral delivery options of dopaminergic therapy are increasing, severe dysphagia may warrant percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement for nutritional support and more reliable PD medication dosing. Analyze vitamin B(12) and D concentrations at regular intervals. Both vitamins are frequently deficient in elderly persons but may not be routinely checked by primary care physicians. Record over-the-counter and nutritional supplement medications at each visit, and assist patients in periodically re-evaluating their potential benefits, side effects, drug interactions, and costs. To date, clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins and nutritional supplements have provided insufficient evidence to support routine use for PD in the clinic. Data from several clinical trials of antioxidant vitamins/nutritional supplements are expected in the near future. Consider altering medication dosing in relation to meals to help with mild to moderate motor fluctuations. Patients with severe motor fluctuations may benefit from adapting the 5:1 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio in their daily meals and snacks. Following a "protein

  6. [Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Andreia Gomes; Gago, Miguel Fernandes; Garrett, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    In current medical practice, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease remains essentially clinical. This practice determines that the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is done in an already advanced neuropathological stage of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the validity of cerebrospinal fluid protein biological markers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The a-synuclein and DJ-1 proteins, due to their role in the hereditary Parkinson's disease, have been the most widely studied cerebrospinal biomarkers. Nevertheless, they have had divergent results mostly owing to different processing, identification and control of laboratory techniques. The new proteomic techniques, directed to the detection of multiple undifferentiated proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (eg. ceruloplasmin, chromogranin B, apoH), are promising. The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is imperious as it is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes extensive morbidity. Most of current scientific research in Parkinson's disease is focused on the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. Thus, the definition of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is highly relevant.

  7. Emotional impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Hai-bo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Emotional impairment is the common complication of Parkinson's disease (PD. Depression, anxiety and apathy affect the quality of life and the prognosis of PD patients. Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies of emotional impairment in PD patients suggest abnormalities involving mesolimbic and mesocortical dopaminergic pathways, but the specific mechanism needs further study. In this review we discuss the clinical manifestation, possible pathological mechanism, diagnosis and treatment in PD patients.

  8. Gender differences in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lisa M

    2007-03-01

    Because estrogen has numerous effects on dopamine neurotransmission, many researchers are interested in its possible use to either slow the progression or reduce the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). The incidence of PD is greater in men than in women. Gender differences in neurotoxicity have been observed, and basic research in experimental animals indicates that estrogen protects neurons from various forms of injury. However, the results of retrospective surveys of the neuroprotective effects of estrogen replacement in PD have been mixed, with some showing no effect on risk and others showing a reduction in risk. A mildly significant gender difference in disability and quality-of-life reporting has been noted, with women citing greater disability and reduced quality of life. Gender differences have been shown in response to treatment of PD, for example, in how levodopa is metabolized--women have greater levodopa bioavailability. In the Parkinson's Disease on Estrogen Therapy Replacement in the Menopause Years (POETRY) study, participants were found to have improved scores on the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale. Based on the POETRY results, it is hypothesized that estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) may lead to improvement in PD symptoms and provide an opportunity to reduce the dosage of antiparkinsonian medication in women.

  9. Motor cortex stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27-31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27-31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  10. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa De Rose

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39, and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD. During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  11. What contributes to depression in Parkinson's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Schrag, A.; M. Jahanshahi; Quinn, N P

    2001-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common problem in patients with Parkinson's disease, but its mechanism is poorly understood. It is thought that neurochemical changes contribute to its occurrence, but it is unclear why some patients develop depression and others do not. Using a community-based sample of patients with Parkinson's disease, we investigated the contributions of impairment, disability and handicap to depression in Parkinson's disease. Methods: Ninety-seven patients seen in a popula...

  12. Parkinson's Disease Research Web - Information for Patients and Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Page Parkinson's Disease: Hope Through Research NINDS Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Strategic Plans NINDS ... Syndrome Information Page Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Dementia ...

  13. A 200-year history of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiao-Dan; Ji, Yong

    2017-01-01

    In 1817, Dr. James Parkinson firstly described the concept, duration, and clinical characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it was widely known until 1877 when it was named "Parkinson's disease" by Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot. In 1912, Frederic Henry Lewy, a neuropathologist, found a special abnormal protein in nerve cells of PD patients. Medical profession began to learn about the pathology of PD only when Konstantin Tretiakoff named the special abnormal protein "Lewy body (LB...

  14. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Xun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders (ICDs in Parkinson's disease (PD are common with a frequency of 13.61% , which are associated with impaired functioning and with depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms, novelty seeking and impulsivity. These behaviors have a bad influence on PD patients in the quality of life. Different behavioral subtypes suggest pathophysiological differences. Recent large scale studies and converging findings are beginning to provide an understanding of mechanisms underlying ICDs in PD which can guide the prevention of these behaviors and optimize therapeutic approaches. This paper will take a review on the recent advances in the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of ICDs in PD.

  15. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, J A; Brola, W; Leonardi, M; Błaszczyk, B

    2012-12-15

    In this review report, current possibilities of evaluation of quality of life in Parkinson's disease have been critically presented. Health Related Quality of Life (-HRQoL) comprises a wide spectrum of consequences of the disease. Measurement of quality of life has become increasingly relevant as an outcome parameter, especially in long-term trials. Most of the available QoL instruments depend on patient self-reports. The data can be collected by written questionnaires. There are universal questionnaires of QoL--for many diseases and the specific ones--specially created for one disease. Among universal questionnaires, the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the Short-Form Health Status Survey (SF-36) are the most popular in Parkinson's disease. As for specific questionnaires: the Parkinson`s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life Questionnaire (PDQL) have been described.

  16. Cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Liu; Hongyun Huang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be improved by cell transplantation,which has caught general attention from the field of the therapy for PD recently. In this paper, we summarize the cell-based therapy for PD.DATA SOURCES: A search for English literature related to the cellular transplantation of PD from January 1979to July 2006 was conducted in Medline with the key words of "Parkinson's disease, cell transplantation,embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells".STUDY SELECTTON: Data were checked in the first trial, and literatures about PD and cell transplantation were selected. Inclusive criteria: ① PD; ② Cell transplantation. Exclusive criteria: repetitive researches.DATA EXTRACTTON: A total of 100 papers related to cellular transplant and PD were collected and 41literatures were in accordance with the inclusive criteria.DATA SYNTHESIS: PD is a neural degeneration disease that threatens the health of the aged people, and most traditional therapeusis cannot delay its pathological proceeding. Cell transplantation is becoming popular as a new therapeutic tool, and the cells used to transplant mainly included dopamine-secreting cells, fetal ventral mesencephalic cells, embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells up to now. Animal experiment and clinical test demonstrate that cell transplantation can relieve the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease obviously, but there are some problems need to be solved.CONCLUSTON: Cell transplantation has visible therapeutic efficacy on PD. Following the improvement of technique, and we have enough cause to credit that cell therapy may cure PD in the future.

  17. Investigation of morphometric variability of subthalamic nucleus, red nucleus, and substantia nigra in advanced Parkinson's disease patients using automatic segmentation and PCA-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Jannin, Pierre; D'Albis, Tiziano; Guizard, Nicolas; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Vérin, Marc; Collins, D Louis

    2014-09-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective surgical therapy to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). Conventional methods employ standard atlas coordinates to target the STN, which, along with the adjacent red nucleus (RN) and substantia nigra (SN), are not well visualized on conventional T1w MRIs. However, the positions and sizes of the nuclei may be more variable than the standard atlas, thus making the pre-surgical plans inaccurate. We investigated the morphometric variability of the STN, RN and SN by using label-fusion segmentation results from 3T high resolution T2w MRIs of 33 advanced PD patients. In addition to comparing the size and position measurements of the cohort to the Talairach atlas, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire more intuitive and detailed perspectives of the measured variability. Lastly, the potential correlation between the variability shown by PCA results and the clinical scores was explored.

  18. Rotigotine transdermal system for long-term treatment of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: results of two open-label extension studies, CLEOPATRA-PD and PREFER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWitt, Peter A; Boroojerdi, Babak; Surmann, Erwin; Poewe, Werner

    2013-07-01

    Open-label extensions [studies SP516 (NCT00501969) and SP715 (NCT00594386)] of the CLEOPATRA-PD and PREFER studies were conducted to evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of the dopaminergic agonist, rotigotine, over several years of follow-up in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Eligible subjects completing the double-blind trials received open-label adjunctive rotigotine (≤16 mg/24 h) for up to 4 and 6 years in Studies SP516 and SP715, respectively. Safety and tolerability were assessed using adverse events, vital signs and laboratory parameters, and efficacy assessed using the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS). Of the 395 and 258 patients enrolled in the SP516 and SP715 studies, 48 and 45 % completed, respectively. Adverse events were typically dopaminergic effects [e.g., somnolence (18-25 %/patient-year), insomnia (5-7 %/patient-year), dyskinesias (4-8 %/patient-year) and hallucinations (4-8 %/patient-year)], or related to the transdermal application of a patch (application site reactions: 14-15 %/patient-year). There were no clinically relevant changes in vital signs or laboratory parameters in either study. Mean UPDRS part II (activities of daily living) and part III (motor function) total scores improved from double-blind baseline during dose titration, then gradually declined over the maintenance period. In study SP516, mean UPDRS part II and III total scores were 0.8 points above and 2.8 points below double-blind baseline, respectively, at end of treatment. In study SP715, mean UPDRS part II and III total scores were 4.1 points above and 0.2 points below baseline, respectively, at end of treatment. In these open-label studies, adjunctive rotigotine was efficacious with an acceptable safety and tolerability profile in patients with advanced PD for up to 6 years.

  19. [Perioperative management of Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, A; Medrano, I Hernández; Cánovas, A Alonso; Lobo, E; Loinaz, C; Vela, L; Espiga, P García-Ruiz; Castrillo, J C Martínez

    2012-01-01

    One of the particular characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the wide clinical variation as regards the treatment that can be found in the same patient. This occurs with specific treatment for PD, as well as with other drug groups that can make motor function worse. For this reason, the perioperative management of PD requires experience and above all appropriate planning. In this article, the peculiarities of PD and its treatment are reviewed, and a strategy is set out for the perioperative management of these patients.

  20. Is "Parkinson's disease" one disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Calne, D B

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to how and why categories of ill health are divided into diseases. Aetiology is a fundamental criterion for the delineation of individual diseases. The same clinical and pathological picture may have many different causes; for example meningococcal meningitis and pneumococcal meningitis are distinct diseases that may display the same symptoms and signs. On the other hand, a single aetiology may lead to quite separate clinical and pathological phenomena; for example, neu...

  1. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J.; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore st

  2. Nonmotor symptoms in genetic Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten, Meike; Kertelge, Lena; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    To review current knowledge on nonmotor symptoms (NMS), particularly psychiatric features, in genetic Parkinson disease (PD) and to provide original data for genetic and idiopathic PD.......To review current knowledge on nonmotor symptoms (NMS), particularly psychiatric features, in genetic Parkinson disease (PD) and to provide original data for genetic and idiopathic PD....

  3. Orthostatic Hypotension (Low Blood Pressure) and Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Advocates Sign Up for Funding News npj Parkinson's Disease Scientific Advisory Board Understanding Parkinson's Coping with a Diagnosis What is Parkinson’s Disease? National HelpLine Educational Publications Online Seminars Parkinson's News ...

  4. Parkinson's Disease and Systemic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Carina C.; Tarelli, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral inflammation triggers exacerbation in the central brain's ongoing damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. Systemic inflammatory stimulus induce a general response known as sickness behaviour, indicating that a peripheral stimulus can induce the synthesis of cytokines in the brain. In Parkinson's disease (PD), inflammation was mainly associated with microglia activation that can underlie the neurodegeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Peripheral inflammation can transform the “primed” microglia into an “active” state, which can trigger stronger responses dealing with neurodegenerative processes. Numerous evidences show that systemic inflammatory processes exacerbate ongoing neurodegeneration in PD patient and animal models. Anti-inflammatory treatment in PD patients exerts a neuroprotective effect. In the present paper, we analyse the effect of peripheral infections in the etiology and progression in PD patients and animal models, suggesting that these peripheral immune challenges can exacerbate the symptoms in the disease. PMID:21403862

  5. Pragmatic communication is impaired in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah; Ouyang, Bichun; Lonnquist, Eryn; Newcombe, Jill

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether severity of disease, cognitive function, age, gender, or amount of social interaction were associated with pragmatic dysfunction in Parkinson disease. No studies have previously been done to investigate variables that may be associated with pragmatic dysfunction in Parkinson disease. A case-control study was conducted with 17 Parkinson disease patients and 17 convenience controls. Each Parkinson disease patient and a control were interviewed, and their pragmatic skills were evaluated using a scale of pragmatic communication skills. Correlation analysis was used to determine what factors were associated with pragmatic dysfunction in the Parkinson disease patients. Cases scored lower on the pragmatic scale with a mean of 29.7 compared with 38.9 in the controls (p pragmatic communication skills had moderate to strong correlations with the MMSE (r = .81, p = .002), Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (r = -.71, p = .002), and duration of disease (r = -.53, p = .03). These results show that Parkinson disease patients have impaired pragmatic function compared with controls on both verbal and nonverbal sections, and this impairment correlates with mental state, duration, and severity of disease.

  6. [Nonpharmacological treatment procedures for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, K; Kalbe, E; Erasmi, R; Ebersbach, G

    2017-03-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment strategies in Parkinson' disease include heterogeneous treatment modalities, such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, cognitive training and deep brain stimulation as well as noninvasive brain stimulation strategies. Even in the early stages of Parkinson's disease nonpharmacological interventions, such as active exercise therapy and speech therapy can be indicated taking the individual symptoms of a patient into account. Mild cognitive deficits are frequently detected in the course of the disease and progression of these disorders to dementia in the advanced stages of the disease is not uncommon. The starting point for a cognitive training, training strategy and training frequency is unknown and currently under investigation. Deep brain stimulation is an established treatment modality, which should be considered when motor fluctuations cannot be adequately controlled by pharmacological treatment. This therapeutic option depends on patient-specific needs and has to be managed by a multiprofessional team. Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation are experimental tools and cannot currently be recommended for general use.

  7. Free-water imaging in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planetta, Peggy J; Ofori, Edward; Pasternak, Ofer; Burciu, Roxana G; Shukla, Priyank; DeSimone, Jesse C; Okun, Michael S; McFarland, Nikolaus R; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-02-01

    Conventional single tensor diffusion analysis models have provided mixed findings in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, but recent work using a bi-tensor analysis model has shown more promising results. Using a bi-tensor model, free-water values were found to be increased in the posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease compared with controls at a single site and in a multi-site cohort. Further, free-water increased longitudinally over 1 year in the posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease. Here, we test the hypothesis that other parkinsonian disorders such as multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy have elevated free-water in the substantia nigra. Equally important, however, is whether the bi-tensor diffusion model is able to detect alterations in other brain regions beyond the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy and to accurately distinguish between these diseases. Free-water and free-water-corrected fractional anisotropy maps were compared across 72 individuals in the basal ganglia, midbrain, thalamus, dentate nucleus, cerebellar peduncles, cerebellar vermis and lobules V and VI, and corpus callosum. Compared with controls, free-water was increased in the anterior and posterior substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Despite no other changes in Parkinson's disease, we observed elevated free-water in all regions except the dentate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, and corpus callosum of multiple system atrophy, and in all regions examined for progressive supranuclear palsy. Compared with controls, free-water-corrected fractional anisotropy values were increased for multiple system atrophy in the putamen and caudate, and increased for progressive supranuclear palsy in the putamen, caudate, thalamus, and vermis, and decreased in the superior cerebellar peduncle and corpus callosum. For all disease

  8. Substantia nigra and Parkinson disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson disease is a slowly progressive disorder that affects movement, muscle control, and balance. Part of the disease process develops as cells are destroyed in certain parts of the brain stem, particularly the crescent-shaped cell ...

  9. Nuclear microscopy in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, F.; Lee, T.; Thong, P. S. P.; Tang, S. M.

    1995-09-01

    Rats have been subjected to unilateral lesioning with the selective neurotoxin 6-OHDA in order to induce Parkinsonism. Analysis using the NUS Nuclear Microscope facility have shown that iron levels are raised by an average of 26% in the lesioned subtantia nigra region of the brain compared with the non-lesioned side. In addition the background tissue level of iron is also elevated by 31% in the lesioned side, indicating that there is a general increase in iron levels as a result of the lesioning. This result is consistent with the other observations that other diseases of the brain are frequently associated with altered iron levels (eg. progressive nuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis).

  10. Corneal nerve microstructure in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Stuti L; Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular surface changes and blink abnormalities are well-established in Parkinson's disease. Blink rate may be influenced by corneal sub-basal nerve density, however, this relationship has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease. This case-control study examined the ocular surface in patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease, including confocal microscopy of the cornea. Fifteen patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease (modified Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 or 4) and fifteen control participants were recruited. Ophthalmic assessment included slit-lamp examination, blink rate assessment, central corneal aesthesiometry and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. The effect of disease laterality was also investigated. Of the 15 patients with Parkinson's disease, ten were male and the mean age was 65.5±8.6years. The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus density was markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (7.56±2.4mm/mm(2)) compared with controls (15.91±2.6mm/mm(2)) (pParkinson's disease (0.79±1.2mBAR) and the control group (0.26±0.35mBAR), p=0.12. Sub-basal nerve density was not significantly different between the eye ipsilateral to the side of the body with most-severe motor symptoms, and the contralateral eye. There was a significant positive correlation between ACE-R scores and sub-basal corneal nerve density (R(2)=0.66, p=0.02). This is the first study to report a significant reduction in corneal sub-basal nerve density in Parkinson's disease and demonstrate an association with cognitive dysfunction. These results provide further evidence to support the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in Parkinson's disease, previously thought to be a central nervous system disorder.

  11. Mutational analysis of TARDBP in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blitterswijk, M. van; Es, M.A. van; Verbaan, D.; Hilten, J.J. van; Scheffer, H.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Veldink, J.H.; Berg, L.H. van den

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in TAR DNA-binding protein (TARDBP) are associated with heterogenic phenotypes, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, and Parkinson's disease. In this study, we investigated the presence of TARDBP mutations in a cohort of 429 Dutch patients with Parkinson's dise

  12. Perioperative management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katus, Linn; Shtilbans, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, leading to a wide range of disability and medical complications. Managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting can be particularly challenging. Suboptimal management can lead to medical complications, prolonged hospital stays, and delayed recovery. This review aims to address the most important issues related to caring for patients with Parkinson's disease perioperatively who are undergoing emergent or planned general surgery. It also intends to help hospitalists, internists, and other health care providers mitigate potential in-hospital morbidity and prevent prolonged recovery. Challenges in managing patients with Parkinson's disease in the perioperative hospital setting include disruption of medication schedules, "nothing by mouth" status, reduced mobility, and medication interactions and their side effects. Patients with Parkinson's disease are more prone to immobility and developing dysphagia, respiratory dysfunction, urinary retention, and psychiatric symptoms. These issues lead to higher rates of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, deconditioning, and falls compared with patients without Parkinson's disease, as well as prolonged hospital stays and a greater need for post-hospitalization rehabilitation. Steps can be taken to decrease these complications, including minimizing nothing by mouth status duration, using alternative routes of drugs administration when unable to give medications orally, avoiding drug interactions and medications that can worsen parkinsonism, assessing swallowing ability frequently, encouraging incentive spirometry, performing bladder scans, avoiding Foley catheters, and providing aggressive physical therapy. Knowing and anticipating these potential complications allow hospital physicians to mitigate nosocomial morbidity and shorten recovery times and hospital stays.

  13. Thiazolidinediones and Parkinson Disease: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John G; Bykov, Katsiaryna; Gagne, Joshua J

    2015-12-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of medications indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, reduce inflammation and have been shown to provide a therapeutic benefit in animal models of Parkinson disease. We examined the association between treatment with thiazolidinediones and the onset of Parkinson disease in older individuals. We performed a cohort study of 29,397 Medicare patients enrolled in state pharmaceutical benefits programs who initiated treatment with thiazolidinediones or sulfonylureas during the years 1997 through 2005 and had no prior diagnosis of Parkinson disease. New users of thiazolidinediones were propensity score matched to new users of sulfonylureas and followed to determine whether they were diagnosed with Parkinson disease. We used Cox proportional hazards models to compare time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease in the propensity score-matched populations. To assess the association with duration of use, we performed several analyses that required longer continuous use of medications. In the primary analysis, thiazolidinedione users had a hazard ratio for a diagnosis of Parkinson disease of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: 0.71, 1.66) when compared with sulfonylurea users. Increasing the duration-of-use requirements to 10 months did not substantially change the association; the hazard ratios ranged from 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 2.05) to 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 2.25). Thiazolidinedione use was not associated with a longer time to diagnosis of Parkinson disease than was sulfonylurea use, regardless of duration of exposure.

  14. Toward precision medicine in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Lu-Lu; Yang, Ke; Xiong, Wei-Xi; Liu, Feng-Tao; Anderson, Boyd; Wang, Ye; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Precision medicine refers to an innovative approach selected for disease prevention and health promotion according to the individual characteristics of each patient. The goal of precision medicine is to formulate prevention and treatment strategies based on each individual with novel physiological and pathological insights into a certain disease. A multidimensional data-driven approach is about to upgrade "precision medicine" to a higher level of greater individualization in healthcare, a shift towards the treatment of individual patients rather than treating a certain disease including Parkinson's disease (PD). As one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, PD is a lifelong chronic disease with clinical and pathophysiologic complexity, currently it is treatable but neither preventable nor curable. At its advanced stage, PD is associated with devastating chronic complications including both motor dysfunction and non-motor symptoms which impose an immense burden on the life quality of patients. Advances in computational approaches provide opportunity to establish the patient's personalized disease data at the multidimensional levels, which finally meeting the need for the current concept of precision medicine via achieving the minimal side effects and maximal benefits individually. Hence, in this review, we focus on highlighting the perspectives of precision medicine in PD based on multi-dimensional information about OMICS, molecular imaging, deep brain stimulation (DBS) and wearable sensors. Precision medicine in PD is expected to integrate the best evidence-based knowledge to individualize optimal management in future health care for those with PD.

  15. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  16. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peixinho, Ana; De Azevedo, Ana Luísa; Simões, Rita Moiron

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine d...

  17. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: a funder's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasier, Mark; Chowdhury, Sohini; Eberling, Jamie; Sherer, Todd

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic development in Parkinson's disease is hampered by the paucity of well-validated biomarkers that can assist with diagnosis and/or tracking the progression of the disease. Since its inception, the Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research has invested heavily in biomarker research and continues to prioritize discovery and development efforts. This article summarizes the history and evolution of the Michael J Fox Foundation's role in supporting biomarker research and lays out the current challenges in successfully developing markers that can be used to test therapies, while also providing a vision of future funding efforts in Parkinson's disease biomarkers.

  18. Bipolar disorder, a precursor of Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia M.S. Novaretti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder predominantly resulting from dopamine depletion in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Some psychiatric disorders may have dopaminergic dysfunction as their substrate. We describe a well-documented case of Parkinson's disease associated with Bipolar Disorder. Although there is some knowledge about the association between these diseases, little is known about its pathophysiology and correlation. We believe that among various hypotheses, many neurotransmitters are linked to this pathophysiology.

  19. Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-hua LI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction is common non-motor symptom (NMS in Parkinson's disease (PD, which affects the patients' quality of life and increases the burden of caregivers. Cognitive dysfunction in PD can be mild cognitive impairment (MCI or dementia. MCI presents in the early stage of PD and the incidence rate is increasing with the disease progression. In some cases it can advance to dementia. The diagnosis of MCI in PD includes inclusion criteria, exclusion criteria and damage level evaluation. Non-pharmacological therapy, such as exercise and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT can improve the symptoms of MCI in PD, while the pharmacological treatment remains to be further studied. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.06.002

  20. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  1. [Diet therapy in Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilming, S T

    1995-04-20

    The significance of restrictions on protein for patients with Parkinson's disease is reviewed. Large neutral amino acids and levodopa share the same saturated carrier system through the blood-brain-barrier. Fluctuating patients are sensitive to a decreased supply of levodopa from the blood, and clinical studies show that an increased concentration of large neutral amino acids in the blood decreases mobility and reduces "on-time". A reduction of protein intake to 0.75-0.8 g/kg body weight/day has been recommended. A protein redistribution diet implying that less than 10% of the daily protein is taken in daytime and the rest in the evening, gives best results. However, in the elderly, protein restrictions may lead to a lasting negative nitrogen balance, and even in younger patients the supply of certain minerals and vitamins may become too low or marginally adequate. The diet must therefore be used with caution.

  2. Progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiping Xia; Zhi-Hong Mao

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disease that is clinically manifested by a triad of cardinal motor symptoms - rigidity,bradykinesia and tremor - due to loss of dopaminergic neurons.The motor symptoms of PD become progressively worse as the disease advances.PD is also a heterogeneous disease since rigidity and bradykinesia are the major complaints in some patients whereas tremor is predominant in others.In recent years,many studies have investigated the progression of the hallmark symptoms over time,and the cardinal motor symptoms have different rates of progression,with the disease usually progressing faster in patients with rigidity and bradykinesia than in those with predominant tremor.The current treatment regime of dopamine-replacement therapy improves motor symptoms and alleviates disability.Increasing the dosage of dopaminergic medication is commonly used to combat the worsenirtg symptoms.However,the drug-induced involuntary body movements and motor comphcations can significantly contribute to overall disability.Further,none of the currently-available therapies can slow or halt the disease progression.Significant research efforts have been directed towards developing neuroprotective or disease-modifying agents that are intended to slow the progression.In this article,the most recent clinical studies investigating disease progression and current progress on the development of disease-modifying drug trials are reviewed.

  3. The role and structure of the multidisciplinary team in the management of advanced Parkinson's disease with a focus on the use of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Stephen W; Suedmeyer, Martin; Liu, Louis W C; Domagk, Dirk; Forbes, Alison; Bergmann, Lars; Onuk, Koray; Yegin, Ashley; van Laar, Teus

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach is increasingly recommended in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment guidelines, but no standard of care exists for such an approach, and the guidelines do not provide clarification on how it should be implemented. This paper reviews evidence of MDT interventions in people with PD and provides expert clinical perspectives for an MDT approach, with a focus on advanced PD and levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (carbidopa-levodopa enteral suspension in the USA). The key recommendations are to enable the best possible treatment of people with PD locally by facilitating a close structured collaboration of different health care professionals working in a fixed network structure; to refer people with PD to established MDT centers in a timely manner; to establish regular meetings for the MDT enabling interdisciplinary exchange and learning; to optimize individual treatment and carefully evaluate available treatment options; to ensure treatment decisions are agreed jointly between people with PD, their caregivers, family, and health care professional; and to include specialists outside of neurology from adjuvant medical departments as necessary when implementing advanced therapies.

  4. Management of psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, E C; Berendse, H W

    2001-08-01

    Psychosis is quite common in Parkinson's disease (approximately 25% of patients) and therefore constitutes a serious public health problem. All patients suffering from idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and especially elderly and demented patients, are at risk of developing delusions or hallucinations. The most prominent psychotogenic factors are dopaminomimetic agents, which may induce dopamine hypersensitivity in the frontal and limbic dopamine projection regions, and consequently, either directly or indirectly, elicit psychotic signs and symptoms. A Parkinson's disease-related cholinergic deficit in combination with an age-related further loss of cholinergic integrity also plays a prominent role. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease patients appears to be a more important contributor to caregiver distress than motor parkinsonism. Psychosis therefore probably represents the single greatest risk factor for nursing home placement. Typical antipsychotic drugs, because of their selective dopamine receptor antagonistic effects, can reduce psychotic signs but at the cost of an increase in parkinsonism. As a consequence of a non-selective antagonism at both serotonergic and dopaminergic receptors, atypical antipsychotic drugs are associated with fewer extrapyramidal side-effects. On the other hand, hypersensitivity to these agents may induce delirium or a malignant neuroleptic syndrome. Atypical antipsychotic agents such as clozapine, quetiapine and olanzapine should therefore be started at very low doses that are increased gradually. Cholinomimetic therapy may prove to be helpful in the prevention and treatment of psychotic manifestations in Parkinson's disease patients, given the effects observed in patients suffering from dementia with Lewy bodies.

  5. Biomarkers of Parkinson's disease: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Hoekstra, Jake G; Zuo, Chuantao; Cook, Travis J; Zhang, Jing

    2013-02-01

    This review summarizes major advances in biomarker discovery for diagnosis, differential diagnosis and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD), with emphasis on neuroimaging and biochemical markers. Potential strategies to develop biomarkers capable of predicting PD in the prodromal stage before the appearance of motor symptoms or correlating with nonmotor symptoms, an active area of research, are also discussed.

  6. Parkinson's disease between internal medicine and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csoti, Ilona; Jost, Wolfgang H; Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    General medical problems and complications have a major impact on the quality of life in all stages of Parkinson's disease. To introduce an effective treatment, a comprehensive analysis of the various clinical symptoms must be undertaken. One must distinguish between (1) diseases which arise independently of Parkinson's disease, and (2) diseases which are a direct or indirect consequence of Parkinson's disease. Medical comorbidity may induce additional limitations to physical strength and coping strategies, and may thus restrict the efficacy of the physical therapy which is essential for treating hypokinetic-rigid symptoms. In selecting the appropriate medication for the treatment of any additional medical symptoms, which may arise, its limitations, contraindications and interactions with dopaminergic substances have to be taken into consideration. General medical symptoms and organ manifestations may also arise as a direct consequence of the autonomic dysfunction associated with Parkinson's disease. As the disease progresses, additional non-parkinsonian symptoms can be of concern. Furthermore, the side effects of Parkinson medications may necessitate the involvement of other medical specialists. In this review, we will discuss the various general medical aspects of Parkinson's disease.

  7. Free-living energy expenditure reduced after deep brain stimulation surgery for Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Hans Ulrik; Werdelin, Lene; Lokkegaard, Annemette

    2012-01-01

    The clinical picture in Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor and postural instability. In advanced stages of the disease, many patients will experience reduced efficacy of medication with fluctuations in symptoms and dyskinesias. Surgical treatment...

  8. Community walking in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Robyn M; Morris, Meg E; Woollacott, Marjorie H; Brauer, Sandra G

    2012-01-01

    People with Parkinson's disease often have walking difficulty, and this is likely to be exacerbated while walking in places in the community, where people are likely to face greater and more varied challenges. This study aims to understand the facilitators and the barriers to walking in the community perceived by people with Parkinson's disease. This qualitative study involved 5 focus groups (n = 34) of people with Parkinson's disease and their partners residing in metropolitan and rural regions in Queensland, Australia. Results found that people with PD reported to use internal personal strategies as facilitators to community walking, but identified primarily external factors, particularly the environmental factors as barriers. The adoption of strategies or the use of facilitators allows people with Parkinson's disease to cope so that participants often did not report disability.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA analysis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, A H; Holt, I J; Sweeney, M; Harding, A E; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1990-01-01

    The reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide coenzyme Q reductase (complex I) activity has recently been shown to be deficient in the substantia nigra of patients dying with Parkinson's disease. This biochemical defect is identical to that produced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which also produces parkinsonism in humans. Complex I comprises 25 polypeptides, seven of which are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. Restriction fragment analysis of substantia nigra DNA from six patients with Parkinson's disease did not show any major deletion. In two cases, there were different novel polymorphisms that were not observed in control brain (n = 6) or blood (n = 34) samples.

  10. Epigenetic regulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Catherine; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Ross, Owen A

    2016-10-01

    Recent efforts have shed new light on the epigenetic mechanisms driving gene expression alterations associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis. Changes in gene expression are a well-established cause of PD, and epigenetic mechanisms likely play a pivotal role in regulation. Studies in families with PD harboring duplications and triplications of the SNCA gene have demonstrated that gene dosage is associated with increased expression of both SNCA mRNA and protein, and correlates with a fulminant disease course. Furthermore, it is postulated that even subtle changes in SNCA expression caused by common variation is associated with disease risk. Of note, genome-wide association studies have identified over 30 loci associated with PD with most signals located in non-coding regions of the genome, thus likely influencing transcript expression levels. In health, epigenetic mechanisms tightly regulate gene expression, turning genes on and off to balance homeostasis and this, in part, explains why two cells with the same DNA sequence will have different RNA expression profiles. Understanding this phenomenon will be crucial to our interpretation of the selective vulnerability observed in neurodegeneration and specifically dopaminergic neurons in the PD brain. In this review, we discuss epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, involved in regulating the expression of genes relevant to PD, RNA-based mechanisms, as well as the effect of toxins and potential epigenetic-based treatments for PD.

  11. Parkinson's disease: the spectrum of disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Pentland, B; Barnes, M P; Findley, L. J.; Oxtoby, M; Pearce, V R; Quinn, N P; Scott, S.

    1992-01-01

    The needs of people with Parkinson's disease (PD) go beyond the purely medical domain and often require collaborative management. A Panel Discussion at the "Hither neurology" Symposium included neurologists, a speech therapist, a geriatrician and a sociologist. Their discussion highlighted certain aspects of the disability and disadvantage associated with PD. The starting point was a video recording, "Parkinson's Disease: the personal view", in which the contributors were patients and carers....

  12. Normal CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease genes of Parkinson`s disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Barton, D.E. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-04-24

    The clinical features of Parkinson`s disease, particularly rigidity and bradykinesia and occasionally tremor, are seen in juvenile-onset Huntington`s disease. Therefore, the CAG and CCG repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene were investigated in 45 Parkinson`s disease patients and compared to 40 control individuals. All of the Parkinson`s disease chromosomes fell within the normal size ranges. In addition, the distributions of the two repeats in the Parkinson`s disease patients did not differ significantly from those of the control population. Therefore, abnormalities of these trinucleotide repeats in the Huntington`s disease gene are not likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson`s disease. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Obesity, diabetes, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Natalia; Gao, Xiang; McCullough, Marjorie L; Jacobs, Eric J; Patel, Alpa V; Mayo, Tinisha; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether obesity and diabetes are related to risk of Parkinson's disease. We prospectively followed 147,096 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort from 1992 to 2005. Participants provided information on anthropometric variables and medical history at baseline and on waist circumference in 1997. Incident cases of Parkinson's disease (n = 656) were confirmed by treating neurologists and medical record review. Relative risks were estimated using proportional hazards models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking, and other risk factors. Neither body mass index nor waist circumference significantly predicted Parkinson's disease risk. Relative risk comparing individuals with a baseline body mass index of ≥ 30 to those with a body mass index Parkinson's disease risk (combined relative risks = 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 1.25; P heterogeneity = 0.96). In addition, neither body mass index at age 18 nor changes in weight between age 18 and baseline were significantly associated with Parkinson's disease risk. The results did not differ significantly by gender. Our results do not provide evidence for a relationship between body mass index, weight change, waist circumference, or baseline diabetes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

  14. [Depression in Parkinson's disease. Assessment and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, S; Dodel, R; Hautzinger, M; Gründer, G; Althaus, A; Schneider, F

    2007-06-01

    With a prevalence of 40%, depression is the most frequent psychiatric diagnosis in Parkinson's disease. Quality of life in Parkinson's patients is severely restricted. There is still no clear evidence concerning the link between these disorders - findings exist that indicate common neurodegenerative processes. At the same time depression seems to develop as a dysfunctional coping reaction to the motoric, emotional, and social restrictions of Parkinson's disease. The authors point out particular features of the depressive symptom profile in patients with Parkinson's disease and recommend a step-by-step approach to assessing depression: screening, assessment by means of the ICD-10 criteria, quantitative evaluation of depressivity, and assessment of suicidality. A survey of current treatment options is provided: pharmacological, somatic, and psychological approaches are introduced and evaluated with respect to effectiveness in this special group of patients.

  15. Biomarkers of cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Hsien; Wu, Ruey-Meei

    2015-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a frequent and devastating non-motor symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Impaired cognition has a major impact on either quality of life or mortality in patients with PD. Notably, the rate of cognitive decline and pattern of early cognitive deficits in PD are highly variable between individuals. Given that the underlying mechanisms of cognitive decline or dementia associated with PD remain unclear, there is currently no mechanism-based treatment available. Identification of biological markers, including neuroimaging, biofluids and common genetic variants, that account for the heterogeneity of PD related cognitive decline could provide important insights into the pathological processes that underlie cognitive impairment in PD. These combined biomarker approaches will enable early diagnosis and provide indicators of cognitive progression in PD patients. This review summarizes recent advances in the development of biomarkers for cognitive impairments in PD.

  16. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients. PMID:2926415

  17. Pulmonary function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovestadt, A; Bogaard, J M; Meerwaldt, J D; van der Meché, F G; Stigt, J

    1989-03-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in 31 consecutive patients with relatively severe Parkinson's disease. Clinical disability was assessed by Hoehn and Yahr scale, Northwestern University Disability Scale and Websterscore. All patients were on levodopa substitution therapy and used anticholinergics. Pulmonary function was investigated by spirography, determination of a maximal inspiratory and expiratory flow-volume curve and, when possible, maximal static mouth pressures were determined. Peak inspiratory and expiratory flow, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and maximal static mouth pressures were significantly below normal values. Vital capacity, forced inspiratory volume in 1 s and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and vital capacity were relatively normal. Nine patients had upper airway obstruction (UAO) as judged by abnormal values for peak inspiratory flow, the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow and the ratio of maximal expiratory and inspiratory flow at 50%. Flow-volume curves were normal in eight patients; four patients demonstrated flow decelerations and accelerations (type A) and 16 had a rounded off flow-volume curve (type B). Type A can be explained by UAO and type B by a combination of decreased effective muscle strength and possible UAO. Overall results of pulmonary function tests in patients without any clinical signs or symptoms of pulmonary disease point to subclinical upper airway obstruction and decreased effective muscle strength in a significant proportion of patients.

  18. Comparison of FP-CIT SPECT with F-DOPA PET in patients with de novo and advanced Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshuis, S.A. [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Neurology, Groningen (Netherlands); University Hospital Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Maguire, R.P.; Leenders, K.L. [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Neurology, Groningen (Netherlands); Jonkman, S.; Jager, P.L. [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2006-02-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be difficult. F-DOPA PET is able to quantify striatal dopa decarboxylase activity and storage capacity of F-dopamine, but is expensive and not generally available. FP-CIT binds to the dopamine transporter, and FP-CIT SPECT is cheaper and more widely available, but has a lower resolution. The aim of this study was to compare these two methods in the same patients with different stages of PD to assess their power in demonstrating deficits of the striatal dopaminergic system. Thirteen patients with de novo PD and 17 patients with advanced PD underwent FP-CIT SPECT and static F-DOPA PET. After data transfer to standard stereotactic space, a template with regions of interest was used to sample values of the caudate, putamen and an occipital reference region. The outcome value was striato-occipital ratios. Patients were clinically examined in the ''off state'' (UPDRS-III and H and Y stage). Good correlations were found between striatal F-DOPA uptake and striatal FP-CIT uptake (r=0.78) and between putaminal F-DOPA uptake and putaminal FP-CIT uptake (r=0.84, both p<0.0001). Both striatal uptake of FP-CIT and that of F-DOPA correlated moderately with H and Y stage ({rho}=-0.52 for both techniques), UPDRS-III ({rho}=-0.38 for F-DOPA; {rho}=-0.45 for FP-CIT) and disease duration ({rho}=-0.59 for F-DOPA; {rho}=-0.49 for FP-CIT, all p<0.05). FP-CIT values correlate well with F-DOPA values. Both methods correlate moderately with motor scores and are equally able to distinguish patients with advanced PD from patients with de novo PD. (orig.)

  19. Trajectories of prediagnostic functioning in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darweesh, Sirwan K L; Verlinden, Vincentius J A; Stricker, Bruno H; Hofman, Albert; Koudstaal, Peter J; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-02-01

    SEE BREEN AND LANG DOI101093/AWW321 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: At the time of clinical diagnosis, patients with Parkinson's disease already have a wide range of motor and non-motor features that affect their daily functioning. However, the temporal sequence of occurrence of these features remains largely unknown. We studied trajectories of daily functioning and motor and non-motor features in the 23 years preceding Parkinson's disease diagnosis by performing a nested case-control study within the prospective Rotterdam study. Between 1990 and 2013, we repeatedly performed standardized assessments of daily functioning (Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale), potential prediagnostic motor (hypo- and bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity, postural imbalance, postural abnormalities) and non-motor features of Parkinson's disease, including cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination, Stroop Test, Letter-Digit-Substitution Test, Word Fluency Test), mood (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scale), and autonomic function (blood pressure, laxative use). In addition, the cohort was followed-up for the onset of clinical Parkinson's disease using several overlapping modalities, including repeated in-person examinations, as well as complete access to medical records and specialist letters of study participants. During follow-up, 109 individuals were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, and each case was matched to 10 controls based on age and sex (total n = 1199). Subsequently, we compared prediagnostic trajectories of daily functioning and other features between Parkinson's disease cases and controls. From 7 years before diagnosis onwards, prediagnostic Parkinson's disease cases more commonly had problems in instrumental activities of daily functioning, and more frequently showed signs of movement poverty and slowness, tremor and subtle cognitive deficits. In the

  20. Visual Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Armstrong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a common disorder of middle-aged and elderly people in which degeneration of the extrapyramidal motor system causes significant movement problems. In some patients, however, there are additional disturbances in sensory systems including loss of the sense of smell and auditory and/or visual problems. This paper is a general overview of the visual problems likely to be encountered in PD. Changes in vision in PD may result from alterations in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, colour discrimination, pupil reactivity, eye movements, motion perception, visual field sensitivity, and visual processing speeds. Slower visual processing speeds can also lead to a decline in visual perception especially for rapidly changing visual stimuli. In addition, there may be disturbances of visuospatial orientation, facial recognition problems, and chronic visual hallucinations. Some of the treatments used in PD may also have adverse ocular reactions. The pattern electroretinogram (PERG is useful in evaluating retinal dopamine mechanisms and in monitoring dopamine therapies in PD. If visual problems are present, they can have an important effect on the quality of life of the patient, which can be improved by accurate diagnosis and where possible, correction of such defects.

  1. [Non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N.J.; Nijhof, A.; Tissingh, G.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has traditionally been viewed as a disease with only motor features. Nowadays, a wide variety of non-motor symptoms and signs are also recognised as being characteristic of the disease. Non-motor symptoms, most importantly autonomic dysfunction, neuropsychiatric symptoms and slee

  2. Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. de Rijk (Maarten)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAt present, Parkinson's disease (PO), after Alzheimer's disease, is generally considered to be the most frequent progressive neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Due to the growing proportion of elderly in many populations, more and more persons will be affected by this disabling di

  3. The effect of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel infusion long-term therapy on motor complications in advanced Parkinson's disease: a multicenter Romanian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Băjenaru, O; Ene, A; Popescu, B O; Szász, J A; Sabău, M; Mureşan, D F; Perju-Dumbrava, L; Popescu, C D; Constantinescu, A; Buraga, I; Simu, M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic treatment with oral levodopa is associated with an increased frequency of motor complications in the late stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). Continuous administration of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG-Duodopa(®), Abbott Laboratories), which has been available in Romania since 2009, represents an option for treating patients with advanced PD. Our primary objective was to report changes in motor complications after initiation of LCIG therapy. The secondary objectives were as follows: to determine the impact of LCIG therapy on the daily levodopa dose variation before/and after LCIG, to collect patient self-assessments of quality of life (QoL), and to study the overall tolerability and safety of LCIG administration. A retrospective analysis (2009-2013) of LCIG therapy and the experience in nine neurology centers in Romania was performed. The impact of LCIG therapy was evaluated by analyzing changes in motor fluctuations, dyskinesia and the patients' QoL after initiating therapy. The safety of LCIG therapy was estimated by noting agent-related adverse events (AEs) and medical device-related AEs. In the 113 patients included, we observed a significant improvement in PD symptoms after initiation of LCIG therapy. The "on" period increased, with a mean value of 6.14 h, and the dyskinesia period was reduced, with a mean value of 29.4 %. The quantified non-motor symptoms subsided. The patients exhibited significant improvements in QoL scores. There were few AEs and few cases of LCIG therapy discontinuation. LCIG is an important and available therapeutic option for managing patients with advanced PD.

  4. SPECT Molecular Imaging in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a common disorder, and the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is clinical and relies on the presence of characteristic motor symptoms. The accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of PD is still limited. Functional neuroimaging using SPECT technique is helpful in patients with first signs of parkinsonism. The changes detected may reflect the disease process itself and/or compensatory responses to the disease, or they may arise in association with disease- and/or treatment-related complications. This paper addresses the value of SPECT in early differential diagnosis of PD and its potential as a sensitive tool to assess the pathophysiology and progression, as well as the therapeutic efficacy of PD.

  5. Current therapy for Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Obukhova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD is to correct dopamine deficiency in the nigrostriatal system. Levodopa preparations and dopamine receptor agonists (DRAs that are prescribed with regards to patient age and disease severity are mainly used now. Notwithstanding the fact that levodopa preparations are the gold standard of therapy, their long-term use gives rise to complications as motor fluctuations and drug-induced dyskinesias. The currently available DRAs are the drugs of choice for the therapy of early-stage PD as they are as effective as levodopa preparations. In extensive-stage PD, DRAs are used to enhance the therapy and correction of developed motor fluctuations and dyskinesias. Pramipexole is one of the most commonly used representatives of non-ergoline DRAs. The paper analyzes the efficacy of the medication used as both monotherapy and part of combined therapy, its effect on tremor and depression in PD. A novel extended-release formulation of pramipexole is considered separately. Both immediate- and extended-release pramipexole formulations contain the same active ingredient and have the same dopamine-receptor interaction profile, but differ in the tablet release rate of the active ingredient. The advantages of the novel formulation are its more steady-state plasma concentration and 24-hour action, which ensures continuous dopaminergic stimulation ofpostsynaptic receptors to prevent and treat already developed motor complications. The once-daily extended-release formulation of the drug makes its treatment regimen easier and patient compliance higher.

  6. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  7. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in advanced Parkinson's disease: five year follow-up at a Portuguese center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Ana; Andrade, Carlos; Rosas, Maria J; Linhares, Paulo; Massano, João; Vaz, Rui; Garrett, Carolina

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. La estimulacion cerebral profunda (ECP) del nucleo subtalamico (NST) en la enfermedad de Parkinson (EP) es segura y eficaz: en la mayoria de series se describen respuestas motoras duraderas y estables. Objetivo. Informar sobre el desenlace a largo plazo de la ECP del NST en pacientes con EP avanzada atendidos en un centro hospitalario portugues. Pacientes y metodos. El estado motor se valoro con la escala unificada de valoracion de la enfermedad de Parkinson, parte III, antes de la intervencion quirurgica –en dos situaciones: sin efecto de la medicacion (off) y bajo el mejor efecto (on)–, en el postoperatorio y al cabo de cinco años (medicacion y estimulacion en on). Se cuantificaron las puntuaciones de cada sintoma axial. La incapacidad se evaluo con la escala de Rankin modificada (mRS). La aparicion de demencia se valoro seis meses y cinco años despues de la ECP. Resultados. Setenta y uno de los 183 pacientes sometidos a la ECP del NST concluyeron los cinco años de seguimiento. Diez de ellos quedaron excluidos: dos por fallecimiento (cancer e infarto de miocardio), cinco por perdida de seguimiento y tres por la retirada del sistema de estimulacion. La funcion motora manifesto una mejora del 78% en el postoperatorio y del 66% a los cinco años. En el postoperatorio se aprecio mejoria de los sintomas axiales, pero al cabo de los cinco años habian empeorado de manera significativa (p < 0,001). Las puntuaciones de la mRS tambien mejoraron en el postoperatorio, pero a los cinco años tambien habian disminuido, pese a que la mayoria (88,5%) conservaba la capacidad ambulatoria (mRS < 4). Un paciente (1,6%) manifesto demencia a los seis meses, mientras que otros 19 (31,2%) la manifestaron al cabo de los cinco años. La edad de los pacientes dementes era notablemente mayor (56,5 ± 7,8 frente a 63,7 ± 5,9 años; p < 0,001). Conclusiones. En esta serie de casos, la ECP del NST demostro su eficacia en la mejora de los sintomas motores, aunque habian

  8. Gastric electromechanical dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krygowska-Wajs, A; Lorens, K; Thor, P; Szczudlik, A; Konturek, S

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate gastric myoelectrical and mechanical activities in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients. Twenty patients with IPD (14 male and 6 female, mean age 42 +/- 9 years) were studied. Patients were divided into two groups: group A--early stage of disease (no. = 6) and group B--advanced IPD (no. = 14). Electrogastrography (EGG) was performed in fasting and postprandial conditions (Synectics system). The cross-sectional area of the gastric antrum was measured by sonography (Hitachi EUB-240). The antral area in fasting conditions was 2.1 +/- 0.4 and 4.2 +/- 1.2 cm2 and gastric emptying was 75 +/- 5 and 125 +/- 12 min in groups A and B respectively. EGG showed dysrhythmias (range 1-6 cycles per minute) in about 75% of both groups of IPD patients without increase in signal amplitude after a meal. Our results suggest that gastric motility is particularly impaired in patients with advanced IPD. It may be caused by the primary degenerative process in the autonomic nervous system of the gut.

  9. Mortalin inhibition in experimental Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Tantucci, Michela; Susta, Federica; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Koya, Keizo; Binaglia, Luciano; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-08-01

    Among heat shock proteins, mortalin has been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In the present work a rat model of Parkinson's disease was used to analyze the expression of striatal proteins and, more specifically, mortalin expression. The possible involvement of mortalin in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis was further investigated by utilizing an electrophysiological approach and pharmacological inhibition of mortalin in both the physiological and the parkinsonian states. Proteomic analysis was used to investigate changes in striatal protein expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease. The electrophysiological effects of MKT-077, a rhodamine-123 analogue acting as an inhibitor of mortalin, were measured by field potential recordings from corticostriatal brain slices obtained from control, sham-operated, and 6-hydroxydopamine-denervated animals. Slices in the presence of rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I, were also analyzed. Proteomic analysis revealed downregulation of mortalin in the striata of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats in comparison with sham-operated animals. MKT-077 reduced corticostriatal field potential amplitude in physiological conditions, inducing membrane depolarization and inward current in striatal medium spiny neurons. In addition, we observed that concentrations of MKT-077 not inducing any electrophysiological effect in physiological conditions caused significant changes in striatal slices from parkinsonian animals as well as in slices treated with a submaximal concentration of rotenone. These findings suggest a critical link between mortalin function and mitochondrial activity in both physiological and pathological conditions mimicking Parkinson's disease.

  10. Visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: theoretical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Alana J; Shine, James M; Halliday, Glenda M; Lewis, Simon J G

    2014-11-01

    One of the most challenging tasks in neuroscience is to be able to meaningfully connect information across the different levels of investigation, from molecular or structural biology to the resulting behavior and cognition. Visual hallucinations are a frequent occurrence in Parkinson's disease and significantly contribute to the burden of the disease. Because of the widespread pathological processes implicated in visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, a final common mechanism that explains their manifestation will require an integrative approach, in which consideration is taken across all complementary levels of analysis. This review considers the leading hypothetical frameworks for visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease, summarizing the key aspects of each in an attempt to highlight the aspects of the condition that such a unifying hypothesis must explain. These competing hypotheses include implications of dream imagery intrusion, deficits in reality monitoring, and impairments in visual perception and attention.

  11. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  12. Exercise May Be Real Medicine for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162698.html Exercise May Be Real Medicine for Parkinson's Disease Physical activity helps improve gait and balance, research ... any exercise is good medicine for someone with Parkinson's disease, a new study confirms. Although physical activity may ...

  13. Parkinson Disease: Treating Symptoms Unrelated to Muscle Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES PARKINSON DISEASE: TREATING SYMPTOMS UNRELATED TO MUSCLE MOVEMENT This fact sheet may help you understand which therapies help Parkinson disease (PD) symptoms unrelated to muscle movement. Neurologists from ...

  14. Role of pramipexole in the management of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Angelo; Barone, Paolo; Ceravolo, Roberto; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Tinazzi, Michele; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    The non-ergot dopamine agonist pramipexole is currently indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and for the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary restless legs syndrome. A new extended-release formulation of pramipexole has now also been launched in Europe and the US to improve ease of use, compliance and provide a more continuous therapeutic effect over 24 hours. Before initiating any treatment, the benefit-risk ratio to the individual patient must be considered. For pramipexole in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, this means taking into account the available evidence regarding its symptomatic efficacy, effect on delaying long-term levodopa-related motor complications, beneficial effect on non-motor symptoms such as depression, and its safety and tolerability profile. Studies have shown that pramipexole is effective as monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease and as adjunctive therapy in advanced disease. Trials further suggest that the benefits of pramipexole may extend beyond the relief of motor symptoms (akinesia, rigidity and tremor at rest) to the amelioration of depressive symptoms in Parkinson's disease. Pramipexole is generally well tolerated; however, compared with levodopa treatment, pramipexole is associated with a higher rate of some dopaminergic adverse effects.

  15. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas; Werdelin, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to diagnose and distinguish from each other. STUDY AIMS AND METHODS: Patients with PD and MSA and controls were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using tissue segmentation...

  16. Biomarkers of Parkinson's disease: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2015-03-01

    Sporadic or idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder of unknown origin that ranks only second behind Alzheimer's disease (AD) in prevalence and its consequent social and economic burden. PD neuropathology is characterized by a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta; however, more widespread involvement of other CNS structures and peripheral tissues now is widely documented. The onset of molecular and cellular neuropathology of PD likely occurs decades before the onset of the motor symptoms characteristic of PD. The hallmark symptoms of PD, resting tremors, rigidity and postural disabilities, are related to dopamine (DA) deficiency. Current therapies treat these symptoms by replacing or boosting existing DA. All current interventions have limited therapeutic benefit for disease progression because damage likely has progressed over an estimated period of ~5 to 15years to a loss of 60%-80% of the nigral DA neurons, before symptoms emerge. There is no accepted definitive biomarker of PD. An urgent need exists to develop early diagnostic biomarkers for two reasons: (1) to intervene at the onset of disease and (2) to monitor the progress of therapeutic interventions that may slow or stop the course of the disease. In the context of disease development, one of the promises of personalized medicine is the ability to predict, on an individual basis, factors contributing to the susceptibility for the development of a given disease. Recent advances in our understanding of genetic factors underlying or contributing to PD offer the potential for monitoring susceptibility biomarkers that can be used to identify at-risk individuals and possibly prevent the onset of disease through treatment. Finally, the exposome concept is new in the biomarker discovery arena and it is suggested as a way to move forward in identifying biomarkers of neurological diseases. It is a two-stage scheme involving a first stage

  17. [Parkinson's disease in literature, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado-Vázquez, Susana; Cano-de-la-Cuerda, Roberto; Carrillo, Jesús M

    2014-02-01

    INTRODUCTION. Since James Parkinson published what can be considered the first treaty on the disease that bears his name in 1817, the scientific literature on this pathology has not ceased to grow. But the illness has also been represented in literature, the cinema and on television, where the symptoms, treatment and socio-familial context of the disease have often been examined very closely. AIM. To address the cases in which Parkinson's disease appears in literature, cinema and television, as well as to reflect on the image of the condition presented in those contexts. DEVELOPMENT. We reviewed some of the most important works in the literature dealing with Parkinson's disease from any period of history and many of them were found to offer very faithful portrayals of the disease. Likewise, we also reviewed major films and TV series that sometimes offer the general public a close look at the vision and the impact of the disease on patients or their relatives. CONCLUSIONS. Literature, cinema and television have helped provide a realistic view of both Parkinson's disease and the related healthcare professionals, and there are many examples that portray the actual experiences of the patients themselves, while also highlighting the importance of healthcare and socio-familial care.

  18. Living Well with Parkinson's Disease Is an Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Living Well with Parkinson's Disease is an Art Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... Cunningham When did you first get diagnosed with Parkinson's disease? What symptoms led you to go to the ...

  19. Pramipexole extended release in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hametner, Eva-Maria; Seppi, Klaus; Poewe, Werner

    2011-09-01

    Pramipexole extended release (ER) is a new once-daily formulation of pramipexole, a nonergot dopamine agonist, which is available in five dosage strengths: 0.26 (0.375) mg, 0.52 (0.75) mg, 1.05 (1.5) mg, 2.1 (3) mg and 3.15 (4.5) mg (all doses are expressed in terms of pramipexole base and the corresponding dose strengths of pramipexole salt are given in brackets). Pramipexole ER is currently approved as monotherapy in early Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as an adjunct therapy to levodopa in advanced PD. Compared with the immediate release (IR) formulation, the ER formulation offers several advantages, including the potential for improved compliance owing to its simple once-daily dosing regimen and steadier plasma levels over 24 h. Double-blind, randomized, placebo and active comparator controlled trials in early, as well as advanced PD, established the superiority of both pramipexole ER and IR over placebo. The overnight switch from pramipexole IR three times a day to ER once-daily in early PD has been shown to be successful in more than 80% of patients. Pramipexole ER is well tolerated, with a similar adverse event profile to pramipexole IR. The aim of this article is to provide a short review of the most relevant pharmacological and clinical data on pramipexole ER.

  20. [Nature of speech disorders in Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlukowska, W; Honczarenko, K; Gołąb-Janowska, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to discuss physiology and pathology of speech and review of the literature on speech disorders in Parkinson disease. Additionally, the most effective methods to diagnose the speech disorders in Parkinson disease were also stressed. Afterward, articulatory, respiratory, acoustic and pragmatic factors contributing to the exacerbation of the speech disorders were discussed. Furthermore, the study dealt with the most important types of speech treatment techniques available (pharmacological and behavioral) and a significance of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment was highlighted.

  1. Network Analysis Identifies Disease-Specific Pathways for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Chiara; Colugnat, Ilaria; Lopiano, Leonardo; Chiò, Adriano; Alberio, Tiziana

    2016-12-21

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the progressive loss of specific neurons in selected regions of the central nervous system. The main clinical manifestation (movement disorders, cognitive impairment, and/or psychiatric disturbances) depends on the neuron population being primarily affected. Parkinson's disease is a common movement disorder, whose etiology remains mostly unknown. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra causes an impairment of the motor control. Some of the pathogenetic mechanisms causing the progressive deterioration of these neurons are not specific for Parkinson's disease but are shared by other neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the literature of all the quantitative proteomic investigations of neuronal alterations in different models of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to distinguish between general and Parkinson's disease-specific pattern of neurodegeneration. Then, we merged proteomics data with genetics information from the DisGeNET database. The comparison of gene and protein information allowed us to identify 25 proteins involved uniquely in Parkinson's disease and we verified the alteration of one of them, i.e., transaldolase 1 (TALDO1), in the substantia nigra of 5 patients. By using open-source bioinformatics tools, we identified the biological processes specifically affected in Parkinson's disease, i.e., proteolysis, mitochondrion organization, and mitophagy. Eventually, we highlighted four cellular component complexes mostly involved in the pathogenesis: the proteasome complex, the protein phosphatase 2A, the chaperonins CCT complex, and the complex III of the respiratory chain.

  2. Postural & striatal deformities in Parkinson`s disease: Are these rare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Garg, Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson`s disease (PD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia. Diagnosis is clinical in the majority of the patients. Patients with PD may have stooped posture but some of them develop different types of postural and striatal deformities. Usually these deformities are more common in atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multisystem atrophy. But in many studies it has been highlighted that these may also be present in approximately one third of PD patients leading to severe disability. These include antecollis or dropped head, camptocormia, p0 isa syndrome, scoliosis, striatal hands and striatal toes. The pathogenesis of these deformities is a complex combination of central and peripheral influences such as rigidity, dystonia and degenerative skeletal changes. Duration of parkinsonism symptoms is an important risk factor and in majority of the patients these deformities are seen in advanced statge of the disease. The patients with such symptoms may initially respond to dopaminergic medications but if not intervened they may become fixed and difficult to treat. Pain and restriction of movement are most common clinical manifestations and these may mimick symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Early diagnosis is important as the patients may respond to adjustment in dopaminergic medications. Recent advances such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) and ultrasound guided botulinum toxin injection are helpful in management of these deformities in patients with PD.

  3. Postural & striatal deformities in Parkinson`s disease: Are these rare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson`s disease (PD is the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by tremor, rigidity and akinesia. Diagnosis is clinical in the majority of the patients. Patients with PD may have stooped posture but some of them develop different types of postural and striatal deformities. Usually these deformities are more common in atypical parkinsonian disorders such as progressive supranuclear palsy and multisystem atrophy. But in many studies it has been highlighted that these may also be present in approximately one third of PD patients leading to severe disability. These include antecollis or dropped head, camptocormia, p0 isa syndrome, scoliosis, striatal hands and striatal toes. The pathogenesis of these deformities is a complex combination of central and peripheral influences such as rigidity, dystonia and degenerative skeletal changes. Duration of parkinsonism symptoms is an important risk factor and in majority of the patients these deformities are seen in advanced statge of the disease. The patients with such symptoms may initially respond to dopaminergic medications but if not intervened they may become fixed and difficult to treat. Pain and restriction of movement are most common clinical manifestations and these may mimick symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders like rheumatoid arthritis. Early diagnosis is important as the patients may respond to adjustment in dopaminergic medications. Recent advances such as deep brain stimulation (DBS and ultrasound guided botulinum toxin injection are helpful in management of these deformities in patients with PD.

  4. Parkinson's disease showing progressive conduction aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Harada, Hiromi; Shima, Keisuke; Notoya, Masako; Yamada, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop progressive dementia late in their clinical course. Dementia in PD is mostly related to neuropathological findings of extensive Lewy bodies (LBs), with or without the coexistence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Aphasia has been reported in patients with LB diseases with AD pathology; however, there have been no reports of typical PD patients developing progressive aphasia during their clinical course. We describe a female PD patient wh...

  5. Statin use and Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Beate; Manthripragada, Angelika D; Qian, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor) use is associated with risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Denmark. We identified 1,931 patients with a first time diagnosis of PD reported in hospital or outpatient clinic re...

  6. Detection of arousals in Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Kempfner, Jacob; Jennum, Poul

    2011-01-01

    suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). The proposed algorithm uses features from EEG, EMG and the manual sleep stage scoring as input to a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). The performance of the algorithm has been assessed using polysomnographic (PSG) recordings from a total of 8 patients...

  7. Phosphorylated α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Tessandra; Sossi, Vesna; Aasly, Jan O;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: α-Synuclein (α-syn) is a key protein in Parkinson's disease (PD), and one of its phosphorylated forms, pS129, is higher in PD patients than healthy controls. However, few studies have examined its levels in longitudinally collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or in preclinical cases. ...

  8. Cyclooxygenase and Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's Disease Neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Anna L.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) expression in the brain is associated with pro-inflammatory activities, which are instrumental in neurodegenerative processes such as Parkinson's disease (PD). It is discussed that drugs with the capacity to rescue dopaminergic neurons from microglia toxicity and neuroinflammato

  9. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensen, E. van; Leeuwen, R.B. van; Zaag-Loonen, H.J. van der; Masius-Olthof, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dizziness is a frequent complaint of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is often thought to be the cause. We studied whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could also be an explanation. AIM: To assess the prevalence of benign paroxysmal

  10. Improving Symptom Control in Early Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, Stuart H; Hauser, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused by a severe loss of pigmented dopamine-producing nigro-striatal neurons. Symptomatic therapies provide benefit for motor features by restoring dopamine receptor stimulation. Studies have demonstrated that delaying the introduction of dopaminergic medical therapy is associated with a rapid decline in quality of life. Nonmotor s...

  11. Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenborg, Line; Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between head injuries throughout life and the risk for Parkinson disease (PD) in an interview-based case-control study. METHODS: We identified 1,705 patients diagnosed with PD at 10 neurologic centers in Denmark in 1996-2009 and verified their diagnoses...

  12. Nordic walking improves mobility in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkeren, FJ van; Reijmers, R.S.; Kleinveld, M.J.; Minten, A.; Bruggen, J.P.; Bloem, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    Nordic walking may improve mobility in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we examined whether the beneficial effects persist after the training period. We included 19 PD patients [14 men; mean age 67.0 years (range 58-76); Hoehn and Yahr stage range 1-3] who received a 6-week Nordic walking exercise pr

  13. Emotion and Object Processing in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Henri; Gagne, Marie-Helene; Hess, Ursula; Pourcher, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The neuropsychological literature on the processing of emotions in Parkinson's disease (PD) reveals conflicting evidence about the role of the basal ganglia in the recognition of facial emotions. Hence, the present study had two objectives. One was to determine the extent to which the visual processing of emotions and objects differs in PD. The…

  14. Voice Onset Time in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Emily; Goberman, Alexander M.

    2010-01-01

    Research has found that speaking rate has an effect on voice onset time (VOT). Given that Parkinson disease (PD) affects speaking rate, the purpose of this study was to examine VOT with the effect of rate removed (VOT ratio), along with the traditional VOT measure, in individuals with PD. VOT and VOT ratio were examined in 9 individuals with PD…

  15. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stacy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Since the original descriptions of hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation syndrome and pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease, impulse control disorders, such as compulsive spending, punding, or binge eating, are increasingly recognized. Although the term hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation syndrome has been supplanted by the concept of the dopamine dysregulation syndrome, the features of severe dyskinesias, cyclical mood disorder with hypomania or manic psychosis, and impairment of soci...

  16. MDS research criteria for prodromal Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, D; Postuma, R.B.; Adler, C.H.; Bloem, B.R.; Chan, P.; Dubois, B.; Gasser, T.; Goetz, C.G.; Halliday, G.; Joseph, L.; Lang, A.E.; Liepelt-Scarfone, I.; Litvan, I.; Marek, K.; Obeso, J.; Oertel, W.; Olanow, C.W.; Poewe, W.; Stern, M.; Deuschl, G.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes research criteria and probability methodology for the diagnosis of prodromal PD. Prodromal disease refers to the stage wherein early symptoms or signs of PD neurodegeneration are present, but classic clinical diagnosis based on fully evolved motor parkinsonism is not yet possi

  17. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postuma, R.B.; Berg, D; Stern, M.; Poewe, W.; Olanow, C.W.; Oertel, W.; Obeso, J.; Marek, K.; Litvan, I.; Lang, A.E.; Halliday, G.; Goetz, C.G.; Gasser, T.; Dubois, B.; Chan, P.; Bloem, B.R.; Adler, C.H.; Deuschl, G.

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical di

  18. Occupational risk factors for Parkinson disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, M.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors probably play an important role in the etiology of Parkinson disease (PD). However, not many environmental factors have been identified for which unequivocal evidence is available for a relation with PD risk. The main focus of the research described in this thesis was on studyi

  19. Mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Stenager, E; Boldsen, J

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: After the introduction of L-dopa the mortality rate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has changed, but is still higher than in the background population. MATERIAL & METHODS: Mortality, age at death and cause of death in a group of PD patients compared with the background population...

  20. Hypocretin (orexin) loss in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Lee, S.Y.; Hegeman, I.M.; Pelt, J. van; Duinen, S.G. van; Lammers, G.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) system plays a central role in the regulation of various functions, including sleep/wake regulation and metabolism. There is a growing interest in hypocretin function in Parkinson's disease (PD), given the high prevalence of non-motor symptoms such as sleep distu

  1. Quantitative Motor Performance and Sleep Benefit in Parkinson Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilst, M.M. van; Mierlo, P. van; Bloem, B.R.; Overeem, S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Many people with Parkinson disease experience "sleep benefit": temporarily improved mobility upon awakening. Here we used quantitative motor tasks to assess the influence of sleep on motor functioning in Parkinson disease. DESIGN: Eighteen Parkinson patients with and 20 without sub

  2. Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164379.html Hepatitis Infection May Raise Risk for Parkinson's Disease New ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with the liver infection hepatitis may be at heightened risk of developing Parkinson's ...

  3. Drugs of abuse and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mursaleen, Leah R; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    The term "drug of abuse" is highly contextual. What constitutes a drug of abuse for one population of patients does not for another. It is therefore important to examine the needs of the patient population to properly assess the status of drugs of abuse. The focus of this article is on the bidirectional relationship between patients and drug abuse. In this paper we will introduce the dopaminergic systems of the brain in Parkinson's and the influence of antiparkinsonian drugs upon them before discussing this synergy of condition and medication as fertile ground for drug abuse. We will then examine the relationship between drugs of abuse and Parkinson's, both beneficial and deleterious. In summary we will draw the different strands together and speculate on the future merit of current drugs of abuse as treatments for Parkinson's disease.

  4. Reproductive factors and Parkinson's disease risk in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greene, N; Lassen, C F; Rugbjerg, K

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Parkinson's disease is more common in men than women by a ratio of about 1.5:1 and yet there is no consensus to date as to whether female reproductive factors including hormone use affect Parkinson's disease risk. Our objective was to examine the relationship between...... and lifestyle factors. RESULTS: After adjusting for smoking, caffeine and alcohol use, education, age, and family Parkinson's disease history, inverse associations between Parkinson's disease and early menarche (first period at ≤11 years), oral contraceptives, high parity (≥4 children) and bilateral...... Parkinson's disease and female reproductive factors in the largest population-based Parkinson's disease case-control study to date. METHODS: Seven hundred and forty-three female Parkinson's disease cases diagnosed between 1996 and 2009 were selected from the Danish National Hospital Register, diagnoses...

  5. A précis of recent advances in the neuropsychology of mild cognitive impairment(s) in Parkinson's disease and a proposal of preliminary research criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröster, Alexander I

    2011-05-01

    Cognitive changes of Parkinson's disease (PD) manifest earlier and are more heterogeneous than previously appreciated. Approximately one-third of patients have at least mild cognitive changes at PD diagnosis, and subtle changes might be appreciable among those at risk for PD. Executive dysfunction is the most common cognitive change, but other phenotypes exist. Pathobiologic and potential prognostic differences among cognitive phenotypes remain poorly understood. Progress in the neuropsychology, epidemiology and pathobiology of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD is hampered by lack of diagnostic criteria. This study proposes preliminary research criteria for two categories of PD non-dementia cognitive impairment.

  6. Prevalence and incidence of Parkinson's disease in The Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Bech, Sara Brynhild Winther; Petersen, Maria Skaalum;

    2008-01-01

    A study in The Faroe Islands in 1995 suggested a high prevalence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and total parkinsonism of 187.6 and 233.4 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively.......A study in The Faroe Islands in 1995 suggested a high prevalence of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and total parkinsonism of 187.6 and 233.4 per 100,000 inhabitants respectively....

  7. Catechol-O-methyltransferase and Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Tai CH; Wu RM

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the main causes of neurological disability in the elderly. Levodopa is the gold standard for treating this disease, but chronic levodopa therapy is complicated by motor fluctuation and dyskinesia. The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors represent a new class of antiparkinsonian drugs. When coadministered with levodopa/decarboxylase inhibitor, 2 COMT inhibitors, tolcapone and entacapone have been shown to improve the clinical benefit of levodopa. C...

  8. The Role of Axonopathy in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    O'Malley, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    New genetic and environmental studies of Parkinson's disease have revealed early problems in synaptic function and connectivity indicating that axonal impairment may be an important hallmark in this disorder. Since many studies suggest that axonal dysfunction precedes cell body loss, it is critical to target axons with treatments aimed at preserving "connectivity" as well as to develop and verify "biomarkers" with which to assess disease progression and drug efficacy.

  9. Parkinson's Disease: Is It a Toxic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seham A. Gad ELhak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is one of the neurodegenerative diseases which we can by certainty identify its pathology, however, this confidence disappeares when talking about the cause. A long history of trials, suggestions, and theories tried linking PD to a specific causation. In this paper, a new suggestion is trying to find its way, could it be toxicology? Can we—in the future—look to PD as an occupational disease, in fact, many clues point to the possible toxic responsibility—either total or partial—in causing this disease. Searching for possible toxic causes for PD would help in designing perfect toxic models in animals.

  10. A fetal risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Brian K; Richfield, Eric K; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; Thiruchelvam, Mona

    2004-01-01

    A lack of strong evidence for genetic heritability of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) has focused attention on environmental toxicants in the disease etiology, particularly agrichemicals. PD is associated with advanced age, but it is unclear whether specific neuronal damage could result from insults during development. This study hypothesized that prenatal exposure to pesticides would disrupt the development of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system and enhance its vulnerability to dopaminergic neurotoxicant exposures later in life. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were treated on gestational days 10-17 with saline or the pesticides maneb (MB, 1 mg/kg) or paraquat (PQ, 0.3 mg/kg). When offspring were evaluated in adulthood, there were no significant effects of prenatal MB or PQ exposure on locomotor activity. Subsequently, offspring were treated for 8 consecutive days with saline, MB (30 mg/kg), or PQ (5 mg/kg). One week after the last exposure, only males exposed to prenatal MB and adulthood PQ showed significant reductions in locomotor activity (95%) and changes in striatal neurochemistry. Stereological assessment of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area correspondingly confirmed selective dopaminergic-neuron loss in SNpc. The lack of changes in other exposure groups suggests a specificity to the sequence of exposures as well as gender specificity. These results suggest that prenatal exposure to MB produces selective, permanent alterations of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and enhances adult susceptibility to PQ exposure. This study implicates a role for developmental neurotoxicant exposure in the induction of neurodegenerative disorders such as PD.

  11. Weight Gain Is Associated with Medial Contact Site of Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Filip Růžička; Robert Jech; Lucie Nováková; Dušan Urgošík; Josef Vymazal; Evžen Růžička

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess changes in body-weight in relation to active electrode contact position in the subthalamic nucleus. Regular body weight measurements were done in 20 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease within a period of 18 months after implantation. T1-weighted (1.5T) magnetic resonance images were used to determine electrode position in the subthalamic nucleus and the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS-III) was used for motor assessment. The distance of...

  12. Physical therapy and occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radder, Danique L M; Sturkenboom, Ingrid H; van Nimwegen, Marlies; Keus, Samyra H; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M

    2017-01-04

    Current medical management is only partially effective in controlling the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As part of comprehensive multidisciplinary care, physical therapy and occupational therapy aim to support people with Parkinson's disease in dealing with the consequences of their disease in daily activities. In this narrative review, we address the limitations that people with Parkinson's disease may encounter despite optimal medical management, and we clarify both the unique and shared approaches that physical therapists and occupational therapists can apply in treating these limitations.

  13. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in clinical and pathologically proven Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are associated with Gaucher's disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Parkinsonism is an established feature of Gaucher's disease and an increased frequency of mutations in GBA has been reported in several different ethnic series with sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of GBA mutations in British patients affected by Parkinson's disease. We utilized the DNA of 790 patients and 257 controls, matche...

  14. Role of dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Pavese, Nicola

    2007-10-01

    At present, dopamine agonists play an important role in antiparkinsonian therapy since they were proved effective in the management of both advanced- and early-stage Parkinson's disease. In the latter, they are often regarded as first-choice medication to delay the introduction of levodopa therapy. Despite sharing the capacity to directly stimulate dopamine receptors, dopamine agonists show different pharmacological properties as they act on different subsets of dopamine receptors. This, in theory, provides the advantage of obtaining a different antiparkinsonian activity or safety profile with each agent. However, there is very little evidence that any of the marketed dopamine agonists should be consistently preferred in the management of patients with Parkinson's disease. Pergolide and cabergoline are now considered a second-line choice after the proven association with valvular fibrosis. Transdermal administration (rotigotine) and subcutaneous infusion (apomorphine) of dopamine receptor agonists are now available alternatives to oral administration and provide continuous dopaminergic stimulation. Continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion during waking hours leads to a large reduction in daily 'off' time, dyskinesias and levodopa daily dose. Almost all currently used dopamine agonists are able to provide neuroprotective effects towards dopaminergic neurons during in vitro and in vivo experiments. This neuroprotection may be the result of different mechanisms including antioxidation, scavenging of free radicals, suppression of lipid peroxidation and inhibition of apoptosis. However, the disease-modifying effect of these agents in Parkinson's disease remains to be ascertained.

  15. Great expectations: the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidstone, Sarah Christine

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the placebo effect has increased exponentially in parallel with the advances in brain imaging. This is of particular importance in the field of Parkinson's disease, where clinicians have described placebo effects in their patients for decades. Significant placebo effects have been observed in clinical trials for medications as well as more invasive surgical trials including deep-brain stimulation and stem-cell implantation. In addition to placebo effects occurring as a byproduct of randomized controlled trials, investigation of the placebo effect itself in the laboratory setting has further shown the capacity for strong placebo effects within this patient population. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that placebos stimulate the release of dopamine in the striatum of patients with Parkinson's disease and can alter the activity of dopamine neurons using single-cell recording. When taken together with the findings from other medical conditions discussed elsewhere in this publication, a unified mechanism for the placebo effect in Parkinson's disease is emerging that blends expectation-induced neurochemical changes and disease-specific nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  16. [Pramipexole in Parkinson disease. Results of a treatment observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, H; Brecht, H M; Kraus, P H; Lemke, M R

    2002-08-01

    Pramipexole is a novel, internationally available selective nonergot D2 dopamine agonist. The effectiveness, tolerability, and safety of pramipexole have been extensively proven in controlled trials in patients in the early and advanced stage of Parkinson's disease as monotherapy and in combination with L dopa. These trials indicated specific activity against tremor, anhedonia, and depression. Therefore, the present prospective, multicenter postmarketing surveillance study evaluated for the first time to what extent the results from the controlled pramipexole trials could be replicated under routine conditions in neurological practice and clinics. Modern scales were applied for the assessment of tremor and mood, i.e., the Short Parkinson's Evaluation Scale (SPES), the Tremor Impact Scale (TIS), and the German version of the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS-D). In 298 German Centers, 657 Parkinson's patients (365 men, 292 women) in advanced disease stages were treated with pramipexole in combination with levodopa. The average ages (+/- SD) were 67 (+/- 8.9) years for men and 69 (+/- 9.4) years for females. Motor functioning, especially tremor, motor complications, depression, and activities of daily living improved highly significantly (P pramipexole prescribed was 1.05 mg and thus was definitely lower than the average daily dosages of 2.35-2.66 mg used in controlled trials. This signifies that the option to adjust dosage according to effectiveness and tolerability under routine conditions yields a considerably lower incidence of adverse effects.

  17. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doraiswamy, M; Martin, W; Metz, A; Deveaugh-Geiss, J

    1995-09-01

    1. This article reviews the prevalence, diagnosis, pathophysiology and management of psychosis in Parkinson's disease. 2. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease has been associated with all antiparkinsonian medications. The most common symptoms are vivid disturbing dreams, visual hallucinations and paranoid delusions. 3. The emergence of psychosis reduces the patient's functional capacity and increases caregiver burden. It also poses a therapeutic dilemma because effective treatment of psychotic symptoms may result in worsening of motor symptoms and vice versa. 4. Increased physician awareness is essential for proper diagnosis and management. Withdrawal of anticholinergic medications and amantadine followed by levodopa dose adjustment is effective in many patients. 5. Atypical neuroleptics, in low doses, may be successful when other measures have failed. However, these agents are not approved for treating Parkinsonian psychosis and must be considered as investigational therapies.

  18. OTHELLO SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiev, Dejan; Danieli, Aljoša; Ocepek, Lidija; Novak, Dominika; Zupančič-Križnar, Nina; Trošt, Maja; Pirtošek, Zvezdan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Othello syndrome (OS) is an organic delusional disorder with prevailing jealousy symptoms presumably appearing as side effect of antiparkinsonian therapy. The clinical spectrum of psychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) is very wide, including symptoms of depresion and anxiety, hallucinations, delusions, with prevalent paranoid symptoms, agitation, delirium and sleep disorders. At our knowledge, just a few cases of patients with PD and OS were reported till now. ...

  19. Inflammation in Parkinson's disease: role of glucocorticoids

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Chronic inflammation is a major characteristic feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Studies in PD patients show evidence of augmented levels of potent pro-inflammatory molecules e.g., TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β whereas in experimental Parkinsonism it has been consistently demonstrated that dopaminergic neurons are particularly vulnerable to activated glia releasing these toxic factors. Recent genetic studies point to the role of immune system in the etiology of PD, thus in com...

  20. Plasma Urate and Parkinson's Disease in Women

    OpenAIRE

    O'Reilly, Éilis J.; Gao, Xiang; Weisskopf, Marc G.; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Spiegelman, Donna; Ascherio, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Plasma urate has been consistently associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease in men, but it is less clear if this relation exists in women. Between 1990 and 2004, the authors conducted a nested case-control study among participants of the female-only Nurses’ Health Study. In controls (n = 504), plasma urate was positively associated with age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, hypertension, and use of diuretics and was inversely associated with physical activity and postmenopausa...

  1. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  2. Dopaminergic neuronal imaging in genetic Parkinson's disease: insights into pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisdair McNeill

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease. METHODS: A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated for bilateral caudate and putamen for each case. The right:left asymmetry index and striatal asymmetry index was calculated. RESULTS: Scans were available from 37 cases of monogenetic Parkinson's disease (7 glucocerebrosidase (GBA mutations, 8 alpha-synuclein, 3 LRRK2, 7 PINK1, 12 Parkin. The asymmetry of radioligand uptake for Parkinson's disease with GBA or LRRK2 mutations was greater than that for Parkinson's disease with alpha synuclein, PINK1 or Parkin mutations. CONCLUSIONS: The asymmetry of radioligand uptake in Parkinsons disease associated with GBA or LRRK2 mutations suggests that interactions with additional genetic or environmental factors may be associated with dopaminergic neuronal loss.

  3. Nonmotor Symptoms in a Malaysian Parkinson's Disease Population

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrul Azmin; Abdul Manaf Khairul Anuar; Hui Jan Tan; Wan Yahya Nafisah; Azman Ali Raymond; Othman Hanita; Shamsul Azhar Shah; Mohamed Ibrahim Norlinah

    2014-01-01

    Background. The nonmotor symptoms are important determinants of health and quality of life in Parkinson's disease but are not well recognized and addressed in clinical practice. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms and their impact on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Exclusion criteria were a Mini Mental State Examination score of

  4. Estrogen-related and other disease diagnoses preceding Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dybdal, Merete; Destefano, Anita L;

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen exposure has been associated with the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD), as well as many other disorders, and yet the mechanisms underlying these relations are often unknown. While it is likely that estrogen exposure modifies the risk of various diseases through many different...

  5. Nonmotor symptoms in a malaysian Parkinson's disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmin, Shahrul; Khairul Anuar, Abdul Manaf; Tan, Hui Jan; Nafisah, Wan Yahya; Raymond, Azman Ali; Hanita, Othman; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Norlinah, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background. The nonmotor symptoms are important determinants of health and quality of life in Parkinson's disease but are not well recognized and addressed in clinical practice. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of nonmotor symptoms and their impact on quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. Methods. This was a cross-sectional study among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Exclusion criteria were a Mini Mental State Examination score of Parkinson's disease and adversely affected the quality of life of our patients. In contrast to western studies, the most common nonmotor symptom is gastrointestinal. The possibility of an Asian diet playing a role in this observation requires further study.

  6. Clinical patterns in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooden, Stephanie Maria van

    2012-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients may reflect the existence of subtypes of the disease. PD subtypes have often been defined by a classification according to researcher-specified criteria, such as age-at-onset or predominant clinical motor features. The general objective

  7. Rasagiline induced hypersexuality in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Dennys; Kurako, Kateryna; Galvez-Jimenez, Nestor

    2014-03-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) are increasingly recognized in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), particularly when treated with commonly used dopamine agonists such as pramipexole and ropinirole. Less evident is the possible association between monoamine oxidase inhibitors type B (MAO-B) and the development of ICD. Rasagiline is a second generation MAO-B I inducing moderate symptomatic and possibly disease modifying benefits with apparently good tolerability and safety profile in PD patients. Rasagiline is effective and well tolerated in PD as a monotherapy or in combination with levodopa. Here, we report a patient with PD who developed ICD when treated de novo with MAO-B inhibitors.

  8. Dysgeusia in parkinson's disease: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Catarina Vieira Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Trabalho de revisão do 6º ano médico com vista à atribuição do grau de mestre (área científica de otorrinolaringologia) no âmbito do ciclo de estudos de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina. Background: Taste has an extreme importance on individual nutrition, health and quality-of-life status. Parkinson's disease (PD), one of the most frequent neurodegenerative disorders, is becoming a systemic disease with an increasing awareness to the importance of non-motor symptoms for early PD diagnosis an...

  9. Incidence and risk factors of Parkinson's disease in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, A.; Collette, H.J.A.; Bartelds, A.I.M.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence and some risk factors of Parkinson's disease were investigated in a study performed in The Netherlands. The study was based on a disease register of the Sentinel Stations, which provide a complete ascertainment of new patients with Parkinson's disease in 60 general practices in The

  10. Parkinson's disease severity and motor subtype influence physical capacity components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pinto Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The severity of Parkinson's disease (PD and PD's motor subtypes influence the components of physical capacity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of both PD severity and motor subtype in the performance of these components. Thirty-six PD patients were assigned into four groups: Tremor (TD initial and TD mild, akinetic-rigid (AR initial, and AR mild. Patients' strength, balance, coordination, mobility and aerobic capacity were evaluated and groups were compared using a two-way ANOVA (severity and subtype as factors. AR presents a poorer performance than TD in almost all tests. Also this performance was worsened with the advance of the disease in AR, contrary to TD. We conclude that AR and TD subgroups are different about their performance on physical capacity components, moreover, this performance worsens with the advance of the disease of the AR group, but not for TD.

  11. Parkinson disease, 10 years after its genetic revolution: multiple clues to a complex disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christine; Schlossmacher, Michael G

    2007-11-27

    Over the last 10 years, an unprecedented number of scientific reports have been published that relate to the pathogenesis of parkinsonism. Since the discovery in 1997 of the first heritable form of parkinsonism that could be linked to a mutation in a single gene, SNCA, many more genetic leads have followed (Parkin, DJ-1, PINK1, LRRK2, to name a few); these have provided us with many molecular clues to better explore the etiology of parkinsonism and have led to the dismantling of many previously held dogmas about Parkinson disease (PD). Epidemiologic studies have delineated an array of environmental modulators of susceptibility to parkinsonism, which can now be examined in the context of gene expression. Furthermore, in vivo imaging data and postmortem results have generated concepts that greatly expanded our appreciation for the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism from its presymptomatic to advanced stages. With this plethora of new information emerged the picture of a complex syndrome that raises many questions: How many forms of classic parkinsonism/Parkinson disease(s) are there? Where does the disease begin? What causes late-onset, "idiopathic" PD? What are the caveats related to genetic testing? What is the role of Lewy bodies? What will be the best disease model to accommodate the now known genetic and environmental contributors to parkinsonism? What will be the ideal markers and targets for earlier diagnosis and cause-directed therapy? In the following article we highlight some of the burning issues surrounding the understanding of classic parkinsonism, a complex puzzle of genes, environment, and an aging host.

  12. Hypersexuality following subthalamic nucleus stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Paresh; Bhargava, Pranshu

    2008-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation is an established surgical treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD). Though the motor benefits of STN stimulation are well understood, its cognitive and behavioral effects are still not fully understood. Manic psychosis, hypersexuality, pathological gambling and mood swings are associated with advanced PD. There have been reports to suggest improvement or worsening in these symptoms following STN deep brain stimulation (DBS). We report two cases as the sole behavioral side-effects of STN stimulation despite good clinical improvement on long-term follow-up. These patients and literature review suggests the complex role of STN stimulation in motor and behavioral control.

  13. C. elegans as a model system for Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson disease( PD) is characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra.Although investigation in mammalian animal models of PD has enhanced our understanding of PD, the complexity of the mammalian nervous system and our inability to visualize DA neurons in vivo restricts the advances in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of PD. Conservation between C. elegans and mammals in genomic, biosynthetic and metabolic pathways as well as the advantages of observing DA neurons morphology in vivo and the ease of transgenic and genetic manipulation make C. elegans an excellent model organism for PD.

  14. Traditional Chinese medicine for modern treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Xie, Yuan-Hong; Wu, Rong; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-20

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic and progressive degenerative disorder of brain commonly seen among the elderly. As conventionally medical therapy is of limited relief and potential side effects, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has attracted growing public and professional attention. Therapies such as acupuncture, musical/rhythmic therapy and deep brain stimulation have been gradually proved positively in clinic. In this review, we retrospected the scientific or evidence-based-medicine advances of application and research for modern treatment of PD by CAM, especially traditional Chinese medicine in categories.

  15. Unilateral pallidotomy in Parkinson's disease : a randomised, single-blind, multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, RMA; de Haan, RJ; Nijssen, PCG; Rutgers, AWF; Beute, GN; Haaxma, R; Schmand, B; Staal, MJ; Speelman, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    Background The results of several cohort studies suggest that patients with advanced Parkinson's disease would benefit from unilateral pallidotomy. We have assessed the efficacy of unilateral pallidotomy in a randomised, single-blind, multicentre trial. Methods We enrolled 37 patients with advanced

  16. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    2008-04-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore striatal dopamine signaling by increasing the supply of dopamine with oral levodopa (L-dopa), stimulating dopamine receptors directly using dopamine agonists, or inhibiting the reuptake of endogenous dopamine. L-dopa is standard therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease. However, with continued treatment and disease progression, the response to oral dopaminergic drugs becomes unstable and motor fluctuations emerge, including off periods and dyskinesia. Direct duodenal-administered infusible L-dopa/carbidopa is effective for the management of refractory motor fluctuations in some patient populations. However, enteral infusions cannot mimic the function of the normal dopaminergic brain, and around-the-clock constant-rate administration carries the risk of causing refractory off periods associated with severe immobility and hyperpyrexia. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is also a promising treatment. DBS passes a high-frequency electrical current into the target area, mimicking the effect of lesioning the stimulated area. However, this treatment requires invasive surgery and is appropriate for a limited segment of the patient population. This supplement provides a rationale for the use of continuous dopaminergic receptor stimulation and offers guidelines on the individualization of treatment decisions, with special focus on continuous L-dopa infusion and STN DBS. Erik Wolters, MD, PhD, offers an introduction to the impact of continuous L-dopa infusion. Andrew J. Lees, MD, FRCP, provides an overview of the physiologic response to L-dopa and reviews clinical pharmacologic studies of intravenous and intraduodenal L-dopa. Jens Volkmann, MD, discusses

  17. Technology in Parkinson's disease: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espay, Alberto J; Bonato, Paolo; Nahab, Fatta B; Maetzler, Walter; Dean, John M; Klucken, Jochen; Eskofier, Bjoern M; Merola, Aristide; Horak, Fay; Lang, Anthony E; Reilmann, Ralf; Giuffrida, Joe; Nieuwboer, Alice; Horne, Malcolm; Little, Max A; Litvan, Irene; Simuni, Tanya; Dorsey, E Ray; Burack, Michelle A; Kubota, Ken; Kamondi, Anita; Godinho, Catarina; Daneault, Jean-Francois; Mitsi, Georgia; Krinke, Lothar; Hausdorff, Jeffery M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Papapetropoulos, Spyros

    2016-09-01

    The miniaturization, sophistication, proliferation, and accessibility of technologies are enabling the capture of more and previously inaccessible phenomena in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, more information has not translated into a greater understanding of disease complexity to satisfy diagnostic and therapeutic needs. Challenges include noncompatible technology platforms, the need for wide-scale and long-term deployment of sensor technology (among vulnerable elderly patients in particular), and the gap between the "big data" acquired with sensitive measurement technologies and their limited clinical application. Major opportunities could be realized if new technologies are developed as part of open-source and/or open-hardware platforms that enable multichannel data capture sensitive to the broad range of motor and nonmotor problems that characterize PD and are adaptable into self-adjusting, individualized treatment delivery systems. The International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society Task Force on Technology is entrusted to convene engineers, clinicians, researchers, and patients to promote the development of integrated measurement and closed-loop therapeutic systems with high patient adherence that also serve to (1) encourage the adoption of clinico-pathophysiologic phenotyping and early detection of critical disease milestones, (2) enhance the tailoring of symptomatic therapy, (3) improve subgroup targeting of patients for future testing of disease-modifying treatments, and (4) identify objective biomarkers to improve the longitudinal tracking of impairments in clinical care and research. This article summarizes the work carried out by the task force toward identifying challenges and opportunities in the development of technologies with potential for improving the clinical management and the quality of life of individuals with PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Alpha synuclein in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Christine Lund; Romero-Ramos, Marina; Halliday, Glenda M

    2014-01-01

    The perception of Parkinson’s disease (PD) as a disease centered on dopaminergic striatonigral neurodegeneration has changed fundamentally since 1997 when the first mutation in the SNCA gene (PARK1) encoding a-synuclein was discovered (Polymeropoulos et al. 1997). This discovery formed the basis...... the last decade (Gai et al. 1998; Spillantini and Goedert 2000; Huang et al. 2004; Ubhi et al. 2011). This review will briefly highlight the historical breakthroughs but focus on a-synuclein modifications, human neuropathology, biomarker potential, current animal models and the new concepts emerging after...

  19. Obsessive compulsive personality disorder and Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Nicoletti

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the frequency of personality disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD patients and in a group of healthy controls. METHODS: Patients affected by PD diagnosed according to the United Kingdom Parkinson's disease Society Brain Bank diagnostic criteria and a group of healthy controls were enrolled in the study. PD patients with cognitive impairment were excluded from the study. Structured Clinical Interview for Personality Disorders-II (SCID-II has been performed to evaluate the presence of personality disorders. Presence of personality disorders, diagnosed according to the DSM-IV, was confirmed by a psychiatric interview. Clinical and pharmacological data were also recorded using a standardized questionnaire. RESULTS: 100 PD patients (57 men; mean age 59.0 ± 10.2 years and 100 healthy subjects (52 men; mean age 58.1 ± 11.4 years were enrolled in the study. The most common personality disorder was the obsessive-compulsive personality disorder diagnosed in 40 PD patients and in 10 controls subjects (p-value<0.0001 followed by the depressive personality disorder recorded in 14 PD patients and 4 control subjects (p-value 0.02. Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder was also found in 8 out of 16 de novo PD patients with a short disease duration. CONCLUSION: PD patients presented a high frequency of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder that does not seem to be related with both disease duration and dopaminergic therapy.

  20. Posture and Locomotion Coupling: A Target for Rehabilitation Interventions in Persons with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Mille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of posture, balance, and gait are debilitating motor manifestations of advancing Parkinson's disease requiring rehabilitation intervention. These problems often reflect difficulties with coupling or sequencing posture and locomotion during complex whole body movements linked with falls. Considerable progress has been made with demonstrating the effectiveness of exercise interventions for individuals with Parkinson's disease. However, gaps remain in the evidence base for specific interventions and the optimal content of exercise interventions. Using a conceptual theoretical framework and experimental findings, this perspective and review advances the viewpoint that rehabilitation interventions focused on separate or isolated components of posture, balance, or gait may limit the effectiveness of current clinical practices. It is argued that treatment effectiveness may be improved by directly targeting posture and locomotion coupling problems as causal factors contributing to balance and gait dysfunction. This approach may help advance current clinical practice and improve outcomes in rehabilitation for persons with Parkinson's disease.

  1. Pathological Gambling in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Mette Buhl; Linnet, Jakob; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer

    Pathological Gambling in Parkinson’s Disease Mette Buhl Callesen, Jakob Linnet, Kristine Rømer Thomsen, Albert Gjedde, Arne Møller PET Center, Aarhus University Hospital and Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus University.   The neurotransmitter dopamine is central to many...... aspects of human functioning, e.g., reward, learning, and addiction, including Pathological Gambling (PG), and its loss is key to Parkinson’s Disease (PD). PD is a neurodegenrative disorder caused by progressive loss of dopamine-producing cells in the midbrain [1]. One type of treatment of PD symptoms...... is medication that binds to dopamine receptors in the brain, i.e., dopamine agonists [1]. Unfortunately, for some PD patients a very serious side effect to this specific kind of treatment is developing PG. PG is an Impulse Control Disorder characterized by recurrent maladaptive behavior associated with personal...

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, N. J.; Tissingh, G.; Poels, P. J. E.; Zuidema, S. U.; Munneke, M.; Koopmans, R. T. C. M.; Bloem, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Management of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism in nursing homes depends on a timely and accurate diagnosis. However, little is known about the diagnostic accuracy of these parkinsonian syndromes in nursing homes. We examined this issue in a large group of Dutch nursin

  3. Restless legs syndrome in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Esteban, Juan C; Zarranz, Juan J; Tijero, Beatriz; Velasco, Fernando; Barcena, Joseba; Rouco, Idoia; Lezcano, Elena; Lachen, María C; Jauregui, Amaia; Ugarte, Amaia

    2007-10-15

    The present study explores the frequency of RLS in PD and focuses on the clinical differences between patients with and without restless legs syndrome (RLS). A cross-sectional study was designed, comprising 114 patients diagnosed with PD. Those patients positive for RLS were assessed for intensity of the syndrome (IRLS). We compared the clinical characteristics of the patients with and without RLS, using specific scales: Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS I-IV), quality of life (Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, PDQ 39), sleep symptoms (Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale, PDSS), and diurnal hypersomnia (Epworth Sleepiness Scale). Twenty-five patients (21.9%) out of a total of 114 subjects diagnosed with PD met the RLS diagnostic criteria. RLS was more frequent in women (68%). The patients with RLS showed poorer scores on the PDSS (PD-RLS+: 102.4 +/- 15.1 vs PD-RLS-: 113.2 +/- 16.4) (P = 0.005) and in the bodily discomfort dimension of the PDQ-39 (PD-RLS+ 6.1 +/- 3.4 vs PD-RLS- 3.8 +/- 2.6) (P = 0.002). Analysis of the subscales of the PDSS showed significant differences (P < 0.001) between both groups of patients in items 4 and 10, and to a lesser degree in items 5 (P = 0.01) and 11 (P = 0.02) There was no increased incidence of diurnal hypersomnia in the group of patients with RLS. There were no differences in the rest of the variables. RLS is frequent in patients with PD, though this condition doesn't apparently affect quality of life or lead to an increased presence of diurnal hypersomnia. It would be advisable to validate the diagnostic criteria of RLS in this specific group of patients.

  4. Parkinson's disease: implications for nutritional care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Meredith L; Traviss, Karol A; Calne, Susan M

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, neurodegenerative disease. People with PD are particularly susceptible to weight loss and malnutrition. Involuntary movements associated with PD result in increased energy expenditure, while both disease symptoms and medication side-effects can limit food intake. In addition, patients with the disease may choose to follow unconventional nutritional therapies that exacerbate malnutrition. Dietitians play a key role in helping patients with PD to optimize their nutritional status and manage various nutrition-related symptoms and medication side-effects. To assume this role, dietitians need to have current knowledge about PD and its nutritional consequences, as well as strategies for managing a variety of nutrition-related symptoms.

  5. DYSPHAGIA AND SIALORRHEA: the relationship to Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Hack NICARETTA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Dysphagia and sialorrhea in patients with Parkinson's disease are both automatically accepted as dependent on this neurological disease. Objective The aim were to establish if these two complaints are a consequence or associated manifestations of Parkinson's disease. Method Two Parkinson's diseases groups from the same outpatients' population were studied. Patients in the first group, with dysphagia, were studied by videofluoroscopy. The second, with sialorrhea, were studied by the scintigraphic method, Results Videofluoroscopic examination of the oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing showed that 94% of Parkinson's diseases patients present, structural causes, not related to Parkinson's diseases, able to produce or intensify the observed disphagia. The scintigraphic examination of Parkinson's diseases patients with sialorrhea showed that there is no increase of serous saliva production. Nevertheless, showed a significantly higher velocity of saliva excretion in the Parkinson's diseases patients. Conclusions Dysphagia can be due to the muscular rigidity often present in the Parkinson's diseases patient, or more usually by non Parkinson's disease associated causes. In Parkinson's diseases patients, sialorrhea is produced by saliva retention. Nevertheless, sialorrhea can produce discomfort in swallowing, although without a formal complaint of dysphagia. In this case, subclinical dysphagia must be considered. Sialorrhea is indicative of dysphagia or at least of subclinical dysphagia. As final conclusion, Parkinson's diseases can be an isolated cause of dysphagia and/or sialorrhea, but frequently, a factor unrelated to Parkinson's diseases is the main cause of or at least aggravates the dysphagia. Contexto Disfagia e sialorreia em pacientes com doença de Parkinson são automaticamente entendidos como decorrentes do comprometimento neurológico produzido pela doença de Parkinson. Objetivo Estabelecer se estas duas queixas s

  6. Singing, music and dance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-28

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a long-term neurological condition that can affect profoundly physical, psychological and social function. It becomes more prevalent with age, affecting 1.6% of the population over the age of 65. Motor symptoms can include slowness, tremor, stiffness and impaired balance; non-motor symptoms can include changed mood and cognition, as well as a wide range of physical, emotional and social functions. There is emerging research into the value of non-pharmacological approaches, such as music, singing and dance. Three reviews of the evidence are summarised.

  7. Weathering the storm: living with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a movement disorder related to dopamine insufficiency in the brain, affects 7 to 10 million people worldwide. Research has focused on etiology and treatment, while research on how patients deal with PD is limited. This ehnographic study explored the illness experience of 14 participants living with PD. The metaphor, "Sailing the Seas in the Eye of the Storm" depicts their experience. Content themes "Daily Negotiations in the Midst of Uncertainty" (the storm) and "Reconstructin of the Self" (the travler's voyage) suggest aspects of holistic care for PD patients.

  8. Traditional and complementary therapies in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyam, B V; Sánchez-Ramos, J R

    1999-01-01

    Parkinson's disease has existed in different parts of the world since ancient times. The first clear description is found in the ancient Indian medical system of Ayurveda under the name Kampavata. Traditional therapies in the form of herbal preparations containing anticholinergics, levodopa, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors were used in the treatment of PD in India, China, and the Amazon basin. Scientific reevaluation of these therapies may be valuable, as shown in the case of Mucuna pruriens and Banisteria caapi. Complementary therapies such as massage therapy, biofeedback, and acupuncture may have beneficial effects for patients and deserve further study.

  9. Parkinson's disease and mitochondrial gene variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andalib, Sasan; Vafaee, Manouchehr Seyedi; Gjedde, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common disorder of the central nervous system in the elderly. The pathogenesis of PD is a complex process, with genetics as an important contributing factor. This factor may stem from mitochondrial gene variations and mutations as well as from nuclear gene variations...... and mutations. More recently, a particular role of mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested, arising from mitochondrial DNA variations or acquired mutations in PD pathogenesis. The present review summarizes and weighs the evidence in support of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variations as important contributors...

  10. Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUO Xiao-guang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment is one of the most common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD and a major influencing factor on patients' daily living ability. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is a cognitive state between normal aging and dementia, and the living capability of MCI patients relatively remains. MCI often occurs in PD, with its clinical features presenting as the impairment in working memory and (or attention, executive function, language ability, memory and visuospatial function. Here we try to depict the general picture of PD-MCI from the view of epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, imaging and diagnostic criteria.

  11. Detection of proteolytic signatures for Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordal, Peter Lüttge; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Winge, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate if idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is associated with distinct proteolytic signatures relative to non-neurodegenerative controls (NND) and patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA). Materials & methods: A subtiligase-based N-terminomics screening method was exploited...... = 11) and MSA (n = 18) samples. Results: The discovery screen detected 300 N-termini for 156 proteins. Selected reaction monitoring analysis revealed that two of these peptides differentiate IPD from NND while three peptides differentiate IPD from MSA. Conclusion: IPD is associated with distinct...

  12. Effects of exercise on mobility in people with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, N.M. van der; King, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder for which only symptomatic treatment exists. Gait and balance disturbance is common in Parkinson's disease and is a major contributor to increased disability and decreased health-related quality of life and survival. Balance and gait defi

  13. On the structure of motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stochl, Jan; Boomsma, Anne; Ruzicka, Evzen; Brozova, Hana; Blahus, Petr

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the structure of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), as measured by the Motor Section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The dimensionality of the Motor Section of the UPDRS was studied using structural equation modeling. The UPDRS mea

  14. Dopaminergic Neuronal Imaging in Genetic Parkinson's Disease: Insights into Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. McNeill (Alisdair); R-M. Wu (Ruey-Meei); K.-Y. Tzen (Kai-Yuan); P.C. Aguiar (Patricia); J.M. Arbelo (Jose); P. Barone (Paolo); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); O.G. Barsottini (Orlando); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); S. Bostantjopoulou (Sevasti); R.A. Bressan (Rodrigo); G. Cossu (Giovanni); P. Cortelli (Pietro); A.C. Felicio (Andre); H.B. Ferraz (Henrique); J. Herrera (Joanna); H. Houlden (Henry); M. Hoexter (Marcelo); C. Isla (Concepcion); A.J. Lees (Andrew); O. Lorenzo-Betancor (Oswaldo); N.E. Mencacci (Niccolo); P. Pastor (Pau); S. Pappata (Sabina); M.T. Pellecchia (Maria Teresa); L. Silveria-Moriyama (Laura); A. Varrone (Andrea); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.H.V. Schapira (Anthony)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease.Methods:A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated fo

  15. Prevalence and characteristics of dementia in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarsland, Dag; Andersen, Kjeld; Larsen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown.......Few longitudinal studies of dementia in Parkinson disease (PD) have been reported, and the proportion of patients with PD who eventually develop dementia is unknown....

  16. Database for Parkinson Disease Mutations and Rare Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    G.W., Van Broeckhoven C, Vance, J.M.: “Parkinson Disease Variant Database ”. MDS 19th International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement...abstracts submitted to ( international ) meetings and announcements of seminars including presentation of the database . Page 9 ABSTRACT NUYTEMANS UDALL...

  17. Primary Health Care Providers' Knowledge Gaps on Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Megan R.; Stone, Ramona F.; Ochs, V. Dan; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine primary health care providers' (PCPs) knowledge gaps on Parkinson's disease, data were collected before and after a one-hour continuing medical education (CME) lecture on early Parkinson's disease recognition and treatment from a sample of 104 PCPs participating at an annual meeting. The main outcome measure was the…

  18. Clear Speech Variants: An Acoustic Study in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jennifer; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated how different variants of clear speech affect segmental and suprasegmental acoustic measures of speech in speakers with Parkinson's disease and a healthy control group. Method: A total of 14 participants with Parkinson's disease and 14 control participants served as speakers. Each speaker produced 18 different…

  19. Screening and Treatment for Depression, Dementia, and Psychosis with Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AND TREATMENT FOR DEPRESSION, DEMENTIA, AND PSYCHOSIS WITH PARKINSON DISEASE Depression, dementia, and psychosis are common in people with Parkinson disease. These conditions can affect how people with Parkinson ...

  20. Neurophysiology of Drosophila models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Ryan J H; Furmston, Rebecca; Williams, Charles A C; Elliott, Christopher J H

    2015-01-01

    We provide an insight into the role Drosophila has played in elucidating neurophysiological perturbations associated with Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related genes. Synaptic signalling deficits are observed in motor, central, and sensory systems. Given the neurological impact of disease causing mutations within these same genes in humans the phenotypes observed in fly are of significant interest. As such we observe four unique opportunities provided by fly nervous system models of Parkinson's disease. Firstly, Drosophila models are instrumental in exploring the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, with several PD-related mutations eliciting related phenotypes including sensitivity to energy supply and vesicular deformities. These are leading to the identification of plausible cellular mechanisms, which may be specific to (dopaminergic) neurons and synapses rather than general cellular phenotypes. Secondly, models show noncell autonomous signalling within the nervous system, offering the opportunity to develop our understanding of the way pathogenic signalling propagates, resembling Braak's scheme of spreading pathology in PD. Thirdly, the models link physiological deficits to changes in synaptic structure. While the structure-function relationship is complex, the genetic tractability of Drosophila offers the chance to separate fundamental changes from downstream consequences. Finally, the strong neuronal phenotypes permit relevant first in vivo drug testing.

  1. Unmasking levodopa resistance in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnekes, Jorik; Timmer, Monique H M; de Vries, Nienke M; Rascol, Olivier; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-11-01

    Some motor and nonmotor features associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) do not seem to respond well to levodopa (or other forms of dopaminergic medication) or appear to become resistant to levodopa treatment with disease progression and longer disease duration. In this narrative review, we elaborate on this issue of levodopa resistance in PD. First, we discuss the possibility of pseudoresistance, which refers to dopamine-sensitive symptoms or signs that falsely appear to be (or have become) resistant to levodopa, when in fact other mechanisms are at play, resulting in suboptimal dopaminergic efficacy. Examples include interindividual differences in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics and underdosing because of dose-limiting side effects or because of levodopa phobia. Moreover, pseudoresistance can emerge as not all features of PD respond adequately to the same dosage of levodopa. Second, we address that for several motor features (eg, freezing of gait or tremor) and several nonmotor features (eg, specific cognitive functions), the response to levodopa is fairly complex, with a combination of levodopa-responsive, levodopa-resistant, and even levodopa-induced characteristics. A possible explanation relates to the mixed presence of underlying dopaminergic and nondopaminergic brain lesions. We suggest that clinicians take these possibilities into account before concluding that symptoms or signs of PD are totally levodopa resistant. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Parkinson disease: from pathology to molecular disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, David T; Jenner, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with both motor and nonmotor symptoms owing to a spreading process of neuronal loss in the brain. At present, only symptomatic treatment exists and nothing can be done to halt the degenerative process, as its cause remains unclear. Risk factors such as aging, genetic susceptibility, and environmental factors all play a role in the onset of the pathogenic process but how these interlink to cause neuronal loss is not known. There have been major advances in the understanding of mechanisms that contribute to nigral dopaminergic cell death, including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, altered protein handling, and inflammation. However, it is not known if the same processes are responsible for neuronal loss in nondopaminergic brain regions. Many of the known mechanisms of cell death are mirrored in toxin-based models of PD, but neuronal loss is rapid and not progressive and limited to dopaminergic cells, and drugs that protect against toxin-induced cell death have not translated into neuroprotective therapies in humans. Gene mutations identified in rare familial forms of PD encode proteins whose functions overlap widely with the known molecular pathways in sporadic disease and these have again expanded our knowledge of the neurodegenerative process but again have so far failed to yield effective models of sporadic disease when translated into animals. We seem to be missing some key parts of the jigsaw, the trigger event starting many years earlier in the disease process, and what we are looking at now is merely part of a downstream process that is the end stage of neuronal death.

  3. New dopamine agonist pramipexole improves parkinsonism and depression in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Toshihide; Ishizaki, Fumiko; Horie, Nobuko; Nitta, Yumiko; Yamada, Tohru; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Nagakane, Tomoomi; Yasumatsu, Yoshiteru; Nitta, Kohsaku; Katsuoka, Hiroyuki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that pramipexole might have the potential to improve depressive symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease. To provide more evidence, in five Japanese patients at Hoehn & Yahr stage 1-3 we evaluated the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at our hospital. After the pramipexole treatment, each total score of UPDRS, HAMD and MADRS significantly decreased compared with that before the treatment. Our data indicate that pramipexole improves depressive symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  4. Morbidity in early Parkinson's disease and prior to diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rune; Kjellberg, Jakob; Ibsen, Rikke;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonmotor symptoms are probably present prior to, early on, and following, a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Nonmotor symptoms may hold important information about the progression of Parkinson's disease. OBJECTIVE: To evaluated the total early and prediagnostic morbidities in the 3...... years before a hospital contact leading to a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. METHODS: Retrospective morbidity data from Danish National Patient Registry records (1997-2007) of 10,490 adult patients with a secondary care diagnosis of Parkinson's disease were compared with 42,505 control cases. RESULTS......: Parkinson's disease was associated with significantly higher morbidity rates associated with conditions in the following categories: mental and psychiatric, nervous system, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal system and connective tissue, genitourinary, abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, injury...

  5. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  6. Parkinson's Disease and Sleep/Wake Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd J. Swick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD has traditionally been characterized by its cardinal motor symptoms of bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, and postural instability. However, PD is increasingly being recognized as a multidimensional disease associated with myriad nonmotor symptoms including autonomic dysfunction, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, pain, gastrointestinal disturbance, impaired olfaction, psychosis, and sleep disorders. Sleep disturbances, which include sleep fragmentation, daytime somnolence, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome (RLS, nightmares, and rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD, are estimated to occur in 60% to 98% of patients with PD. For years nonmotor symptoms received little attention from clinicians and researchers, but now these symptoms are known to be significant predictors of morbidity in determining quality of life, costs of disease, and rates of institutionalization. A discussion of the clinical aspects, pathophysiology, evaluation techniques, and treatment options for the sleep disorders that are encountered with PD is presented.

  7. Blood-based biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Lama M; Stern, Matthew B; Chen-Plotkin, Alice

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for biomarkers to diagnose Parkinson's disease (PD), assess disease severity, and prognosticate course. Various types of biologic specimens are potential candidates for identifying biomarkers--defined here as surrogate indicators of physiological or pathophysiological states--but blood has the advantage of being minimally invasive to obtain. There are, however, several challenges to identifying biomarkers in blood. Several candidate biomarkers identified in other diseases or in other types of biological fluids are being pursued as blood-based biomarkers in PD. In addition, unbiased discovery is underway using techniques including metabolomics, proteomics, and gene expression profiling. In this review, we summarize these techniques and discuss the challenges and successes of blood-based biomarker discovery in PD. Blood-based biomarkers that are discussed include α-synuclein, DJ-1, uric acid, epidermal growth factor, apolipoprotein-A1, and peripheral inflammatory markers.

  8. Increased intracranial volume in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Katja; Karlsborg, Merete; Hansen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to diagnose and distinguish from each other. STUDY AIMS AND METHODS: Patients with PD and MSA and controls were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using tissue...... segmentation and outlining of regions in order to identify regional volume changes that might be useful in the diagnosis of the two diseases. RESULTS: Patients with PD had significantly larger intracranial volumes (ICVs) and significantly smaller putaminal and sustantia nigra volumes than controls. MSA...... or compensatory responses to early CNS damage. Atrophy of the amygdala in MSA patients has not been demonstrated with MR before. It might explain why these patients can have hyposmia. The putaminal atrophy found in the PD group may be a trait of the later stages of PD. Segmentation of the substantia nigra can...

  9. Restless legs syndrome and its associated risk factors in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmin, Shahrul; Khairul Anuar, Abdul Manaf; Nafisah, Wan Yahya; Tan, Hui Jan; Raymond, Azman Ali; Hanita, Othman; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Norlinah, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Restless legs syndrome has been shown to negatively impact the quality of life of patients. Studies have shown an association between restless legs syndrome and Parkinson's disease. We attempted to investigate the prevalence of restless legs syndrome in Parkinson's disease patients and to identify associated risk factors. Method. This was a cross-sectional study among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Exclusion criterion was a Mini Mental State Examination score of less than 21/30. The International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group criterion was used to identify patients with restless legs syndrome. Results. A total of 113 patients were recruited. The prevalence rate of restless legs syndrome in our cohort was 9.7% and was significantly associated with a younger onset of Parkinson's disease (P = 0.023), male gender (P = 0.045), higher Mini Mental State Examination score (P = 0.004), and less advanced Hoehn & Yahr stage (P = 0.014). Conclusion. The prevalence rate of restless legs syndrome in our Parkinson's disease population is in keeping with other studies published worldwide. The significance of the association between a younger onset of Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome needs to be further investigated.

  10. Comparison of a timed motor test battery to the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaxma, C.A.; Bloem, B.R.; Borm, G.F.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.

    2008-01-01

    The most widely used scale currently available for the clinical evaluation of motor dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD)-the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III (UPDRS-III) -is time-consuming, subjective, and has suboptimal sensitivity. A brief timed motor test (TMT) battery could possib

  11. The emergence of Parkinson disease among patients with Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstein, Deborah; Alcalay, Roy; Zimran, Ari

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, several lines of evidence have been presented that document the clinical manifestations, genetic associations, and sub-cellular mechanisms of the inter-relatedness of β-glucocerebrosidase mutations and the emergence of Parkinson disease among carriers and patients with Gaucher disease. This review is an attempt to apprise the reader of the recent literature with the caveat that this is an area of intensive exploration that is constantly being updated because of the immediate clinical ramifications but also because of the impact on our understanding of Parkinson disease, and finally because of the unexpected inter-reactions between these entities on the molecular level. It has been an unexpected happenstance that it has been discovered that a rare monogenetic disease has an interface at many points with a neurological disorder of the elderly that has both familial and sporadic forms: to date there is no cure for either of these disorders.

  12. Diagnostic value of the impairment of olfaction in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaantje Casjens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Olfactory impairment is increasingly recognized as an early symptom in the development of Parkinson's disease. Testing olfactory function is a non-invasive method but can be time-consuming which restricts its application in clinical settings and epidemiological studies. Here, we investigate odor identification as a supportive diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease and estimate the performance of odor subsets to allow a more rapid testing of olfactory impairment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Odor identification was assessed with 16 Sniffin' sticks in 148 Parkinson patients and 148 healthy controls. Risks of olfactory impairment were estimated with proportional odds models. Random forests were applied to classify Parkinson and non-Parkinson patients. Parkinson patients were rarely normosmic (identification of more than 12 odors; 16.8% and identified on average seven odors whereas the reference group identified 12 odors and showed a higher prevalence of normosmy (31.1%. Parkinson patients with rigidity dominance had a twofold greater prevalence of olfactory impairment. Disease severity was associated with impairment of odor identification (per score point of the Hoehn and Yahr rating OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.26-2.77. Age-related impairment of olfaction showed a steeper gradient in Parkinson patients. Coffee, peppermint, and anise showed the largest difference in odor identification between Parkinson patients and controls. Random forests estimated a misclassification rate of 22.4% when comparing Parkinson patients with healthy controls using all 16 odors. A similar rate (23.8% was observed when only the three aforementioned odors were applied. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that testing odor identification can be a supportive diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease. The application of only three odors performed well in discriminating Parkinson patients from controls, which can facilitate a wider application of this method

  13. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Yorka; Carrasco, Carlos M; Campos, Joaquín D; Aguirre, Pabla; Núñez, Marco T

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences-mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage-generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation-by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways-is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle.

  14. Non motor subtypes and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, Anna; Jenner, Peter; Todorova, Antoniya; Chaudhuri, K Ray

    2016-01-01

    Non motor symptoms (NMS) represent a significant burden in Parkinson's disease (PD) with numerous studies highlighting the importance of NMS both in "pre-motor" phase of PD as well as throughout the course of disease. In part this has led the international Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society (IPMDS) task force to attempt a re-definition of PD incorporating NMS and not base the diagnosis solely on motor symptoms. While motor subtypes within PD have been recognized and researched, recent clinical and neurobiological research suggests the existence of discrete non motor subtypes in PD, particularly in untreated (drug naïve) and early PD patients. Several independent observers have reported specific "clusters of NMS dominant PD" using a data driven approach in early and untreated PD patients while others have reported on the burden of NMS in untreated PD and specific NMS dominant phenotypes in untreated or treated PD using observational case series based data. In this review we report on specific NMS dominant phenotypes of PD as described in the literature using clinical observational studies and address pathophysiological concepts. A proposal for several NMS subtypes are reported combining clinical reports with, where possible, evidence base supporting probable biomarkers.

  15. Parkinson's disease biomarkers program brain imaging repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Edward; Du, Guangwei; Babcock, Debra; Huang, Xuemei; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-01-01

    The Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP) is a multi-site study designed to identify Parkinson's disease (PD) biomarkers that can be used to improve the understanding of PD pathophysiology and to develop tools that provide novel measures to evaluate PD clinical trials. The PDBP consortium comprises numerous individual projects of which two are specifically geared to the development of brain imaging markers for diagnosis, progression, and prognosis of PD or related disorders. All study data from PD patients, atypical Parkinsonian patients, patients with essential tremor, and healthy controls collected from the sites are integrated in the PDBP database and will be publically available. All subjects are asked to submit blood samples, and undergo a battery of clinical evaluations that cover motor, cognitive, and other background information. In addition, a subset of subjects contributed cerebrospinal fluid samples. A restricted access, web-based Data Management Resource facilitates rapid sharing of data and biosamples across the entire PD research community. The PDBP consortium is a useful resource for research and collaboration aimed at the discovery of biomarkers and their use in understanding the pathophysiology of PD.

  16. Plasma urate and Parkinson's disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Eilis J; Gao, Xiang; Weisskopf, Marc G; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Spiegelman, Donna; Ascherio, Alberto

    2010-09-15

    Plasma urate has been consistently associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease in men, but it is less clear if this relation exists in women. Between 1990 and 2004, the authors conducted a nested case-control study among participants of the female-only Nurses' Health Study. In controls (n = 504), plasma urate was positively associated with age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, hypertension, and use of diuretics and was inversely associated with physical activity and postmenopausal hormone use, as expected. Mean urate levels were 5.04 mg/dL for cases (n = 101) and 4.86 mg/dL for controls (P = 0.17). The age-, smoking-, and caffeine-adjusted rate ratio comparing women in the highest (≥5.8 mg/dL) with those in the lowest (body mass index, physical activity, history of hypertension, and postmenopausal hormone use did not change the results. Unlike in men, these findings do not support the hypothesis that urate is strongly associated with lower rates of Parkinson's disease among women.

  17. Mapping Nursing language terms of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Hyczy de Siqueira Tosin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Implementing cross-mapping of Nursing language terms with the terminology of NANDA International, contained in records of patients with Parkinson's disease in rehabilitation. METHOD Descriptive study of cross mapping, carried out in three steps. A simple random sample of 67 files of patients who participated in the rehabilitation in the period between March 2009 and April 2013. RESULTS We identified 454 terms of Nursing language that resulted in 54 diagnoses after cross-mapping, present in 11 of the 13 taxonomy domains. The most mapped diagnosis was "Impaired urinary elimination" (59.7%, followed by "Urgent urinary incontinence" (55.2%, "Willingness to self-control improved health" (50.7%, "Constipation" (47.8% and "Compromised physical mobility" (29.9%. Seven described terms were not mapped due to a corresponding defining characteristic being absent. CONCLUSION It was possible to determine the profile of patients, as well as the complexity of nursing care in the rehabilitation of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  18. Apathy and depression in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguru, Miyako; Tachibana, Hisao; Toda, Kazuo; Okuda, Bungo; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and clinical correlates of apathy and depression in Parkinson disease (PD), and to clarify whether apathy can be dissociated from depression. One hundred fifty patients with PD completed the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II), Starkstein's Apathy Scale (AS), and a quality of life (QOL) battery. Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed on the same day. Apathy (AS score > or = 16) was diagnosed in 60% of patients and depression (BDI-II score > or = 14) in 56%. Apathy coexisted with depression in 43% of patients, compared with depression without apathy in 13% and apathy without depression in 17%. Apathy scale score was significantly correlated with UPDRS scores, HY stage, and age, whereas BDI-II score was correlated only with UPDRS scores. Both AS and BDI-II scores were negatively correlated with QOL. However, multiple regression analysis revealed that depression was strongly and negatively associated with emotional well-being and communication, whereas apathy was mainly associated with cognition and stigma. These findings suggest that apathy and depression may be separable in PD, although both are common in patients with PD and are associated with QOL.

  19. Clinical pharmacokinetics of levodopa in parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchine, J R; Shaw, G M

    1976-01-01

    Although levodopa has provided a major advance in the treatment of parkinsonism, its maximum benefits have not yet been realised, in part because of its complicated pharmacokinetics. This review summarises that available pharmacokinetic data involving levodopa, especially as it relates to therapeutic response of parkinsonian patients. A large number of factors, including protein intake, gastric emptying time, pyridoxine ingestion, and dopa decarboxylase activity, affect plasma levels of levodopa attained following oral administration of this drug. Other variables influence the rate of brain uptake of levodopa from the blood. Even so, plasma levodopa concentration correlates significantly with dosage size in a large parkinsonian population and also coincides with therapeutic response in many, but not all, patients. Therefore, in certain instances, valuable information may be derived by correlating clinical response with plasma levodopa concentration. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of homovanillic acid, a major metabolite of dopamine, may have some value in predicting clinical response to levodopa. This relationship, however, has not been firmly established. Concentration of homovanillic acid or levodopa in body fluids may also be closely related to certain adverse side-effects, including abnormal involuntary movements, gastric discomfort and psychiatric disturbances. Evidence indicates that a clearer understanding of levodopa pharmacokinetics may improve the clinical management of parkinsonism.

  20. Recent Advances of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Parkinson's Disease Treatment%帕金森病中医治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; 胡瀛宇; 雒晓东

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a commonly encountered central neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. According to theories of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), PD is characterized by deficiency in the root and excess in the branch. Deficiency was referred to qi-blood deficiency of the liver and kidney. Excess was referred as the wind, fire, phlegm and stasis. Deficiency was the root and excess was the branch. Good efficacies have been obtained by treatment based on syndrome differentiation, treatment with specific prescriptions, acupuncture and moxibustion and comprehensive treatment. Some experiments had been conducted to elucidate its mechanisms. However, no uni-fied standard for therapeutic evaluation, poor control of medicinal quality, inferior quality of designed clinical trials, and unclear treatment mechanism in the clinical study on therapeutic effect of PD treatment with TCM require fur-ther studied.%帕金森病是中老年常见的神经系统变性疾病。中医学认为该病总属本虚标实,虚则指肝肾气血亏虚,实则指风、火、痰、瘀,以虚为本、实为标,在辨证论治、专病专方、针灸治疗及综合治疗方面取得了较好的疗效,并对其作用机制进行了一定的实验研究。但中医治疗帕金森病的临床研究的疗效评定标准尚不统一,药物质量控制差,临床研究质量不高,治疗作用机制尚不明确,有待进一步的研究。

  1. Using 'omics' to define pathogenesis and biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, W Michael; Bammler, Theo K; Lin, Yvonne; Pan, Sheng; Zhang, Jing

    2010-06-01

    Although great effort has been put forth to uncover the complex molecular mechanisms exploited in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, a satisfactory explanation remains to be discovered. The emergence of several -omics techniques, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have been integral in confirming previously identified pathways that are associated with dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequently Parkinson's disease, including mitochondrial and proteasomal function and synaptic neurotransmission. Additionally, these unbiased techniques, particularly in the brain regions uniquely associated with the disease, have greatly enhanced our ability to identify novel pathways, such as axon-guidance, that are potentially involved in Parkinson's pathogenesis. A comprehensive appraisal of the results obtained by different -omics has also reconfirmed the increase in oxidative stress as a common pathway likely to be critical in Parkinson's development/progression. It is hoped that further integration of these techniques will yield a more comprehensive understanding of Parkinson's disease etiology and the biological pathways that mediate neurodegeneration.

  2. Blood biomarker for Parkinson disease: peptoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Umar; Zaman, Sayed; Hynan, Linda S; Brown, L Steven; Dewey, Richard B; Karp, David; German, Dwight C

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Because dopaminergic neuronal loss begins years before motor symptoms appear, a biomarker for the early identification of the disease is critical for the study of putative neuroprotective therapies. Brain imaging of the nigrostriatal dopamine system has been used as a biomarker for early disease along with cerebrospinal fluid analysis of α-synuclein, but a less costly and relatively non-invasive biomarker would be optimal. We sought to identify an antibody biomarker in the blood of PD patients using a combinatorial peptoid library approach. We examined serum samples from 75 PD patients, 25 de novo PD patients, and 104 normal control subjects in the NINDS Parkinson’s Disease Biomarker Program. We identified a peptoid, PD2, which binds significantly higher levels of IgG3 antibody in PD versus control subjects (P<0.0001) and is 68% accurate in identifying PD. The PD2 peptoid is 84% accurate in identifying de novo PD. Also, IgG3 levels are significantly higher in PD versus control serum (P<0.001). Finally, PD2 levels are positively correlated with the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale score (r = 0.457, P<0001), a marker of disease severity. The PD2 peptoid may be useful for the early-stage identification of PD, and serve as an indicator of disease severity. Additional studies are needed to validate this PD biomarker. PMID:27812535

  3. Diabetes and the risk of developing Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schernhammer, Eva; Hansen, Johnni; Rugbjerg, Kathrine;

    2011-01-01

    Insulin contributes to normal brain function. Previous studies have suggested associations between midlife diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Using Danish population registers, we investigated whether a history of diabetes or the use of antidiabetes drugs...

  4. Inflammation in Parkinson's disease: role of glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, María-Trinidad; Estrada, Cristina; Maatouk, Layal; Vyas, Sheela

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a major characteristic feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Studies in PD patients show evidence of augmented levels of potent pro-inflammatory molecules e.g., TNF-α, iNOS, IL-1β whereas in experimental Parkinsonism it has been consistently demonstrated that dopaminergic neurons are particularly vulnerable to activated glia releasing these toxic factors. Recent genetic studies point to the role of immune system in the etiology of PD, thus in combination with environmental factors, both peripheral and CNS-mediated immune responses could play important roles in onset and progression of PD. Whereas microglia, astrocytes and infiltrating T cells are known to mediate chronic inflammation, the roles of other immune-competent cells are less well understood. Inflammation is a tightly controlled process. One major effector system of regulation is HPA axis. Glucocorticoids (GCs) released from adrenal glands upon stimulation of HPA axis, in response to either cell injury or presence of pathogen, activate their receptor, GR. GR regulates inflammation both through direct transcriptional action on target genes and by indirectly inhibiting transcriptional activities of transcriptional factors such as NF-κB, AP-1 or interferon regulatory factors. In PD patients, the HPA axis is unbalanced and the cortisol levels are significantly increased, implying a deregulation of GR function in immune cells. In experimental Parkinsonism, the activation of microglial GR has a crucial effect in diminishing microglial cell activation and reducing dopaminergic degeneration. Moreover, GCs are also known to regulate human brain vasculature as well as blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability, any dysfunction in their actions may influence infiltration of cytotoxic molecules resulting in increased vulnerability of dopamine neurons in PD. Overall, deregulation of glucocorticoid receptor actions is likely important in dopamine neuron degeneration through establishment of chronic

  5. Glucocerebrosidase activity in Parkinson's disease with and without GBA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalay, Roy N; Levy, Oren A; Waters, Cheryl C; Fahn, Stanley; Ford, Blair; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Mazzoni, Pietro; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Gan-Or, Ziv; Rouleau, Guy A; Chung, Wendy K; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Marder, Karen; Zhang, Xiaokui

    2015-09-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations have been associated with Parkinson's disease in numerous studies. However, it is unknown whether the increased risk of Parkinson's disease in GBA carriers is due to a loss of glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity. We measured glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots in patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 517) and controls (n = 252) with and without GBA mutations. Participants were recruited from Columbia University, New York, and fully sequenced for GBA mutations and genotyped for the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, the most common autosomal dominant mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots was measured by a mass spectrometry-based assay and compared among participants categorized by GBA mutation status and Parkinson's disease diagnosis. Parkinson's disease patients were more likely than controls to carry the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (n = 39, 7.5% versus n = 2, 0.8%, P Parkinson's risk but not with Gaucher disease (E326K, P = 0.009; T369M, P Parkinson's disease were considered, they had lower mean glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity than controls (11.14 µmol/l/h versus 11.85 µmol/l/h, P = 0.011). Difference compared to controls persisted in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (after exclusion of all GBA and LRRK2 carriers; 11.53 µmol/l/h, versus 12.11 µmol/l/h, P = 0.036) and after adjustment for age and gender (P = 0.012). Interestingly, LRRK2 G2019S carriers (n = 36), most of whom had Parkinson's disease, had higher enzymatic activity than non-carriers (13.69 µmol/l/h versus 11.93 µmol/l/h, P = 0.002). In patients with idiopathic Parkinson's, higher glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity was associated with longer disease duration (P = 0.002) in adjusted models, suggesting a milder disease course. We conclude that lower glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity is strongly associated with GBA mutations, and modestly with idiopathic Parkinson

  6. Parkinson's disease: evidence for environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieburtz, Karl; Wunderle, Kathryn B

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has no known cause. Although recent research has focused particularly on genetic causes of PD, environmental causes also play a role in developing the disease. This article reviews environmental factors that may increase the risk of PD, as well as the evidence behind those factors. Enough evidence exists to suggest that age has a causal relationship to PD. Significant evidence exists that gender, tobacco use, and caffeine consumption are also associated with the development of PD. Other environmental factors (pesticide exposure, occupation, blood urate levels, NSAID use, brain injury, and exercise) have limited or conflicting evidence of a relationship to PD. Future research must not neglect the impact of these environmental factors on the development of PD, especially with respect to potential gene-environment interactions.

  7. Limitations of Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Potashkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cases of Parkinson's disease (PD are sporadic. When choosing an animal model for idiopathic PD, one must consider the extent of similarity or divergence between the physiology, anatomy, behavior, and regulation of gene expression between humans and the animal. Rodents and nonhuman primates are used most frequently in PD research because when a Parkinsonian state is induced, they mimic many aspects of idiopathic PD. These models have been useful in our understanding of the etiology of the disease and provide a means for testing new treatments. However, the current animal models often fall short in replicating the true pathophysiology occurring in idiopathic PD, and thus results from animal models often do not translate to the clinic. In this paper we will explain the limitations of animal models of PD and why their use is inappropriate for the study of some aspects of PD.

  8. Factors affecting levodopa effects in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa N

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Levodopa is the gold standard for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD because of its outstanding clinical efficacy. However, the majority of patients experience various adverse reactions, including the wearing-off phenomenon, the on-off phenomenon, dyskinesia and psychiatric symptoms. The response to levodopa depends not only on the intrinsic responsiveness of the patients, but also on various other important factors including the type of levodopa preparation, its absorption/metabolism, the blood-brain barrier, age at onset of disease and concomitant use of anti-parkinsonian drugs. This review summarizes factors which influence the effects of levodopa in PD. To minimize levodopa-induced adverse reactions and to relieve long-term parkinsonian symptoms, levodopa therapy should be conducted by taking these factors into consideration.

  9. Health and social problems of Parkinson´s disease

    OpenAIRE

    PAŤHOVÁ, Eva

    2007-01-01

    The Parkinson´s disease is a chronic disease whose syptomps affect human life to a consederable extent. If follows the results of the research that seniors have a knowledge in the basic fields, i.e. they know what physical system is affected by the Parkinson´s disease has a slow, sneak course. they are also aware of the most frequent method of therapy (pharmacological) and know that the Parkinson´s disease often stimulates tendčency to depresssions. However, few of the questioned seniors were...

  10. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Parkinson's Disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Beate; Lee, Pei-Chen; Hansen, Johnni

    2016-01-01

    air pollution and Parkinson's disease. METHODS: In a case-control study of 1,696 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients identified from Danish hospital registries and diagnosed 1996-2009 and 1,800 population controls matched by gender and year of birth we assessed long-term traffic-related air pollutant......OBJECTIVE: Very little is currently known about air pollutants' adverse effects on neurodegenerative diseases even though recent studies have linked particulate exposures to brain pathologies associated with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Here we investigate long-term exposure to traffic-related...

  11. Parkinson's disease--the continuing search for biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, David P; Michell, Andrew W; Barker, Roger A

    2011-03-01

    There is currently no well-established biomarker for Parkinson's disease. The need to better diagnose the condition, define the subtypes of disease, and follow its course independent of any symptomatic drug effects is well-established. In this review, we will begin by reviewing the evidence for biological fluid biomarkers in Parkinson's disease. We will then touch upon the role of brain imaging in diagnosis and defining prognosis, as well as the value of studying motor phenotype and its potential applications for characterising Parkinson's disease subtypes with differing natural histories.

  12. α-Synuclein inclusions in the skin of Parkinson's disease and parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objective The presence in the brain of α-synuclein containing Lewy neurites, or bodies, is the histological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The discovery of α-synuclein aggregates in nerve endings of the heart, digestive tract, and skin has lent support to the concept of PD as a systemic disease. Our goals were, first, to demonstrate the presence of α-synuclein inclusions in the skin and, second, to detect quantitative differences between patients with PD and atypical parkinsonism (AP)....

  13. Understanding Parkinson Disease: A Complex and Multifaceted Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna, Apoorva; Alexander, Sheila A

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson disease is an incredibly complex and multifaceted illness affecting millions of people in the United States. Parkinson disease is characterized by progressive dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction and loss, leading to debilitating motor, cognitive, and behavioral symptoms. Parkinson disease is an enigmatic illness that is still extensively researched today to search for a better understanding of the disease, develop therapeutic interventions to halt or slow progression of the disease, and optimize patient outcomes. This article aims to examine in detail the normal function of the basal ganglia and dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, the etiology and pathophysiology of Parkinson disease, related signs and symptoms, current treatment, and finally, the profound impact of understanding the disease on nursing care.

  14. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... areas of its research: MedlinePlus . medlineplus.gov . Type "Parkinson's disease" in the Search box. NIHSeniorHealth —Parkinson's Disease http:// ...

  15. Activity of the basal ganglia in Parkinson`s disease estimated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohye, Chihiro [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-04-01

    Positron emission tomographic (PET) studies on the local cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolic rate, glucose metabolic rate in the basal ganglia of Parkinson`s disease are reviewed. PET has demonstrated that blood flow was decreased in the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal region, of Parkinson`s disease and that specific change in blood flow or metabolic rate in the basal ganglia was detected only in patients with hemi-parkinsonism. In authors` study on PET using {sup 18}FDG in patients with tremor type and rigid type Parkinson`s disease, changes in blood flow and metabolic rate were minimal at the basal ganglia level in tremor type patients, but cortical blood flow was decreased and metabolic rate was more elevated in the basal ganglia in rigid type patients. These findings were correlated with depth micro-recordings obtained by stereotactic pallidotomy. PET studies have also revealed that activity in the nerve terminal was decreased with decreasing dopamine and that dopamine (mainly D{sub 2}) activity was remarkably increased. PET studies with specific tracers are promising in providing more accurate information about functional state of living human brain with minimal invasion to patients. (N.K.).

  16. [Functional imaging of deep brain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilker, R

    2010-10-01

    Functional brain imaging allows the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the living human brain to be investigated. In patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), positron emission tomography (PET) studies were undertaken at rest as well as under motor, cognitive or behavioral activation. DBS leads to a reduction of abnormal PD-related network activity in the motor system, which partly correlates with the improvement of motor symptoms. The local increase of energy consumption within the direct target area suggests a predominant excitatory influence of the stimulation current on neuronal tissue. Remote effects of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on frontal association cortices indicate an interference of stimulation energy with associative and limbic basal ganglia loops. Taken together, functional brain imaging provides very valuable data for advancement of the DBS technique in PD therapy.

  17. [Non-invasive brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajo, Gianandrea; Pollak, Pierre; Lüscher, Christian; Benninger, David

    2015-04-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a major socio-economic burden increasing with the aging population. In advanced PD, the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses a therapeutic challenge. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) as an alternative therapeutic tool. NIBS could offer an alternative approach for patients at risk who are excluded from surgery and/or to treat refractory symptoms. The treatment of the freezing of gait, a major cause of disability and falls in PD patients, could be enhanced by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). A therapeutic study is currently performed at the Department of Neurology at the CHUV.

  18. Dependency and transfer incomes in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starhof, Charlotte Chrom; Anker, Niels; Henriksen, Tove;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population above 65 years of age. The aim of this study was to define the estimated Danish IPD population and to elucidate source of income and labour market affiliation...... by the Danish Parkinson Association. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  19. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  20. High prevalence of Parkinson's disease in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Joensen, P; Bünger, N

    1997-01-01

    We used several case-findings methods and strict criteria for case ascertainment to diagnose parkinsonism and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) in the Faroe Islands. In the last few years before the prevalence date of July 1, 1995, we searched various registries from pharmacies, hospitals, and ...

  1. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: The contribution of cerebral metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Aminian, Kelly; Li, Crystal; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease associated with a feeling of overwhelming lack of energy. The aim of this study was to identify the neural substrates that may contribute to the development of fatigue in Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three Parkinson's disease patients meeting UK Brain Bank criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited and completed the 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET scan. The metabolic activities of Parkinson's disease patients with fatigue were compared to those without fatigue using statistical parametric mapping analysis. The Parkinson's disease group exhibiting higher level of fatigue showed anti-correlated metabolic changes in cortical regions associated with the salience (i.e., right insular region) and default (i.e., bilateral posterior cingulate cortex) networks. The metabolic abnormalities detected in these brain regions displayed a significant correlation with level of fatigue and were associated with a disruption of the functional correlations with different cortical areas. These observations suggest that fatigue in Parkinson's disease may be the expression of metabolic abnormalities and impaired functional interactions between brain regions linked to the salience network and other neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:283-292, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Clinical profile of parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease in Lagos, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojo Oluwadamilola O

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current data on the pattern of parkinsonism and Parkinson's disease in Nigerians are sparse. This database was designed to document the clinical profile of PD in Nigerians, and compare this to prior observations. Methods A database of patients presenting to the Neurology out-patients clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital was established in October 1996. Demographic and clinical data at presentation (disease stage using Hoehn and Yahr scale; 'off' state severity on the Unified Parkinson's disease Rating Scale were documented for patients diagnosed with parkinsonism between October 1996 and December 2006. Cases were classified as Parkinson's disease or secondary parkinsonism (in the presence of criteria suggestive of a secondary aetiology. Results The hospital frequency of parkinsonism (over a 2-year period, and relative to other neurologic disorders was 1.47% (i.e. 20/1360. Of the 124 patients with parkinsonism, 98 (79.0% had PD, while 26 (21.0% had secondary parkinsonism. Mean age (SD at onset of PD (61.5 (10.0 years was slightly higher than for secondary parkinsonism (57.5 (14.0 years (P = 0.10. There was a male preponderance in PD (3.3 to 1 and secondary parkinsonism (2.7 to 1, while a positive family history of parkinsonism was present in only 1.02% (1/98 of PD. There was a modestly significant difference in age at onset (SD of PD in men (60.3 (10.4 compared to women (65.2 (7.9 (T = 2.08; P = 0.04. The frequency of young onset PD (≤ 50 years was 16.3% (16/98. The mean time interval from onset of motor symptoms to diagnosis of PD was 24.6 ± 26.1 months with majority presenting at a median 12 months from onset. On the H&Y scale, severity of PD at presentation was a median 2.0 (range 1 to 4. PD disease subtype was tremor-dominant in 31 (31.6%, mixed 54 (55.1% and akinetic-rigid 14 (14.3%. Hypertension was present as a co-morbidity in 20 (20.4%, and diabetes in 6 (6.12%. Conclusions The clinical profile of PD in

  3. Daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: a reappraisal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Cochen De Cock

    Full Text Available Excessive daytime sleepiness is a frequent complaint in Parkinson's disease (PD; however the frequency and risk factors for objective sleepiness remain mostly unknown. We investigated both the frequency and determinants of self-reported and objective daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD using a wide range of potential predictors.One hundred and thirty four consecutive patients with PD, without selection bias for sleep complaint, underwent a semi-structured clinical interview and a one night polysomnography followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT. Demographic characteristics, medical history, PD course and severity, daytime sleepiness, depressive and insomnia symptoms, treatment intake, pain, restless legs syndrome, REM sleep behaviour disorder, and nighttime sleep measures were collected. Self-reported daytime sleepiness was defined by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS score above 10. A mean sleep latency on MSLT below 8 minutes defined objective daytime sleepiness.Of 134 patients with PD, 46.3% had subjective and only 13.4% had objective sleepiness with a weak negative correlation between ESS and MSLT latency. A high body mass index (BMI was associated with both ESS and MSLT, a pain complaint with ESS, and a higher apnea/hypopnea index with MSLT. However, no associations were found between both objective and subjective sleepiness, and measures of motor disability, disease onset, medication (type and dose, depression, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, REM sleep behaviour disorder and nighttime sleep evaluation.We found a high frequency of self-reported EDS in PD, a finding which is however not confirmed by the gold standard neurophysiological evaluation. Current treatment options for EDS in PD are very limited; it thus remains to be determined whether decreasing pain and BMI in association with the treatment of sleep apnea syndrome would decrease significantly daytime sleepiness in PD.

  4. Computational intelligence for target assessment in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheli-Tzanakou, Evangelia; Hamilton, J. L.; Zheng, J.; Lehman, Richard M.

    2001-11-01

    Recent advances in image and signal processing have created a new challenging environment for biomedical engineers. Methods that were developed for different fields are now finding a fertile ground in biomedicine, especially in the analysis of bio-signals and in the understanding of images. More and more, these methods are used in the operating room, helping surgeons, and in the physician's office as aids for diagnostic purposes. Neural Network (NN) research on the other hand, has gone a long way in the past decade. NNs now consist of many thousands of highly interconnected processing elements that can encode, store and recall relationships between different patterns by altering the weighting coefficients of inputs in a systematic way. Although they can generate reasonable outputs from unknown input patterns, and can tolerate a great deal of noise, they are very slow when run on a serial machine. We have used advanced signal processing and innovative image processing methods that are used along with computational intelligence for diagnostic purposes and as visualization aids inside and outside the operating room. Applications to be discussed include EEGs and field potentials in Parkinson's disease along with 3D reconstruction of MR or fMR brain images in Parkinson's patients, are currently used in the operating room for Pallidotomies and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS).

  5. Copper dyshomoeostasis in Parkinson's disease: implications for pathogenesis and indications for novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Katherine M; Mercer, Julian F B; Chen, Nicholas; Double, Kay L

    2016-04-01

    Copper is a biometal essential for normal brain development and function, thus copper deficiency or excess results in central nervous system disease. Well-characterized disorders of disrupted copper homoeostasis with neuronal degeneration include Menkes disease and Wilson's disease but a large body of evidence also implicates disrupted copper pathways in other neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disease and prion diseases. In this short review we critically evaluate the data regarding changes in systemic and brain copper levels in Parkinson's disease, where alterations in brain copper are associated with regional neuronal cell death and disease pathology. We review copper regulating mechanisms in the human brain and the effects of dysfunction within these systems. We then examine the evidence for a role for copper in pathogenic processes in Parkinson's disease and consider reports of diverse copper-modulating strategies in in vitro and in vivo models of this disorder. Copper-modulating therapies are currently advancing through clinical trials for Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease and may also hold promise as disease modifying agents in Parkinson's disease.

  6. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauminger, E. R.; Nowik, I.

    1998-12-01

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be ~ 160 μg/g wet tissue and ~ 670 μg/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  7. Iron in Parkinson disease, blood diseases, malaria and ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauminger, E.R.; Nowik, I. [Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    1998-12-15

    The concentration of iron in Substantia nigra, the part of the brain which is involved in Parkinson disease, has been found by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) to be {approx} 160 {mu}g/g wet tissue and {approx} 670 {mu}g/g dry weight, both in control and Parkinson samples. All the iron observed by MS in these samples is ferritin-like iron. In several blood diseases, large amounts of ferritin-like iron have been observed in red blood cells. Desferral removed iron from serum, but not from red blood cells. The iron compound in the malarial pigment of human blood infected by P. falciparum was found to be hemin-like, whereas the pigment iron in rats infected by P. berghei was different from any known iron porphyrin.

  8. Anchanling reduces pathology in a lactacystin- induced Parkinson's disease model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghong Li; Zhengzhi Wu; Xiaowei Gao; Qingwei Zhu; Yu Jin; Anmin Wu; Andrew C. J. Huang

    2012-01-01

    A rat model of Parkinson's disease was induced by injecting lactacystin stereotaxically into the left mesencephalic ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. After rats were intragastrically perfused with Anchanling, a Chinese medicine, mainly composed of magnolol, for 5 weeks, when compared with Parkinson's disease model rats, tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased, α-synuclein and ubiquitin expression was decreased, substantia nigra cell apoptosis was reduced, and apomorphine-induced rotational behavior was improved. Results suggested that Anchanling can ameliorate Parkinson's disease pathology possibly by enhancing degradation activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  9. Problems associated with fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyhlén, Jakob; Constantinescu, Radu; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on biochemical markers that may be used in the diagnostics of Parkinson's disease and associated disorders, and to identify early cases and stratify patients into subgroups. We present an updated account of some currently available candidate fluid biomarkers, and discuss their diagnostic performance and limitations. We also discuss some of the general problems with Parkinson's disease biomarkers and possible ways of moving forward. It may be concluded that a diagnostically useful fluid biomarker for Parkinson's disease is yet to be identified. However, some interesting candidates exist and may prove useful in the future, alone or when analyzed together in patterns.

  10. Neuropathology and Neurochemistry of Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Isidro Ferrer

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is no longer considered a complex motor disorder characterized by Parkinsonism but rather a systemic disease with variegated non-motor deficits and neurological symptoms, including impaired olfaction, autonomic failure, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric symptoms. Many of these alterations appear before or in parallel with motor deficits and then worsen with disease progression. Although there is a close relation between motor symptoms and the presence of Lewy bodies...

  11. Mechanisms of body weight fluctuations in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Andrea; Lhommée, Eugénie; Krack, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Typical body weight changes are known to occur in Parkinson's disease (PD). Weight loss has been reported in early stages as well as in advanced disease and malnutrition may worsen the clinical state of the patient. On the other hand, an increasing number of patients show weight gain under dopamine replacement therapy or after surgery. These weight changes are multifactorial and involve changes in energy expenditure, perturbation of homeostatic control, and eating behavior modulated by dopaminergic treatment. Comprehension of the different mechanisms contributing to body weight is a prerequisite for the management of body weight and nutritional state of an individual PD patient. This review summarizes the present knowledge and highlights the necessity of evaluation of body weight and related factors, as eating behavior, energy intake, and expenditure in PD.

  12. Parkinson's disease--challenges in new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Tomislav; Mahović, Darija

    2008-12-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. Treatment aims in IPD include the provision of symptomatic relief reduction of functional disability, halting or slowing of the neurodegenerative process, and the prevention of long-term complications by proper initiation of therapy. At present, pharmacotherapeutic strategies allow the amelioration of motor symptoms of IPD only, whereas non-motor manifestations are not helped by dopamine replacement strategies. In addition, levodopa-induced fluctuation and dyskinesia are still challenging, particularly in long-term treatment. Despite advances in pharmacotherapy that have improved quality of life for these patients, the mortality rate remains largely unchanged. Sustained interest in IPD will hopefully allow increased funding of research to develop new and better treatments.

  13. Visual hallucinations in photographs in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaou, Okeanis; Saint-Hilaire, Marie; Friedman, Joseph

    2013-05-22

    Visual hallucinations are reported in 16-37% of drug-treated patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and are the most common hallucinations in PD. We report two patients with PD with symptoms that uniquely integrate visual hallucinations and delusions. We report two cases of patients with PD with visual hallucinations who saw the persistence of these hallucinations in photographs. These pictures were taken to prove the absence of these hallucinations. We believe this is the first description of this peculiar phenomenon, in which hallucinations or illusions could be replicated in photographs. Both patients had delusions associated with the images and we speculate that the images they saw in the photographs represent a further delusion, hence a 'delusional hallucination' or 'delusional illusion.' We believe that delusions fostering hallucinations are rare.

  14. Parkinson's disease pharmacogenomics: new findings and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher-Schuh, Artur F; Rieder, Carlos R M; Hutz, Mara H

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is unique among neurodegenerative disorders because a highly effective pharmacological symptomatic treatment is available. The marked variability in drug response and in adverse profiles associated with this treatment led to the search of genetic markers associated with these features. We present a review of the literature on PD pharmacogenetics to provide a critical discussion of the current findings, new approaches, limitations and recommendations for future research. Pharmacogenetics studies in this field have assessed several outcomes and genes, with special focus on dopaminergic genes, mainly DRD2, which is the most important receptor in nigrostriatal pathway. The heterogeneity in methodological strategies employed by different studies is impressive. The question of whether PD pharmacogenetics studies will improve clinical management by causing a shift from a trial-and-error approach to a pharmacological regimen that takes into account the individual variability remains an open question. Collaborative longitudinal studies with larger sample sizes, better outcome definitions and replication studies are required.

  15. Update on Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Hallett, M.D

    2000-01-01

    @@Prevention The best treatment is to prevent the illness in the first place or to retard its progression. There is considerable new information about Parkinson's disease genetics and pathophysiology that hopefully will lead to therapy in this regard, but there is still nothing definitive. The only medication for which there are some reasonable data is selegiline, a monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor. This drug actually has a symptomatic effect since it prevents the breakdown ofdopamine in the brain. Some trials have shown a beneficial effect separate from its symptomatic effect. The situation is rather controversial, however, and in one study there was an excess of mortality. {4}There are no supportive data for antioxidants such as vitamin E, and a trial of the neurotrophic factor GDNF was not positive.

  16. Frontostriatal Cognitive Staging in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl de la Fuente-Fernández

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and behavioural disorders are often encountered in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD. A simple PD-related frontostriatal cognitive dysfunction (PDFCD staging is proposed. Executive dysfunction and mental fatigue (stage I, depression/anxiety (stage IIa, apathy/pain (stage IIb, and dementia (stage III reflect a sequential process of dopamine depletion occurring in different regions of the striatum (stages I and II and the frontal cortex (stage III. In addition to these nonmotor manifestations present in the unmedicated (OFF state, the PDFCD model also predicts a number of complications related to dopaminergic treatment (ON state, from impulse control disorders (stages I and IIa to hallucinations (stage IIb and psychosis (stage III. Although the model admittedly needs further refinements, it provides a framework for hypothesis testing and may help clinicians optimize therapeutic strategies.

  17. Classical eyeblink conditioning in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, I; Schugens, M M; Breitenstein, C; Topka, H; Spieker, S

    1996-11-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) show impairments of a range of motor learning tasks, including tracking or serial reaction time task learning. Our study investigated whether such deficits would also be seen on a simple type of motor learning, classic conditioning of the eyeblink response. Medicated and unmediated patients with PD showed intact unconditioned eyeblink responses and significant learning across acquisition; the learning rates did not differ from those of healthy control subjects. The overall frequency of conditioned responses was significantly higher in the medicated patients with PD relative to control subjects, and there was also some evidence of facilitation in the unmedicated patients with PD. Conditioning of electrodermal and electrocortical responses was comparable in all groups. The findings are discussed in terms of enhanced excitability of brainstem pathways in PD and of the involvement of different neuronal circuits in different types of motor learning.

  18. Autonomic Nervous System Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesiewicz, Theresa A.; Baker, Matthew J.; Wahba, Mervat; Hauser, Robert A.

    2003-03-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction is common in Parkinson's disease (PD), affects 70% to 80% of patients, and causes significant morbidity and discomfort. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction symptoms in PD include sexual dysfunction, swallowing and gastrointestinal disorders, bowel and bladder abnormalities, sleep disturbances, and derangements of cardiovascular regulation, particularly, orthostatic hypotension. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in PD may be caused by an underlying degenerative process that affects the autonomic ganglia, brainstem nuclei, and hypothalamic nuclei. Anti-parkinsonian medications can cause or worsen symptoms of ANS dysfunction. The care of a PD patient with ANS dysfunction relies on its recognition and directed treatment, including coordinated care between the neurologist and appropriate subspecialist. Pharmacotherapy may be useful to treat orthostasis, gastrointestinal, urinary, and sexual dysfunction.

  19. Visuoperceptive region atrophy independent of cognitive status in patients with Parkinson's disease with hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Jennifer G; Stebbins, Glenn T; Dinh, Vy; Bernard, Bryan; Merkitch, Doug; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Goetz, Christopher G

    2014-03-01

    Visual hallucinations are frequent, disabling complications of advanced Parkinson's disease, but their neuroanatomical basis is incompletely understood. Previous structural brain magnetic resonance imaging studies suggest volume loss in the mesial temporal lobe and limbic regions in subjects with Parkinson's disease with visual hallucinations, relative to those without visual hallucinations. However, these studies have not always controlled for the presence of cognitive impairment or dementia, which are common co-morbidities of hallucinations in Parkinson's disease and whose neuroanatomical substrates may involve mesial temporal lobe and limbic regions. Therefore, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging to examine grey matter atrophy patterns associated with visual hallucinations, comparing Parkinson's disease hallucinators to Parkinson's disease non-hallucinators of comparable cognitive function. We studied 50 subjects with Parkinson's disease: 25 classified as current and chronic visual hallucinators and 25 as non-hallucinators, who were matched for cognitive status (demented or non-demented) and age (± 3 years). Subjects underwent (i) clinical evaluations; and (ii) brain MRI scans analysed using whole-brain voxel-based morphometry techniques. Clinically, the Parkinson's disease hallucinators did not differ in their cognitive classification or performance in any of the five assessed cognitive domains, compared with the non-hallucinators. The Parkinson's disease groups also did not differ significantly in age, motor severity, medication use or duration of disease. On imaging analyses, the hallucinators, all of whom experienced visual hallucinations, exhibited grey matter atrophy with significant voxel-wise differences in the cuneus, lingual and fusiform gyri, middle occipital lobe, inferior parietal lobule, and also cingulate, paracentral, and precentral gyri, compared with the non-hallucinators. Grey matter atrophy in the hallucinators occurred

  20. Is acupuncture efficacious therapy in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Jeon, Beom S

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to assess the evidences from recent clinical studies regarding the efficacy of acupuncture on Parkinson's disease. Relevant literatures were searched from 13 databases under the condition "published between 2000 and 2012" with language restrictions. Eleven studies were indentified including 6 randomized clinical trials (RCTs), 4 uncontrolled open label studies, and 1 crossover trial. The number of trials, and their total sample size were not enough to prove the favorable effects of acupuncture. Five studies failed to report proper diagnostic criteria for enrollment. Two of the 6 RCTs did not include the randomization methods and whether the assessors were blinded. Drop-outs were unreported or insufficiently reported in 2 trials. Three RCTs compared the effects of acupuncture with placebo acupuncture. Two of these trials failed to show superiority of acupuncture. One RCT showed beneficial effects of constitutional acupuncture, but not needle acupuncture. Three RCTs that assessed the effects of acupuncture adjunctive to conventional drugs reported beneficial effects of acupuncture. The placebo response to acupuncture was not excluded, because there was no control acupuncture group in these studies. Two uncontrolled studies showed significant positive effects of acupuncture, while other two uncontrolled trials failed. There were no recognized validated acupuncture treatment protocols and a lack of consensus on the location of acupoints. Safety and tolerability were reported only in 5 studies. No study evaluated the long-lasting effect of acupuncture following cessation of the treatment. To date, the evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating Parkinson's disease is not convincing. There are needs for further studies with improved methodological quality.

  1. Stem Cells as In Vitro Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L. Martínez-Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in understanding neurodegenerative cell biology in Parkinson's disease (PD has been hampered by a lack of predictive and relevant cellular models. In addition, the lack of an adequate in vitro human neuron cell-based model has been an obstacle for the uncover of new drugs for treating PD. The ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from PD patients and a refined capacity to differentiate these iPSCs into DA neurons, the relevant disease cell type, promises a new paradigm in drug development that positions human disease pathophysiology at the core of preclinical drug discovery. Disease models derived from iPSC that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established for several monogenic diseases, but iPSC can likewise be used for phenotype-based drug screens in complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances as well as limitations in the use of iPSC technology for modelling PD “in a dish” and for testing compounds against human disease phenotypes in vitro. We discuss how iPSCs are being exploited to illuminate disease pathophysiology, identify novel drug targets, and enhance the probability of clinical success of new drugs.

  2. Freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease: from pathophysiology to emerging therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucca, Alberto; Biagioni, Milton C; Fleisher, Jori E; Agarwal, Shashank; Son, Andre; Kumar, Pawan; Brys, Miroslaw; Di Rocco, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is 'an episodic inability to generate effective stepping in the absence of any known cause other than parkinsonism or high level gait disorders'. FOG is one of the most disabling symptoms in Parkinson's disease, especially in its more advanced stages. Early recognition is important as FOG is related to higher fall risk and poorer prognosis. Although specific treatments are still elusive, there have been recent advances in the development of new therapeutic approaches. The aim of this review is to present the latest knowledge regarding the phenomenology, pathogenesis, diagnostic assessment and conventional treatment of FOG in Parkinson's disease. A review of the evidence supporting noninvasive brain stimulation will follow to highlight the potential of these strategies.

  3. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  4. Eryptosis as a marker of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Swanepoel, Albe C; Buys, Antoinette V; Vermeulen, Natasha; Duim, Wiebren; Kell, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    A major trend in recent Parkinson's disease (PD) research is the investigation of biological markers that could help in identifying at-risk individuals or to track disease progression and response to therapies. Central to this is the knowledge that inflammation is a known hallmark of PD and of many other degenerative diseases. In the current work, we focus on inflammatory signalling in PD, using a systems approach that allows us to look at the disease in a more holistic way. We discuss cyclooxygenases, prostaglandins, thromboxanes and also iron in PD. These particular signalling molecules are involved in PD pathophysiology, but are also very important in an aberrant coagulation/hematology system. We present and discuss a hypothesis regarding the possible interaction of these aberrant signalling molecules implicated in PD, and suggest that these molecules may affect the erythrocytes of PD patients. This would be observable as changes in the morphology of the RBCs and of PD patients relative to healthy controls. We then show that the RBCs of PD patients are indeed rather dramatically deranged in their morphology, exhibiting eryptosis (a kind of programmed cell death). This morphological indicator may have useful diagnostic and prognostic significance. PMID:25411230

  5. Peripheral neuropathy in Parkinson's disease : Levodopa exposure and implications for duodenal delivery [Universally Available

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Thomas; van Laar, Teus; Cornblath, David R.; Odin, Per; Klostermann, Fabian; Grandas, Francisco J.; Ebersbach, Georg; Urban, Peter P.; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Antonini, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, continuous intra-duodenal infusion of levodopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) is an established approach in the management of motor complications that cannot be further improved by conventional oral therapy. In general, tolerability of LCIG has resembl

  6. Axial disability and deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fasano, A.; Aquino, C.C.; Krauss, J.K.; Honey, C.R.; Bloem, B.R.

    2015-01-01

    Axial motor signs-including gait impairment, postural instability and postural abnormalities-are common and debilitating symptoms in patients with advanced Parkinson disease. Dopamine replacement therapy and physiotherapy provide, at best, partial relief from axial motor symptoms. In carefully selec

  7. Understanding the role of the Parkinson's disease nurse specialist in the delivery of apomorphine therpy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Boonpang, Kamolwan; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong

    2016-01-01

    Optimal care of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients should involve a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of which a PD nurse specialist (PDNS) is a key member. The role of a PDNS is particularly prominent in the care of advanced PD patients suitable for apomorphine because, in addition to nursing skills, ...

  8. Proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of Parkinson's disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiguang Guo; Zhongwu Sun; Shifu Xiao; Dongping Liu; Guohua Jin; Ersong Wang; Jiangning Zhou; Jiawei Zhou

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although treatments for PD may be beneficial in the early stages of disease, accurate diagnosis during these stages remains a challenge. An ideal diagnosis for PD should be highly specific and sensitive, as well as be able to predict disease progression.

  9. Physical therapy in Parkinson's disease: evolution and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.J.; Munneke, M.; Nijkrake, M.J.; Kwakkel, G.; Bloem, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are faced with progressively increasing mobility problems. For this reason, many patients require additional physical therapy. Here, we review the professional evolution and scientific validation

  10. Physical therapy in Parkinson's disease: evolution and future challenges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, S.H.J.; Munneke, M.; Nijkrake, M.J.; Kwakkel, G.; Bloem, B.R.

    2009-01-01

    Even with optimal medical management using drugs or neurosurgery, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are faced with progressively increasing mobility problems. For this reason, many patients require additional physical therapy. Here, we review the professional evolution and scientific validation

  11. Risk of Parkinson's disease after hospital contact for head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Ritz, Beate; Korbo, Lise;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a hospital contact for a head injury increases the risk of subsequently developing Parkinson's disease. DESIGN: Population based case-control study. SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 13 695 patients with a primary diagnosis of Parkinson's disease in the Danish national...... of history of head injury. RESULTS: An overall 50% increase in prevalence of hospital contacts for head injury was seen before the first registration of Parkinson's disease in this population (odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 1.7). The observed association was, however, due almost entirely...... to injuries that occurred during the three months before the first record of Parkinson's disease (odds ratio 8.0, 5.6 to 11.6), and no association was found between the two events when they occurred 10 or more years apart (1.1, 0.9 to 1.3). CONCLUSIONS: The steeply increased frequency of hospital contacts...

  12. Glucose metabolism in small subcortical structures in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Hansen, Søren B; Eggers, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests a characteristic pattern of metabolic perturbation in discrete, very small basal ganglia structures. These structures are generally too small to allow valid investigation by conventional positron emission tomography (PET...

  13. How might physical activity benefit patients with Parkinson disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelman, A.D.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Nimwegen, M.L. van; Petzinger, G.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor and nonmotor impairments. These impairments incline many patients towards a sedentary lifestyle, which has many deleterious consequences. Accumulating evidence suggests that patients with PD might benefit from

  14. Dementia with Parkinson's disease: Clinical diagnosis, neuropsychological aspects and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lorenzo Otero

    Full Text Available Abstract Dementia with Parkinson's disease represents a controversial issue in the complex group of alpha-synucleinopathies. The author acknowledges the concept of a "continuum" between Parkinson disease's (PD, Lewy body dementia (LBD, and dementia in Parkinson's disease (PDD. However, the practicing neurologist needs to identify the phenotypic signs of each dementia. The treatment and prognosis are different in spite of the overlaps between them. The main aim of this review was to characterize the clinical diagnoses of dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PDD. Secondarily, the review discussed some epidemiological and neuropsychological issues. Selection of articles was not systematic and reflects the author's opinion, where the main text selected was the recommendations from the Movement Disorder Society Task Force for PDD diagnosis. The Pub Med, OVID, and Proquest data bases were used for the search.

  15. Exploring the Association Between Rosacea and Parkinson Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Hansen, Peter Riis; Gislason, Gunnar H

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The pathogenesis of rosacea is unclear, but increased matrix metalloproteinase target tissue activity appears to play an important role. Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders also display increased matrix metalloproteinase activity that contribute to neuronal loss....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of incident (new-onset) Parkinson disease in patients with rosacea. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A nationwide cohort study of the Danish population was conducted using individual-level linkage of administrative registers. All Danish citizens 18 years or older from.......9 [10.2] years) received a diagnosis of Parkinson disease during the study period and 68 053 individuals (45 712 [67.2%] women; mean age, 42.2 [16.5] years) were registered as having rosacea. The IRs of Parkinson disease per 10 000 person-years were 3.54 (95% CI, 3.49-3.59) in the reference population...

  16. Cause-Specific Mortality Among Spouses of Parkinson Disease Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene; Hansen, Jonni; Ritz, Beate

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Caring for a chronically ill spouse is stressful, but the health effects of caregiving are not fully understood. We studied the effect on mortality of being married to a person with Parkinson disease. METHODS: All patients in Denmark with a first-time hospitalization for Parkinson...... men, being married to a Parkinson disease patient was associated with a slightly higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.06 [95% confidence interval = 1.00-1.11]). Mortality was particularly high for death due to external causes (1.42 [1.09-1.84]) including suicide (1.89 [1...

  17. Parkinson's disease showing progressive conduction aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Harada, Hiromi; Shima, Keisuke; Notoya, Masako; Yamada, Masahito

    2012-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may develop progressive dementia late in their clinical course. Dementia in PD is mostly related to neuropathological findings of extensive Lewy bodies (LBs), with or without the coexistence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Aphasia has been reported in patients with LB diseases with AD pathology; however, there have been no reports of typical PD patients developing progressive aphasia during their clinical course. We describe a female PD patient who later developed progressive conduction aphasia characterized by phonemic paraphasia and disturbance in repetition of short sentences without disturbance in writing or auditory comprehension. No episodes of fluctuations of attention, memory complaints, or planning errors were observed. She experienced episodes of visual hallucination. Her low scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination suggested impairment of orientation and attention, and her scores on Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices test indicated impaired visuospatial functions. However, her cognitive deficits were not sufficiently severe to impair her daily life. Brain magnetic resonance images revealed atrophy of the left superior temporal gyrus and widening of the left sylvian fissure. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed glucose hypometabolism in the left cerebral hemisphere. These findings may be related to conduction aphasia. During the progression of PD lesions, the brainstem LB is assumed to take an upward course, extend to the limbic system, and then extend to the neocortex. Conduction aphasia observed in our patient may be associated with an unusual progression of the LB pathology from the brainstem to the left temporoparietal lobe.

  18. Animal Models of Parkinson's Disease: Vertebrate Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjong; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex genetic disorder that is associated with environmental risk factors and aging. Vertebrate genetic models, especially mice, have aided the study of autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive PD. Mice are capable of showing a broad range of phenotypes and, coupled with their conserved genetic and anatomical structures, provide unparalleled molecular and pathological tools to model human disease. These models used in combination with aging and PD-associated toxins have expanded our understanding of PD pathogenesis. Attempts to refine PD animal models using conditional approaches have yielded in vivo nigrostriatal degeneration that is instructive in ordering pathogenic signaling and in developing therapeutic strategies to cure or halt the disease. Here, we provide an overview of the generation and characterization of transgenic and knockout mice used to study PD followed by a review of the molecular insights that have been gleaned from current PD mouse models. Finally, potential approaches to refine and improve current models are discussed. PMID:22960626

  19. Gastroparesis and Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heetun, Zaid S; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-06-01

    Some of the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms commonly experienced by patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have been attributed to gastroparesis; however, the precise prevalence and relevance of gastric emptying delay in PD is unclear. The definition of gastroparesis varies; currently the most widely accepted definition (from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium) is the presence of appropriate symptoms (including nausea, retching, vomiting, stomach fullness, and inability to finish a meal) for ≥ 12 weeks, together with delayed gastric emptying on scintigraphy and the absence of any obstructive lesions on upper GI endoscopy. In PD patients, gastroparesis has the potential to affect nutrition and quality of life, as well as the absorption of PD medications, including L-dopa. This reduced absorption of L-dopa has implications for the control of the PD motor symptoms for which it is administered. We performed a systematic review of the literature on gastroparesis in PD with the aim of developing an evidence-based approach to its management. Based on this review, we conclude that while gastric emptying has been reported to be frequently delayed in PD, the existing data do not permit definitive conclusions concerning its true prevalence, relationship to the underlying disease process, relevance to PD management, or the optimal therapy of related GI symptoms. Further study of these important issues is, therefore, required.

  20. Impact of Anxiety on Quality of Life in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Kristine K.; Alice Cronin-Golomb

    2012-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), both the patient and the health care provider look for ways to preserve the patient's quality of life. Many studies focus on the impact of depression and motor disability on poor life quality but neglect to examine the role of anxiety. We investigated the impact of anxiety and depression on health-related quality of life in PD, using the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life measure (PDQ-39). Symptoms of anxiety, more than depression, cognitiv...

  1. Elvis is back: musical hallucinations in a Parkinson disease patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Manoj; Giron, Louis T

    2010-08-01

    Hallucinations are common among patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Hallucinations, typically transitory and occurring at night, are classically visual and occur in 30% of treated patients; auditory hallucinations are rare. A musical hallucination (MH) is a rare type of complex auditory hallucination reported in only six PD patients so far. To the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case of a patient with Parkinson disease who experienced auditory and visual MH.

  2. Increase in body weight after pramipexole treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Hatice; Santamaria, Joan; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Marti, Maria J; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2006-11-01

    Body weight changes occur during the clinical course of Parkinson's disease (PD) and with surgical treatment, but the effect of dopaminergic treatment on weight is unknown. Body mass index (BMI), Hamilton depression scale score (HDS), and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III (UPRS-III) were measured before and 3 months after starting pramipexole in 28 PD patients. Pramipexole produced a significant weight increase, as well as motor and mood improvement (P weight gain in PD.

  3. Diagnostic value of the impairment of olfaction in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Olfactory impairment is increasingly recognized as an early symptom in the development of Parkinson's disease. Testing olfactory function is a non-invasive method but can be time-consuming which restricts its application in clinical settings and epidemiological studies. Here, we investigate odor identification as a supportive diagnostic tool for Parkinson's disease and estimate the performance of odor subsets to allow a more rapid testing of olfactory impairment. METHODOLOGY/PRINC...

  4. The role of neuroimaging in the early diagnosis and evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibyl, J; Jennings, D; Tabamo, R; Marek, K

    2005-10-01

    The development of imaging biomarkers which target specific sites in the brain represents a significant advance in neurodegenerative diseases and Parkinson's disease with the promise of new and improved approaches for the early and accurate diagnosis of disease as well as novel ways to monitor patients and assess treatment. The 3 major applications of imaging may play a role in Parkinson's disease include: 1) the use of neuroimaging as a biomarker of disease in order to improve the accuracy, timeliness, and reliability of diagnosis; 2) objective monitoring of the progression of disease to provide a molecular phenotype of Parkinson's disease which may illuminate some of the sources of clinical variability; 3) the evaluation of so-called ''disease-modifying'' treatments designed to retard the progression of disease by interfering with pathways thought implicated in the ongoing neuronal loss or replace dopamine-producing cells. Each of these areas has shown a numbers of critical clinical investigations which have better defined the utility of the imaging tools to these tasks. Nonetheless, current unresolved issues around the clinical role of neuroimaging in monitoring patients over time and validation of quantitative imaging measures of dopaminergic function are immediate issues for the field and the subject of current research efforts and the extension of the lessons learned in Parkinson's to other neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's dementia.

  5. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies.

  6. Nanoparticle technology for treatment of Parkinson's disease: the role of surface phenomena in reaching the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Cortés, Hernán; Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-García, Norberto; Quintanar-Guerrero, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-07-01

    The absence of a definitive treatment for Parkinson's disease has driven the emerging investigation in the search for novel therapeutic alternatives. At present, the formulation of different drugs on nanoparticles has represented several advantages over conventional treatments. This type of multifunctional carrier, owing to its size and composition, has different interactions in biological systems that can lead to a decrease in ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Therefore, this review focuses on the latest advances in obtaining nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease and provides an overview of technical aspects in the design of brain drug delivery of nanoparticles and an analysis of surface phenomena, a key aspect in the development of functional nanoparticles for Parkinson's disease.

  7. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. [Mental time dysfunction in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Kuroda, Takeshi; Futamura, Akinori; Sugimoto, Azusa; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2015-03-01

    Mental time is altered by a number of factors and the underlying neural processing involved is highly complicated. Recent research suggests that mental time in patients with particular neurological diseases is perceptually shorter than in normal individuals. This review introduces mental time dysfunction and a model for processing of mental time in Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Although the two diseases show the same dysfunction of mental time in behavior, we expect the underlying neural mechanism to vary in each disease. It is possible that the dysfunction of mental time in Parkinson's disease is caused by the abnormal striatum acting as a pacemaker, while that in Alzheimer's disease is caused by abnormal hippocampal memory.

  9. 帕金森病手足纹状体畸形的研究进展%Advances in the Study of Striatal Deformities of the Hand and Foot in Parkinson Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳

    2012-01-01

    帕金森病可出现手足畸形,称之为"纹状体手、足",一般多出现于病程晚期,但部分患者在病程初期也可以出现.由于此种畸形的表现较复杂,易误诊为其他疾病,如类风湿性关节炎、骨关节病、运动神经元病等,应引起临床医师的重视.现就帕金森病纹状体手足的临床表现、可能的发病机制、流行病学及治疗等方面的研究进展进行综述.%Deformities of the hand and foot are abnormal postures commonly seen in patients with advanced Parkinson disease,which can also present in the early stages in some patients,called " striatal hand" and " striatal foot". Because of their complicated clinical presentation, the deformities are often misdiagnosed as other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis,orthopaedic problems,and upper-motorneuron syndromes. Here is to make a review on the clinical features of these deformities,possible pathogenesis, epidemiology, and the treatment.

  10. Ipsilateral coordination features for automatic classification of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Fernanda; Atehortúa, Angélica; Martínez, Fabio; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    A reliable diagnosis of the Parkinson Disease lies on the objective evaluation of different motor sub-systems. Discovering specific motor patterns associated to the disease is fundamental for the development of unbiased assessments that facilitate the disease characterization, independently of the particular examiner. This paper proposes a new objective screening of patients with Parkinson, an approach that optimally combines ipsilateral global descriptors. These ipsilateral gait features are simple upper-lower limb relationships in frequency and relative phase spaces. These low level characteristics feed a simple SVM classifier with a polynomial kernel function. The strategy was assessed in a binary classification task, normal against Parkinson, under a leave-one-out scheme in a population of 16 Parkinson patients and 7 healthy control subjects. Results showed an accuracy of 94;6% using relative phase spaces and 82;1% with simple frequency relations.

  11. Drugs in development for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Tom H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2004-07-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) is entering a new and exciting era. Real promise now exists for the clinical application of a large range of molecules in development that will combat different aspects and stages of the condition. These include methyl- and ethyl-esterified forms of L-dopa (etilevodopa and melevodopa), inhibitors of enzymes such as monoamine oxidase type-B (eg, rasagiline), catechol-O-methyl transferase (eg, BIA-3202) and the monoamine re-uptake mechanism (eg, brasofensine). In addition, a range of full and partial dopamine agonists (eg, sumanirole, piribedil and BP-897) and their new formulations, for example, patch delivery systems (eg, rotigotine) are being developed. We also highlight non-dopaminergic treatments that will have wide ranging applications in the treatment of PD and L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. These include alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonists (eg, fipamezole), adenosine A2A receptor antagonists (eg, istradefylline), AMPA receptor antagonists (eg, talampanel), neuronal synchronization modulators (eg, levetiracetam) and agents that interact with serotonergic systems such as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A agonists (eg, sarizotan) and 5-HT2A antagonists (eg, quetiapine). Lastly, we examine a growing number of neuroprotective agents that seek to halt or even reverse disease progression. These include anti-apoptotic kinase inhibitors (eg, CEP-1347), modulators of mitochondrial function (eg, creatine), growth factors (eg, leteprinim), neuroimmunophilins (eg, V-10367), estrogens (eg, MITO-4509), c-synuclein oligomerization inhibitors (eg, PAN-408) and sonic hedgehog ligands.

  12. [Fatigue and weight loss in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2012-04-01

    Fatigue is a common, under recognized, and poorly understood nonmotor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). Fatigue frequently presents early in PD, and its prevalence increases with disease progression, affecting up to 60% of patients. Fatigue has a negative impact on quality of life. Fatigue is often associated with other nonmotor symptoms, including sleep disturbance, excessive daytime sleepiness, and depression. Only a few reports have been published on the treatment of fatigue in PD (methylphenidate, levodopa, and pramipexole). Further well-designed studies, including physiotherapy, are necessary to develop more effective treatments for PD-associated fatigue. A number of patients with PD lose weight because of loss of fat. However, the evolution and determinants of weight loss are not well established. Possible determinants of weight loss in PD include loss of appetite, impaired hand-mouth coordination, difficulty in chewing and dysphagia, nausea, intestinal hypomotility, and increased energy requirements because of muscular rigidity and involuntary movements. Noticeable weight gain has repeatedly been reported after subthalamic or pallidal deep brain stimulation. Because low body weight is associated with negative health effects and a poor prognosis, monitoring weight and nutritional status should be part of PD management.

  13. An objective fluctuation score for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm K Horne

    Full Text Available Establishing the presence and severity of fluctuations is important in managing Parkinson's Disease yet there is no reliable, objective means of doing this. In this study we have evaluated a Fluctuation Score derived from variations in dyskinesia and bradykinesia scores produced by an accelerometry based system.The Fluctuation Score was produced by summing the interquartile range of bradykinesia scores and dyskinesia scores produced every 2 minutes between 0900-1800 for at least 6 days by the accelerometry based system and expressing it as an algorithm.This Score could distinguish between fluctuating and non-fluctuating patients with high sensitivity and selectivity and was significant lower following activation of deep brain stimulators. The scores following deep brain stimulation lay in a band just above the score separating fluctuators from non-fluctuators, suggesting a range representing adequate motor control. When compared with control subjects the score of newly diagnosed patients show a loss of fluctuation with onset of PD. The score was calculated in subjects whose duration of disease was known and this showed that newly diagnosed patients soon develop higher scores which either fall under or within the range representing adequate motor control or instead go on to develop more severe fluctuations.The Fluctuation Score described here promises to be a useful tool for identifying patients whose fluctuations are progressing and may require therapeutic changes. It also shows promise as a useful research tool. Further studies are required to more accurately identify therapeutic targets and ranges.

  14. Epidemiology of psychosis in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fénelon, Gilles; Alves, Guido

    2010-02-15

    Psychotic symptoms are frequent and disabling in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methodological issues in the epidemiology of PD associated psychosis (PDP) include differences in the symptoms assessed, the methods of assessment, and the selection of patients. Most studies are prospective clinic-based cross-sectional studies providing point prevalence rates in samples on dopaminergic treatment. Visual hallucinations are present in about one quarter to one third of the patients, auditory in up to 20%. Tactile/somatic, and olfactory hallucinations are usually not systematically sought. Minor phenomena such as sense of presence and visual illusions affect 17 to 72% of the patients, and delusions about 5%. Lifetime prevalence of visual hallucinations reaches approximately 50%. Prospective longitudinal cohort studies suggest that hallucinations persist and worsen in individual patients, and that their prevalence increases with time. A facilitating role of treatment on PDP is demonstrated at least for dopaminergic agonists, but there is no simple dose-effect relationship between dopaminergic treatment and the presence or severity of hallucinations. The main endogenous non-modifiable risk factor is cognitive impairment. Other associated factors include older age/longer duration of PD, disease severity, altered dream phenomena, daytime somnolence, and possibly depression and dysautonomia. PDP reduces quality of life in patients and increases caregiver distress, and is an independent risk factor for nursing home placement and development of dementia.

  15. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Reichmann, Heinz

    2010-02-15

    Symptoms of cardiovascular dysautonomia are a common occurrence in Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition to this dysautonomia as part of PD itself, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) can be triggered as a side-effect of drug treatment interacting with the ANS or - if prominent and early - an indication of a different disease such as multiple system atrophy (MSA). Various diagnostic tests are available to demonstrate autonomic failure. While autonomic function tests can differentiate parasympathetic from sympathetic dysfunction, cardiac imaging can define the pathophysiologically involved site of a lesion. Standard tests such as 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements can identify significant autonomic failure which needs treatment. The most frequent and disturbing symptom of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction is orthostatic hypotension. Symptoms include generalized weakness, light-headiness, mental "clouding" up to syncope. Factors like heat, food, alcohol, exercise, activities which increase intrathoraric pressure (e.g. defecation, coughing) and certain drugs (e.g. vasodilators) can worsen a probably asymptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Non-medical and medical therapies can help the patient to cope with a disabling symptomatic orthostatic hypotension. Supine hypertension is often associated with orthostatic hypotension. The prognostic role of cardiovagal and baroreflex dysfunction is still not yet known.

  16. Alpha-synuclein and Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Xiaozhong Wang

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the recent progresses on the studies of α-synuclein in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD) and look into the perspective of α-synuclein as a new therapy target.DATA SOURCES: To search the literatures on the progresses of PD studies, especially on the structure, gene expression of α-synuclein and the pathogenesis of PD in Medline from January 1998 to February 2007.Search terms were "Parkinson's disease, α -synuclein" in English.STUDY SELECTION: Initial check the data and choose the original and review articles directly linked to the role of α -synuclein in PD pathogenesis and screening out indirectly discussing articles. Collect the full text and trace the quoting articles and the quoted articles. Only the latest reviews were chosen in Chinese articles.DATA EXTRACTION: There were 424 articles on α-synuclein and its role in the pathogenesis of PD and 43 articles directly related with α -synuclein were chosen among which 12 were reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: α-synuclein is a kind of soluble protein expressed in pre-synapse in central nervous system encoded by gene in homologous chromosome 4q21. It has physiological function in modulating the stability of membrane and neural plasticity. There is a close relationship between gene mutation in α -synuclein and the pathogenesis of PD. Environmental and genetic factors can induce the misfolding of α-synuclein, and secondary structural change can result in oligomer formation which induces a series of cascade reaction to damage dopaminergic system subsequently. Cell and animal transgenic and non-transgenic models are established recently and the important role of α -synuclein in the pathogenesis both of familial and sporadic PD is confirmed. Studies reveal that inhibiting the aggregation of α -synuclein can prevent its neurotoxicity;gene parkin can intercept the cell death pathway triggered by the aggregation of α -synuclein in cytoplasm.CONCLUSION: Gene mutation of α -synuclein and the

  17. Effect of ganglioside and levodopa combined therapy on Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong Li; Nan-Nan Li; Jie Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of ganglioside and levodopa combined therapy on oxidative stress indexes, serum Parkinson related proteins and inflammatory factors of patients with Parkinson's disease.Methods:A total of 110 patients with Parkinson’s disease treated in our hospital were selected, and randomly divided to be the combination group and the control group, 55 cases for each. Patients in control group were treated with levodopa, patients in combination group were provided with ganglioside and levodopa combined therapy. Oxidative stress indexes, serum Parkinson related proteins and serum inflammatory factors for each group of patients were detected before and after treatment.Results:No statistical difference showed in oxidative stress indexes, serum Parkinson related proteins and serum inflammatory factors between the two groups of patients with Parkinson's disease (P>0.05). Compared with prior treatment, serum Parkinson related proteins (Csy C and S-100B), MDA and inflammatory factors (TNF-α, CRP, IL-6) after relevant treatment were significantly decreased, BDNF, IL-2 and oxidative stress indexes (NO, SOD and GSH) were significantly increased (P<0.05). Oxidative stress indexes (NO, SOD and GSH), BDNF, IL-2 in combination group were significantly higher than which in control group after treatment, serum Parkinson related proteins (Csy C and S-100B), inflammatory factors (TNF-α, CRP, IL-6) and MDA were significantly lower than in control group after treatment (P<0.05).Conclusions:Ganglioside and levodopa combination can significantly improve levels of oxidative stress indexes, serum Parkinson related proteins and serum inflammatory factors in patients with Parkinson’s disease. It has important clinical significance on therapy of patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  18. Is PIGD a legitimate motor subtype in Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagal, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson disease is a chronic progressive syndrome with a broad array of clinical features. Different investigators have suggested the heterogeneous motor manifestations of early Parkinson disease can be conceptualized through a taxonomy of clinical subtypes including tremor-predominant and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtypes. Although it is theoretically valuable to distinguish subtypes of Parkinson disease, the reality is that few patients fit these discrete categories well and many transition from exhibiting elements of one subtype to elements of another. In the time since the initial description of the postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant subtype, Parkinson disease clinical research has blossomed in many ways - including an increased emphasis on the role of medical comorbidities and extranigral pathologies in Parkinson disease as markers of prognostic significance. By conceptualizing the pathogenesis of an expansive disease process in the limited terms of categorical motor subtypes, we run the risk of overlooking or misclassifying clinically significant pathogenic risk factors that lead to the development of motor milestones such as falls and related axial motor disability. Given its critical influence on quality of life and overall prognosis, we are in need of a model of postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features in Parkinson disease that emphasizes the overlooked pathological influence of aging and medical comorbidities on the development of axial motor burden and postural instability and gait difficulty-predominant features. This Point of View proposes thinking of postural instability and gait difficulties in Parkinson disease not as a discrete subtype, but rather as multidimensional continuum influenced by several overlapping age-related pathologies.

  19. Genetic Testing for Huntington's Disease in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M S; Nagai, Y; Popiel, H A; Fujikake, N; Okamoto, Y; Ahmed, M U; Islam, M A; Islam, M T; Ahmed, S; Rahman, K M; Uddin, M J; Dey, S K; Ahmed, Q; Hossain, M A; Jahan, N; Toda, T

    2010-10-01

    The study was conducted to find out Huntington's disease (HD) by genetic analysis from those presenting with parkinsonism in the Neurology department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital. A sample of about 5ml blood was collected by veni puncture in EDTA tube with informed consent from 9 patients & 7 healthy individuals after approval of the institutional ethics committee for genetic study. The neurological disorder along with a complete history and physical findings were recorded in a prescribed questionnaire by the neurologists of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital. Extraction of genomic DNA from the venous blood using FlexiGene DNA kit (Qiagen, Japan) was performed in Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh. The extracted DNA was stored and accumulated and then these DNA were sent to Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Medical Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Suita, Osaka 565 0871, Japan for PCR and further analysis. PCR amplification of the CAG repeat in the 1T15 gene was performed with primers HD1 and HD3. HD PCR products revealed the DNA product of about 110bp (no. of CAG repeats=21) to 150bp (no. of CAG repeats=34) in both healthy individual and suspected PD patient DNA.

  20. Parkinson's disease: carbidopa, nausea, and dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz,1 Alvin Stein,2 Ted Cole3 1Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Cape Coral, FL, 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, 3Cole Center for Healing, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: When ʟ-dopa use began in the early 1960s for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, nausea and reversible dyskinesias were experienced as continuing side effects. Carbidopa or benserazide was added to ʟ-dopa in 1975 solely to control nausea. Subsequent to the increasing use of carbidopa has been the recognition of irreversible dyskinesias, which have automatically been attributed to ʟ-dopa. The research into the etiology of these phenomena has identified the causative agent of the irreversible dyskinesias as carbidopa, not ʟ-dopa. The mechanism of action of the carbidopa and benserazide causes irreversible binding and inactivation of vitamin B6 throughout the body. The consequences of this action are enormous, interfering with over 300 enzyme and protein functions. This has the ability to induce previously undocumented profound antihistamine dyskinesias, which have been wrongly attributed to ʟ-dopa and may be perceived as irreversible if proper corrective action is not taken. Keywords: vitamin B6, PLP, irreversible, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate

  1. Theory of Mind in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Morris; Stuss, Donald T

    2011-11-15

    Theory of Mind is an important concept within social cognition and refers to the ability to attribute mental states to oneself and others. Other terms for this concept include mentalizing and mind reading. Deficits in Theory of Mind may contribute to behavioral abnormalities, such as paranoia and delusions that are common in dementia. There are several experimental tasks for measuring Theory of Mind. A classical example is the false belief test. Examples of other measures include tests of understanding metaphor, sarcasm, irony, deception, and faux pas, determining what a person is thinking or feeling from photographs of the eye region, and visual perspective taking. There are several anatomical areas related to Theory of Mind. These include regions within the frontal and temporal lobes, and temporoparietal junction. There is a small but emerging literature on Theory of Mind in Parkinson's disease (PD). The data suggest that Theory of Mind is impaired in PD and that the deficits precede the development of dementia. Future studies are needed to better define the nature of the Theory of Mind deficits in PD, as well as the impact of these deficits on clinical disability in this disorder.

  2. Parkinson's disease detection based on dysphonia measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-04-01

    Assessing dysphonic symptoms is a noninvasive and effective approach to detect Parkinson's disease (PD) in patients. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of different dysphonia measurements on PD detection by support vector machine (SVM). Seven categories of dysphonia measurements are considered. Experimental results from ten-fold cross-validation technique demonstrate that vocal fundamental frequency statistics yield the highest accuracy of 88 % ± 0.04. When all dysphonia measurements are employed, the SVM classifier achieves 94 % ± 0.03 accuracy. A refinement of the original patterns space by removing dysphonia measurements with similar variation across healthy and PD subjects allows achieving 97.03 % ± 0.03 accuracy. The latter performance is larger than what is reported in the literature on the same dataset with ten-fold cross-validation technique. Finally, it was found that measures of ratio of noise to tonal components in the voice are the most suitable dysphonic symptoms to detect PD subjects as they achieve 99.64 % ± 0.01 specificity. This finding is highly promising for understanding PD symptoms.

  3. Safinamide: A Review in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Hannah A; Dhillon, Sohita

    2017-02-01

    Safinamide (Xadago(®)) is an orally active, selective, reversible monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor with both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic (glutamatergic) properties. In the EU, safinamide is approved for the treatment of mid- to late-stage fluctuating Parkinson's disease (PD) as add-on therapy to a stable dose of levodopa alone or in combination with other PD medications. Safinamide 50-100 mg/day administered as a fixed or flexible dose significantly increased daily 'on' time without dyskinesia (primary endpoint) in patients with mid- to late-stage PD with motor fluctuations in 24-week, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Other outcomes, including motor function, overall clinical status and health-related quality of life, were also generally improved with safinamide. Furthermore, in an 18-month extension of one study, although dyskinesia (primary endpoint) was not significantly improved with safinamide relative to placebo, treatment benefits in other outcomes were generally sustained over 24 months of treatment. Safinamide was generally well tolerated in clinical trials; dyskinesia was the most common adverse event. Although further studies are needed, including comparative and long-term studies, current evidence indicates that safinamide extends the treatment options available for use as add-on therapy to levodopa and other PD medications in patients with mid- to late-stage PD experiencing motor fluctuations.

  4. Dementia in Parkinson's disease: a Brazilian sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Baldivia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of dementia associated with Parkinson's disease (PD-D in a Brazilian sample adopting clinical and diagnostic procedures recommended by the Movement Disorders Society (MDS. Sixty-seven patients were consecutively submitted to neurological, neuropsychological and functional examinations. PD-D was established according to MDS clinical criteria (Level II and clinical procedures for PD-D (Level I and prevalence rate was compared between the levels adopted. Ten patients (14.9% were diagnosed as demented by Level I criteria whereas sixteen (23.8% were diagnosed based on Level II criteria. Level I criteria had low sensitivity in detecting PD-D (31.25%, but greater specificity (90.19. The PD-D group had significantly worse performance on all neuropsychological tests, were older (p<0.001, had an older age of onset ofdisease (p<0.01, had lower educational level (p<0.02 and had higher scores on functional scales. Current age (p=0.046 and Hoehn & Yahr score (p=0.048 were predictors for developing PD-D.

  5. Cutaneous autonomic denervation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Otano, Judith; Casanova-Mollà, Jordi; Morales, Merche; Valls-Solé, Josep; Tolosa, Eduard

    2015-08-01

    Numerous studies have detailed involvement of the peripheral autonomic nervous system (PANS) in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed autonomic innervation of dermal annexes through quantitative fluorescence measurement from skin obtained via punch biopsies at distal leg region in PD and control subjects. We defined a ratio between the area corresponding to protein gen product (PGP) immunoreactivity and the area corresponding to blood vessel or sweat gland as a quantitative measure of autonomic innervation. Presence of alpha-synuclein (AS) deposits in dermis and hypodermis was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Skin biopsies form six PD patients and six healthy controls were studied. Autonomic innervation scores were lower in PD than in controls in both blood vessels and sweat glands. No AS or phosphorylated AS (pAS) immunoreactivity was detected in dermis or hypodermis in any of the studied subjects. The results of this investigation suggest that autonomic innervation of dermal annexes in living patients with PD is reduced compared to controls. AS or pAS deposits were not found in dermis or hypodermis suggesting that distal leg skin study is not useful for in vivo detection of AS in PD.

  6. Efficacies of globus pallidus stimulation and subthalamic nucleus stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan ZG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Gang Tan, Qian Zhou, Tao Huang, Yugang JiangDepartment of Neurosurgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People’s Republic of ChinaObjectives: Deep brain stimulation (DBS is the surgical procedure for patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. Globus pallidus internus (GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN are the most targeted locations for the procedure. To investigate the variable efficiencies for the two different locations, we conducted a meta-analysis to compare both stimulation sites.Materials and methods: A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library databases. Randomized controlled trials comparing the efficacies of GPi and STN DBS were included. Clinical outcomes of motor function, nonmotor function, and quality of life (QOL were collected for the meta-analysis.Results: Ten eligible trials with 1,034 patients were included in the analysis. Unified Parkinson’s disease rating scale III (UPDRS-III scores were collected at 6, 12, and 24 months postsurgery separately to assess the motor function of the patients. A statistically significant effect in favor of the GPi DBS was obtained in the off-medication/on-stimulation phase of UPDRS-III at 12 months (mean difference [MD] =6.87, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 3.00–10.74, P=0.57, I2=0%. However, GPi DBS showed an opposite result at 24 months (MD =−2.46, 95% CI: −4.91 to −0.02, P=0.05, I2=0%. In the on-medication/on-stimulation phase, GPi DBS obtained a worse outcome compared with STN DBS (MD =−2.90, 95% CI: −5.71 to −0.09, P=0.05, I2=0%. Compared with STN DBS, increased dosage of levodopa equivalent doses was needed in GPi DBS (standardized MD =0.60, 95% CI: 0.46–0.74, P<0.00001, I2=24%. Meanwhile, Beck Depression Inventory II scores demonstrated that STN has a better performance (standardized MD =−0.31, 95% CI: −0.51 to −0.12, P=0.002, I2=0%. As for neurocognitive phase postsurgery

  7. Nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: classification and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erro R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Roberto Erro,1,2 Gabriella Santangelo,3,4 Paolo Barone,5 Carmine Vitale4,6 1Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience and Movement Disorders, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, United Kingdom; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Neurologiche e del Movimento, Università di Verona, Verona, Italy; 3Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy; 4IDC Hermitage – Capodimonte, Naples, Italy; 5University of Salerno, Center for Neurodegenerative diseases – CEMAND, Salerno, Italy; 6University of Naples "Parthenope," Department of Motor Sciences, Naples, Italy Abstract: Despite the emphasis on the motor phenotype of Parkinson's disease (PD, it has been increasingly recognized that PD patients experience several nonmotor symptoms (NMS, which have even greater significance when assessed by quality-of-life measures and institutionalization rates. The burden of NMS tends to increase with age and disease severity and, in the very advanced stage of disease, NMS such as urinary problems, drooling, somnolence, psychosis, and dementia dominate the clinical phenotype. Moreover, the dopaminergic treatment used for the motor symptoms of PD can arise or worsen a number of NMS, including orthostatic hypotension, nausea, sleep disturbances, hallucinations, or impulsive compulsive behaviors. Here we review the most common NMS of PD with a focus on their pharmacological management. Keywords: disease management, PD, NMS

  8. Effectiveness of electrical stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim NKC

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson's disease is one of the most disabling chronic neurologic diseases and leads to a significant loss of quality of life. Electrical stimulation activate nerves innervating extremities affected by paralysis resulting from Spinal Cord Injury (SCI, head injury, stroke and hence is primarily used to restore function in people with disabilities. Methods: The study was performed after the institutional ethical clearance and informed consent from all the participants. The parameters assessed were time taken to complete 20 M walk with turn round, distance covered in the first 3 minutes of walking, gait dynamics like stride length, step length and cadence and number of falls with the help of video tape recorder, stop watch and measuring tape. Results: We observed a non-significant reduction (P = 0.471 of UPDRS, mean score of PDQ-39 was declined non-significantly (P = 0.36, time taken to complete 20 meters walk with turn was declined significantly (P = 0.017, The distances walked in 3 minutes by the patients were increased significantly (P = 0.000, number of steps during 20 meter walk was recorded and was found to be declined significantly (P = 0.088, stride length of the patients were increased significantly (P = 0.000, step length of the patients was increased significantly (P = 0.000, average number of falls reduced significantly (P = 0.00 during the stimulation period from week 0 to week 8. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the superior efficacy of electrical stimulation over best medical management in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 963-967

  9. Efficacy and safety of a once-daily extended-release formulation of pramipexole switched from an immediate-release formulation in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: results from an open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, M; Shimo, Y; Hatano, T; Oyama, G; Hattori, N

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an extended-release tablet formulation of pramipexole (PPX-ER) given once daily when switched from an immediate-release tablet formulation (PPX-IR) given 3 times daily. This open-label study included 29 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) who were followed for 8 weeks. Primary endpoints were Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III score, a physician evaluation of motor symptoms; nocturnal and early morning symptoms (NEMS) score, based on the results for 4 items in the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale and the Movement Disorder Society - sponsored revision of the UPDRS; and patients' formulation preference, determined through questionnaires. Secondary endpoints were nocturnal sleep disturbance, evaluated using the revised version of the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2); quality of life, evaluated using the 39-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39); Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) score; Patient Global Impression-Improvement (PGI-I) score; and caregiver formulation preference. UPDRS part III score (mean ± SD) was significantly decreased after 4 weeks (13.9 ± 7.3; P=0.030) and 8 weeks (12.2 ± 7.3; P<0.001) from baseline (15.3 ± 7.0). However, no significant change was found in NEMS scale, PDSS-2 or PDQ-39 scores. After 8 weeks, the responder rates based on CGI-I and PGI-I scores were 27.6% and 20.7%, respectively. As a result of the questionnaire, 63.0% of patients and 58.8% of their caregivers preferred PPX-ER. A non-serious drug-related adverse event (diarrhea) was observed in one patient. In conclusion, PPX-ER can be considered as a useful treatment option when PPX-IR needs to be switched to other dopamine agonists.This study is registered with UMIN-CTR (UMIN000006521).

  10. Increased incidence of Parkinson disease among relatives of patients with Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Assaf; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari

    2006-01-01

    In a previous study of 99 Ashkenazi Jewish patients with Parkinson disease from Israel who were tested for the six most common mutations for Gaucher disease, 31.3% had at least one Gaucher disease mutation, implying that carrier status per se my be a risk for Parkinson disease. The purpose of this survey was to ascertain the presence of Parkinson disease among Ashkenazi Jewish obligate carriers of Gaucher disease relative to its incidence in a comparable cohort of Ashkenazi Jews who are putatively non-carriers. There was no statistically significant difference in gender or age between the groups (n>100). Among patients, 27.3% reported having a relative with Parkinson disease while among the controls there was a reported 12.3% which was statistically significant (P=0.05). While based completely on subjective reports in a paper-base questionnaire, the results of this survey implicate a high rate of Parkinson disease among individuals with Gaucher disease mutations.

  11. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Robottom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J RobottomDepartment of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.Keywords: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, rasagiline, selegiline, Parkinson's disease, efficacy, safety

  12. Balance in Parkinson's disease patients changing the visual input

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez,Hamlet; Geisinger, Dario; Ferreira,Enrique D.; Nogueira,Santiago; Arocena,Sofia; Roman,Cecilia San; Suarez,Alejo

    2011-01-01

    The description of the postural responses in Parkinson's disease patients when visual information changes from a stable to a moving visual field analyzing the impact on balance in these patients. METHODS (CLINICAL): Limits of Stability, Body center of pressure and balance functional reserve were measured by means of the force platform in 24 Parkinson´s patients in stages 1 and 2 of the Boher classification and 19 volunteers as a control group. Both groups were stimulated with 1-Static visual ...

  13. Deterioration of Parkinson's disease during hospitalization: survey of 684 patients

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    Gerlach Oliver HH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial fraction of Parkinson's disease patients deteriorate during hospitalisation, but the precise proportion and the reasons why have not been studied systematically and the focus has been on surgical wards and on Accident & Emergency departments. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors of deterioration of Parkinson's disease symptoms during hospitalization, including all wards. Methods We invited Parkinson's disease patients from three neurology departments in The Netherlands to answer a standardised questionnaire on general, disease and hospital related issues. Patients who had been hospitalized in the previous year were included and analysed. Possible risk factors for Parkinson's disease deterioration were identified. Proportions were analysed using the Chi-Square test and a logistic regression analysis was performed. Results Eighteen percent of 684 Parkinson's disease patients had been hospitalized at least once in the last year. Twenty-one percent experienced deterioration of motor symptoms, 33% did have one or more complications and 26% had received incorrect anti-Parkinson's medication. There were no statistically significant differences for these variables between admissions on neurologic or non-neurologic wards and between having surgery or not. Incorrect medication during hospitalization was significantly associated with higher risk (OR 5.8, CI 2.5-13.7 of deterioration, as were having infections (OR 6.7 CI 1.8-24.7. A higher levodopa equivalent dose per day was a significant risk factor for deterioration. When adjusting for different variables, wrong medication distribution was the most important risk factor for deterioration. Conclusions Incorrect medication and infections are the important risk factors for deterioration of Parkinson's disease patients both for admissions with and without surgery and both for admissions on neurologic and non-neurologic wards. Measures should be taken to improve care

  14. New drug treatments show neuroprotective effects in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Insulin signaling in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease is impaired. Preclinical studies of growth factors showed impressive neuroprotective effects. In animal models of Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, insulin, glia-derived neurotrophic factor, or analogues of the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 prevented neurodegenerative processes and improved neuronal and synaptic functionality in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. On the basis of these promising findings, several clinical trials are ongoing with the first encouraging clinical results published. This gives hope for developing effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease that are currently unavailable.

  15. Recognition and management of neuropsychiatric complications in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreri, Florian; Agbokou, Catherine; Gauthier, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is primarily considered a motor disease characterized by rest tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural disturbances. However, neuropsychiatric complications, including mood and anxiety disorders, fatigue, apathy, psychosis, cognitive impairment, dementia, sleep disorders and addictions, frequently complicate the course of the illness. The pathophysiologic features of these complications are multifaceted and include neuropathophysiologic changes of a degenerative disease...

  16. Sleep/wake problems in Parkinson's disease: pathophysiology and clinicopathologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondo, William G

    2014-08-01

    In his initial description of shaking palsy, James Parkinson first noted that sleep became disturbed with advancing paralysis agitans. More recent studies have confirmed that the majority of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) suffer from some sleep disturbances. This can manifest as difficulty in falling or staying asleep, fractionated sleep, specific parasomnias, and daytime sleepiness. In this article, we will explore the pathophysiology of these varied sleep disorders. In most cases, however, the definitive etiology is debated, and phenotypes are often felt to be multifactorial. Some of these may be associated with dopaminergic dysfunction, some presumed to arise from varied non-dopaminergic PD pathology, and some from PD treatments.

  17. The rate of cognitive decline in Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarsland, Dag; Andersen, Kjeld; Larsen, Jan Petter

    2004-01-01

    To measure the rate and predictors of change on the Mini-Mental State Examination in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and to compare that change with the Mini-Mental State Examination changes of patients with Alzheimer disease and nondemented subjects.......To measure the rate and predictors of change on the Mini-Mental State Examination in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and to compare that change with the Mini-Mental State Examination changes of patients with Alzheimer disease and nondemented subjects....

  18. Pisa syndrome in Parkinson's disease: diagnostic and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miletić V

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vladimir Miletić Department of Neurology, Movement Disorders Centre, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia Abstract: Pisa syndrome is a rare clinical entity characterized by marked lateral flexion of the trunk, which is typically mobile and resolves at supine position. When observed in clinical practice, it denotes an incapacitating symptom of underlying neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of Pisa syndrome are poorly understood, and its management remains a challenge. In this review, we will focus our attention on Pisa syndrome in patients with Parkinson's disease, and provide an update on prevalence, pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, and treatment options. Keywords: Pisa syndrome, lateral trunk flexion, Parkinson's disease

  19. Motor cortical plasticity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupa, Kaviraja; Chen, Robert

    2013-09-04

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there are alterations of the basal ganglia (BG) thalamocortical networks, primarily due to degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. These changes in subcortical networks lead to plastic changes in primary motor cortex (M1), which mediates cortical motor output and is a potential target for treatment of PD. Studies investigating the motor cortical plasticity using non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have found altered plasticity in PD, but there are inconsistencies among these studies. This is likely because plasticity depends on many factors such as the extent of dopaminergic loss and disease severity, response to dopaminergic replacement therapies, development of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID), the plasticity protocol used, medication, and stimulation status in patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). The influences of LID and DBS on BG and M1 plasticity have been explored in animal models and in PD patients. In addition, many other factors such age, genetic factors (e.g., brain derived neurotropic factor and other neurotransmitters or receptors polymorphism), emotional state, time of the day, physical fitness have been documented to play role in the extent of plasticity induced by TMS in human studies. In this review, we summarize the studies that investigated M1 plasticity in PD and demonstrate how these afore-mentioned factors affect motor cortical plasticity in PD. We conclude that it is important to consider the clinical, demographic, and technical factors that influence various plasticity protocols while developing these protocols as diagnostic or prognostic tools in PD. We also discuss how the modulation of cortical excitability and the plasticity with these non-invasive brain stimulation techniques facilitate the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD and help design potential therapeutic possibilities in this disorder.

  20. Loss of phosphodiesterase 10A expression is associated with progression and severity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolini, Flavia; Foltynie, Thomas; Reis Marques, Tiago; Muhlert, Nils; Tziortzi, Andri C; Searle, Graham E; Natesan, Sridhar; Kapur, Shitij; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Gunn, Roger N; Piccini, Paola; Politis, Marios

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and loss of dopaminergic signalling in Parkinson's disease are still only partially understood. Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is a basal ganglia expressed dual substrate enzyme, which regulates cAMP and cGMP signalling cascades, thus having a key role in the regulation of dopaminergic signalling in striatal pathways, and in promoting neuronal survival. This study aimed to assess in vivo the availability of PDE10A in patients with Parkinson's disease using positron emission tomography molecular imaging with (11)C-IMA107, a highly selective PDE10A radioligand. We studied 24 patients with levodopa-treated, moderate to advanced Parkinson's disease. Their positron emission tomography imaging data were compared to those from a group of 12 healthy controls. Parametric images of (11)C-IMA107 binding potential relative to non-displaceable binding (BPND) were generated from the dynamic (11)C-IMA107 scans using the simplified reference tissue model with the cerebellum as the reference tissue. Corresponding region of interest analysis showed lower mean (11)C-IMA107 BPND in the caudate (P Parkinson's disease compared to healthy controls, which was confirmed with voxel-based analysis. Longer Parkinson's duration correlated with lower (11)C-IMA107 BPND in the caudate (r = -0.65; P = 0.005), putamen (r = -0.51; P = 0.025), and globus pallidus (r = -0.47; P = 0.030). Higher Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part-III motor scores correlated with lower (11)C-IMA107 BPND in the caudate (r = -0.54; P = 0.011), putamen (r = -0.48; P = 0.022), and globus pallidus (r = -0.70; P Parkinson's disease with levodopa-induced dyskinesias (n = 12), correlated with lower (11)C-IMA107 BPND in the caudate (r = -0.73; P = 0.031) and putamen (r = -0.74; P = 0.031). Our findings demonstrate striatal and pallidal loss of PDE10A expression, which is associated with Parkinson's duration and severity of motor symptoms and complications. PDE10A is an

  1. Postural reactions to neck vibration in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovic, Peter; Krafczyk, Siegbert; Saling, Marian; Benetin, Ján; Bötzel, Kai

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that reduced reactions to proprioceptive input signals contribute to postural instability in Parkinson's disease (PD), pulses of mechanical vibration were applied to the neck muscles of PD patients and healthy controls. This stimulus elicits postural reactions in standing subjects. Participating were 13 moderately affected PD patients, 13 severely affected PD patients, and 13 age-matched healthy subjects. Patients were tested on and off medication. Three-second-long pulses of vibration were regularly (10 times) applied to the posterior neck muscles while subjects kept their eyes open or closed. Postural responses to the stimuli were measured by static posturography. No intergroup difference in the pattern and latencies of responses was found. However, the amplitudes of the postural reactions (shift of center of foot pressure) were significantly larger in advanced PD patients; those of moderately affected PD patients did not differ from those of control subjects. Moreover, the size of postural responses in both latter groups decreased across the trial contrary to that of advanced PD patients. Comparison of the measures during on and off testing revealed no significant differences. These results indicate that neither afferent proprioceptive deficits nor central integrative functions but rather scaling and habituation of erroneous proprioceptive information are disturbed in the postural control of advanced PD. Nondopaminergic structures seem to be responsible for this impairment.

  2. Stem cells and the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fahad; Stott, Simon R W; Barker, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Progress in Parkinson's disease (PD) research has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate model which exhibits the core pathology seen in the human brain. Recent advances in deriving cells with neuronal phenotypes from patients with neurodegenerative disorders through cellular reprogramming offer a unique tool for disease modelling and may help shed light on the molecular pathogenesis that drives the progression of the disease. This technology may also help in establishing platforms for drug screening and open up exciting new prospects for cell grafting. In this review, we will discuss progress made in differentiating stem cells into authentic dopamine neurons and where we stand with respect to clinical trials with these cells in patients with PD. We will also examine the various approaches used in cellular reprogramming and their differentiation into patient-specific midbrain dopamine neurons, with an emphasis particularly on modelling familial cases of PD to recapitulate disease phenotypes. This review will highlight some of the challenges that need to be addressed for this technology to have any potential clinical application in cell therapy and personalised medicine.

  3. Dopamine-Induced Nonmotor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD may emerge secondary to the underlying pathogenesis of the disease, while others are recognized side effects of treatment. Inevitably, there is an overlap as the disease advances and patients require higher dosages and more complex medical regimens. The non-motor symptoms that emerge secondary to dopaminergic therapy encompass several domains, including neuropsychiatric, autonomic, and sleep. These are detailed in the paper. Neuropsychiatric complications include hallucinations and psychosis. In addition, compulsive behaviors, such as pathological gambling, hypersexuality, shopping, binge eating, and punding, have been shown to have a clear association with dopaminergic medications. Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS is a compulsive behavior that is typically viewed through the lens of addiction, with patients needing escalating dosages of dopamine replacement therapy. Treatment side effects on the autonomic system include nausea, orthostatic hypotension, and constipation. Sleep disturbances include fragmented sleep, nighttime sleep problems, daytime sleepiness, and sleep attacks. Recognizing the non-motor symptoms that can arise specifically from dopamine therapy is useful to help optimize treatment regimens for this complex disease.

  4. Group comparison of spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhyastha, Tara M; Askren, Mary K; Zhang, Jing; Leverenz, James B; Montine, Thomas J; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances with functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging have demonstrated that at rest the brain exhibits coherent activity within a number of spatially independent maps, normally called 'intrinsic' or 'resting state' networks. These networks support cognition and behaviour, and are altered in neurodegenerative disease. However, there is a longstanding perspective, and ample functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence, demonstrating that intrinsic networks may be fractionated and that cortical elements may participate in multiple intrinsic networks at different times, dynamically changing alliances to adapt to cognitive demands. A method to probe the fine-grained spatiotemporal structure of networks may be more sensitive to subtle network changes that accompany heterogeneous cognitive deficits caused by a neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that alterations to the latent (hidden) structure of intrinsic networks may reveal the impact of underlying pathophysiologic processes as assessed with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Using a novel modelling approach that we call 'network kernel analysis', we compared fine-grained network ensembles (network kernels) that include overlapping cortical elements in 24 patients with Parkinson's disease (ages 45-86, 17 male) and normal cognition or mild cognitive impairment (n = 13), and 21 cognitively normal control subjects (ages 41-76, nine male). An omnibus measure of network disruption, calculated from correlations among network kernels, was correlated with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of pathophysiological processes in Parkinson's disease: concentrations of α-synuclein and amyloid-β42. Correlations among network kernels more accurately classified Parkinson's disease from controls than other functional neuroimaging measures. Inspection of the spatial maps related to the default mode network and a frontoparietal task control network kernel showed that the

  5. Ceruloplasmin Oxidation, a Feature of Parkinson's Disease CSF, Inhibits Ferroxidase Activity and Promotes Cellular Iron Retention

    KAUST Repository

    Olivieri, S.

    2011-12-14

    Parkinson\\'s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by oxidative stress and CNS iron deposition. Ceruloplasmin is an extracellular ferroxidase that regulates cellular iron loading and export, and hence protects tissues from oxidative damage. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we investigated ceruloplasmin patterns in the CSF of human Parkinson\\'s disease patients. Parkinson\\'s disease ceruloplasmin profiles proved more acidic than those found in healthy controls and in other human neurological diseases (peripheral neuropathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer\\'s disease); degrees of acidity correlated with patients\\' pathological grading. Applying an unsupervised pattern recognition procedure to the two-dimensional electrophoresis images, we identified representative pathological clusters. In vitro oxidation of CSF in two-dimensional electrophoresis generated a ceruloplasmin shift resembling that observed in Parkinson\\'s disease and co-occurred with an increase in protein carbonylation. Likewise, increased protein carbonylation was observed in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF, and the same modification was directly identified in these samples on ceruloplasmin. These results indicate that ceruloplasmin oxidation contributes to pattern modification in Parkinson\\'s disease. From the functional point of view, ceruloplasmin oxidation caused a decrease in ferroxidase activity, which in turn promotes intracellular iron retention in neuronal cell lines as well as in primary neurons, which are more sensitive to iron accumulation. Accordingly, the presence of oxidized ceruloplasmin in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF might be used as a marker for oxidative damage and might provide new insights into the underlying pathological mechanisms.

  6. Consumption of dairy products and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honglei; O'Reilly, Eilis; McCullough, Marjorie L; Rodriguez, Carmen; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-05-01

    The authors prospectively investigated the association between intake of dairy products and risk of Parkinson's disease among 57,689 men and 73,175 women from the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. A total of 250 men and 138 women with Parkinson's disease were identified during follow-up (1992-2001). Dairy product consumption was positively associated with risk of Parkinson's disease: Compared with the lowest intake quintile, the corresponding relative risks for quintiles 2-5 were 1.4, 1.4, 1.4, and 1.6 (95 percent confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 2.2; p for trend = 0.05). A higher risk among dairy product consumers was found in both men and women, although the association in women appeared nonlinear. Meta-analysis of all prospective studies confirmed a moderately elevated risk of Parkinson's disease among persons with high dairy product consumption: For extreme intake categories, relative risks were 1.6 (95 percent CI: 1.3, 2.0) for both sexes, 1.8 for men (95 percent CI: 1.4, 2.4), and 1.3 for women (95 percent CI: 0.8, 2.1). These data suggest that dairy consumption may increase the risk of Parkinson's disease, particularly in men. More studies are needed to further examine these findings and to explore underlying mechanisms.

  7. Parkinson's disease associated with impaired oxidative phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterer, J. [Ludwig Boltzmann Inst. for Research in Epilepsy and Neuromuscular Disorders and 2. Neurological Dept., Neurological Hospital Rosenhuegel, Vienna (Austria); Jarius, C. [Institute of Clinical Neurology, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Baumgartner, M. [Radiological Dept., Municipal Hospital Lainz, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-11-01

    Parkinson's disease may be due to primary or secondary oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects. In a 76-year-old man with Parkinson's disease since 1992, slightly but recurrently elevated creatine phosphokinase, recurrently elevated blood glucose, thickening of the left ventricular myocardium, bifascicular block and hypacusis were found. Cerebral MRI showed atrophy, periventricular demyelination, multiple, disseminated, supra- and infratentorial lacunas, and haemosiderin deposits in both posterior horns. Muscle biopsy showed typical features of an OXPHOS defect. Whether the association of Parkinson's disease and impaired OXPHOS was causative or coincidental remains unknown. Possibly, the mitochondrial defect acted as an additional risk factor for Parkinson's disease or the OXPHOS defect worsened the preexisting neurological impairments by a cumulative or synergistic mechanism. In conclusion, this case shows that Parkinson's disease may be associated with a mitochondrially or nuclearly encoded OXPHOS defect, manifesting as hypacusis, myopathy, axonal polyneuropathy, cardiomyopathy and recurrent subclinical ischaemic strokes and haemorrhages. (orig.)

  8. [Parkinson's disease due to laboral exposition to paraquat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Verastegui, Angel Gilberto

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is considered a neurodegenerative disorder, which involves environmental factors in the etiology of the disease. Such as chemical agents with neuromolecular effect among which is the MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6 tetra-hydropyridine), MPP (1-methyl-4-phenyl hypyridinium), paraquat, the latter used as a herbicide in the agricultural fields of our country. It has been documented in epidemiological and experimental studies the association of occupational exposure to paraquat and Parkinson's disease. The aim of this paper is to describe a clinical case of occupational medicine in Parkinson's disease in occupationally exposed workers to paraquat, elevating the importance of medical history work, which was the key to the clinical case study.

  9. Current development of acupuncture research in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bai-Yun; Salvage, Sarah; Jenner, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disease. The etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms that cause PD are still not fully understood. The available treatments to PD are only symptomatic relief. Acupuncture is used to treat many medical conditions for 1000 years in China and has gained wider and increasing acceptance within both public and medical profession because it has been a very safe and well-tolerated treatment. In this chapter, we reviewed relevant laboratory findings regarding acupuncture mechanism on Parkinson's. We showed that acupuncture stimulation in Parkinson's models had generated valuable mechanistic insight of Parkinson's and showed that acupuncture treatment is in fact a neuroprotective therapy that increase the release of various neuroprotective agents such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and cyclophilin A. In addition, acupuncture therapy slows cell death process and attenuates oxidative stress to dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Further, acupuncture therapy modulates neuronal activity of the basal ganglia output structures. These results suggest that early application of acupuncture therapy to Parkinson's patients may be helpful for the best efficacy of acupuncture treatment. It is hopeful that translation of achievement in acupuncture research in Parkinson's models will maximize the potentials of acupuncture treatment.

  10. [A case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Maki; Kawamoto, Kunihiko; Funakawa, Itaru; Jinnai, Kenji

    2005-08-01

    In 1992, a 63 year-old woman complained of dysphagia and chest pain, and was diagnosed with esophageal achalasia. Three years later, she developed resting tremor, cog-wheel rigidity, and retro-pulsion, and was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and given appropriate medication. Several years later, intractable vomitting and aspiration pneumonia developed, and the lower esophageal sphincter was dilated using a pneumatic balloon dilator under gastroscopic guidance in 2004. That procedure improved her symptoms and the esophageal dilation was visualized on chest CT images. Herein, we report this rare case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease and discuss the relationship between the two diseases.

  11. Validation of hospital register-based diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, Lene; Lassen, Christina Funch; Himmerslev, Liselotte;

    2012-01-01

    (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and only 75-80% of patients with parkinsonism will have idiopathic PD (iPD). It is necessary to follow patients in order to determine if some of them will develop other neurodegenerative diseases and a one-time-only diagnostic code for iPD reported in the register......Denmark has a long-standing tradition of maintaining one of the world's largest health science specialized register data bases as the National Hospital Register (NHR). To estimate the prevalence and incidence of diseases, the correctness of the diagnoses recorded is critical. Parkinson's disease...

  12. [Therapy options in the case of advanced therapy resistant Morbus Parkinson].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, R

    2010-12-01

    In Germany about 300,000 to 400,000 people are suffering from Morbus Parkinson at present. It is one of the most common neurological diseases both in Germany and in Europe as a whole. With the rising number of elderly people in our population, the number of Parkinson patients will strongly increase as well in future. About 20% of these patients are already in an advanced stage. This stage leaves its marks with motor and non-motor sequelae. With the minority of these patients oral medication is ineffective. For these relatively rare cases an indication for an L-dopa-infusion therapy (duodopa pump), an apomorphine pump therapy or a deep brain stimulation may exist. The indication for one of these 3 therapy forms is given by the neurological clinic in agreement with the patient and is only given in case of failure of oral medication. All 3 therapy options are very expensive. In case of the deep brain stimulation, close cooperation between the neurologist and the neurosurgeon as well as with the patient is necessary. Experts warn about a transplantation of stem cells because there are no clinical studies and only partial clinical improvement with severe side effects are known. The transplantation of stem cells for advanced Morbus Parkinson is not a medically necessary treatment at present.

  13. Patterns of cortical thinning in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Carme; Segura, Barbara; Baggio, Hugo Cesar; Abos, Alexandra; Marti, Maria Jose; Valldeoriola, Francesc; Compta, Yaroslau; Bargallo, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Clinical variability in the Parkinson's disease phenotype suggests the existence of disease subtypes. We investigated whether distinct anatomical patterns of atrophy can be identified in Parkinson's disease using a hypothesis‐free, data‐driven approach based on cortical thickness data. Methods T1‐weighted 3‐tesla MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in a sample of 88 nondemented Parkinson's disease patients and 31 healthy controls. We performed a hierarchical cluster analysis of imaging data using Ward's linkage method. A general linear model with cortical thickness data was used to compare clustering groups. Results We observed 3 patterns of cortical thinning in patients when compared with healthy controls. Pattern 1 (n = 30, 34.09%) consisted of cortical atrophy in bilateral precentral gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules, cuneus, posterior cingulate, and parahippocampal gyrus. These patients showed worse cognitive performance when compared with controls and the other 2 patterns. Pattern 2 (n = 29, 32.95%) consisted of cortical atrophy involving occipital and frontal as well as superior parietal areas and included patients with younger age at onset. Finally, in pattern 3 (n = 29, 32.95%), there was no detectable cortical thinning. Patients in the 3 patterns did not differ in disease duration, motor severity, dopaminergic medication doses, or presence of mild cognitive impairment. Conclusions Three cortical atrophy subtypes were identified in nondemented Parkinson's disease patients: (1) parieto‐temporal pattern of atrophy with worse cognitive performance, (2) occipital and frontal cortical atrophy and younger disease onset, and (3) patients without detectable cortical atrophy. These findings may help identify prognosis markers in Parkinson's disease. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement

  14. Olfactory training in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Haehner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Decrease of olfactory function in Parkinson's disease (PD is a well-investigated fact. Studies indicate that pharmacological treatment of PD fails to restore olfactory function in PD patients. The aim of this investigation was whether patients with PD would benefit from "training" with odors in terms of an improvement of their general olfactory function. It has been hypothesized that olfactory training should produce both an improved sensitivity towards the odors used in the training process and an overall increase of olfactory function. METHODS: We recruited 70 subjects with PD and olfactory loss into this single-center, prospective, controlled non-blinded study. Thirty-five patients were assigned to the olfactory training group and 35 subjects to the control group (no training. Olfactory training was performed over a period of 12 weeks while patients exposed themselves twice daily to four odors (phenyl ethyl alcohol: rose, eucalyptol: eucalyptus, citronellal: lemon, and eugenol: cloves. Olfactory testing was performed before and after training using the "Sniffin' Sticks" (thresholds for phenyl ethyl alcohol, tests for odor discrimination, and odor identification in addition to threshold tests for the odors used in the training process. RESULTS: Compared to baseline, trained PD patients experienced a significant increase in their olfactory function, which was observed for the Sniffin' Sticks test score and for thresholds for the odors used in the training process. Olfactory function was unchanged in PD patients who did not perform olfactory training. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate that olfactory training may increase olfactory sensitivity in PD patients.

  15. Genomic and pharmacogenomic biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Jimenez-Jimenez, Felix Javier; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Agundez, Jose A G

    2014-02-01

    The relative role of genetic and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been the matter of investigation and debate, especially in the last 30 years. The possible interaction between genetic and environmental factors led to a great number of association studies between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of many candidate genes and PD risk. In this study we summarized and critically reviewed the results of studies published on this issue, with especial reference to those reported in the last 5 years. Many studies provided conflicting findings and, when positive associations were identified, associations were weak. Polymorphisms related with activation or detoxification of drugs and xenobiotics, such as CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP19A1, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, CYP2D6, NAT2, GSTM1, GSTM3, GSTO1, GSTP1, PON1, PON2, ABCB1 and ADH genes have not been demonstrated convincingly a definitive association with the risk of developing PD. Nor did polymorphisms in genes related to dopamine or serotonin DRD, DAT, TH, DDC, DBH, MAO, COMT, SLC6A4, MTR, MTHFR, oxidative stress NOQ1, NOQ2, mEPHX, HFE, GPX, CAT, mnSOD, HFE, HO-1, HO-2, NFE2L2, KEAP1, inflammatory processes, ILs, TNF, ACT, NOS, HNMT, ABP1, HRHs, trophic and growth factors BDNF, FGF, or mitochondrial metabolism and function. In addition we analyzed other putative relations and genes associated with monogenic familial PD.Taking together the results of candidate gene association studies and genome wide association studies, only some SNPs of the MAPT, SNCA, HLA and GBA genes seem to be the most likely associated with PD risk.

  16. Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease Using Tabu Search Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Einipour

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is the second most common disease of the brain and nerves. The diseas is a progressive disease meaning that over time it becomes more difficult to treat. Although so far no definitive treatment for this disease but there are good drugs which if the condition is diagnosed early can help improve the lives of people affected. In recent years provided computer methods as medical decision support systems for fast and low-cost detection of the disease which uses speech disorders and accurate and fast analysis to be diagnosed Parkinson's disease early in the disease course. The purpose of this paper is development of a decision support system for the detection of Parkinson's disease. In the proposed system, relevant knowledge is the most important part of it. To obtain such knowledge, Tabu Search algorithm to be used. Tabu Search is able to search in a large space data of course, this search is also associated with a certain intelligence. Results on Parkinson's disease data set from UCI machine learning repository show that the proposed approach would be capable of diagnosis with high accuracy.

  17. Parkinson's Disease Shares the Lysosome with Gaucher's Disease

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    Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The second most common neurodegenerative disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age dependent progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement. While many of the causes of PD remain unclear, a consistent finding in PD is the abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein that has lead to the widely held notion that PD is a synucleinopathy. In a recent Cell manuscript Mazzuli et al., provide a potential mechanistic link between Gaucher's disease, a glycolipid lysosomal storage disorder due to Glucocerebrocidase (GBA) deficiency and PD. The authors reveal a reciprocal connection between the loss of GBA activity and accumulation of α-synuclein in the lysosome establishing a bidirectional positive feed back loop with pathologic consequences. These findings should stimulate further work on role of the lysosome in PD pathogenesis and the identification of new treatment strategies for PD. PMID:21753118

  18. Pharmacokinetic optimisation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, M; Riva, R; Albani, F; Baruzzi, A

    1996-06-01

    The current symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease mainly relies on agents which are able to restore dopaminergic transmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, such as the dopamine precursor levodopa or direct agonists of dopamine receptors. Ancillary strategies include the use of anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic agents or inhibitors of cerebral dopamine catabolism, such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors. Levodopa is the most widely used and effective drug. Its peculiar pharmacokinetics are characterised by an extensive presystemic metabolism, overcome by the combined use of extracerebral inhibitors of the enzyme aromatic-amino acid decarboxylase and rapid adsorption in the proximal small bowel by a saturable facilitated transport system shared with other large neutral amino acids. Drug transport from plasma to the brain is mediated by the same carriers operating in the intestinal mucosa. The main strategies to assure reproducibility of both drug intestinal absorption and delivery to the brain and clinical effect include standardisation of levodopa administration with respect to meal times and a controlled dietary protein intake. The levodopa plasma half-life is very short, resulting in marked plasma drug concentration fluctuations which are matched, as the disease progresses, with swings in the therapeutic response ('wearing-off' phenomena). 'Wearing-off' phenomena can be also associated, at the more advanced disease stages with a 'negative', both parkinsonism-exacerbating and dyskinetic effect of levodopa at subtherapeutic plasma concentrations. Dyskinesias may be also related to high-levodopa, excessive plasma concentrations. Recognition of the different levodopa toxic response patterns can be difficult on a clinical basis alone, and simultaneous monitoring of levodopa concentration-effect relationships may prove useful to disclose the underlying mechanism and in planning the correct pharmacokinetic management. Controlled-release levodopa

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng;

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  20. Parkinson's Disease: New Research Offers Hope for Better Diagnosis and Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease New Research Offers Hope for Better Diagnosis and ... As many as one million Americans live with Parkinson's disease (PD), which is more than the combined number ...

  1. Gait disorders and balance disturbances in Parkinson's disease: clinical update and pathophysiology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.A.; Kooij, H. van der; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Gait disorders and balance impairments are one of the most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Here, we discuss the latest findings regarding epidemiology, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of gait and balance impairments in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS

  2. Stability and Change in Patterns of Coping with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Leslie D.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined how Parkinson's disease patients cope with disease-related stressors over time. Of interest was whether patterns of coping would support a dispositional model of coping (i.e., stability) or a contextual model of coping (i.e., change). The influence of stability and change in coping on mental and physical health outcomes was…

  3. The Role of LRRK2 in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Di Fonzo (Alessio)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the role of the leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene in Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD is the second most frequent human neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease. The etiology of PD remains unknown in most cases, but several genetically-determine

  4. Primary skin fibroblasts as a model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auburger, G.; Klinkenberg, M.; Droste, J.A.H.; Marcus, K.; Morales-Gordo, B.; Kunz, W.S.; Brandt, U.; Broccoli, V.; Reichmann, H.; Gispert, S.; Jendrach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. While most cases occur sporadic mutations in a growing number of genes including Parkin (PARK2) and PINK1 (PARK6) have been associated with the disease. Different animal models and cell models like patient skin fibroblasts a

  5. Psychosis in Parkinson's Disease: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna; Fox, Susan H

    2016-07-01

    Psychotic symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are associated with poorer quality of life and increased caregiver burden. PD psychosis is correlated with several factors, such as more advanced disease, cognitive impairment, depression, and sleep disorders. The underlying causes of psychosis in PD thus involve a complex interplay between exogenous (e.g., drugs, intercurrent illnesses) and endogenous (e.g., PD disease pathology) factors. Current theories of the pathophysiology of PD psychosis have come from several neuropathological and neuroimaging studies that implicate pathways involving visual processing and executive function, including temporo-limbic structures and neocortical gray matter with altered neurotransmitter functioning (e.g., dopamine, serotonin, and acetylcholine). Treatment of PD psychosis requires a step-wise process, including initial careful investigation of treatable triggering conditions and a comprehensive evaluation with adjustment of PD medications and/or initiation of specific antipsychotic therapies. Clozapine remains the only recommended drug for the treatment of PD psychosis; however, because of regular blood monitoring, quetiapine is usually first-line therapy, although less efficacious. Emerging studies have focused on agents involving other neurotransmitters, including the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist pimavanserin, cholinesterase inhibitors, and antidepressants and anxiolytics.

  6. Proteome analysis of human substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease

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    Werner Cornelius J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is the most common neurodegenerative disorder involving the motor system. Although not being the only region involved in PD, affection of the substantia nigra and its projections is responsible for some of the most debilitating features of the disease. To further advance a comprehensive understanding of nigral pathology, we conducted a tissue based comparative proteome study of healthy and diseased human substantia nigra. Results The gross number of differentially regulated proteins in PD was 221. In total, we identified 37 proteins, of which 16 were differentially expressed. Identified differential proteins comprised elements of iron metabolism (H-ferritin and glutathione-related redox metabolism (GST M3, GST P1, GST O1, including novel redox proteins (SH3BGRL. Additionally, many glial or related proteins were found to be differentially regulated in PD (GFAP, GMFB, galectin-1, sorcin, as well as proteins belonging to metabolic pathways sparsely described in PD, such as adenosyl homocysteinase (methylation, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 and cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (aldehyde metabolism. Further differentially regulated proteins included annexin V, beta-tubulin cofactor A, coactosin-like protein and V-type ATPase subunit 1. Proteins that were similarly expressed in healthy or diseased substantia nigra comprised housekeeping proteins such as COX5A, Rho GDI alpha, actin gamma 1, creatin-kinase B, lactate dehydrogenase B, disulfide isomerase ER-60, Rab GDI beta, methyl glyoxalase 1 (AGE metabolism and glutamine synthetase. Interestingly, also DJ-1 and UCH-L1 were expressed similarly. Furthermore, proteins believed to serve as internal standards were found to be expressed in a constant manner, such as 14-3-3 epsilon and hCRMP-2, thus lending further validity to our results. Conclusion Using an approach encompassing high sensitivity and high resolution, we show that alterations of SN in PD include many

  7. Malignant syndrome in Parkinson's disease without dopaminergic drug withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, C J Suresh

    2008-10-01

    Malignant syndrome is a rare complication occurring during the course of drug treatment for Parkinson's disease. It resembles neuroleptic malignant syndrome and is characterized by fever, marked rigidity, altered consciousness, leucocytosis and elevated creatine kinase. Malignant syndrome is a potentially fatal condition and awareness of this condition is imperative for prevention and treatment. The commonest precipitating factor is dopaminergic drug withdrawal or dose reduction. We report malignant syndrome (precipitated by hyponatremia) in a case of Parkinson's disease, in the absence of dopaminergic drug withdrawal. A 60-year-old man presented with fever, severe rigidity and altered sensorium following repeated vomiting. On investigation, he was found to have hyponatremia precipitated malignant syndrome. Treatment with hydration, cooling, correction of hyponatremia and dopaminergic drugs reversed his condition. The triad of fever, severe rigidity and altered sensorium should prompt evaluation for malignant syndrome in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Speech dysprosody but no music 'dysprosody' in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert; Leenders, Klaus L; de Jong, Bauke M

    2016-12-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized not only by bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor, but also by impairments of expressive and receptive linguistic prosody. The facilitating effect of music with a salient beat on patients' gait suggests that it might have a similar effect on vocal behavior, however it is currently unknown whether singing is affected by the disease. In the present study, fifteen Parkinson patients were compared with fifteen healthy controls during the singing of familiar melodies and improvised melodic continuations. While patients' speech could reliably be distinguished from that of healthy controls matched for age and gender, purely on the basis of aural perception, no significant differences in singing were observed, either in pitch, pitch range, pitch variability, and tempo, or in scale tone distribution, interval size or interval variability. The apparent dissociation of speech and singing in Parkinson's disease suggests that music could be used to facilitate expressive linguistic prosody.

  9. The promise of stem cells in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, J William

    2005-01-01

    Neurotransplantation as a treatment for Parkinson disease reached the stage of human trials over 15 years ago, but the field, which is still in its infancy, has encountered a number of roadblocks since then, both political and scientific. With hope that stem cells may be used as a new source of dopaminergic neurons to replace the degenerating nerve cells in Parkinson disease looming, it is critical that we learn from the past as we work toward achieving new milestones aimed at making this new therapeutic strategy a reality. One of those milestones, which is an important translational step in the development of stem cell technology and the subject of a report in this issue of the JCI, involves transplanting new dopaminergic cell lines to a primate model of Parkinson disease.

  10. Resting-state functional brain networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Hugo C; Segura, Bàrbara; Junque, Carme

    2015-10-01

    The network approach is increasingly being applied to the investigation of normal brain function and its impairment. In the present review, we introduce the main methodological approaches employed for the analysis of resting-state neuroimaging data in Parkinson's disease studies. We then summarize the results of recent studies that used a functional network perspective to evaluate the changes underlying different manifestations of Parkinson's disease, with an emphasis on its cognitive symptoms. Despite the variability reported by many studies, these methods show promise as tools for shedding light on the pathophysiological substrates of different aspects of Parkinson's disease, as well as for differential diagnosis, treatment monitoring and establishment of imaging biomarkers for more severe clinical outcomes.

  11. Marijuana Compounds: A Nonconventional Approach to Parkinson's Disease Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Haregewein; Basu, Paramita; Chumki, Sanjeda; Loewy, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder, is the second most common neurological illness in United States. Neurologically, it is characterized by the selective degeneration of a unique population of cells, the nigrostriatal dopamine neurons. The current treatment is symptomatic and mainly involves replacement of dopamine deficiency. This therapy improves only motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease and is associated with a number of adverse effects including dyskinesia. Therefore, there is unmet need for more comprehensive approach in the management of PD. Cannabis and related compounds have created significant research interest as a promising therapy in neurodegenerative and movement disorders. In this review we examine the potential benefits of medical marijuana and related compounds in the treatment of both motor and nonmotor symptoms as well as in slowing the progression of the disease. The potential for cannabis to enhance the quality of life of Parkinson's patients is explored. PMID:28050308

  12. IMPULSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDERS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE. CLINICAL CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Fedorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective – a description of clinical cases of impulsive­compulsive disorders in Parkinson,s disease. The first clinical case. Patient N., 75 years old, suffering for 15 years from Parkinson,s disease, akinetic­rigid form of the disease, stage 4 by Hyun–Yar. Since 2009, he received levodopa/carbidopa 250/25 mg 5 times/day (daily dose of 1250 mg of levodopa; pramipexole 3.5 mg per day (daily dose 3.5 mg, amantadine sulfate 100 mg 5 times/day (daily dose 500 mg. While taking antiparkinsonian drugs the patient developed behavioral disorders such as dopamine disregulatory syndrome combined with punding, hypersexuality and compulsive shopping accompanied by visual hallucinations. The total equivalent dose of levodopa was 1600 mg per day. The second clinical case. Patient R., 52 years old, suffers from Parkinson,s disease about 5 years, a mixed form. She complained of slowness of movement, tremor in her left hand, sleep disturbances, poor mood. The clinic was appointed piribedil 50 mg 3 times per day. Despite the fact that the patient took only one of dopaminergic drugs in a therapeutic daily dose, she developed impulsive­compulsive disorder as hyper­ sexuality, compulsive shopping and binge eating. Results. In the first clinical case for correction of behavioral disorders in patients with Parkinson,s disease levodopa/carbidopa dose was reduced to 750 mg per day (3/4 Tab. 4 times a day; added to levodopa/benserazide dispersible 100 mg morning and levodopa/benserazide 100 mg before sleep (total dose of levodopa of 950 mg per day. Amantadine sulfate and pramipexole were canceled. It was added to the therapy of atypical neuroleptic clozapine dose 6,25 mg overnight. After 3 months marked improvement, regressed visual hallucina­ tions, improved family relationships, background mood became more stable. The patient continue to sing karaoke, but this hobby has be­ come less intrusive. In the second clinical event correction impulsive

  13. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... do not support the hypothesis that autoimmune diseases increase the risk for Parkinson disease. The decreased risk observed among patients with rheumatoid arthritis might be explained by underdiagnosis of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease in this patient group or by a protective effect...

  14. Clinical effectiveness of acupuncture on Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Hyun; Lim, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second-most-common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disease. The long-term use of levodopa leads to a loss of efficacy and to complications. Therefore, many patients with PD have turned to complementary therapies to help relieve their symptoms. Acupuncture is most commonly used as a complementary therapy in patients with PD. This paper presents a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of acupuncture for patients with PD. This study was performed to summarize and evaluate evidence regarding the effectiveness of acupuncture in the relief of PD symptoms. Methods: Seven databases, namely, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure [CNKI], and three Korean medical databases, were searched from their inception through August 2015 without language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they contained reports of acupuncture compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone or acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone for PD symptoms. Assessments were performed with the unified PD rating scales (UPDRS) I, II, III, and IV and the total score, the Webster scale, and effectiveness rating. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale and the Cochrane risk of bias (ROB). Results: In all, 982 potentially relevant articles were identified; 25 RCTs met our inclusion criterion, 19 of 25 RCTs were high-quality studies (i.e., a score of 6 or higher). The included RCTs showed favorable results for acupuncture plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone in the UPDRS II, III, and IV and the total score. Acupuncture was effective in relieving PD symptoms compared with no treatment and conventional treatment alone, and acupuncture plus conventional treatment had a more significant effect than conventional treatment alone

  15. Aged monkeys as a partial model for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, P J; Elsworth, J D; Whittaker, M C; Roth, R H; Redmond, D E

    2011-09-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) and the natural aging process share a number of biochemical mechanisms, including reduced function of dopaminergic systems. The present study aims to determine the extent that motor and behavioral changes in aged monkeys resemble parkinsonism induced by the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. The behavioral and physiological changes in PD are believed to result largely from selective depletion of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system. In the present study, ten aged female monkeys were compared with three groups: 9 untreated young adult female monkeys, 10 young adult male monkeys and 13 older male monkeys that had been exposed to MPTP. Trained observers, blind as to age and drug condition and without knowledge of the hypotheses, scored the monkeys using the Parkinson's factor score (Parkscore), which has been validated by a high correlation with post mortem striatal dopamine (DA) concentrations. The aged animals had higher scores on the Parkscore compared with the young adults, with most of its component behavioral items showing significance (tremor, Eating Problems, Delayed initiation of movement, and Poverty of Movement). L-Dopa and DA-agonists did not clearly reverse the principal measure of parkinsonism. DA concentrations post mortem were 63% lower in 3 aged monkeys in the ventral putamen compared with 4 young adults, with greater reductions in putamen than in caudate (45%). We conclude that aged monkeys, unexposed to MPTP, show a similar profile of parkinsonism to that seen after the neurotoxin exposure to MPTP in young adult monkeys. The pattern of greater DA depletion in putamen than in caudate in aged monkeys is the same as in human Parkinson's disease and contrasts with the greater depletion in caudate seen after MPTP. Aged monkeys of this species reflect many facets of Parkinson's disease, but like older humans do not improve with standard dopamine replacement pharmacotherapies.

  16. α-Synuclein oligomers and clinical implications for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Lorraine V; Kalia, Suneil K; McLean, Pamela J; Lozano, Andres M; Lang, Anthony E

    2013-02-01

    Protein aggregation within the central nervous system has been recognized as a defining feature of neurodegenerative diseases since the early 20th century. Since that time, there has been a growing list of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease, which are characterized by inclusions of specific pathogenic proteins. This has led to the long-held dogma that these characteristic protein inclusions, which are composed of large insoluble fibrillar protein aggregates and visible by light microscopy, are responsible for cell death in these diseases. However, the correlation between protein inclusion formation and cytotoxicity is inconsistent, suggesting that another form of the pathogenic proteins may be contributing to neurodegeneration. There is emerging evidence implicating soluble oligomers, smaller protein aggregates not detectable by conventional microscopy, as potential culprits in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The protein α-synuclein is well recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and is the major component of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. However, α-synuclein also forms oligomeric species, with certain conformations being toxic to cells. The mechanisms by which these α-synuclein oligomers cause cell death are being actively investigated, as they may provide new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson disease and related disorders. Here we review the possible role of α-synuclein oligomers in cell death in Parkinson disease and discuss the potential clinical implications.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammann Andersen, Andreas; Binzer, Michael; Stenager, Egon;

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosticering af Parkinson's sygdom (PD) er baseret på den kliniske udvikling af sygdommen samt en fysisk undersøgelse af patienten, men fejldiagnosticering sker hyppigt; specielt i tidlige stadier. Biomarkører for PD kan muliggøre en tidligere og mere præcis diagnosticering samt monitorering af...

  18. The internal consistency and validity of the Self-Assessment Parkinson's Disease Disability Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, M A; Dekker, J; van der Woude, L H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the consistency and validity of the Self-assessment Parkinson's Disease Disability Scale in patients with Parkinson's disease living at home. DESIGN: Patients with Parkinson's disease responded to a set of questionnaires. In addition, an observation of the performance of daily act

  19. Cognitive impairment in early-stage non-demented Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeiffer, Helle Cecilie Viekilde; Løkkegaard, A; Zoetmulder, Marielle;

    2013-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) and Parkinson's disease-mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) are common. PD-MCI is a risk factor for developing PDD. Knowledge of cognition in early-stages PD is essential in understanding and predicting the dementia process....

  20. Personality Changes after Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Uyen; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Skogseid, Inger-Marie; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Andersson, Stein; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit; Aarsland, Dag; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is a recognized therapy that improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about its impact on personality. To address this topic, we have assessed personality traits before and after STN-DBS in PD patients. Methods. Forty patients with advanced PD were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI): the Urgency, Premeditation, Perseverance, Sensation Seeking impulsive behaviour scale (UPPS), and the Neuroticism and Lie subscales of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-N, EPQ-L) before surgery and after three months of STN-DBS. Collateral information obtained from the UPPS was also reported. Results. Despite improvement in motor function and reduction in dopaminergic dosage patients reported lower score on the TCI Persistence and Self-Transcendence scales, after three months of STN-DBS, compared to baseline (P = 0.006; P = 0.024). Relatives reported significantly increased scores on the UPPS Lack of Premeditation scale at follow-up (P = 0.027). Conclusion. STN-DBS in PD patients is associated with personality changes in the direction of increased impulsivity. PMID:25705545

  1. Aripiprazole Can Improve Apraxia of Eyelid Opening in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokisato, Kaori; Fukunaga, Kimiko; Tokunaga, Makoto; Watanabe, Susumu; Nakanishi, Ryoji; Yamanaga, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We herein report three cases of Parkinson's disease associated with difficulty in eyelid opening, referred to as apraxia of eyelid opening (AEO), which improved after aripiprazole treatment. In case 1, aripiprazole was administered as a psychiatric treatment. It proved to be effective in AEO with blepharospasm. In case 2 and case 3, the patients experienced AEO without blepharospasm, and a significant improvement was observed after aripiprazole treatment. In this study, the aripiprazole dosage ranged between 3 and 9 mg/day. This is the first report of aripiprazole as a potentially effective treatment for AEO in Parkinson's disease.

  2. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson's disease: the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S; Toledo, Jon B; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1-42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1-42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1-42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1-42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance.

  3. The use of stem cells in regenerative medicine for Parkinson's and Huntington's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescaudron, L; Naveilhan, P; Neveu, I

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been proposed as a means of replacing specific cell populations lost through neurodegenerative processes such as that seen in Parkinson's or Huntington's diseases. Improvement of the clinical symptoms has been observed in a number of Parkinson and Huntington's patients transplanted with freshly isolated fetal brain tissue but such restorative approach is greatly hampered by logistic and ethical concerns relative to the use of fetal tissue, in addition to potential side effects that remain to be controlled. In this context, stem cells that are capable of self-renewal and can differentiate into neurons, have received a great deal of interest, as demonstrated by the numerous studies based on the transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells, embryonic stem cells or mesenchymal stem cells into animal models of Parkinson's or Huntington's diseases. More recently, the induction of pluripotent stem cells from somatic adult cells has raised a new hope for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present article, we review the main experimental approaches to assess the efficiency of cell-based therapy for Parkinson's or Huntington's diseases, and discuss the recent advances in using stem cells to replace lost dopaminergic mesencephalic or striatal neurons. Characteristics of the different stem cells are extensively examined with a special attention to their ability of producing neurotrophic or immunosuppressive factors, as these may provide a favourable environment for brain tissue repair and long-term survival of transplanted cells in the central nervous system. Thus, stem cell therapy can be a valuable tool in regenerative medicine.

  4. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  5. Investigation of Urination Disorder in Parkinson's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Mei Zhang; Xu-Ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Urination disorders are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and respond poorly to medication.This study aimed to analyze the risk factors for urination disorders in PD.Methods:Ninety-one patients with PD (aged 34-83 years old) were recruited.Patients were assessed with the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS),Hoehn and Yahr stage,Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI),Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD),and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA).Micturition number was recorded,and Type B ultrasound was used to evaluate residual urine.Statistics was performed using binary logistic regression,bivariate correlations,and Chi-square and t-tests.Results:Of 91 patients,urinary dysfunction occurred in 55.0%.Among these,49.5% suffered with nocturia,47.3% with pollakiuria.Nocturia number had a positive linear relationship with HAMA score (odds ratio [OR] =0.340,P =0.001),HAMD score (OR =0.323,P =0.002),duration of L-dopa medication (OR =0.328,P =0.001),dose of L-dopa (OR =0.273,P =0.009),UPDRS-Ⅱ (OR =0.402,P =0.000),UPDRS-Ⅲ score (OR =0.291,P =0.005),and PSQI score (OR =0.249,P =0.017).Micturition number over 24 h was positively associated with HAMA (OR =0.303,P =0.004) and UPDRS-Ⅱ scores (OR =0.306,P =0.003).Of patients with residual urine,79.3% had a volume of residual urine <50 ml.Residual urine was present in 44.4% of the patients with nocturia,46.5% of the patients with pollakiuria,and 80.0% of the patients with dysuria.More men than women had residual urine (35.2% male vs.13.3% female;P =0.002).Conclusions:Nocturia and pollakiuria were common micturition symptoms in our participants with PD.Nocturia was associated with depression,anxiety,sleep problems,and severity of PD.Pollakiuria was associated with anxiety and severity of PD.Male patients were more prone to residual urine and pollakiuria.

  6. Parkinson's disease Assessment using Fuzzy Expert System and Nonlinear Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEMAN, O.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new screening system for quantitative evaluation and analysis, designed for the early stage detection of Parkinson disease. This has been carried out in the view of improving the diagnosis currently established upon a basis of subjective scores. Parkinson?s disease (PD appears as a result of dopamine loss, a chemical mediator that is responsible for the body?s ability to control movements. The symptoms reflect the loss of nerve cells, due to an unknown. The input parameters of the system are represented by amplitude, frequency, the spectral characteristic and trembling localization. The main symptoms include trembling of hand, arms, movement difficulties, postural instability, disturbance of coordination and equilibrium, sleep disturbance, difficulties in speaking, reducing of voice volume. The medical knowledge in PD field is characterized by imprecision, uncertainty and vagueness. The proposed system (fuzzy expert systems is non-invasive and, easy to use by both physicians and patients at home.

  7. The use of acupuncture in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fung Kei

    2016-12-29

    Parkinson's disease, a progressive neuro-degeneration of multiple systems damaging motor and non-motor functions, affects individual and societal dimensions negatively. In addition to standard treatments, complementary and alternative medicine has been adopted, in which acupuncture, a traditional Chinese medical practice by needle penetration at specific stimulation points (acupoints) along the body, indicates positive outcomes in this illness. Apart from offering an overview of using acupuncture in Parkinson's disease, this literature review analyses the effects of acupuncture on Parkinson's-induced physical symptoms and mental problems such as slow movements, stiffness, constipation, and sleep disorders. In light of the 35 reviewed research projects in mainland China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and the United States of America, this study reveals the optimization of this approach through combined therapy and its preventive contribution using acupuncture alone. It also suggests research and practical implications that hint at enhancements in medical applications.

  8. Anterior cingulate integrity: executive and neuropsychiatric features in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Simon J G; Shine, James M; Duffy, Shantel; Halliday, Glenda; Naismith, Sharon L

    2012-09-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly suffer with significant executive dysfunction and concomitant visual hallucinations. Although the underlying pathophysiology remains poorly understood, numerous studies have highlighted the strong association between these neuropsychiatric features, suggesting common neural pathways. Although previous neuroimaging studies have identified widespread volume loss across a number of cortical regions, to date, no studies have utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to provide insights into how neurometabolic changes may relate to such symptoms. Twenty patients with PD and 20 healthy controls underwent spectroscopy to determine the N-acetyl aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio, which reflects the degree of neuronal integrity in neurodegenerative diseases. Voxels were obtained from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), an area critical for a wide range of executive mechanisms as well as from a control volume in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC). Compared to controls, patients with PD had lower NAA/Cr ratios in the ACC. In turn, lower NAA/Cr ratios significantly correlated with poorer executive function on tasks of attentional set-shifting and response inhibition, as well as more-severe psychotic symptoms and poorer performance on the Bistable Percept Paradigm, a neuropsychological probe of visual hallucinations. NAA/Cr ratios were significantly lower in hallucinators, compared to nonhallucinators, within the ACC, but did not differ in the PCC. These results suggest that loss of neuronal integrity within the ACC plays an important role in the pathophysiology underlying executive functioning and visual hallucinations in PD. © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging markers for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Marino; Rosella Ciurleo; Giuseppe Di Lorenzo; Marina Barresi; Simona De Salvo; Sabrina Giacoppo; Alessia Bramanti; Pietro Lanzafame; Placido Bramanti

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective and progressive degeneration, as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In PD, approximately 60-70% of nigrostriatal neurons are degenerated and 80% of content of the striatal dopamine is reduced before the diagnosis can be established according to widely accepted clinical diagnostic criteria. This condition describes a stage of disease called "prodromal", where non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, depression, precede motor sign of PD. Detection of prodromal phase of PD is becoming an important goal for determining the prognosis and choosing a suitable treatment strategy. In this review, we present some non-invasive instrumental approaches that could be useful to identify patients in the prodromal phase of PD or in an early clinical phase, when the first motor symptoms begin to be apparent. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MRI techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, are useful to differentiate early PD with initial motor symptoms from atypical parkinsonian disorders, thus, making easier early diagnosis. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging techniques can show abnormalities in the olfactory system in prodromal PD.

  10. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in clinical and pathologically proven Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Juliane; Bras, Jose; Deas, Emma; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Parkkinen, Laura; Lachmann, Robin H; Li, Abi; Holton, Janice; Guerreiro, Rita; Paudel, Reema; Segarane, Badmavady; Singleton, Andrew; Lees, Andrew; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry; Revesz, Tamas; Wood, Nicholas W

    2009-07-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are associated with Gaucher's disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Parkinsonism is an established feature of Gaucher's disease and an increased frequency of mutations in GBA has been reported in several different ethnic series with sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of GBA mutations in British patients affected by Parkinson's disease. We utilized the DNA of 790 patients and 257 controls, matched for age and ethnicity, to screen for mutations within the GBA gene. Clinical data on all identified GBA mutation carriers was reviewed and analysed. Additionally, in all cases where brain material was available, a neuropathological evaluation was performed and compared to sporadic Parkinson's disease without GBA mutations. The frequency of GBA mutations among the British patients (33/790 = 4.18%) was significantly higher (P = 0.01; odds ratio = 3.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.12-12.14) when compared to the control group (3/257 = 1.17%). Fourteen different GBA mutations were identified, including three previously undescribed mutations, K7E, D443N and G193E. Pathological examination revealed widespread and abundant alpha-synuclein pathology in all 17 GBA mutation carriers, which were graded as Braak stage of 5-6, and had McKeith's limbic or diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology. Diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology tended to occur more frequently in the group with GBA mutations compared to matched Parkinson's disease controls. Clinical features comprised an early onset of the disease, the presence of hallucinations in 45% (14/31) and symptoms of cognitive decline or dementia in 48% (15/31) of patients. This study demonstrates that GBA mutations are found in British subjects at a higher frequency than any other known Parkinson's disease gene. This is the largest study to date on a non-Jewish patient sample with a detailed genotype/phenotype/pathological analyses

  11. Sporadic Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis complex (Brait-Fahn-Schwartz disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Concetta; Lipari, Alessio; Bono, Valeria; Taiello, Alfonsa Claudia; La Bella, Vincenzo

    2013-03-15

    Clinical evidence for parkinsonism may accompany Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with a frequency ranging from 5% to 17%. The concurrence of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Parkinson's disease, outside the known Guam and Kii Peninsula foci, is instead rare, but this raises the possibility of a common pathogenesis. Clinically this complex presents with a levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and has been termed Brait-Fahn-Schwartz disease. Here we describe two patients with this uncommon neurodegenerative complex. Both presented with Parkinson disease and progressed to a full blown Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. We further suggest that the association of Parkinson disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis represents a distinct nosological entity, which should be kept separated from extrapyramidal signs and symptoms that may occur in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

  12. Effects of pedunculopontine nucleus area stimulation on gait disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraye, Murielle; Debû, Bettina; Fraix, Valérie; Goetz, Laurent; Ardouin, Claire; Yelnik, Jérôme; Henry-Lagrange, Christelle; Seigneuret, Eric; Piallat, Brigitte; Krack, Paul; Le Bas, Jean-François; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Chabardès, Stephan; Pollak, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Gait disturbances are frequent and disabling in advanced Parkinson's disease. These symptoms respond poorly to usual medical and surgical treatments but were reported to be improved by stimulation of the pedunculopontine nucleus. We studied the effects of stimulating the pedunculopontine nucleus area in six patients with severe freezing of gait, unresponsive to levodopa and subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Electrodes were implanted bilaterally in the pedunculopontine n...

  13. The role of frontostriatal impairment in freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    James M. Shine; Ahmed A. Moustafa; Matar, Elie; Frank, Michael J.; Lewis, Simon J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a disabling symptom of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) that leads to an increased risk of falls and nursing home placement. Interestingly, multiple lines of evidence suggest that the manifestation of FOG is related to specific deficits in cognition, such as set shifting and the ability to process conflict-related signals. These findings are consistent with the specific patterns of abnormal cortical processing seen during functional neuroimaging experiments of FOG, ...

  14. Clinical application of brain MRI in parkinsonism. From basic to advanced imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with increased prevalence at raising age, and the most frequent cause of parkinsonism. In clinical practice, differentiating Parkinson’s disease from the various forms of neurodegenerative atypical parkinsonism can be difficult, especially in the e

  15. Dual task and postural control in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Pires de Andrade

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with neurodegenerative diseases are required to use cognitive resources while maintaining postural control. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a frontal cognitive task on postural control in patients with Alzheimer, Parkinson and controls. Thirty-eight participants were instructed to stand upright on a force platform in two experimental conditions: single and dual task. Participants with Parkinson's disease presented an increase in the coefficient of variation greater than 100% in the dual task as compared to the single task for center of pressure (COP area and COP path. In addition, patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease had a higher number of errors during the execution of the cognitive task when compared to the group of elderly without neurodegenerative diseases. The motor cortex, which is engaged in postural control, does not seem to compete with frontal brain regions in the performance of the cognitive task. However, patients with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease presented worsened performance in cognitive task.

  16. Multidimensional exercise for people with Parkinson's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluding, Patricia; McGinnis, Patricia Quinn

    2006-06-01

    The primary impairments associated with Parkinson's disease occur in combination with the secondary, preventable effects of immobility. A community-based fitness program may help increase activity and maintain function in people in the early or middle stages of the disease. This article describes a unique program designed to reduce fall risk and promote independent exercise for people with Parkinson's disease. Two 66-year-old males, both community ambulators and in early or middle stages of Parkinson's disease, participated in 3 months of various physical activities. Group balance classes were held twice weekly during the first month, participants joined a fitness center and self-directed their exercise program during the second month, and group Tai Chi classes were held twice weekly during the third month. At conclusion of the program, participants were given suggestions for continued physical fitness activities. After the 3-month program, improvements were noted for both individuals in functional reach, Timed Up and Go, and Berg Balance scores. Both participants continued to exercise regularly for at least 8 months following the program. Two individuals with Parkinson's disease demonstrated improvement in their balance test performance over a 3-month period. Perhaps most importantly, these participants independently continued exercising after completing this program.

  17. Comparison with Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonism in dementia with lewy bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Jae Woo [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Dementia with lewy bodies (DLB) is recognized as a common cause of dementia in elderly people. It is characterized by Parkinsonism as well as fluctuation cognition and visual hallucination. It is not easy to differentiated DLB with Parkinsonism from Parkinson's disease (PD). We compared clinical features and I-123 IPT SPECT findings between two groups. Ten probable DLB patients and 15 PD patients were included. They were all matched for age (66.9{+-}8.5 vs 65.8{+-}8.5), education period (9.8{+-}4.9 vs 9.1{+-}4.5) and H and Y stage (2.9{+-}0.8). Clinical features were scored. I-123 IPT SPECT were performed. The mean age of disease onset was seen more common in PD, but the severity of rigidity and bradykinesia was not significantly different. We found no significant difference of responsiveness to levodopa measured with decrement of UPDRS scores before and after treatment of levodopa. The mean disease duration reaching same H and Y stage was longer in PD than in DLB. The average K-MMSE score was significantly lower in DLB than in PD. The uptake ratio in the striatum in DLB was comparable to that in PD. In differentiating the two conditions the speed of disease progression and cognitive state were considered to be important. The level of dopamine transporter was not different between two diseases with same H and Y stage.

  18. Neuregulins, Neuroprotection and Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    cultures. Journal of Neurochemistry 91: 1358-1368. Yurek, D.M., Zhang, L., Fletcher-Turner, A. and Seroogy, K.B. (2004) Supranigral injection of...speaker, Central Ohio Parkinson Society, Annual Symposium, Columbus, OH, April 24, 2004) 8 “Neuroprotective and Neurotrophic Actions of Neuregulin...growth factor-2 on dopaminergic neurons in rat primary midbrain cultures. Journal of Neurochemistry 91: 1358-1368. Yurek, D.M., Zhang, L., Fletcher

  19. Pisa syndrome in Parkinson's disease: diagnostic and management challenges

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Vladimir Miletić Department of Neurology, Movement Disorders Centre, University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia Abstract: Pisa syndrome is a rare clinical entity characterized by marked lateral flexion of the trunk, which is typically mobile and resolves at supine position. When observed in clinical practice, it denotes an incapacitating symptom of underlying neurodegenerative disease such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and Alzheimer's disease. The ...

  20. Attentional and perceptual impairments in Parkinson's disease with visual hallucinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerts, Janneke; Borg, Maarten A. J. P.; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Leenders, Klaus L.; van Beilen, Marije; van Laar, Teus

    2010-01-01

    Visual hallucinations (VH) are common in Parkinson's Disease (PD). Both deficits of perception and attention seem to play a role in the pathogenesis of VH in PD. However, the possible coexistence of impairments in attention and visual perception in PD with VH is not known. This study investigated bo

  1. Bilateral adaptive deep brain stimulation is effective in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Neal, Spencer; Cheeran, Binith; Cagnan, Hayriye; Gratwicke, James; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Pogosyan, Alex; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction & objectives Adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) uses feedback from brain signals to guide stimulation. A recent acute trial of unilateral aDBS showed that aDBS can lead to substantial improvements in contralateral hemibody Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score

  2. Speech dysprosody but no music 'dysprosody' in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Robert; Leenders, Klaus L.; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized not only by bradykinesia, rigidity, and tremor, but also by impairments of expressive and receptive linguistic prosody. The facilitating effect of music with a salient beat on patients' gait suggests that it might have a similar effect on vocal behavior, however

  3. SensorShoe: Mobile Gait Analysis for Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw-A-Tjoe, R.; Thalen, J.; Marin-Perianu, M.; Havinga, P.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present the design and initial evaluation of a mobile gait analysis system, SensorShoe. The target user group is represented by Parkinson's Disease patients, which need continuous assistance with the physical therapy in their home environment. SensorShoe analyses the gait by using a low-power sen

  4. SensorShoe: Mobile Gait Analysis for Parkinson's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, P.J.M.; Kauw-A-Tjoe, R.G.; Marin-Perianu, M.; Thalen, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We present the design and initial evaluation of a mobile gait analysis system, SensorShoe. The target user group is represented by Parkinson's Disease patients, which need continous assistance with the physical therapy in their home environment. SensorShoe analyses the gait by using a low-power sens

  5. [Possibilities of non-drug treatment for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhabov, D V; Abramov, V G; Pokhabov, D D

    In this article, non-drug methods of treatment of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Particular attention is given to the motor symptoms of disease, specifically to gait disorders. Information about objective methods of gait impairment is presented. Own results that confirm the effect of a method of tempo-rhythmical correction of walk in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and vascular parkinsonism as well as a device for assessment of gait parameters developed by the authors are analyzed. The efficacy of other methods of gait correction using external cues, study design and level of evidence are analyzed as well. Information about possibilities of physical therapy and ergotherapy for correction of different symptoms of Parkinson's disease is presented. Positive and negative results of transcranial magnetic stimulation, light therapy and transcranial micropolarization in PD are analyzed. Basis non-drug methods of PD treatment, which currently have insufficient level of evidence (methods of mental relaxation and auditory training, methods of whole body vibration (vibromassage), laser therapy (photoacoustic therapy), acupuncture), are described in brief. Perspectives of the method of gait recovery in PD using tempo-rhythmic correction are emphasized.

  6. Impaired Awareness of Movement Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzio, Martina; Monteverdi, Silvia; Giordano, Alessandra; Soliveri, Paola; Filippi, Paola; Geminiani, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study analyzed the presence of awareness of movement disorders (dyskinesias and hypokinesias) in 25 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and motor fluctuations (dyskinesias, wearing off, on-off fluctuations). Of the few studies that have dealt with this topic, none have analyzed the differences in the awareness of motor deficits…

  7. Quantitative wearable sensors for objective assessment of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maetzler, W.; Domingos, J.; Srulijes, K.; Ferreira, J.J.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing interest in the quantitative assessment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated signs and disability using wearable technology. Both persons with PD and their clinicians see advantages in such developments. Specifically, quantitative assessments using wearable technology ma

  8. Prefrontal cortex and striatal activation by feedback in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keitz, Martijn; Koerts, Janneke; Kortekaas, Rudie; Renken, Remco; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    Positive feedbacks reinforce goal-directed behavior and evoke pleasure. in Parkinson's disease (PD) the striatal dysfunction impairs motor performance, but also may lead to decreased positive feedback (reward) processing. This study investigates two types of positive feedback processing (monetary fe

  9. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...

  10. Cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with early Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Cumming, Paul; Østergaard, Karen;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: Decreased activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). This model would most likely predict a decrease in the rate of cerebral oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)). To test this hypothesis, we compared CMRO(2...

  11. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score...

  12. Impaired Emotion Recognition in Music in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tricht, Mirjam J.; Smeding, Harriet M. M.; Speelman, Johannes D.; Schmand, Ben A.

    2010-01-01

    Music has the potential to evoke strong emotions and plays a significant role in the lives of many people. Music might therefore be an ideal medium to assess emotion recognition. We investigated emotion recognition in music in 20 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 20 matched healthy volunteers. The role of cognitive dysfunction…

  13. The Parkinson's disease death rate: carbidopa and vitamin B6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinz M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz,1 Alvin Stein,2 Ted Cole31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc., Cape Coral, FL, USA; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, USA; 3Cole Center for Healing, Cincinnati, OH, USAAbstract: The only indication for carbidopa and benserazide is the management of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa-induced nausea. Both drugs irreversibly bind to and permanently deactivate pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP, the active form of vitamin B6, and PLP-dependent enzymes. PLP is required for the function of over 300 enzymes and proteins. Virtually every major system in the body is impacted directly or indirectly by PLP. The administration of carbidopa and benserazide potentially induces a nutritional catastrophe. During the first 15 years of prescribing L-dopa, a decreasing Parkinson's disease death rate was observed. Then, in 1976, 1 year after US Food and Drug Administration approved the original L-dopa/carbidopa combination drug, the Parkinson's disease death rate started increasing. This trend has continued to the present, for 38 years and counting. The previous literature documents this increasing death rate, but no hypothesis has been offered concerning this trend. Carbidopa is postulated to contribute to the increasing Parkinson's disease death rate and to the classification of Parkinson's as a progressive neurodegenerative disease. It may contribute to L-dopa tachyphylaxis.Keywords: L-dopa, levodopa, vitamin B6, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate

  14. Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Rutgers, AWF; Van Weerden, TW

    1998-01-01

    Voluntary and involuntary adaptation of gait in Parkinson's disease (PD) were studied in two separate experiments. In the first experiment, effects of changes in voluntary control were studied by asking PD patients and age-matched healthy subjects to adapt their walking pattern to visual cues result

  15. Spatial remapping of cortico-striatal connectivity in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Derikx, L.C.; Bakker, M.; Scheeringa, R.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by striatal dopamine depletion, especially in the posterior putamen. The dense connectivity profile of the striatum suggests that these local impairments may propagate throughout the whole cortico-striatal network. Here we test the effect of striatal dopamin

  16. Spatial Remapping of Cortico-striatal Connectivity in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Derikx, L.C.E.M.; Bakker, M.; Scheeringa, R.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by striatal dopamine depletion, especially in the posterior putamen. The dense connectivity profile of the striatum suggests that these local impairments may propagate throughout the whole cortico-striatal network. Here we test the effect of striatal dopamin

  17. Spatial remapping of cortico-striatal connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Derikx, L.C.E.M.; Bakker, M.; Scheeringa, R.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by striatal dopamine depletion, especially in the posterior putamen. The dense connectivity profile of the striatum suggests that these local impairments may propagate throughout the whole cortico-striatal network. Here we test the effect of striatal dopamin

  18. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.; Heida, T.; Zhao, Y.; Gils, S.A. van; Wezel, Richard van

    2014-01-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a majo

  19. PARK1 gene mutation of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ligang Jiang; Guohua Hu; Qiuhui Chen; Ying Zhang; Xinyu Hu; Jia Fan; Lifeng Liu; Rui Guo; Yajuan Sun; Yixhi Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that PARK1 gene is associated with the autosomal dominant inheritance of Parkinson's disease.PARK1 gene contains two mutation sites, namely Ala30Pro and AIa53Thr, which are located on exons 3 and 4, respectively.However, the genetic loci of the pathogenic genes remain unclear.In this study, blood samples were collected from 11 members of a family with high prevalence of Parkinson's disease, including four affected cases, five suspected cases,and two non-affected cases.Point mutation screening of common mutation sites on PARK1 gene exon 4 was conducted using PCR, to determine the genetic loci of the causative gene for Parkinson's disease.Gene identification and sequencing results showed that a T base deletion mutation was observed in the PARK1 gene exon 4 of all 11 collected samples.It was confirmed that the PARKf gene exon 4 gene mutation is an important pathogenic mutation for Parkinson's disease.

  20. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: vocal and quality of life analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Furtado e Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare voice and life quality of male patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, with individuals without disease (Control Group. METHODS: A cross-sectional study that evaluated the voice of individuals with Parkinson's disease, the group was composed of 27 subjects, aged from 39 to 79 years-old (average 59.96. The Control Group was matched on sex and age. Participants underwent voice recording. Perceptual evaluation was made using GRBASI scale, which considers G as the overall degree of dysphonia, R as roughness, B as breathiness, A as asthenia, S as strain and I as instability. The acoustic parameters analyzed were: fundamental frequency, jitter, shimmer, and harmonic to noise ratio (NHR. For vocal self-perception analysis, we used the Voice Related Quality of Life protocol. RESULTS: Fundamental frequency and jitter presented higher values in the Parkinson's group. NHR values were higher in the Control Group. Perceptual analysis showed a deviation ranging. The vocal disorder self-perception demonstrated a worse impact on quality of life. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with Parkinson's disease have an altered voice quality and a negative impact on quality of life.