WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced nuclear energy

  1. Communicating about advanced nuclear energy plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of advanced nuclear energy plants, as with any new product, will not depend on design alone. Success will require public support and good communications to achieve that support. In the past, communication weaknesses - including mixed and confusing messages - have sometimes created barriers between the technical community and the public. Several lessons learned from a decade of social science research in the United States of America have implications for communicating effectively about advanced design nuclear energy plants: (1) Most audiences are open-minded and receptive to communications on this topic. They view nuclear energy as a fuel of the future and want to be comfortable about the future. Most people in the USA (82%) expect future nuclear energy plants to be safer, so the improvements being made are simply consistent with public expectations. (2) Few people pay close attention to energy issues. (3) Communications must be simple and free of jargon. Because people do not pay close attention to the issues, their knowledge is limited. Some terms used by the industry to describe advanced design plants are misinterpreted. (4) Good communications focus on consumer wants and values, not industry needs or problems. People care about generational responsibility, planning for the future, environmental protection and security. (5) Benefits and safeguards should be shown instead of risk comparisons. Generic benefits of nuclear energy, such as clean air, are important to consumers. (6) Pictures and hand-on demonstrations help in communicating about nuclear energy plants, because many of the discussion concepts are abstract. (7) Trust is crucial and is established now for tomorrow through word and deed. (author)

  2. Perspective of nuclear energy and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear energy growth will be the result of the contributions of every single plant being constructed or projected at present as it is connected to the grid. As per IAEA, there exists presently 34 nuclear power plants under construction 81 with the necessary permits and funding and 223 proposed, which are plants seriously pursuing permits and financing. This means that in a few decades the number of nuclear power plants in operation will have doubled. This growth rate is characterised by the incorporation of new countries to the nuclear club and the gradually increasing importance of Asian countries. During this expansive phase, generation III and III+designs are or will be used. These designs incorporate the experience from operating plants, and introduce innovations on rationalization design efficiency and safety, with emphasis on passive safety features. In a posterior phase, generation IV designs, presently under development, will be employed. Generation IV consists of several types of reactors (fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, etc), which will improve further sustain ability, economy, safety and reliability concepts. The described situation seems to lead to a renaissance of the nuclear energy to levels hardly thinkable several years ago. (Author)

  3. Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuels for advanced nuclear reactors differ greatly from conventional light water reactor fuels and vary widely between the different concepts, due differences in reactor architecture and deployment. Functional requirements of all fuel designs include (1) retention of fission products and fuel nuclides, (2) dimensional stability, and (3) maintaining a coolable geometry. In all cases, the anticipated fuel performance under normal or off-normal conditions is the limiting factor in reactor system design, and cumulative effects of increased exposure to higher burnup degrades fuel performance. In high-temperature (thermal) gas reactor systems, fuel particles of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide particles are coated with layers of carbon and SiC (or ZrC). Such fuels have been used successfully to very high burnup (10-20% of heavy-metal atoms) and can withstand transient temperatures up to 1600 C. Oxide (pellet-type) and metal (pin-type) fuels clad in stainless steel tubes have been successfully used in liquid metal cooled fast reactors, attaining burnup of 20% or more of heavy-metal atoms. Those fuel designs are being adapted for actinide management missions, requiring greater contents of minor actinides (e.g. Am, Np, Cm). The current status of each fuel system is reviewed and technical challenges confronting the implementation of each fuel in the context of the entire advanced reactor fuel cycle (fabrication, reactor performance, recycle) are discussed

  4. The Advanced BWR Nuclear Plant: Safe, economic nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, J.R. [GE Nuclear Energy, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The safety and economics of Advanced BWR Nuclear Power Plants are outlined. The topics discussed include: ABWR Programs: status in US and Japan; ABWR competitiveness: safety and economics; SBWR status; combining ABWR and SBWR: the passive ABWR; and Korean/GE partnership.

  5. Advanced training of specialists in nuclear energy at ONPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The is considered the relevance of training of specialists in nuclear energy in the form of advanced training to maintain professional skills at the needed level.The problems of thr re-profiling of specialists working in the nuclear industry and having a non specialized education to the specialty 'Nuclear Engineering' are also considered. The results of activity of the Centre for Continuing Education of ONPU in this direction for recent years are presented.

  6. Advanced energy system with nuclear reactors as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    recovery system is also applicable to a fast reactor (FR) with a supercritical CO2 gas turbine that achieves higher cycle efficiency than conventional sodium cooled FRs with steam turbines. The FR will eliminate problems of conventional FRs related to safety, plant maintenance, and construction costs. The FR consumes efficiently trans-uranium elements (TRU) produced in light water reactors as fuel and reduce long-lived radioactive wastes or environmental loads of long term geological disposal. An Advanced Energy System (AES) with nuclear reactors as an energy source has been proposed which supply electricity and heat to cities. The AES has three objectives: 1. Save energy resources and reduce green house gas emissions, attaining total energy utilization efficiency higher than 85% through waste heat recovery and utilization. 2. Foster a recycling society that produces methane and methanol for fuel cells from waste products of cities and farms. 3. Consume TRU produced in LWRs as fuel for FRs, and reduce long-lived radioactive wastes or environmental loads of long term geological disposal. References 1. Y. Kato, T. Nitawaki and K. Fujima, 'Zero Waste Heat Release Nuclear Cogeneration System, 'Proc. 2003 Intl. Congress on Advanced Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP'03), Cordoba, Spain, May 4-7, 2003, Paper 3313. 2. Y. Kato, T. Nitawaki and Y. Muto, 'Medium Temperature Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine Reactor, 'Nucl. Eng. Design, 230, pp. 195-207 (2004). 3. H. N. Tran and Y. Kato, 'New 237Np Burning Strategy in a Supercritical CO2 Cooled Fast Reactor Core Attaining Zero Burnup Reactivity Loss,' Proc. American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics (PHYSOR 2006), Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 10-14, 2006

  7. Korea advanced nuclear energy system development. Requirements and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements for Advanced Nuclear Energy System development in Korea are to improve safety, economics, environmental impact, and social acceptability compared to Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) and to maximize nuclear fuel resource utilization. The target for such system is to commission first commercial unit around 2015. Since Korean R and D and industrial capabilities as well as resources are limited, viable reactor and fuel cycle development strategies have to be analyzed and various good options synthesized to suit for the national, regional, and global needs. Undoubtedly, most viable strategy would be through well balanced joint cooperations of bilateral, or multilateral nature depending upon the progressive stages of advanced nuclear energy system development. (author)

  8. Impact of Nuclear Energy Futures on Advanced Fuel Cycle Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    tripling market share by 2100 from the current 8.4% to 25%, equivalent to continuing the average market growth of last 50 years for an additional 100 years. Five primary spent fuel management strategies are assessed against each of the energy futures to determine the number of geological repositories needed and how the first repository would be used. The geological repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has the physical potential to accommodate all the spent fuel that will be generated by the current fleet of domestic commercial nuclear reactors, even with license extensions. If new nuclear plants are built in the future as replacements or additions, the United States will need to adopt spent fuel treatment to extend the life of the repository. Should a significant number of new nuclear plants be built, advanced fuel recycling will be needed to fully manage the spent fuel within a single repository. The analysis also considers the timeframe for most efficient implementation of new spent fuel management strategies. The mix of unprocessed spent fuel and processed high level waste in Yucca Mountain varies with each future and strategy. Either recycling must start before there is too much unprocessed waste emplaced or unprocessed waste will have to be retrieved later with corresponding costs. For each case, the latest date to implement reprocessing without subsequent retrieval is determined

  9. The role of ANS in enhancing public understanding of advanced nuclear energy plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concurrent with the design certification of both evolutionary and passive designs for advanced nuclear energy plants in the US, the American Nuclear Society (ANS) has an extensive nuclear community and public information program under way. The goal of the program is to inform both the technical community and the general public on the following major topics related to the deployment of advanced nuclear energy plants: (1) need for new baseload electrical generation; (2) environmental advantages of nuclear power generation; (3) design of advanced nuclear energy plants; (4) nuclear waste issues; and (5) work force issues

  10. 'A la carte' in advanced nuclear energy. Challenges in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here was introduced some parts of advanced efforts in the nuclear energy field recently carried out at universities and institutes in Japan. They have 100 items on summarized advanced nuclear informations, containing 1) new nuclear power generation system and its back-end technologies, 2) nuclear fuels and upgrading on thermal flow technology in reactors, 3) advancement on structural engineering and maintenance engineering of power plants, 4) technical innovation in human man-machine system and robots, 5) advancement of quantum beam engineering and efforts onto realization of nuclear fusion reactors, and 6) safety security on radiation and nuclear energy and their countermeasure to social and environmental problems. (G.K.)

  11. 4+D digital engineering for advanced nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) require massive quantity of data during the design, construction, operation, maintenance and decommissioning stages because of their special features like size, cost, radioactivity, and so forth. The system engineering thus calls for a fully automated way of managing the information flow spanning their life cycle. In line with practice in disciplines of naval architecture, aerospace engineering, and automotive manufacturing, the paper proposes total digital systems engineering based on three-dimensional (3D) computer-aided design (CAD) models. The signature in the proposal lies with the four-plus-dimensional (4+D) TechnologyTM, a critical know-how for digital management. The so-called OPIUM (Optimized Plant Integrated Ubiquitous Management) features a 4+D TechnologyTM for nuclear energy systems engineering. The technology proposed in the 3D space and time plus cost coordinates, i.e. 4+D, is the backbone of digital engineering in the nuclear systems design and management. Based on an integrated 3D configuration management system, OPIUM consists of solutions NOTUS (Nuclear Optimization Technique Ubiquitous System), VENUS (Virtual Engineering Nuclear Ubiquitous System), INUUS (Informatics Nuclear Utilities Ubiquitous System), JANUS (Junctional Analysis Numerical Ubiquitous System) and EURUS (Electronic Unit Research Ubiquitous System). These solutions will help initial simulation capability for NPPs to supply the crucial information. NOTUS contributes to reducing the construction cost of the NPPs by optimizing the component manufacturing procedure and the plant construction process. Planning and scheduling construction projects can thus benefit greatly by integrating traditional management techniques with digital process simulation visualization. The 3D visualization of construction processes and the resulting products intrinsically afford most of the advantages realized by incorporating a purely schedule level detail based the 4+D system

  12. Nanostructured Fe-Cr Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scattergood, Ronald O. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-04-26

    We have completed research on the grain-size stabilization of model nanostructured Fe14Cr base alloys at high temperatures by the addition of non-equilibrium solutes. Fe14Cr base alloys are representative for nuclear reactor applications. The neutron flux in a nuclear reactor will generate He atoms that coalesce to form He bubbles. These can lead to premature failure of the reactor components, limiting their lifetime and increasing the cost and capacity for power generation. In order to mitigate such failures, Fe14Cr base alloys have been processed to contain very small nano-size oxide particles (less than 10 nm in size) that trap He atoms and reduce bubble formation. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the grain boundaries can also be very effective traps for He atoms and bubble formation. An optimum grain size will be less than 100 nm, ie., nanocrystalline alloys must be used. Powder metallurgy methods based on high-energy ball milling can produce Fe-Cr base nanocrystalline alloys that are suitable for nuclear energy applications. The problem with nanocrystalline alloys is that excess grain-boundary energy will cause grains to grow at higher temperatures and their propensity for He trapping will be lost. The nano-size oxide particles in current generation nuclear alloys provide some grain size stabilization by reducing grain-boundary mobility (Zener pinning – a kinetic effect). However the current mitigation strategy minimizing bubble formation is based primarily on He trapping by nano-size oxide particles. An alternate approach to nanoscale grain size stabilization has been proposed. This is based on the addition of small amounts of atoms that are large compared to the base alloy. At higher temperatures these will diffuse to the grain boundaries and will produce an equilibrium state for the grain size at higher temperatures (thermodynamic stabilization – an equilibrium effect). This would be preferred compared to a kinetic effect, which is not

  13. Key nuclear data measurements for advanced fission energy and white neutron source at CSNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key nuclear data for advanced fission energy are important in designing advanced nuclear reactors and facilities for nuclear-waste transmutation. Because the present nuclear data library is limited by experimental condition and energy range, the precision of some nuclear data is low, even some nuclear data are blank. In this paper, the status of the nuclear data and white neutron sources were presented. The back-streaming neutron beam at China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has very wide energy spectrum (0.01 eV-200 MeV) and excellent time structure. From the simulation results, it's obtained that the uncollimated neutron fluence rate is around 9.3 × 106 cm-2 · s-1 within the given energy range at 80 m away from the target, which accounts for about 53% of the total neutrons. The time resolution of 0.3%-0.9%, which is important for the Time-of-Flight method, can be obtained for both the parasite operation mode with two proton bunches and the dedicated operation mode with a single proton bunch. CSNS white neutron source will be a good facility for nuclear data measurement. (authors)

  14. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X

  15. Advanced Safeguards Technology Road-map for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strengthening the nonproliferation regime, including advanced safeguards, is a cornerstone of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). To meet these challenges, the Safeguards Campaign was formed, whose mission is to provide research and technology development for the foundation of next generation safeguards systems for implementation in U.S. GNEP facilities. The Safeguards Campaign works closely with the Nuclear Nonproliferation and International Security department (NA-24) of NNSA (National Nuclear Safety Administration) to ensure that technology developed for domestic safeguards applications are optimum with respect to international safeguards use. A major milestone of the program this year has been the development of the advanced safeguards technology road-map. This paper will broadly describe the road-map, which provides a path to next generation safeguards systems including advanced instrumentation; process monitoring; data integration, protection, and analysis; and system level evaluation and knowledge extraction for real time applications. (authors)

  16. Advanced Safeguards Technology Road-map for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.C.; Tobin, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS E540, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Smith, L.E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Ehinger, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Dougan, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Cipiti, B. [Sandia National Laboratory (United States); Bakel, A. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Bean, R. [Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Strengthening the nonproliferation regime, including advanced safeguards, is a cornerstone of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). To meet these challenges, the Safeguards Campaign was formed, whose mission is to provide research and technology development for the foundation of next generation safeguards systems for implementation in U.S. GNEP facilities. The Safeguards Campaign works closely with the Nuclear Nonproliferation and International Security department (NA-24) of NNSA (National Nuclear Safety Administration) to ensure that technology developed for domestic safeguards applications are optimum with respect to international safeguards use. A major milestone of the program this year has been the development of the advanced safeguards technology road-map. This paper will broadly describe the road-map, which provides a path to next generation safeguards systems including advanced instrumentation; process monitoring; data integration, protection, and analysis; and system level evaluation and knowledge extraction for real time applications. (authors)

  17. Cladding and Structural Materials for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, G S; Allen, T R; Ila, D; C,; Levi,; Morgan, D; Motta, A; Wang, L; Wirth, B

    2011-06-30

    The goal of this consortium is to address key materials issues in the most promising advanced reactor concepts that have yet to be resolved or that are beyond the existing experience base of dose or burnup. The research program consists of three major thrusts: 1) high-dose radiation stability of advanced fast reactor fuel cladding alloys, 2) irradiation creep at high temperature, and 3) innovative cladding concepts embodying functionally-graded barrier materials. This NERI-Consortium final report represents the collective efforts of a large number of individuals over a period of three and a half years and included 9 PIs, 4 scientists, 3 post-docs and 12 students from the seven participating institutions and 8 partners from 5 national laboratories and 3 industrial institutions (see table). University participants met semi-annually and participants and partners met annually for meetings lasting 2-3 days and designed to disseminate and discuss results, update partners, address outstanding issues and maintain focus and direction toward achieving the objectives of the program. The participants felt that this was a highly successful program to address broader issues that can only be done by the assembly of a range of talent and capabilities at a more substantial funding level than the traditional NERI or NEUP grant. As evidence of the success, this group, collectively, has published 20 articles in archival journals and made 57 presentations at international conferences on the results of this consortium.

  18. Education in nuclear science at IPEN - CNEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Advanced School of Nuclear Energy-EAEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EAEN (Advanced School of Nuclear Energy, 2010) is an annual school that consists of a week of activities in the area of Nuclear Physics, Radiochemistry and uses of Nuclear Energy for a public made of high school students. The EAEN project represents a pioneering program on science education and dissemination of knowledge, conducted by researchers and focused mainly on high school and scientific education for the population in general. The school's priority is to explore the failures and the lack of education in the dissemination of nuclear energy for high school students as well as to attract prospective students with great potential for graduate courses of IPEN and other institutions in Sao Paulo and in Brazil. (author)

  19. Advanced nuclear energy systems and the need of accurate nuclear data: the n_TOF project at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Colonna, N; Praena, J; Lederer, C; Karadimos, D; Sarmento, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Plag, R; Massimi, C; Calviani, M; Guerrero, C; Paradela, C; Belloni, F

    2010-01-01

    To satisfy the world's constantly increasing demand for energy, a suitable mix of different energy sources has to be devised. In this scenario, an important role could be played by nuclear energy, provided that major safety, waste and proliferation issues affecting current nuclear reactors are satisfactorily addressed. To this purpose, a large effort has been under way for a few years towards the development of advanced nuclear systems with the aim of closing the fuel cycle. Generation IV reactors, with full or partial waste recycling capability, accelerator driven systems, as well as new fuel cycles are the main options being investigated. The design of advanced systems requires improvements in basic nuclear data, such as cross-sections for neutron-induced reactions on actinides. In this paper, the main concepts of advanced reactor systems are described, together with the related needs of new and accurate nuclear data. The present activity in this field at the neutron facility n\\_TOF at CERN is discussed.

  20. Measurements of neutron cross sections for advanced nuclear energy systems at n_TOF (CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbagallo M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The n_TOF facility operates at CERN with the aim of addressing the request of high accuracy nuclear data for advanced nuclear energy systems as well as for nuclear astrophysics. Thanks to the features of the neutron beam, important results have been obtained on neutron induced fission and capture cross sections of U, Pu and minor actinides. Recently the construction of another beam line has started; the new line will be complementary to the first one, allowing to further extend the experimental program foreseen for next measurement campaigns.

  1. Proceedings of the fourth international symposium on advanced nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented and discussed in the 4th International Symposium on Advanced Nuclear Energy Research, of which subject was focussed on the Roles and Direction of Material Science in Nuclear Technology are contained. The sessions organized for the aural session of the symposium were (1) Processing Science for New Materials, (2) New Tools for Advanced Materials Research, (3) Challenge of Materials Database and (4) Frontier of Materials Technology in New Power Systems, from which 18 invited and 77 contributed papers were selected for the publication. The volume includes also summaries of the panel discussions titled as (1) Computer Simulation for Materials Innovation and (2) What is Expected for Materials Science in Future Nuclear Energy Developments ?, with which a complete recording of the discussions for the latter subject was attempted by the Editorial Working Group of the Program Committee. The 65 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Advanced concepts for waste management and nuclear energy production in the EURATOM fifth framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the objectives of the research projects on Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of long lived radionuclides in nuclear waste and advanced systems for nuclear energy production in the key action on nuclear fission of the EURATOM Fifth Framework Programme (FP5) (1998-2002). As these FP5 projects cover the main aspects of P and T, they should provide a basis for evaluating the practicability, on an industrial scale, of P and T for reducing the amount of long lived radionuclides to be disposed of. Concerning advanced concepts, a cluster of projects is addressing the key technical issues to be solved before implementing High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) commercially for energy production. Finally, the European Commission(tm)s proposal for a New Framework Programme (2002-2006) is briefly outlined. (author)

  3. Advanced concepts for waste management and nuclear energy production in the EURATOM 5. framework programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the objectives of the research projects on partitioning and transmutation (P and T) of long-lived radionuclides in nuclear waste and advanced systems for nuclear energy production in the key action on nuclear fission of the EURATOM 5. Framework Programme (FP5) (1998-2002). As these FP5 projects cover the main aspects of P and T, they should provide a basis for evaluating the practicability, on an industrial scale, of P and T for reducing the amount of long-lived radionuclides to be disposed of. Concerning advanced concepts, a cluster of projects is addressing the key technical issues to be solved before implementing high-temperature reactors (HTRs) commercially for energy production. Finally, the European Commissions proposal fora New Framework Programme (2002-2006) is briefly outlined. (authors)

  4. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  5. Progress in high energy physics and nuclear safety : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Safe Nuclear Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Polański, Aleksander; Begun, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    The book contains recent results on the progress in high-energy physics, accelerator, detection and nuclear technologies, as well as nuclear safety in high-energy experimentation and in nuclear industry, covered by leading experts in the field. The forthcoming experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and cosmic-ray experiments are highlighted. Most of the current high-energy experiments and their physical motivation are analyzed. Various nuclear energy safety aspects, including progress in the production of new radiation-resistant materials, new and safe nuclear reactor designs, such as the slowly-burning reactor, as well as the use of coal-nuclear symbiotic methods of energy production can be found in the book.

  6. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  7. The U.S. nuclear future: DOE initiatives to advance nuclear energy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Also under the impact of the events on September 11, 2001, the United States regards long-term, reliable planning for the future structure of the country's energy supply an important activity to be addressed by all parties involved in politics, industry, and research. In the light of the existing resource situation, the importance of reliable energy supply, and the necessary protection of the environment and the world climate, a balanced interaction is sought of energy, ecology, and economy. The special objectives pursued include increased efficiency in energy use and energy conservation, modernization of the infrastructure in the energy sector, and diversification of energy supply. The structure of the US power plant park and the expected increases in electricity consumption are likely to give rise to the need to add approximately 390,000 to 570,000 MW of new generating capacity over the next twenty years. In this connection, nuclear power is expected to play an important role as a safe, non-polluting, economic source of energy. The Department of Energy therefore also supports initiatives seeking to extend the licenses of existing nuclear power plants and to promote research and development of future 4th generation reactors in national and international programs. In addition, work is supported which deals, e.g., with matters of transmutation, the repository storage of radioactive residues, and the implementation of safeguards measures. (orig.)

  8. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well

  9. Axial enrichment profile in advance nuclear energy power plant at supercritical-pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tashakor, S. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School; Islamic Azad Univ., Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Zarifi, E. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Reactor Research School; Salehi, A.A. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Energy

    2015-12-15

    The High-Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is the European version of the advance nuclear energy power plant at Supercritical-pressure. A light water reactor at supercritical pressure, being currently under design, is the new generation of nuclear reactors. The aim of this study is to predict the HPLWR neutronic behavior of the axial enrichment profile with an average enrichment of 5 w/o U-235. Neutronic calculations are performed using WIMS and CITATION codes. Changes in neutronic parameter, such as Power Peaking Factor (PPF) are discussed in this paper.

  10. Impact of high energy heavy ion nuclear collisions on advancement of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contributions of low energy heavy ion research to the inventions in nuclear physics are highlighted. The theoretical ideas used in their interpretations are qualitatively discussed. The survey of the literature relevant to charged particle spectroscopy and reactions with heavy ions is presented. The light projectile collision work and its relevant physics is also briefly summarized. In light of this, few suggestions are made to effectively use our heavy ion facilities. (author). 4 refs

  11. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  12. Development of technetium alloy waste forms for advanced nuclear energy cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program within the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy is charged with developing nuclear fuel cycle options that improve use of actinide resources, responsibly manage wastes, improve and limit proliferation risk. Technetium is a fission product of particular concern for disposal in a repository because of its high fission yield, long half-life, and high solubility and mobility in groundwater as pertechnetate. For example, modeling studies for the former Yucca Mountain repository site indicated that technetium would be an important dose contributor after closure of the repository, in the first 10,000 years. The FCT Program is investigating a range of potential repository environments for ultimate disposal of fission products including technetium from advanced nuclear fuel recycling schemes

  13. NATO Advanced Research Workshop “Nuclear Power and Energy Security”

    CERN Document Server

    Apikyan, Samuel A; Nuclear Power and Energy Security

    2010-01-01

    World energy consumption has grown dramatically over the past few decades. This growth in energy demand will be driven by large increases in both economic growth and world population coupled with rising living standards in rapidly growing countries. The last years, we routinely hear about a "renaissance" of nuclear energy. The recognition that nuclear power is vital to global energy security in the 21st century has been growing for some time. "The more we look to the future, the more we can expect countries to be considering the potential benefits that expanding nuclear power has to offer for the global environment and for economic growth," IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei said in advance of a gathering of 500 nuclear power experts assembled in Moscow for the "International Conference on Fifty Years of Nuclear Power - the Next Fifty Years". But such a renaissance is not a single-valued and sure thing. Legitimate four unresolved questions remain about high relative costs; perceived adverse safety, envir...

  14. The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finck, P.; Edelstein, N.; Allen, T.; Burns, C.; Chadwick, M.; Corradini, M.; Dixon, D.; Goff, M.; Laidler, J.; McCarthy, K.; Moyer, B.; Nash, K.; Navrotsky, A.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Peterson, P.; Sackett, J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Tulenko, J.; Weber, W.; Morss, L.; Henry, G.

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this report is to identify new basic science that will be the foundation for advances in nuclear fuel-cycle technology in the near term, and for changing the nature of fuel cycles and of the nuclear energy industry in the long term. The goals are to enhance the development of nuclear energy, to maximize energy production in nuclear reactor parks, and to minimize radioactive wastes, other environmental impacts, and proliferation risks. The limitations of the once-through fuel cycle can be overcome by adopting a closed fuel cycle, in which the irradiated fuel is reprocessed and its components are separated into streams that are recycled into a reactor or disposed of in appropriate waste forms. The recycled fuel is irradiated in a reactor, where certain constituents are partially transmuted into heavier isotopes via neutron capture or into lighter isotopes via fission. Fast reactors are required to complete the transmutation of long-lived isotopes. Closed fuel cycles are encompassed by the Department of Energy?s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), to which basic scientific research can contribute. Two nuclear reactor system architectures can meet the AFCI objectives: a ?single-tier? system or a ?dual-tier? system. Both begin with light water reactors and incorporate fast reactors. The ?dual-tier? systems transmute some plutonium and neptunium in light water reactors and all remaining transuranic elements (TRUs) in a closed-cycle fast reactor. Basic science initiatives are needed in two broad areas: ? Near-term impacts that can enhance the development of either ?single-tier? or ?dual-tier? AFCI systems, primarily within the next 20 years, through basic research. Examples: Dissolution of spent fuel, separations of elements for TRU recycling and transmutation Design, synthesis, and testing of inert matrix nuclear fuels and non-oxide fuels Invention and development of accurate on-line monitoring systems for chemical and nuclear species in the nuclear

  15. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  16. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Nuclear Power and Energy Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this NATO workshop is to contribute to the critical assessment of how to prepare for a new national nuclear energy program, and to make recommendations for future action. In addition, our goal is to promote close working relationships between technical people from different countries and with different professional expertise. In particular, the countries that are involved in this workshop are those from NATO and those from the Partner countries such as those in the Commonwealth of Independent States. A NATO workshop is not an international conference or symposium but rather a forum for advanced level, intensive discussions. The presentations are part of the growing font of knowledge on the subject of how to develop a national nuclear energy program. It is heard about the infrastructure that is needed and how the IAEA and countries with existing experience are helping to provide that infrastructure to those working toward a nuclear energy program. It is heard about the experiences of several countries embarking on new nuclear development, with an emphasis on how progress is being made in Armenia. It is also heard about the potential for using small and medium size reactors; something not being pursued by the countries with large nuclear programs

  17. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V and V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V and V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V and V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V and V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M and S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V and V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M and S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T

  18. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear

  19. Materials Issues in Advanced Nuclear Systems: Executive Summary of DOE Basic Research Needs Workshop, 'Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X

  20. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. Ο Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system Ο Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system Ο Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress Ο Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  1. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. 1) Investigation and analysis of the international and domestic trends related to future nuclear system 2) To maximize the national interests by the strategic participation of GIF meeting - To participate of GIF meeting and to support of relative work - To investigate the System R and D Arrangement and to inform its progress situation 3) To maximize the propulsion results of Korea/U.S nuclear energy joint research(I-NERI) - To support a delegation by the review of agenda in aspect of the technical/legal point - To participate of BINERIC meeting and to support of relative work 4) Streamline the nuclear energy R and D due to the effective connection between domestic R and D and international collaboration. The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  2. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. · Investigation and analysis of the international and domestic trends related to future nuclear system · To maximize the national interests by the strategic participation of GIF meeting - To participate of GIF meeting and to support of relative work - To investigate the System R and D Arrangement and to inform its progress situation · To maximize the propulsion results of Korea/U.S nuclear energy joint research(I-NERI) - To support a delegation by the review of agenda in aspect of the technical/legal point - To participate of BINERIC meeting and to support of relative work · Streamline the nuclear energy R and D due to the effective connection between domestic R and D and international collaboration The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  3. Public perception of the activities of the Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technologies Agency of Cuba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Marta; Arencibia, Alois; Alvarado, Jorge; Garcia, Dulce; Rodriguez, Ingrids; Hernandez, Noslen [Centro de Gestion de la Informacion y Desarrollo de la Energia (CUBAENERGIA), La Habana (Cuba); Aguilar, Aurora; Perera, Maricela [Centro de Investigaciones Psicologicas y Sociologicas (CIPS), La Habana, (Cuba); Rodriguez, Ramon [Agencia de Energia Nuclear y Tecnologias de Avanzada (AENTA), La Habana, (Cuba); Alonso, Ivonne [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear (CNSN), La Habana, (Cuba); Quintana, Natacha [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana, (Cuba); Cardenas, Juan; Ramos, Odalys [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones (CPHR), La Habana, (Cuba); Elias, Lidia Lauren [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana, (Cuba)

    2013-07-01

    The work presents the results of a study of perception of the nuclear activities of the Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technologies Agency of Cuba, carried out by means of a study of image. The public object was a wide group of clients, providers, journalists and experts of the governing and regulatory organs which constitute its external public. For the investigation a methodology was prepared with a questionnaire and a semi structured interview, which allowed to obtain complementary information of qualitative character. In general, the perception of the Agency turned out to be positive and the human resources were the best evaluated aspect. Nevertheless, the visibility of the Agency in the public day pupils is considered to be insufficient. The study provided the necessary information so as to design the strategy of communication of the Agency. (author)

  4. Public perception of the activities of the Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technologies Agency of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presents the results of a study of perception of the nuclear activities of the Nuclear Energy and Advanced Technologies Agency of Cuba, carried out by means of a study of image. The public object was a wide group of clients, providers, journalists and experts of the governing and regulatory organs which constitute its external public. For the investigation a methodology was prepared with a questionnaire and a semi structured interview, which allowed to obtain complementary information of qualitative character. In general, the perception of the Agency turned out to be positive and the human resources were the best evaluated aspect. Nevertheless, the visibility of the Agency in the public day pupils is considered to be insufficient. The study provided the necessary information so as to design the strategy of communication of the Agency. (author)

  5. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  6. The advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) role in the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), launched in February, 2006, proposes to introduce used nuclear fuel recycling in the United States with improved proliferation-resistance and a more effective waste management approach. This program is evaluating ways to close the fuel cycle in a manner that builds on recent laboratory breakthroughs in U.S. national laboratories and draws on international and industry partnerships. Central to moving this advanced fuel recycling technology from the laboratory to commercial implementation is a flexible research, development and demonstration facility, called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF was introduced as one of three projects under GNEP and will provide the U.S. with the capabilities to evaluate technologies that separate used fuel into reusable material and waste in a proliferation-resistant manner. The separations technology demonstration capability is coupled with a remote transmutation fuel fabrication demonstration capability in an integrated manner that demonstrates advanced safeguard technologies. This presentation will discuss the key technical and programmatic features of AFCF and their support of the GNEP objectives. (authors)

  7. Advanced nuclear propulsion concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, S.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A preliminary analysis has been carried out for two potential advanced nuclear propulsion systems: a contained pulsed nuclear propulsion engine and an antiproton initiated ICF system. The results of these studies indicate that both concepts have a high potential to help enable manned planetary exploration but require substantial development.

  8. Nuclear energy and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do Georgia needs nuclear energy? Nuclear energy is high technology and application of such technology needs definite level of industry, science and society development. Nuclear energy is not only source of electricity production - application of nuclear energy increases year-by-year for medical, science and industrial use. As an energy source Georgia has priority to extend hydro-power capacity by reasonable use of all available water resources. In parallel regime the application of energy efficiency and energy conservation measures should be considered but currently this is not prioritized by Government. Meanwhile this should be taken into consideration that attempts to reduce energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency would simply raise demand for energy in the economy as a whole. The Nuclear energy application needs routine calculation and investigation. For this reason Government Commission is already established. But it seems in advance that regional nuclear power plant for South-Caucasus region would be much more attractive for future

  9. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation

  10. The Advanced Energy Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliken, JoAnn; Joseck, Fred; Wang, Michael; Yuzugullu, Elvin

    The President's Advanced Energy Initiative (AEI), launched in 2006, addresses the challenges of energy supply and demand facing our Nation by supporting research and development of advanced technologies for transportation and stationary power generation. The AEI portfolio includes clean coal, nuclear and renewable energy technologies (solar and wind) for stationary power generation and advanced battery technologies, cellulosic ethanol as a fuel and hydrogen fuel cells for transportation. These research and development programs are underpinned by comprehensive life-cycle analysis efforts using models such as Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) and Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) to enable a better understanding of the characteristics and trade-offs associated with advanced energy options and to help decision makers choose viable pathways for clean, reliable and affordable energy.

  11. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  12. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview about the evolution of nuclear energy for the next 25 years is presented. Several types of nuclear power reactors are described and the power installed up to year 2000 are discussed. Some processes of nuclear fuel enrichment used in the world are shown. (E.G.)

  13. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  14. The Advanced Photon Source: Using Synchrotron Radiation to Study Actinide Containing Samples Relevant to Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realization of advanced nuclear reactors as a national source of reliable energy awaits materials research on fuels, reactor components under extreme environments and options for waste treatment and storage. The third generation synchrotrons such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) provide a high flux of coherent, variable energy X rays that can be used to probe in situ a wide range of chemical, physical and materials problems of relevance to nuclear energy production. Synchrotron radiation from such a source is particularly suited to the study of radioactive samples because of its tunability, penetration and intensity. Together, these features provide the opportunity to work with small, encapsulated samples, a necessary requirement because of the inherently hazardous heavy metal, highly radioactive materials. Complicating the practical advantages of synchrotron radiation to the study of nuclear energy systems is the need for risk mitigation when bringing such materials into a user facility. The APS has used a risk based approach to the problem. As part of Argonne National Laboratory, which has a long history in nuclear energy, the APS has taken advantage of the broader Laboratory infrastructure to reach out and accommodate experiments on radioactive samples and the broad nuclear energy community. (author)

  15. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Stoitsov, M; Nazarewicz, W; Bulgac, A; Hagen, G; Kortelainen, M; Pei, J C; Roche, K J; Schunck, N; Thompson, I; Vary, J P; Wild, S M

    2011-01-01

    The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper illustrates significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integration of the theoretical approaches, advanced numerical algorithms, and leadership class computational resources.

  16. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book provides the man in the street with a fair presentation of nuclear energy and can help him to build his own opinion about this much debated question. The first chapter defines what is involved in the hazy term of energy. The second chapter explains how a nuclear power plant operates. The chapters 3 to 6 give a good grounding in basic physics to understand radioactivity and the different processes that occur in a nuclear reactor. The chapters 7 and 8 present the different reactor types and the complete fuel cycle from uranium ore extraction to radioactive waste storage. The last chapter is dedicated to the pros and cons of nuclear energy, this chapter includes a presentation of the organization of nuclear safety in France. (A.C.)

  17. Ship-Based Nuclear Energy Systems for Accelerating Developing World Socioeconomic Advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroski, Robert; Wood, Lowell

    2014-07-01

    Technological, economic, and policy aspects of supplying energy to newly industrializing and developing countries using ship-deployed nuclear energy systems are described. The approach analyzed comprises nuclear installations of up to gigawatt scale deployed within currently mass-produced large ship hulls which are capable of flexibly supplying energy for electricity, water desalination and district heating-&-cooling with low latencies and minimized shoreside capital expenditures. Nuclear energy is uniquely suited for mobile deployment due to its combination of extraordinary energy density and high power density, which enable enormous supplies of energy to be deployed at extremely low marginal costs. Nuclear installations on ships also confer technological advantages by essentially eliminating risk from earthquakes, tsunamis, and floods; taking advantage of assured access to an effectively unlimited amount of cooling water, and involving minimal onshore preparations and commitments. Instances of floating nuclear power stations that have been proposed in the past, some of which are currently being pursued, have generally been based on conventional LWR technology, moreover without flexibility or completeness of power output options. We consider nuclear technology options for their applicability to the unique opportunities and challenges of a marine environment, with special attention given to low-pressure, high thermal margin systems with continuous and assured afterheat dissipation into the ambient seawater. Such systems appear promising for offering an exceptionally high degree of safety while using a maximally simple set of components. We furthermore consider systems tailored to Developing World contexts, which satisfy societal requirements beyond electrification, e.g., flexible sourcing of potable water and HVAC services, servicing time-varying user requirements, and compatibility with the full spectrum of local renewable energy supplies, specifically including

  18. US Department of Energy Nuclear Energy University program in robotics for advanced reactors: Program plan, FY 1987-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has provided support to four universities and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to pursue research leading to the development and deployment of an advanced robotic system capable of performing tasks that are hazardous to humans, that generate significant occupational radiation exposure, and/or whose execution times can be reduced if performed by an automated system. The goal is to develop a generation of advanced robotic systems capable of performing surveillance, maintenance, and repair tasks in nuclear facilities and other hazardous environments. This goal will be achieved through a team effort among the Universities of Florida, Michigan, Tennessee, Texas, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and their industrial partners, Combustion Engineering, Martin Marietta Baltimore Aerospace, Odetics, Remotec, and Telerobotics International. Each of the universities and ORNL have ongoing activities and corresponding facilities in areas of R and D related to robotics. This program is designed to take full advantage of these existing resources at the participating institutions

  19. Nuclear energy

    OpenAIRE

    Bucaille, Alain; Shihab-Eldin, Adnan; Bauquis, Pierre-René

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear energy can play a role in carbon free production of electrical energy, thus making it interesting for tomorrow’s energy mix. However, several issues have to be addressed. In fission technology, the design of so-called fourth generation reactors show great promise, in particular in addressing materials efficiency and safety issues. If successfully developed, such reactors may have an important and sustainable part in future energy production. Working fusion reactors may be even more ma...

  20. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With simple and accessible explanations, this book presents the physical principles, the history and industrial developments of nuclear energy. More than 25 years after the Chernobyl accidents and few months only after the Fukushima one, it discusses the pros and cons of this energy source with its assets and its risks. (J.S.)

  1. The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles, September 12-14, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to identify new basic science that will be the foundation for advances in nuclear fuel-cycle technology in the near term, and for changing the nature of fuel cycles and of the nuclear energy industry in the long term. The goals are to enhance the development of nuclear energy, to maximize energy production in nuclear reactor parks, and to minimize radioactive wastes, other environmental impacts, and proliferation risks. The limitations of the once-through fuel cycle can be overcome by adopting a closed fuel cycle, in which the irradiated fuel is reprocessed and its components are separated into streams that are recycled into a reactor or disposed of in appropriate waste forms. The recycled fuel is irradiated in a reactor, where certain constituents are partially transmuted into heavier isotopes via neutron capture or into lighter isotopes via fission. Fast reactors are required to complete the transmutation of long-lived isotopes. Closed fuel cycles are encompassed by the Department of Energy?s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), to which basic scientific research can contribute. Two nuclear reactor system architectures can meet the AFCI objectives: a ?single-tier? system or a ?dual-tier? system. Both begin with light water reactors and incorporate fast reactors. The ?dual-tier? systems transmute some plutonium and neptunium in light water reactors and all remaining transuranic elements (TRUs) in a closed-cycle fast reactor. Basic science initiatives are needed in two broad areas: ? Near-term impacts that can enhance the development of either ?single-tier? or ?dual-tier? AFCI systems, primarily within the next 20 years, through basic research. Examples: Dissolution of spent fuel, separations of elements for TRU recycling and transmutation Design, synthesis, and testing of inert matrix nuclear fuels and non-oxide fuels Invention and development of accurate on-line monitoring systems for chemical and nuclear species in the nuclear

  2. Benchmarking of thermalhydraulic loop models for lead-alloy-cooled advanced nuclear energy systems. Phase I: Isothermal forced convection case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) has been established to co-ordinate scientific activities regarding various existing and advanced nuclear fuel cycles, including advanced reactor systems, associated chemistry and flowsheets, development and performance of fuel and materials and accelerators and spallation targets. The WPFC has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in the field of nuclear fuel cycle. The Task Force on Lead-Alloy-Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems (LACANES) was created in 2006 to study thermal-hydraulic characteristics of heavy liquid metal coolant loop. The objectives of the task force are to (1) validate thermal-hydraulic loop models for application to LACANES design analysis in participating organisations, by benchmarking with a set of well-characterised lead-alloy coolant loop test data, (2) establish guidelines for quantifying thermal-hydraulic modelling parameters related to friction and heat transfer by lead-alloy coolant and (3) identify specific issues, either in modelling and/or in loop testing, which need to be addressed via possible future work. Nine participants from seven different institutes participated in the first phase of the benchmark. This report provides details of the benchmark specifications, method and code characteristics and results of the preliminary study: pressure loss coefficient and Phase-I. A comparison and analysis of the results will be performed together with Phase-II

  3. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, H; Nazarewicz, W; Bulgac, A; Hagen, G; Kortelainen, M; Maris, P; Pei, J C; Roche, K J; Schunck, N; Thompson, I; Vary, J P; Wild, S M

    2012-01-01

    The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multidisciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadershi...

  4. Advances in conceptual design of a gas-cooled accelerator driven system (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of a nuclear energy development are considerably increasing with the world energetic demand increment. However, the management of nuclear waste from conventional nuclear power plants and its inventory minimization are the most important issues that should be addressed. Fast reactors and Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are the main options to reduce the long-lived radioactive waste inventory. Pebble Bed Very High Temperature advanced systems have great perspectives to assume the future nuclear energy development challenges. The conceptual design of a Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA) has been made in preliminary studies. The TADSEA is an ADS cooled by helium and moderated by graphite that uses as fuel small amounts of transuranic elements in the form of TRISO particles, confined in 3 cm radius graphite pebbles forming a pebble bed configuration. It would be used for nuclear waste transmutation and energy production. In this paper, the results of a method for calculating the number of whole pebbles fitting in a volume according to its size are showed. From these results, the packing fraction influence on the TADSEAs main work parameters is studied. In addition, a redesign of the previous configuration, according to the established conditions in the preliminary design, i.e. the exit thermal power, is made. On the other hand, the heterogeneity of the TRISO particles inside the pebbles can not be negligible. In this paper, a study of the power density distribution inside the pebbles by means of a detailed simulation of the TRISO fuel particles and using an homogeneous composition of the fuel is addressed. (author)

  5. Energy Storage (II): Developing Advanced Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Arthur L

    1974-01-01

    Energy storage, considered by some scientists to be the best technological and economic advancement after advanced nuclear power, still rates only modest funding for research concerning the development of advanced technologies. (PEB)

  6. An advanced accident-protective network system for the nuclear energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an opportunity of the TMI accident formed on March, 1979, some improvements on accident-protective countermeasure of nuclear energy by government and so on have been intended. Along this planning, the Atomic Energy Safety Technical Center has practised a business on accident-protection of nuclear energy under trust of government and so on. And then, the Center expanded some business, such as intention to spread the SPEEDI (system for prediction of environmental emergency dose information) network for the Center for First-aid Countermeasure in Emergency (called Off-site Center) and so on. Here were described on present status and future development of the business on accident protection at a center of the SPEEDI network system, which was a system rapidly to predict in-air concentration of radioactive materials, exposed dose, and so on at circumferential environment under informations on their emission sources (emitted nuclides, emission, emission time, and so on), meteorological conditions and topographical data if a lot of radioactive materials were or anxious to be emitted from a nuclear power station and so on. (G.K.)

  7. Energy: nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  8. Nuclear energy research initiative (NERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives of the nuclear energy research initiative are: to address and help to overcome the principal technical and scientific obstacles to expand the use of nuclear energy in the US; advance the state of nuclear technology to maintain a competitive position in the overseas markets and a future domestic market; promote and maintain nuclear science and engineering; and to improve the performance, efficiency, reliability, economics and other attributes to enhance nuclear energy application

  9. Nuclear Energy General Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way it achieves this objective is to issue publications in various series. Two of these series are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III, paragraph A.6, of the IAEA Statute, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are primarily written in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own activities. The principal users are Member State regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series consists of reports designed to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia and politicians, among others. The information is presented in guides, reports on the status of technology and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The series complements the IAEA's safety standards, and provides detailed guidance, experience, good practices and examples on the five areas covered in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. The Nuclear Energy Basic Principles is the highest level publication in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and describes the rationale and vision for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It presents eight Basic Principles on which nuclear energy systems should be based to fulfil nuclear energy's potential to help meet growing global energy needs. The Nuclear Energy Series Objectives are the second level publications. They describe what needs to be

  10. Nuclear energy. Sources and global perspective (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy. The development of the new generation of the nuclear reactors as well as the advanced nuclear power plants is analysed. The perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  11. Nuclear energy. Sources and global perspective (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy. The development of the new generation nuclear reactors as well as the advanced nuclear power plants is analysed. The perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  12. Nuclear Energy Data - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants remained steady in 2013 despite the progressive shutdown of all reactors in Japan leading up to September and the permanent closure of six reactors in the OECD area. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for increasing nuclear generating capacity, and progress was made in the development of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel, with Finland expected to have the first such facility in operation in the early 2020's. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'StatLinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  13. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Administrative Court of Braunschweig judges the Ordinance on Advance Funding of Repositories (EndlagervorausleistungsVO) to be void. The Hannover Regional Court passes a basic judgment concerning the Gorleben salt mine (repository) and an action for damages. The Federal Administrative Court dismisses actions against part-permits for the Hanau fuel element fabrication plant. The Koblenz Higher Administrative Court dismisses actions against a part-permit for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor. 31st Amendment of the German Criminal Code passed, involving amendments in environmental criminal code, defined in the 2nd amendment to the Act on Unlowful Practices Causing Damage to the Environment (UKG); here: Amendments to the law relating to the criminal code and penal provisions governing unlawful conduct in the operation of nuclear installations. (orig.)

  14. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, H.; Petersen, C. Leth; Kjaer, A.;

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is an essential part of functional, non-invasive, cardiac imaging. Significant advances have been made in nuclear cardiology since planar (201)thallium ((201)TI) scintigraphy was introduced for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) perfusion nearly 40 years ago. The use......-coronary cardiac diseases. The advances in nuclear cardiology are discussed under the four headlines of: 1) myocardial perfusion, 2) cardiac performance including LV and right ventricular (RV) function, 3) myocardial metabolism, and 4) experimental nuclear cardiology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  15. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Greebler, Paul

    1966-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 3 provides an authoritative, complete, coherent, and critical review of the nuclear industry. This book presents the advances in the atomic energy field.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the use of pulsed neutron sources for the determination of the thermalization and diffusion properties of moderating as well as multiplying media. This text then examines the effect of nuclear radiation on electronic circuitry and its components. Other chapters consider radiation effects in various inorganic solids, with empha

  16. Advanced nuclear reactor systems - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilisation as its mainstay for its sustainable growth. The current levels of deployment of nuclear energy in India need to be multiplied nearly hundred fold to reach levels of electricity generation that would facilitate the country to achieve energy independence as well as a developed status. The Indian thorium based nuclear energy systems are being developed to achieve sustainability in respect of fuel resource along with enhanced safety and reduced waste generation. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and its variants have been designed to meet these objectives. The Indian High Temperature Reactor programme also envisages use of thorium-based fuel with advanced levels of passive safety features. (author)

  17. Advancing against nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeting a day before the summit, Bush and Putin announced a new Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism; a plan for multiple, multilateral guaranteed suppliers of nuclear fuel to States that forgo building their own enrichment plants; and a Civil Nuclear Agreement that will lift restrictions on cooperation between the two countries in developing peaceful nuclear power. Each of these initiatives provides a framework for dozens of specific actions that can measurably reduce the risk of terrorists acquiring a nuclear weapon. The significance of the Global Initiative against Nuclear Terrorism lies not only in its substance but in Russia's visible joint ownership of the Initiative. After years in which Washington lectured Moscow about this threat, Putin's joint leadership in securing nuclear material worldwide should give added impetus to this undertaking inside Russia as well. Globally, this initiative calls for work plans in five arenas: prevention, detection, disruption, mitigation of consequences after an attack, and strengthening domestic laws and export controls against future A.Q. Khans. The guaranteed nuclear fuel supply tightens the noose around Iran as it seeks to exploit a loophole in the global Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. By guaranteeing States that six separate international suppliers will provide backup guarantees against interruption of supply for any reason other that breech of commitments under the NPT, this proposal eliminates Iran's excuse for Natanz-the enrichment plant it is rushing to finish today. This system for supply will be subject to the supervision by the IAEA, which will also have nuclear fuel reserves that allow it to be a supplier of last resort. The Civil Nuclear Agreement will allow joint research on next-generation, proliferation-proof reactors, including technologies where Russian science is the best in the world. It will permit sale to Russia of US technologies that can improve the safety and efficiency of Russian nuclear

  18. Nuclear Energy's Renaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear energy is about to enter its renaissance. After almost 30 years of new plant construction dormancy, utilities are seriously preparing for ordering new plants in the next two years. This resurgence in interest is based on improved plant performance, new Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing processes, significant incentives introduced by Congress in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to encourage new orders, and new technologies that are competitive, simpler to operate and safer. These new evolutionary light water reactors will pave the way to more advanced high temperature gas reactors such as the pebble bed or prismatic reactors that will provide improved efficiency and safety leading to more process heat applications in oil extraction or hydrogen production. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) also authorized by the Energy Policy act will provide the fundamental technical basis for the future of these technologies. Progress continues on the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste disposal site enabling this expansion. When coupled with the long term strategy of waste minimization through reprocessing and actinide destruction as proposed in the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, the future of nuclear energy as part of this nation's energy mix appears to be assured.

  19. Parliament and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper provides a historical review of the behaviour of Parliament in the discussion about utilizing nuclear energy. An analysis of the positions taken and reasons advanced so far is necessary, because it is only from its results that promising strategies appropriate to bring about a consensus can be derived. There is no doubt that it is a genuine task of the democratically legitimated bodies to strive for a consensus in energy policy, in particular nuclear energy, in the interest of the whole State, with the legislative, executive and economic bodies combining their efforts. The reservedness of Parliament is regrettable. At the moment, however, there is the positive effect of the discussion being revived. It should be conducted rationally in the joint interest of reaching a political consensus and, on that basis, a broad acceptance of nuclear energy utilization. (orig./HSCH)

  20. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  1. Nuclear energy outlook 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the launch today of its first Nuclear Energy Outlook, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) makes an important contribution to ongoing discussions of nuclear energy's potential role in the energy mixes of its member countries. As world energy demand continues to grow unabated, many countries face serious concerns about the security of energy supplies, rising energy prices and climate change stemming from fossil fuel consumption. In his presentation, the NEA Director-General Luis Echavarri is emphasizing the role that nuclear power could play in delivering cost-competitive and stable supplies of energy, while also helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In one Outlook scenario, existing nuclear power technologies could provide almost four times the current supply of nuclear-generated electricity by 2050. Under this scenario, 1400 reactors of the size commonly in use today would be in operation by 2050. But in order to accomplish such an expansion, securing political and societal support for the choice of nuclear energy is vital. An ongoing relationship between policy makers, the nuclear industry and society to develop knowledge building and public involvement will become increasingly important, the publication notes. Moreover, governments have a clear responsibility to maintain continued effective safety regulation, advance efforts to develop radioactive waste disposal solutions and uphold and reinforce the international non-proliferation regime. The authors find that the security of energy from nuclear power is more reliable than that for oil or gas. Additionally, uranium's high energy density means that transport is less vulnerable to disruption, and storing a large energy reserve is easier than for fossil fuels. One tonne of uranium produces the same energy as 10 000 to 16 000 tonnes of oil using current technology. Ongoing technological developments are likely to improve that performance even more. Until the middle of the century the dominant reactor

  2. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives descriptions of explanations of terminologies concerning to nuclear energy such as analysis of financial safety of nuclear energy, radwaste disposal, fast breeder reactor, nuclear reactor and device, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy radiation and measurement, plan for development of nuclear energy and international institution. This book includes 160 terms on nuclear energy and arranges in Korean alphabetical order.

  3. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  4. FY2001 Final Report Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Advanced Nuclear Fuel Design in the Future Nuclear Energy Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.; Choi, J.-S.; DiSabatino, A.; Wirth, B.

    2001-09-30

    This study is to research the maturity of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding technology and to explore the suitability of existing technology for addressing the emerging requirements for Generation IV reactors and emerging thermal/fast spectrum reactors, while simultaneously addressing nuclear waste management, and proliferation resistance concerns.

  5. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  6. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC): FY10 development and integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  7. Advanced nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) is the largest power company among the six subsidiaries that separated from Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) in 2001, accounting for approximately 25% of electricity producing facilities, hydro and nuclear combined. KHNP operates 20 nuclear power plants in Kori, Yonggwang, Ulchin and Wolsong site and several hydroelectric power generation facilities, providing approximately 36% of the national power supply. As a major source of electricity generation in Korea, nuclear energy contributes greatly to the stability of national electricity supply and energy security. KHNP's commercial nuclear power plant operation, which started with Kori Unit 1 in 1978, has achieved an average capacity factor more than 90% since 2000 and a high record of 93.4% in 2008. Following the introduction of nuclear power plants in the 1970's, Korea accumulated its nuclear technology in the 1980's, developed OPR 1000(Optimized Power Reactor) and demonstrated advanced level of its nuclear technology capabilities in the 2000's by developing an advanced type reactor, APR 1400(Advanced Power Reactor) which is being constructed at Shin-Kori Unit 3 and 4 for the first time. By 2022, KHNP will construct additional 12 nuclear power plants in order to ensure a stable power supply according to the Government Plan of Long-Term Electricity supply and Demand. 4 units of OPR 1000 reactor model will be commissioned by 2013 and 8 units of APR 1400 are under construction and planned. At the end of 2022, the nuclear capacity will reach 33% share of total generation capacity in Korea and account for 48% of national power generation. (author)

  8. Advanced teleoperation in nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new generation of integrated remote maintenance systems is being developed to meet the needs of future nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Development activities cover all aspects of an advanced teleoperated maintenance system with particular emphasis on a new force-reflecting servomanipulator concept. The new manipulator, called the advanced servomanipulator, is microprocessor controlled and is designed to achieve force-reflection performance near that of mechanical master/slave manipulators. The advanced servomanipulator uses a gear-drive transmission which permits modularization for remote maintainability (by other advanced servomanipulators) and increases reliability. Human factors analysis has been used to develop an improved man/machine interface concept based upon colorgraphic displays and menu-driven tough screens. Initial test and evaluation of two advanced servomanipulator slave arms and several other development components have begun. 9 references, 5 figures

  9. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible

  10. Nuclear energy after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper on fundamental questions by a representative of the Federal German Government focuses on the following subjects: Nuclear energy as a part of the energy policy of the Federal German Government, the justifiability of nuclear energy, lessons from Chernobyl, nuclear phase-out, safety concepts for the future, supply of nuclear power plants, and nuclear waste disposal. (UA)

  11. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  12. Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief indication is given of the United Kingdom nuclear power programme including descriptions of the fission process, the Magnox, AGR and PWR type reactors, the recycling process, waste management and decommissioning, safety precautions, the prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, and the JET fusion experiment. (U.K.)

  13. Advanced nuclear precleaner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program's goal is to develop a dynamic, self-cleaning air precleaner for high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration systems that would extend significantly the life of HEPA filter banks by reducing the particulate matter that causes filter fouling and increased pack pressure. HEPA filters are widely used in DOE, Department of Defense, and a variety of commercial facilities. InnovaTech, Inc. (Formerly Micro Composite materials Corporation) has developed a proprietary dynamic separation device using a concept called Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer (BLMT) to extract particulate matter from fluid process streams. When used as a prefilter in the HVAC systems or downstream of waste vitrifiers in nuclear power plants, fuel processing facilities, and weapons decommissioning factories, the BLMT filter will dramatically extend the service life and increase the operation efficiency of existing HEPA filtration systems. The BLMT filter is self cleaning, so there will be no degraded flow or increased pressure drop. Because the BLMT filtration process is independent of temperature, it can be designed to work in ambient, medium, or high-temperature applications. During Phase II, the authors are continuing development of the computerized flow simulation model to include turbulence and incorporate expansion into a three-dimensional model that includes airflow behavior inside the filter housing before entering the active BLMT device. A full-scale (1000 ACFM) prototype filter is being designed to meet existing HEPA filter standards and will be fabricated for subsequent testing. Extensive in-house testing will be performed to determine a full range of performance characteristics. Final testing and evaluation of the prototype filter will be conducted at a DOE Quality Assurance Filter Test Station

  14. Advanced nuclear precleaner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, S.R. [InnovaTech, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    This Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program`s goal is to develop a dynamic, self-cleaning air precleaner for high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration systems that would extend significantly the life of HEPA filter banks by reducing the particulate matter that causes filter fouling and increased pack pressure. HEPA filters are widely used in DOE, Department of Defense, and a variety of commercial facilities. InnovaTech, Inc. (Formerly Micro Composite materials Corporation) has developed a proprietary dynamic separation device using a concept called Boundary Layer Momentum Transfer (BLMT) to extract particulate matter from fluid process streams. When used as a prefilter in the HVAC systems or downstream of waste vitrifiers in nuclear power plants, fuel processing facilities, and weapons decommissioning factories, the BLMT filter will dramatically extend the service life and increase the operation efficiency of existing HEPA filtration systems. The BLMT filter is self cleaning, so there will be no degraded flow or increased pressure drop. Because the BLMT filtration process is independent of temperature, it can be designed to work in ambient, medium, or high-temperature applications. During Phase II, the authors are continuing development of the computerized flow simulation model to include turbulence and incorporate expansion into a three-dimensional model that includes airflow behavior inside the filter housing before entering the active BLMT device. A full-scale (1000 ACFM) prototype filter is being designed to meet existing HEPA filter standards and will be fabricated for subsequent testing. Extensive in-house testing will be performed to determine a full range of performance characteristics. Final testing and evaluation of the prototype filter will be conducted at a DOE Quality Assurance Filter Test Station.

  15. INPRO Activities on Development of Advanced Tools to Support Judgment Aggregation for Comparative Evaluation of Nuclear Energy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kuznetsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents first results of the INPRO Collaborative Project on Key Indicators for Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems, which has the objective to develop guidance and tools for comparative evaluation of the status, prospects, benefits, and risks associated with development of innovative nuclear technologies for a more distant future. Presented results illustrate expedience of application of the multicriteria decision analysis methods, which are able to provide the added value to comparative assessment of nuclear energy systems. First, the paper presents a short review of the multicriteria decision analysis methods appropriate to support judgment aggregation within comparative evaluations of nuclear energy systems based on key indicators and highlights the methodology to perform such assessments. Second, a set of key indicators elaborated in the INPRO Collaborative Project on Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle (GAINS were evaluated for comparative evaluation of nuclear energy system evolution scenarios. Third, a numerical example is presented of application of the selected key indicators, methods, and tools for judgment aggregation in comparative assessment of the GAINS nuclear energy systems.

  16. The Fifth International Symposium on Advanced Nuclear Energy Research - neutrons as microscopic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New neutron sources being planned, such as the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) or the European Spallation Source (ESS), will provide an order of magnitude flux increase over what is available today, but neutron scattering will still remain a signal-limited technique. At the same time, the development of new materials, such as polymer and ceramic composites or a variety of complex fluids, will increasingly require neutron-based research. This paper will discuss some of the new techniques which will allow us to make. better use of the available neutrons, either through improved instrumentation or through sample manipulation. Discussion will center primarily on unpolarized neutron techniques since polarized neutrons will be the subject of the next paper

  17. Nuclear energy advance modeling and simulation program-Fuels integrated performance and safety code program - A multi-scale approach to modeling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased use of nuclear energy in the nations energy portfolio has been suggested recently by various social, economical and political organizations. Several options for the extension of nuclear energy being considered are; 1- Life Extension of Current Nuclear Reactors (operations at high burn ups), 2-Advanced New Generation Reactors (Gen III systems), 3- Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (particularly Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) concentrating on high temperature applications), and Advance Fuel Cycle Initiatives (AFCI) (fast reactor and advanced transmutation fuels). These new technology concepts will require new types of fuels (except the first option that may require more understanding of fuel behavior than development or minor modifications of fuels), and the new fuels have be developed and qualified. In the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) program we initially focus to the multi-scale modeling and simulation of new fuel types that AFCI Transmutation Fuel Campaign (TFC) program is developing. TFC is a natural customer of the NEMAS fuels IPSC project and a strong interaction and integration between the campaign and IPSC must be implemented. The program plan in terms of approach is general enough to be applicable to other fuel types of the future nuclear technology solutions. Requirements, however, may need to be updated for fuels not considered by TFC, depending upon the new physics findings. The advanced fuels of interest to AFCI programs are more complex than the traditional fuels previously and currently used in existing reactors. It is clear that using a traditional, heavily empirical approach to develop and qualify fuels over the entire range of variables pertinent to AFCI on a timely basis with available funds would be very challenging and costly, if not impossible. As a result, AFCI TFC has launched an advanced modeling and simulation campaign to revolutionize fuel

  18. Recent Advances in Nuclear Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Woo

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine. PMID:27540423

  19. Nuclear Symmetry Energy for Dense Hadronic Matter in the Era of Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments of gravitational wave detectors like LIGO and Virgo provide us an optimistic opportunity of expecting first few events in near future. One of the exciting possibilities is that we can probe the inner structure of compact objects like neutron star by analyzing the observed pattern of gravitational waves. Among the characteristic features of the equation of state (EoS), the symmetry energy of dense hadronic matter is discussed. A model which implements a new scaling law of physical parameters of hadronic matter is briefly sketched to demonstrate how it affects the equation of state and the outcome for the mass and radius estimation is discussed for an n-p asymmetric configuration.

  20. Nuclear energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of basic statistics on electricity generation and nuclear power in OECD countries. The reader will find quick and easy reference to the present status of and projected trends in total electricity generating capacity, nuclear generating capacity, and actual electricity production as well as on supply and demand for nuclear fuel cycle services

  1. Advanced nuclear systems. Review study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task of this review study is to from provide an overview of the developments in the field of the various advanced nuclear systems, and to create the basis for more comprehensive studies of technology assessment. In an overview the concepts for advanced nuclear systems pursued worldwide are subdivided into eight subgroups. A coarse examination raster (set pattern) is developed to enable a detailed examination of the selected systems. In addition to a focus on enhanced safety features, further aspects are also taken into consideration, like the lowering of the proliferation risk, the enhancement of the economic competitiveness of the facilities and new usage possibilities (for instance concerning the relaxation of the waste disposal problem or the usage of alternative fuels to uranium). The question about the expected time span for realization and the discussion about the obstacles on the way to a commercially usable reactor also play a substantial role as well as disposal requirements as far as they can be presently recognized. In the central chapter of this study, the documentation of the representatively selected concepts is evaluated as well as existing technology assessment studies and expert opinions. In a few cases where this appears to be necessary, according technical literature, further policy advisory reports, expert statements as well as other relevant sources are taken into account. Contradictions, different assessments and dissents in the literature as well as a few unsettled questions are thus indicated. The potential of advanced nuclear systems with respect to economical and societal as well as environmental objectives cannot exclusively be measured by the corresponding intrinsic or in comparison remarkable technical improvements. The acceptability of novel or improved systems in nuclear technology will have to be judged by their convincing solutions for the crucial questions of safety, nuclear waste and risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons

  2. Nuclear energy data 2010

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This 2010 edition of Nuclear Energy Data , the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of official statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, provides key information on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035 in OECD member countries. This comprehensive overview provides authoritative information for policy makers, experts and other interested stakeholders.

  3. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  4. Prospects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad overviews presented on the future prospects and conditions of nuclear power. Several graphs and diagrams are shown on energy consumption, energy demand, energy sources, pollution by power plants, mineral fuel inventories, fissionable material inventories, renewable energy sources. The conditions of future utilization of nuclear power and nuclear power plants are discussed. (R.P.)

  5. Nuclear energy data 2011

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

     . Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, contains official information provided by OECD member country governments on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035. For the first time, it includes data for Chile, Estonia, Israel and Slovenia, which recently became OECD members. Key elements of this edition show a 2% increase in nuclear and total electricity production and a 0.5% increase in nuclear generating ca

  6. Nuclear energy data 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Publishing, OECD

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers a projection horizon lengthened to 2025 for the first time.  It presents the reader with a comprehensive overview on the status and trends in nuclear electricity generation in OECD countries and in the various sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  7. Nuclear energy - some aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy

  8. The use of nuclear energy for district heating. The branch program of activities. NIKIET design efforts on the advanced nuclear co-generation plant with VK-300 reactor, the Ruta nuclear heating plant and small power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: District heating is among the top priorities of the state economic and energy policy of Russia and is the largest and expanding sector of the national power industry. The nuclear sources of energy are regarded as the promising option for this sector of the power industry. The branch program of activities which is being implemented is intended for developing the policy and program of nuclear district heating. The priority task is to provide co-generated heat from the NPPs and nuclear co-generation plants to the amount of 30 mln Gcal/year by 2020 as specified in the Energy Policy of Russia for the period until 2020. NIKIET named after N.A. Dollezhal has been developing the special purpose reactor facilities for the power units of the nuclear co-generation plants and nuclear heating plants. The detailed design of the power unit with the simplified passive boiling water reactor VK-300 has been developed for the nuclear co-generation plant (NCP) intended to be deployed in the large-scale power industry. It has been demonstrated that NCP with VK-300 reactor is competitive with respect to the operating and advanced fossil thermal co-generation plants. It is envisaged to construct the four-unit first of-the-kind NCP with VK-300 reactor in Arkhangelsk region. The nuclear heating plant based on the pool RUTA reactors operating under atmospheric pressure is being developed for the small towns. It is planned to construct the pilot plant of such kind on the site of RF State Research Center FEI, Obninsk. In the frame of conversion of the defense-oriented works NIKIET has developed the UNITHERM reactor facility for a small NPP to be located in the distant and difficult-to access regions of Russia. To provide heat and electricity to the small communities, meteorological observatories, lighthouses and radio navigation stations in a reliable and safe way, it is possible to use non-attended small nuclear power plants based on the self-regulating water-water reactor and

  9. Advanced energy materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    An essential resource for scientists designing new energy materials for the vast landscape of solar energy conversion as well as materials processing and characterization Based on the new and fundamental research on novel energy materials with tailor-made photonic properties, the role of materials engineering has been to provide much needed support in the development of photovoltaic devices. Advanced Energy Materials offers a unique, state-of-the-art look at the new world of novel energy materials science, shedding light on the subject's vast multi-disciplinary approach The book focuses p

  10. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  11. Sustainable nuclear energy dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Afgan Naim H.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable energy development implies the need for the emerging potential energy sources which are not producing adverse effect to the environment. In this respect nuclear energy has gained the complimentary favor to be considered as the potential energy source without degradation of the environment. The sustainability evaluation of the nuclear energy systems has required the special attention to the criteria for the assessment of nuclear energy system before we can make firm justifica...

  12. Advances in Nuclear Monitoring Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Brent

    2006-03-01

    Homeland security requires low-cost, large-area detectors for locating and identifying weapons-usable nuclear materials and monitors for radiological isotopes that are more robust than current systems. Recent advances in electronics materials and nanotechnology, specifically organic semiconductors and inorganic quantum dots, offer potential improvements. We provide an overview of the physical processes involved in radiation detection using these new materials in the design of new device structures. Examples include recent efforts on quantum dots, as well as more traditional radiation-detecting materials such as CdZnTe and high-pressure xenon. Detector improvements demand not only new materials but also enhanced data-analysis tools that reduce false alarms and thus increase the quality of decisions. Additional computing power on hand-held platforms should enable the application of advanced algorithms to radiation-detection problems in the field, reducing the need to transmit data and thus delay analysis.

  13. Sustainable nuclear energy dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afgan Naim H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy development implies the need for the emerging potential energy sources which are not producing adverse effect to the environment. In this respect nuclear energy has gained the complimentary favor to be considered as the potential energy source without degradation of the environment. The sustainability evaluation of the nuclear energy systems has required the special attention to the criteria for the assessment of nuclear energy system before we can make firm justification of the sustainability of nuclear energy systems. In order to demonstrate the sustainability assessment of nuclear energy system this exercise has been devoted to the potential options of nuclear energy development, namely: short term option, medium term option, long term option and classical thermal system option. Criteria with following indicators are introduced in this analysis: nuclear indicator, economic indicator, environment indicator, social indicator... The Sustainability Index is used as the merit for the priority assessment among options under consideration.

  14. Advanced integral reactor (SMART) for nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, severe fresh water shortages are occurring in some regional areas of the Republic of Korea and the problem is expected to spread throughout the country within a decade unless appropriate and timely countermeasures are taken. Of these, nuclear sea water desalination is receiving much attention because the Republic of Korea has a firmly established nuclear environment and abundant sea water resources. In addition, nuclear plants provide cleaner energy than fossil plants, which is another important beneficial factor for countries as crowded as ours. With a view to applying nuclear desalination, development of SMART (system integrated modular advanced reactor) was initiated and is currently in progress. SMART is being developed as a 330 MW(th) integral reactor with passive safety features. The design of SMART is aimed at combining the firmly established commercial reactor design with new advanced technologies. This has led to the use of industry proven Korea optimized fuel assembly (KOFA) based fuels, while radically new technologies such as a self-pressurizing pressurizer, helical once-through steam generators and a new control concept are being developed. The current development status of SMART and its application to nuclear desalination are presented. (author)

  15. Nuclear energy: Sources and global perspective (7)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of the global nuclear energy. The development of the new generation of the nuclear reactors AR 600 is analysed. The advanced nuclear power plants as well as the perspectives of the nuclear power development are also analysed

  16. The future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europe is one of the world leaders in nuclear technology advancement. The development of spent fuel reprocessing is but one example of this. This process continues today with the development by France and Germany of the European Pressurised-Water Reactor. Nuclear research and development work is continuing in Europe, and must be continued in the future, if Europe is to retain its world leadership position in the technological field and on the commercial front. If we look at the benefits, which nuclear energy has to offer, in economic and environmental terms, 1 support the view that nuclear is an energy source whose time has come again. This is not some fanciful notion or wishful thinking. There is clear evidence of greater long-term reliance on nuclear energy. Perhaps we do not see new nuclear plants springing up in Europe, but we do see ambitious nuclear power development programmes underway in places like China, Japan and Korea. Closer to home, Finland is seriously considering the construction of a new nuclear unit. Elsewhere, in Europe and the US, we see a growing trend towards nuclear plant life extension and plant upgrades geared towards higher production capacity. These are all signs that nuclear will be around for a long time to come and that nuclear will indeed have a future

  17. Role of advanced reactors in further nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the national long-term nuclear R and D program launched in 1992, an endeavor has been made in Korea to develop advanced nuclear reactor systems with significantly enhanced safety and economics from those of the current generation nuclear power plants. The advanced PWR nuclear reactor systems under development in Korea include 1300 MWe Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), 330 MWt Integral Type System Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART) for nuclear cogeneration, and 330 MWe Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER) in addition to the evolutionary enhancement of the 1000 MWt KSNPP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant). Three point design philosophy has been adopted for the development of the advanced reactors in Korea : enhancements on safety, economics and public acceptance of nuclear power. To enhance the safety of the advanced reactor systems, a strategy has been adopted to employ advanced design features as well as the passive safety design features. Economically viable design concepts also have been implemented in the evolutionary KSNPP, KNGR, and the SMART development. Economic competitiveness against the fossil plants also has been set as a major objective of the ALWR development program in Korea. These safer and more economical advanced reactors will better promote the public acceptance of the commercial use of the nuclear power and thus could be utilized to meet the forecasted national energy need in the early 21st century. International cooperation in the areas of ALWR development as well as improving public acceptance of the nuclear power is required. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general view about the use of energy for brazilian development is presented. The international situation of the nuclear field and the pacific utilization of nuclear energy in Brazil are commented. The safety concepts used for reactor and nuclear facilities licensing, the environmental monitoring program and radiation protection program used in Brazil are described. (E.G.)

  19. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  20. Nuclear energy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of nuclear energy on medicine, as well as the basic principles of these applications, are presented. The radiological diagnosis, the radiotherapy, the nuclear medicine, the radiological protection and the production of radioisotopes are studied. (M.A.C.)

  1. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Baldo, M.; Burgio, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symme...

  2. Argentine nuclear energy standardization activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has more than 200 Technical Committees that develop technical standards. During April 2004 took place in Buenos Aires the 14th Plenary of the ISO/TC 85 Nuclear Energy Committee. During this Plenary issues as Nuclear Terminology, Radiation Protection, Nuclear Fuels, Nuclear Reactors and Irradiation Dosimetry was dealt with. 105 International delegates and 45 National delegates (belonging to CNEA, ARN, NASA, INVAP, CONUAR, IONICS and other organizations) attended the meetings. During this meeting ISO/TC 85 changed its scope; the new scope of the Committee is 'Standardization in the fields of peaceful applications of nuclear energy and of the protection of individuals against all sources of ionizing radiations'. This work summarizes the most important advances and resolutions about the development of standards taken during this meeting as well as the main conclusions. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has a strong relation to a society. However, due to accidents and scandals having occurred in recent years, people's reliability to nuclear energy has significantly swayed and is becoming existence of a worry. Analyzing such a situation and grasping the problem contained are serious problems for people engaging in nuclear field. In order that nuclear energy is properly used in society, communication with general public and in nuclear power plant site area are increasingly getting important as well as grasping the situation and surveying measures for overcoming the problems. On the basis of such an analysis, various activities for betterment of public acceptance of nuclear energy by nuclear industry workers, researchers and the government are proposed. (J.P.N.)

  4. Nuclear fusion: sixty years of efforts, great advances and challenges. May nuclear fusion replace fossil energies? The Grail which makes start-ups dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A first article proposes an overview of sixty years of researches, investments and realisations aimed at a better knowledge and control of nuclear fusion to solve the Planet's energy problems. After a brief overview of the Sun as an example, and while presenting the principle of magnetic fusion in a tokamak, some key figures illustration the development of ITER, the authors describe magnetic fusion as the royal road to nuclear fusion (challenges for the ITER project, development of Stellarator as a concurrent of tokamaks), and inertial fusion as an alternate approach (principle, military interest, plasma physics). They also indicate other approaches based on a change of energy source, a change in ignition process, or a change in fuel. In a second article, the author discusses the economic perspectives of nuclear fusion: a supposed unlimited fuel, existence of radioactive releases and pollution, operation risks and costs, technical challenges to be faced, a development to be amortised on more than a century except if more compact processes are elaborated and developed. The author also discusses issues of profitability and of proliferation. The third and last article comments the existence of many start-ups, notably financed by Silicon Valley rich companies, which invest in researches and projects on nuclear fusion. They try to develop more compact systems, and aim at manufacturing their first prototypes by 2020. On the other side, academics remain doubtful about their ability to reach their objectives

  5. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  6. Introduction to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some descriptions about atoms, fission and fusion, explanations are given about the functioning of a nuclear power plant. The safety with the different plans of emergency and factors that lead to a better nuclear safety are exposed, then comes a part for the environmental protection; the fuel cycle is tackled. Some historical aspects of nuclear energy finish this file. (N.C.)

  7. Nuclear energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity

  8. Nuclear energy class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces general conception and principle on nuclear energy. It comprised of twelve units, which are atom and an atom nucleus, a radioisotope and radioactivity, interaction on radiation and substance, nuclear reaction, nuclear reactor, making of a radioisotope, nuclear fuel cycle, utilization of radioisotope and radiation, natural radioactivity, radiation hazard, limitation of exposure and safety supervision on radiation. It has a chart on the symbol of element.

  9. Nuclear Energy Data 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants declined in 2012 as a result of operational issues at some facilities and suspended operation at all but two reactors in Japan. Nuclear safety was further strengthened in 2012 following safety reviews prompted by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix pursued initiatives to increase nuclear generating capacity. In Turkey, plans were finalised for the construction of the first four reactors for commercial electricity production. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Statlinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link

  10. Nuclear energy in view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This leaflet advertises the availability of the following from UKAEA: film and video titles (nuclear fuel cycle; energy for all; power from the atom; using radioactivity; fast reactor; energy - the nuclear option; principles of fission; radiation); slide-tape packs (16 titles); other information services. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution discusses the energy policy in Japan. In contrast to Germany nuclear power is not a bridging technology for Japan, the construction of new nuclear power plants is planned. The credibility of the Japanese nuclear power industry should have been discussed in the public even before the catastrophic reactor accidents in Fukushima-Daiichi. Safety, reliability, credibility and transparency are basic for public acceptance of high risk technologies. Up to 2011 Japan has not promoted the use of renewable energies.

  12. The Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Baldo, M

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy characterizes the variation of the binding energy as the neutron to proton ratio of a nuclear system is varied. This is one of the most important features of nuclear physics in general, since it is just related to the two component nature of the nuclear systems. As such it is one of the most relevant physical parameters that affect the physics of many phenomena and nuclear processes. This review paper presents a survey of the role and relevance of the nuclear symmetry energy in different fields of research and of the accuracy of its determination from the phenomenology and from the microscopic many-body theory. In recent years, a great interest was devoted not only to the Nuclear Matter symmetry energy at saturation density but also to its whole density dependence, which is an essential ingredient for our understanding of many phenomena. We analyze the nuclear symmetry energy in different realms of nuclear physics and astrophysics. In particular we consider the nuclear symmetry ene...

  13. Nuclear energy inquiries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our choice of energy sources has important consequences for the economy and the environment. Nuclear energy is a controversial energy source, subject to much public debate. Most individuals find it difficult to decide between conflicting claims and allegations in a variety of technical subjects. Under these circumstances, knowledge of various relevant inquiries can be helpful. This publication summarizes the composition and major findings of more than thirty nuclear energy inquiries. Most of the these are Canadian, but others are included where they have relevance. The survey shows that, contrary to some claims, virtually every aspect of nuclear energy has been subject to detailed scrutiny. The inquiries' reports include many recommendations on how nuclear energy can be exploited safely, but none rejects it as an acceptable energy source when needed. (Author) 38 refs

  14. To MARS and Beyond with Nuclear Power - Design Concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The President Park of ROK has also expressed support for space program promotion, praising the success of NARO as evidence of a positive outlook. These events hint a strong signal that ROK's space program will be accelerated by the national eager desire. In this national eager desire for space program, the policymakers and the aerospace engineers need to pay attention to the advanced nuclear technology of ROK that is set to a major world nuclear energy country, even exporting the technology. The space nuclear application is a very much attractive option because its energy density is the most enormous among available energy sources in space. This paper presents the design concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANuTER) that is one of the advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine developing in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) for space application. Solar system exploration relying on CRs suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard, nuclear propulsion is a very attractive option for that because of higher performance and already demonstrated technology. Although ROK was a late entrant into elite global space club, its prospect as a space racer is very bright because of the national eager desire and its advanced technology. Especially it is greatly meaningful that ROK has potential capability to launch its nuclear technology into space as a global nuclear energy leader and a soaring space adventurer. In this regard, KANuTER will be a kind of bridgehead for Korean space nuclear application.

  15. Nuclear power energy mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains the papers presented at the conference held on 23/24 February 1994 at the RWTH in Aachen. The goal of this conference was to analyse key issues of future energy management from different viewpoints and to attempt to achieve objective estimations. This VDI Report treats the following main themes: - is the climate question relevant? - chances and limits of renewable energy sources - does nuclear power have a future? - are the nuclear and non-nuclear waste problems solvable? - external costs in energy management -company and energy management decision criteria. (orig.)

  16. Perspectives for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Belgium, approximately 60 percent of the produced electricity is generated by nuclear power. At present, nuclear power production tends to stagnate in Europe and North America but is still growing in Asia. The document gives an overview of the present status and the future energy demand with emphasis on electric power. Different evaluation criteria including factors hindering and factors promoting the expansion of nuclear power as well as requirements of new nuclear power plants are discussed. The extension of the lifetime of existing facilities as well as fuel supply are taken into consideration. A comparative assesment of nuclear power with other energy sources is made. The report concludes with estimating the contribution and the role of nuclear power in future energy demand as well as with an overview of future reactors and research and development programmes

  17. Nuclear energy today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is the power of the world's economies, whose appetite for this commodity is increasing as the leading economies expand and developing economies grow. How to provide the energy demanded while protecting our environment and conserving natural resources is a vital question facing us today. Many parts of our society are debating how to power the future and whether nuclear energy should play a role. Nuclear energy is a complex technology with serious issues and a controversial past. Yet it also has the potential to provide considerable benefits. In pondering the future of this imposing technology, people want to know. - How safe is nuclear energy? - Is nuclear energy economically competitive? - What role can nuclear energy play in meeting greenhouse gas reduction targets? - What can be done with the radioactive waste it generates? - Does its use increase the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons? - Are there sufficient and secure resources to permit its prolonged exploitation? - Can tomorrow's nuclear energy be better than today's? This publication provides authoritative and factual replies to these questions. Written primarily to inform policy makers, it will also serve interested members of the public, academics, journalists and industry leaders. (author)

  18. Options for treatment of legacy and advanced nuclear fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, Christopher John

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of advanced nuclear fuels is relevant to the stabilisation of legacy spent fuels or nuclear materials and fuels from future nuclear reactors. Historically, spent fuel reprocessing has been driven to recover uranium and plutonium for reuse. Future fuel cycles may also recover the minor actinides neptunium, americium and perhaps curium. These actinides would be fabricated into new reactor fuel to produce energy and for transmutation of the minor actinides. This has the potential t...

  19. The nuclear energy debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have not been able to obtain closure in the nuclear energy debate because the public perception of nuclear energy is out of sync with reality. The industry has not been about to deal with the concerns of those opposed to nuclear energy because its reaction has been to generate and disseminate more facts rather than dealing with the serious moral and ethical questions that are being asked. Nuclear proponents and opponents appeal to different moral communities, and those outside each community cannot concede that the other might be right. The Interfaith Program for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues (IPPANI) has been formed, sponsored by members of the Jewish, Baha'i, Roman Catholic, United, and Anglican faiths, to provide for a balanced discussion of the ethical aspects of energy. (L.L.)

  20. Nuclear energy pack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pack contains teaching material to supply factual information about nuclear energy for those teaching physics or chemistry or general science for GCE examinations. It is intended for use either in class teaching or in some forms of resource-based learning systems. The material comprises: illustrated booklets and accompanying filmstrips on (1) energy from atoms, (2) ionising radiation and its detection, (3) nuclear reactors, and (4) the uses of radioisotopes; wallcharts on (1) nuclear fuel cycle, (2) radioactivity at work, and (3) nuclear reactors for producing electricity; glossary of atomic terms; and teachers' guide. (U.K.)

  1. Commonsense in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: the ultimate price of an energy collapse; desecration of the environment (by activities other than nuclear power); nuclear reactors cannot explode, but other things can (examples of chemical explosions); death sentences (coal mine explosions); radioactivity (activity from all sources compared); how damaging is radioactivity (effects of radiation in various doses); nuclear accidents; the day the dam broke; how stands solar; natural gas; coal; storing one's own nuclear waste; [was there] a nuclear accident in the U.S.S.R.; breeder reactors and the U.S. Non-proliferation Act; who is doing the proliferating; it has all happened before. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear energy and jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mr. Goldfinger, Research Director of AFL-CIO, examines the problem of energy in general, nuclear in particular, and the employment relationship. The energy shortages in the U.S. and its dependence on oil are cited. Directly connected with this serious problem relating to energy are jobs, income, and living standards. If energy is not available, industries will be unable to expand to meet the needs of the growing population; and prices of goods will rise. From an evaluation of what experts have said, Mr. Goldfinger concludes that increased coal production and better coal technology cannot meet energy demands; so the sharp increase both in volume and as a percentage of total energy needed in the future will have to come from nuclear power. Development of alternative sources is necessary, he feels, and intense research on these is needed now. The employment impact in the nuclear energy scenario is analyzed according to the trades involved. It is estimated that 1.5 million jobs in the nuclear industry would be open by the year 2000 if nuclear is to provide one-fourth of energy supplies. The employment picture, assuming abandonment of nuclear energy, is then discussed

  3. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  4. Axiology of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy was born in World War II and it has grown within the regime of Cold War. When the Cold War came to the end around early 1990 s, we who have benefited by the development of nuclear energy must have been challenged with a new tide of civilization change. Although it has not been so much closely questioned since then, such a new movement, that was submerging, abruptly manifested on September 11, 2001. Then, many of us realized that global circumstances, especially concerned with security, must have actually changed with the reordering of the world basic structures. This paper describes on the thoughts to reveal the cause and background of the event on September 11 with the linkage to nuclear energy development, or nuclear civilization in pursuit of the future regime of nuclear in harmonization with the global society in 21st century. (author)

  5. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion for Advanced Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, M. G.; Borowski, S. K.; George, J. A.; Kim, T.; Emrich, W. J.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.; Gerrish, H. P.; Adams, R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental capability of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is game changing for space exploration. A first generation Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) based on NTP could provide high thrust at a specific impulse above 900 s, roughly double that of state of the art chemical engines. Characteristics of fission and NTP indicate that useful first generation systems will provide a foundation for future systems with extremely high performance. The role of the NCPS in the development of advanced nuclear propulsion systems could be analogous to the role of the DC-3 in the development of advanced aviation. Progress made under the NCPS project could help enable both advanced NTP and advanced Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP).

  6. Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Walter A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

  7. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  8. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  9. Nuclear energy related research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Program Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Center for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities, and industry also contribute to many projects.

  10. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1991. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  11. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1990. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Utilities and industry also contribute to some projects

  12. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1988. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  13. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1989. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  14. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Nuclear generated hydrogen has important potential advantages over other sources that will be considered for a growing hydrogen share in a future world energy economy. Still, there are technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes that need to be addressed through a vigorous research and development effort. Safety issues as well as hydrogen storage and distribution are important areas of research to be undertaken to support a successful hydrogen economy in the future. The hydrogen economy is gaining higher visibility and stronger political support in several parts of the

  15. Desalting and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Calvin C.

    1971-01-01

    Future use of nuclear energy to produce electricity and desalted water is outlined. Possible desalting processes are analyzed to show economic feasibility and the place in planning in world's economic growth. (DS)

  16. Nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summary represents an overview of the energy situation in Armenia and, in particular, the nuclear energy development during the last period of time. the energy sector of Armenia is one of the most developed economy branches of the country. The main sources of energy are oil products, natural gas, nuclear energy, hydropower, and coal. In the period of 1985-1988 the consumption of these energy resources varied between 12-13 million tons per year of oil equivalent. Imported energy sources accounted for 96% of the consumption. During the period 1993-1995 the consumption dropped to 3 million tons per year. Electricity in Armenia is produced by three thermal, one nuclear, and two major hydroelectric cascades together with a number small hydro units. The total installed capacity is 3558 MW. Nuclear energy in Armenia began its development during the late 1960's. Since the republic was not rich in natural reserves of primary energy sources and the only domestic source of energy was hydro resource, it was decided to build a nuclear power plant in Armenia. The Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) Unit 1 was commissioned in 1996 and Unit 2 in 1980. The design of the ANPP was developed in 1968-1969 and was based on the project of Units 3 and 4 of the Novovoronezh NPP. Both units of the plant are equipped with reactors WWER-440 (V -270) type, which are also in use in some power stations in Russian Federation, Bulgaria, and Slovakia. Currently in Armenia, 36% of the total electricity production is nuclear power electricity. (authors)

  17. Risk communication: Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emphasis is put on communication processes, here in particular with regard to nuclear energy. Not so much dealt with are questions concerning political regulation, the constellation of power between those becoming active and risk perception by the population. Presented are individual arguments, political positions and decision-making processes. Dealt with in particular are safety philosophies, risk debates, and attempts to 'channel' all sides to the subject of nuclear energy. (DG)

  18. Deliberations about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a discussion of points raised in three safety studies dealing with nuclear energy. It reviews the problems that must be faced in order to form a safe and practical energy policy with regard to health and the environment (potential hazards, biological effects and radiation dose norms), the proliferation of nuclear weapons, reactor accidents (including their causes, consequences and evacuation problems that arise), the fallout and contamination problems, and security (both reactor security and national security)

  19. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1962-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 1 provides an authoritative, complete, coherent, and critical review of the nuclear industry. This book covers a variety of topics, including nuclear power stations, graft polymerization, diffusion in uranium alloys, and conventional power plants.Organized into seven chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the three stages of the operation of a power plant, either nuclear or conventionally fueled. This text then examines the major problems that face the successful development of commercial nuclear power plants. Other chapters consider

  20. The nuclear energy outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, nuclear power has witnessed a remarkable revival, driven by a number of concerns about the current global energy mix. In a situation where use of fossil fuels predominates, energy security has become a priority for many countries, as prices remain volatile and the long-term prospect of their exhaustion looms large. Worries about climate change are also fostering interest in nuclear power given that this energy source is virtually free of CO2 emissions. The NEO concludes that nuclear energy is a mature technology that could play a large part in resolving the world's energy issues. Not only can nuclear power provide very large quantities of energy, largely CO2-free and for very long periods of time, but it can also be used to provide heat, to supply potable water and to produce hydrogen for transport. Nuclear energy is not necessarily the answer in all situations and in all societies. The NEO nevertheless aims to provide a lasting, quality resource to inform decision makers' and citizens' debates on potential energy options

  1. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and

  2. Advances in nuclear fuel technology. 3. Development of advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle technology has a technical characteristics flexibly easy to apply to diverse fuel compositions such as plutonium, minor actinides, and so on and fuel configurations. By using this characteristics, various feasibilities on effective application of uranium resources based on breeding of uranium of plutonium for original mission of FBR, contribution to radioactive wastes problems based on amounts reduction of transuranium elements (TRU) in high level radioactive wastes, upgrading of nuclear diffusion resistance, extremely upgrading of economical efficiency, and so on. In this paper, were introduced from these viewpoints, on practice strategy survey study on FBR cycle performed by cooperation of the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) with electric business companies and so on, and on technical development on advanced nuclear fuel recycle systems carried out at the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, and so on. Here were explained under a vision on new type of fuels such as nitride fuels, metal fuels, and so on as well as oxide fuels, a new recycle system making possible to use actinides except uranium and plutonium, an 'advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology', containing improvement of conventional wet Purex method reprocessing technology, fuel manufacturing technology, and so on. (G.K.)

  3. Recent advances in nuclear ADC's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronics Division of BARC has done leading research work in nuclear ADC's. Number of new methods have been developed. The most important of these methods are: (1) the vernier Approximation Technique, (2) the method based on new DAC correction technique, and (3) the Interpolation Technique. These are briefly described. High resolution (8K and 4K) nuclear ADC's constructed based on new methods of A/D conversion give low DNL ( < ± 1 per cent) and low conversion time (< 10 μsec). These ADC's give much lower conversion time as compared to the conversion time obtained using Wilkinson technique. Thus 100 MHz Wilkinson type of ADC with 8K resolution has conversion time of 81 micro seconds which is very high as compared to conversion time of 6.5 micro secs. of the 8K nuclear ADC made at Electronics Division, BARC. All these nuclear ADC's utilize commercially available monolithic ADC's and monolithic DAC's. The recent improvements in speed size and cost of these ADC's and DAC's are thus directly utilized to improve corresponding factors in nuclear ADC's. Thus conversion time of 4K nuclear ADC can be reduced from 12 μsec to nearly 4 μsec just with replacement of ADC-84 by its high speed version. This is a distinct advantage of these nuclear ADC's over Wilkinson type of ADC's, where improvement of performance requires major changes in circuit design. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  4. Nuclear energy debate

    CERN Document Server

    Healey, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The debate over the introduction of nuclear power in Australia has recently become more heated in light of safety concerns over the nuclear reactor meltdown emergency in Japan. Australia has also just committed to a carbon trading scheme to address its reliance on coal-fired energy and reduce greenhouse emissions. With 40% of the world's uranium located in Australia, the economic, environmental and health considerations are significant. This book contains an overview of global nuclear energy use and production, and presents a range of current opinions debating the pros and cons of Australia's

  5. High energy nuclear structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear field theory has been applied to study nuclear matter as well as finite nuclei. Within the mean field approximation the known bulk properties of nuclei such as binding energy, density, and compressibility are well reproduced. Charge and matter distributions of closed shell nuclei are in good agreement with experimental results, so are rms radii and single-particle energy levels. In addition to the description of known nuclear structure the field theoretical approach may reveal entirely new nuclear phenomena, based on the explicite treatment of mesonic degrees of freedom. The existence of such abnormal nuclear states was proposed by Lee and Wick employing the sigma-model Lagrangian. There the non-linearity of the meson field equations allows for soliton solutions in the presence of nucleons, in particular the sigma-field may exhibit a kink. Some of these solutions are considered

  6. Advanced safeguards for the nuclear renaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear energy provides not only the benefit of carbon-neutral electricity, but also the potential for proliferation concern as well. Nuclear safeguards implemented at the state level (domestic) and at the international level by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are essential for ensuring that nuclear materials are not misused and are thereby a critical component of the increased usage of nuclear energy. In the same way that the 1950's Atoms for Peace initiative provided the foundation for a robust research and development program in nuclear safeguards, the expansion of nuclear energy that is underway today provides the impetus to enter a new era of technical development in the safeguards community. In this paper, we will review the history of nuclear safeguards research and development as well future directions.

  7. Center for Advanced Energy Studies Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Kostelnik

    2005-09-01

    The world is facing critical energy-related challenges regarding world and national energy demands, advanced science and energy technology delivery, nuclear engineering educational shortfalls, and adequately trained technical staff. Resolution of these issues is important for the United States to ensure a secure and affordable energy supply, which is essential for maintaining U.S. national security, continued economic prosperity, and future sustainable development. One way that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges is by tasking the Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) with developing the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). By 2015, CAES will be a self-sustaining, world-class, academic and research institution where the INL; DOE; Idaho, regional, and other national universities; and the international community will cooperate to conduct critical energy-related research, classroom instruction, technical training, policy conceptualization, public dialogue, and other events.

  8. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1970-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 5 presents the underlying principles and theory, as well as the practical applications of the advances in the nuclear field. This book reviews the specialized applications to such fields as space propulsion.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the design and objective of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide fast flux irradiation testing facilities. This text then examines the problem in the design of nuclear reactors, which is the analysis of the spatial and temporal behavior of the neutron and temperature dist

  9. Robot vision for nuclear advanced robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes Robot Vision and Operation System for Nuclear Advanced Robot. This Robot Vision consists of robot position detection, obstacle detection and object recognition. With these vision techniques, a mobile robot can make a path and move autonomously along the planned path. The authors implemented the above robot vision system on the 'Advanced Robot for Nuclear Power Plant' and tested in an environment mocked up as nuclear power plant facilities. Since the operation system for this robot consists of operator's console and a large stereo monitor, this system can be easily operated by one person. Experimental tests were made using the Advanced Robot (nuclear robot). Results indicate that the proposed operation system is very useful, and can be operate by only person. (author)

  10. Nuclear energy and environment: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this meeting on nuclear energy and environment, abstracts on the following subjects were presented: nuclear fuels; materials; radioisotopes and its applications; reactors and nuclear power plants; regulations, energy and environment; radioactive wastes; and analytical techniques

  11. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility: advancing nuclear technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a Users Week, internships, faculty student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In addition, the ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  12. Improving public acceptance of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, public acceptance of nuclear energy decreased dramatically. In order to prevent such catastrophic events, major safety improvements have been achieved both in the operating nuclear power plants and in the future advanced projects as well. Nowadays, the nuclear energy problem was totally modified by the complete mastery and control of nuclear power generation as well as of radioactive waste management. It become a solution to the global climatic challenges and equally to the ever increasing world energy demand. (author)

  13. Nuclear Energy in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new energy approach towards nuclear, due to the growing political support at the beginning of this century, is the result of a complexity of economical, social, political and technological factors. The history of peaceful use of nuclear energy in Romania goes back 45 years. Considering the strategic importance of the energy sector in developing the national economy on sustainable basis, the sector evolution should be outlined through prognosis and strategies on different horizons of time, so that the development perspectives and the energy supply to be correctly estimated. This necessity is emphasized in the Governmental Program of the present administration, which takes into consideration Romanian Economic Strategy on medium term and also The Government Action Plan on 2000-2004, agreed with the European Commission. In order to implement the Governmental Program, the Ministry of Industries and Resources elaborates the National Energy Strategy. The Government Action Plan draw up the conclusion that Unit 2 from Cernavoda NPP must be finalized. This solution fits the least-cost energy development planning and answers to environment requirements. Romania became a Member State of the Agency in 1957. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s its technical co-operation program with the Agency covered mainly research in nuclear physics and some medical and other applications of radiation and isotopes. Since 1976, when the Romanian nuclear power program was embarking to use CANDU-type reactors, the Agency has supported mainly the activities related to the Cernavoda NPP. In the framework of the Romanian accession process to the European structures, CNCAN co-operates with European Commission for transposition of the communautaire acquis in the field of nuclear activities. Romania has had laws in place governing the regulation of nuclear activities since 1974. They were remained in force throughout and subsequent to the national constitutional changes started in 1989 until 1996

  14. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1972-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 6 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book covers a variety of topics, including nuclear steam generator, oscillations, fast reactor fuel, gas centrifuge, thermal transport system, and fuel cycle.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the high standards of technical safety for Europe's first nuclear-propelled merchant ship. This text then examines the state of knowledge concerning qualitative results on the behavior of the solutions of the nonlinear poin

  15. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1976-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 9 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book discusses the safe and beneficial development of land-based nuclear power plants.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the possible consequences of a large-scale release of radioactivity from a nuclear reactor in the event of a serious accident. This text then discusses the extension of conventional perturbation techniques to multidimensional systems and to high-order approximations of the Boltzmann equation.

  16. Nuclear Systems Materials Handbook. [Materials requirements for nuclear energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchbanks, M.F; Moen, R.A.; Irvin, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The NSM Handbook is a multi-volume document being compiled on a continuing basis to meet the broad materials data requirements of those involved in the development of advanced nuclear energy systems. The present focus of the Handbook is upon nuclear systems that have not yet achieved commercial status, with near-term emphasis on the nation's Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. Actual use of the Handbook extends to other advanced nuclear concepts sharing the same needs, and to many nonnuclear engineering activities as well.

  17. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It examines the technical, scientific and legal issues relating to the peaceful use of atomic energy in Turkey. The first fifteen chapters give a general overview of the atom and radioactivity; the chapters which follow this section are more technical and deal with the causes of nuclear accidents in reactors.A number of chapters cover legal issues, for example the conditions and procedures involved in the insurance market and the risks linked to operation of a nuclear power plant.The following subjects are examined in relation to nuclear insurance: risks during construction; fire during operation of the plants and other causes of accidents; risks due to the transport of radioactive materials and waste etc. The final chapters reproduce the principle legislative texts in force in Turkey in the field of nuclear energy, and also certain regulations which establish competent regulatory bodies

  18. Nuclear energy. Unmasking the mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standing Committee on Energy, Mines and Resources of the House of Commons of Canada undertook a study of the economics of nuclear power in Canada. This is its report on the evidence it heard. It found that maintaining the nuclear power option is vital to Canada's interests. The Committee recommended that: the schedule for establishing a commercial high-level radioactive waste repository be advanced; the basic insurance coverage on nuclear facilities be raised; the federal government increase its financial support of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL); AECL expand its research and development activities, including non-nuclear R and D; AECL be allowed to hold a minority interest in any component of AECL that is privatized; any new entity created by privatization from AECL be required to remain under Canadian control; the Atomic Energy Control Act be altered to allow the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to recover costs through licensing fees and user charges, while the AECB's parliamentary appropriation is increased to offset remaining costs of operations; membership on the AECB be increased from one to five full-time members, retaining the present four part-time members; the AECB hold its hearings in public; the name of the AECB be changed so it is more readily distinguishable from AECL; the AECB establish an office of public information; and that federal and provincial governments cooperate more closely to identify opportunities where more efficient use of electricity could be achieved and to promote those measures that can attain the greatest economic efficiency

  19. Teachers and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of the seminar were: to exchange national experience in informing and assisting teachers in the nuclear field, and to determine the conditions for improving the effectiveness of these programmes; to develop an international understanding on the basic training and information requirements to assist secondary-school teachers in discussing nuclear energy in an appropriately wide and balanced context at school; to study the respective contributions of national authorities, industry and relevant institutes in this endeavour

  20. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this French-English bilingual Guide is to present a synthesis embracing all the aspects and all the implications of the development of nuclear energy by situating it both within the French administrative and professional framework and in the world context. Special attention has been paid to the protection of man and the environment and to safety and security problems; most of the other questions -technological, economic, industrial- which arise at all points in the nuclear cycle. Teaching and research are outlined and a special appendix is devoted to nuclear information

  1. Nuclear energy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finland currently generates about 40% of its electricity from nuclear power. This achievement of worldwide record magnitude is based on long-lasting efforts to build and maintain the competent infrastructure and close international cooperation required by this demanding technology. This booklet published by the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission gives an overview of nuclear energy and related organizations in Finland. It describes the utility companies and nuclear power production, the manufacturing industry and its export potential, research and educational activities and the legal framework and authorities for nuclear safety and administration. International cooperation has been essential for Finland in developing its nuclear energy capacity and appreciation is espressed to many countries and international organizations which have contributed to this. At the same time Finnish organizations are willing to share the experiences and know-how they have gained in building nuclear power in a small country. This is a road which will be followed by many other countries in the decades to come. It is hoped that this booklet will also help to open new channels of cooperation in such efforts

  2. Nuclear energy and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, about 80 developing countries are using nuclear techniques in various sectors of their national economies. In the sector of industry, the radiation processing using gamma rays of high energy electrons has grown. While in the sector of health care, an estimated 10000 gamma cameras-imaging instruments are used in combination with radioisotopes in medical diagnosis. In the field of agriculture there is, nearly, 1000 crop varieties derived from radiaton-induced mutations which are grown worldwide. Furthermore and concerning the energy sector there is 417 nuclear power plants operating in 26 countries, accounting for just 16% of the world's total electricity production; the nuclear energy helped in developing and supporting a variety of sciences. 2 tabs

  3. Information and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive information on the safety aspects in the field of nuclear energy is supplied by the documents established by international and national bodies. As compared with chemical or biological hazards, the detection of radiations is especially simple and sensitive. The biological effects of ionizing radiation are well known thanks to epidemiological surveys and biological experiments. The dose-effect relationships have been determined allowing an assessment of the risks associated with any radiation exposure: natural exposure, X-ray in medical diagnosis, nuclear energy production,... A comparative study shows that the overall risks associated with the production of electric energy of nuclear origin are lower than those linked to fossil-fueled power plants, the latter being much lower than the risks from smoking

  4. Alternatives to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses several possibilities as alternatives to nuclear energy and their relevance to the Philippine case. The major present and future fuel alternatives to petroleum and nuclear energy are coal, geothermal heat, solar energy and hydrogen, the first two of which are being used. Different conversion technologies are also discussed for large scale electricity production namely solar thermal electric conversion (STC), photovoltaic electric power system (PEPS) and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Major environmental considerations affect the choice of energy sources and technologies. We have the problem of long term accumulation of radioactive waste in the case of nuclear energy; in geothermal and fossil-fuels carbon dioxide uranium and accumulation may cause disastrous consequences. With regard to Philippine option, the greatest considerations in selecting alternative energy options would be resources availability - both energy and financial and technology status. For the country's energy plan, coal and geothermal energy are expected to play a significant role. The country's coal resources are 1.4 billion metric tons. For geothermal energy, 25 volcanic centers were identified and has a potential equivalent to 2.5 x 106 million barrels of oil. Solar energy if harnessed, being in the sunbelt, averaging some 2000 hours a year could be an energy source. The present dilemma of the policy maker is whether national resources are better spent on large scale urban-based energy projects or whether those should be focused on small scale, rural oriented installations which produced benefits to the more numerous and poorer members of the population. (RTD)

  5. Nuclear energy and civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of energy is indeed very important since without it there will be no living-things in this world. A country's ability to cultivate energy determines the levels of her civilization and wealth. Sufficient energy supply is needed for economic growth, industrialization, and modernization. In a modern civilization, the prosperity and security of a country depends more on the capability of her people rather than the wealth of her natural resources. Energy supplies the wealth, prosperity and security, and sufficient reliable continuous supply of energy secures the sustainable development. The energy supply to sustain the development has to improve the quality of life covering also the quality of environment to support the ever increasing demand of human race civilization. Energy has a closer relationship with civilization in a modern society and will have to become even closer in the future more civilized and more modern society. The utilization of nuclear energy has, however, some problems and challenges, e.g. misleading information and understanding which need serious efforts for public information, public relation, and public acceptance, and possible deviation of nuclear materials for non-peaceful uses which needs serious efforts for technological and administrative barriers, precaution, prevention, safety, physical protection, safeguard, and transparency. These require cooperation among nuclear community. The cooperation should be more pronounced by heterogeneous growing Asian countries to reach harmony for mutual benefits toward better civilization. (J.P.N.)

  6. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the report dispatched in the middle of 1978 by the Atlantic Council of United States, organized by North American citizens, is presented. The report considers the relation between the production of nucleoelectric energy and the capacity of proliferation of nuclear weapons. The factors which affect the grade of proliferation risk represented by the use of nuclear energy in the world comparing this risk with the proliferation risks independently of nuclear energy, are examined. (M.C.K.)

  7. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  8. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    , and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  9. Evaluation and development of advanced nuclear materials: IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economical, environmental and non-proliferation issues associated with sustainable development of nuclear power bring about a need for optimization of fuel cycles and implementation of advanced nuclear systems. While a number of physical and design concepts are available for innovative reactors, the absence of reliable materials able to sustain new challenging irradiation conditions represents the real bottle-neck for practical implementation of these promising ideas. Materials performance and integrity are key issues for the safety and competitiveness of future nuclear installations being developed for sustainable nuclear energy production incorporating fuel recycling and waste transmutation systems. These systems will feature high thermal operational efficiency, improved utilization of resources (both fissile and fertile materials) and reduced production of nuclear waste. They will require development, qualification and deployment of new and advanced fuel and structural materials with improved mechanical and chemical properties combined with high radiation and corrosion resistance. The extensive, diverse, and expensive efforts toward the development of these materials can be more effectively organized within international collaborative programmes with wide participation of research, design and engineering communities. IAEA carries out a number of international projects supporting interested Member States with the use of available IAEA program implementation tools (Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings, Expert Reviews, etc). The presentation summarizes the activities targeting material developments for advanced nuclear systems, with particular emphasis on fast reactors, which are the focal topics of IAEA Coordinated Research Projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modelling of Radiation Effects' (on-going), 'Benchmarking of Structural Materials Pre-Selected for Advanced Nuclear Reactors', 'Examination of advanced fast reactor fuel and core

  10. IMPULSE - advanced nuclear thermal propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanenok, J.F. III; Wett, J.F. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The IMPULSE nuclear thermal rocket concept provides an evolutionary step toward high thrust-to-weight and specific impulse over a wide operating range. Most of the components and features of the concept are based on demonstrated or proven technology from the NER VA/Rover program. The performance increase is due to the use of a new solid nuclear fuel shape. The new fuel shape provides a large flow area while maintaining flow control and eliminating hot spots due to fuel-to-fuel contact. The control and eliminating hot spots due to fuel-to-fuel contact. The IMPULSE reactor utilizes a multi-pass, series flow configuration to provide excess turbine power while improving the thermal efficiency of the overall system. This configuration also provides a large area for moderator. The IMPULSE concept can provide a specific impulse of up to 1000 seconds and trust to weight ratios approaching 40. The improved performance will reduce the Initial Mass In Low Earth Orbit (IMLEO) and provide a consequent reduction in launch costs and logistics problems.

  11. Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) was established on 1 February 1958 under the name of the OEEC European Nuclear Energy Agency. It received its present designation on 20 April 1972, when Japan became its first non-European full Member. Now, NEA membership consists of 28 OECD Member countries, i.e. Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. The NEA is the only intergovernmental nuclear energy organization which brings together developed countries of North America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region in a small, non-political forum with a relatively narrow, technical focus. - NEA membership represents much of the world's best nuclear expertise; - By pooling this expertise, the NEA provides each Member access to the substantial experience of others and an opportunity to substantially leverage its resources in this field; - Homogeneity of NEA membership makes possible a like-minded approach to problems, a climate of mutual trust and collaboration, the full exchange of experience, and a frank assessment of issues; - The NEA is relatively unfettered by political and bureaucratic constraints, and is able to focus effectively on the specific needs of its Members; - NEA scientific and technical work is in the forefront of knowledge and is known for its depth; - The NEA publishes consensus positions on key issues, providing Member countries with credible references; - The NEA is cost effective. It operates with a small staff, relying on Member country experts, and provides significant added value; - The NEA's system of standing technical committees enables the Agency to be flexible and responsive; - NEA joint projects and information exchange programmes enable interested Members and non-members to join forces in carrying

  12. Perspectives of nuclear energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederle, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2007), s. 59-65. ISSN N. [Promises of Science. Prague, 13.01.2006-15.01.2006] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 839 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : perspectives of nuclear energy, carbon dioxide emissions, climate changes, generation IV reactors system * carbon dioxide emissions * climate changes Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics

  13. Nuclear energy and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article contains information related to the support that the Latin-American countries have counted, from the International Atomic Energy Agency, for the development and application of the nuclear energy in different fields. In the particular case of Costa Rica, it mentions some projects included in the program ARCAL. The achievements reached in the year 1998 and the goals proposed for 1999-2000. (S. Grainger)

  14. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99mTc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  15. Drive for Nuclear Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    New Delhi warms to the United States in a bid to acquire nuclear technologies for energy independence and strategic influence on July 21, U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton completed her five-day trip to India. The two sides reached several agree-ments during the visit. The most important

  16. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research programme plan for 1985 covers the nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in Finland, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT

  17. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1973-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 7 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of nuclear science and technology. This book discusses the safe and beneficial development of land-based nuclear power plants.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of irradiation-induced void swelling in austenitic stainless steels. This text then examines the importance of various transport processes for fission product redistribution, which depends on the diffusion data, the vaporization properties, and the solubility in the fuel matrix. Other chapters co

  18. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Greebler, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology Volume 4 provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of advanced reactor concepts. This book discusses the advances in various areas of general applicability, including modern perturbation theory, optimal control theory, and industrial application of ionizing radiations.Organized into seven chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the technology of sodium-cooled fast breeder power reactors and gas-cooled power reactors. This text then examines the key role of reactor safety in the development of fast breeder reactors. Other chapt

  19. Advanced nuclear systems in comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at a comparison of future reactor concepts, paying particular attention to aspects of safety, of the fuel cycle, the economics, the experience-base and the state of development. Representative examples of typical development lines, that could possibly be 'of interest' within a time horizon of 50 years were selected for comparison. This can be divided into three phases: - Phase I includes the next 10 years and will be characterised mainly by evolutionary developments of light water reactors (LWR) of large size; representative: EPR, - Phase II: i.e. the time between 2005 and 2020 approximately, encompasses the forecasted doubling of today's world-wide installed nuclear capacity; along with evolutionary reactors, innovative systems like AP600, PIUS, MHTGR, EFR will emerge, - Phase III covers the time between 2020 and 2050 and is characterised by the issue of sufficient fissile material resources; novel fast reactor systems including hybrid systems can, thus, become available; representatives: IFR, EA, ITER (the latter being). The evaluated concepts foresee partly different fuel cycles. Fission reactors can be operated in principle on the basis of either a Uranium-Plutonium-cycle or a Thorium-Uranium-cycle, while combinations of these cycles among them or with other reactor concepts than proposed are possible. With today's nuclear park (comprising mainly LWRs), the world-wide plutonium excess increases annually by about 100 t. Besides strategies based on reprocessing like: - recycling in thermal and fast reactors with mixed oxide fuels, - plutonium 'burning' in reactors with novel fuels without uranium or in 'hybrid' systems, allowing a reduction of this excess, direct disposal of spent fuel elements including their plutonium content ('one-through') is being considered. (author) figs., tabs., 32 refs

  20. Energy supply and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author emphasizes the necessity and importance of nuclear energy for the energy supply and stresses the point that it is extremely important to return to objective arguments instead of having emotional disputes. In this connection, it would be necessary for the ministries in question to have clear-cut political responsibility from which, under no circumstances, they may escape, and which they cannot pass on to the courts either. Within the framework of listing present problems, the author is concerned with the possibility of improved site planning, the introduction of a plan approval procedure and questions concerning immediately enforceable nuclear licences. He also deals with a proposal, repeatedly made, to improve nuclear licensing procedures on the one hand by introducing a project-free site-appointment procedure, and on the other hand by introducing a simplified licensing procedure for facilities of the same kind. Splitting the procedure into site and facility would make sense solely for the reason that in many cases the objections are, above all, directed against the site. (HP)

  1. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  2. Convincing about the advanced use of nuclear energy closing the fuel cycle: from a burden to a solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France has associated a closed fuel cycle with its nuclear program, and developed the corresponding treatment recycling capabilities accordingly. This choice was recently consolidated by law. according to the sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste act of June 2006, the volume and radio toxicity reduction of nuclear waste is an objective that can notably be reached with their treatment and conditioning. Presently, used fuel valuable components (U and Pu) are recycled into MOX fuel and RepU, when fission products are conditioned under an extremely solid and resistant form which cannot disperse and dissolve in the environment (High Level Vitrified Waste). Safety and waste minimisation remain the AREVA constant objective. Presently operated treatment and recycling AREVA NC facilities are using mature industrial technologies, which address environment preservation and non proliferation concerns. This french national choice requires a permanent global acceptance strategy towards politicians, media, associations and more generally public opinion: to. be accepted, in needs to be understood. Transparency, dialogue and information are keywords for AREVA NC to be sure that closing the fuel cycle is considered as the best option available now for responsibly managing the waste, respecting the environment, preserving the resource and securing the future. Partnering in this Global Acceptance policy with other countries and customers, who already rely- or plan to do so - on this recycling strategy is both a reality and a permanent axis of development for AREVA NC

  3. Nuclear energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for energy is very high in developed countries and is rapidly increasing in the developing countries. The supply of fossil fuels is limited and their use causes greenhouse effect and acid rain. Nuclear energy is an attractive option, as it does not cause these adverse effects. Very large amounts of oil, coal and gas have been saved in countries that have gone in for large scale nuclear energy. Releases of carbon dioxide which is a greenhouse gas and the oxides of nitrogen, which contribute to acid rain have been avoided in the process. However, the public is concerned about its other impacts on the environment, particularly of radioactive waste. The experts have shown that technology is available for safe disposal of radioactive wastes. Decommissioning has also been shown to be feasible. The radiological impact due to the release of radioactive materials from nuclear power plants is minimal. The dose due to these to the members of the public is too small to be measured. The estimated value of the radiation dose is a small fraction of the radiation dose due to natural background radiation present at all locations. The environment-friendly nature of nuclear power plants is getting due attention. (author)

  4. Japan's advanced reactor development and nuclear fuel policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    That being the case, Japan has promoted development and utilization of nuclear energy supply structure in the face of its fragility of its energy supply structure in the face of its growing energy demand, but subject to the strict limitation of adherence to peaceful uses alone as stipulated in its Atomic Energy Basic Law. Furthermore, in order to make the most of limited uranium resources and at the same time solve the problem of appropriate treatment and disposal of reactivate waste from nuclear power generation, Japan has adopted nuclear fuel recycling, i. e. reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel for recovery of plutonium and other reusable components thereof for effective use as nuclear fuel, as one of the basic building blocks of its nuclear energy policy. As an advanced country in the field of peaceful uses of nuclear energy, Japan considers it important that it appropriately respond to growing demands for it to make an international contribution in that field, and that research and development and efforts to resolve common problems be based on international cooperation, and it intends to continue to play an international role in an active manner continue to play an international role in an active manner both in development and utilization of nuclear energy and in nuclear non-proliferation. In particular, concerning the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO), Japan has high expectations that will function in such a way as to lead to relaxation of tension on the Korean such a way as to lead to relaxation of tension on the Korean Peninsula and more generally in Northeast Asia, and that its activities can be carried forward smoothly on the basis of cooperation among the countries concerned

  5. Advanced energy efficient windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2007-01-01

    energy savings. In terms of energy, windows occupy a special position compared with other thermal envelope structures due to their many functions: 1) windows let daylight into the building and provide occupants with visual contact with their surroundings 2) windows protect against the outdoor climate 3......Windows should be paid special attention as they contribute a significant part of the total heat-loss coefficient of the building. Contrary to other parts of the thermal envelope the windows are not only heat loosers, but may gain heat in the day-time. Therefore there are possibilities for large......) windows transmit solar energy that may contribute to a reduction of energy consumption, but which may also lead to unpleasant overheating. In the following paragraphs the current use of windows is reviewed with an emphasis on energy, while special products like solar protection glazing and security...

  6. Advanced Performance Hydraulic Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bruce, Allan; Lam, Adrienne S.

    2013-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, has developed a novel advanced hydraulic wind energy design, which has up to 23% performance improvement over conventional wind turbine and conventional hydraulic wind energy systems with 5 m/sec winds. It also has significant cost advantages with levelized costs equal to coal (after carbon tax rebate). The design is equally applicable to tidal energy systems and has passed preliminary laboratory proof-of-performance tests, as funded by the Department of Energy.

  7. Atomic energy to advance human progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr Manmohan Singh, the prime minister of India on the occasion of the inaugural ceremony of international conference on peaceful uses of atomic energy said that the return of India to the international nuclear global main streams is of high significance not only for India but for global energy security as well. It is not beyond the imagination of the human mind to devise solutions and strategies that exploit the vast potential of atomic energy to advance human progress, while assuring global peace and security

  8. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

    1999-01-28

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  9. Non-nuclear energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different meanings of the word 'energy', as understood by economists, are reviewed and explained. Present rates of consumption of fossil and nuclear fuels are given as well as corresponding reserves and resources. The time left before exhaustion of these reserves is calculated for different energy consumption scenarios. On finds that coal and nuclear only allow to reach the end of this century. Without specific dispositions, the predicted massive use of coal is not compatible with any admissible value of global heating. Thus, we discuss the clean coal techniques, including carbon dioxide capture and storage. One proceeds with the discussion of availability and feasibility of renewable energies, with special attention to electricity production. One distinguishes controllable renewable energies from those which are intermittent. Among the first we find hydroelectricity, biomass, and geothermal and among the second, wind and solar. At world level, hydroelectricity will, most probably, remain the main renewable contributor to electricity production. Photovoltaic is extremely promising for providing villages remote deprived from access to a centralized network. Biomass should be an important source of bio-fuels. Geothermal energy should be an interesting source of low temperature heat. Development of wind energy will be inhibited by the lack of cheap and massive electricity storage; its contribution should not exceed 10% of electricity production. Its present development is totally dependent upon massive public support. A large part of this paper follows chapters of the monograph 'L'energie de demain: technique, environnement, economie', EDP Sciences, 2005. (author)

  10. Development of the Advanced Nuclear Safety Information Management (ANSIM) System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea has become a technically independent nuclear country and has grown into an exporter of nuclear technologies. Thus, nuclear facilities are increasing in significance at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute), and it is time to address the nuclear safety. The importance of nuclear safety cannot be overemphasized. Therefore, a management system is needed urgently to manage the safety of nuclear facilities and to enhance the efficiency of nuclear information. We have established ISP (Information Strategy Planning) for the Integrated Information System of nuclear facility and safety management. The purpose of this paper is to develop a management system for nuclear safety. Therefore, we developed the Advanced Nuclear Safety Information Management system (hereinafter referred to as the 'ANSIM system'). The ANSIM system has been designed and implemented to computerize nuclear safety information for standardization, integration, and sharing in real-time. Figure 1 shows the main home page of the ANSIM system. In this paper, we describe the design requirements, contents, configurations, and utilizations of the ANSIM system

  11. Development of the Advanced Nuclear Safety Information Management (ANSIM) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jae Min; Ko, Young Cheol; Song, Tai Gil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Korea has become a technically independent nuclear country and has grown into an exporter of nuclear technologies. Thus, nuclear facilities are increasing in significance at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute), and it is time to address the nuclear safety. The importance of nuclear safety cannot be overemphasized. Therefore, a management system is needed urgently to manage the safety of nuclear facilities and to enhance the efficiency of nuclear information. We have established ISP (Information Strategy Planning) for the Integrated Information System of nuclear facility and safety management. The purpose of this paper is to develop a management system for nuclear safety. Therefore, we developed the Advanced Nuclear Safety Information Management system (hereinafter referred to as the 'ANSIM system'). The ANSIM system has been designed and implemented to computerize nuclear safety information for standardization, integration, and sharing in real-time. Figure 1 shows the main home page of the ANSIM system. In this paper, we describe the design requirements, contents, configurations, and utilizations of the ANSIM system

  12. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is initially of the international-and national situation regarding energetic resources. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Policy and the Brazilian Nuclear Program are dealt with, as well as the Nuclear Cooperation agreement signed with the Federal Republic of Germany. The situation of Brazil regarding Uranium and the main activities of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission are also discussed

  13. A century of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author proposes a history of the French nuclear industry and nuclear energy since the Nobel prizes of 1903 and 1911. He describes and comments the context of the energy production sector before the development of the nuclear energy, the development of the institutional context, the successive and different nuclear technologies, the main characteristics of the French program at its beginning, the relationship between the nuclear energy and the public, the main accidents and lessons learned from them, the perspectives of evolution of nuclear energy

  14. Advanced applications of water cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By August 2007, there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation worldwide, with a total capacity of 371.7 GW(e). Further, 31 units, totaling 24.1 GW(e), were under construction. During 2006 nuclear power produced 2659.7 billion kWh of electricity, which was 15.2% of the world's total. The vast majority of these plants use water-cooled reactors. Based on information provided by its Member States, the IAEA projects that nuclear power will grow significantly, producing between 2760 and 2810 billion kWh annually by 2010, between 3120 and 3840 billion kWh annually by 2020, and between 3325 and 5040 billion kWh annually by 2030. There are several reasons for these rising expectations for nuclear power: - Nuclear power's lengthening experience and good performance: The industry now has more than 12 000 reactor years of experience, and the global average nuclear plant availability during 2006 reached 83%; - Growing energy needs: All forecasts project increases in world energy demand, especially as population and economic productivity grow. The strategies are country dependent, but usually involve a mix of energy sources; - Interest in advanced applications of nuclear energy, such as seawater desalination, steam for heavy oil recovery and heat and electricity for hydrogen production; - Environmental concerns and constraints: The Kyoto Protocol has been in force since February 2005, and for many countries (most OECD countries, the Russian Federation, the Baltics and some countries of the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) greenhouse gas emission limits are imposed; - Security of energy supply is a national priority in essentially every country; and - Nuclear power is economically competitive and provides stability of electricity price. In the near term most new nuclear plants will be evolutionary water cooled reactors (Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), often pursuing economies of scale. In the longer term, innovative designs that

  15. Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joseph; Furnstahl, Richard; Horoi, Mihai; Lusk, Rusty; Nazarewicz, Witold; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-01

    An understanding of the properties of atomic nuclei is crucial for a complete nuclear theory, for element formation, for properties of stars, and for present and future energy and defense applications. During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. Until recently such an undertaking was hard to imagine, and even at the present time such an ambitious endeavor would be far beyond what a single researcher or a traditional research group could carry out.

  16. French nuclear energy development strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear energy development in France is based on the spirit of democracy. Through the discussions in various groups and so on, an energy independent policy has been decided. That is, the energy independence of 50% is aimed at by 1990, by reducing the energy import. In order to lower the current petroleum reliance from 48.5% to 32% (by 1990), the development of new energy sources, including nuclear power, is essential. Nuclear energy is particularly important for French energy independence. The nuclear energy development program is on a very large scale; the share of nuclear energy in the total primary energy will be from 26% to 28% by 1990. Nuclear power generation features its low cost, and its remarkably high safety. For the nuclear power development, the consensus by all people is necessary. For the purpose, the network of both local and central organs is set up. (Mori, K.)

  17. Advanced energy efficient windows

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2007-01-01

    Windows should be paid special attention as they contribute a significant part of the total heat-loss coefficient of the building. Contrary to other parts of the thermal envelope the windows are not only heat loosers, but may gain heat in the day-time. Therefore there are possibilities for large energy savings. In terms of energy, windows occupy a special position compared with other thermal envelope structures due to their many functions: 1) windows let daylight into the building and provide...

  18. Advanced materials for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Li, Feng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2010-02-23

    Popularization of portable electronics and electric vehicles worldwide stimulates the development of energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors, toward higher power density and energy density, which significantly depends upon the advancement of new materials used in these devices. Moreover, energy storage materials play a key role in efficient, clean, and versatile use of energy, and are crucial for the exploitation of renewable energy. Therefore, energy storage materials cover a wide range of materials and have been receiving intensive attention from research and development to industrialization. In this Review, firstly a general introduction is given to several typical energy storage systems, including thermal, mechanical, electromagnetic, hydrogen, and electrochemical energy storage. Then the current status of high-performance hydrogen storage materials for on-board applications and electrochemical energy storage materials for lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors is introduced in detail. The strategies for developing these advanced energy storage materials, including nanostructuring, nano-/microcombination, hybridization, pore-structure control, configuration design, surface modification, and composition optimization, are discussed. Finally, the future trends and prospects in the development of advanced energy storage materials are highlighted. PMID:20217798

  19. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was the risk of contamination of ships from the Pacific atmospheric atomic bomb tests in the 1940's that seems first to have set insurers thinking that a limited amount of cover would be a practical possibility if not a commercially-attractive proposition. One Chapter of this book traces the early, hesitant steps towards the evolution of ''nuclear insurance'', as it is usually called; a term of convenience rather than exactitude because it seems to suggest an entirely new branch of insurance with a status of its own like that of Marine, Life or Motor insurance. Insurance in the field of nuclear energy is more correctly regarded as the application of the usual, well-established forms of cover to unusual kinds of industrial plant, materials and liabilities, characterised by the peculiar dangers of radioactivity which have no parallel among the common hazards of industry and commerce. It had, and still has, the feature that individual insurance underwriters are none too keen to look upon nuclear risks as a potential source of good business and profit. Only by joining together in Syndicates or Pools have the members of the national insurance markets been able to make proper provision for nuclear risks; only by close international collaboration among the national Pools have the insurers of the world been able to assemble adequate capacity - though still, even after thirty years, not sufficient to provide complete coverage for a large nuclear installation. (author)

  20. Advances in nuclear desalination in BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of our programme to improve the quality of life of our large population by systematic induction of nuclear energy, BARC has been engaged in R and D activities on desalination since 1970s. The desalination activities were part of a programme of setting up a number of demonstration plants for the energy intensive processes such as desalination of seawater, electrolytic production of hydrogen and electro thermal production of phosphorus. These activities are presently termed by IAEA as 'Non Electrical Application of Nuclear Energy'. Over a period of time, BARC has successfully developed desalination technologies based on multi-stage flash (MSF) evaporation, reverse osmosis (RO) and low temperature evaporation (LTE). In the field of thermal desalination, efforts are directed towards utilizing the low-grade heat and the waste heat as energy input for desalination. In membrane desalination, work is being carried out on newer pre-treatment methods such as use of ultra filtration, energy reduction and higher membrane life. Based on operational experience of MSF and RO plants at Trombay, BARC has undertaken establishment of the Nuclear Desalination Demonstration Project (NDDP), Kalpakkam. NDDP consists of a hybrid MSF-RO desalination plant of 6300 m3/d capacity (4500 m3/d MSF and 1800 m3/d Sea Water Reverse Osmosis (SWRO)) coupled to 2 x 170 MWe Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) at MAPS, Kalpakkam. The requirements of seawater, steam and electrical power for the desalination plants are met from MAPS I and II which are around 1.5%, 1.0% and 0.5% of available at MAPS. The hybrid plant has provision for redundancy, utilization of streams from one to other and production of two qualities of products for their best utilization. The 1800 m3/d SWRO plant, which is already commissioned in August 2002, is designed to operate at relatively lower pressure (51.5 bar during 1st year and 54 bar during 3rd year) to save energy, employs lesser pre-treatment (because of

  1. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TNC 90 focuses on nuclear energy technology. Some more basic or less central terms which were included in the previous glossary, TNC 55, have not been included in this version. About 1200 definitions in swedish included together with translations to english, german and french. The terms have been listed in alphabetical order. To make it easier to look up a certain term or terms that stand for related concepts the terms have been systematically arranged in a special index. (L.E.)

  2. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics

  3. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Oh, K. B

    2006-12-15

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics.

  4. The categorization of the impacts of the results of scientific and technological innovation in the Agency of Nuclear energy and advanced technologies (AENTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Science and technology are essential to the development of contemporary societies, however, there are different concepts and methodologies internationally to assess the economic and social impact of science and technology. In our country he has worked intensely with this aim and has established a national nomenclature of impact of science, technology and innovation. The Agency of Nuclear energy and advanced technologies (AEN-TA) is intended to improve the management of the programmes and projects management system framed within the system of science and technological innovation of the Republic of Cuba (SCIT) and one of the aspects of your special attention is the proper selection and follow-up (ex - before and during) projects to ensure that they contribute to improving the level of economic and social of our country one of his fundamental premises. This work has aims to show how the bases of the categorization of the impacts of the projects were established in the AEN-Mt management programs, as a management tool for the selection and monitoring of them, and which are characterized by a flexibility that keeping their identity do not differ from the established in the country. (author)

  5. Building confidence in nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anti-nuclear groups have been very active in public communication and are advocating nuclear phase-out. The Canadian Nuclear Society has launched a course for science teachers to help them address the lack of understanding of an advanced technology, by teaching good science in plain language. (author)

  6. Building confidence in nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttler, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada); Garland, W.J. [McMaster Univeristy (Canada); Reynolds, A.B. [University of Virginia, Nuclear Reactor Facility (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The anti-nuclear groups have been very active in public communication and are advocating nuclear phase-out. The Canadian Nuclear Society has launched a course for science teachers to help them address the lack of understanding of an advanced technology, by teaching good science in plain language. (author)

  7. Nuclear Energy Economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A criterion of profitability for large capital expenditure is defined first. The methods for calculating depreciation are recalled and the discounted value system is described, so that the difference existing between estimated costs and present worth average costs, is correctly understood. Although the numerical values of costs are soon out of date, the numerical applications have been given in detail. All this provides a glimpse of the complex field of equipment programme selections as used with respect to electricity and nuclear electricity in particular. The economics of fissile substances are dealt with next: enriched uranium, plutonium about which it is shown that a market price does not make much sense at present. Finally the need to utilise nuclear and all other forms of energy in order to meet the requirements of mankind is highlighted. To do so, it is shown that in world terms and particularly in French terms, the energy requirements being what they are, how essential it is, in the short and medium term, to make use of nuclear energy and, within its framework, to have recourse to fast breeder reactors

  8. Nuclear energy in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Malaysian Vision 2020 envisages doubling of the its economy every ten years for the next three decades. The Second Outline Perspective plan 1991-2000 (OPP2), also known as the National Development Policy (NDP) will set the pace to enable Malaysia to become a fully developed nation by the year 2020. The Malaysian economy is targeted to grow at 7 percent per annum in the decade of OPP2. In view of the targets set under Vision 2020, it is important to ensure that energy does not become a constraint to growth, and this sector develops in a least cost basis. Energy is crucial for industrialization and no modern industrial state can function without it. The paper presents a description of the main utilities in the country. Their installed capacities, maximum demand, generation mix and customers served are discussed. The electricity demand forecast till the year 2020 is presented. The paper presents this for 4 scenarios - a low growth, business as usual scenario, a moderate growth, business as usual scenario, a moderate growth, energy efficient scenario and a targeted growth, energy efficient scenario. The energy resources in the country is described together with its energy policy. The country's four-fuel policy is elaborated with the various options discussed. The environmental and pricing policies with regards to energy is also briefly given. Finally the nuclear option is presented in this context of the country's energy policy. The country had undertaken various studies for the nuclear option. These studies are given in the paper. The purpose of these studies and what the government decided is also discussed. Finally the prospects for the nuclear option in the future for the country is discussed. It is concluded that while, for the present, the nuclear option is not considered by the government, this may not be so in the future. The various reasons for this is given and the paper concludes that it may be prudent to keep this option under constant review. (J.P.N.)

  9. Advanced energy conversion and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This VDI-report 1029 contains the manuscripts of 45 lectures which have been held on the expert meeting ''Advanced energy conversion and application''. The following 3 main subjects have been dealt with: I electric power stations and heating and power stations, II industrial energy technology, III energy supply of buildings. For each of the 45 manuscripts, a separated assessment with regard to the content has been elaborated. (HW)

  10. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  11. Advances in nuclear science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Henley, Ernest J

    1975-01-01

    Advances in Nuclear Science and Technology, Volume 8 discusses the development of nuclear power in several countries throughout the world. This book discusses the world's largest program of land-based electricity production in the United States.Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the phenomenon of quasi-exponential behavior by examining two mathematical models of the neutron field. This text then discusses the finite element method, which is a method for obtaining approximate solutions to integral or differential equations. Other chapters consider the status of

  12. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savrasov, Sergey [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haule, Kristjan [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  13. Space flight requires nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To be able to solve its future tasks, space flight needs nuclear energy: manned space flight to the Mars is almost unthinkable without nuclear propulsion, and orbital nuclear power plants will be required for the power supply of high-capacity satellites or large space stations. Nuclear energy needs space flight: a nuclear power plant on the moon does not bother man because of the high natural radiation exposure existing there, and could contribute to terrestrial power supply. (orig./HSCH)

  14. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M and S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V and V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M and S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V and V rigor to each and every M and S capability, M and S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M and S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V and V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M and S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M and S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V and V plan.

  15. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

  16. Symposium on Nuclear Energy. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy problem poses a big challenge to a developing country like the Philippines. The development of renewable energy sources is not enough. Aware then of the limitations of these energy sources, in spite of arguments against nuclear energy we have no other recourse but to go nuclear. This symposium emphasizes the importance of energy development to attain the country's progress and discusses the pros and economics of nuclear power. (RTD)

  17. Nuclear energy supports sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is aimed at acceptability, compatibility and sustainability of nuclear energy as non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy , radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously abjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  18. Advances in instrumentation for nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Pain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the nuclear physics properties which govern energy generation and nucleosynthesis in the astrophysical phenomena we observe in the universe is crucial to understanding how these objects behave and how the chemical history of the universe evolved to its present state. The low cross sections and short nuclear lifetimes involved in many of these reactions make their experimental determination challenging, requiring developments in beams and instrumentation. A selection of developments in nuclear astrophysics instrumentation is discussed, using as examples projects involving the nuclear astrophysics group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developments will be key to the instrumentation necessary to fully exploit nuclear astrophysics opportunities at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams which is currently under construction.

  19. Overview of global development of advanced nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power has proven its viability as an energy source in many countries. Nuclear power technology is mature, and has achieved tremendous progress in the last decades. Like any other progressing technology, it continues to pursue improvements. The accumulated experience, which now exceeds 14,000 reactor-years of operation, is being used to develop advanced nuclear power plant designs. This development is proceeding for all reactor lines (water-cooled reactors, gas-cooled reactors, and liquid metal-cooled reactors) so that nuclear power can play an important and increasing role in global energy supply in the future. Improved economic competitiveness and a very high level of safety are common goals for advanced designs. To achieve economic competitiveness for new plants, proven means for achieving cost efficiency are being applied and new approaches are being pursued. There is also considerable potential for nuclear energy to expand beyond production of electricity to other applications such as sea-water desalination and hydrogen production. (author)

  20. Importance of Advanced Planning of Manufacturing for Nuclear Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shykinov Nick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of energy demands by growing economies, climate changes, fossil fuel pricing volatility, and improved safety and performance of nuclear power plants, many countries express interest in expanding or acquiring nuclear power capacity. In the light of the increased interest in expanding nuclear power the supply chain for nuclear power projects has received more attention in recent years. The importance of the advanced planning of procurement and manufacturing of components of nuclear facilities is critical for these projects. Many of these components are often referred to as long-lead items. They may be equipment, products and systems that are identified to have a delivery time long enough to affect directly the overall timing of a project. In order to avoid negatively affecting the project schedule, these items may need to be sourced out or manufactured years before the beginning of the project. For nuclear facilities, long-lead items include physical components such as large pressure vessels, instrumentation and controls. They may also mean programs and management systems important to the safety of the facility. Authorized nuclear operator training, site evaluation programs, and procurement are some of the examples. The nuclear power industry must often meet very demanding construction and commissioning timelines, and proper advanced planning of the long-lead items helps manage risks to project completion time. For nuclear components there are regulatory and licensing considerations that need to be considered. A national nuclear regulator must be involved early to ensure the components will meet the national legal regulatory requirements. This paper will discuss timing considerations to address the regulatory compliance of nuclear long-lead items.

  1. Directions for advanced use of nuclear power in century XXI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, C E

    1999-05-01

    Nuclear power can provide a significant contribution to electricity generation and meet other needs of the world and the US during the next century provided that certain directions are taken to achieve its public acceptance. These directions include formulation of projections of population, energy consumption, and energy resources over a responsible period of time. These projections will allow assessment of cumulative effects on the environment and on fixed resources. Use of fossil energy resources in a century of growing demand for energy must be considered in the context of long-term environmental damage and resource depletion. Although some question the validity of these consequences, they can be mitigated by use of advanced fast reactor technology. It must be demonstrated that nuclear power technology is safe, resistant to material diversion for weapon use, and economical. An unbiased examination of all the issues related to energy use, especially of electricity, is an essential direction to take.

  2. Finnish energy outlook - role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New nuclear power partly covers additional electricity demand and replaces retiring power plants in coming decades after 2010. Nuclear energy secures stable, economical and predictable electricity price as well as operation environment for the electricity intensive industry for coming decades. Nuclear energy also reduces the dependence on electricity import of Finland. Nuclear energy partly enables, together with renewable, fulfilment of Finland's Kyoto commitments. Solutions for nuclear waste management are a condition sine qua non for sound nuclear programmes. Funding has been arranged. All this is carried out in Finland in a transparent way and in accordance with any democratic requirements. (author)

  3. Spanish program of advanced Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy Spanish Plan is promoting some actions within the area of advanced reactors. Efforts are focussed onto the European Program of Advanced Reactors, the Program of Passive Plants (EPRI), European Fast Reactor Project and the APWR-1000 Program of INI. Electrical sector utilities and industrial partners supported by the Administration have organized an steering committee. The program of Passive Plants includes activities on Qualification, design and detailed engineering (Qualification project, SBWR project of G.E. and AP600 Project of Westinghouse. The european project on advanced plants has the following Spanish contribution: Analysis of alternative Dossier on European requisites (EUR) and Design of an European Reactor (EPR)

  4. Nuclear energy policy for fiscal 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan with little energy resources, about 80 % of the total energy consumption is imported ; of which the petroleum is about 60 %. Nuclear power generation has advantages of the supply security and the high economy. It is the nucleus of petroleum substitute. The role of nuclear power should further increase in the future. Under this situation, the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, the advancement of LWR power plants and the development of advanced type reactors must be pursued positively. In tables are given the nuclear-power-relation budget estimates for fiscal 1986 in general account and in special accounts power source siting and diversification and also the treasury investments and loans, itemized in the respective subjects. (Mori, K.)

  5. Nuclear energy Division - 2011 Activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the activity of the Nuclear Energy Department (DEN) within the CEA. It evokes its international relationship (participation to international initiatives, cooperation with different countries), describes the scientific activity within the DEN, presents the Advanced Material Program, and the activities undertaken in different fields: future nuclear industrial systems (fourth generation reactors, downstream part of the future fuel cycle, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present nuclear industrial activity (second and third generation reactors, nuclear security, upstream and downstream part of the present fuel cycle), tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, Jules Horowitz reactor), cleaning up and nuclear dismantling (dismantling strategy, the Passage project in Grenoble, works in Marcoule, the Aladin project in Fontenay, waste and material flow management, nuclear support installations, transports). It finally addresses the specific activities of the Marcoule, Cadarache and Saclay centres

  6. Nuclear energy. Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-10-01

    The Administrative Court of Braunschweig judges the Ordinance on Advance Funding of Repositories (EndlagervorausleistungsVO) to be void. The Hannover Regional Court passes a basic judgment concerning the Gorleben salt mine (repository) and an action for damages. The Federal Administrative Court dismisses actions against part-permits for the Hanau fuel element fabrication plant. The Koblenz Higher Administrative Court dismisses actions against a part-permit for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor. 31st Amendment of the German Criminal Code passed, involving amendments in environmental criminal code, defined in the 2nd amendment to the Act on Unlowful Practices Causing Damage to the Environment (UKG); here: Amendments to the law relating to the criminal code and penal provisions governing unlawful conduct in the operation of nuclear installations. (orig.)

  7. Nuclear energy and independence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pro-nuclear lobby in the United Kingdom won its battle. The Report on the Windscale Inquiry strongly endorsed the application by British Nuclear Fuels (a company owned by the government) to set up a plant to reprocess spent oxide fuels from thermal reactors; a motion in Parliament to postpone a decision was heavily defeated. The Windscale Inquiry was an attempt to settle in a civilized manner what has been tried in other countries by demonstrations and violence. In this exercise, a High Court Judge was given the task of assessing an enormous mass of highly complex technical and medical material, as well as economic, social, and political arguments. The outcome is bitterly disappointing to the objectors, all of whose arguments were rejected. Although the question of whether Britain should embark on a fast breeder reactor program was specifically excluded from the Inquiry, it clearly had a bearing on it. A decision not to proceed with the reprocessing plant would have made a fast breeder program impossible; indeed, the Report argues that such a decision would involve throwing away large indigenous energy resources, a manifest advocacy of the fast breeder. Other arguments for the decision to go ahead with the reprocessing plant included the need to keep the nuclear industry alive, and the profit which Britain will make in processing fuels from other countries, particularly Japan. The author comments further on present UK policy, taking a dissenting view, and then comments on the paper, Nuclear Energy and the Freedom of the West, by A.D. Sakharov

  8. Inevitability of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian atomic energy programme that has been launched in the late 1940s, with the courageous vision of Homi Bhabha, had made remarkable progress during the fifties, sixties and till the mid-seventies, leading to the establishment of a comprehensive base of nuclear science, technology and engineering, and the setting up of nuclear power stations. After the Pokharan experiment in 1974, the programme had to face a hostile attitude from the Western powers, with the stoppage of flow of technology and equipment from the West. The programme had shown the resilience to face the challenge, and march ahead, developing a range of indigenous capabilities both within the Department and in the Indian industry, though with a certain loss in the momentum. The successful design, construction and operation of the 100 Mw(t) research reactor Dhruva in Trombay, and the successful commissioning of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor in Kalpakkam, with a unique plutonium-uranium carbide fuel of Indian design, are significant capability demonstrations in the latter phase. On the power front, the twin-unit power stations at Narora (UP) and Kakrapar (Gujarat) have shown excellent performance, with respect to plant availability and capacity factor. This article presents an assessment of the progress achieved so far, amidst the difficulties encountered. Factors accounting for the apparently slow pace of growth are discussed, and the public concerns regarding nuclear safety and safety regulations are also addressed. In a situation where acute power shortages have become a fact of life, and difficulties can be foreseen in the development of coal and hydel resources (which are also limited in extent), the importance of pursuing the nuclear energy option is re-iterated. The need for unstinted government support to the program at this stage is also emphasized. (author)

  9. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  10. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions

  11. Recent Advances in Ocean Nuclear Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Heon Lee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, recent advances in Ocean Nuclear Power Plants (ONPPs are reviewed, including their general arrangement, design parameters, and safety features. The development of ONPP concepts have continued due to initiatives taking place in France, Russia, South Korea, and the United States. Russia’s first floating nuclear power stations utilizing the PWR technology (KLT-40S and the spar-type offshore floating nuclear power plant designed by a research group in United States are considered herein. The APR1400 and SMART mounted Gravity Based Structure (GBS-type ONPPs proposed by a research group in South Korea are also considered. In addition, a submerged-type ONPP designed by DCNS of France is taken into account. Last, issues and challenges related to ONPPs are discussed and summarized.

  12. Equipment system for advanced nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the settlement of equipment system for nuclear Fuel Technology Development Facility(FTDF) is to build a seismic designed facility that can accommodate handling of nuclear materials including <20% enriched Uranium and produce HANARO fuel commercially, and also to establish the advanced common research equipment essential for the research on advanced fuel development. For this purpose, this research works were performed for the settlement of radiation protection system and facility special equipment for the FTDF, and the advanced common research equipment for the fuel fabrication and research. As a result, 11 kinds of radiation protection systems such as criticality detection and alarm system, 5 kinds of facility special equipment such as environmental pollution protection system and 5 kinds of common research equipment such as electron-beam welding machine were established. By the settlement of exclusive domestic facility for the research of advanced fuel, the fabrication and supply of HANARO fuel is possible and also can export KAERI-invented centrifugal dispersion fuel materials and its technology to the nations having research reactors in operation. For the future, the utilization of the facility will be expanded to universities, industries and other research institutes

  13. Present Status of Nuclear Energy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagner, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, SI (2013), s. 89-94. ISSN 0375-8842. [European Nuclear Forum. Praha, 12.05.2013-13.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear energy * nuclear reactors * electricity production Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  14. US DOE Advanced Nuclear Fuel Development Programme Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has been given the responsibility to develop advanced nuclear fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program using a science based approach, focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. The science based approach combines theory, experiment and multiscale modelling and simulation to develop a fundamental understanding of the fuel fabrication processes and fuel and cladding performance under irradiation. The objective is to use a predictive approach to design fuels and cladding to achieve the desired performance (in contrast to more empirical observation based approaches traditionally used in fuel development). The AFC programme conducts research and development of innovative, enhanced, accident tolerant, next generation LWRs and transmutation fuel systems for sustainable fuel cycles. The major areas of research include enhancing the accident tolerance of fuels and materials, improving the fuel system’s ability to achieve significantly higher fuel and plant performance, and developing innovations that provide for major increases in burnup and performance. The AFC programme is interested in advanced nuclear fuels and materials technologies that are robust, have high performance capability, and are more tolerant to accident conditions than traditional fuel systems. The scope of the AFC includes evaluation and development of multiple fuel forms to support the objectives described in the DOE Strategic Plan and the DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. The word ‘fuel’ is used generically to include fuels, targets and their associated cladding materials. (author)

  15. Communication techniques and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents some thoughts on several factors related to nuclear energy and the way they are presented by the mass media, usually provoking controversy to the Spanish society and thus, undermining public acceptance. Some possibilities for boosting nuclear energy among public opinion are suggested, emphasizing the fact that nuclear power is essential because it is both ecologically and economically sound. (Author)

  16. Topical subjects of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report supplements and extends basic information contained in the seminar report 'Use and risk of nuclear energy' (Juel-Conf-17). The contributions deal with nuclear waste management, measures to avoid the misuse of nuclear fuels, and the properties and use of plutonium. As against the last edition, the subject 'Energy and environment' has been added. (orig.)

  17. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents information on energy futures; energy demand, energy supplies; exclusive paths and difficult choices--hard, soft, and moderate energy paths; an energy-deficient society; energy shortages; economics of light-water reactors; fast breeder reactor economics; international cooperation in the nuclear field; nuclear recycling; alternative fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors; the nuclear weapons proliferation issue; paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards; the homemade bomb issue; LWR risk assessment; accident analysis and risk assessment; the waste disposal risk; radon problems; risks in our society; health effects of low-level radiation; routine releases of radioactivity from the nuclear industry; low-level radioactivity and infant mortality; the myth of plutonium toxicity; myths about high-level radioactive waste; the aging reactor myth; the police state myth; insurance and nuclear power--the Price-Anderson Act; and solar and nuclear power as partners

  18. Ethics and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Should the scientist be a morally unbiased person? This is the eternal question asked by many great thinkers interested in science. The answer is hard to find. Scientists are expected to take into consideration the consequences of their actions before they actually start ot act. Sometimes they have to make certain sacrifices in order to help mankind. Unfortunately, we are witnesses of some intelligent, but inhuman and selfish people carrying out their even most destructive ideas. In this paper the relation between scientists and experts in the field of nuclear energy and the public will be discussed. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the opening speech from a national seminar on the uses for nuclear energy in everyday life. The speaker, the public information director for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), stresses the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. He points out that used for peaceful purposes, and prudently, nuclear energy applications have, tremendous benefits to offer mankind in both the industrial world and developing nations

  20. Relevance of advanced nuclear fusion research: Breakthroughs and obstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    An in depth understanding of the collective modes that can be excited in a wide range of high-energy plasmas is necessary to advance nuclear fusion research in parallel with other fields that include space and astrophysics in particular. Important achievements are shown to have resulted from implementing programs based on this reality, maintaining a tight connection with different areas of investigations. This involves the undertaking of a plurality of experimental approaches aimed at understanding the physics of fusion burning plasmas. At present, the most advanced among these is the Ignitor experiment involving international cooperation, that is designed to investigate burning plasma regimes near ignition for the first time.

  1. Present market for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present market for nuclear energy is present since nuclear production and electric power generation to the utilization of radioisotopes in medicine and biology. Some data about the main world suppliers to this market are shown. (E.G.)

  2. Speaking of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the 1989 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference, the Japanese Government pledged an extra-budgetary contribution for a three-year enhanced public information programme. On this basis the programme was developed centering on a series of two-day regional media seminars. It was determined that these seminars were to be informative and educational, and provide balanced, honest background material on the subject of nuclear energy. The speakers chosen were a mix of IAEA and outside experts from around the world. About 500 participants from 20 countries took part over the initial three years of the programme. This document contains a selection of speeches and topics that, is believed, captured the essence of the information presented during the regional seminars

  3. High energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the High Energy Nuclear Physics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory research program is focused on the fundamental physics of interactions, on the new techniques for the acceleration of charged particles and on the nuclei double beta decay. The experiments are performed on the following topics: the measurement of the π0 inclusive production and the photons production in very high energy nuclei-nuclei interactions and the nucleon stability. Concerning the experiments under construction, a new detector for LEP, the study and simulation of the hadronic showers in a calorimeter and the H1 experiment (HERA), are described. The future research programs and the published papers are listed

  4. The energy forecast and nuclear energy prospect in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the middle of next century China will be a medium developed country. According to the energy demand forecast energy consumption should be 2.7-3.2 billion toe, since coal still will be the main source for energy use, so large amount of CO2 emission will cause serious environment problem. Nuclear energy development both in power generation and heat supply is one of the important ways to solve the shortage of energy supply and reduce the environment pollution, in accordance with the energy supply analysis. The expected proportion of the nuclear energy in primary energy will be 6-20%, i.e. 120-360 million KW (include heat supply). Different types of advanced thermal reactors, i.e. advanced PWR (include heat supply reactor) and HTGR for high temperature process heat supply and nuclear-coal liquefaction will be developed in priority, then FBR will be followed up for improving the utilization of nuclear resource and continue development of nuclear energy in long period. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear energy in future sustainable, competitive energy mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current energy policy, especially in the OECD countries, is characterized by the deregulation of the energy markets and the growing inclusion of aspects of sustainability in the evaluation of energy supply options. These factors are influencing decisionmaking right now, and will increasingly determine the public view. In the light of these aspects, the decision by Finland to build its fifth nuclear power plant also underlines the positive assessment of nuclear power. In the OECD countries, nuclear power plants are making a reliable and cost-effective contribution to the supply of energy. The technical reliability of nuclear power plants worldwide is reflected by high plant availabilities of, on the average, 83%, as well as in the low-cost generation of electricity associated with it. Safety at a high level is guaranteed as a result of the efforts made by industry and by the regulatory authorities. A decisive criterion for building new nuclear power plants can be the cost structure of these plants in electricity generation. Capital costs, though high, can be calculated reliably on a long-term basis. This can make electricity from nuclear power a robust factor in deregulated markets suffering from considerable price fluctuations of other sources of energy. Once their capital outlay has been written off, nuclear power plants are among the most favorable plants costwise. Another aspect to be considered are the low external costs of nuclear power - an important yardstick for evaluating energy supply systems. Advanced research and development work on nuclear systems of the kind carried out, for instance, by the International Generation IV Forum reveals additional perspectives for the future of nuclear power. Advanced safety systems, intensified use of fuel resources, possible uses of reactors beyond the generation of electricity, and new technologies of managing radioactive waste indicate the development potential inherent in nuclear power and to be tapped by

  6. French opinion on Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrary to what many think or say, most French people do not have a clear-cut opinion about nuclear power. And until public opinion can be accurately assessed, we should be worried of speaking on its behalf. More than half the population of France believes that nuclear power is the cheapest option, but 40% of them have no idea what the situation really is. The French are keenly aware of the what is at stake at the international level, and the fact that energy is becoming a worldwide issue. What they are most concerned about is nuclear waste and the possibility of a catastrophe of the Chernobyl type occurring. Disquiet about the first is now dissipating, after having increased. But attitudes about the second are ambivalent. A quarter of the French are very ignorant about radioactivity. 20% of the population complain that not enough information is forthcoming, particularly as concerns advances in technology. As can be anticipated, awareness of the question of climate change is growing year by year, with increased reporting of storms, floods and heat waves

  7. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO2) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  8. Development of nuclear energy and nuclear policy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Status of nuclear power development in China, nuclear policy and nuclear power programme are described. Issues regarding nuclear fuel cycle system, radioactive waste management and international cooperation in the field of peaceful use of nuclear energy are discussed

  9. Energy: nuclear energy; Energies: l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, M. [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN), 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  10. Nuclear energy. Risk or advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is controversial. But what's all about really in the controversy? It's about more than safty or electricity prices. Nuclear energy is not only a technical or political question, but also a moral, a human. The discussion enter various rational and irrational arguments, beside straightforward arguments various misleading and mendacious exist. The present publication is comprehensively dedicated to the thema of nuclear energy - its pro and contra - and considers its risks and advantages. Thereby the sources of energy, the processes in the nuclear reactor, and the risk potentials (Harrisburg, Chernobyl, Fukushima) are illustratively and reproducibly presented. Extensively the text explains the forms of the radiation, its doses, and the tolerance of it. Also to the theme waste and final disposal an explaining chapter is dedicated and the question for the exit from nuclear energy elucidated. Finally the author appoints with the question ''How considers mankind nuclear energy world-wide'' the international comparison.

  11. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Myung; Lee, M.K.; Moon, K.H.; Kim, S.S.; Lim, C.Y.; Song, K.D.; Kim, H

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of nuclear energy to the energy use in the economical way, based on the factor survey performed on the internal and external environmental changes occurred recent years. Internal and external environmental changes are being occurred recent years involving with using nuclear energy. This study summarizes the recent environmental changes in nuclear energy such as sustainable development issues, climate change talks, Doha round and newly created electricity fund. This study also carried out the case studies on nuclear energy, based on the environmental analysis performed above. The case studies cover following topics: role of nuclear power in energy/environment/economy, estimation of environmental external cost in electric generation sector, economic comparison of hydrogen production, and inter-industrial analysis of nuclear power generation.

  12. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of nuclear energy to the energy use in the economical way, based on the factor survey performed on the internal and external environmental changes occurred recent years. Internal and external environmental changes are being occurred recent years involving with using nuclear energy. This study summarizes the recent environmental changes in nuclear energy such as sustainable development issues, climate change talks, Doha round and newly created electricity fund. This study also carried out the case studies on nuclear energy, based on the environmental analysis performed above. The case studies cover following topics: role of nuclear power in energy/environment/economy, estimation of environmental external cost in electric generation sector, economic comparison of hydrogen production, and inter-industrial analysis of nuclear power generation

  13. Nuclear energy in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy plays a major role in the French economy because of the lack of fossil fuels on the French territory. About 75% of the French electric power is of nuclear origin. This paper gives an analysis of the French public attitude about nuclear energy and the methods used by the nuclear industrialists to better the electro-nuclear image. Communication, advertising and transparency are the best attitudes for a suitable public information and are necessary to reduce the public anxiety after the Chernobyl accident. Television advertising, magazines and organized visits of nuclear installations have allowed to explain the interest of nuclear energy in the environmental reduction of pollutants. However, public information must include the topic about nuclear wastes to remain credible. (J.S.)

  14. Safety related terms for advanced nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terms considered in this document are in widespread current use without a universal consensus as to their meaning. Other safety related terms are already defined in national or international codes and standards as well as in IAEA's Nuclear Safety Standards Series. Most of the terms in those codes and standards have been defined and used for regulatory purposes, generally for application to present reactor designs. There is no intention to duplicate the description of such regulatory terms here, but only to clarify the terms used for advanced nuclear plants. The following terms are described in this paper: Inherent safety characteristics, passive component, active component, passive systems, active system, fail-safe, grace period, foolproof, fault-/error-tolerant, simplified safety system, transparent safety

  15. Nuclear energy: considerations about nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general view of historical aspects of nuclear energy and the arrangements to assure its use for peaceful purposes are presented. Then the internal character of nuclear energy in a juride context is demonstrated; some consideration about the international organizations and conventions and the Brazilian Legislation in the nuclear area are examined. It also deals with the political aspects of nuclear trade and the function of IAEA in this are. Furthermore the restrictions imposed by Non-Proliferation Treaty-NPT, the objectures of the Tlatelolco Treaty and ''London Club'' guidelines. Afterwards the bilateral cooperation under taken by countries and its agreements are discussed. Besides some aspects of agreements made between United States, France Germany and Brazil are discussed

  16. Redefining disease through advances in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear Imaging has progressed significantly in the last decade. The disease is being explored at receptor antigenic and biochemical level. The Molecular Imaging with tracers such as the 18-Fluro-Deoxy-Glucose (FDG), 11C-thymidine, 18-Fluro-Estradiol have enabled us to look into different aspects of disease. The FDG helps us in understanding aggressiveness of tumor and thereby survival of a cancer patient. It is enabling us to redefine disease at metabolic level leading to 'Metabolic Classification' of disease. The 18-Fluro-Estradiol scan is exploring breast cancer at receptor level and has enabled us to understand why some breast cancer patients do not respond to the hormone therapy. The 11C-Thymidine scan is able to image proliferative capacity of a tumor and thereby impact on the treatment approach. In addition to the field on oncology, recent advances in Nuclear Imaging are now providing valuable insights in understanding of various other human diseases. We are now redefining Alzheimer's disease and some of the psychiatric illnesses like Schizophrenia and Depression through the new Nuclear Imaging techniques. The years ahead will see extensive application of Nuclear Imaging technology in human disorders. Metabolic Classification of disease would bring out the processes underlying the causation and manifestation of diverse human disorders and help redefine the disease with the aim of more effective and less toxic personalized medicine

  17. Advanced nuclear plants meet the economic challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants operated in the baseload regime are economically competitive even when compared with plants burning fossil fuels. As they do not produce emissions when operated, they do not pollute the environment. This is clearly reflected also in the internalized costs. After 2000, many new power plants are expected to be constructed in the USA and worldwide. An important role in this phase will be played by advanced light water reactors of the ABWR and SBWR types representing the future state of the art in technology and safety as well as in cost and plant operations management. (orig.)

  18. Licensed bases management for advanced nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospective Advanced Nuclear Plant (ANP) owners must have high confidence that the integrity of the licensed bases (LB) of a plant will be effectively maintained over its life cycle. Currently, licensing engineers use text retrieval systems, database managers, and checklists to access, update, and maintain vast and disparate licensing information libraries. This paper describes the demonstration of a ''twin-engine'' approach that integrates a program from the emerging class of concept searching tools with a modern Product Data Management System (PDMS) to enhance the management of LB information for an example ANP design. (author)

  19. Climatic change and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data presented in the different chapters lead to show that nuclear energy ids not a sustainable energy sources for the following reasons: investments in nuclear energy account financing that lacks to energy efficiency programmes. The nuclear programmes have negative effects such the need of great electric network, the need of highly qualified personnel, the freezing of innovation in the fields of supply and demand, development of small performing units. The countries resort to nuclear energy are among the biggest carbon dioxide emitters, because big size nuclear power plants lead to stimulate electric power consumption instead of inducing its rational use. Nuclear energy produces only electric power then a part of needs concerns heat (or cold) and when it is taken into account nuclear energy loses its advantages to the profit of cogeneration installations. Finally nuclear energy is a dangerous energy source, difficult to control as the accident occurring at Tokai MURA showed it in 1998. The problem of radioactive wastes is not still solved and the nuclear proliferation constitutes one of the most important threat at the international level. (N.C.)

  20. Nuclear power vs. solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What should a long-term energy policy strategy look like. Nuclear power is still a controversial issue. Can solar energy be a realistic alternative. The book presents a detailed comparison of the two energy sources, showing that a combined strategy of solar energy and energy conservation is better suited to the future ecological, social and economic needs than nuclear energy. Bauerschmidt's detailed investigation, in which the advantages and drawbacks of the two alternatives are carefully weighed against each other, makes it impossible for anybody to consider nuclear power as the only feasible alternative. (orig.)

  1. Energy from nuclear fission(*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripani M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of nuclear fission as physical phenomenon will be revisited, emphasizing its peculiarities with respect to other nuclear reactions. Some basic concepts underlying the operation of nuclear reactors and the main types of reactors will be illustrated, including fast reactors, showing the most important differences among them. The nuclear cycle and radioactive-nuclear-waste production will be also discussed, along with the perspectives offered by next generation nuclear assemblies being proposed. The current situation of nuclear power in the world, its role in reducing carbon emission and the available resources will be briefly illustrated.

  2. Advanced Measuring (Instrumentation Methods for Nuclear Installations: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiu-kuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear technology has been widely used in the world. The research of measurement in nuclear installations involves many aspects, such as nuclear reactors, nuclear fuel cycle, safety and security, nuclear accident, after action, analysis, and environmental applications. In last decades, many advanced measuring devices and techniques have been widely applied in nuclear installations. This paper mainly introduces the development of the measuring (instrumentation methods for nuclear installations and the applications of these instruments and methods.

  3. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  4. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  5. Innovative nuclear energy systems roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing nuclear energy that is sustainable, safe, has little waste by-product, and cannot be proliferated is an extremely vital and pressing issue. To resolve the four issues through free thinking and overall vision, research activities of 'innovative nuclear energy systems' and 'innovative separation and transmutation' started as a unique 21st Century COE Program for nuclear energy called the Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, COE-INES. 'Innovative nuclear energy systems' include research on CANDLE burn-up reactors, lead-cooled fast reactors and using nuclear energy in heat energy. 'Innovative separation and transmutation' include research on using chemical microchips to efficiently separate TRU waste to MA, burning or destroying waste products, or transmuting plutonium and other nuclear materials. Research on 'nuclear technology and society' and 'education' was also added in order for nuclear energy to be accepted into society. COE-INES was a five-year program ending in 2007. But some activities should be continued and this roadmap detailed them as a rough guide focusing inventions and discoveries. This technology roadmap was created for social acceptance and should be flexible to respond to changing times and conditions. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Nuclear energy and a novel energy culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear energy within the entire system of energy sources is explained. Aspects addressed in this context are siting problems, hostile attitudes towards technological progress, low acceptance by the general public, reactor safety, waste management, and costs. (UA)

  7. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  8. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents in-depth articles on the main issues affecting the use and usefulness of nuclear energy for peaceful domestic purposes. Topics considered include energy futures (a world study), energy demand-energy supplies, an energy-deficient society, energy shortages, the economics of light water reactors (LWRs), fast breeder reactor economics, international cooperation in the nuclear field, nuclear recycling (costs, savings, safeguards), alternative fuels, alternative fuel cycles, alternative reactors, the nuclear weapons proliferation issue, paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards, the homemade bomb issue, LWR risk assessment, accident analysis and risk assessment, the waste disposal risk, radon problems, health effects of low-level radiation, routine releases of radioactivity, plutonium toxicity, and the Price-Anderson Act

  9. A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

  10. Nuclear energy promise or peril?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy will inevitably become an important worldwide issue in the 21. century. The authors are authorities in their own fields and their contributions have been read, discussed and criticized by a wide, international group of experts. The today status of nuclear power is exposed, the authors weigh the pros and cons of nuclear energy. In a near future nuclear energy could play a major role in preventing climate change and atmospheric pollution. The main challenges that put at risk nuclear energy are: nuclear safety, radiation protection, the management of radioactive wastes, the problem of plutonium stocks and the risk of proliferation. For each of these open questions, a specialist makes a precise survey of the situation

  11. Perception of the nuclear energy in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From their beginnings the Nuclear Energy has generated a lot of polemic, since on one hand it was seen as something completely harmful, due to the making of atomic weapons and those effects of the radiation (Hiroshima and Nagasaki). But on the other hand it has been saying that it could be the 'Panacea' of the humanity like an inexhaustible source of energy, this brought that a countless of reactors was built for the electric power production at world level, unfortunately some accidents as that of Chernobyl (Former Soviet Union 1986) as well as the contribution of the media of the fear toward the nuclear energy made that it was formed a barrier of the public opinion toward all that has to do with the nuclear energy, the construction of new power stations one came below and even in some countries the environmentalist organizations achieved their governments to close some power stations. In the last years the concern for the global heating and the climatic change has put in the world calendar the use of the nuclear energy again, by means of the new designs of advanced reactors with more safety measures, more efficient and economic. In several countries the public opinion is looking to the nuclear energy with good eyes, reason by a resurgence is glimpsed from the nuclear energy to great scale, so it is so several countries they have already begun the construction of new advanced reactors ones (Japan, China, Finland) and some included one already has them in operation. In Mexico, it is ignored to certain science which is the real posture of the public opinion with regard to this topic so controversial, reason why it was carried out this study to know the perception of the public in general with regard to this topic, as well as the convenience of enlarging the infrastructure of electric power generation in our country by means of this energy type. (Author)

  12. Uranium and nuclear energy: 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fourteenth symposium of the Uranium Institute marked the bicentenary of the discovery of uranium, with papers on the history of uranium and its mining, nuclear energy's peaceful applications and its future place. Symposium papers also dealt with the background to the 1990 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, the evidence for global warming, environmental regulations affecting energy supply in the USA, radiation effects, nuclear safety in the USSR, the Indian and Brazilian nuclear programmes, the enrichment fuel fabrication and MOX fuel industries, uranium supply and demand and uranium resources, the implications for nuclear energy of deregulation of electricity supply in the USA, EC and UK, fusion and new fission reactors. (author)

  13. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual reports are given by CNA subcommittees on codes, standards and practices, economic development, education and manpower, international affairs, nuclear insurance, nuclear safety and environment, public affairs, and technology. (E.C.B.)

  14. Nuclear Energy and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Méritet, Sophie; Zaleski, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The paper will discuss the possibilities of the development of nuclear energy in the world in the midterm and long term. It will correlate the prospects with the emissions of CO2 and the effects on climate change. In particular it will discuss the problems nuclear energy face to make a large contribution of climate change issue.

  15. Nuclear energy: basics, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricotti M. E

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is conceived for non-nuclear experts, intended as a synthetic and simplified overview of the technology related to energy by nuclear fission. At the end of the paper, the Reader will find a minimal set of references, several of them on internet, useful to start deepening the knowledge on this challenging, complex, debated albeit engaging energy source.

  16. Social Institutions and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Alvin M.

    1972-01-01

    Nuclear technologists can offer an all but infinite source of relatively cheap and clean energy" but society must decide whether the price of eternal vigilance needed to ensure proper and safe operation of its nuclear energy system" is worth the benefits. (Author/AL)

  17. Overview of Nuclear Energy: Present and Projected Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander Stanculescu

    2011-09-01

    Several factors will influence the contribution of nuclear energy to the future energy mix. Among them, the most important are the degree of global commitment to greenhouse gas reduction, continued vigilance in safety and safeguards, technological advances, economic competitiveness and innovative financing arrangements for new nuclear power plant constructions, the implementation of nuclear waste disposal, and, last but not least, public perception, information and education. The paper presents an overview of the current nuclear energy situation, possible development scenarios, of reactor technology, and of non-electric applications of nuclear energy.

  18. Nuclear Energy in Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the interested non-specialist reader with insights on five major issues associated with nuclear power generation: nuclear development and economics, protection of man and the environment, power plant safety, radioactive waste management and compensation for damage from a nuclear accident

  19. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To date, 370 GW of nuclear power capacity in operation around the world currently produce 16% of world's electricity, which represents the largest share provided by any non-greenhouse gas-emitting source. This results in a significant reduction of the environmental impact of today's electricity generation, and is set to continue doing so in the future. World Energy Outlook 2008 projections indicate an additional 250 GW of nuclear capacity by 2030, a scenario that would stabilise the atmosphere at 450 ppm CO2, thereby limiting global warming to 2 deg C above pre-industrial levels. However the road to long-term deployment of nuclear energy is still paved with numerous obstacles. The first one concerns fuel resources and fuel cycle backend: nuclear energy must become more sustainable in its utilisation of uranium ores, as well as in the management/disposal of nuclear waste. The second one is related to economics and safety issues: nuclear plants must be economically competitive, yet their safety levels must remain of key importance. Additionally, deployment of plants must be undertaken in a manner that can guarantee worldwide non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. Finally, they should help meet anticipated future needs for a broad range of products beyond electricity, such as high-quality process heat for industrial purposes. Generation IV nuclear energy systems are aimed at meeting these challenges by delivering unprecedented performance, thus ensuring nuclear energy's long-term expansion and sustained contribution to world's energy security

  20. Open discussions on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part, economic prospects in the world and in the European Community and their repercussions on energy demand are examined. Supply structure and growth scenari are outlined. Present and potential contribution of nuclear energy to energy supply is developed. The pros and cons are given. In the second part is examined how the production and use of various form of energy including nuclear energy, can affect health and the environment, with special reference to waste of all kinds. Safety problems and risk of accidents are examined in both non nuclear and nuclear sectors. Prospects for a low energy society and economic and social implications of the use of new forms of energy are also discussed

  1. Nuclear energy outlook: a GE perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Full text: As one of the world's leading suppliers of power generation and energy delivery technologies, GE Energy provides comprehensive solutions for coal, oil, natural gas and nuclear energy; renewable resources such as wind, solar and biogas, along with other alternative fuels. With the ever increasing demand for energy and pressures to decrease greenhouse gas emissions, global trends indicate a move towards building more base line nuclear generation capacity. As a reliable, cost-competitive option for commercial power generation, nuclear energy also addresses many of the issues the world faces when it comes to the environment. Since developing nuclear reactor technology in the 1950s, GE's Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) technology accounts for more than 90 operating plants in the world today. Building on that success, GE's ABWR design is now the first and only Generation 111 nuclear reactor in operation today. This advanced reactor technology, coupled with current construction experience and a qualified global supply chain, make ESBWR, GE's Generation III+ reactor design, an attractive option for owners considering adding nuclear generation capacity. In pursuit of new technologies, GE has teamed with Silex to develop, commercialize and license third generation laser enrichment technology. By acquiring the exclusive rights to develop and commercialize this technology, GE is positioned to support the anticipated global demands for enriched uranium. At GE, we are continuing to develop imaginative ideas and investing in products that are cost effective, increase productivity, limit greenhouse gas emissions, and improve safety and security for our customers

  2. Finnish energy outlook - role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation author deals with production a consumption of electricity in the Finland. New nuclear power partly covers additional electricity demand and replaces retiring power plants in coming decades after 2010. Nuclear energy secures stable, economical and predictable electricity price as well as operation environment for the electricity intensive industry for coming decades. Nuclear energy also reduces the dependence on electricity import of Finland. Nuclear energy partly enables, together with renewable, fulfilment of Finland's Kyoto commitments. Solutions for nuclear waste management are a condition sine qua non for sound nuclear programmes. Funding has been arranged. All this is carried out in Finland in a transparent way and in accordance with any democratic requirements. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy; Le nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  4. Nuclear energy: a vital energy choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speaking from the platform of the XIIIth annual session of the International Atomic Energy Agency, at New Delhi, AEC managing director Michel Pecqueur made a solemn appeal to the world community for the decisions which are needed on energy. The present energy crisis can lead the world to a recession and be a factor in grave troubles for peace and balance in the world. The crisis cannot be resolved without accrued recourse to the use of nuclear energy. Two essential themes were outlined: the development of nuclear energy in the world, and the increased reduction of proliferation risks. In concluding, he expressed the hop that with a greater effort in information media, the nuclear fact-of-life would be better accepted by the general public in future, for it is there that lies a brake which may hinder nuclear energy development

  5. Advanced Space Power Systems (ASPS): Advanced Energy Storage Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of high specific energy devices will enable NASA’s future robotic and human-exploration missions.  The need for advances in energy...

  6. Radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007 ENEA's Department of Nuclear Fusion and Fission, and Related Technologies acted according to national policy and the role assigned to ENEA FPN by Law 257/2003 regarding radioactive waste management and advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies

  7. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  8. Generation-IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Harold

    2008-05-01

    Nuclear power technology has evolved through roughly three generations of system designs: a first generation of prototypes and first-of-a-kind units implemented during the period 1950 to 1970; a second generation of industrial power plants built from 1970 to the turn of the century, most of which are still in operation today; and a third generation of evolutionary advanced reactors which began being built by the turn of the 20^th century, usually called Generation III or III+, which incorporate technical lessons learned through more than 12,000 reactor-years of operation. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a cooperative international endeavor to develop advanced nuclear energy systems in response to the social, environmental and economic requirements of the 21^st century. Six Generation IV systems under development by GIF promise to enhance the future contribution and benefits of nuclear energy. All Generation IV systems aim at performance improvement, new applications of nuclear energy, and/or more sustainable approaches to the management of nuclear materials. High-temperature systems offer the possibility of efficient process heat applications and eventually hydrogen production. Enhanced sustainability is achieved primarily through adoption of a closed fuel cycle with reprocessing and recycling of plutonium, uranium and minor actinides using fast reactors. This approach provides significant reduction in waste generation and uranium resource requirements.

  9. Nanocarbons for advanced energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Xinliang

    2015-01-01

    This first volume in the series on nanocarbons for advanced applications presents the latest achievements in the design, synthesis, characterization, and applications of these materials for electrochemical energy storage. The highly renowned series and volume editor, Xinliang Feng, has put together an internationally acclaimed expert team who covers nanocarbons such as carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, graphenes, and porous carbons. The first two parts focus on nanocarbon-based anode and cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, while the third part deals with carbon material-based supercapacit

  10. Advanced materials for clean energy

    CERN Document Server

    Xu (Kyo Jo), Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Arylamine-Based Photosensitizing Metal Complexes for Dye-Sensitized Solar CellsCheuk-Lam Ho and Wai-Yeung Wongp-Type Small Electron-Donating Molecules for Organic Heterojunction Solar CellsZhijun Ning and He TianInorganic Materials for Solar Cell ApplicationsYasutake ToyoshimaDevelopment of Thermoelectric Technology from Materials to GeneratorsRyoji Funahashi, Chunlei Wan, Feng Dang, Hiroaki Anno, Ryosuke O. Suzuki, Takeyuki Fujisaka, and Kunihito KoumotoPiezoelectric Materials for Energy HarvestingDeepam Maurya, Yongke Yan, and Shashank PriyaAdvanced Electrode Materials for Electrochemical Ca

  11. Advanced nuclear power plant solidification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, M. [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hirayama, S.; Nishi, T. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Huang, C. T. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lungtan (Taiwan)

    2003-07-01

    'Slim-Rad' is an advanced radioactive waste treatment system reflecting Hitachi's long experience as a supplier of nuclear plants. The system utilizes new technologies such as a hollow fiber filter, high-performance cement solidification and laundry and shower drain treatment. By adopting this Slim-Rad system, not only the final waste volume but also the number of radwaste tanks can be reduced 1/8 and 1/2, respectively, compared with previous Hitachi radwaste treatment systems. Moreover, release of radioactivity into the environment from the treated waste is reduced effectively. This paper outlines the system and describes its features, as well as the features of the key technology such as volume reduction and solidification technology.

  12. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are

  13. Informing parliamentarians on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains a selection of the papers presented at an international seminar on informing parliamentarians in the nuclear field. This seminar has been organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to respond to important information needs. As a matter of fact, providing clear and accurate information to decision-makers is a key element that contributes to the quality of work for legislation for a safe use of nuclear energy. The sessions dealt with : meeting the information needs of parliamentarians and other elected representatives on nuclear energy questions, actors and their respective roles in the information process, means and tools for communicating information on nuclear energy, case studies in communication with elected officials. Abstracts have been prepared for all of the papers in this volume. (TEC)

  14. Topical questions of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discussion with the general public on reactor safety, environmental protection, and the relevance of nuclear energy for the energy supply - including the increasingly political character of the nuclear energy debate - was a central issue at this meeting of reactor experts which recurred even more often than in recent years and also found its way into the opening and closing speeches. This first report on the reactor meeting, therefore, contains three excerpts from papers read on this issue. (orig./AK)

  15. Nuclear energy: meeting the challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Nuclear Energy - Meeting the Challenges' was the theme of the 25th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, held in Toronto, Ontario on June 6-9, 2004. The theme has the implication of optimism - that we WILL meet the many challenges needed to overcome if nuclear power is to play a significant role in our energy future. The organizers succeeded in presenting a thorough discussion of the challenges facing the nuclear power industry in Canada with close to 300 delegates attending the three-day event

  16. Nuclear Energy and European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest shown by the European Institutions in the energy debates, in which the nuclear energy is included as a key component within the energy mix, is obvious. Climate change and energy supply have pushed some countries to publicly express their interest for developing the nuclear energy. These positions are however in contradiction with some others within the European Union which are a lot more critical towards this type of energy and where face-out policies still prevail. Despite the fact that the use of the nuclear energy will remain within the competence of each Member State, the European Union will continue to play a prominent role in the development of an energy strategy based on a low carbon economy. (Author)

  17. Future of nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of the easing of worldwide energy supply and demand situation in these years, we believe that research efforts towards the next generation nuclear energy are indispensably necessary. Firstly, the nuclear colleagues believe that nuclear energy is the best major energy source from many points of view including the global environmental viewpoint. Secondly, in the medium- and long-range view, there will once again be a high possibility of a tight supply and demand situation for oil. Thirdly, nuclear energy is the key energy source to overcome the vulnerability of the energy supply structure in industrialized countries like Japan where virtually no fossil energy source exists. In this situation, nuclear energy is a sort of quasi-domestic energy as a technology-intensive energy. Fourthly, the intensive efforts to develop the nuclear technology in the next generation will give rise to a further evolution in science and technology in the future. A few examples of medium- and long-range goals of the nuclear energy research are development of new types of reactors which can meet various needs of energy more flexibly and reliably than the existing reactors, fundamental and ultimate solution of the radioactive waste problems, creation and development of new types of energy production systems which are to come beyond the fusion, new development in the biological risk assessment of the radiation effects and so on. In order to accomplish those goals it is quite important to introduce innovations in such underlying technologies as materials control in more microscopic manners, photon and particle beam techniques, accelerator engineering, artificial intelligence, and so on. 32 refs, 2 figs

  18. Advances in nuclear and radiochemistry. Extended abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication compiles extended abstracts of the conference. Conference topics were: fundamental nuclear chemistry (nuclear reactions, radioactive decay), actinides, transactinides, radioanalytics (nuclear and non-nuclear methods), nuclear technology (techniques, cross sections, radionuclide production), radiotracers in life sciences (radiopharmaceutical chemistry), radioactive indicators in research and chemistry, radionuclides in geochemistry and cosmochemistry, nuclear fuel cycle (waste management, transmutation, partitioning), radioecology and environmental sciences. (uke)

  19. Economics of nuclear energy

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    While few people now believe that nuclear power would provide ‘power too cheap to meter’, there is still a common perception that nuclear power is a cheap source of electricity. The fact that nuclear power has not come to dominate electricity generation is seen as being due to a combination of public opposition and dealing with the safety issues raised by accidents such as those at Three Mile Island (1978), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The reality is that nuclear power has seldom be...

  20. Better materials for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The improved performance of present generation nuclear reactors and the realization of advanced reactor concepts, both, require development of better materials. Physical metallurgy /materials science principles which have been exploited in meeting the exacting requirements of nuclear systems comprising fuels, structural materials, moderators and coolants are outlined citing a few specific examples. While the incentive for improvement of traditional fuels (e.g., UO2 fuel) is primarily for increasing the average core burn up, the development of advanced fuels (e.g., MOX, mixed carbide, nitride, silicide and dispersion fuels) are directed towards better utilization of fissile and fertile inventories through adaptation of innovative fuel cycles. As the burn up of UO2 fuel reaches higher levels, a more detailed and quantitative understanding of the phenomena such as fission gas release, fuel restructuring - induced by radiation and thermal gradients and pellet-clad interaction is being achieved. Development of zirconium based alloys for both cladding and pressure tube applications is discussed with reference to their physical metallurgy, fabrication techniques, in-reactor degradation mechanisms, and in-service inspection. The issue of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) is covered drawing a comparison between the western and eastern specifications of RPV steels. The search for new materials which can stand higher rates of atomic displacement due to radiation has led to the development of swelling resistant austenitic and ferritic stainless steels for fast reactor applications as exemplified by the development of the D-9 steel for Indian fast breeder reactor. New challenges are thrown to material scientists for the development of materials suitable for high temperature reactors, which have a potential for providing primary heat for thermo chemical dissociation of water. Development of several ceramic materials, carbon based materials, dissimilar

  1. Advanced nuclear plant design options to cope with external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the stagnation period of nuclear power apparently coming to an end, there is a renewed interest in many Member States in the development and application of nuclear power plants (NPPs) with advanced reactors. Decisions on the construction of several NPPs with evolutionary light water reactors have been made (e.g. EPR Finland for Finland and France) and more are under consideration. There is a noticeable progress in the development and demonstration of innovative high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, in China, South Africa and Japan. The Generation IV International Forum has defined the International Near Term Deployment programme and, for a more distant perspective, six innovative nuclear energy systems have been selected and certain R and D started by several participating countries. National efforts on design and technology development for NPPs with advanced reactors, both evolutionary and innovative, are ongoing in many Member States. Advanced NPPs have an opportunity to be built at many sites around the world, with very broad siting conditions. There are special concerns that safety of these advanced reactors may be challenged by external events following new scenarios and failure modes, different from those well known for the currently operated reactors. Therefore, the engineering community identified the need to assess the proposed design configurations in relation to external scenarios at the earliest stages of the design development. It appears that an early design optimization in relation to external events is a necessary requirement to achieve safe and economical advanced nuclear power plants. Reflecting on these developments, the IAEA has planned the preparation of a report to define design options for protection from external event impacts in NPPs with evolutionary and innovative reactors. The objective of this publication is to present the state-of-the-art in design approaches for the protection of NPPs with evolutionary and innovative

  2. Advances in nuclear oil well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of some of the significant developments in nuclear logging over the last several years based on publications in scientific journals in the United States and in Europe. Density measurements which make use of the photoelectric effect to distinguish major rock types are now common. Spectral γ-ray measurements of natural radioactivity and neutron-induced radiations make possible elemental analysis from logging data. Familiar logs such as the compensated neutron and density have undergone improvements in data analysis for thin bed identification. Nuclear measurements while drilling have greatly advanced in recent years with the introduction of neutron porosity and γ-ray density measurements in addition to natural γ-ray counting. Multiple radioactive isotopes are now injected into formations and detected by their spectral γ-ray signatures. Computer simulations of logging tool responses have gained wide use in modeling tools and determining their environmental corrections. Monte Carlo codes now routinely run on small computers and parallel processors, whereas they once required large mainframe computers. (Author)

  3. Nuclear integrated database and design advancement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Jeong, Kwang Sub; Kim, Seung Hwan; Choi, Sun Young

    1997-01-01

    The objective of NuIDEAS is to computerize design processes through an integrated database by eliminating the current work style of delivering hardcopy documents and drawings. The major research contents of NuIDEAS are the advancement of design processes by computerization, the establishment of design database and 3 dimensional visualization of design data. KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant) is the target of legacy database and 3 dimensional model, so that can be utilized in the next plant design. In the first year, the blueprint of NuIDEAS is proposed, and its prototype is developed by applying the rapidly revolutionizing computer technology. The major results of the first year research were to establish the architecture of the integrated database ensuring data consistency, and to build design database of reactor coolant system and heavy components. Also various softwares were developed to search, share and utilize the data through networks, and the detailed 3 dimensional CAD models of nuclear fuel and heavy components were constructed, and walk-through simulation using the models are developed. This report contains the major additions and modifications to the object oriented database and associated program, using methods and Javascript.. (author). 36 refs., 1 tab., 32 figs.

  4. Nuclear integrated database and design advancement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of NuIDEAS is to computerize design processes through an integrated database by eliminating the current work style of delivering hardcopy documents and drawings. The major research contents of NuIDEAS are the advancement of design processes by computerization, the establishment of design database and 3 dimensional visualization of design data. KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant) is the target of legacy database and 3 dimensional model, so that can be utilized in the next plant design. In the first year, the blueprint of NuIDEAS is proposed, and its prototype is developed by applying the rapidly revolutionizing computer technology. The major results of the first year research were to establish the architecture of the integrated database ensuring data consistency, and to build design database of reactor coolant system and heavy components. Also various softwares were developed to search, share and utilize the data through networks, and the detailed 3 dimensional CAD models of nuclear fuel and heavy components were constructed, and walk-through simulation using the models are developed. This report contains the major additions and modifications to the object oriented database and associated program, using methods and Javascript.. (author). 36 refs., 1 tab., 32 figs

  5. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  6. Recent Advances in Nuclear Medicine Imaging Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review introduces advances in clinical and pre-clinical single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) providing noninvasive functional images of biological processes. Development of new collimation techniques such as multi-pinhole and slit-slat collimators permits the improvement of system spatial resolution and sensitivity of SPECT. Application specific SPECT systems using smaller and compact solid-state detector have been customized for myocardial perfusion imaging with higher performance. Combined SPECT/CT providing improved diagnostic and functional capabilities has been introduced. Advances in PET and CT instrumentation have been incorporated in the PET/CT design that provide the metabolic information from PET superimposed on the anatomic information from CT. Improvements in the sensitivity of PET have achieved by the fully 3D acquisition with no septa and the extension of axial field-of-view. With the development of faster scintillation crystals and electronics, time-of-flight (TOF) PET is now commercially available allowing the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio by incorporation of TOF information into the PET reconstruction process. Hybrid PET/SPECT/CT systems has become commercially available for molecular imaging in small animal models. The pre-clinical systems have improved spatial resolution using depth-of-interaction measurement and new collimators. The recent works on solid state detector and dual modality nuclear medicine instrumentations incorporating MRI and optical images will also be discussed

  7. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  8. Advanced Nuclear Applications in Medicinr at Chiang Mai University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic energy applications in Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University (CMU) are mainly performed by department of Radiology that is divided into three dicisions: 1) Diagnostic Radiology Division for the applications of X-rays, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance, 2) Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Division for cancer treatments by photon accelrator and external radionuclides therapy or brachytherapy, 3) Nuclear Meddicine Division for clinical dignosis by using radionuclide scintigraphy, targeted molecular imaging and internal radionuclide therapy. In the last decade, many advanced medical images for clinical diagnosis included of digital & computed radiology (DR & CR), digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and images (DSI), computed tomography (CT) with dual X-rays energies, manetic resonance imaging (MRI), and hybrid images of SPECT/CT were established in Radiology Department and PET/CT Cyclitron Center Chiang Mai University (PCCMU), respectively. For cancer treatments, the frontier technologies in radiation oncligy therapy such as tomotherapy, IMRT, 3D conformal radiation treatment, stereotactic radiationtherapy (SRT), stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS), and radiation biology laboratory were implemented in the department as well. As far as fast development of nuclear technology in medicine, future implementation of advanced nuclear applications in medicine strongly need an intergrated knoowledge from many specialties e.g. computer softeare in image reconstruction, accuracy and and precision technology, production of specific radiotracers for molecular imaging and therapy, techniques in radionuclide productions, innovation of new wquipment or materials for radiationprotection and safety, etc. However the most important factors of nuclear applications in medicine are the vision, mission and the value statements of the organization on the high cost in radiology investment and human resources development. We have to emphasize that people who are involved

  9. Nuclear energy such as an alternative energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power is still an unknown subject to many and ends up being left out when it comes to alternative energy sources and environmental preservation. Unfamiliarity and the disclosures information that are not always correct end up not to show the public the true risks and benefits of this source. The strength of public opinion is the main barrier to the advancement of this technology. So, this paper aims to demystify the villain aspect of nuclear energy that could become a major source for power generation. For this, will be made a historical retrospective of the theories that enabled the field of nuclear fission, the authors and key points, such as will be described how nuclear fission reaction is produced, controlled and sustained and how energy is produced, will be also made an argument on key facts that lead public opinion to stand up against nuclear power, as the generation of radioactive waste and nuclear weapons. Are presented possible solutions beyond the learning and improvements resulting from the occurred accidents. After these analyzes was observed that, besides being a potentially clean source for power generation, it can be safe in order that the waste generated are already safely managed and intelligence groups also monitor terrorist groups, seeking to ensure global security in relation to nuclear weapons and, at the issue of accidents, each event has brought learning and became the nuclear industry today, one of the safest. (author)

  10. Nuclear energy and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the nuclear controversy in the US and in France shows out the economic consequences of US opponents' action, the economic and social consequences that could result from renunciation to the French nuclear program, and the complexity of technology assessment

  11. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, Julio Cezar; Fonseca, Renato Alves da, E-mail: jrausch@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: rfonseca@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy safety - new challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima accident in March this year, the second most serious nuclear accident in the world, put in evidence a discussion that in recent years with the advent of the 'nuclear renaissance' has been relegated in the background: what factors influence the use safe nuclear energy? Organizational precursor, latent errors, reduction in specific areas of competence and maintenance of nuclear programs is a scenario where the guarantee of a sustainable development of nuclear energy becomes a major challenge for society. A deep discussion of factors that influenced the major accidents despite the nuclear industry use of the so-called 'lessons learned' is needed. Major accidents continue to happen if a radical change is not implemented in the focus of safety culture. (author)

  13. Nuclear technologies for local energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified and appropriate reactors developed. The Canadian program on reactor systems for local energy supply is at the forefront of these developments. This program emphasizes design simplicity, low power density and fuel rating, reliance on natural processes, passive systems, and reduced reliance on operator action. The first product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, is a 10 MW heat source specifically designed to provide hot water to satisfy the needs of local heating systems for building complexes, institutions and municipal district heating systems. A demonstration heating reactor has been constructed at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba and has been undergoing an extensive test program since first operation in 1987 July. Based on the knowledge learned from the design, construction, licensing and operational testing of this facility, the design of the 10 MW commercial-size unit is well advanced, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is prepared to commit the construction of the first commercial unit. Although the technical demonstration of the concept is important, it is recognized that another crucial element is the public and regulatory acceptance of small nuclear systems in urban areas. The decision by a community to commit the construction of a SLOWPOKE Energy System brings to a sharp focus the current public apprehension about nuclear technologies

  14. Nuclear energy - status and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogner, Hans-Holger; MacDonald, Alan

    2007-07-01

    Rising expectations best characterize the current prospects of nuclear power in a world that is confronted with a burgeoning demand for energy, higher energy prices, energy supply security concerns and growing environmental pressures. It appears that the inherent economic and environmental benefits of the technology and its excellent performance record over the last twenty years are beginning to tilt the balance of political opinion and public acceptance in favour of nuclear power. Nuclear power is a cost-effective supply-side technology for mitigating climate change and can make a substantial contribution to climate protection. This paper reviews the current status of nuclear power and its fuel cycle and provides an outlook on where nuclear power may be headed in the short-to-medium run (20 to 40 years from now). (auth)

  15. A nuclear data library production system for advanced lattice codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear data library production system has been written to recover and format nuclear data required in the recently released advanced lattice code DRAGON Version-4. State-of-the-art resonance self-shielding calculations require information that goes beyond WIMS-D type models. Dilution-dependent cross sections are required for all resonant reactions and for more than 10 specific dilutions. Ultra-fine multigroup cross section data is also required in the resolved energy domain. Another important aspect of advanced lattice codes is the explicit treatment of most neutron induced reactions in the burnup calculation. We need to perform power normalization due to energy from various neutron induced and decay reactions. Even though the decay energy contributes very little relative to the neutron induced reactions, the information will be very useful for post irradiation behavior of fuel. All this information is collected using DRAGR, a new post-processing module in NJOY99, and formatted in a single direct access hierarchical database. Burnup data is also recovered and the short-life isotopic data is automatically lumped. Moreover, PyNjoy, an object-oriented script, was developed to automate the recovery of Endf/B evaluations, the building, and the management of the database. This system was developed under the Lesser General Public License and is openly available. (author)

  16. Nuclear energy and its future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of nuclear power in the world and its future are briefly discussed. It is shown that nuclear power capacity is increasing in the Asian and Pacific rim region and that new reactor designs, with the increased emphasis on safety and standardisation, could make nuclear power a more acceptable option in the future. The author also outlines the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization wide range of skills and facilities which are bringing the benefits of nuclear science and technology to Australia. These include: the development of Synroc as an advanced second generation waste management; production of radiotracers for biomedical researches and environmental problems; application of gamma irradiation in industry and of ion beam analysis in biology, archaeology, semi-conductor and environmental science. 2 tabs

  17. Proceedings of the 1. General Congress of Nuclear Energy. v. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of 1 General Congress of Nuclear Energy are presented. All fields related to nuclear energy are enclosed. In the first part the following fields are shown: safety analysis, science and technology of materials, nuclear materials, nuclear laws, education and trainning, reactor physics, nuclear physics, quality assurance, mathematical models, reactor operation, safeguards, advanced technologies, thermohydraulic and reactor licensing. (M.C.K.)

  18. Nuclear energy and climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy is one of the essential motives for social and economic development of the humanity. Nuclear energy is a feasible option to stand up to a larger demand of energy, and it is playing, and will continue playing in the future, a decisive role in the debate about climate change and sustainable development, and in the efforts to reduce the CO2 emissions. (Author)

  19. Which nuclear energy for tomorrow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facing the constant increase of electric power consumption, the authors wonder about the energy sources possibilities. After a synthesis of the fossil fuels and the renewable energies they present the nuclear energy and more specially the new hybrid reactor project (Carlo Rubbia), or ADS (Accelerator Driven System). (A.L.B.)

  20. Nuclear Power on Energy Agenda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The big debate on whether or not to use nuclear power as an energy option has raged among countries like the U.S., Britain, and Germany for decades, with not even the advent and threat of global warming forcing a conclusion. China, however, has always stressed energy diversity and been determined to develop and use this alternative energy source.

  1. Can we fix nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Weinberg discusses some of the history of various aspects of the nuclear industry in light of the accident at Three Mile Island. The siting of commercial nuclear power plants near population centers is a result of opening up nuclear operations at the private sector. Early reactors established as a part of the Manhattan Project were all remote from unknowledgeable populations. When the utilities began to construct nuclear plants, their siting tended to conform to the practices already established for generation plants. With the nearness of nuclear power plants to people, and with media coverage of accidents so widespread, the public perception of risk associated with nuclear energy deserves attention. The primary issue concerning nuclear power plants is, according to Dr. Weinberg, the 15 billion curies in an operating reactor and the possibility of their release. He identifies six characteristics necessary for an acceptable nuclear energy system: technical fixes; physical isolation; separation of generation and distribution; professionalization of the nuclear cadre; heightened security; and, perhaps most difficult, public education about the hazards of radiation. The major alternatives to fission - geothermal, fusion, fossil, and the various forms of solar energy - are discussed briefly

  2. Nuclear energy and sustainable development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blix, H. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1991-04-01

    After a brief discussion of some of the applications of nuclear techniques in agriculture, medicine, hydrology, and industry, the role of nuclear power in meeting world energy demands within a framework of sustainable development is considered. Special emphasis is given to environmental and safety questions. (Author).

  3. Nuclear energy for environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990 nuclear energy supplied about 17% of the total electric power produced in the world, what makes it the third most used power source after coal and hydropower. In this paper the advantages of using nuclear power for generating large quantities of electric power are presented

  4. Living with nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is argued that with the possible exception of hydroelectric power the nuclear option is, on the record to date, the cheapest, the safest and the least environmentally harmful of any existing source of electricity generation. (U.K.)

  5. Benefits of using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to present, especially for high school students, the benefits of the use of nuclear energy, promoting a deeper knowledge of this technology, encouraging critical thinking of students and society around them

  6. Nuclear energy demon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German nuclear power plants (here Grafenrheinfeld, Isar) dispose of large-scale provisions echeloned in depth against release of activity due to incidents. According to human judgement environmental risks can be excluded. The direct risk is explained in the Rasmussen-study and in the German Risk Study Nuclear Power Plants. The Inhaber-study represents an important contribution to the risk assessment. (DG)

  7. Nuclear energy and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over two thirds of the population (68%) believe that nuclear energy is necessary to secure the supply of power. This is one of the results of a representative poll conducted by the Demoscopic Institute Allensbach on behalf of the Nuclear Energy Information Circle of the German Atom Forum. 78% of the population are of the opinion that the power supply is secure for the next 20 years. The significance of nuclear power in today's power supply is, however, grossly underestimated. For example 30% of respondents put the number of nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic at four at the most. Many more people than one year ago are now convinced of the environmental compatibility of nuclear power plants. The public debate on nuclear energy is generally judged critically by politicians, journalists and experts: factual and emotional. 54% of the population and 71% of politicians interviewed regard the question of nuclear energy utilisation as a predominantly political decision. Questioned was a representative sample of the population which included politicians, journalists, scientists and energy economists. The results, which were presented at a press conference in Bonn by the economist Renate Koecher, are reviewed. (orig.)

  8. Energy supply concepts in the 21st century - the role of nuclear energy. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contents: Supply structures in the 21st century; security of energy supply in Europe - The European Commission's Green Paper; the U.S. nuclear future; DOE initiatives to advance nuclear energy in the United States; supply reliability - contribution of renewable energy sources; role of brown coal in the futural energy mixing; gas supply for the 21st century; the contribution of nuclear power on supply reliability in Europe and a new power plant for Finland. (GL)

  9. Advanced Energy Projects FY 1990 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report serves as a guide to prepare proposals and provides summaries of the research projects active in FY 1990, sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Division of Advanced Energy Projects, Department of Energy. (JF)

  10. Advanced Space Nuclear Reactors from Fiction to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    The advanced nuclear power sources are used in a large variety of science fiction movies and novels, but their practical development is, still, in its early conceptual stages, some of the ideas being confirmed by collateral experiments. The novel reactor concept uses the direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, has electronic control of reactivity, being surrounded by a transmutation blanket and very thin shielding being small and light that at its very limit may be suitable to power an autonomously flying car. It also provides an improved fuel cycle producing minimal negative impact to environment. The key elements started to lose the fiction attributes, becoming viable actual concepts and goals for the developments to come, and on the possibility to achieve these objectives started to become more real because the theory shows that using the novel nano-technologies this novel reactor might be achievable in less than a century.

  11. Religious organizations debate nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the history of the religious debate on nuclear energy over the last thirty years. In the 1950s, religious statements recognized the peaceful uses of atomic energy as a blessing from God and called upon world leaders to promote its use. Nuclear energy programmes were launched in this decade. In the 1960s, there was still religious approval of nuclear energy, but questions about ethics arose. It was not until the 1970s, after the oil crisis, that serious questioning and criticism of nuclear energy emerged. This was particularly true in the United States, where the majority of statements originated - especially in 1979, the year of the Three Mile Island accident. Around this time, the World Council of Churches developed the concept of the just, participatory and sustainable society. The meaning and use of these terms in the nuclear energy debate is examined. This paper also compares the balanced debate of the World Council with the case against the plutonium economy prepared by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA. Three religious statements from the 1980s are examined. A United Church of Canada resolution, critical of nuclear energy, is compared with a favourable report from the Methodist Church in England. Both use similar values: in one case, justice, participation and sustainability; in the other case, concern for others, participation and stewardship. There are not many Catholic statements on nuclear energy. One which is cautious and favourable is examined in detail. It is concluded that the use of concepts of justice, participation and sustainability (or their equivalents) has not clarified the nuclear debate

  12. Nuclear energy: obstacles and promises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has distinctive merits (sustainable resources, low costs, no greenhouse gases) but its development must overcome serious hurdles (fear of accidents, radio-phobia, waste management). The large unit size of present-day reactors is compatible only with large electrical grids, and involves a high capital cost. Taking into account these different factors, the paper outlines how nuclear energy may contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases, and which are the most promising developments. (author)

  13. Nuclear Energy, Long Term Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are serious warnings about depletion of oil and gas and even more serious warnings about dangers of climate change caused by emission of carbon dioxide. Should developed countries be called to replace CO2 emitting energy sources as soon as possible, and the time available may not be longer then few decades, can nuclear energy answer the call and what are the requirements? Assuming optimistic contribution of renewable energy sources, can nuclear energy expand to several times present level in order to replace large part of fossil fuels use? Paper considers intermediate and long-term requirements. Future of nuclear power depends on satisfactory answers on several questions. First group of questions are those important for near and intermediate future. They deal with economics and safety of nuclear power stations in the first place. On the same time scale a generally accepted concept for radioactive waste disposal is also required. All these issues are in the focus of present research and development. Safer and more economical reactors are targets of international efforts in Generation IV and INPRO projects, but aiming further ahead these innovative projects are also addressing issues such as waste reduction and proliferation resistance. However, even assuming successful technical development of these projects, and there is no reason to doubt it, long term and large-scale nuclear power use is thereby not yet secured. If nuclear power is to play an essential role in the long-term future energy production and in reduction of CO2 emission, than several additional questions must be replied. These questions will deal with long-term nuclear fuel sufficiency, with necessary contribution of nuclear power in sectors of transport and industrial processes and with nuclear proliferation safety. This last issue is more political then technical, thus sometimes neglected by nuclear engineers, yet it will have essential role for the long-term prospects of nuclear power. The

  14. EU Commission energy package - the role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the title 'An Energy Policy for Europe', on January 20, 2007, the European Commission presented its plans for an energy policy concept for the coming years, with the intention of advancing the European energy policy. The Commission promotes a structural change in favor of a low-CO2 energy supply. Moreover, in addition to combating the climate change, the measures are intended to aid in reducing the European Union's dependency on importing fossil fuels, particularly oil and gas. The published Nuclear Illustrative Programme (PINC) is also a part of the energy package, which comprises a large number of documents related to individual subject areas. According to the EURATOM treaty, the EU Commission is required to publish a Nuclear Illustrative Programme at regular intervals. Based on valid arguments, the report elaborates on the fact that utilization of nuclear energy plays an important role on a global scale and for the European energy policy. PINC emphasizes the efficiency of nuclear energy for generating electricity, its contribution to climate protection and the robustness of the uranium supply against increasing prices. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear energy, environmental protection and international conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some general and some critical remarks on: nuclear energy as an image for politics; nuclear energy as a model for research planning; nuclear controversy; the principle of precaution in nuclear and radiation protection law; reactor safety on probation; advantages and economy of nuclear energy; communication difficulties; the special role of nuclear energy; the need for European site planning; supervision of fissionable materials; the world's energy household in danger; global structure politics and nuclear energy; nuclear energy with a capacity for social innovations. (HP/LN)

  16. Density content of nuclear symmetry energy from nuclear observables

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Agrawal

    2014-11-01

    The nuclear symmetry energy at a given density measures the energy transferred in converting symmetric nuclear matter into the pure neutron matter. The density content of nuclear symmetry energy remains poorly constrained. Our recent results for the density content of the nuclear symmetry energy, around the saturation density, extracted using experimental data for accurately known nuclear masses, giant resonances and neutron-skin thickness in heavy nuclei are summarized.

  17. Energy Outlook and Nuclear Energy in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mooneon; Kang, Jun-young; Song, Kiwon; Park, Hyun Sun; Park, Chang Kue [Pohang university of science and technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    China receives attention from the whole world as not only have they become a country spending the most energy in the world, but also the amount of energy they need is still increasing. Consequently, many problems related to environmental pollution have occurred in China. Recently, China agreed to reduce carbon emission in order to deal with this issue. Therefore, they need to find energy sources other than fossil fuel; the nuclear energy could be an alternative. In addition, it is considered to be a base load owing to its low fuel cost and continuation of electricity generation. In reality, the Chinese government is planning to build about 400 Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) up to 2050. Therefore, it is expected that China will become a giant market in the nuclear industry. It could give us either chances to join the huge market or challenges to meet not merely nuclear fuel price crisis but competitors from China in the world nuclear power plant market. In any case, it is obvious that the energy policy of China would influence us significantly. Accordingly, we need appropriate prediction of the Chinese nuclear industry to cope with the challenges.

  18. Energy Outlook and Nuclear Energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China receives attention from the whole world as not only have they become a country spending the most energy in the world, but also the amount of energy they need is still increasing. Consequently, many problems related to environmental pollution have occurred in China. Recently, China agreed to reduce carbon emission in order to deal with this issue. Therefore, they need to find energy sources other than fossil fuel; the nuclear energy could be an alternative. In addition, it is considered to be a base load owing to its low fuel cost and continuation of electricity generation. In reality, the Chinese government is planning to build about 400 Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) up to 2050. Therefore, it is expected that China will become a giant market in the nuclear industry. It could give us either chances to join the huge market or challenges to meet not merely nuclear fuel price crisis but competitors from China in the world nuclear power plant market. In any case, it is obvious that the energy policy of China would influence us significantly. Accordingly, we need appropriate prediction of the Chinese nuclear industry to cope with the challenges

  19. Sustainable development and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has four chapters .In the first chapter world energy statute and future plans;in the second chapter Turkey's energy statute and future plans; in the third chapter world energy outlook and in the last chapter sustainable development and nuclear energy has discussed in respect of environmental effects, harmony between generations, harmony in demand, harmony in sociapolitic and in geopolitic. Additional multimedia CD-ROM has included

  20. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with current energy issues, environmental aspects of energy, project feasibility evaluation, and activities of international organizations. Current energy issues including activities related with UNFCCC, sustainable development, and global concern on energy issues were surveyed with focusing on nuclear related activities. Environmental aspects of energy includes various topics such as, inter- industrial analysis of nuclear sector, the role of nuclear power in mitigating GHG emission, carbon capture and sequestration technology, hydrogen production by using nuclear energy, Life Cycle Analysis as a method of evaluating environmental impacts of a technology, and spent fuel management in the case of introducing fast reactor and/or accelerator driven system. Project feasibility evaluation includes nuclear desalination using SMART reactor, and introduction of COMFAR computer model, developed by UNIDO to carry out feasibility analysis in terms of business attitude. Activities of international organizations includes energy planning activities of IAEA and OECD/NEA, introduction of the activities of FNCA, one of the cooperation mechanism among Asian countries. In addition, MESSAGE computer model was also introduced. The model is being developed by IAEA to effectively handle liberalization of electricity market combined with environmental constraints

  1. Britain's nuclear energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the mid 1980s the Labour Party's position and clear intention was to phase out nuclear generated power in the UK. BNFL's reprocessing business was singled out for particular criticism. Many argued that this sounded the death knell for an industry with a legacy of negative public opinion and no commercial future. How against this background then was the Rt. Hon Tony Blair able, on 9 June 1999, to state that 'If we were to question the continued operation of Thorp, I think that would not be right. Thorp is an operation with orders now valued at some 12 billion pounds, it provides 6000 skilled jobs, it indirectly supports many more... I do not support the case of those who would like us to abandon Thorp?' Furthermore, in June 1999 the Royal Society stated that, 'it is vital to keep the nuclear option open' and in October of the same year the House of Commons Trade Industry Select Committee went further and advised, 'a formal presumption be made now for the purposes of long-term planning that new nuclear plant may be required in the course of the next two decades'. On 13 July 1999, the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, Rt. Hon Stephen Byers, announced a possible sale of up to 49% of BNFL by a Public Private Partnership. Dare we view this as the genesis of a nuclear renaissance for the United Kingdom? This clear change in political attitude towards the nuclear option has come about as a result of a concerted public and government relations effort over the past ten years. That said, many barriers remain if we are to meet the challenge of delivering new nuclear build in the UK. Public opinion may allow new build but only if the industry demonstrates a track record of safety and environmental stewardship. There will always be the 'not in my back yard' argument so we must be a good neighbour and, most importantly of all, a long-term solution must be found for the disposal of nuclear waste. If the stage is set for the nuclear renaissance, the industry

  2. TALSPEAK Chemistry in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of trivalent transplutonium actinides from fission product lanthanide ions represents a challenging aspect of advanced nuclear fuel partitioning schemes. The challenge of this separation could be amplified in the context of the AFCI-UREX+1a process, as Np and Pu will accompany the minor actinides to this stage of separation. At present, the baseline lanthanide-actinide separation method is the TALSPEAK (Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorus reagent Extraction from Aqueous complexes) process. TALSPEAK was developed in the late 1960's at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has been demonstrated at pilot scale. This process relies on the complex interaction between an organic and an aqueous phase both containing complexants for selectively separating the trivalent actinide. The 3 complexing components are: the di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP), the lactic acid (HL) and the diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA). In this report we discuss observations on kinetic and thermodynamic features described in the prior literature and describe some results of our ongoing research on basic chemical features of this system. The information presented indicates that the lactic acid buffer participates in the net operation of the TALSPEAK process in a manner that is not explained by existing information on the thermodynamic features if the known Eu(III)-lactate species. (authors)

  3. Nuclear energy: A female technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amongst the important scientific and technological revolutions of history there is none in which women have played such a substantial and many-sided role as in the development of nuclear energy. The birth of nuclear energy is not only due to Marie Curie and Lise Meitner but also to a large number of courageous 'nuclear women' who decided against all sorts of prejudices and resistances in favour of a life in research. Therefore the revolution of the atom has also become the greatest breakthrough of women in natural sciences. This double revolution is the subject of this book. Here the history of nuclear energy itself is dealt with documented with the original work and personal memories of different persons - mainly women - who have been substantially involved in this development. (orig./HP)

  4. High education and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Faculty of Energy of the University 'Politecnica' in Bucharest is the only faculty in Romania in the field of nuclear energy education. With an experience of more than 29 years, the Faculty of Energy offers the major 'Nuclear Power Plants', which students graduate after a 5-year education as engineers in the Nuclear Power Plant major. Among the principal objectives of the development and reshape of the Romanian education system was mentioned the upgrading of organizational forms by introducing the transfer credit system, and starting in the fall '97 by accrediting Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety Master education. As a result of co-operation and assistance offered by TEMPUS-SENECA program, the new major is shaped and endowed with a modern curriculum harmonized with UE and IAEA requirements and a modern and performing laboratory. This way the Romanian higher education offers a fully correct and concordant structure with UE countries education. (authors)

  5. Nuclear power: tomorrow's energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, 76% of electricity is produced by nuclear power. The industry's pricing levels are among the most competitive in Europe. Thanks to its 58 nuclear reactors France enjoys almost 50% energy autonomy thus ensuring a highly stable supply. Equally, as a non-producer of greenhouse gases, the nuclear sector can rightfully claim to have an environmentally friendly impact. Against a background to increasing global demand with predictions that fossil fuels will run out and global warming a central issue, it is important to use production methods which face up to problems of this nature. There is no question that nuclear energy has a vital role to play alongside other energy sources. (authors)

  6. Nuclear energy and materials in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Vision Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is examining a range of long-term nuclear energy futures as well as exploring and assessing optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies. An established global energy, economics, environmental (E3) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed, where future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term (∼2100) demographic, economic, policy, and technological drivers. A spectrum of futures is examined at two levels in a hierarchy of scenario attributes in which drivers are either external or internal to nuclear energy. The result reported examine departures from a basis scenario and are presented in the following order of increasing specificity: (a) definition and parametric variations of the basis scenario; (b) comparison of the basis scenario with other recent studies; (c) parametric studies that vary upper-level hierarchical scenario attributes (external drivers); and (d) variations of the lower-level scenario attributes (internal drivers). Impacts of a range of nuclear fuel-cycle scenarios are reflected back to the higher-level scenario attributes that characterize particular nuclear energy scenarios. Special attention is given to the role of nuclear materials inventories (in magnitude, location, and form) and their contribution to the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy, the future competitiveness of both conventional and advanced nuclear reactors, and proliferation risk

  7. Nuclear energy and materials in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Vision Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is examining a range of long- term nuclear energy futures as well as exploring and assessing optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies. An established global energy, economics, environmental (E3) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed, where future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term (∼2100) demographic, economic, policy, and technological drivers. A spectrum of futures is examined at two levels in a hierarchy of scenario attributes in which drivers are either external or internal to nuclear energy. The results reported examine departures from a ''basis scenario'' and are presented in the following order of increasing specificity: a) definition and parametric variations the basis scenario; b) comparison of the basis scenario with other recent studies; c) parametric studies that vary upper-level hierarchical scenario attributes (external drivers); and d) variations of the lower-level scenario attributes (internal drivers). Impacts of a range of nuclear fuel cycle scenarios are reflected back to the higher-level scenario attributes that characterize particular nuclear energy scenarios. Special attention is given to the role of nuclear materials inventories (in magnitude, location, and form) and their contribution to the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy, the future competitiveness of both conventional and advanced nuclear reactors, and proliferation risk. (author)

  8. Future perspectives of nuclear energy in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akimoto, Yumi [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The criticality accident at Tokai-mura in the fall of 1999 not only caused the death of two workers, but also had a very negative impact on the image of nuclear power in Japan. The credibility of nuclear power has been impaired considerably, and uncertainty, fear, and the rejection of this source of power are now subjects of public debate. Given the positive economic development of Japan, and given also the energy supply situation of the country, with its considerable dependence on energy imports and the very special geographic situation with its consequences for infrastructure - energy resources transmitted through pipes or lines can be routed only over limited distances in the insular state of Japan, and importing across the seas from neigboring countries is not feasible - nuclear power is going to hold an important role also in the country's and the region's future energy supply. The global situation of the limited nature of fossil energy reserves is going to open perspectives of an expansion of nuclear power worldwide in the long term, including the development and construction of advanced reactors. (orig.)

  9. Future perspectives of nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality accident at Tokai-mura in the fall of 1999 not only caused the death of two workers, but also had a very negative impact on the image of nuclear power in Japan. The credibility of nuclear power has been impaired considerably, and uncertainty, fear, and the rejection of this source of power are now subjects of public debate. Given the positive economic development of Japan, and given also the energy supply situation of the country, with its considerable dependence on energy imports and the very special geographic situation with its consequences for infrastructure - energy resources transmitted through pipes or lines can be routed only over limited distances in the insular state of Japan, and importing across the seas from neigboring countries is not feasible - nuclear power is going to hold an important role also in the country's and the region's future energy supply. The global situation of the limited nature of fossil energy reserves is going to open perspectives of an expansion of nuclear power worldwide in the long term, including the development and construction of advanced reactors. (orig.)

  10. The nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the lesson provided by the author at the physics summer school. After a recall on the atoms nuclei properties, he explains the nuclear reactor principle, their stability and safety. The fuel cycle is also detailed as the different reactors technologies. The last part deals with the thermonuclear fusion. (A.L.B.)

  11. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, μ-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session

  12. From nuclear power to fusion nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of thermonuclear fusion, which is over 50 years long, now has come to a stage expected to pave the way to the industrial implementation of fusion energy. The euphoria, which has spread in the society after the success of thermonuclear arms' tests and first fission reactors, has also influenced plasma physicists, which then promised to launch fusion power plants within the next 20 years. However, the science development has shown once again, how cautiously such projections should be treated. Specialists have clearly underestimated the complexity of the task to create a fusion energy source for the Earth conditions. It took several decades of fundamental plasma process research to give birth to a new area of science-the hot plasma physics. Only thanks to the development of this discipline, parameters of fusion installations have gradually approached the diapason, which was of interest for a fusion power reactor. Today the plasma physics has enough theoretical and experimental achievements to transfer, from theory to practice, the issue of constructing the first fusion reactor, with power yielded from fusion reactions exceeding by an order of magnitude the energy spent for supporting the reactor plasma. Physicist have reasons to believe that the prospects of nuclear fusion energy (thermonuclear energy), which is called to eliminate the problem of limited energy resources, could become a reality in the second half of the XXI century

  13. September 11 and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terrible September 11 attacks have demonstrated the ability of international terrorists to carry out well-planned and complex operations that can kill thousands of citizens. The potential for biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism has increased and will remain as long as their underlying causes. Nuclear installations could be the targets, or the sources of materials usable for terrorism. Whilst thick containment buildings around nuclear reactors are unlikely to be breached, some installations, such as spent fuel pond are more vulnerable. The safety of nuclear installations must be reconsidered taking into account some new initiating events hitherto considered of very low probability. A resistance against nuclear power plant sabotage by terrorist group penetrating into reactor building, is a controversial topic. Measures against diversion of nuclear materials, which could be used in nuclear terrorism, must be reviewed. The danger of diversion from giant military stocks of highly enriched uranium and plutonium by far exceeds that from peaceful use of nuclear energy. Measures to neutralize these stocks, such as dilution of highly enriched uranium, should be speeded up and have a priority in public concern. As for the nuclear power stations, public should be informed about the recommendations of IAEA for better physical protection of nuclear materials prepared in 1999 (INFCIRC 225/Rev.4) and about Additional protocol to inadequate Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials from 1980, which is in a process of ratification. For acceptable nuclear future public must be aware that all required measures to eliminate unacceptable risks resulting from terrorist activity against nuclear installations will be undertaken. (author)

  14. Energy supply without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a first phase of work (1979-1980), the four energy paths were developed as an attempt to describe on a technical basis in quantitative terms, and combine in a consistent picture, the variety of opinions then prevailing in the Federal Republic with respect to future energy supply structures. The social compatibility of energy supply systems was the subject of investigation in the early eighties by two groups of scientists working on behalf, and following a suggestion, respectively, of the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology, i.e., one group headed by K.M. Meyer-Abich and B. Schefold, and another group at the Juelich Nuclear Research Center. The final report by the Meyer-Abich/Schefold group, which was written for public release, is a book entitled 'Die Grenzen der Atomwirtschaft' (The Limits to the Nuclear Economy). This latter book came out in spring of 1986 and soon played a major role in the energy policy debate after the Chernobyl disaster. In their conclusions the authors clearly express themselves against using nuclear power on the grounds that it was a socially incompatible source of energy. This article compairs the energy scenarios K and S described in the book with the energy paths 2 and 3 of the Fact Finding Committee on Future Nuclear Energy Policy. (orig.)

  15. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  16. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases

  17. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  18. Nuclear energy in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography was prepared by the Scientific Library, Nuclear Training Department of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission for scientists and researchers interested in nuclear energy in the Philippines. This sixth supplement consists of eighty-six (86) entries, mostly research reports of the scientists of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. The entries are arranged alphabetically by titles under their respective subject headings together with their bibliographic data consisting of author, title of publication, volume, data and pages. A brief annotation or a summary of the article follows. An author index is provided to facilitate prompt retrieval of the particular research information

  19. The Future of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current nuclear energy represents 23.5% of the total electrical power available within the OECD countries. This is the energy offering the lowest costs to generate, it does not emit greenhouse-effect fumes nor does it contribute to global warming, however, it does generate radioactive and toxic waste which society perceives as an unacceptable risk. For this reason the development of new nuclear installation in Europe is at a stand still or moving backward. Truthful information and social participation in decisions is the best way to achieve the eradication of the social phobia produced by this energy source. (Author)

  20. CEA nuclear energy Directorate - Activity report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an overview of the activities of the Directorate at the international level, of its scientific activities, and of the consideration given to quality, and a presentation of the transverse program on advanced materials, this report proposes presentations of activities in different domains: future nuclear industrial systems (reactors of 4. generation, back-end of the future cycle, sustainable management of nuclear materials, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present industrial nuclear activity (reactors of 2. and 3. generation, front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle), the main tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, the Jules Horowitz reactor), valorisation, economic support of Haute-Marne and Meuse territories (the Syndiese project), nuclear dismantling and decontamination (dismantling projects, projects and works in Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Saclay, waste and material flow management, nuclear service facilities, transports). It also presents the activities of some specific CEA centres like Marcoule (R and D in fuel cycle), Cadarache (future energies) and Saclay (nuclear sciences and simulation of reactors and fuel cycle)

  1. Research and development on the application of advanced control technologies to advanced nuclear reactor systems: A US national perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control system designs for nuclear power plants are becoming more advanced through the use of digital technology and automation. This evolution is taking place because of: (1) the limitations in analog based control system performance and maintenance and availability and (2) the promise of significant improvement in plant operation and availability due to advances in digital and other control technologies. Digital retrofits of control systems in US nuclear plants are occurring now. Designs of control and protection systems for advanced LWRs are based on digital technology. The use of small inexpensive, fast, large-capacity computers in these designs is the first step of an evolutionary process described in this paper. Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, GE Nuclear Energy and several universities are performing research and development in the application of advances in control theory, software engineering, advanced computer architectures, artificial intelligence, and man-machine interface analysis to control system design. The target plant concept for the work described in this paper is the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module reactor (PRISM), an advanced modular liquid metal reactor concept. This and other reactor designs which provide strong passive responses to operational upsets or accidents afford good opportunities to apply these advances in control technology. 18 refs., 5 figs

  2. Advanced Energy Efficiency and Distributed Renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovins, Amory

    2007-04-01

    The US now wrings twice the GDP from each unit of energy that it did in 1975. Reduced energy intensity since then now provides more than twice as much service as burning oil does. Yet still more efficient end-use of energy -- explained more fully in a companion workshop offered at 1245 -- is the largest, fastest, cheapest, most benign, least understood, and least harnessed energy resource available. For example, existing technologies could save half of 2000 US oil and gas and three-fourths of US electricity, at lower cost than producing and delivering that energy from existing facilities. Saving half the oil through efficiency and replacing the other half with saved natural gas and advanced biofuels would cost an average of only 15/barrel and could eliminate US oil use by the 2040s, led by business for profit. Efficiency techniques and ways to combine and apply them continue to improve faster than they're applied, so the ``efficiency resource'' is becoming ever larger and cheaper. As for electricity, ``micropower'' (distributed renewables plus low-carbon cogeneration) is growing so quickly that by 2005 it provided a sixth of the world's electricity and a third of its new electricity, and was adding annually 4x the capacity and 11x the capacity added by nuclear power, which it surpassed in capacity in 2002 and in output in 2006. Together, micropower and ``negawatts'' (saved electricity) now provide upwards half the world's new electrical services, due to their far lower cost and lower financial risk than the central thermal power stations that still dominate policy discussions. For oil and electricity, each of which adds about two-fifths of the world's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, efficiency plus competitive alternative supplies can stabilize the earth's climate at a profit, as well as solving the oil and (largely) the nuclear proliferation problems. Conversely, costlier and slower options, notably nuclear power, would displace less carbon emission per

  3. Criteria for Global Nuclear Energy Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    true for numerous nuclear programs even in developed countries with limited geologically suitable formations. Fortunately, several organizations are currently pursuing international solutions to the nuclear waste disposal problem. While the capability to deploy nuclear energy in a specific country may not be desirable for a number of reasons, we should not develop nuclear hardware that can only benefit and serve technically and economically advanced countries. The potential benefits of nuclear energy are global, and we should not unduly limit that potential by inattention today to the requirements necessary for global deployment. (authors)

  4. Nuclear energy-hazards, safety strategies, risk proportions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear risk analysis is the most advanced field of safety science but a number of unclear definitions, e.g. very small probability of accidents or very great consequences of damage, remain to be settled. The risks of nuclear energy are evaluated on the basis of comparisons, and points of main effort of recent safety research are discussed with emphasis on health hazards. (DG)

  5. Alumnus, Energy Secretary Buzz Savage Lectures on Nuclear Future

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School Public Affairs Office

    2010-01-01

    Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy, and Director of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Program in the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Carter “Buzz” Savage offered his knowledge and experience in nuclear energy use, research and administration to the Naval Postgraduate School community through an NPS Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (GSEAS) Distinguished Lecture Series held at the Monterey, Calif., campus in June.

  6. Nuclear power and energy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid depletion of conventional energy sources such as coal and oil and the growing world demand for energy the question of how to provide the extra energy needed in the future is addressed. Relevant facts and figures are presented. Coal and oil have disadvantages as their burning contributes to the greenhouse gases and they will become scarcer and more expensive. Renewable sources such as wind and wave power can supply some but not all future energy requirements. The case made for nuclear power is that it is the only source which offers the long term prospect of meeting the growing world energy demand whilst keeping energy costs close to present levels and which does not add to atmospheric pollution. Reassurance as to the safety of nuclear power plants and the safe disposal of radioactive wastes is given. (UK)

  7. The nuclear energy: a future energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beginning of civil use of nuclear energy is resumed and the different steps of nuclear power utilization to produce electricity are given. The accelerations, the petroleum crisis in 1973, and the brakes such Chernobyl accident or Three Mile Island accident are explained. The competitiveness of nuclear power plants in front of fossil fuels power plants explains the stability of their utilization as well as the energy independence that they bring. The disadvantages remain the public opinion against a possible accident, the problem of nuclear waste storage and the privatization of electricity companies in a lot of countries where the investments favour the natural gas power plants because of the less expansive costs and the shorter payback period. In developing countries, nuclear power meets others obstacles. The financial difficulties and the debts of these countries reduce or declare void the advantages of nuclear electricity production and they do not always satisfy to the required technological competences. To fight against these obstacles, nuclear industry has to improve again the economic performances and to increase the safety and the environment protection to make the public reticence fall. (N.C.). 8 refs

  8. Nuclear Energy. Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kenneth; Thessing, Dan

    This document is one of five learning packets on alternative energy (see note) developed as part of a descriptive curriculum research project in Arkansas. The overall objectives of the learning packets are to improve the level of instruction in the alternative energies by vocational exploration teachers, and to facilitate the integration of new…

  9. The public and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explain why an individual or public opinion is for or against the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, one should not consider only the dimension of the risk involved, as experts on radiation protection and safety will often do. Many other dimensions should be considered, all the more as the nuclear problem is gaining importance on a national level, becoming the topic of the day in the press and other media and the subject of definite standpoints on the part of political parties and social groups. An investigation carried out by the Protection Division of the French Atomic Energy Commission has made it possible to specify the socio-cultural dimensions at the origin of the attitudes taken on the nuclear problem in France. The nuclear topic was therefore compared with other current topics of interest to public opinion; this comparison was made possible by means of an attitude survey covering various social groups. A model of social perception was thus developed. (author)

  10. Nuclear energy activities in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the nuclear energy activities in Mexico is presented. The most important of these are related to the operation of Unit-1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant and the construction of Unit-2, both 654MWe (net) boiling water reactors (GE, Mark II). The research and development activities as well as the local specialized technical services capacity are described. Participation in the design of simplified light water reactors and the activities related to siting studies for future nuclear power plants and engineering for installation of low and medium level radioactive waste are also presented. Application of radioisotopes in industry and medicine is described the research and development activities related to them as well as the future plans for the utilization of nuclear energy in power generation are briefly discussed. 1 tab., 2 figs

  11. Nuclear energy - some aspects; Energia nuclear - alguns aspectos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-15

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy.

  12. Addressing Attribution - Advances in Nuclear Forensics

    OpenAIRE

    LUETZENKIRCHEN Klaus; Mayer, Klaus; WALLENIUS Maria; Varga, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is a discipline in science that exploits information which is inherent to nuclear material. As nuclear material is an industrial product, the respective production process will unavoidably leave a "fingerprint" in the material. In consequence, parameters related to process and source material are measured and conclusions about the history and origin of the nuclear material can be drawn. Chemical impurities, microstructure, molecular structure or isotopic composition are exam...

  13. Society response to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy demand in the world is growing increasingly, among other factors due to economic development. Every way of producing electricity has got their own drawbacks and has implicit environmental impact. Among all the energy sources, nuclear energy is the most polemic because of the way it is presented by the mass media. This aspect provokes controversy to occidental societies which reject this kind of energy with arguments normally based on a wrong and insufficient knowledge of the matter. The antinuclear discourse, promoted late in the seventies, has gone deeply into the collective social unconscious and has undermined public acceptance of nuclear energy due to the fact, deeply exploited by antinuclear groups, of linking nuclear energy with the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In this sense, it is important to mention that in Japan there was a profound resentment and opposition to nuclear energy, because the memory of the nuclear bombings was permanently alive. However when the Japanese government told its people that this energy was necessary to boost their industrial development, Japanese citizens in an unprecedented attitude of patriotism overcame their most antagonist feelings, in order to contribute to the industrial development of their country. The result was that most of them voted in favour. Presently Japan gets 30% of its energy by means of 56 nuclear power plants and 1 more is under construction. Antinuclear groups took as their best emblem the accident of Chernobyl to justify their opposition to the nuclear power plants. The manipulation of this accident has been one of the most shameful in the nuclear history. It is widely known among the experts that the reactor used in Chernobyl was a type of military plutonium converter with a positive temperature reactivity coefficient, which made very dangerous its functioning. Any nuclear regulatory commission in democratic and responsible countries would have never authorized the use of this reactor

  14. NUCLEAR ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Nataša TOMIC

    2010-01-01

    In this paper are analyzed prospects for nuclear energy utilization in the future paying special attention to the protection of environment. Shadow of global crisis appeared over all of us during these days. The most important story in media in 2009. in all countries of the world was economic crisis, with fight against terorism, as well as the protection of the Planet Earth. More and more energy is needed, but as the branch of economy, energy is the greatest pollutant of environment. Environm...

  15. Nuclear energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis of this paper is that the world will need more energy and not less in the coming decades but that this enormous energy consumption entails dangers to the environment not only locally but regionally and internationally through the emissions from the burning of fossil fuels which now provide 85% of the world's commercial energy supply. The solution to this problem is nuclear power. It does not contribute to global warming. 12 figs

  16. Nuclear and solar energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this chapter are restricted to a synopsis of the major uses of molten salts in direct energy production processes, nuclear and solar. Topics discussed include nuclear technologies, fission reactors, molten salts, fuels, process operations and support studies, fuel reprocessing and nonreactor molten salt processes, molten salts for fusion reactors, solar applications, semiconductor electrodeposition and anodization with molten salts, photoelectrochemical cell studies, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems

  17. The Economics of Nuclear Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Kazutomo Irie

    2009-01-01

    The economics of the civilian uses of nuclear energy, that is to say the economics of nuclear power generation in which its civilian uses has been virtually limited to power generation---has been the focus of much public discussion both internationally and domestically here in Japan. The reasons are that there are many underlying factors which determine the economics of power generation methods and that various assumptions can be made concerning these factors. In addition, the value of these ...

  18. Nuclear energy for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It composed of 15 parts, which are energy resource, knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear fuel cycle, present condition of nuclear power generation, the necessity of nuclear power generation, safety of nuclear power generation, current situation of major foreign countries, generation and disposal of waste of radiation, management of waste of radiation, commentary on insistence related waste of radiation, management of waste of radiation in major foreign countries, radiation and daily life, international organization on nuclear energy, diplomacy cooperation of nuclear energy and extra major interesting of nuclear energy and waste of radiation.

  19. How competitive is nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear energy will be crucial for determining its future share in world electricity production. In addition, the widespread liberalization of power markets, in particular in OECD countries, reinforces the role of commercial criteria in technology selection . The recently published IEA/NEA study on Projected Costs of Generating Electricity: 2010 Edition (IEA/NEA, 2010) provides important indications regarding the relative competitiveness of nuclear energy in OECD member countries as well as in four non-OECD countries (Brazil, China, Russia and South Africa). The results highlight the paramount importance of discount rates and, to a lesser extent, carbon and fuel prices when comparing different technologies. Going beyond this general finding, the study also shows that the relative competitiveness of nuclear energy varies widely from one major region to another, and even from country to country. While the study provides a useful snapshot of the costs of generating electricity with different technologies, it does not provide an absolute picture of the competitiveness of nuclear energy. Like any study, Projected Costs of Generating Electricity makes a number of common assumptions about discount rates as well as carbon and fuel prices. In addition, its calculations are based on a methodology that is referred to as the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE), which assumes that all risks are included in the interest or discount rate, which determines the cost of capital. In other words, neither the electricity price risk for nuclear and renewables, nor the carbon and fuel price risk for fossil fuels such as coal and gas, receive specific consideration. The decisions of private investors, however, will depend to a large extent on their individual appreciations of these risks. The competitiveness of nuclear energy thus depends on three different factors which may vary greatly from market to market: interest rates, carbon and fuel prices, and

  20. Marketing nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown how the nuclear industry can present itself to the American public in a more favorable light. Two pieces of writing concerning the same event, the reactor accident at the Enrico Fermi reactor near Detroit, Michigan in 1966, is analyzed for clarity and readability. Seven principles of persuasive communication, as outlined by R.H.S. Crossman who was in charge of Allied psychological warfare in Europe during World War II, are quoted along with examples of their violation, and suggestions given how they might be improved. 10 refs

  1. Advanced nuclear techniques for health and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Particle accelerators were developed seventy years ago to investigate nuclear and atomic structure. Nuclear reactors were developed fifty years ago with the promise of producing low cost energy and for military purposes. In the last three decades, we have witnessed a major shift towards the use of high energy ions from accelerators and high quality neutron beams from reactors in the analysis of materials composition and structure for a broad range of scientific applications. Electrostatic accelerators have evolved into specialised tools for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and ion beam analysis techniques. AMS is the technique of choice for the analysis of carbon-14 and other long-lived radionuclides in oceanography, hydrology, paleoclimatology and other environmental applications where isotope sensitivities of one part in 1015 are required. AMS is also applied in toxicology to study human exposure to chemicals and biomolecules at atto mole levels. Synchrotron accelerators fitted with insertion devices like wigglers and ondulators have revived interest in the field of hard x-rays microprobes. Recent developments are based on the use of Fresnel zone plates and tapered glass capillaries producing photon fluxes of 1010 photons per sec per μm2 that allow minimum detection limits below 10-15 g, an ideal microanalytical tool for biology and materials studies. Finally, high-flux neutrons produced by modern research reactors have unique properties for characterising the structure of matter in condensed states. In particular, small angle neutron scattering with cold neutrons is a versatile technique to determine microstructural features with dimensions in the range 10 to 1000 angstroms in biological, environmental and industrial samples. In conclusion, ions, synchrotron radiation and neutron beams are increasingly used to probe materials structure and composition on the microscopic scale, each with their own range of applications, advantages and disadvantages

  2. A VISION of Advanced Nuclear System Cost Uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VISION (VerifIable fuel cycle SImulatiON) is the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative's and Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Program's nuclear fuel cycle systems code designed to simulate the US commercial reactor fleet. The code is a dynamic stock and flow model that tracks the mass of materials at the isotopic level through the entire nuclear fuel cycle. As VISION is run, it calculates the decay of 70 isotopes including uranium, plutonium, minor actinides, and fission products. VISION.ECON is a sub-model of VISION that was developed to estimate fuel cycle and reactor costs. The sub-model uses the mass flows generated by VISION for each of the fuel cycle functions (referred to as modules) and calculates the annual cost based on cost distributions provided by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report1. Costs are aggregated for each fuel cycle module, and the modules are aggregated into front end, back end, recycling, reactor, and total fuel cycle costs. The software also has the capability to perform system sensitivity analysis. This capability may be used to analyze the impacts on costs due to system uncertainty effects. This paper will provide a preliminary evaluation of the cost uncertainty affects attributable to (1) key reactor and fuel cycle system parameters and (2) scheduling variations. The evaluation will focus on the uncertainty on the total cost of electricity and fuel cycle costs. First, a single light water reactor (LWR) using mixed oxide fuel is examined to ascertain the effects of simple parameter changes. Three system parameters; burnup, capacity factor and reactor power are varied from nominal cost values and the affect on the total cost of electricity is measured. These simple parameter changes are measured in more complex scenarios 2-tier systems including LWRs with mixed fuel and fast recycling reactors using transuranic fuel. Other system parameters are evaluated and results will be presented in the paper. Secondly, the uncertainty due to variation

  3. Global development of advanced nuclear power plants, and related IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renewed interest in the potential of nuclear energy to contribute to a sustainable worldwide energy mix is underlining the IAEA's statutory role in fostering the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, in particular the need for effective exchanges of information and collaborative research and technology development among Member States on advanced nuclear power technologies deployable in the near term as well as in the longer term. For applications in the medium to longer term, with rising expectations for the role of nuclear energy in the future, technological innovation has become a strong focus of nuclear power technology developments by many Member States. To meet Member States' needs, the IAEA conducts activities to foster information exchange and collaborative research and development in the area of advanced nuclear reactor technologies. These activities include coordination of collaborative research, organization of international information exchange, and analyses of globally available technical data and results, with a focus on reducing nuclear power plant capital costs and construction periods while further improving performance, safety and proliferation resistance. In other activities, evolutionary and innovative advances are catalyzed for all reactor lines such as advanced water cooled reactors, high temperature gas cooled reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors and accelerator driven systems, including small and medium sized reactors. In addition, there are activities related to other applications of nuclear energy such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications. This brochure summarizes the worldwide status and the activities related to advanced nuclear power technology development and related IAEA activities. It includes a list of the collaborative research and development projects conducted by the IAEA, as well as of the status reports and other publications produced

  4. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to analyze how the economics of nuclear power generation are affected by the change in nuclear environmental factors and then, to suggest desirable policy directions to improve the efficiency of the use of nuclear energy resources in korea. This study focused to analyze the impact of the change in 3 major nuclear environmental factors in Korea on the economics of nuclear power generation. To do this, environmental external cost, nuclear R and fund, and carbon emission control according to UNFCCC were selected as the major factors. First of all, this study evaluated the impacts on the health and the environment of air pollutants emitted from coal power plant and nuclear power plant, two major electric power generating options in Korea. Then, the environmental external costs of those two options were estimated by transforming the health and environmental impact in to monetary values. To do this, AIRPACTS and 'Impacts of atmospheric release' model developed by IAEA were used. Secondly, the impact of nuclear R and D fund raised by the utility on the increment of nuclear power generating cost was evaluated. Then, the desirable size of the fund in Korea was suggested by taking into consideration the case of Japan. This study also analyzed the influences of the fund on the economics of nuclear power generation. Finally, the role of nuclear power under the carbon emission regulation was analyzed. To do this, the econometric model was developed and the impact of the regulation on the national economy was estimated. Further efforts were made to estimate the role by developing CGE model in order to improve the reliability of the results from the econometric model

  5. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  6. Medium energy nuclear data for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of medium energy nuclear data required for applications are discussed. Features of analysis tools, consisting of both detailed nuclear model codes and simple formulas based on nuclear systematics are presented. The activities of the Medium Energy Nuclear Data Working Group (MENDWG) are described including the recent benchmark comparison of nuclear model codes. 40 refs., 7 figs

  7. Nuclear energy from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global energy demand is increasing. Sound forecasts indicate that by the year 2020 almost eight thousand million people will be living on our planet, and generating their demand for energy will require conversion of about 20 thousand million tonnes of coal equivalents a year. Against this background scenario, a new concept for energy generation elaborated by nuclear scientists at CERN attracts particular interest. The concept describing a new nuclear energy source and technology intends to meet the following principal requirements: create a new energy source that can be exploited in compliance with extremely stringent safety requirements; reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive waste; substantially reduce the size of required radwaste repositories; use easily available natural fuels that will not need isotopic separation; prevent the risk of proliferation of radioactive materials; process and reduce unwanted actinides as are generated by the operation of current breeder reactors; achieve high efficiency both in terms of technology and economics. (orig./CB)

  8. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  9. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the President's Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel cycle - in which nuclear fuel is used in a power plant one time and the resulting spent nuclear fuel is stored for eventual disposal in a geologic repository - to a closed fuel cycle in which spent nuclear fuel would be recycled to recover energy-bearing components for use in new nuclear fuel. At this time, DOE has no specific proposed actions for the international component of the GNEP Program. Rather, the United States, through the GNEP Program, is considering various initiatives to work cooperatively with other nations. Such initiatives include the development of grid-appropriate reactors and the development of reliable fuel services (to provide an assured supply of fresh nuclear fuel and assist with the management of the used fuel) for nations who agree to employ nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes, such as electricity generation.

  10. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Wigeland

    2008-10-01

    Abstract: The proposed Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Program, which is part of the President’s Advanced Energy Initiative, is intended to support a safe, secure, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy, both domestically and internationally. Domestically, the GNEP Program would promote technologies that support economic, sustained production of nuclear-generated electricity, while reducing the impacts associated with spent nuclear fuel disposal and reducing proliferation risks. The Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action envisions changing the United States nuclear energy fuel cycle from an open (or once-through) fuel cycle—in which nuclear fuel is used in a power plant one time and the resulting spent nuclear fuel is stored for eventual disposal in a geologic repository—to a closed fuel cycle in which spent nuclear fuel would be recycled to recover energy-bearing components for use in new nuclear fuel. At this time, DOE has no specific proposed actions for the international component of the GNEP Program. Rather, the United States, through the GNEP Program, is considering various initiatives to work cooperatively with other nations. Such initiatives include the development of grid-appropriate reactors and the development of reliable fuel services (to provide an assured supply of fresh nuclear fuel and assist with the management of the used fuel) for nations who agree to employ nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes, such as electricity generation.

  11. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author compares the per capita power consumption of Kenya with that of some more developed countries and makes a plea for the greater utilization of nuclear power to augment natural resources in the developing world. He considers nuclear energy first for its educational uses and then for its commercial and industrial uses. With reference to the requirements of Kenya, the questions of costs and economic reactor size are discussed. The author insists that unless Africa makes use of the immense resources offered by atomic energy, the continent will be limited to an extremely slow development, incompatible with the needs of present-day man. (author)

  12. 77 FR 67809 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  13. 75 FR 13269 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  14. 78 FR 70932 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  15. 78 FR 76599 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of... that the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC) will be renewed for a two-year period beginning...

  16. 75 FR 67351 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  17. 78 FR 29125 - Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee (NEAC)....

  18. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J. R. [ed.

    1977-01-01

    The topics considered in the seven sessions were nuclear methods in atmospheric research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in tracer applications; energy exploration, production, and utilization; nuclear methods in environmental monitoring; nuclear methods in water research; and nuclear methods in biological research. Individual abstracts were prepared for each paper. (JSR)

  19. Nuclear energy in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Plan Energetico Nacional de 1983' (1983 National Energy Program)(PEN-83) was approved recently by the Spanish Government and presented to the 'Cortes Espanolas' (Spanish Parliament) in May 1984. The PEN-83 is being discussed at present in the Parliament and it is possible that some modifications be introduced, but expectedly will be rather limited and minor. PEN-83 covers the period 1983-1992. It includes a comparative analysis of the evolution and situation in OECD countries and in Spain. In Spain the offer, supply and consumption of primary energy and of the interrelation with other economic indicators, such as the gross domestic product, inflation rate and unemployment compared with that of the industrialized OECD countries, has shown a much lower capability to adapt its structure to the energy price increases

  20. Utility and risk of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report contains lectures of a seminar that was arranged by the programme group nuclear power and environment of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich . The items were: 1) Do we need nuclear energy. An attempt at a system analytic answer. 2) Energy production by means of nuclear fission. 3) The nuclear power plants. 4) Nuclear energy and radiation hazard. 5) Safety of nuclear power plants. (RW)

  1. Nuclear Energy Today - Second edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeting the growing demand for energy, and electricity in particular, while addressing the need to curb greenhouse gas emissions and to ensure security of energy supply, is one of the most difficult challenges facing the world's economies. No single technology can respond to this challenge, and the solution which policy-makers are seeking lies in the diversification of energy sources. Although nuclear energy currently provides over 20% of electricity in the OECD area and does not emit any carbon dioxide during production, it continues to be seen by many as a controversial technology. Public concern remains over its safety and the management of radioactive waste, and financing such a capital-intensive technology is a complex issue. The role that nuclear power will play in the future depends on the answers to these questions, several of which are provided in this up-to-date review of the status of nuclear energy, as well as on the outcome of research and development on the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor technologies

  2. Nuclear energy and the media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author believes that it is very important for the public to understand the scientific and engineering realities of nuclear energy systems, so that their support for or their opposition to energy policy decisions will not be based on false premises. While there do exist widespread misconceptions about the safety of nuclear energy, these misconceptions spring from the high degree of emphasis placed on engineered safety by the nuclear energy community in their communications with the public. That this situation continues to exist is largely the result of either a failure of the technocrats to require their professional communicators to learn the elements of the subject or a refusal of these communicators to do so, combined with an underestimation on the part of both groups of public capacity for understanding. The nuclear energy community's concern about public acceptance of its product is to a certain extent misplaced at the present time. Its communication efforts have been image-oriented and generalized and have eschewed technical rigour. The important issue of scientific and engineering illiteracy, especially among those groups with significant input to policy decisions, is being neglected

  3. Workshop on advanced nuclear data online services. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Data Online Services held in Vienna, Austria, 29 November to 3 December 1999. It includes the main topics of the agenda, the list of participants, and general comments and recommendations. (author)

  4. Use of nuclear energy for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The potential of three hydrogen production processes, under development for the industrial production of hydrogen using nuclear energy, are compared and evaluated in this paper, namely: advanced electrolysis, steam reforming, and sulfur-iodine water splitting cycle. Water electrolysis and steam reforming of methane are proven and used extensively for the production of hydrogen today. The overall thermal efficiency of the electrolysis includes the efficiency of the electrical power generation and of the electrolysis itself. The electrolysis process efficiency is about 75 % and of electrical power generation is only about 30 %, the overall thermal efficiency for H2 generation being about 25 %. Steam reforming process consists of reacting methane (or natural gas) and steam in a chemical reactor at 800 - 900 deg C, with a thermal efficiency of about 70 %. In a reforming process, with heat supplied by nuclear reactor, the heat must be supplied by a secondary loop from the nuclear side and be transferred to the methane/steam mixture, via heat exchanger type reactor. The sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle, a thermochemical water splitting, is of particular interest because it produces hydrogen efficiently with no CO2 as byproduct. If heated with a nuclear source it could prove to be an ideal environmental solution to hydrogen production. Steam reforming remains the cheapest hydrogen production method based on the latest estimates, even when implemented with nuclear reactor. The S-I cycle offers a close second and the electrolysis is the most expensive of the options for industrial H2 production. The nuclear plant could power electrolysis operations right away. Steam reforming with nuclear power is a little bit further off into the future, the first operation expected with nuclear facility is in Japan in 2008. The S-I cycle implementation is still over the horizon, it will be more than 10 years until we will see that cycle in full scale operation with a nuclear reactor

  5. Nuclear energy and ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In his speech on the occasion of the ''25th Jubilee Beznau'' celebrations of the NOK, the Bishop of Sitten discussed the connection between ethics and atomic energy within the larger framework of power generation and use, its risks and possibilities of conflicts

  6. Hybrid nuclear light bulb-nuclear-pumped laser propulsion for advanced missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, G. H.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid ``nuclear light bulb'' gaseous core reactor that can radiantly transfer energy to a propellant or alternately activate laser action is proposed for advanced space missions. The propellant mode would be employed in the phases of the mission requiring a higher thrust. However, for the bulk of the travel, the propellant would be turned off and the ultrahigh specific impulse laser mode of operation would be employed. The concept is reviewed, research and development issues are identified, and steps necessary for a feasibility demonstration are discussed.

  7. Nuclear energy and process heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy generated in fission reactors is a versatile commodity that can, in principle, satisfy any and all of mankind's energy needs through direct or indirect means. In addition to its dominant current use for electricity generation and, to a lesser degree, marine propulsion, nuclear energy can and has been used for process heat applications, such as space heating, industrial process heating, and seawater desalination. Moreover, a wide variety of reactor designs has been employed to this end in a range of countries. From this spectrum of experience, two design approaches emerge for nuclear process heating, (NPH): extracting a portion of the thermal energy from a nuclear power plant (NPP) (i.e., creating a combined heat and power, or CHP, plant) and transporting it to the user, or deploying dedicated nuclear heating plants (NHPs) in generally closer proximity to the thermal load. While the former approach is the basis for much of the current NPH experience, considerable recent interest exists for the latter, typically involving small, innovative reactor plants with enhanced and passive safety features. The high emphasis on inherent nuclear safety characteristics in these reactor designs reflects the need to avoid any requirement for evacuation of the public in the event of an accident, and the desire for sustained operation and investment protection at minimum cost. Since roughly 67% of mankind's primary energy usage is not in the form of electricity, a vast potential market for NPH systems exists, particularly at the low-to-moderate end-use temperatures required for residential space heating, and several industrial applications. Although only about 0.5% of global nuclear energy production is presently used for NPH applications, an expanded role in the 21st century seems inevitable, in part, as a measure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality. While the technical aspects of many NPH applications are considered to be well proven, a

  8. Nuclear energy by way of 110 questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this updated edition is to provide the general public with information on the civil nuclear policy in France. Twelve chapters deal with following topics: nuclear economy, nuclear industry, nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear waste, nuclear safety, radioactivity and health, nuclear accidents in the world, nuclear energy and environment, inspection planning, information, nuclear proliferation prevention, nuclear energy in the world and in the future. At the end of each chapter the authors answer a set of questions corresponding to the general pubic queries. (N.T.)

  9. Strategic position and development prospects of nuclear energy in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wenquan

    2007-01-01

    By analyzing the challenges of China's energy supply, an excellent perspective of nuclear power development in the country has been described. Taking into account the near-, mid-, and long-term development requirements,a comprehensive, coordinated and sustainable nuclear power program is proposed. Thus, our national nuclear industry can not only catch up with the world's advanced level in proper time, but also possess enough stamina for sustainability.

  10. Fuel rod bundles proposed for advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper aims to be a general presentation for fuel bundles to be used in Advanced Pressure Tube Nuclear Reactors (APTNR). The characteristics of such a nuclear reactor resemble those of known advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors like: Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACRTM-1000, pertaining to AECL) and Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). We have also developed a fuel bundle proposal which will be referred as ASEU-43 (Advanced Slightly Enriched Uranium with 43 rods). The ASEU-43 main design along with a few neutronic and thermalhydraulic characteristics are presented in the paper versus similar ones from INR Pitesti SEU-43 and CANDU-37 standard fuel bundles. General remarks regarding the advantages of each fuel bundle and their suitability to be burned in an APTNR reactor are also revealed. (authors)

  11. The promise of innovation: Nuclear energy horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 21st century promises the most open, competitive, and globalized markets in human history, as well as the most rapid pace of technological change ever. For nuclear energy, as any other, that presents challenges. Though the atom now supplies a good share of world electricity, its share of total energy is relatively small, anywhere from four to six per cent depending on how it is calculated. And, while energy is most needed in the developing world, four of every five nuclear plants are in industrialized countries. Critical problems that need to be overcome are well known - high capital costs for new plants, and concerns over proliferation risks and safety, (including safety of waste disposal) stand high among them. The IAEA and other programmes are confronting these problems through ambitious initiatives involving both industrialized and developing countries. They include the collaborative efforts known as the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) and the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). They use ideas, results and the best experiences from today's research and development tools and advanced types of nuclear energy systems to meet tomorrow's challenges. Though the market often decides the fate of new initiatives, the market is not always right for the common good. Governments, and the people that influence them, play an indispensable role in shaping progress in energy fields for rich and poor countries alike. They shoulder the main responsibilities for fundamental science, basic research, and long-term investments. For energy in particular, government investment and support will prove instrumental in the pace of innovation toward long-term options that are ready to replace limited fossil fuel supplies, and respond to the growing premium put on clean energy alternatives. Yet governments cannot go it alone. The challenges are too diverse and complex, and public concerns - about proliferation or safety - go beyond

  12. Public communication and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article tries to explain why on occasion the public's perception of nuclear is more negative than of any other form of electricity generation or issue related to this field, when in reality public opinion has been gradually losing interest in nuclear in recent years. In fact, we could say that as nuclear loses its interest, its presence in the media grows in relation to the environmental aspects of electricity generation, of which nuclear form a part. Of the accusations directed at the nuclear industry, probably the most frequent one concerns the lack of transparency and lack of information on its activities. This article shows how the nuclear sector is probably one that generates more and better information on its own business. However, the lack of social acceptance of this activity, and of the energy business in general, is recognized. To solve this, mention is made of the example of France and Finland, where a well planned communication policy, implemented on a sustained basis over time, and the invitation to society to take part in these issues have favored a substantial improvement of public acceptance of electric generation sources, and specifically the nuclear option. The article ends with some recommendations that could be applied to Spain. (Author)

  13. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ki Dong; Lee, M. K.; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Kim, H. S

    2000-12-01

    This study identified the role of nuclear energy in the following three major aspects. First of all, this study carried out cost effectiveness of nuclear as a CDM technology, which is one of means of GHG emission reduction in UNFCCC. Secondly, environmental externalities caused by air pollutants emitted by power options were estimated. The 'observed market behaviour' method and 'responses to hypothetical market' method were used to estimate objectively the environmental external costs by electric source, respectively. Finally, the role of nuclear power in securing electricity supply in a liberalized electricity market was analyzed. This study made efforts to investigate whether nuclear power generation with high investment cost could be favored in a liberalized market by using 'option value' analysis of investments.

  14. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study identified the role of nuclear energy in the following three major aspects. First of all, this study carried out cost effectiveness of nuclear as a CDM technology, which is one of means of GHG emission reduction in UNFCCC. Secondly, environmental externalities caused by air pollutants emitted by power options were estimated. The 'observed market behaviour' method and 'responses to hypothetical market' method were used to estimate objectively the environmental external costs by electric source, respectively. Finally, the role of nuclear power in securing electricity supply in a liberalized electricity market was analyzed. This study made efforts to investigate whether nuclear power generation with high investment cost could be favored in a liberalized market by using 'option value' analysis of investments

  15. Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) provided a brief presentation on the state of energy demand in the United States and discussed the improving economics for new nuclear power plants. He discussed the consolidation of companies under deregulation and the ability of these larger companies to undertake large capital projects such as nuclear power plant construction. He discussed efforts under way to support a new generation of plants but noted that there needs to be greater certainty in the licensing process. He discussed infrastructure challenges in terms of people, hardware, and services to support new and current plants. He stated that there needs to be fair and equitable licensing fees and decommissioning funding assurance for innovative modular designs such as the PBMR. He concluded that NRC challenges will include resolving 10 CFR Part 52 implementation issues, establishing an efficient and predictable process for siting, COL permits and inspection, and an increasing regulatory workload

  16. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bararu, Corina [Nuclearelectrica, 65 Polona St., Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being

  17. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being a

  18. Answers to Questions: Nuclear Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Electricity is an increasingly important part of our everyday lives. Its versatility allows one to heat, cool, and light homes; cook meals; watch television; listen to music; power computers; make medical diagnosis and treatment; explore the vastness of space; and study the tiniest molecules. Nuclear energy, second to coal, surpasses natural gas,…

  19. Public awareness of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many countries in the world are in the process of getting acquainted with nuclear power nowadays. As in all structural changes nuclear power option leads to various discussions with a reason or not. The public has certain reasonable worries related to problem brought by the TMI and Chernobyl Nuclear Power Accidents. The disasters caused by atomic bombs and these three accidents affected the people in a very adverse manner. Meeting energy demand is of high importance in Turkey because, the country has dynamic economic development and rapid population growth. And the World Energy Council has concluded that growth based only fossil fuels and hydroelectric generation would not be sustainable and an expanded role of nuclear energy must be considered. The future of nuclear power utilization in all countries in the world will depend mainly on how the general public perceives it. This makes the public information a very sensitive and an important issue and it should be taken very seriously. Experts should consider the socio-economic structure of the country before taking the appropriate steps. The way the message is given, is, as important as the message itself. This should be done in the following manner. 1) Be friendly, talk friendly; 2) Don't forget, the target need to be informed; 3) Don't describe, but explain using healthy discussion; 4) Don't simplify, but clarify; 5) Don't try to use statistics, but tell the truth; 6) Don't use confused numbers but give examples; 7) Don't hesitate, be stable; 8) Don't use details, decide on a central message. In this manner, current activities in the area of nuclear energy and civil society should be pursued and their results carefully evaluated. Participation of public representatives, from primary school students to universities and decision makers should remain in current activities

  20. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  1. Nuclear Energy: Combating Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global electricity demand is expected to increase strongly over the coming decades, even assuming much improved end-use efficiency. Meeting this demand while drastically reducing CO2 emissions from the electricity sector will be a major challenge. Given that the once-significant expectations placed on carbon capture and storage are rapidly diminishing, and given that hydropower resources are in limited supply, there are essentially only two options to de-carbonise an ever increasing electricity sector: nuclear power and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar PV. Of these two options, only nuclear provides firmly dispatchable base-load electricity, since the variability of wind and solar PV requires flexible back-up that is frequently provided by carbon-intensive peak-load plants. The declining marginal value of electricity production and the security of electricity supply are additional issues that must be taken into account. Nuclear power plants do, however, face challenges due to their large up-front capital costs, complex project management requirements and difficulties in siting. As technologies with high fixed costs, both nuclear power and renewables must respond to the challenge of acquiring long-term financing, since investments in capital-intensive low-carbon technologies are unlikely to be forthcoming in liberalised wholesale markets. In order to substantially de-carbonise the electricity systems of OECD countries, policy-makers must understand the similarities, differences and complementarities between nuclear and renewables in the design of future low-carbon electricity systems. The value of dispatchable low-carbon technologies, such as hydro and nuclear, for the safe and reliable functioning of electricity systems must also be recognised. Should the de-carbonisation of electricity sectors in the wake of COP 21 become a reality, nuclear power might well be the single most important source of electricity by 2050, thanks mainly to the contribution

  2. Nuclear energy significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is devoted to nuclear energy, to its acceptability, compatibility and sustainability. Nuclear energy is non-dispensable part of energy sources with vast innovation potential. The safety of nuclear energy, radioactive waste deposition, and prevention of risk from misuse of nuclear material have to be very seriously adjudged and solved. Nuclear energy is one of the ways how to decrease the contamination of atmosphere with carbon dioxide and it solves partially also the problem of global increase of temperature and climate changes. Given are the main factors responsible for the renaissance of nuclear energy. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy, radiation and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few decades, energy has been the subject of much debate. Energy is the backbone of technology and economic development. Today, most machines run on electricity and they are needed to make anything and everything. Hence, our energy requirements have spiraled in the years following the industrial revolution. This rapid increase in use of energy has created problems of demand and supply in addition to the environmental consciousness which picked momentum in last decades of 20th century. The impending crisis the world over due to overuse of nonrenewable energy sources to reduce this gap shall soon lead to a situation for all concerned to take a prudent decision to tap other sources of energy, including relatively new renewable sources. Future economic growth crucially depends on the long-term availability of energy from sources that are affordable, accessible and environmentally friendly. The drive for more energy has had the happy consequences of spawning new technologies and improving earlier ones. Emphasis on renewable sources has resulted in viable harnessing of solar, wind and tidal energies. Even though these sources offer relatively clean energy, their potential to supply reliable energy in large scale in an economically viable way is limited. Nuclear energy offers a major source of commercial energy, which is economic, reliable and environmentally benign

  4. Energy consensus talks collapse over nuclear issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    Germany's energy consensus talks, ongoing since March 1993, were brought to unsuccessful end on October 26. Representatives from the Social Democratic Party (SDP), led by Lower Saxony's prime minister, Gerhard Schroeder, failed to get approval from party leaders on continued development of advanced reactors with enhanced safety - notably the Siemens/Framatome-designed 1500-MWe European pressurized water reactor (EPR) plan, for which the prospective schedule envisages a construction start in 1998. Nor would the SDP leadership accept the continued operation of existing nuclear plans to the end of their design life (some 20 to 25 years).

  5. Energy consensus talks collapse over nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germany's energy consensus talks, ongoing since March 1993, were brought to unsuccessful end on October 26. Representatives from the Social Democratic Party (SDP), led by Lower Saxony's prime minister, Gerhard Schroeder, failed to get approval from party leaders on continued development of advanced reactors with enhanced safety - notably the Siemens/Framatome-designed 1500-MWe European pressurized water reactor (EPR) plan, for which the prospective schedule envisages a construction start in 1998. Nor would the SDP leadership accept the continued operation of existing nuclear plans to the end of their design life (some 20 to 25 years)

  6. Christianity and nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaemann, R.

    1980-01-01

    The author is of the opinion that the ethical aspect suffers no rival points of view. From that he concludes the necessity of a fair public discussion about the rank and urgency of the goods, values, and interests in hand. He calls for a moratorium: before the final option on the future way of energy supply, the scientific and economic competitional advantage of the strict course of large-scale technologies must be balanced. In order to render medium-scale technologies comparable at all from the economic and technical point of view, alternative technology research ought to be promoted for a couple of years under the same financial conditions and with the same expenditure of personnel.

  7. Can Slovakia to survive without nuclear energy? State and perspectives of nuclear energetics. Attitudes of public to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation authors deals with the review of the state of nuclear energetics in the Slovak Republic. Perspectives of nuclear energy and renewable sources of energy as well as attitudes of public to nuclear energy are discussed

  8. Nuclear Energy: Pros and Cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early this year the Government of the Republic of Lithuania has basically approved and submitted to the Parliament (Seimas) for their approval the new draft of the National Energy Strategy. It still envisages two scenarios for the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. In accordance with one of them, the nuclear plant is to be shut down fairly soon. The greatest advantage of any commercial nuclear plant is that the share of fuel in the production cost is low. That is why efforts are being made to operate nuclear power plants to their full capacity all over the world. At the meantime a system of legal regulation and organisational management has been created and is functioning in Lithuania; Lithuania has joined the key international agreements that regulate the use of nuclear energy; a lot has been done to upgrade safety and reliability of the Ignalina NPP. Lithuania is going to stick to the policy of openness and co-operation with international organisations concerned, at the same time defends the interests of country's population

  9. Fifty years of nuclear energy in Mexico 1945-1995; Cincuenta anos de energia nuclear en Mexico 1945-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez O, C. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Programa Universitario de Energia. Coordinacion de Vinculacion. Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    This book presents the state of development of the nuclear energy in Mexico during the period 1945-1995, its benefits, advances and failures. It is related in a pleasant and informed way about the past decisions, the vision of the initiators of the nuclear development in Mexico, their successes and that its were followed the present advances and future problems to confront. (Author)

  10. Helium mobility in advanced nuclear ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms able to drive the helium behaviour in transition metal carbides and nitrides submitted to thermal annealing or ion irradiation. TiC, TiN and ZrC polycrystals were implanted with 3 MeV 3He ions at room temperature in the fluence range 2 * 1015 et 6 * 1016 cm-2. Some of them have been pre-irradiated with self-ions (14 MeV Ti or Zr). Fully controlled thermal annealing tests were subsequently carried out in the temperature range 1000 - 1600 C for two hours. The evolution of the helium depth distribution in function of implantation dose, temperature and pre-irradiation dose was measured thanks to the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction 3He(d, p0)4He between 900 keV and 1.8 MeV. The microstructure of implanted and annealed samples was investigated by transmission electron microscopy on thin foils prepared using the FIB technique. Additional characterization tools, as X-ray diffraction and Raman microspectrometry, have been also applied in order to obtain complementary information. Among the most relevant results obtained, the following have to be outlined: - double-peak helium depth profile was measured on as implanted sample for the three compounds. The first peak is located near the end of range and includes the major part of helium, a second peak located close to the surface corresponds to the helium atoms trapped by the native vacancies; - the helium retention capacity in transition metal carbides and nitrides submitted to fully controlled thermal treatments varies according to ZrC0.92 ≤ TiC0.96 ≤ TiN0.96; - whatever the investigated material, a self-ion-induced pre-damaging does not modify the initial helium profile extent. The influence of the post-implantation thermal treatment remains preponderant in any case; - the apparent diffusion coefficient of helium is in the range 4 * 10-18 - 2 * 10-17 m2 s-1 in TiC0.96 and 3.5 * 10-19 - 5.3 * 10-18 m2 s-1 in TiN0.96 between 1100 and 1600 C. The

  11. Addressing Attribution - Advances in Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear forensic investigations the information is typically used to find out the origin of the material including its production place and process. As nuclear material is an industrial product, the respective production process will unavoidably leave a 'fingerprint' in the material. In consequence, parameters related to process and source material are measured and conclusions about the history and origin of the nuclear material can be drawn. Chemical impurities, microstructure, molecular structure or isotopic composition are examples of such parameters, which compose a characteristic 'signature'. The rare-earth elemental (REE) pattern has been found to be an important signature to determine the type of ore used as source material for the production of uranium ore concentrate, since the REE pattern is invariable in most hydrometallurgical processes. Generally, Decrypting the information for nuclear forensic investigations requires sophisticated methodology, subject matter expertise and reference data. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  12. Nuclear Energy for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power and propulsion systems can enable exciting space exploration missions. These include bases on the moon and Mars; and the exploration, development, and utilization of the solar system. In the near-term, fission surface power systems could provide abundant, constant, cost-effective power anywhere on the surface of the Moon or Mars, independent of available sunlight. Affordable access to Mars, the asteroid belt, or other destinations could be provided by nuclear thermal rockets. In the further term, high performance fission power supplies could enable both extremely high power levels on planetary surfaces and fission electric propulsion vehicles for rapid, efficient cargo and crew transfer. Advanced fission propulsion systems could eventually allow routine access to the entire solar system. Fission systems could also enable the utilization of resources within the solar system. Fusion and antimatter systems may also be viable in the future

  13. Theological reflections on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is for a long time that, in this journal also, nuclear energy has been discussed in great detail with respect to its scientific, technical and engineering aspects. In connection with the public controversy about electricity generation being performed on an nuclear basis, the political, sociological and ethical aspects of nuclear energy have been discussed, too. As a third category, also theology plays an important role in this controversy. A theological discussion must include an explicit presentation of the relationship between mankind, nature and God, and must cover the insights and necessities of this relationship. On the basis of assumed rules, the referency system for this is not subject to scientific debate since the points of view as well as the methodology and the presuppositions forming part of theology generally appear strange to ordinary science. The controversy about nuclear energy has become a matter about which also the World Council of Churches as well as the National Council of Churches, and many other religious groups are concerned. For this reason, the editorial department of this journal would like to inform its scientific readers about how this controversy appears from theological standpoints. The author's considerations are based on the understanding of nature, mankind and God as it has been handed down in the Hebrew bible an in the Septuagint; it is confined to categories which are derived from our religious heritage. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 KSCH

  14. (Nuclear) energy policy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With this report the German Federal Diet submits the final results of the opinion-forming and decision-making process concerning the recommendations made by the investigation committee 'Future Nuclear Energy Policy' in June 1980. By means of this report it is intended to point out to an interested public the difficult and time-consuming process of parliamentary decision-making. This report is also to be seen as the final opinion delivered on the recommendations made by the investigation committee. The recommendations were to continue to pursue the peaceful use of nuclear energy, the necessity and technical justifiability of which had basically been approved by all parliamentary groups. In view of the import of the subject and in recognition of the work done by the investigation committee, the German Parliament has thoroughly discussed the report and has reviewed the analyses and recommendations in conjunction with other political fields to be considered. One part of the recommendations was taken up almost unanimously. As far as the safety of nuclear installations is concerned, the investigation committee could not submit any new findings which would give reasons for modifying the hitherto positive assessment of the safety of nuclear installations. The recommendations of the investigation committee mainly referred to the decision-making process in the field of energy policy which will effect the next decade. What fundamental decisions are to be made until when was pointed out as well as the findings and experience to be made until then. (orig./HP)

  15. Hydrogen economy and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global energy outlooks based on present trends, such as WETO study, give little optimism about fulfilling Kyoto commitments in controlling CO2 emissions and avoiding unwanted climate consequences. Whilst the problem of radioactive waste has a prominence in public, in spite of already adequate technical solutions of safe storage for future hundreds and thousands of years, there s generally much less concern with influence of fossil fuels on global climate. In addition to electricity production, process heat and transportation are approximately equal contributors to CO2 emission. Fossil fuels in transportation present also a local pollution problem in congested regions. Backed by extensive R and D, hydrogen economy is seen as the solution, however, often without much thought where from the hydrogen in required very large quantities may come. With welcome contributions from alternative sources, nuclear energy is the only source of energy capable of producing hydrogen in very large amounts, without parallel production of CO2. Future high temperature reactors could do this most efficiently. In view of the fact that nuclear weapon proliferation is not under control, extrapolation from the present level of nuclear power to the future level required by serious attempts to reduce global CO2 emission is a matter of justified concern. Finding the sites for many hundreds of new reactors would, alone, be a formidable problem in developed regions with high population density. What is generally less well understood and not validated is that the production of nuclear hydrogen allows the required large increases of nuclear power without the accompanied increase of proliferation risks. Unlike electricity, hydrogen can be economically shipped or transported by pipelines to places very far from the place of production. Thus, nuclear production of hydrogen can be located and concentrated at few remote, controllable sites, far from the population centers and consumption regions. At such

  16. Risk analysis in nuclear energy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear energy like other energy sources risk is present. The risk assessment and comparison with proposed risk criteria in nuclear energy user country, need to be measured for nuclear power plant site selection, construction, operation and maintenance. Experience of long-term nuclear energy user countries need to be used in the risk assesment and criteria creation. In article are shown results of risk assessment in many human activities. Nuclear power plants accidents categorization is given. There are accidents shown which occurred at nuclear power plants. Basic information about probabilistic risk assessment in nuclear power plant site evaluation are given. (author)

  17. Nuclear energy - a spiritual perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: the search for energy (historical); from uranium to the bomb (radioactivity); the principle of fission (atomic structure; isotopes); fear of nuclear reactors (types of reactor; antinuclear groups; economic argument; socio-political argument; psychological argument); Capra and the dance of life; elements and ethers (life ethers and subtle elements); origins of matter (etheric forces; the primal matrix); the balance of gold and silver (etheric forces, which can only be directly perceived in the spirit); Lucifer, Ahriman and nuclear accident; Christ's resurrection and the essence of matter; the opening of the abyss; the divine mother. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear energy - myth and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation remains one of the least understood or accepted forms of energy in society as far as the general population is concerned. People are jubilant when radiation is successful in detecting or destroying cancer cells, but protest loudly when a shipment of radioactive waste moves through their community. The public fears nuclear technology because the information they hear only relates to the risk. To dispel public anxiety and allow the nuclear industry to move forward, clear and rational information, which paints a more balanced picture of the benefits of radiation and the risks involved, is needed. (author)

  19. Global economics/energy/environmental (E3) modeling of long-term nuclear energy futures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global energy, economics, environment (E3) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Using this model, consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed. A spectrum of future is examined at two levels in a hierarchy of scenario attributes in which drivers are either external or internal to nuclear energy. Impacts of a range of nuclear fuel-cycle scenarios are reflected back to the higher-level scenario attributes. An emphasis is placed on nuclear materials inventories (in magnitude, location, and form) and their contribution to the long-term sustainability of nuclear energy and the future competitiveness of both conventional and advanced nuclear reactors

  20. Soft computing trends in nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In spite of so many advancements in the power and energy sector over the last two decades, its survival to cater quality power with due consideration for planning, coordination, marketing, safety, stability, optimality and reliability is still believed to remain critical. Though it appears simple from the outside, yet the internal structure of large scale power systems is so complex that event management and decision making requires a formidable preliminary preparation, which gets still worsened in the presence of uncertainties and contingencies. These aspects have attracted several researchers to carryout continued research in this field and their valued contributions have been significantly helping the newcomers in understanding the evolutionary growth in this sector, starting from phenomena, tools, methodologies to strategies so as to ensure smooth, stable, safe, reliable and economic operation. The usage of soft computing would accelerate interaction between the energy and technology research community with an aim to foster unified development in the next generation. Monitoring the mechanical impact of a loose (detached or drifting) part in the reactor coolant system of a nuclear power plant is one of the essential functions for operation and maintenance of the plant. Large data tables are generated during this monitoring process. This data can be 'mined' to reveal latent patterns of interest to operation and maintenance. Rough set theory has been applied successfully to data mining. It can be used in the nuclear power industry and elsewhere to identify classes in datasets, finding dependencies in relations and discovering rules which are hidden in databases. An important role may be played by nuclear energy, provided that major safety, waste and proliferation issues affecting current nuclear reactors are satisfactorily addressed. In this respect, a large effort is under way since a few years towards the development of advanced nuclear systems that would use

  1. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  2. Energy and the need for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: fuel and mankind (world population estimates); fuel supply and demand (world nuclear and total primary energy demand forecasts); oil dependence; oil, gas and coal (world oil production and consumption; world coal reserves); nuclear option (consumption of nuclear energy in Western Europe; nuclear plant worldwide at December 1981; uranium reserves 1981); renewable resources; price of energy; Britain's need for nuclear power. (U.K.)

  3. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  4. US Department of Energy nuclear energy research initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) that has been established to address and help overcome the principal technical and scientific issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  5. Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses

    OpenAIRE

    Min LIU; Wang, Ning; Li, Zhuxia; Zhang, Fengshou

    2010-01-01

    The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

  6. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research

  7. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, J R [ed.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 75 papers were presented on nuclear methods for analysis of environmental and biological samples. Sessions were devoted to software and mathematical methods; nuclear methods in atmospheric and water research; nuclear and atomic methodology; nuclear methods in biology and medicine; and nuclear methods in energy research.

  8. The prospects and trends of nuclear energy technology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assurance of reliable and economic energy supply under conditions acceptable to the environment and transportation is one of the major prerequisites for achieving the ultimate goal of quadrupling the national gross annual value of industry and agriculture by the end of this century in China. The statistical data on energy and electricity usage and socioeconomic development in China show clearly the necessity for developing nuclear power station in this century, and for developing advanced nuclear energy technology in the next century, this paper gives a summary description of the nuclear power development plan by 2000, as well as the trends of nuclear energy technology in the future of China. Before the year 2000 there will be approximately 10 nuclear power reactors with a total net capacity of 6700 MWe connected into the grid and 5 nuclear power reactors with net capacity of 5000 MWe under construction. From now on, great attention is being paid to developing advanced nuclear reactor systems, and there are several types of reactors to be taken into account: High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, Fast Breeder Reactor and Hybrid Fusion-Fission Reactor. At all stages of nuclear power development particular emphasis is being given for enhancing reactor safety and measuring operational reliability. Supply of nuclear fuels based on self-reliance is our inherent policy. China is undertaking to set up a fully integrated advanced nuclear fuel cycle, adapted to the nuclear power development. With the decommissioning of some nuclear facilities set up during the 1960's, the R and D program is being considered on the following topics: decommissioning safety assessment, robotic remote handling, decommissioning waste treatment environment evaluation methodology and cost analysis. 2 refs, 2 tabs

  9. Nuclear energy propulsion in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy can be used under two different ways in spatial applications, first the most common is the production of electricity that is used to supply an electrical propulsion system. The second way is the thermal propulsion where the nuclear reactor is considered as a heat exchanger whose purpose is to heat a gas that will expand in a nozzle. The thermal propulsion implies that the nuclear fuel and some reactor components will have to sustain very high temperatures ( > 2000 K) and important temperature gradients over short time intervals. Because of size and mass constraints propulsion reactors require highly enriched uranium fuels, in such cases power densities reach 1 to 10 MW / liter of core, which is by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude bigger than in a PWR-type power reactor, this represents a true technological challenge. In this article 2 projects: ERATO concerning spatial power generation and MAPS concerning thermal propulsion are presented. (A.C.)

  10. Suppose we renounce nuclear energy.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the highlights of the report by the 'Commission on Consequences' set up by the Swedish Government. The study is based on the reference alternative with the aim to complete as many as twelve nuclear power plants by 1990, whereas the abolition alternative provides the abolition of nuclear energy within the next ten years. To renounce nuclear power plants means to abolish electric power. The consequences of the abolition for society, economy, and environment are discussed by three forecasts of the electric power demand. Coal has increasingly to bear the main burden of supply, more heating plants have to be built, houses being heated nowadays by means of electric power have to be converted to oil and the dependency on oil imports would rather be increased than reduced. (UA)

  11. Elaborating SRES scenarios for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is identifying mid-century economic targets for nuclear energy. The first step is to describe what the mid-century energy market might look like: the major competitors for nuclear energy, what products are in demand, how much of each, where is growth greatest, and so forth. The mechanism for systematically describing the future market is scenario building. The starting point is the scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. SRES developed four narrative story lines, each representing a different coherent set of demographic, social, economic, technological, and environmental developments. For each story line several different scenarios were developed by six international modelling teams, resulting in 40 scenarios grouped in the 4 story lines. For three of the story lines this paper uses a single marker scenario representative of central tendencies within the scenario family. For the fourth story line the authors chose the scenario that assumes that advances in non-fossil technologies - renewable, nuclear, and high-efficiency conservation technologies - make them most cost-competitive. (BA)

  12. Nuclear energy and environment of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper included following contents: China needs to develop nuclear energy; China pays attention to the radiation environment management; the role of China National Environmental Protection Agency in nuclear energy and the environment

  13. The sustainable development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide use of nuclear energy has promoted the development of China's economy and the improvement of people's living standards. To some extent, the exploitation of nuclear power plants will solve the energy crisis faced with human society. Before the utilization of nuclear fusion energy, nuclear fission energy will be greatly needed for the purpose of alleviating energy crisis for a long period of time. Compared with fossil fuel, on the one hand, nuclear fission energy is more cost-efficient and cleaner, but on the other hand it will bring about many problems hard to deal with, such as the reprocessing and disposal of nuclear spent fuel, the contradiction between nuclear deficiency and nuclear development. This paper will illustrate the future and prospect of nuclear energy from the perspective of the difficulty of nuclear development, the present reprocessing way of spent fuel, and the measures taken to ensure the sustainable development of nuclear energy. By the means of data quoting and comparison, the feasibility of sustainable development of nuclear energy will be analyzed and the conclusion that as long as the nuclear fuel cycling system is established the sustainable development of nuclear energy could be a reality will be drawn. (author)

  14. Assessment of nuclear energy sustainability index using fuzzy logic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is increasingly perceived as an attractive mature energy generation technology that can deliver an answer to the worldwide increasing energy demand while respecting environmental concerns as well as contributing to a reduced dependence on fossil fuel. Advancing nuclear energy deployment demands an assessment of nuclear energy with respect to all sustainability dimensions. In this paper, the nuclear energy, whose sustainability will be assessed, is governed by the dynamics of three subsystems: environmental, economic, and sociopolitical. The overall sustainability is then a non-linear function of the individual sustainabilities. Each subsystem is evaluated by means of many components (pressure, status, and response). The combination of each group of indicators by means of fuzzy logic provides a measurement of sustainability for each subsystem.

  15. Nuclear re-think [The case for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1970s, Patrick Moore, a co-founder of Greenpeace, believed that nuclear energy was synonymous with nuclear holocaust. Thirty years on, his views have changed because nuclear energy is the only non-greenhouse-gas-emitting power source that can effectively replace fossil fuels while satisfying the world's increasing demand for energy. Today, 441 nuclear plants operating globally avoid the release of nearly 3 billion tonnes of CO2 emissions annually-the equivalent of the exhaust from more than 428 million cars. Concerns associated with nuclear energy are discussed including costs of nuclear energy, safety of nuclear plants, radioactive waste management, vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorist attacks and diversion of nuclear fuel for weaponization. It is concluded that nuclear energy is the best way to produce safe, clean, reliable baseload electricity, and will play a key role in achieving global energy security. With climate change at the top of the international agenda, we must all do our part to encourage a nuclear energy renaissance

  16. Man, environment and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acceptability of nuclear fission as energy source is governed by three factors, economic, ecological and sociological. It is necessary to account first for the economic context and for the state of natural resources: gradual exhaustion of fossil fuels as a result of ever-increasing demands. The biological risk concept which determines the acceptable industrial application level is the second factor to be considered. The danger of radioactive contamination is almost inexistent except in the accident hypothesis, and power stations are built with excessive safeguards against hypothetical accidents. The idea of systematic processing of all working effluent to reduce radioactive waste discharge by several orders of magnitude (zero release principle) is being examined. At present, the waste discharge levels are always well below the limits set by the CIPR and present no danger to the population. The only serious problems seem to be the disposal of radioactive wastes and the plutonium non-proliferation question bound up with breeder reactors. Whereas vitrification, the new 'Synroc' process, offer some solution to the radioactive waste conditioning problem, responsibility for the proliferation of nuclear weapons rests with the human conscience alone. The development of nuclear power stations over several decades seems to present no inacceptable danger and offers the best compromise between growth and minimum risk requirements. The third factor to be accounted for is the opposition displayed by a fraction of the population to the development of nuclear energy for peaceful applications

  17. Nuclear energy risks and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multidisciplinary policy research program. The study region consists of all of Kentucky, most of West Virginia, and substantial portions of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. By 1988, coal-fired electrical generating capacity in the region is expected to total over 100,000 MWe, versus about 11,000 MWe projected for nuclear-fueled capacity by that year. Thus, the ORBES emphasis was on coal-fired generation. This report attempts to fill in some of the gaps in the relative lack of emphasis on the risks and benefits of nuclear electricity production in the study region. It covers the following topics: (1) basic facts about radiation, (2) an overview of the current regulatory framework of the nuclear industry, (3) health risks associated with electricity production by LWRs, (4) the risks of nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and sabotage, (5) comparative economics and healthy risks of coal versus nuclear, and (6) the March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island

  18. Nuclear energy - some regulatory aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry is often perceived by the public as being uniquely hazardous. As a consequence, the demands placed upon a nuclear regulatory agency invariably include sorting out the valid from the invalid. As the public becomes better informed, more time should become available for regulating the industry. The Canadian nuclear safety philosophy relies upon fundamental principle and basic criteria which licensees must show they are meeting at all stages in the development of a nuclear facility. In reactors, the concept of defence in depth involves the use of well-qualified personnel, compliance with national and international engineering codes and standards, the separation of process and safety systems, frequent testing of safety systems, redundancy in monitoring, control and initiation systems, multiple barriers against fission product release, and strict enforcement of compliance measurements. The Atomic Energy Control Board is writing a set of licensing guides to cover the whole nuclear fuel cycle; however, these will not lead to the impsition of a 'design by regulation' approach in Canada. (LL)

  19. NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability

  20. The nuclear energy, future of ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the author, nuclear energy is the energy of future, because it's the only one which allows to satisfy energy needs increases in the 21st century with a pollution reduction. This book presents the nuclear paradox which is: nuclear electricity is the most contested energy source by ecologists, while in reality, it is the cleanest energy, the most surveyed and the most respectful of environment among the massively available energies. (A.B.)

  1. The Westinghouse AP600 -- An update on the advanced simplified nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, government and industry are working together on advanced nuclear power plant designs that take advantage of valuable lessons learned from the experience to date and promise to reconcile the demands of economic expansion with the laws of environmental protection. In the U.S., the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a design certification program in 1989 to develop and commercialize advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for the next round of power plant construction. Advanced, simplified technology is one approach under development to end the industry's search for a simpler, more forgiving, and less costly reactor. As part of this program, Westinghouse is developing the AP600, a new standard 600 MWe advanced, simplified plant. The design strikes a balance between the use of proven technology and new approaches. The result is a greatly streamlined plant that can meet safety regulations and reliability requirements, be economically competitive, and promote broader public confidence in nuclear energy

  2. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-27

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  3. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  4. Nuclear energy - the way ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed, after a general introduction, under the headings: current situation; losses and accidents; safety factors; mistaken estimates (risks over-stated); licensing; transport and storage (of spent fuel and radioactive wastes); performance considerations; plant size; costs; developing countries; political considerations; OECD policy (energy policy, government policies, public relations); nuclear proliferation; media role; conclusions (mainly political, safety and public relations considerations). (U.K.)

  5. What can nuclear energy do for society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear energy and the predicted impact of future uses of nuclear energy are discussed. Areas of application in electric power production and transportation methods are described. It is concluded that the need for many forms of nuclear energy will become critical as the requirements for power to supply an increasing population are met.

  6. Nuclear power in the World Energy Outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, I shall discuss nuclear power in the context of the International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook. I shall also draw on the implications for nuclear power of three major energy policy issues: sustainability, climate change and electricity market competition. Those issues were addressed in detail in a recent IEA publication, entitled Nuclear Power. (author)

  7. An advanced course in modern nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of nuclear physics is entering the 21st century while experiencing a strong revival. On the one hand it is changing qualitatively through new experimental developments that allow us to direct radioactive and other exotic probes to target nuclei, and spark off extremely energetic nuclear collisions. Also, the impressive sophistication of new detector systems leads us to expect a number of new discoveries in the near future. On the other hand, many new applications have appeared in fields as diverse as medicine, industry, art, archaeology and the environmental sciences. This book is a set of extended lectures on basic and new topics, that gives a tutorial introduction to the field of modern nuclear physics. It is ideally suited to bridging the gap between the standard textbook material and the research literature, and provides the necessary foundation for acting as those who intend to work in any of the many disciplines where nuclear science and technology is going to play an important role in the future. (orig.)

  8. The social responsibility of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in the concept of Social Responsibility (SR) has increased recently. Continuing advances in the pace of innovative science and information technology development, growing competition in the world's markets, economic globalization and harsh criticism from communities have all drawn attention to the behavior of different organizations. As a way of drawing global attention to the fulfillment of SR, the goal of coexistence assumes an increasingly significant role from the standpoint of sustainable development of organizations and society. This implies that SR involves two responsibilities: the primary responsibility being an obligation to society, and the secondary responsibility being a positive contribution to society. Seen from the same perspective, Nuclear Energy (NE) is expected to make a positive contribution to the advancement of society and to encourage a safety culture that prevents serious accidents while also encouraging the sound development of organizations and society. ('Society' includes the environment and the economy, with the same sense as a 'triple bottom line'.) Considering the Social Responsibility of Nuclear Energy (NSR) from these points-of-view, NE should coexist with multiple stakeholders. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between NE and society, to define a framework for problem-solving, and finally to suggest changes in NSR as a whole. (author)

  9. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  10. Nuclear Reactions at Intermediate Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Shyam, Radhey

    2015-01-01

    In the domain of Nuclear reactions at intermediate energies, the QCD coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ is large enough ($\\sim$ 0.3 - 0.5) to render the perturbative calculational techniques inapplicable. In this regime the quarks are confined into colorless hadrons and it is expected that effective field theories of hadron interactions via exchange of hadrons, provide useful tools to describe such reactions. In this contribution we discuss applications of one such theory, the effective Lagrangian model, in describing the hadronic reactions at intermediate energies whose measurements are the focus of a vast international experimental program.

  11. Nuclear energy prevents ecological disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The booklet containing 6 pages brings forth 10 arguments and facts called upon to convince the reader that the nuclear energy is the main if not the only means to avoid catastrophic ecological consequences caused by the increasing non-usage of the organic fuel. By the middle of the 2lst century the triple growth of the worldwide energy consumption will inevitably cause a significant increase Of CO2, NO2, SO2 emission and reduction of oxygen content in the Earth atmosphere if it is satisfied as before due to the combustion of coal, petrol and gas. Significant changes of the environment are turning out to be a serious threat to the existence of mankind. Such dispiriting fact and some other negative factors inherent in the so-called 'fire' energy oppose to the remarkable advantages already demonstrated by the nuclear energy supposed to become the energy of the 21st century. The text will contain the tables and color pictures to further the perception of the material set forth in the booklet. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy and social impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic development and population increase are boosting a new process of energy demand all around the world which implies also a protection of the environment and, consequently, the reduction of emissions of CO2, a challenge that has to be solved. Fossil fuels represent the cheapest costs in capital and have as common features that their exploitation is based on largely known technologies, having developed a big experience in construction, operation and maintenance. However they are big environment polluters. Nuclear energy fulfils three of the main objectives that should be pursued for a steady development: 1. It does not emit Greenhouse gases. 2. It is the cheapest produced energy. 3. It guarantees a security in its supply due to the fact, among others, that it is not conditioned by external factors. However, as any other energy source, nuclear power has its own drawbacks. Some are real and some are fictitious. For this reason it becomes necessary to improve the social image of this source of energy, so as to counteract the negative consequences of the antinuclear discourse, promoted late in the seventies that has permanently undermined public acceptance

  13. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This Cd-Rom is the collection of the 139 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: reactor physics, nuclear fusion, radiation monitoring, research and training reactors, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, thermal hydraulics, safety analyses, severe accidents, nuclear materials, probabilistic safety assessment, nuclear power plant operation and monitoring, nuclear waste, public safety and environmental issues, nuclear knowledge, education and training, nuclear energy and society, advances in nuclear technology and other topics

  14. Performance of a transmutation advanced device for sustainable energy application

    OpenAIRE

    García, C.; Rosales, J.; García, L.; Pérez-Navarro, A.; Escrivá, A.; Abánades Velasco, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been performed to design a device for nuclear waste transmutation and hydrogen generation based on a gas-cooled pebble bed accelerator driven system, TADSEA (Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Application). In previous studies we have addressed the viability of an ADS Transmutation device that uses as fuel wastes from the existing LWR power plants, encapsulated in graphite in the form of pebble beds, cooled by helium which enables high temperatures (...

  15. Building a Universal Nuclear Energy Density Functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Joe A. [Michigan State University; Furnstahl, Dick; Horoi, Mihai; Lust, Rusty; Nazaewicc, Witek; Ng, Esmond; Thompson, Ian; Vary, James

    2012-12-30

    During the period of Dec. 1 2006 – Jun. 30, 2012, the UNEDF collaboration carried out a comprehensive study of all nuclei, based on the most accurate knowledge of the strong nuclear interaction, the most reliable theoretical approaches, the most advanced algorithms, and extensive computational resources, with a view towards scaling to the petaflop platforms and beyond. The long-term vision initiated with UNEDF is to arrive at a comprehensive, quantitative, and unified description of nuclei and their reactions, grounded in the fundamental interactions between the constituent nucleons. We seek to replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that delivers maximum predictive power with well-quantified uncertainties. Specifically, the mission of this project has been three-fold:  First, to find an optimal energy density functional (EDF) using all our knowledge of the nucleonic Hamiltonian and basic nuclear properties;  Second, to apply the EDF theory and its extensions to validate the functional using all the available relevant nuclear structure and reaction data;  Third, to apply the validated theory to properties of interest that cannot be measured, in particular the properties needed for reaction theory.

  16. Energy from nuclear fission an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    De Sanctis, Enzo; Ripani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an overview on nuclear physics and energy production from nuclear fission. It serves as a readable and reliable source of information for anyone who wants to have a well-balanced opinion about exploitation of nuclear fission in power plants. The text is divided into two parts; the first covers the basics of nuclear forces and properties of nuclei, nuclear collisions, nuclear stability, radioactivity, and provides a detailed discussion of nuclear fission and relevant topics in its application to energy production. The second part covers the basic technical aspects of nuclear fission reactors, nuclear fuel cycle and resources, safety, safeguards, and radioactive waste management. The book also contains a discussion of the biological effects of nuclear radiation and of radiation protection, and a summary of the ten most relevant nuclear accidents. The book is suitable for undergraduates in physics, nuclear engineering and other science subjects. However, the mathematics is kept at a level that...

  17. Energy policy and challenges: which part for the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides many data and charts on the energy domain: energy consumption, energy demand, the reserves, the climatic changes, the renewable energies, the energy cost, the radioactive wastes management, the new nuclear technology. (A.L.B.)

  18. Advances in Nuclear Power Process Heat Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an IAEA coordinated research project, this publication compiles the findings of research and development activities related to practical nuclear process heat applications. An overview of current progress on high temperature gas cooled reactors coupling schemes for different process heat applications, such as hydrogen production and desalination is included. The associated safety aspects are also highlighted. The summary report documents the results and conclusions of the project.

  19. Advances in solid state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several types of commercially available phosphate glasses with a wide range of sensitivities have recently been developed. Chief among these is BP-1, which has a high sensitivity and an unprecedented charge resolution. CR-39 has been found to respond differently at velocities below ∼10-2c, where nuclear stopping begins to dominate, than at high velocities, where electronic stopping dominates. Atomic force microscopy has been shown to be a powerful new tool for the study of the etching process, using recoil tracks in mica. CR-39 has been used to set limits on cold fusion rates in strong conflict with rates claimed by some electrochemists. CR-39 and BP-1 have been used to study a number of topics in atomic and nuclear physics including charge pickup in relativistic nucleus-nucleus reactions, nuclear and electromagnetic spallation of relativistic heavy nuclei, the determination of electron attachment and stripping cross sections for relativistic heavy nuclei, and cluster radioactivity. CR-39 is being used to search for strangelets in nature and in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions. Several studies of cosmic ray composition, including TREK, ANTIPODE, HIIS, and UHCRE, are obtaining new results using CR-39, polycarbonate, and BP-1 glass. An experiment to search for weakly interacting massive elementary particles called WIMPs will use mica to detect very short tracks of nuclei that recoil when struck elastically by the WIMPs. (Author)

  20. Nuclear energy in future sustainable, competitive energy mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear energy is an established component of electricity supply worldwide (16%) and in particular in OECD (nearly a quarter). It is supported by a mature industry benefiting from extensive experience (more than 8 000 reactor years of commercial operation) and dynamic R and D programmes implemented by governments and industries. Existing nuclear power plants are competing successfully in deregulated electricity markets owing to their low marginal production costs, their technical reliability (availability factors exceeding 80% in many countries) and good safety performance. Stringent safety requirements and radiation protection regulations in place in OECD countries allow potential impacts of nuclear energy facilities on human health and the environment to remain extremely low. Furthermore, nuclear energy, a nearly carbon free source, contributes to alleviating the risk of global climate change (worldwide, GHG emissions from the energy sector are already 8% lower than they would be without nuclear energy). Issues related to high-level waste management and disposal are being addressed in comprehensive, step by step approach. Progress towards the implementation of deep geological repositories is being demonstrated (e.g., Yucca Mountain in the US, Olkiluoto in Finland) and research on innovative fuel cycles aiming at partitioning and transmutation of minor actinides is being actively pursued. Up to 2010-2020, nuclear energy will maintain its role mainly through capacity upgrade and lifetime extension of existing plants, in many cases the most cost effective means to increase power capacity and generation. Examples are provided by utility policies and decisions in a number of OECD countries (e.g., Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, US). Although only few new units are being or will be built in the very near term, their construction and operation is bringing additional experience on advanced evolutionary nuclear systems and paving the way for the renaissance of