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Sample records for advanced light water

  1. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  2. The Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program is a forward-looking program designed to produce viable nuclear generating system candidates to meet the very real, and perhaps imminent, need for new power generation capacity in the U. S. and around the world. The ALRR Program is an opportunity to move ahead with confidence, to confront problems today which must be confronted if the U. S. electrical utilities are to continue to meet their commitment to provide safe, reliable, economical electrical power to the nation in the years ahead. Light water reactor technology is today playing a vital role in the production of electricity to meet the world's needs. At present about 13% of the world's electricity is supplied by nuclear power plants, most of those light water reactors. Nevertheless, there is a clear need for expanded use of nuclear generation. Here in Korea and elsewhere in Asia, demand for electricity has continued to increase at a very high rate. In the United States demand growth has been more moderate, but a large number of existing stations will be ready for replacement in the next two decades, and all countries face the problem of dwindling fuel supplies and growing environmental impact of fossil-fired power plants. Despite the evident need for expanded nuclear generation capacity in the United States, there have been no new plants ordered in the past ten years and at present there are no immediate prospects for new plant orders. Concerns about safety, the high cost of recent nuclear stations, and the current excess of electrical generation capacity in the United States, have combined to interrupt completely the growth of this vital power supply system

  3. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  4. Advancement of light water reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese technology of light water reactors is based on the technology imported from abroad around 1970, and the experience has been accumulated by the construction, operation and repair of light water reactors as well as the countermeasures to various troubles, moreover, the improvement and standardization of light water reactors have been promoted. As the result, recently the high capacity ratio has been attained, and the LWR technology has firmly taken root in Japan. The Subcommittee for the Advancement of Light Water Reactor Technology of the Advisory Committee for Energy has examined the subjects of technical development and the way the development should be in order to decide the strategy to advance LWR technology, and drawn up the interim report. The change of situation around the LWRs in Japan and the necessity to advance the technology, the target of advancing LWR technology and the subjects of the technical development, the system for the technical development and the securement of fund, and international cooperation are reported. The subjects of development are the pursuit of higher reliability and economic efficiency, the extension of plant life, the improvement of repairability and the reduction of radiation exposure, the improvement of operational capability, the reduction of wastes, the techniques for reactor decommissioning and the diversified location. (Kako, I.)

  5. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  6. Advanced light and heavy water reactors for improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26-29 November 1984 the Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna the Technical Committee and Workshop on Advanced Light and Heavy Water Reactor Technology in order to provide an opportunity to review and discuss the current status and recent development in the lay-out and design of advanced water reactor and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from 16 nations and 2 international organizations presenting 25 papers. The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Advanced light water reactor programmes (6 papers); Advanced light water design, technology and physics (12 papers); Advanced heavy water reactors (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  7. Economics of advanced light water reactors - Recent update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes recently updated analyses of the economic prospects of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) during the decade of the 1990s. United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) has performed engineering economic analyses related to ALWRs over the last 5 yr using both target economics and detailed cost-estimating methodologies. It has been found through such cost comparisons that properly designed and constructed ALWRs should cost less than the target cost figures listed above and significantly less than the pressurized water reactor better experience reference LWR plant cost

  8. Qualification issues for advanced light-water reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying the I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light-water reactor. The template was then used to suggest a methodology for the qualification of microprocessor-based protection systems. The methodology identifies standards/regulatory guides (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems. This approach addresses in part issues raised in NRC policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards. as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  9. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  10. Incorporating outage management principles into the advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States there are 110 light water reactor (LWR) plants currently in operation, with a total generating capacity of 102 580 MW(electric). These plants include 37 boiling water reactor (BWR) and 73 pressurized water reactor (PWR) units. Since 1980, more than 40 nuclear power plants have entered service in the United States. However, no new plants have been ordered by utilities and owners groups since 1978. There will come a time in the not-too-distant future that new, large electricity generating units will be needed to supply expected increases in base-load capacity. Will the new advanced LWR (ALWR) designs be able to pass muster and be chosen to help meet that need? With outage management at operating plants improving every year, what can the ALWR designs offer that has not already been incorporated?

  11. The advanced light water reactor program approach for gaining acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric utilities in the US face several obstacles and disincentives to building new nuclear power plants. A reformed licensing process that permits true one-step licensing is a prerequisite, as is timely implementation of the technical and political solutions of the high-level waste issue by the federal government and low-level waste storage by state governments. In addition, a more tangible acceptance of the need, benefits, and residual risk of nuclear power by all concerned institutions is an essential impetus for the return of the nuclear option. An improved version of the light water reactor (LWR) is expected to be the preferred choice for the next increment of nuclear capacity ordered in the US. The paper discusses the need for research and advanced LWR development. The advanced LWR program, sponsored jointly by the utility industry and the US Department of Energy (DOE), offers the most promising approach to developing the next generation of nuclear power plants

  12. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  13. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  14. ALWR - VTT's technology programme on advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1998, VTT Energy launched a four year research programme 'Advanced Light Water Reactors' (ALWR). The research programme strives to intensify co operation between different Finnish organisations as well as to make better use of international R and D efforts on ALWR concepts. Some projects of the programme focus on use of new computational tools for the design and safety analysis of ALWRs. Improved computer simulation methods and models are necessary for the analysis of passive safety systems. Some projects address development and assessment of new technical solutions in ALWR. The projects are carried out in close co operation with the Finnish power companies and are often part of reactor vendors international development programmes. Another key element of the programme is training of new nuclear experts and providing possibilities for continuing education of the current staff. (author)

  15. Utility Leadership in Defining Requirements for Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is appropriate, based on twenty five years of operating experience, that utilities take a position of leadership in developing the technical design and performance requirements for the next generations of nuclear electric generating plants. The U. S. utilities, through the Electric Power Research Institute, began an initiative in 1985 to develop such Utility requirements. Many international Utility organizations, including Korea Electric Power Corporation, have joined as full participants in this important Utility industry initiative. In light of the closer linkage among countries of the world due to rapid travel and telecommunications, it is also appropriate that there be international dialogue and agreement on the principal standards for nuclear power plant acceptability and performance. The Utility/EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Program guided by the ALRR Utility Steering Committee has been very successful in developing these Utility requirements. This paper will summarize the state of development of the ALRR Utility Requirements for Evolutionary Plants, recent developments in their review by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, resolution of open issues, and the extension of this effort to develop a companion set of ALRR Utility Requirements for plants employing passive safety features

  16. PARs for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the progress being made in the United States to introduce passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) technology as a cost-effective alternative to electric recombiners for controlling combustible gas produced in postulated accidents in both future Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) and certain U. S. operating nuclear plants. PARs catalytically recombine hydrogen and oxygen, gradually producing heat and water vapor. They have no moving parts and are self-starting and self-feeding, even under relatively cold and wet containment conditions. Buoyancy of the hot gases they create sets up natural convective flow that promotes mixing of combustible gases in a containment. In a non-inerted ALWR containment, two approaches each employing a combination of PARs and igniters are being considered to control hydrogen in design basis and severe accidents. In pre-inerted ALWRs, PARs alone control radiolytic oxygen produced in either accident type. The paper also discusses regulatory feedback regarding these combustible gas control approaches and describes a test program being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricite de France (EdF) to supplement the existing PAR test database with performance data under conditions of interest to U.S. plants. Preliminary findings from the EPRI/EdF PAR model test program are included. Successful completion of this test program and confirmatory tests being sponsored by the U. S. NRC are expected to pave the way for use of PARs in ALWRs and operating plants. (author)

  17. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously

  18. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  19. On the path to ordering standardized advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) program is specifying, designing, and certifying the next generation of nuclear power plants. Begun in the mid-1980's, the program is on track to permit ordering and construction of families of standardized plants at the start of the twenty-first century. ALWRs will be constructed only if they are economically competitive with alternative forms of electricity generation and are recognized as acceptable and favorable by the public, prospective owners, and investors. This paper first gives an overview of the major building blocks ensuring safe, reliable, and economic designs and the status of those designs. Next it lays out the path the industry has charted toward adopting the ALWR option and indicates the status of three key steps -- design certification, utility requirements, and first-of-a-kind engineering. Lastly, the paper focuses on one of the most important building blocks for ensuring economic viability -- life-cycle standardization. Among the topics are the definition and scope of standardization; its advantages and disadvantages; design team standardization plans that describe the desired or optimum degree of standardization and the processes used to achieve it; and the need for an agreement among all plant owners and operators for implementing and sustaining standardization in families of ALWRs. 10 refs., 5 figs

  20. Fast reactors and advanced light water reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: The importance of nuclear energy, as a realistic option to solve the issues of the depletion of energy resources and the global environment, has been re-acknowledged worldwide. In response to this international movement, the papers compiling the most recent findings in the fields of fast reactors (FR) and advanced light water reactors (LWR) were gathered and published in this special issue. This special issue compiles six articles, most of which are very meticulously performed studies of the multi year development of design and assessment methods for large sodium-cooled FRs (SFRs), and two are related to the fuel cycle options that are leading to a greater understanding on the efficient utilization of energy resources. The Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is addressed in two manuscripts. H. Yamano et al. reviewed the current design which adopts a number of innovative technologies in order to achieve economic competitiveness, enhanced reliability, and safety. Their safety assessments of both design basis accidents and severe accidents indicate that the devised JSFR satisfies well their risk target. T. Takeda et al. discussed the improvement of the modeling accuracy for the detailed calculation of JSFR's features in three areas: neutronics, fuel materials, and thermal hydraulics. The verification studies which partly use the measured data from the prototype FBR Monju are also described. Two of these manuscripts deal with those aspects of advanced design of SFR that have hitherto not been explored in great depth. The paper by G. Palmiotti et al. explored the possibility of using the sensitivity methodologies in the reactor physics field. A review of the methods used is provided, and several examples illustrate the success of the methodology in reactor physics. A new application as the improvement of nuclear basic parameters using integral experiments is also described. F. Baque et al. reviewed the evolution of the in

  1. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  2. Water chemistry control to meet the advanced design and operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The road maps on R and D plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems in Japan have been proposed along with promotion of R and D related water chemistry improvement for the advanced application of light water reactors (LWRs). The technical trends were divided into four categories, dose rate reduction, structural integrity, fuel integrity and radioactive waste reduction, and latest technical break through for each category was shown for the advanced application of LWRs. At the same time, the technical break through and the latest movements for regulation of water chemistry were introduced for each of major organizations related to nuclear engineering in the world. The conclusions were summarized as follows; 1. Water chemistry improvements might contribute to achieve the advanced application of LWRs, while water chemistry should be often changed to achieve the advanced application of LWRs. 2. Only one solution for water chemistry control was not obtained for achieving the advanced application of LWRs, but miscellaneous solutions were possible for achieving one. Optimal water chemistry control was desired for having the good practices for satisfying multi-targets at the same time and it was much affected by the plant unique systems and operational history. 3. That meant it was difficult to determine water chemistry regulation targets for achieving application of LWRs but it was necessary to prepare suitable guideline for good achievement of application of LWRs. That meant the guideline should be recommendation for good practice in the plant. 4. The water chemistry guide line should be modified along with progress of plant operation and water chemistry and related technologies. (author)

  3. Advances in environmental fatigue evaluation for light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently acquired fatigue test data have indicated that the low cycle fatigue lives attained in light water reactor environments can be markedly shorter than those determined in the ambient atmospheric air. Of the various factors that are known to exert influence on the fatigue life, the present authors have noted strain rate, temperature, and dissolved oxygen (DO) content, and proposed a method of evaluating the environmental fatigue lives for the Class 1 vessels when they vary with time. In this paper, this method is examined against, and revised in view of, the fatigue data acquired since then, and subsequently simplified so as to become adaptable to the Class 1 piping besides the Class 1 vessels. Then, these two versions of this evaluation method are combined into a methodological system by their respective nature, and, in doing so, have proved their worth by applying themselves to several different sorts of component. The results show that the effects of the light water reactor environments on the fatigue life is a factor of 2 or so in terms of the increase of the usage factor (i.e., the environmental effect correction factor Fen = ca. 2)

  4. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The NRC seeks public...- Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' This area includes a revised...

  5. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    OpenAIRE

    Kulesza Joel A.; Franceschini Fausto; Evans Thomas M.; Gehin Jess C.

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR) operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a fir...

  6. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  7. 77 FR 62270 - Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The current SRP does... Section 19.3, ``Regulatory Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light...

  8. Identification of improvements of advanced light water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this report is to identify the improvement of reactor developments with respect to reactor safety. This includes the collection of non-proprietary information on the description of the advanced design characteristics, especially summary design descriptions and general publications. This documentation is not intended to include a safety evaluation of the advanced concepts; however, it is structured in such a way that it can serve as a basis for a future safety evaluation. This is taken into account in the structure of the information regarding the distinction of the various concepts with respect to their 'advancement' and the classification of design characteristics according to some basic safety aspects. The overall description concentrates on those features which are relevant to safety. Other aspects, such as economy, operational features, maintenance, the construction period, etc...are not considered explicitly in this report

  9. Evolutionary/advanced light water reactor data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition is examining options for placing fissile materials that were produced for fabrication of weapons, and now are deemed to be surplus, into a condition that is substantially irreversible and makes its use in weapons inherently more difficult. The principal fissile materials subject to this disposition activity are plutonium and uranium containing substantial fractions of plutonium-239 uranium-235. The data in this report, prepared as technical input to the fissile material disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) deal only with the disposition of plutonium that contains well over 80% plutonium-239. In fact, the data were developed on the basis of weapon-grade plutonium which contains, typically, 93.6% plutonium-239 and 5.9% plutonium-240 as the principal isotopes. One of the options for disposition of weapon-grade plutonium being considered is the power reactor alternative. Plutonium would be fabricated into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and fissioned (''burned'') in a reactor to produce electric power. The MOX fuel will contain dioxides of uranium and plutonium with less than 7% weapon-grade plutonium and uranium that has about 0.2% uranium-235. The disposition mission could, for example, be carried out in existing power reactors, of which there are over 100 in the United States. Alternatively, new LWRs could be constructed especially for disposition of plutonium. These would be of the latest US design(s) incorporating numerous design simplifications and safety enhancements. These ''evolutionary'' or ''advanced'' designs would offer not only technological advances, but also flexibility in siting and the option of either government or private (e.g., utility) ownership. The new reactor designs can accommodate somewhat higher plutonium throughputs. This data report deals solely with the ''evolutionary'' LWR alternative

  10. Advanced steam cycles for light water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An appraisal of the potential of adding superheat to improve the overall LWR plant cycle performance is presented. The study assesses the economic and technical problems associated with the addition of approximately 5000F of superheat to raise the steam temperature to 10000F. The practicality of adding either nuclear or fossil superheat to LWR's is reviewed. The General Electric Company Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) model 238-732 (BWR/6) is chosen as the LWR starting point for this evaluation. The steam conditions of BWR/6 are representative of LWR's. The results of the fossil superheat portion of the evaluation are considered directly applicable to all LWR's. In spite of the potential of a nuclear superheater to provide a substantial boost to the LWR cycle efficiency, nuclear superheat offers little promise of development at this time. There are difficult technical problems to resolve in the areas of superheat fuel design and emergency core cooling. The absence of a developed high integrity, high temperature fuel for operation in the steam/water environment is fundamental to this conclusion. Fossil superheat offers the potential opportunity to utilize fossil fuel supplies more efficiently than in any other mode of central station power generation presently available. Fossil superheat topping cycles evaluated included atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds, pressurized furnaces, conventional furnaces, and combined gas/steam turbine cycles. The use of an AFB is proposed as the preferred superheat furnace. Fossil superheat provides a cycle efficiency improvement for the LWR of two percentage points, reduces heat rejection by 15 percent per kWe generated, increases plant electrical output by 54 percent, and burns coal with an incremental net efficiency of approximately 40 percent. This compares with a net efficiency of 36--37 percent which might be achieved with an all-fluidized bed fossil superheat plant design

  11. Needs of nuclear data for advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hitachi has been developing medium sized ABWRs as a power source that features flexibility to meet various market needs, such as minimizing capital risks, providing a timely return on capital investments, etc. Basic design concepts of the medium sized ABWRs are 1) using the current ABWR design which has accumulated favorable construction and operation histories as a starting point; 2) utilizing standard BWR fuels which have been fabricated by proven technology; 3) achieving a rationalized design by suitably utilizing key components developed for large sized reactors. Development of the medium sized ABWRs has proceeded in a systematic, stepwise manner. The first step was to design an output scale for the 600MWe class reactor (ABWR-600), and the next step was to develop an uprating concept to extend this output scale to the 900MWe class reactor (ABWR-900) based on the rationalized technology of the ABWR-600 for further cost savings. In addition, Hitachi and MHI developed an ultra small reactor, 'Package-Reactor'. About the nuclear data, for the purpose of verification of the nuclear analysis method of BWR for mixed oxide (MOX) cores, UO2 and MOX fuel critical experiments EPICURE and MISTRAL were analyzed using nuclear design codes HINES and CERES with ENDF/B nuclear data file. The critical keffs of the absorber worth experiments, the water hole worth experiments and the 2D void worth experiments agreed with those of the reference experiments within about 0.1%Δk. The root mean square differences of radial power distributions between calculation and measurement were almost less than 2.0%. The calculated reactivity worth values of the absorbers, the water hole and the 2D void agreed with the measured values within nearly experimental uncertainties. These results indicate that the nuclear analysis method of BWR in the present paper give the same accuracy for the UO2 cores and the MOX cores. (author)

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of interest. The specific nonlinear soil behavior included in the NLSSI calculation presented in this report is gapping and sliding. Other NLSSI effects are not included in the calculation. The results presented in this report document initial model runs in the linear and nonlinear analysis process. Final comparisons between traditional and advanced SPRA will be presented in the September 30th deliverable.

  13. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    of interest. The specific nonlinear soil behavior included in the NLSSI calculation presented in this report is gapping and sliding. Other NLSSI effects are not included in the calculation. The results presented in this report document initial model runs in the linear and nonlinear analysis process. Final comparisons between traditional and advanced SPRA will be presented in the September 30th deliverable.

  14. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  15. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  16. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program: Program management and staff review methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report summarizes the NRC/EPRI coordinated effort to develop design requirements for a standardized advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and the procedures for screening and applying new generic safety issues to this program. The end-product will be an NRC-approved ALWR Requirements Document for use by the nuclear industry in generating designs of LWRs to be constructed for operation in the 1990s and beyond.

  17. Development of Advanced High Uranium Density Fuels for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, James [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Butt, Darryl [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Meyer, Mitchell [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    This work conducts basic materials research (fabrication, radiation resistance, thermal conductivity, and corrosion response) on U3Si2 and UN, two high uranium density fuel forms that have a high potential for success as advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels. The outcome of this proposed work will serve as the basis for the development of advance LWR fuels, and utilization of such fuel forms can lead to the optimization of the fuel performance related plant operating limits such as power density, power ramp rate and cycle length.

  18. Impact of cut-off probability on emergency planning zone sizing for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, NRC performed an evaluation of emergency planning for the evolutionary and advanced light water reactors, and indicated that no changes to emergency planning (EP) requirements were warranted in the existing technical framework. How- ever, NRC also recognized if the lower probability of severe accidents or the longer time period between accident initiation and release of radioactive material was considered, the changes to EP requirements for advanced light water reactors might be warranted and the emergency planning zone (EPZ) sizing might be reduced. This means that if the accidents which probabilities are lower than a cut-off probability are not considered, there may be a significant impact on the EPZ sizing. AP1000 was selected as an example in this study and the probable impacts of different cut-off probabilities were studied by using MACCS code in accordance with the NUREG-0396 method. The results show that, only if the cut-off probability is higher than the occurrence probability of the accident which has relatively serious consequence and high probability, there will be a significant impact on the EPZ sizing for the advanced light water reactor. (authors)

  19. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take

  20. Probabilistic analysis for the Babcock and Wilcox advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) design employs design features that will provide enhanced safety, reliability, and design margin over the current generation of commercial nuclear power plants. This paper presents a probabilistic analysis performed to provide early feedback to the designers to enhance the reliability of these systems. Feedback from the probabilistic analysis was used to improve the system design by incorporating the insights gained. The calculated core melt frequency for the ALWR design was better than the design targets since most of the features that dominate the risk profile in conventional pressurized water reactors (PWRs) were eliminated in the redesign for the ALWR

  1. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a first-principles approach. In order to pursue these goals, CASL has participation from laboratory, academic, and industry partners. These partners are pursuing the solution of ten major “Challenge Problems” in order to advance the state-of-the-art in reactor design and analysis to permit power uprates, higher burnup, life extension, and increased safety. At present, the problems being addressed by CASL are primarily reactor physics-oriented; however, this paper is intended to introduce CASL to the reactor dosimetry community because of the importance of reactor physics modelling and nuclear data to define the source term for that community and the applicability and extensibility of the transport methods being developed.

  2. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Joel A.; Franceschini, Fausto; Evans, Thomas M.; Gehin, Jess C.

    2016-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR) operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a first-principles approach. In order to pursue these goals, CASL has participation from laboratory, academic, and industry partners. These partners are pursuing the solution of ten major "Challenge Problems" in order to advance the state-of-the-art in reactor design and analysis to permit power uprates, higher burnup, life extension, and increased safety. At present, the problems being addressed by CASL are primarily reactor physics-oriented; however, this paper is intended to introduce CASL to the reactor dosimetry community because of the importance of reactor physics modelling and nuclear data to define the source term for that community and the applicability and extensibility of the transport methods being developed.

  3. Utility leadership in reopening the nuclear option with advanced light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marston, T.U.; Layman, W.H. (Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Since 1981, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been pursing the development of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The ALWR Program is comprised of five phases and are described in the paper. In order to meet the anticipated baseline power generation requirements in the US, the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC) has developed a strategic plan for ALWR implementation in order to regain the nuclear option in the United States. The paper also covers the policies behind the utility requirements, the status of ALWR developments in the United States, the electricity demands during the period 1990-2010, and some of the innovative features of the passive plants presently under design.

  4. Utility leadership in reopening the nuclear option with advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1981, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been pursing the development of the advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The ALWR Program is comprised of five phases and are described in the paper. In order to meet the anticipated baseline power generation requirements in the US, the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC) has developed a strategic plan for ALWR implementation in order to regain the nuclear option in the United States. The paper also covers the policies behind the utility requirements, the status of ALWR developments in the United States, the electricity demands during the period 1990-2010, and some of the innovative features of the passive plants presently under design

  5. Advanced light water reactors: an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to safety and reliability, a common mission for the international nuclear industry in the 21. century will be ensure affordable electricity. At the Westinghouse Electric Corporation believe our advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design gives us the opportunity to provide the safest, most reliable, lowest cost, most competitive generation method possible for use by nations and utilities worldwide. While the safety and reliability aspects of the ALWR can be proven tangibly and are well-documented, questions have been raised about the technology's ability to work within the world's selling price range for electricity generation. For our industry's financial stability, and especially for the stability of the world's future power needs, Westinghouse has done extensive work on this issue and we are convinced we can meet the competitive challenge. We believe the ALWR can be an economically viable part of the world's future energy mix. This paper will define the competitive challenge that is being addressed by the industry and then analyze three specific areas: capital costs, operating costs, and financing costs. The hidden advantage of nuclear power in responding to these challenges will be explored, and a strong case will be made asserting that the advanced light water reactor will be able to compete in international markets with viable production costs. (authors)

  6. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  7. Advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Overview of its development, main features and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S utilities, with extensive support and participation of several international companies, and with the close cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy, have been leading an industry-wide effort to establish a technical foundation for designing the next generation of light water reactors, referred to as Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs). the cornerstone of this effort is the ALWR Utility Requirement Document (URD). The URD address the entire plant, including nuclear steam supply system and balance of plant. The requirements intend to provide improved and standardized versions of ALWRs, which eliminate most of the problems and inefficiencies associated with some of the existing designs; and assure a simple, more forgiving plant design that is excellent in all respects, including safety and economics. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has published a Safety Evaluation Report on the requirements for evolutionary and passive ALWRs. Through the NRC review, the URD supports improved stability in the regulatory basis for ALWRs by including agreements on outstanding licensing and severe accident issues. Looking forward, the URD provides a set of utility-driven requirements, which can be used in an ALWR investor bid package, and which provide a basis for investor confidence in implementing an ALWR. (author)

  8. IRIS - Generation IV Advanced Light Water Reactor for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse, is developing a Generation IV Reactor, International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS). IRIS is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. It features innovative, advanced engineering, but it does not require new technology development since it relies on the proven technology of light water reactors. This paper presents the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and four-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. The path forward for possible future extension to a eight-year cycle will be also discussed. IRIS has a large potential worldwide market because of its proven technology, modularity, low financing, compatibility with existing grids and very limited infrastructure requirements. It is especially appealing to developing countries because of ease of operation and because its medium power is more adaptable to smaller grids. (author)

  9. Standardization of advanced light water reactors and progress on achieving utility requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that for a number of years, the U.S. utilities had led an industry-wide effort to establish a technical foundation for the design of the next generation of light water reactors in the United States. Since 1985, this utility initiative has been effected through a major technical program managed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Program. In addition to the U.S. utility leadership and sponsorship, the ALWR Program also has the participation and sponsorship of a number of international utility companies and close cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NPOC Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Plants creates a framework within which new standardized nuclear plants may be built. The Strategic Plan is an expression of the nuclear energy industry's serious intent to create the necessary conditions for new plant construction and operation. The industry has assembled a comprehensive, integrated list of actions that must be taken before new plants will be built and assigns responsibility for managing the various issues and sets time-tables and milestones against which we must measure progress

  10. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Research in Support of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce P.; Kenneth, Thomas [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II and C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R and D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals to ensure that legacy analog II and C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and to implement digital II and C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II and C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security.

  11. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Research in Support of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II and C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R and D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals to ensure that legacy analog II and C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and to implement digital II and C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II and C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security

  12. Maintenance Cycle Extension in the IRIS Advanced Light Water Reactor Plant Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New nuclear power generation in the United States will be realized only if the economic performance can be made competitive with other methods of electrical power generation. The economic performance of a nuclear power plant can be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described that can be used to resolve, in the design phase, maintenance-related operating cycle length barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the International Reactor, Innovative and Secure (IRIS) design. IRIS is an advanced light water nuclear power plant that is being designed to maximize this on-line generating time by increasing the operating cycle length. This is consequently a maintenance strategy paper using the IRIS plant as the example.Potential IRIS operating cycle length maintenance-related barriers, determined by modification of an earlier operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant cycle length analysis to account for differences between the design of IRIS and this operating PWR, are presented. The proposed methodology to resolve these maintenance-related barriers by the design process is described. The results of applying the methodology to two potential IRIS cycle length barriers, relief valve testing and emergency heat removal system testing, are presented

  13. Advanced light water reactor utility requirements document: Overview of its development, main features and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. utilities, with extensive support and participation from several international companies, as well as the close cooperation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), led an industry-wide effort to establish a technical foundation for designing the next generation of light water reactors (LWRs), referred to as Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs). The cornerstone of this effort was the utility design requirements, the ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). ALWR requirements are driven by utilities, but with broad industry participation, including U.S. nuclear steam supply vendors, as well as engineering service, consulting, architect-engineer, and construction companies. Thus there was essentially a consensus of the industry as to those features to be sought in the next generation of plants, based on the information and lessons learned from over 35 years of operating over 100 LWRs in the U. S. and many more internationally. The ALWR Utility Requirements Document addresses the entire plant, including nuclear steam supply system and balance of plant. The requirements intend to provide improved and standardized versions of ALWRs, which eliminate most of the problems and inefficiencies associated with some of the existing designs; assure a simpler, more forgiving plant design which is excellent in all respects, including safety, performance, constructibility, and economics. The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is directly involved with the URD and has published a Safety Evaluation Report on the requirements for each type of ALWR. Through the NRC review, the URD supports improved stability in the regulatory basis for ALWRs by including agreements on outstanding licensing and severe accident issues. Looking forward, the URD provides a set of utility technical requirements which can be used in developing an ALWR investor bid package for detailed design, licensing and construction, and which provide a basis for investor confidence in implementing an ALWR

  14. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics "core simulator" based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  15. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly

  16. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  17. Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Neill Todreas

    2001-10-01

    A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team

  18. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    Research and development (R&D) activities on advanced, higher performance Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels have been ongoing for the last few years. Following the unfortunate March 2011 events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, the R&D shifted toward enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs. Qualitative attributes for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance, such as improved reaction kinetics with steam resulting in slower hydrogen generation rate, provide guidance for the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. A common set of technical metrics should be established to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs on a more quantitative basis. “Metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. This report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to evaluate the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed toward qualification.

  19. Single-earthquake design for piping systems in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appendix A to Part 100 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 100) requires, in part, that all structures, systems, and components of the nuclear power plant necessary for continued operation without undue risk to the health and safety of the public shall be designed to remain functional and within applicable stress and deformation limits when subject to an operating basis earthquake (OBE). The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is proposing changes to Appendix A to Part 100 to redefine the OBE at a level such that its purpose can be satisfied without the need to perform explicit response analyses. Consequently, only the safe-shutdown earthquake (SSE) would be required for the seismic design of safety-related structures, systems and components. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the proposed changes to existing seismic design criteria that the NRC staff has found acceptable for implementing the proposed rule change in the design of safety-related piping systems in the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) lead plant. These criteria apply only to the ALWR lead plant design and are not intended to replace the seismic design criteria approved by the Commission in the licensing bases of currently operating facilities. Although the guidelines described herein have been proposed for use as a pilot program for implementing the proposed rule change specifically for the ALWR lead plant, the NRC staff expects that these guidelines will also be applied to other ALWRs

  20. Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+trademark Design Certification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MWt (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment

  1. Safety, technical and economic objectives of the electric power research institute's advanced light water reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1980s, the Electric Power Research Institute entered into a programme to develop the safety, technical, operational and economic objectives of the next generation of LWRs. The programme benefited from the support and participation of US and international utilities, the United States Department of Energy, US reactor vendors and architect-engineering firms. This programme provided a foundation for the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee's comprehensive initiative for revitalizing nuclear power in the USA, as set forth in its 'Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants', published in November 1990 and updated annually each November. This Strategic Plan contains 14 'building blocks', each of which is considered essential to constructing a new nuclear plants. Building from the perspective that the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) should reflect lessons learned from the design, construction and operation of existing nuclear power plants, utilities were surveyed to help identify the cornerstone principles of what was subsequently called the 'ALWR Utility Requirements Document' (URD). The paper provides a review of the objectives underlying these principles, and the design targets that derive from this. Some examples are provided of how these targets are being met in the design of the four ALWR plants currently undergoing United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing certification under United States Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR52. Some areas requiring further investigation are also described. The paper concludes by discussing key challenges to the URD targets and process, in particular with respect to regulatory and economic considerations, and provides brief highlights of steps being taken to respond to these challenges. (author). 2 tabs

  2. Severe transient analysis of the Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For this reason the modeling has been performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS). The basic design and normal transients have been performed successfully with MMS. However, the true test of an inherently safe concept lies in its response to more brutal transients. Therefore, such a demonstrative transient is chosen for the PSU ALWR: a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total loss of offsite ac power. Diesel generators are likewise unavailable. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. The low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The results of the transient analyses indicate excellent performance by the PSU ALWR in terms of inherently safe operation. The primary coolant enters full natural circulation, and removes all decay heat through the steam generators. Further, the steam generators continually supply sufficient steam to the shutdown power system, despite the abrupt changeover to the auxiliary feedwater system. Finally, even with coincident failures in the pressurization system, the primary repressurizes to near-normal values, without overpressurization. No core boiling or uncovery is predicted, and consequently fuel damage is avoided. 17 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Licensing design basis source term update for the Evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document the technical basis for a licensing source term update for the Evolutionary Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) which will make the source term more physically realistic. While TID [Technical Information Document] 14844 and related regulatory guidance have served the industry well, much has been learned about source term over the last 30 years, and the ALWR Requirements Document provides an opportunity to incorporate this experience by updating the licensing source term. Further, the source term update will provide an improved basis for evolutionary ALWR accident mitigation design. Results of this work indicate that the fission product release magnitude to containment is slightly less than TID 14844 for noble gas, iodine, and semi and low volatiles, but somewhat higher for cesium and tellurium. Release timing is delayed by one hour or more after the accident initiation. The chemical form of iodine is largely aerosol with significantly less organic iodine compared to regulatory guidance which specifies mostly elemental and a relatively large fraction of organic. Containment spray aerosol removal rate was determined to be significantly higher than specified in regulatory guidance. Finally, BWR suppression pool decontamination factor was determined to be less effective than allowed by regulatory guidance early in the accident (due to the delayed release noted above) and more effective than that allowed by regulatory guidance later in the accident. It is recognized by the ALWR program that the source term update could be taken further in the direction of a physically-based source term. 47 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  4. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule durations, and to simplify design. This document discusses construction methods, materials, and tools. 51 refs., 33 figs

  5. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  6. Typical technology of mechanics on Gen-III passive NPPs and Gen-IV advanced supercritical light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Technical requirements for Gen-III advanced nuclear power plants, which take passive reactors as the main body, were originally brought forward in American 'Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirement Document' (ALWR-URD) in early 1990's. The primary characteristic of passive nuclear power plant is large amount of simplification to the original active safety systems, replacing or supplementing them with passive safety systems, which enhances safety and economy. However, the replacement of active safety systems by passive safety systems also brings about some mechanics that compel attention, typically, such as load-carrying capability evaluation for steel containment, in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core debris, seismic design without OBE, thermo-hydraulic issues concerning with coupling between two-phase fluid and solid, etc. At the beginning of this century, six typical Gen-IV advanced reactor types (Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor, Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor, etc.) were put forward. Among these types of reactors, Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor adopts supercritical water as coolant and operates above the thermodynamic critical point of water by increasing temperature and pressure of the coolant, which makes the plant economic and efficient. However, this type of reactor also brings about some mechanical difficulties (e.g. pressure fluctuation caused by the supercritical fluid in the core, creep of materials working at high temperature, etc.) for the design of facility and components. In this paper, the issues mentioned above are outlined for further consideration. (author)

  7. The Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

    2014-06-10

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  9. Advanced fuel assemblies for economic and flexible operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing competition in the electricity market sets up a corresponding competition between the different electricity producing technologies. This makes further improvements in the economics of nuclear power generation a vital item for the future of nuclear energy. Though the costs for development, design and fabrication of fuel assemblies contribute only about 10% to the fuel cycle costs, the design and the performance of the fuel assemblies considerably influences total electricity generation cost. By the recent creation of Framatome ANP the nuclear activities of Framatome and Siemens were combined into one company. In the past, both had made considerable achievements in the development of fuel assemblies and related services supporting the goal of safe and economic electricity generation by light water reactors. The examples described in this paper cover former Siemens products and experience. In the future, our combined experience bases will be an ideal platform to offer further substantial improvements to our customers. (author)

  10. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  11. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval

  12. Development and Deployment Strategy for a Small Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses development and deployment strategies for the modular Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR). Modularity, small size, capability to transport whole modules including containment on road or by rail, simplicity and safety of this reactor allows innovative deployment strategies for a variety of applications. A larger plant may be constructed of many independent power generation units. The multi-module plant is intended to be operated as a base-load plant. Each reactor is to be operated at full load. However, in response to changes in power demand individual units can brought on line or shut down. A larger plant can be built in small increments to match the power demand balancing capital commitments with revenues from sales of electricity. Also, an unplanned shutdown of a reactor only affects a relatively small portion of the total plant capacity. Simplification of MASLWR design and extensive use of modularization coupled with factory fabrication will result in improved productivity of fieldwork and improved quality achieved in a factory environment. The initial MASLWR design concept development has been completed under the U.S. DOE (Department of Energy) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) project. This paper discusses a strategy for developing and deploying a MASLWR plant by 2015. This schedule is realistic because the plant design relies on existing industrial experience and manufacturing capabilities. The development strategy consists of the following elements: concept confirmation through testing (under the NERI program a scaled integral test facility has been constructed and initial testing performed), design concept optimization, and design certification based on prototype testing. (authors)

  13. Use of the modular modeling system in severe transient analysis of Penn State advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering of the Pennsylvania State University has designed and developed, with Department of Energy support, an inherently safe pressurized light water reactor concept. The Penn State University Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR) incorporates various passive and active ultra-safe features, such as continuous online injection and letdown for pressure control, a raised-loop reactor primary system for enhanced natural circulation, a dedicated primary reservoir (the atmospheric tank) for enhanced thermal hydraulic control, and a secondary shutdown turbine. Because of the conceptual design basis of the project, the dynamic system modeling was to be performed using a code with a high degree of flexibility. For these reasons, the modeling was performed with the Modular Modeling System (MMS) developed by Babcock and Wilcox for EPRI. The demonstrative transient chosen for the PSU ALWR was a turbine trip and reactor scram, concurrent with total station blackout. This transient demonstrates the utility of the pressure control system, the shutdown turbine generator, and the enhanced natural circulation of the PSU ALWR. However, the low flow rates, low pressure drops, and large derivative states encountered in such a transient pose special problems for the modeler and for MMS. The use of Extended Range MMS, the development of the necessary system controls, and certain local modifications to the MMS itself are described below, along with the final results of the prescribed transient

  14. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+trademark design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994 - September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems

  15. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1996 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

  16. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+trademark design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995 - September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1996 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems

  17. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapter 1, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  18. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapters 2--13, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  19. Use of the modular modeling system in the design of the Penn State advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular Modeling System (MMS), developed by Babcock and Wilcox under a contract from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is a computer code designed for the simulation of nuclear and fossil power plants. MMS uses preprogrammed modules to present specific power plant components and allows for the interconnection of these modules in a wide variety of configurations to model present and future plant configurations. MMS requires the use of a simulation language to translate and execute the plant model. The Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ASCL), a general purpose simulation language by Mitchell and Gauthier, was used in conjunction with MMS for the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) studies at the Pennsylvania State University (PSU). For the past year, the Nuclear Engineering Department at PSU, under a contract from the Department of Energy (DOE), has been involved in the conceptual design and evaluation of a reconfigured Ultra-Safe ALWR. The underlying design philosophy was that the large amounts of energy stored in a reactor at shutdown could be used in such a way as to ensure safe plant shutdown, even if all AC power to the plant is lost. A secondary shutdown turbine was employed to recover energy to power the initial cooldown of the plant until natural circulation can develop and dissipate the remaining decay heat in the core. Primary system pressure is no longer controlled using a conventional pressurizer. Instead a modified let-down injection system connected to an inside containment atmospheric tank controls pressure

  20. RISMC advanced safety analysis working plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (“why is this important?”) that will make the case for stakeholder’s use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable “use case” demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  1. RISMC advanced safety analysis project plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (@@@why is this important?@@@) that will make the case for stakeholder's use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable @@use case@@@ demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  2. Advanced mixed oxide fuel assemblies with higher plutonium content for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MOX introduction in LWRs (PWR and BWR) was started in Germany with initial steps of design in the early 70's. The process of commercial utilisation of Pu recycling was based on these designs and initial MOX insertion at the Obrigheim-plant KWO (PWR) and the Gundremmingen-plant Unit A KRB-A (BWR). The needs of testing and validation of used methods could mainly be fulfilled by the insertion of initial MOX-FA reloads. Experiments with these early MOX-FAs have been conducted under fully realistic power reactor conditions for neutronic/nuclear and fuel/technological aspects. Optimising fuel cycle costs by increasing the final burnup leads to reduced generation of plutonium. Under properly defined boundary conditions thermal recycling in MOX-FAs further reduces the amount of Pu which has to be disposed of to final storage. Increasing the final burnup requires higher initial enrichments of U-fuel to be matched by an advanced design of MOX-FAs with higher Pu contents. The neutronic design of these MOX-FAs has to consider the licensing status of NPPs concerning the use of MOX fuel and the evolution of U fuel enrichment and burnup level. The Siemens Nuclear Fuel Cycle Division, with more than 20 year's experience in the production of MOX fuel, has designed several advanced MOX FAs of different types for PWRs (14x14 to 18x18) as well as for BWRs (9x9 and 10x10) with averaged contents of fissile plutonium up to 5.85 w/o. Some reloads of this kind are at present under irradiation in different NPPs. (author)

  3. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  4. Advanced light water reactor program at ABB-Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the needs of Electric Utilities ordering nuclear power plants in the 1990s, ABB-Combustion Engineering is developing two designs which will meet EPRI consensus requirements and new licensing issues. The System 80 Plus design is an evolutionary pressurized water reactor plant modelled after the successful System 80 design in operation in Palo Verde and under construction in Korea. System Plus is currently under review by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with final design approval expected in 1991 and design certification in 1992. The Safe Integral Reactor (SIR) plant is a smaller facility with passive safety features and modular construction intended for design certification in the late 1990s. (author)

  5. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  6. Advanced light water reactor utility requirements document: Volume 1--ALWR policy and summary of top-tier requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. utilities are leading an industry wide effort to establish the technical foundation for the design of the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR). This effort, the ALWR Program, is being managed for the U.S. electric utility industry by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and includes participation and sponsorship of several international utility companies and close cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The cornerstone of the ALWR Program is a set of utility design requirements which are contained in the ALWR Requirements Document. The purpose of the Requirement Document is to present a clear, complete statement of utility desires for their next generation of nuclear plants. The Requirements Document covers the entire plant up to the grid interface. It therefore is the basis for an integrated plant design, i.e., nuclear steam supply system and balance of plant, and it emphasizes those areas which are most important to the objective of achieving an ALWR which is excellent with respect to safety, performance, constructibility, and economics. The document applies to both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs). The Requirements Document is organized in three volumes. Volume 1 summarizes AlWR Program policy statements and top-tier requirements. The top-tier design requirements are categorized by major functions, including safety and investment protection, performance, and design process and constructibility. There is also a set of general design requirements, such as simplification and proven technology, which apply broadly to the ALWR design, and a set of economic goals for the ALWR program. The top-tier design requirements are described further in Volume 1 and are formally invoked as requirements in Volumes 2 and 3

  7. Enhancement of the in-vessel retention capabilities of advanced light water reactors through the use of nano-fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) systems, such as Westinghouse's AP1000 and the Korean APR1400, employ an In-Vessel Retention (IVR) strategy to mitigate the consequences of hypothetical severe accidents in which the core melts and relocates to the bottom of the reactor vessel. IVR heat removal is limited by the occurrence of Critical Heat Flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel outer surface. Using colloidal suspensions of nano-particles in water, known in the literature as nano-fluids, can increase CHF considerably and thus improve the IVR margins and/or extend the IVR capabilities to higher power density cores. A simple thermal-hydraulic model of the two-phase flow and heat transfer on the outer surface of the vessel shows that the use of nano-fluids could afford up to 40% increase in stable residual heat removal from the vessel at a constant Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR). Interestingly, such CHF gains in nano-fluids occur at very low nano-particle concentrations, i.e., less than 0.1 % by volume. Therefore, we envision a system in which small tanks containing a concentrated nano-fluid would inject into the water-flooded reactor cavity. The resulting dilute nano-fluid would then remove the heat from the outer surface of the vessel. A risk-informed conceptual design for such injection system has been developed. It was found that two 100% tanks with two injection lines each would be adequate to ensure reliable injection of the nano-fluid. The colloidal stability of dilute nano-fluids was also studied and found acceptable over the time scale typical of severe accidents. (authors)

  8. Advanced Maya texturing and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Lanier, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Level up your skills with powerful texturing and lighting techniques Advanced Maya Texturing and Lighting, Third Edition leads you through the latest advanced techniques for adding realistic detail to your models. This new edition is up-to-date with the latest Maya texturing, lighting, and rendering features, including an exploration of the Node Editor, new Maya utility nodes and expanded coverage of mental ray shaders, and render settings. The proven tutorials are culled from real-world experience and refined to give you the ultimate in practical skills. You'll learn workflow t

  9. Technical support for the EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute] debris coolability requirement for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design requirement for cavity sizing to promote long-term core debris coolability specifies that the reactor containment be arranged to afford a floor area for potential core debris spreading of at least 0.02 square meters per thermal megawatt of reactor power. This requirement has substantial experimental and analytical support as a sufficient basis to ensure long-term debris coolability. A logical framework and presentation of such support is provided in this document. The evidence as presented demonstrates that, following vessel failure, core debris in the cavity would consist of a mixture of fragments and a relatively continuous, but porous and cracked, phase that would be distributed relatively uniformly over the area that would be available per the requirement. Considering pertinent operative heat transfer phenomena, it is also demonstrated that the heat removal rate from core debris in this configuration would be sufficient to ensure debris coolability in the reactor cavity, even when the cavity is flooded after vessel failure. 29 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  10. Use of the modular modeling system in the design of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study involves the design and subsequent transient analysis of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor (PSU ALWR). The performance of the PSU ALWR is evaluated during small step changes in power and a turbine trip from full power without scram. The Modular Modeling System (MMS), developed by Babcock and Wilcox under a contract from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is a computer code designed for the simulation of nuclear and fossil power plants. MMS uses preprogrammed modules to represent specific power plant components such as pipes, pumps, steam generators, and a nuclear reactor. These components can then be connected in any manner the user desires providing certain simple interconnection rules are followed. In this study, MMS is used to develop computer models of both the PSU ALWR and a conventional PWR operating at the same power level. These models are then subjected to the transients mentioned above to evaluate the ability of the letdown-injection system to maintain primary system pressure. The transient response of the PSU ALWR and conventional PWR MMS models were compared to each other and whenever possible to actual plant transient data. 14 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  12. Analysis of two-phase flow phenomena with FLUENT-4 code in the experiments for advanced light water reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of advanced light water reactors, thermohydraulic phenomena are versatile in comparison with the present concepts. The new features are the passive safety systems, where energy transport takes place by natural circulation instead of forced flow. For cooling of the molten core, new concepts have been created including external vessel cooling and core catchers. In all new concepts, two-phase flow circulation patterns exist. The calculational tools should be capable of analysing multidimensional circulation created by the gravity field instead of the forced pump circulation. In spite of extensive model development for the one-dimensional Eulerian solutions for two-phase flow, multidimensional calculation is still a great challenge. The momentum transfer terms and turbulence models for the two-phase flow still require large efforts, although the turbulence models for the single phase flow are versatile and rather advanced at present. Two-phase models exist already now in several CFD codes. In VTT, most experience has been achieved with Fluent-4 Fluent-5 and at last Fluent-6 codes. Fluent-4 and Fluent-6 have the Euler-Euler solution for two-phase conservation equations, which is required for the flow conditions, where the volume fraction of both liquid and gas phases is important and the flow circulation is largely created by the gravity field. VTT is participating in several experimental projects on ALWRs, where multidimensional two-phase circulation is essential. This paper presents three examples of the use of CFD codes for analyses of ALWRs. The first example is connected with SWR 1000 reactor form Framatome ANP. Framatome ANP is performing experiments for evaluation of external cooling of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) of SWR 1000. The experiments are aimed for determining the limits to avoid critical heat fluxes (CHFs). The experimental programme is carried out in three steps. The first part, the air-water experiments, has been analysed at

  13. LIGHT WATER REACTOR SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION, INFORMATION, AND CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGIES TECHNICAL PROGRAM PLAN FOR 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce; Thomas, Ken

    2014-07-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  14. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  15. Advanced light source master oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Master Oscillator of the Advanced Light Source operates at a frequency of 499.654 MHz which is the 328th harmonic of the storage ring. The oscillator is capable of providing up to a maximum of ± 500 KHz frequency deviation for various experimental purposes. Provisions for external signal injection as well as using an external signal source have been designed into the unit. A power distribution system has also been included to provide signals for various parts of the ALS machine and user requirements. The Master Oscillator is made up with modules housed in a Euro chassis. 4 refs., 7 figs

  16. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work

  17. Light water lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the well-known laboratories in the field of light-water lattices, who exchanged the latest information on the status of work in their countries and discussed both the theoretical and the experimental aspects of the subjects. The supporting papers covered most problems, including criticality, resonance absorption, thermal utilization, spectrum calculations and the physics of plutonium bearing systems. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Advanced Light Source elliptical wiggler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3.5m long elliptical wiggler, optimized to produce elliptically polarized light in the 50 eV to 10 keV range, is currently under design and construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Calculations of spectral performance show that the flux of circularly polarized photons exceeds 1013 photons/sec over the 50 eV to 10 keV operating range for current of 0.4 amps and 1.5 GeV electron energy. This device features vertical and horizontal magnetic structures of 14 and 14 1/2 periods respectively. The period length is 20.0 cm. The vertical structure is a hybrid permanent magnet design with tapered pole tips that produce a peak field of 2.0 T. The horizontal structure is an iron core electromagnetic design, shifted longitudinally 1/4 period, that is tucked between the upper and lower vertical magnetic structure sections. A maximum peak oscillating field of 0.095 T at a frequency up to 1 Hz will be achieved by excitation of the horizontal poles with a trapezoidal current waveform. The vacuum chamber is an unconventional design that is removable from the magnetic structure, after magnetic measurements, for UHV processing. The chamber is fabricated from non-magnetic stainless steel to minimize the effects of eddy currents. Device design is presented

  19. LIGHT SOURCE: Conceptual design of Hefei advanced light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Min; Wang, Lin; Feng, Guang-Yao; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Xu, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zu-Ping

    2009-06-01

    The conceptual of Hefei Advanced Light Source, which is an advanced VUV and Soft X-ray source, was developed at NSRL of USTC. According to the synchrotron radiation user requirements and the trends of SR source development, some accelerator-based schemes were considered and compared; furthermore storage ring with ultra low emittance was adopted as the baseline scheme of HALS. To achieve ultra low emittance, some focusing structures were studied and optimized in the lattice design. Compromising of emittance, on-momentum and off-momentum dynamic aperture and ring scale, five bend acromat (FBA) was employed. In the preliminary design of HALS, the emittance was reduced to sub nm · rad, thus the radiation up to water window has full lateral coherence. The brilliance of undulator radiation covering several eVs to keVs range is higher than that of HLS by several orders. The HALS should be one of the most advanced synchrotron radiation light sources in the world.

  20. Light water detritiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Aleksee, I.A.; Bondarenko, S.D.; Vasyanina, T.V. [B.P. Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute of National Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m{sup 3}/day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m{sup 3}), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the

  1. Light water detritiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundreds of thousands of tons of tritiated light water have been accumulating from the enterprises of nuclear fuel cycles around the world. The Dual-Temperature Water-Hydrogen (DTWH) process looks like the only practical alternative to Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE). In DTWH power-consuming lower reflux device (electrolytic cell) is replaced by a so-called 'hot tower' (LPCE column operating at conditions which ensure relatively small value of elementary separation factor α(hot)). In the upper, cold tower, the tritium transfers from hydrogen to water while in the lower, hot tower - in the opposite direction - from water to hydrogen. The DTWH process is much more complicated compared to CECE; it must be thoroughly computed and strictly controlled by an automatic control system. The use of a simulation code for DTWH is absolutely important. The simulation code EVIO-5 deals with 3 flows inside a column (hydrogen gas, water vapour and liquid water) and 2 simultaneous isotope exchange sub-processes (counter-current phase exchange and co-current catalytic exchange). EVIO-5 takes into account the strong dependence of process performance on given conditions (temperature and pressure). It calculates steady-state isotope concentration profiles considering a full set of reversible exchange reactions between different isotope modifications of water and hydrogen (12 molecular species). So the code can be used for simulation of LPCE column operation for detritiation of hydrogen and water feed, which contains H and D not only at low concentrations but above 10 at.% also. EVIO-5 code is used to model a Tritium Removal Facility with a throughput capacity of about 400 m3/day. Simulation results show that a huge amount of wet-proofed catalyst is required (about 6000 m3), mainly (90%) in the first stage. One reason for these large expenses (apart from a big scale of the problem itself) is the relatively high tritium separation factor in the hot tower

  2. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  3. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  4. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  6. Estimation of core-damage frequency to evolutionary ALWR [advanced light water reactor] due to seismic initiating events: Task 4.3.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is presently developing a requirements document for the design of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). One of the basic goals of the EPRI ALWR Requirements Document is that the core-damage frequency for an ALWR shall be less than 1.0E-5. To aid in this effort, the Department of Energy's Advanced Reactor Severe Accident Program (ARSAP) initiated a functional probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to determine how effectively the evolutionary plant requirements contained in the existing EPRI Requirements Document assure that this safety goal will be met. This report develops an approximation of the core-damage frequency due to seismic events for both evolutionary plant designs (pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor(BWR)) as modeled in the corresponding functional PRAs. Component fragility values were taken directly form information which has been submitted for inclusion in Appendix A to Volume 1 of the EPRI Requirements Document. The results show a seismic core-damage frequency of 5.2E-6 for PWRS and 5.0E-6 for BWRs. Combined with the internal initiators from the functional PRAs, the overall core-damage frequencies are 6.0E-6 for the pwr and BWR, both of which satisfy the 1.0E-5 EPRI goal. In addition, site-specific considerations, such as more rigid components and less conservative fragility data and seismic hazard curves, may further reduce these frequencies. The effect of seismic events on structures are not addressed in this generic evaluation and should be addressed separately on a design-specific basis. 7 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Advanced lighting guidelines: 1993. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, C.; Tolen, T.M. [Eley Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Benya, J.R. [Luminae Souter Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rubinstein, F.; Verderber, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 Advanced Lighting Guidelines document consists of twelve guidelines that provide an overview of specific lighting technologies and design application techniques utilizing energy-efficient lighting practice. Lighting Design Practice assesses energy-efficient lighting strategies, discusses lighting issues, and explains how to obtain quality lighting design and consulting services. Luminaires and Lighting Systems surveys luminaire equipment designed to take advantage of advanced technology lamp products and includes performance tables that allow for accurate estimation of luminaire light output and power input. The additional ten guidelines -- Computer-Aided Lighting Design, Energy-Efficient Fluorescent Ballasts, Full-Size Fluorescent Lamps, Compact Fluorescent Lamps, Tungsten-Halogen Lamps, Metal Halide and HPS Lamps, Daylighting and Lumen Maintenance, Occupant Sensors, Time Scheduling Systems, and Retrofit Control Technologies -- each provide a product technology overview, discuss current products on the lighting equipment market, and provide application techniques. This document is intended for use by electric utility personnel involved in lighting programs, lighting designers, electrical engineers, architects, lighting manufacturers` representatives, and other lighting professionals.

  8. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems and Human-System Interface Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce P. Hallbert; J. J. Persensky; Carol Smidts; Tunc Aldemir; Joseph Naser

    2009-08-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and development (R&D) program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The program is operated in close collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of Nuclear Power Plants that are currently in operation. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. Advanced instruments and control (I&C) technologies are needed to support the safe and reliable production of power from nuclear energy systems during sustained periods of operation up to and beyond their expected licensed lifetime. This requires that new capabilities to achieve process control be developed and eventually implemented in existing nuclear assets. It also requires that approaches be developed and proven to achieve sustainability of I&C systems throughout the period of extended operation. The strategic objective of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technology R&D pathway is to establish a technical basis for new technologies needed to achieve safety and reliability of operating nuclear assets and to implement new technologies in nuclear energy systems. This will be achieved by carrying out a program of R&D to develop scientific knowledge in the areas of: • Sensors, diagnostics, and prognostics to support characterization and prediction of the effects of aging and degradation phenomena effects on critical systems, structures, and components (SSCs) • Online monitoring of SSCs and active components, generation of information, and methods to analyze and employ online monitoring information • New methods for visualization, integration, and information use to enhance state awareness and leverage expertise to achieve safer, more readily available electricity generation

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  10. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information

  11. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Duque editor, Theresa; Greiner editor, Annette; Moxon editor, Elizabeth; Robinson editor, Arthur; Tamura editor, Lori

    2003-01-01

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  12. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-01-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  13. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself

  14. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  16. Fluid-phase transitions in light water and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase transitions are important phenomena in water-cooled nuclear-fission reactors. In this study, liquid-vapour phase transitions and critical-point behaviour are considered. Special attention is given to the van der Waals model, asymptotic critical scaling, thermodynamic potentials and steam properties. Models and data are shown for light water and heavy water. The relevance to advanced Generation III reactors and proposed Generation IV reactors is assessed. (author)

  17. A review of the DOE/ARSAP core melt progression program supporting design certification for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important element of the safety approach for AP600 is in-vessel retention (IVR). System design features are provided which enable the reactor cavity to be flooded in the event of a core melt accident. The ARSAP is performing work demonstrating that core melt materials would be retained and cooled within the vessel by means of this cavity flooding, and that ex-vessel threats to the containment are thereby avoided. This paper address in-vessel melt progression analyses being performed by ARSAP which are providing input to IVR-related issues such as in-vessel steam explosion and melt stream impingement/vessel wall ablation (the issue of melt coolability in the vessel lower head, by virtue of external water cooling, is not sensitive to details of core melt progression and has been handled separately). This paper also reviews the in-vessel core melt progression database as well as results from the TMI-2 accident which are the foundation of the current analyses for AP600. (author). 15 refs

  18. Recent Advance in Light Stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHIU; Chris

    2001-01-01

    In order to protect polymers or coatings from the damage by sun light, scientists have created the UV Absorber to complete the task. The first commercialized UV absorber (UVA) is based on a benzophenone structure and was developed by American Cyanamid (UV 531), circa 1955, and is still the leading UVA for flexible PVC. The most powerful UVA is of the triazine type, developed by American Cyanamid (UV 1164) and commercialized in 1987.  ……

  19. Recent Advance in Light Stabilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ In order to protect polymers or coatings from the damage by sun light, scientists have created the UV Absorber to complete the task. The first commercialized UV absorber (UVA) is based on a benzophenone structure and was developed by American Cyanamid (UV 531), circa 1955, and is still the leading UVA for flexible PVC. The most powerful UVA is of the triazine type, developed by American Cyanamid (UV 1164) and commercialized in 1987.

  20. Light-water breeder reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning prebreeder and breeder reactors based on light-water-breeder (LWBR) Type 1 modules; light-water backfit prebreeder supplying advanced breeder; light-water backfit prebreeder/seed-blanket breeder system; and light-water backfit low-gain converter using medium-enrichment uranium, supplying a light-water backfit high-gain converter

  1. Light water type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear reactor of the present invention prevents disruption of a reactor core even in a case of occurrence of entire AC power loss event, and even if a reactor core disruption should occur, it prevents a rupture of the reactor container due to excess heating. That is, a high pressure water injection system and a low pressure water injection system operated by a diesel engine are disposed in the reactor building in addition to an emergency core cooling system. With such a constitution, even if an entire AC power loss event should occur, water can surely be injected to the reactor thereby enabling to prevent the rupture of the reactor core. Even if it should be ruptured, water can be sprayed to the reactor container by the low pressure water injection system. Further, if each of water injection pumps of the high pressure water injection system and the low pressure water injection system can be driven also by motors in addition to the diesel engine, the pump operation can be conducted more certainly and integrally. (I.S.)

  2. Advances in water resources technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation of technological advances in the field of water resources will be the focus of Advances in Water Resources Technology, a conference to be held in Athens, Greece, March 20-23, 1991. Organized by the European Committee for Water Resources Management, in cooperation with the National Technical University of Athens, the conference will feature state-of-the art papers, contributed original research papers, and poster papers. Session subjects will include surface water, groundwater, water resources conservation, water quality and reuse, computer modeling and simulation, real-time control of water resources systems, and institutions and methods for technology.The official language of the conference will be English. Special meetings and discussions will be held for investigating methods of effective technology transfer among European countries. For this purpose, a wide representation of research institutions, universities and companies involved in water resources technology will be attempted.

  3. Monitoring performance of the Advanced Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Warren E.; Lampo, Edward J.; Samuelson, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Providing high quality light to users in a consistent and reliable manner is one of the main goals of the accelerator physics group at the Advanced Light source (ALS). To meet this goal considerable time is spent monitoring the performance of the machine. At the Group's weekly meeting the performance of the accelerator over the previous week's run is reviewed. This paper describes the parameters that are monitored to optimize the performance of the ALS.

  4. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  5. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  6. Preliminary results from an advanced lighting controlstestbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, Douglas; Jennings, Judity; Rubinstein, Francis

    1998-03-01

    Preliminary results from a large-scale testbed of advanced lighting control technologies at the Phillip Burton Federal Building at 450 Golden Gate Ave. in San Francisco are presented. The first year objective of this project is to determine the sustainable energy savings and cost-effectiveness of different lighting control technologies compared to a portion of the building where only minimal controls are installed. The paper presents the analyzed results from six months of tests focused on accurately characterizing the energy savings potential of one type of daylight-linked lighting controls compared to the lighting in similar open-planned areas without dimming controls. After analyzing a half year;s data, we determined that the annual energy savings for this type of daylight- linked controls was 41% and 30% for the outer rows of lights on the South and North sides of the building, respectively. The annual energy savings dropped to 22% and 16% for the second row of lights for the South and North, respectively, and was negligible for the third rows of lights.

  7. Advances in water resources management

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Chih; Wang, Mu-Hao

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides in-depth coverage of such topics as multi-reservoir system operation theory and practice, management of aquifer systems connected to streams using semi-analytical models, one-dimensional model of water quality and aquatic ecosystem-ecotoxicology in river systems, environmental and health impacts of hydraulic fracturing and shale gas, bioaugmentation for water resources protection, wastewater renovation by flotation for water pollution control, determination of receiving water’s reaeration coefficient in the presence of salinity for water quality management, sensitivity analysis for stream water quality management, river ice process, and computer-aided mathematical modeling of water properties. This critical volume will serve as a valuable reference work for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, designers of water resources systems, and scientists and researchers. The goals of the Handbook of Environmental Engineering series are: (1) to cover entire environmental fields, includin...

  8. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  9. Light distribution through advanced fenestration systems

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Marilyne

    2002-01-01

    Most energy-saving applications of advanced fenestration systems, e.g. solar blinds, novel types of glazing and daylight redirecting devices, require a precise knowledge of their directional light-transmission features. These photometric properties are described by a Bi-directional Transmission Distribution Function (BTDF), which is experimentally assessed by a bi-directional photogoniometer. As such a function represents a heavy amount of data, there is a need for a synthetic and intuitive v...

  10. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Evaluation of a UV-light emitting diodes unit for the removal of micropollutants in water for low energy advanced oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autin, Olivier; Romelot, Christophe; Rust, Lena; Hart, Julie; Jarvis, Peter; MacAdam, Jitka; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2013-07-01

    There is growing interest in using light emitting diodes (LEDs) as alternative to traditional mercury lamps for the removal of micropollutants by advanced oxidation processes due to their low energy consumption and potential for high efficiency and long lifetime. This study investigates the penetration and coverage of the light emitted by LEDs in order to build an optimised LED collimated beam apparatus. From the experimental data, cost analysis was conducted in order to identify when LEDs will become economically viable. It was observed that if their development follows the predictions, LEDs should be a viable alternative to traditional lamps within 7yr for both UV/H2O2 and UV/TiO2 processes. However, parameters such as wall plug efficiency and input power need to improve for LEDs to become competitive. PMID:23668964

  12. Loss of feed water analyses of advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. Passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power level with no primary coolant pumps. The case analysed in this paper is the loss of feedwater to steam drum which results in decrease in heat removal from core. This also causes increase in reactor pressure. Further consequences depend upon various protective and engineered safeguard systems like relief system, reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator. Analysis has been done using code RELAP5/MOD3.2. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, qualities and flow in different part of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. (author)

  13. Advances in water resources engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The Handbook of Environmental Engineering is a collection of methodologies that study the effects of pollution and waste in their three basic forms: gas, solid, and liquid. A sister volume to Volume 15: Modern Water Resources Engineering, this volume focuses on the theory and analysis of various water resources systems including watershed sediment dynamics and modeling, integrated simulation of interactive surface water and groundwater systems, river channel stabilization with submerged vanes, non-equilibrium sediment transport, reservoir sedimentation, and fluvial processes, minimum energy dissipation rate theory and applications, hydraulic modeling development and application, geophysical methods for assessment of earthen dams, soil erosion on upland areas by rainfall and overland flow, geofluvial modeling methodologies and applications, and an environmental water engineering glossary. This critical volume will serve as a valuable reference work for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, designers of...

  14. Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world's brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director's message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users' executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff

  15. Advanced Light Source beam diagnostics systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, has been recently commissioned. Beam diagnostics were very important to the success of the operation. Each diagnostic system is described in this paper along with detailed discussion of its performance. Some of the systems have been in operation for two years. Others, in the storage ring, have not yet been fully commissioned. These systems were, however, working well enough to provide the essential information needed to store beam. The devices described in this paper include wall current monitors, a beam charge monitor, a 50 ohm Faraday cup, DC current transformers, broad-hand striplines, fluorescence screens, beam collimators and scrapers, and beam position monitors. Also, the means by which waveforms are digitized and displayed in the control room is discussed

  16. Radiation damage of light water reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor materials and irradiation conditions have changed as reactor types advanced from light water reactors to fast breeder reactors and future nuclear fusion reactors, but the physical and chemical processes of irradiation damage at the final stage of service of the structural materials of light water reactors must be studied more in detail. The research on the secular change of LWR materials under irradiation is regarded as most important. Especially in the problems of the embrittlement of pressure vessels, the irradiation damage of in-core structures, and the irradiation growth and creep of zircaloy, it has become more important to continuously evaluate the secular deterioration and assure the soundness, and to elucidate the process of microstructure chanage of the materials under irradiation for forecasting the life. The structure and the materials of light water reactors are explained. The neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels must be forecast more accurately as the years of operation elapse. The factors affecting the irradiation embrittlement are described. The physical model and the microstructure of the irradiation embittlement are shown. As for in-core structures, intergranular stress corrosion cracking is discussed. As for zirconium alloy, the factors affecting the irradiation creep and growth are explained. (K.I.)

  17. Light water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the technology of light water reactors (LWR) was being commercialized, the German Federal Government funded the reactor safety research program, which was conducted by national research centers, universities, and industry, and which led to the establishment, in early 1972, of the Nuclear Safety Project in Karlsruhe. In the seventies, the PNS project mainly studied the loss-of-coolant accident. Numerous experiments were run and computer codes developed for this purpose. In the eighties, the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center contributed to the German Risk Study, investigating especially core meltdown accidents under the impact of the events at Three Mile Island-2 and Chernobyl-4. Safety research in the nineties is concentrated on the requirements of future reactor generations, such as the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) or potential approaches which, at the present time, are discernible only as tentative theoretical designs. (orig.)

  18. Advancing Water Science through Improved Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B. J.; Miles, B.; Rai, A.; Ahalt, S.; Band, L. E.; Minsker, B.; Palmer, M.; Williams, M. R.; Idaszak, R.; Whitton, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Major scientific advances are needed to help address impacts of climate change and increasing human-mediated environmental modification on the water cycle at global and local scales. However, such advances within the water sciences are limited in part by inadequate information infrastructures. For example, cyberinfrastructure (CI) includes the integrated computer hardware, software, networks, sensors, data, and human capital that enable scientific workflows to be carried out within and among individual research efforts and across varied disciplines. A coordinated transformation of existing CI and development of new CI could accelerate the productivity of water science by enabling greater discovery, access, and interoperability of data and models, and by freeing scientists to do science rather than create and manage technological tools. To elucidate specific ways in which improved CI could advance water science, three challenges confronting the water science community were evaluated: 1) How does ecohydrologic patch structure affect nitrogen transport and fate in watersheds?, 2) How can human-modified environments emulate natural water and nutrient cycling to enhance both human and ecosystem well-being?, 3) How do changes in climate affect water availability to support biodiversity and human needs? We assessed the approaches used by researchers to address components of these challenges, identified barriers imposed by limitations of current CI, and interviewed leaders in various water science subdisciplines to determine the most recent CI tools employed. Our preliminary findings revealed four areas where CI improvements are likely to stimulate scientific advances: 1) sensor networks, 2) data quality assurance/quality control, 3) data and modeling standards, 4) high performance computing. In addition, the full potential of a re-envisioned water science CI cannot be realized without a substantial training component. In light of these findings, we suggest that CI

  19. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs

  20. Proposed and existing passive and inherent safety-related structures, systems, and components (building blocks) for advanced light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Moses, D.L.; Lewis, E.B.; Gibson, R.; Pearson, R.; Reich, W.J.; Murphy, G.A.; Staunton, R.H.; Kohn, W.E.

    1989-10-01

    A nuclear power plant is composed of many structures, systems, and components (SSCs). Examples include emergency core cooling systems, feedwater systems, and electrical systems. The design of a reactor consists of combining various SSCs (building blocks) into an integrated plant design. A new reactor design is the result of combining old SSCs in new ways or use of new SSCs. This report identifies, describes, and characterizes SSCs with passive and inherent features that can be used to assure safety in light-water reactors. Existing, proposed, and speculative technologies are described. The following approaches were used to identify the technologies: world technical literature searches, world patent searches, and discussions with universities, national laboratories and industrial vendors. 214 refs., 105 figs., 26 tabs.

  1. Advances in BWR water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews recent advances in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) water chemistry control with examples of plant experiences at U.S. designed BWRs. Water chemistry advances provide some of the most effective methods for mitigating materials degradation, reducing fuel performance concerns and lowering radiation fields. Mitigation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of materials remains a high priority and improved techniques that have been demonstrated in BWRs will be reviewed, specifically hydrogen injection combined with noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and the newer on-line noble metal application process (OLNC). Hydrogen injection performance, an important part of SCC mitigation, will also be reviewed for the BWR fleet, highlighting system improvements that have enabled earlier injection of hydrogen including the potential for hydrogen injection during plant startup. Water chemistry has been significantly improved by the application of pre-filtration and optimized use of ion exchange resins in the CP (condensate polishing) and reactor water cleanup (RWCU) systems. EPRI has monitored and supported water treatment improvements to meet water chemistry goals as outlined in the EPRI BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines, particularly those for SCC mitigation of reactor internals and piping, minimization of fuel risk due to corrosion and crud deposits and chemistry control for radiation field reduction. In recent years, a significant reduction has occurred in feedwater corrosion product input, particularly iron. A large percentage of plants are now reporting <0.1 ppb feedwater iron. The impacts to plant operation and chemistry of lower feedwater iron will be explored. Depleted zinc addition is widely practiced across the fleet and the enhanced focus on radiation reduction continues to emphasize the importance of controlling radiation source term. In addition, shutdown chemistry control is necessary to avoid excessive release of activated corrosion products from fuel

  2. Research opportunities at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility based on a low-emittance, 1.5-GeV electron storage ring with 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices and, initially, 24 bend-magnet ports. Undulators will provide high-brightness radiation at photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes to above 10 keV. Scheduled to begin operations as a US Department of Energy national user facility in the spring of 1993, the ALS will support an extensive research program in which soft x-ray and ultraviolet radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. Participating research teams to implement the initial scientific program have been selected. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Performance of the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is the first of the lower energy (1--2 GeV) third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities to come into operation. Designed with very small electron beam emittances to operate with long insertion devices producing very high brightness beams of synchrotron radiation in the VUV and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum, these facilities are complementary to the higher energy (6--9 GeV) facilities designed for harder x-radiation. The ALS storage ring began operation in October 1993. In this paper, we will review the operational performance of the ALS, including the effects of the 4.5 m long undulators (period 5 cm), and discuss the overall performance of the facility

  4. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs; Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically; Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards; Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste; and Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements

  5. Operational experience at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) has been operational for users since October 1993 when white light from a bend magnet was delivered to the Center for X-Ray Optic close-quote s (CXRO) x-ray microprobe end station. Since then, the ALS has installed and commissioned three undulators and their beamlines (including monochromators and post-monochromator focusing optics), and eight bend-magnet beamlines, including one dedicated to machine diagnostics. Apart from one serious outage, when scheduled beam was not available to users for 17 days, the ALS has enjoyed remarkable operating statistics, with typically 95% of scheduled beam time delivered to the users. Beam quality has also been very good. With a vertical emittance measured at 0.06 nm-rad, the electron beam is kept stable to about one-tenth of its transverse dimensions, in the face of changing error fields in the insertion devices (as their main fields are varied), temperature variations, and floor vibration. The longitudinal motion of the beam, which leads to an increase in the electron beam energy spread and thence to a degradation of the undulator spectra, has recently been brought under control by the addition of an innovative feedback system. This paper focuses on those aspects of electron beam stability that we find most affect the ALS users: beam size and position, and energy spread. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  6. Operational experiences at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) has been operational for users since October 1993 when white light from a bend magnet was delivered to the Center for X-Ray Optic's (CXRO) x-ray microprobe end-station. Since then, the ALS has installed and commissioned three undulators and their beamlines (including monochrornators and post-monochromator focusing optics), and eight bend magnet beamlines, including one dedicated to machine diagnostics. Apart from one serious outage, when scheduled beam was not available to users for 17 days, the ALS has enjoyed remarkable operating statistics, with typically 95% of scheduled beam-time delivered to the users. Beam quality has also been very good. With a vertical emittance measured at 0.06 nm-rad, the electron beam is kept stable to about one-tenth of it's transverse dimensions, in the face of changing error fields in the insertion devices (as their main fields are varied), temperature variations and floor vibration. The longitudinal motion of the beam, which leads to an increase in the electron beam energy spread, and thence, to a degradation of the undulator spectra, has recently been brought under control by the addition of an innovative feedback system. This paper focuses on those aspects of electron beam stability that we find most affect the ALS users: beam size and position, and energy spread

  7. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: · Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs, · Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically, · Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards, · Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste, and · Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements.

  8. Radioactive wastes from possible future UK Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The predictive radioactive wastes from the operation and decommissioning of various designs of Light Water Reactor (LWR) are reviewed and compared to the Sizewell 'B' Pressurised Water Reactor. The designs considered are the N4, Konvoi, System 80+, Advanced PWR, AP600, Advanced Boiling Water Reactor, the European Pressurised Water Reactor (EPR) and the Sizewell 'XL' design. The sources of activity, active arisings, waste treatment plants, discharges to the environment, the optimisation of waste treatment, lifetime arisings of solid waste and the characteristics of spent fuel are addressed. Conclusions are drawn on the implications for UK waste management policy. (author)

  9. NRU light water reflector inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2009 May, the National Research Universal (NRU) calandria leaked. In the next year the calandria was inspected with six new techniques, repaired, and the repair inspected with four additional new techniques. The calandria is surrounded by a light water reflector vessel. Concerns that the same corrosion mechanism may have damaged the reflector vessel led to plans to inspect the full circumference of the reflector wall for corrosion damage, through a 64 mm diameter port, from 10 m away, while inspecting from the corroded surface. The ultrasonic technique is intended to produce a very fine inspection grid, through the corroded surface, using a very small probe body over the approximately 5 m2 to be inspected. The calandria vessel inspections were successfully performed, in a short time period, under difficult conditions. This paper will discuss Operating Experience (OPEX) from the 2009/2010 calandria wall inspections and industry dialogue that were applied to the Reflector Wall Inspection (RWI) project. Interaction with the CANDU Inspection Qualification Bureau (CIQB) on procedures, training plans, and mock-up training, led to improvements in how these activities were performed for the RWI project. Experience with shift turnover meetings led to improvements in how the inspection team captures lessons learned, trends issues, and eliminates reoccurring design and procedure problems. Experience with collected and analyzed data, inspection shift logs, and video captured from inspections and repairs, were used to improve inspection performance. Finally, OPEX from radiation/activation and the calibration process reduced dose through tool design and procedure changes. (author)

  10. General description of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a boiling light water cooled, heavy water moderated and vertical pressure tube type reactor with its design optimised for utilisation of thorium for power generation. The core consists of (Th-U233 )O2 and (Th-Pu)O2 fuel with a discharge burn up of 20,000 MWd/Te. This reactor incorporates several features to simplify the design, which eliminate certain systems and components. AHWR design is also optimised for easy replaceability of coolant channels, facilitation of in-service inspection and maintenance and ease of erection. The AHWR design also incorporates several passive systems for performing safety-related functions in the event of an accident. In case of LOCA, emergency coolant is injected through 4 accumulators of 260 m3 capacity directly into the core. Gravity driven water pool of capacity 6000 m3 serves to cool the core for 3 days without operator's intervention. Core submergence, passive containment isolation and passive containment cooling are the added features in AHWR. The paper describes the various process systems, core and fuel design, primary components and safety concepts of AHWR. Plant layout and technical data are also presented. The conceptual design of the reactor has been completed, and the detailed design and development is scheduled for completion in the year 2002. (author)

  11. NRU light water reflector inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsden, R.H.; Hebert, H.; Zahn, N.; Simpson, N.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In 2009 May, the National Research Universal (NRU) calandria leaked. In the next year the calandria was inspected with six new techniques, repaired, and the repair inspected with four additional new techniques. The calandria is surrounded by a light water reflector vessel. Concerns that the same corrosion mechanism may have damaged the reflector vessel led to plans to inspect the full circumference of the reflector wall for corrosion damage, through a 64 mm diameter port, from 10 m away, while inspecting from the corroded surface. The ultrasonic technique is intended to produce a very fine inspection grid, through the corroded surface, using a very small probe body over the approximately 5 m{sup 2} to be inspected. The calandria vessel inspections were successfully performed, in a short time period, under difficult conditions. This paper will discuss Operating Experience (OPEX) from the 2009/2010 calandria wall inspections and industry dialogue that were applied to the Reflector Wall Inspection (RWI) project. Interaction with the CANDU Inspection Qualification Bureau (CIQB) on procedures, training plans, and mock-up training, led to improvements in how these activities were performed for the RWI project. Experience with shift turnover meetings led to improvements in how the inspection team captures lessons learned, trends issues, and eliminates reoccurring design and procedure problems. Experience with collected and analyzed data, inspection shift logs, and video captured from inspections and repairs, were used to improve inspection performance. Finally, OPEX from radiation/activation and the calibration process reduced dose through tool design and procedure changes. (author)

  12. Analysis of PROTEUS LWHCR [light water high conversion reactor] Phase II experiments performed using the AARE [advanced analysis for reactor engineering] modular system and JEF [joint evaluated file] based libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of the AARE [advanced analysis for reactor engineering] modular code system and JEF-1 [joint evaluated file] based nuclear data libraries to analyze LWHCR [light water high conversion reactor] lattices is investigated by calculating the wet and dry cells of the PROTEUS-LWHCR Phase II experiment. The results are compared to those obtained using several cell codes. Main features of AARE, such as the self-shielding of resonance cross sections in the whole energy range, the generation of adequate fission source spectra, the accurate calculation of migration areas, and the efficiency of the elastic removal correction are investigated. In particular, it is shown that AARE can predict the k∞ void coefficient well with a 1% deviation from experiment, whereas the other codes give larger deviations

  13. Photoionization of multiply charged ions at the advanced light source

    OpenAIRE

    Schlachter, A. S.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Aguilar, A.; Gharaibeh, M. F.; Emmons, E. D.; Scully., S. W. J.; Phaneuf, R A; Muller, A.; Schippers, S.; I. Alvarez; Cisneros, C.; Hinojosa, G.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2004-01-01

    Photoionization of multiply charged ions is studied using the merged-beams technique at the Advanced Light Source. Absolute photoionization cross sections have been measured for a variety of ions along both isoelectronic and isonuclear sequences.

  14. Study on neutron scattering in light water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scotta Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is presented a method to produce covariance matrices of the light water total cross section from thermal scattering laws of the JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data library and CAB model. The generalized least square method was used to fit the LEAPR module parameters of the processing tool NJOY with light water experimental transmission measurements at 293.6K with CONRAD code. The marginalization technique was applied to account for systematic uncertainties.

  15. Advanced light sculpting for contemporary biophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson;

    , structured illumination, optical security, parallel laser marking and recently in contemporary biophotonics applications such as for real-­‐time parallel two-­‐photon optogenetics and neurophotonics. Our most recent GPC light sculpting developments geared towards these applications will be presented. This......Our proprietary Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method is a light efficient approach for generating speckle-­‐free contiguous optical distributions using binary-­‐only or analog spatial phase modulation. It has been used in applications such as optical trapping and manipulation, active microscopy...

  16. Advanced light source, User`s Handbook, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a national facility for scientific research and development located at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) of the University of California. Its purpose is to generate beams of very bright light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The facility is open to researchers from industry, universities, and government laboratories.

  17. Light-water-reactor safety research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the agenda for light water reactor (LWR) safety research as the author sees it from the perspective of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This research has a good record of accomplishment in the years since the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident in systems, materials, the person-machine interface, and in the knowledge of severe accidents. We are well on the way to sufficiency of knowledge for opeating LWRs, but a few important tasks remain. The advanced LWR concepts arise from a well-established base of design and operating experience, but, in their innovation of concepts and systems, they present some new challenges to designers, regulators, and operators, as the latter approach the time of decision in the newly revised process for review and certification of standard designs. This revised process carries with it a larger commitment in the expected number of plants of the same design over a 15-yr period than was the case when commercial nuclear power began its development in the 1960s

  18. Partial Sleep Deprivation Reduces Phase Advances to Light in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Burgess, Helen J.

    2010-01-01

    Partial sleep deprivation is increasingly common in modern society. This study examined for the first time if partial sleep deprivation alters circadian phase shifts to bright light in humans. Thirteen young healthy subjects participated in a repeated-measures counterbalanced design with 2 conditions. Each condition had baseline sleep, a dim-light circadian phase assessment, a 3-day phase-advancing protocol with morning bright light, then another phase assessment. In one condition (no sleep d...

  19. New results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source is the world's first low-energy third-generation synchrotron radiation source. It has been running reliably and exceeding design specifications since it began operation in October 1993. It is available to a wide community of researchers in many scientific fields, including atomic and molecular science and chemistry. Here, new results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source demonstrate the opportunities available in atomic and molecular physics at this synchrotron light source. The unprecedented brightness allows experiments with high flux, high spectral resolution, and nearly 100% linear polarization

  20. Advances and prospects in visible light communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongda, Chen; Chunhui, Wu; Honglei, Li; Xiongbin, Chen; Zongyu, Gao; Shigang, Cui; Qin, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) is an emerging technology in optical wireless communication (OWC) that has attracted worldwide research in recent years. VLC can combine communication and illumination together, which could be applied in many application scenarios such as visible light communication local area networks (VLANs), indoor localization, and intelligent lighting. In recent years, pioneering and significant work have been made in the field of VLC. In this paper, an overview of the recent progress in VLC is presented. We also demonstrate our recent experiment results including bidirectional 100 Mbit/s VLAN or Li-Fi system based on OOK modulation without blue filter. The VLC systems that we proposed are good solutions for high-speed VLC application systems with low-cost and low-complexity. VLC technology shows a bright future due to its inherent advantages, shortage of RF spectra and ever increasing popularity of white LEDs. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Nos. 2015AA033303, 2013AA013602, 2013AA013603, 2013AA03A104), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61178051, 61321063, 61335010, 61178048, 61275169), and the National Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2013CB329205, 2011CBA00608).

  1. Recent Advances in Conjugated Polymers for Light Emitting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Raja

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review.

  2. Recent advances in conjugated polymers for light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Alam, Javed; Dass, Lawrence Arockiasamy; Raja, Mohan

    2011-01-01

    A recent advance in the field of light emitting polymers has been the discovery of electroluminescent conjugated polymers, that is, kind of fluorescent polymers that emit light when excited by the flow of an electric current. These new generation fluorescent materials may now challenge the domination by inorganic semiconductor materials of the commercial market in light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and polymer laser devices. This review provides information on unique properties of conjugated polymers and how they have been optimized to generate these properties. The review is organized in three sections focusing on the major advances in light emitting materials, recent literature survey and understanding the desirable properties as well as modern solid state lighting and displays. Recently, developed conjugated polymers are also functioning as roll-up displays for computers and mobile phones, flexible solar panels for power portable equipment as well as organic light emitting diodes in displays, in which television screens, luminous traffic, information signs, and light-emitting wallpaper in homes are also expected to broaden the use of conjugated polymers as light emitting polymers. The purpose of this review paper is to examine conjugated polymers in light emitting diodes (LEDs) in addition to organic solid state laser. Furthermore, since conjugated polymers have been approved as light-emitting organic materials similar to inorganic semiconductors, it is clear to motivate these organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and organic lasers for modern lighting in terms of energy saving ability. In addition, future aspects of conjugated polymers in LEDs were also highlighted in this review. PMID:21673938

  3. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  4. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Survey, alignment, and beam stability at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes survey and alignment at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerators from 1993 to 1997. The ALS is a third generation light source requiring magnet alignment to within 150 microns. To accomplish this, a network of monuments was established and maintained. Monthly elevation surveys show the movement of the floor over time. Inclinometers have recently been employed to give real time information about magnet, vacuum tank and magnet girder motion in the ALS storage ring

  6. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Light energy dissipation under water stress conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 14CO2 gas exchange and metabolite analyses, stomatal as well as total internal CO2 uptake and evolution were estimated. Pulse modulated fluorescence was measured during induction and steady state of photosynthesis. Leaf water potential of Digitalis lanata EHRH. plants decreased to -2.5 megapascals after withholding irrigation. By osmotic adjustment, leaves remained turgid and fully exposed to irradiance even at severe water stress. Due to the stress-induced reduction of stomatal conductance, the stomatal CO2 exchange was drastically reduced, whereas the total CO2 uptake and evolution were less affected. Stomatal closure induced an increase in the reassimilation of internally evolved CO2. This CO2-recycling consumes a significant amount of light energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents. As a consequence, the metabolic demand for light energy is only reduced by about 40%, whereas net photosynthesis is diminished by about 70% under severe stress conditions. By CO2 recycling, carbon flux, enzymatic substrate turnover and consumption of light energy were maintained at high levels, which enabled the plant to recover rapidly after rewatering. In stressed D. lanata plants a variable fluorescence quenching mechanism, termed coefficient of actinic light quenching, was observed. Besides water conservation, light energy dissipation is essential and involves regulated metabolic variations

  8. Equations of state for light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equations of state for light water were developed, based on the tables of Keenan and Keyes. Equations are presented, describing the specific volume, internal energy, enthalpy and entropy of saturated steam, superheated vapor and subcooled liquid as a function of pressure and temperature. For each property, several equations are shown, with different precisions and different degress of complexity. (Author)

  9. Light-water reactor accident classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art

  10. Light-water reactor accident classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1980-02-01

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art.

  11. Facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on design features, special equipment, and construction methods useful in the facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors is presented. A wide range of facilitation methods - from improved documentation to special decommissioning tools and techniques - is discussed. In addition, estimates of capital costs, cost savings, and radiation dose reduction associated with these facilitation methods are given

  12. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  13. How advances in light technology have shaped ENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, M; Fishman, J M; Tolley, N S

    2016-02-01

    The development of light technologies, allowing anatomical visualisation of otherwise hidden structures, led to significant advances in ENT in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Natural light from the sun, and from candles, was initially harnessed using mirrors. Later, the invention of limelight and electricity preceded the emergence of the modern-day endoscope, which, in tandem with the discovery of coherent fibre-optics in the 1950s, significantly expanded the surgical repertoire available to otolaryngologists. This study aimed to trace the rich history of ENT through the specialty's use of light. PMID:26669735

  14. Measurement of storage ring motion at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical stability of the Advanced Light Source storage ring is examined over a period of 1.5 years from the point of view of floor motion. The storage ring beam position monitor stability is examined under various operating conditions

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year

  16. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Annette (ed.)

    1999-03-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

  17. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  18. Water Management Applications of Advanced Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.; Braswell, G.; Delaney, C.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced precipitation sensors and numerical models track storms as they occur and forecast the likelihood of heavy rain for time frames ranging from 1 to 8 hours, 1 day, and extended outlooks out to 3 to 7 days. Forecast skill decreases at the extended time frames but the outlooks have been shown to provide "situational awareness" which aids in preparation for flood mitigation and water supply operations. In California the California-Nevada River Forecast Centers and local Weather Forecast Offices provide precipitation products that are widely used to support water management and flood response activities of various kinds. The Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT) program is being conducted to help advance the science of precipitation tracking and forecasting in support of the NWS. HMT high-resolution products have found applications for other non-federal water management activities as well. This presentation will describe water management applications of HMT advanced precipitation products, and characterization of benefits expected to accrue. Two case examples will be highlighted, 1) reservoir operations for flood control and water supply, and 2) urban stormwater management. Application of advanced precipitation products in support of reservoir operations is a focus of the Sonoma County Water Agency. Examples include: a) interfacing the high-resolution QPE products with a distributed hydrologic model for the Russian-Napa watersheds, b) providing early warning of in-coming storms for flood preparedness and water supply storage operations. For the stormwater case, San Francisco wastewater engineers are developing a plan to deploy high resolution gap-filling radars looking off shore to obtain longer lead times on approaching storms. A 4 to 8 hour lead time would provide opportunity to optimize stormwater capture and treatment operations, and minimize combined sewer overflows into the Bay.ussian River distributed hydrologic model.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  20. Sonication for advanced drinking water treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guang-ming; WEI Xi-zhu; LI Xiang-kun; ZHANG Jie; DOU Zi-bo

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigated the feasibility of sonication as an advanced treatment method for drinking water production and used comprehensive indexes of water quality to examine its efficiency. Results show that sonication significantly reduces the toxicity of water. Sonication with 5 W/L at 90 kHz lasting for 30 min decreases he water SUVA and the disinfection byproduct formation potential (DBPFP) by 38.7% and 27.2% respective ly. Sonieation also decreases the UV254 by more than 50% through destroying unsaturated chemical bonds.Higher sound intensity and higher frequency benefit the reduction of TOC and UV254, Besides, sonication significantly increases the affinity of organics with granular activated carbon (GAC), and thus the hybrid sonication-GAC method reduces the water TOC, COD, UV254, and DBPFP by 78. 3%, 69.4%, 75.7%, and 70. 0% respectively. Therefore, sonieation and the hybrid sonieation-GAC method are proposed as advanced treatment methods for drinking water.

  1. Light-water reactor safety analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the evolution of light-water reactor safety analysis codes is presented. Included is a summary comparison of the technical capabilities of major system codes. Three recent codes are described in more detail to serve as examples of currently used techniques. Example comparisons between calculated results using these codes and experimental data are given. Finally, a brief evaluation of current code capability and future development trends is presented

  2. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  3. Innovative Pressure Tube Light Water Reactor with Variable Moderator Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The features of a reactor based on multiple pressure tubes, rather than a single pressure vessel, provide the reactor with considerable flexibility for continuous design improvements and developments. This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor, which has the ability to advance the current pressure tubes reactors. The proposed design is aimed to simplify the pressure tubes reactors by: - replacing heavy water by a light water as a coolant and moderator, - adopting batch refueling instead of on-line refueling. Furthermore, the design is based on proven technologies, existing fuel and structure materials. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect significant capital cost savings, short licensing and introduction period of the proposed concept into the power production grid. The basic novelty of the proposed design is based on an idea of variable moderator content in the core and 'breed and burn' mode of operation. Both concepts were extensively investigated and reported in the past (2) (3) (4). In order to evaluate a practical reactor design build on proven technology, several features of the advanced CANDU reactor (ACR-1000) were adopted. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The proposed design is basically pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator Control (PTVM LWR). This paper presents a detailed description of the PTVM core design and demonstrates the reactivity control and the 'breed and burn' mode of operation, which are implemented by the variation of the moderator in the core, from a

  4. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Radiation Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a 1.5 Gev synchrotron light source facility consisting of a 120 kev electron gun, 50 Mev linear accelerator, 1.5 Gev booster synchrotron, 200 meter circumference electron storage ring, and many photon beamline transport systems for research. Figure 1. ALS floor plan. Pairs of neutron and gamma radiation monitors are shown as dots numbered from 1 to 12. The Radiation Safety System for the ALS has been designed and built with a primary goal of providing protection against inadvertent personnel exposure to gamma and neutron radiation and, secondarily, to enhance the electrical safety of select magnet power supplies

  5. Advanced applications for 0.53 laser light

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, W. David

    2001-01-01

    Use of the National Ignition Facility with green light as the laser output is an intriguing option for advanced applications ranging from inertial fusion to production of compact x-ray sources. Particular attention is given to the potential use of 0.53 micrometers light to produce a high-energy x-ray source. This application requires the efficient generation of high-energy electrons which can subsequently produce high-energy x-rays as they transport into gold or other high Z wall. One- and tw...

  6. Hydrogen production from water: Recent advances in photosynthesis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-31

    The great potential of hydrogen production by microalgal water splitting is predicated on quantitative measurement of the algae`s hydrogen-producing capability, which is based on the following: (1) the photosynthetic unit size of hydrogen production; (2) the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production; (3) thermodynamic efficiencies of conversion of light energy into the Gibbs free energy of molecular hydrogen; (4) photosynthetic hydrogen production from sea water using marine algae; (5) the potential for research advances using modern methods of molecular biology and genetic engineering to maximize hydrogen production. ORNL has shown that sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen can be performed with mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack a detectable level of the Photosystem I light reaction. This result is surprising in view of the standard two-light reaction model of photosynthesis and has interesting scientific and technological implications. This ORNL discovery also has potentially important implications for maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into chemical energy by green plant photosynthesis. Hydrogen production performed by a single light reaction, as opposed to two, implies a doubling of the theoretically maximum thermodynamic conversion efficiency from {approx}10% to {approx}20%.

  7. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis.

  8. How Water Advances on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Frank; Encinas, Noemí; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Superliquid repellency can be achieved by nano- and microstructuring surfaces in such a way that protrusions entrap air underneath the liquid. It is still not known how the three-phase contact line advances on such structured surfaces. In contrast to a smooth surface, where the contact line can advance continuously, on a superliquid-repellent surface, the contact line has to overcome an air gap between protrusions. Here, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to get the first microscopic videos of water drops advancing on a superhydrophobic array of micropillars. In contrast to common belief, the liquid surface gradually bends down until it touches the top face of the next micropillars. The apparent advancing contact angle is 180°. On the receding side, pinning to the top faces of the micropillars determines the apparent receding contact angle. Based on these observations, we propose that the apparent receding contact angle should be used for characterizing superliquid-repellent surfaces rather than the apparent advancing contact angle and hysteresis. PMID:26991185

  9. Elliptically polarizing undulator beamlines at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circular polarization insertion devices and beamlines at the Advanced Light Source are described. The facility will consist of multiple undulators feeding two independent beamlines, one optimized for microscopy and the other for spectroscopy. The energy range of the beamlines will go from below 100 eV to 1,800 eV, enabling studies of the magnetically important L2,3 edges of transition metals and the M4,5 edges of rare earths

  10. Elliptically polarizing undulator beamlines at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circular polarization insertion devices and beamlines at the Advanced Light Source are described. The facility will consist of multiple undulators feeding two independent beamlines, one optimized for microscopy and the other for spectroscopy. The energy range of the beamlines will go from below 100 eV to 1800 eV, enabling studies of the magnetically important L2,3 edges of transition metals and the M4,5 edges of rare earths. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Recent Advances in GEO Water Cycle Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Over the past few years GEO (Group on Earth Observations) efforts within the Water Societal Benefit Area (SBA) have been coordinated by the Science Committee of the former Integrated Global Observing Strategy Partnership (IGOS-P) IGWCO (Integrated Global Water Cycle Observations) theme. Within this framework a number of projects related to data system design, product development, and capacity building are being carried out. GEO has recently consolidated the Water SBA activities into three tasks, namely Droughts, Floods and Water Resource Management; Capacity Building for Water Resource Management (in Asia, Africa and the Americas); and Integrated Products for Water Resource Management and Research. In order to strengthen interactions with the GEO and its User Interface Committee, a Water Cycle Community of Practice (COP) was initiated. In addition, within the past year, the IGWCO Science Committee has decided to also function as a Community of Practice in collaboration with the existing Water Cycle COP. This overview will provide background and an update on the GEO Water SBA activities with an emphasis of the way in which these activities are being integrated within the three tasks. It will also describe activities that are planned for 2010 to facilitate this integration. Recent advances related to drought monitoring, capacity and network building, and observational and data systems will be highlighted. New water-related activities arising from collaborations between US GEO and Canada GEO, and through activities within the GEO Architecture and Data Committee, will also be described. This presentation will conclude with a longer-term outlook for water within the GEO framework and provide some guidance for interested experts on how they can become involved in helping to implement these plans.

  12. The advanced light source: America's brightest light for science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    America's brightest light comes from the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national facility for scientific research, product development, and manufacturing. Completed in 1993, the ALS produces light in the ultraviolet and x-ray regions of the spectrum. Its extreme brightness provides opportunities for scientific and technical progress not possible anywhere else. Technology is poised on the brink of a major revolution - one in which vital machine components and industrial processes will be drastically miniaturized. Industrialized nations are vying for leadership in this revolution - and the huge economic rewards the leaders will reap

  13. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  14. Outline of advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) is based on construction and operational experience in Japan, USA and Europe. It was developed jointly by the BWR supplieres, General Electric, Hitachi, and Toshiba, as the next generation BWR for Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. provided leadership and guidance in developing the ABWR, and in combination with five other Japanese electric power companies. The major objectives in developing the ABWR are: 1. Enhanced plant operability, maneuverability and daily load-following capability; 2. Increased plant safety and operating margins; 3. Improved plant availability and capacity factor; 4. Reduced occupational radiation exposure; 5. Reduced radwaste volume, and 6. Reduced plant capital and operating costs. (Liu)

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  16. EDITORIAL: Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources Special Issue on advanced and emerging light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverlag, Marco; Kroesen, Gerrit; Ferguson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    ' discharge light sources and (O)LED sources, and new concepts are still being added to the range of technologies that are being used in practice. A truly classic aspect of lamp operation is lumen maintenance, and despite being in use for almost 50 years, Na/Sc quartz metal halide lamps until recently still suffered from a strong lumen depreciation over life. This issue has been resolved to a large extent with the introduction of high-frequency operation. In the paper of Van Erk et al, indications are given as to why this mode of operation is so successful. Another classic theme in the area of discharge lamp sources is ignition, still a major issue. In two consecutive papers by Sobota et al, several aspects of the cold ignition of ceramic metal halide lamps are discussed, including statistical delay effects, the role of the driving voltage, and ignition aids. The ignition becomes more complex when mercury is left out of a metal halide lamp and this is clearly shown in the paper by Estupiñán et al. When not buffered by mercury, water impurities will give rise to the formation of hydrogen iodide, which is very volatile and a strongly electronegative species, thereby hampering the ignition process. Mercury-free metal halide lamps will potentially show very different spectral properties. This is shown in the paper by Käning et al, where use has been made of the ongoing improvements in ceramic lamp technology to make lamps with a high rare-earth iodide content. It was found that in such lamps the contribution of molecular lines can become so important that some lines even become self-reversed. This opens new possibilities for making high-quality white light sources without mercury while retaining the use of electrodes. High rare-earth content also changes the behaviour of electrodes as a result of the lowering of the work function due to gas-phase emitter effects. In the paper by Reinelt et al some clear examples of this effect are investigated as well as their dependence on

  17. Insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory will be the first of the new generation of dedicated synchrotron light sources to be put into operation. Specially designed insertion devices will be required to realize the high brightness photon beams made possible by the low emittance of the electron beam. The complement of insertion devices on the ALS will include undulators with periods as short as 3.9 cm and one or more high field wigglers. The first device to be designed is a 5 m long, 5 cm period, hybrid undulator. The goal of very high brightness and high harmonic output imposes unusually tight tolerances on the magnetic field quality and thus on the mechanical structure. The design process, using a generic structure for all undulators, is described. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Can light water reactors be proliferation resistant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade several questions were raised concerning the proliferation issues of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in comparison with other types of power reactors, particularly Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs). These questions were strongly highlighted when the Agreed Framework between the United States and the DPRK was signed in October 1994 and following the formation of KEDO organization to provide two LWRs to DPRK in replacement of all its GCRs in its nuclear program. One might summarize the main questions into three groups, mainly: 1. Can LWRs produce weapon-grade Plutonium (Pu)? 2. Why is the LWR type considered as a better option with regard to non-proliferation compared to other power reactors - particularly GCR and HWR types? 3. How could LWRs be more resistant to proliferation? This paper summarizes the effort to answer these questions. Included tables present numerical parameters for Pu production capability of the three main reactor types (LWRs, GCRs and HWRs) of a 400 MWe power reactor unit, during normal operation, and during abnormal operation to produce weapon grade Pu. Can LWRs produce weapon-grade Pu? It is seen from the available data that weapon-grade Pu could be produced in LWR fuel, as in the fuel of most other power reactor types, by limiting fuel irradiation to two or three months only. However, such production, though possible, is exceptional. In a recent study 5% of LWRs under IAEA safeguards have spent fuel inventory containing limited amount of high-grade Pu. The equilibrium burnup of discharged fuel is in the order of 33,000 MWD/T. However and due to lower enrichment of initial inventory almost half of that burnup is produced. In normal situations the discharged initial inventory has a Pu grade which is less than weapon grade and is unlikely to be used for weapon production. Why LWR the type is considered as a better option for non-proliferation Referring to tables, one can conclude that LWRs make less Pu

  19. Engineering for high heat loads on ALS [Advanced Light Source] beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discussed general thermal engineering problems and specific categories of thermal design issues for high photon flux beam lines at the LBL Advanced Light Source: thermal distortion of optical surfaces and elevated temperatures of thermal absorbers receiving synchrotron radiation. A generic design for water-cooled heat absorbers is described for use with ALS photon shutters, beam defining apertures, and heat absorbing masks. Also, results of in- situ measurements of thermal distortion of a water-cooled mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam line are compared with calculated performance estimates. 17 refs., 2 figs

  20. Advanced heavy water reactor pressure tube-easy replaceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 300 MWe vertical pressure tube type reactor. A coolant channel consists of pressure tube, made of Zr-2.5 % Nb, which is separated from cold calandria tube using garter spring spacers. The principal function of pressure tube is to support and locate the fuel assembly and allows light water coolant through fuel assembly by natural circulation. Since AHWR is designed for life of 100 years, it necessitates the replacement of pressure tubes during service life. Easy replaceability of pressure tube, along with surveillance requirements, has major bearing on the design of coolant channel assembly. The several systems and tools have been conceptualised to cater the needs for easy and quick replacement of a pressure tube during reactor shut down. This paper gives the highlights of the innovative design features of coolant channel, preliminary design and pre-requisites for replacement, and experimental programme for demonstration of easy replaceability. (author)

  1. LIGHT SOURCE: Conceptual design of Hefei Advanced Light Source (HALS) injection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wang, Lin; Feng, Guang-Yao; Wu, Cong-Feng; Li, Wei-Min; Xu, Hong-Liang; Liu, Zu-Ping

    2009-06-01

    The Hefei Advanced Light Source(HALS) is a super low emittance storage ring and has a very short beam life time. In order to run the ring stablely, top-up injection will be necessary. The injection system will greatly affect the quality of beam. This article first gives a physics design of the injecting system. Then the injecting system is tracked under different errors. The responses of storage beam and injecting beam are given in the article.

  2. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  3. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  4. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHood, M D

    2000-10-12

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Commercial Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  5. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response

  6. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  7. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  8. Water splitting on semiconductor catalysts under visible-light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Yerga, Rufino M; Alvarez Galván, M Consuelo; del Valle, F; Villoria de la Mano, José A; Fierro, José L G

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable hydrogen production is a key target for the development of alternative, future energy systems that will provide a clean and affordable energy supply. The Sun is a source of silent and precious energy that is distributed fairly all over the Earth daily. However, its tremendous potential as a clean, safe, and economical energy source cannot be exploited unless the energy is accumulated or converted into more useful forms. The conversion of solar energy into hydrogen via the water-splitting process, assisted by photo-semiconductor catalysts, is one of the most promising technologies for the future because large quantities of hydrogen can potentially be generated in a clean and sustainable manner. This Minireview provides an overview of the principles, approaches, and research progress on solar hydrogen production via the water-splitting reaction on photo-semiconductor catalysts. It presents a survey of the advances made over the last decades in the development of catalysts for photochemical water splitting under visible-light irradiation. The Minireview also analyzes the energy requirements and main factors that determine the activity of photocatalysts in the conversion of water into hydrogen and oxygen using sunlight. Remarkable progress has been made since the pioneering work by Fujishima and Honda in 1972, but he development of photocatalysts with improved efficiencies for hydrogen production from water using solar energy still faces major challenges. Research strategies and approaches adopted in the search for active and efficient photocatalysts, for example through new materials and synthesis methods, are presented and analyzed. PMID:19536754

  9. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  10. Highly Automated Module Production Incorporating Advanced Light Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelli-Minetti, Michael [SolarWorld Americas Inc., Hillsboro, OR (United States); Roof, Kyle [SolarWorld Americas Inc., Hillsboro, OR (United States)

    2015-08-11

    The objective was to enable a high volume, cost effective solution for increasing the amount of light captured by PV modules through utilization of an advanced Light Re-directing Film and to follow a phased approach to develop and implement this new technology in order to achieve an expected power gain of up to 12 watts per module. Full size PV modules were manufactured using a new Light Redirecting Film (LRF) material applied to two different areas of PV modules in order to increase the amount of light captured by the modules. One configuration involved applying thin strips of LRF film over the tabbing ribbon on the cells in order to redirect the light that is normally absorbed by the tabbing ribbon to the active areas of the cells. A second configuration involved applying thin strips of LRF film over the white spaces between cells within a module in order to capture some of the light that is normally reflected from the white areas back through the front glass of the modules. Significant power increases of 1.4% (3.9 watts) and 1.0% (3.2 watts), respectively, compared to standard PV modules were measured under standard test conditions. The performance of PV modules with LRF applied to the tabbing ribbon was modeled. The results showed that the power increase provided by LRF depended greatly on the angle of incident light with the optimum performance only occurring when the light was within a narrow range of being perpendicular to the solar module. The modeling showed that most of the performance gain would be lost when the angle of incident light was greater than 28 degrees off axis. This effect made the orientation of modules with LRF applied to tabbing ribbons very important as modules mounted in “portrait” mode were predicted to provide little to no power gain from LRF under real world conditions. Based on these results, modules with LRF on tabbing ribbons would have to be mounted in “landscape” mode to realize a performance advantage. In addition

  11. Harmonic sextupoles for the Advanced Light Source low emittance upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madur, A., E-mail: amadur@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States); Arbelaez, D.; Marks, S.; Prestemon, S.; Robin, D.; Schlueter, R.; Steier, C.; Wan, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced Light Source is a 3rd generation light source in operation since 1993. This light source is providing state of the art performance to more than 40 beamlines and their users thanks to the upgrades that have been completed over the last few years. Higher photon beam brightness is expected to become available to users in the near future through a new upgrade with the introduction of 48 sextupoles in the ALS lattice. Introducing new combined function magnets in an existing storage ring is a challenge due to the limited space available and a balance had to be found between magnet performance and spatial constraints. Moreover, the existing steering magnets will be replaced by the harmonic sextupoles. Therefore predicting the hysteresis behavior of the harmonic sextupole steering functions became critical for those included in the fast-orbit feedback loop (22 of them). After a brief introduction to the motivation for the upgrade and the scope of the project, we develop in this paper the different constraints driving the three required combined function magnet designs as well as their expected performance.

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials

  13. 20% inlet header break analysis of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. A passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power levels, with no primary coolant pumps. Loss of coolant due to failure of inlet header results in depressurization of primary heat transport (PHT) system and containment pressure rise. Depressurization activates various protective and engineered safety systems like reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator, limiting the consequences of the event. This paper discusses the thermal hydraulic transient analysis for evaluating the safety of the reactor, following 20% inlet header break using RELAP5/MOD3.2. For the analysis, the system is discretized appropriately to simulate possible flow reversal in one of the core paths during the transient. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, steam quality and flow in different parts of the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. Flow and energy discharges into the containment are also estimated for use in containment analysis. (author)

  14. Fuel behavior in advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rod behavior of advanced pressurized water reactors under steady state conditions has been investigated in this study. System-80+ and Westinghouse Vantage-5 fuels have been considered as advanced pressurized water reactor fuels to be analyzed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of ditferent models and the effect of selected design parameters on the overall fuel behavior. FRAPCON-II computer code has been used for the analyses. Different modelling options of FRAPCON-II have also been considered in these analyses. Analyses have been performed in two main parts. In the first part, effects of operating conditions on fuel behavior have been investigated. First, fuel rod response under normal operating conditions has been analyzed. Then, fuel rod response to different fuel ratings has been calculated. In the second part, in order to estimate the effect of design parameters on fuel behavior, parametric analyses have been performed. In this part, the effects of initial gap thickness, as fabricated fuel density, and initial fill gas pressure on fuel behavior have been analyzed. The computations showed that both of the fuel rods used in this study operate within the safety limits. However, FRAPCON-II modelling options have been resulted in different behavior due to their modelling characteristics. Hence, with the absence of experimental data, it is difficult to make assesment for the best fuel parameters. It is also difficult to estimate error associated with the results. To improve the performance of the code, it is necessary to develop better experimental correlations for material properties in order to analyze the eftect ot considerably different design parameters rather than nominal rod parameters

  15. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.; Strain, R. V.

    2007-11-06

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2002. Topics that have been investigated include: (a) environmental effects on fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs in BWRs, (c) evaluation of causes and mechanisms of irradiation-assisted cracking of austenitic SS in PWRs, and (d) cracking in Ni-alloys and welds. A critical review of the ASME Code fatigue design margins and an assessment of the conservation in the current choice of design margins are presented. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic SSs. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on fatigue crack initiation in these materials in air and LWR environments. Crack growth tests were performed in BWR environments on SSs irradiated to 0.9 and 2.0 x 10{sup 21} n x cm{sup -2}. The crack growth rates (CGRs) of the irradiated steels are a factor of {approx}5 higher than the disposition curve proposed in NUREG-0313 for thermally sensitized materials. The CGRs decreased by an order of magnitude in low-dissolved oxygen (DO) environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in high-purity 289 C water on steels irradiated to {approx}3 dpa. The bulk S content correlated well with the susceptibility to intergranular SCC in 289 C water. The IASCC susceptibility of SSs that contain >0.003 wt. % S increased drastically. bend tests in inert environments at 23 C were conducted on broken pieces of SSRT specimens and on unirradiated specimens of the same materials after hydrogen charging. The results of the tests and a review of other data in the literature

  16. Optical Beam Timing Monitor Experiments at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the initial results of an experimental study of a beam timing monitor based on an optoelectronic technique. This technique uses the electrical signal from a beam position monitor to modulate the amplitude of a train of laser pulses, converting timing jitter into an amplitude jitter. This modulation is then measured with a photodetector and sampled by a fast ADC. This approach has already demonstrated sub-100fs resolution and promises even better results. Additionally, we are planning to use the technique as a way to extract the maximum possible bandwidth from a BPM, avoiding the dispersion typical of long RF cables. We show our initial results using signals from the Advanced Light Source storage ring

  17. Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications

  18. Design of the Advanced Light Source timing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation synchrotron radiation facility, and as such, has several unique timing requirements. Arbitrary Storage Ring filling patterns and high single bunch purity requirements demand a highly stable, low jitter timing system with the flexibility to reconfigure on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This modular system utilizes a highly linear Gauss Clock with ''on the fly'' programmable setpoints to track a free-running Booster ramping magnet and provides digitally programmable sequencing and delay for Electron Gun, Linac, Booster Ring, and Storage Ring RF, Pulsed Magnet, and Instrumentation systems. It has proven itself over the last year of accelerator operation to be reliable and rock solid

  19. Performance of Advanced Light Source particle beam diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, is complete. The particle beam diagnostics have been installed and tested. The beam injection systems have been running for two years. We have performance data on beam position monitors, beam intensity monitors, scintillators, beam collimators, a 50 Ω Faraday cup, and broad-band striplines and kickers used in the linac, transport lines, and the booster synchrotron. The single-turn monitoring capability of the booster beam position monitoring system has been particularly useful for studying beam dynamics. Beam diagnostics for the storage ring are being commissioned. In this paper we describe each instrument, show its performance, and outline how the instruments are controlled and their output data displayed

  20. Insertion device magnet measurements for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allowable magnetic field errors for the 4.6 m long insertion devices for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) are extremely small and are driven by electron beam and radiation requirements. Detailed measurements and adjustments of each insertion device are performed to qualify them for installation in the ALS. To accomplish this, a high speed, precision magnetic measurement facility has been designed and built. Hall probe mapping equipment, capable of completing a 2500 sample, 6 m scan with precision axial position monitoring using a laser interferometer in under one minute, is used to obtain both local and integrated field information. A 5.5 m long, 1 cm wide coil is used to measure the field integral through an entire insertion device. This paper describes magnetic measurement equipment, and results of measurements on IDA, the first of the ALS insertion devices

  1. Visible Light Activated Photocatalytic Water Polishing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal targets development of a LED light activated photocatalytic water polishing system that enables reduction of organic impurities (TOC and...

  2. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vos, Winnok H., E-mail: winnok.devos@uantwerpen.be [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Cell Systems and Imaging Research Group, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Beghuin, Didier [Lambda-X, Nivelles (Belgium); Schwarz, Christian J. [European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jones, David B. [Institute for Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K. [Physical Biology, BMLS (FB15, IZN), Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  3. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy

  4. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  5. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  6. Light water reactor piping system damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, based on a detailed evaluation and screening of existing damping data, a set of damping values are recommended for light water reactor piping systems. A multivariate regression model was used to identify the significant physical and response characteristics of piping systems. Although initially several experimental biases were identified that help explain the large variability in the existing data, these were ignored and only physical attributes were considered for the final recommendations. Of these twenty-two initial variables, only six were identified as being important to energy dissipation. Since the existing data is incomplete for certain variables, the identified parameters are not an exhaustive set. A regression analysis can only identify those parameters as significant that have a sufficient number and a wide spectrum of data points. Making several conservation assumptions, the six variable damping prediction equation was reduced to a damping table with two parameters: Response Level and Diameter. Pipe diameter is a convenient simple characteristic to represent system stiffness and hence support/pipe interaction, which tends to be a significant source of energy dissipation in piping systems

  7. Use of Thorium in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium-based fuels can be used to reduce concerns related to the proliferation potential and waste disposal of the conventional light water reactor (LWR) uranium fuel cycle. The main sources of proliferation potential and radiotoxicity are the plutonium and higher actinides generated during the burnup of standard LWR fuel. A significant reduction in the quantity and quality of the generated Pu can be achieved by replacing the 238U fertile component of conventional low-enriched uranium fuel by 232Th. Thorium can also be used as a way to manage the growth of plutonium stockpiles by burning plutonium, or achieving a net-zero transuranic production, sustainable recycle scenario. This paper summarizes some of the results of recent studies of the performance of thorium-based fuels.It is concluded that the use of heterogeneous U-Th fuel provides higher neutronic potential than a homogeneous fuel. However, in the former case, the uranium portion of the fuel operates at a higher power density, and care is needed to meet the thermal margins and address the higher-burnup implications. In macroheterogeneous designs, the U-Th fuel can yield reduced spent-fuel volume, toxicity, and decay heat. The main advantage of Pu-Th oxide over mixed oxide is better void reactivity behavior even for undermoderated designs, and increased burnup of Pu

  8. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  9. Sustainability of light water reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares the sustainability of two light water reactor, LWR, fuel cycles: the once-through UOX (low-enriched uranium oxide) cycle and the twice-through MOX (Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide) cycle (increasing the input efficiency of available uranium) by assessing their probable long-term competitiveness. With the retirement of diffusion enrichment facilities, enrichment prices have declined by one-third since 2009 and are likely to remain below $100-kgSWU for the foreseeable future. Here, initial uranium prices are set at $90/kgU and reprocessing costs at $2500 per kilogram of heavy-metal throughput, representative of “new-build” costs for reprocessing facilities. Substantial reprocessing cost reductions must be achieved if MOX is to be competitive, i.e., if it is to improve the sustainability of the LWR. However, results indicate that preserving the MOX alternative for spent fuel management later in this century has a large present value under several sets of assumptions regarding uranium price increases and reprocessing cost decreases. - Highlights: • We compare two nuclear fuel cycles: uranium versus reprocessed plutonium (mixed oxide, MOX). • We modify assumptions in MIT, The Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (2011). • New reprocessing facilities are more expensive and uranium enrichment prices are lower than previously assumed, decreasing MOX competitiveness. • The MOX cycle option value could be large, but depends on uranium prices and reprocessing costs. • R and D should focus on reducing reprocessing facility costs before implementing the MOX fuel cycle

  10. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  11. Light scattering by particles in water theoretical and experimental foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasz, Miroslaw

    2007-01-01

    Light scattering-based methods are used to characterize small particles suspended in water in a wide range of disciplines ranging from oceanography, through medicine, to industry. The scope and accuracy of these methods steadily increases with the progress in light scattering research. This book focuses on the theoretical and experimental foundations of the study and modeling of light scattering by particles in water and critically evaluates the key constraints of light scattering models. It begins with a brief review of the relevant theoretical fundamentals of the interaction of light with condensed matter, followed by an extended discussion of the basic optical properties of pure water and seawater and the physical principles that explain them. The book continues with a discussion of key optical features of the pure water/seawater and the most common components of natural waters. In order to clarify and put in focus some of the basic physical principles and most important features of the experimental data o...

  12. Physics design of advanced heavy water reactor utilising thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being developed in India with the aim of utilising thorium for power generation. AHWR is a vertical pressure tube type reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. It has been optimised for the thorium cycle. The main design objective is to be self-sustaining in 233U with most of the power from the thorium fuel using plutonium as the external fissile feed. It incorporates several advanced safety features namely, heat removal through natural circulation and a negative void coefficient of reactivity. The reactor has been designed to produce 750 MW(th) at a discharge burnup of 20,000 MWd/H(e). The physics design of AHWR has followed an evolutionary path ranging from a seed and blanket concept to a simplified composite cluster to achieve a good thermal hydraulic coupling. We have designed a composite cluster using both kinds of fuel namely, (Th-UO2 and (Th-Pu)O2. With plutonium seed, negative void coefficient can be achieved by making the spectrum harder. This was done by using a pyrocarbon scatterer in the moderator. The void coefficient strongly depends on plutonium. As plutonium burns very rapidly, it is not possible to achieve uniformly negative void coefficient with burnup in this cluster. Alternatively, burnable poison can be used within the cluster to achieve negative void coefficient taking advantage of the flux redistribution and change in spectrum upon voiding. Here, it is possible to achieve almost constant void reactivity with burnup resulting in a good thermal hydraulic coupling. The cluster design presently incorporates a central burnable absorber region. Boiling light water coolant requires that the core power distribution be optimised with thermal hydraulic parameters. The peaking factors inside the cluster should be low so as to have significant margin in operational conditions and to avoid burnout in accident conditions. The variation of reactivity from cold clean to hot operating has

  13. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor and Light Water Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, located in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, which was the first large-scale nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. A program was started in 1953 at the Bettis Laboratory to confirm the practical application of nuclear power for large-scale electric power generation. It led to the development of zirconium alloy (Zircaloy) clad fuel element containing bulk actinide oxide ceramics (UO2, ThO2, ThO2 -- UO2, ZrO2 -- UO2) as nuclear reactor fuels. The program provided much of the technology being used for design and operation of the commercial, central-station nuclear power plants now in use. The Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) began initial power operation on December 18, 1957, and was a reliable electric power producer until February 1974. In 1965, subsequent to the successful operation of the Shippingport PWR (UO2, ZrO2 -- UO2 fuels), the Bettis Laboratory undertook a research and development program to design and build a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core for operation in the Shippingport Station. Thorium was the fertile fuel in the LWBR core and was the base oxide for ThO2 and ThO2 -- UO2 fuel pellets. The LWBR core was installed in the pressure vessel of the original Shippingport PWR as its last core before decommissioning. The LWBR core started operation in the Shippingport Station in the autumn of 1977 and finished routine power operation on October 1, 1982. Successful LWBR power operation to over 160% of design lifetime demonstrated the performance capability of the core for both base-load and swing-load operation. Postirradiation examinations confirmed breeding and successful performance of the fuel system

  14. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  15. Photocatalytic Removal of Microcystin-LR by Advanced WO3-Based Nanoparticles under Simulated Solar Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of advanced WO3-based photocatalysts including CuO/WO3, Pd/WO3, and Pt/WO3 were synthesized for the photocatalytic removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR under simulated solar light. In the present study, Pt/WO3 exhibited the best performance for the photocatalytic degradation of MC-LR. The MC-LR degradation can be described by pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Chloride ion (Cl− with proper concentration could enhance the MC-LR degradation. The presence of metal cations (Cu2+ and Fe3+ improved the photocatalytic degradation of MC-LR. This study suggests that Pt/WO3 photocatalytic oxidation under solar light is a promising option for the purification of water containing MC-LR.

  16. Artificial light at night advances avian reproductive physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Dominoni, Davide; Quetting, Michael; Partecke, Jesko

    2013-01-01

    Artificial light at night is a rapidly increasing phenomenon and it is presumed to have global implications. Light at night has been associated with health problems in humans as a consequence of altered biological rhythms. Effects on wild animals have been less investigated, but light at night has often been assumed to affect seasonal cycles of urban dwellers. Using light loggers attached to free-living European blackbirds (Turdus merula), we first measured light intensity at night which fore...

  17. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    Radiolytic labeling is established as a collaborative program at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Results indicate that white-light bend-magnet beamlines at the ALS produce flux densities high enough to allow microsecond exposures yielding sufficient modification to conduct footprinting experiments, representing a significant advance for the footprinting experiment.

  18. The applicability of advanced treatment processes in the management of deteriorating water quality in the Mid-Vaal river system / Zelda Hudson

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Zelda

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the applicability of advanced water treatment processes namely granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption, ultraviolet (UV) light disinfectant and ozone in the management of deteriorating water quality in the Mid-Vaal River system for drinking purposes. Both the scarcity and the deteriorating quality of water in South Africa can be addressed by investigating advanced water treatment processes such as GAC adsorption, UV light disinfectant and o...

  19. Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

  20. Advanced feed water distributing system for WWER 440 steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J. [Energovyzkum Ltd, Brno (Switzerland); Grazl, K. [Vitkovice s.c., Ostrava (Switzerland); Tischler, J.; Mihalik, M. [SEP Atomove Elektrarne Bohunice (Slovakia)

    1995-12-31

    The original designed feed water distributing system was replaced by an advanced one. The characteristics of both feed water distributing systems have been measured and evaluated. The paper deals with the problems of measurement and evaluation of both feed water distributing system characteristics and comparison of statistical data obtained. (orig.). 3 refs.

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼ 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  2. Water dimer absorption of visible light

    OpenAIRE

    Hargrove, J

    2007-01-01

    International audience Laboratory measurements of water vapor absorption using cavity ring-down spectroscopy revealed a broad absorption at 405 nm with a quadratic dependence on water monomer concentration, a similar absorption with a linear component at 532 nm, and only linear absorption at 570 nm in the vicinity of water monomer peaks. D2O absorption is weaker and linear at 405 nm. Van't Hoff plots constructed at 405.26 nm suggest that for dimerization, Keq=0.056±0.02 atm?1, ?H°301 K=?16...

  3. Measurements for uranium-light water subcritical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this report is to determine the matter Laplacian of a subcritical assembly, done for educational purposes, using natural uranium combustible and light water for the moderator and the reflector. (M.B.)

  4. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  5. Advanced water treatment as a tool in water scarcity management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoes, Poul

    2000-01-01

    of water. In the former case, the water is lost by evaporation and polluted. In the latter case, the water is not lost but heavily polluted. With increasing scarcity, the value of water and the need for controls increase. In this situation, water reuse becomes an option that has been considered exotic......The water resource is under increasing pressure, both from the increase in population and from the wish to improve the living standards of the individual. Water scarcity is defined as the situation where demand is greater than the resource. Water scarcity has two distinctly different dimensions......: water availability and water applicability. The availability is a question of quantitative demand relative to resource. The applicability is a question of quality suitability for the intended use of the water. There is a significant difference in this regard with respect to rural versus urban use...

  6. Advanced applications of water cooled nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By August 2007, there were 438 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation worldwide, with a total capacity of 371.7 GW(e). Further, 31 units, totaling 24.1 GW(e), were under construction. During 2006 nuclear power produced 2659.7 billion kWh of electricity, which was 15.2% of the world's total. The vast majority of these plants use water-cooled reactors. Based on information provided by its Member States, the IAEA projects that nuclear power will grow significantly, producing between 2760 and 2810 billion kWh annually by 2010, between 3120 and 3840 billion kWh annually by 2020, and between 3325 and 5040 billion kWh annually by 2030. There are several reasons for these rising expectations for nuclear power: - Nuclear power's lengthening experience and good performance: The industry now has more than 12 000 reactor years of experience, and the global average nuclear plant availability during 2006 reached 83%; - Growing energy needs: All forecasts project increases in world energy demand, especially as population and economic productivity grow. The strategies are country dependent, but usually involve a mix of energy sources; - Interest in advanced applications of nuclear energy, such as seawater desalination, steam for heavy oil recovery and heat and electricity for hydrogen production; - Environmental concerns and constraints: The Kyoto Protocol has been in force since February 2005, and for many countries (most OECD countries, the Russian Federation, the Baltics and some countries of the Former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe) greenhouse gas emission limits are imposed; - Security of energy supply is a national priority in essentially every country; and - Nuclear power is economically competitive and provides stability of electricity price. In the near term most new nuclear plants will be evolutionary water cooled reactors (Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), often pursuing economies of scale. In the longer term, innovative designs that

  7. Water dimer absorption of visible light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hargrove

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory measurements of water vapor absorption using cavity ring-down spectroscopy revealed a broad absorption at 405 nm with a quadratic dependence on water monomer concentration, a similar absorption with a linear component at 532 nm, and only linear absorption at 570 nm in the vicinity of water monomer peaks. D2O absorption is weaker and linear at 405 nm. Van't Hoff plots constructed at 405.26 nm suggest that for dimerization, Keq=0.056±0.02 atm−1, ΔH°301 K=−16.6±2 kJ mol−1 and ΔS°301 K=−80±10 J mol−1 K−1. This transition peaks at 409.5 nm, could be attributed to the 8th overtone of water dimer and the 532 nm absorption to the 6th overtone. It is possible that some lower overtones previously searched for are less enhanced. These absorptions could increase water vapor feed back calculations leading to higher global temperature projections with currently projected greenhouse gas levels or greater cooling from greenhouse gas reductions.

  8. Advanced Methods for Treatment of Organic Compounds Contamined Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PREDESCU Andra

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The progress recorded in the field of science and advanced engineering at nanometric scale supplies largeopportunities for more efficient (from the point of view of the costs and more ecological approach of the processes ofwater purifying. This paper delivers a short description of the possibilities of using advanced materials in purifying thecontamined water with toxic metallic ions, organic and anorganic compounds. The opportunities and challenges werealso emphasized when nanomaterials were used for the surface, underground and industrial used waters treatment.

  9. Study of Advanced Oxidation System for Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hygiene water is still a big problem globally as well as energy and food, especially in Indonesia where more than 70 % lived in Java island. One of the efforts in treating hygiene water is to recycle the used water. In this case it is needed clean water technology. Many methods have been done, this paper describes the advanced oxidation technology system based on ozone, titania and plasma discharge. (author)

  10. Temperature Dependence of Light Absorption by Water

    OpenAIRE

    Cumming, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    A model is described that relates the temperature coefficient of the optical absorption spectrum of pure water to the frequency derivative of that spectrum and two parameters that quantify the dependence of a peak's amplitude and its position on temperature. When applied to experimental temperature coefficients, it provides a better understanding of the process than the analysis currently in use.

  11. Advanced water treatment as a tool in water scarcity management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harremoes, Poul

    2000-01-01

    until recently. This paper sets the stage with respect to perspective and management options related to implementation of water reuse. Water treatment has to be interpreted as the means by which to purify the water from any degree of impurity to any degree of purity that fits the desired use, including......The water resource is under increasing pressure, both from the increase in population and from the wish to improve the living standards of the individual. Water scarcity is defined as the situation where demand is greater than the resource. Water scarcity has two distinctly different dimensions......: water availability and water applicability. The availability is a question of quantitative demand relative to resource. The applicability is a question of quality suitability for the intended use of the water. There is a significant difference in this regard with respect to rural versus urban use of...

  12. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  13. Welding engineering for light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constituents of the primary circulation, of nuclear auxiliary and ancillary equipment, and of the water/steam circulation are considered. Mistakes which may occur in welding and annealing, and operational mistakes are treated. The results of the experience gained in welding engineering, i.e. measures about designs, welding procedures and about materials used, as well as trends of further development are presented. (orig./HP)

  14. Advances in optical water isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometers routinely achieve impressive measurement precision and high throughput. In spite of this, a number of fundamental and practical problems are encountered. These are most notable in the case of water, arguably the most important molecule in the environment. Optical techniques to measure stable isotope ratios are able to address at least some of these issues; particularly, in relation to sample pretreatment and the difficulty of in-situ measurements. After discussing some general design criteria for infrared laser-based isotope ratio spectrometers, the case made above will be illustrated with a number of different instruments in applications from earthbound to the atmospheric: From laboratory based ice-core water isotope analyses to in-situ water isotope measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. (author)

  15. Recent advancement of slow light in microwave photonics applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Sanghoon; Thévenaz, Luc

    2010-01-01

    A complete realization of an optically tunable true time delay, generated through the combination of a photonic RF phase shifter and a Brillouin slow light element is presented. Illustration through a dynamic microwave photonic filter is demonstrated.

  16. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Hydrogen (or oxygen) in reactor water. For PWR secondary coolant circuits: pH in feedwater; Cation productivity in steam generator blowdown; Iron concentration in feedwater; Oxygen concentration in condensate. And BWR coolant circuits: Conductivity of reactor water; Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Iron concentration in feedwater; Copper concentration in feedwater. The present document represents a review of the developments in some Member States on how to implement a reasonable water chemistry programme and how to assess its effectiveness through numerical indicators. 12 figs, 20 tabs

  17. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) studies were made to evaluate the feasibility of multicycle transmutation of plutonium and the minor actinides (MAs) in light-water reactors (LWRs). Results showed that significant repository benefits, cost reductions, proliferation resistance, and effective use of facilities can be obtained. Key advantages are shown to be made possible by processing 30-year-decayed spent fuel rather than the more traditional 5-year-decayed fuel. (authors)

  18. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification

  19. Self-Advanced Propagation of Light Pulse in an Optical Fiber Based on Brillouin Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Sanghoon; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel; Thévenaz, Luc

    2007-01-01

    We propose a novel method to realize self-induced fast light and signal advancement with no distinct pump source in optical fibers, based on stimulated Brillouin scattering. This scheme will be helpful for real application systems.

  20. Water and Environmental Engineering: Embracing Multi-Disciplinary Approach through Advanced and Integrated Technologies for Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Suhaimi Abdul-Talib; Chia-Chay Tay; Nor-Azazi Zakaria; Aminuddin Ab-Ghani; Lariyah Mohd-Sidek; Ngai-Weng Chan

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses how the current changes in climate and economic landscape affect the focus of engineers and scientists in managing the abundant but finite water resources. The important concept of sustainability where the delicate balance between human needs and protection of the environment is further stressed in light of emerging advanced technological platforms. The critical need to embrace these emerging platforms through multi-disciplinary approaches is highlighted through selected ...

  1. Advances and prospects in nitrides based light-emitting-diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinmin, Li; Zhe, Liu; Zhiqiang, Liu; Jianchang, Yan; Tongbo, Wei; Xiaoyan, Yi; Junxi, Wang

    2016-06-01

    Due to their low power consumption, long lifetime and high efficiency, nitrides based white light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) have long been considered to be a promising technology for next generation illumination. In this work, we provide a brief review of the development of GaN based LEDs. Some pioneering and significant experiment results of our group and the overview of the recent progress in this field are presented. We hope it can provide some meaningful information for the development of high efficiency GaN based LEDs and solid-state-lighting. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA03A101).

  2. Advanced Methods for Treatment of Organic Compounds Contamined Water

    OpenAIRE

    PREDESCU Andra; A.Predescu; Ecaterina MATEI

    2009-01-01

    The progress recorded in the field of science and advanced engineering at nanometric scale supplies largeopportunities for more efficient (from the point of view of the costs) and more ecological approach of the processes ofwater purifying. This paper delivers a short description of the possibilities of using advanced materials in purifying thecontamined water with toxic metallic ions, organic and anorganic compounds. The opportunities and challenges werealso emphasized when nanomaterials wer...

  3. Vacuum design of advanced and compact synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains papers dealing with the following main topics: Vacuum considerations for synchrotron radiation sources; Machine design; Compact light sources for x-ray lithography; Surface cleaning and conditioning; Ion trapping, gas desorption, lifetime; Wigglers, undulators chamber design; and General conditioning of pumps, machines and gauges

  4. Removal and recovery of tritium from light and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus for removing tritium from light water are described, comprising contacting tritiated feed water in a catalyst column in countercurrent flow with hydrogen gas originating from an electrolysis cell so as to enrich this feed water with tritium from the electrolytic hydrogen gas and passing the tritium enriched water to an electrolysis cell wherein the electrolytic hydrogen gas is generated and then fed upwards through the catalyst column or recovered as product. The tritium content of the hydrogen gas leaving the top of the enricher catalyst column is further reduced in a stripper column containing catalyst which transfers the tritium to a countercurrent flow of liquid water. Anodic oxygen and water vapour from the anode compartment may be fed to a drier and condensed electrolyte recycled with a slip stream or recovered as a further tritium product stream. A similar method involving heavy water is also described. (author)

  5. X-ray micro-Tomography at the Advanced Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    The X-ray micro-Tomography Facility at the Advanced Light Source has been in operation since 2004. The source is a superconducting bend magnet of critical energy 10.5KeV; photon energy coverage is 8-45 KeV in monochromatic mode, and a filtered white light option yields useful photons up to 50 KeV. A...

  6. History and status of reloading techniques for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and status of reloading techniques for light water reactors is presented by covering both the techniques used to reload the cores and the nucleonic codes used to calculate the core performance characteristics. The nucleonic codes involve a cross section generating code and a core analysis code. The evolution of these codes is described beginning with the early LEOPARD code and then going to present day WIMS, CASMO, CPM2, etc. for the cross section generating codes. The modern accurate nodal codes with pin power reconstruction is presented as the most advanced method for analyzing reloads. The basic equations employed in modern cross section generating codes and modern nodal codes are developed. Optimization techniques used to reload nuclear reactors are briefly reviewed, i.e., giving a short history on this subject and ending with modern optimization techniques. Special emphasis is given to the author's method of using one code system to perform automatically all of the tasks needed to reload the reactor. Two separate codes are described, one involving a combination of C-language and FORTRAN, and the other completely written in FORTRAN. The former is designed for the Westinghouse Beaver Valley PWR's and the other for the TIM-1 PWR. Each code contains the optimization calculations needed to produce an optimal reload design with all of the numerous constraints needed for a practical core. Both codes, however, employ the same basic approach. They begin with a priority loading plan (its source described in the paper) which initially loads the core in an optimum manner with the available fuel. The core pattern is then automatically modified to meet all constraints using the Haling power distribution. Then the burnable poisons are optimally placed in the core. The final design is automatically depleted in the normal manner. These codes can load a core equal to or better than any experienced fuel manager. (author). 43 refs, 32 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  8. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  9. NEPTUNE: a modular system for light-water reactor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete modular system of light water reactor calculations has been designed. It includes basic nuclear data processing, the APOLLO phase: transport calculations for cells, multicells, fuel assemblies or reactors, the NEPTUNE phase: reactor calculations. A fuel management module, devoted to the automatic determination of the best shuffling strategy is included in NEPTUNE

  10. Risk management and decision rules for light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of developing and adopting safety objectives in quantitative terms can provide a basis for focusing societal decision making on the suitability of such objectives and upon questions of compliance with those objectives. A preliminary proposal for a light water reactor (LWR) risk management framework is presented as part of that process

  11. Overview of environmental materials degradation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a brief overview of analyses and conclusions reported in published literature regarding environmentally induced degradation of materials in operating light-water reactors. It is intended to provide a synopsis of subjects of concern rather than to address a licensing basis for any newly discovered problems related to reactor materials

  12. Nero, an instrument to measure light attenuation length in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it has written about the building of a demonstrator to prove the feasibility of a new instrument to measure the attenuation length of light in very clean waters. The demonstrator has been tested successfully and we are now designing a final version for immersion into the deep

  13. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  14. Advances in Membrane Distillation for Water Desalination and Purification Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Gomez; Stephen Gray; Jun-de Li; Mikel Duke; Jianhua Zhang; Ludovic Dumée; Lucy Mar Camacho

    2013-01-01

    Membrane distillation is a process that utilizes differences in vapor pressure to permeate water through a macro-porous membrane and reject other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. This review considers the fundamental heat and mass transfer processes in membrane distillation, recent advances in membrane technology, module configurations, and the applications and economics of membrane distillation, and identifies areas that may lead to technological improvements in membr...

  15. Dancing with light advances in photofunctional liquid-crystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Haifeng

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in this field indicates that integrating photochromic molecules into LC materials enables one to photo-manipulate unique features such as photoinduced phase transition, photocontrolled alignment and phototriggered molecular cooperative motion, leading to their novel applications beyond displays. This book introduces readers to this field, from the primary- to the advanced level in photoresponsive LC materials. The subject is introduced step-by-step, including the basic knowledge of LCs, photoresponsive properties of LCs, and their detailed performances in the form of low-molecu

  16. Annual meeting of the Advanced Light Source Users` Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: ALS Director`s Report; ALS Operations Update; Recent Results in Machine Physics; Progress in Beamline Commissioning and Overview of New Projects; The ALS Scientific Program; First Results from the SpectroMicroscopy Beamline; Soft X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Solids; Soft X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Molecules; Microstructures and Micromachining at the ALS; High-Resolution Photoemission from Simple Atoms and Molecules; X-Ray Diffraction at the ALS; Utilizing Synchrotron Radiation in Advanced Materials Industries; Polymer Microscopy: About Balls, Rocks and Other ``Stuff``; Infrared Research and Applications; and ALS User Program.

  17. Annual meeting of the Advanced Light Source Users' Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the following topics: ALS Director's Report; ALS Operations Update; Recent Results in Machine Physics; Progress in Beamline Commissioning and Overview of New Projects; The ALS Scientific Program; First Results from the SpectroMicroscopy Beamline; Soft X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Solids; Soft X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Molecules; Microstructures and Micromachining at the ALS; High-Resolution Photoemission from Simple Atoms and Molecules; X-Ray Diffraction at the ALS; Utilizing Synchrotron Radiation in Advanced Materials Industries; Polymer Microscopy: About Balls, Rocks and Other ''Stuff''; Infrared Research and Applications; and ALS User Program

  18. Light water reactor materials and water chemistry studies at Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is undertaking several studies aimed at evaluating the effects of coolant chemistry on LWR materials corrosion performance by means of in-pile tests performed in facilities simulating both PWR and BWR environments. A PWR facility has been used to determine the effects of high pH (4-4.5ppm Li) on the corrosion behaviour of Zircaloy-4 cladding material and the results of this investigation are presented. A BWR test facility, dedicated to exploring the effects of environmental variables on the Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking behaviour of stainless steels and nickel-based alloys commonly found in BWRs, is described. The water chemistry monitoring capabilities at Halden are addressed and plans for future studies are discussed. (author)

  19. Advance directives, dementia, and withholding food and water by mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Paul T; Chandler-Cramer, M Colette

    2014-01-01

    People with dementia who are no longer competent have limited control over how their lives end. But an advance directive to withhold food and water by mouth could be used to ensure that one does not live for years in severe dementia. Such directives are arguably already legal. PMID:24821250

  20. A modern control room for Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a next generation nuclear power plant being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. AHWR is a vertical, pressure tube type, heavy-water-moderated, boiling light-water-cooled, innovative reactor, relying on natural circulation for core cooling in all operating and accident conditions. In addition, it incorporates various passive systems for decay heat removal, containment cooling and isolation. In addition to the many passive safety features, AHWR has state of the art I and C architecture based on extensive use of computers and networking. In tune with the many advanced features of the reactor, a centralized modern control room has been conceived for operation and monitoring of the plant. The I and C architecture enables the implementation of a fully computerised operator friendly control room with soft Human Machine Interfaces (HMI). While doing so, safety has been given due consideration. The control and monitoring of AHWR systems are carried out from the fully computer-based operator interfaces, except safety systems, for which only monitoring is provided from soft HMI. The control of the safety systems is performed from dedicated hardwired safety system panels. Soft HMI reduces the number of individual control devices and improves their reliability. The paper briefly describes the I and C architecture adopted for the AHWR plant along with the interfaces to the main and backup control rooms. There are many issues involved while introducing soft HMI based operator interfaces for Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) compared to the conventional plants. Besides discussing the implementation issues, the paper elaborates the design considerations that have undergone in the design of various components in the main control room especially operator workstations, shift supervisor console, safety system panels and large display panels. Mainly task based displays have been adopted for the routine operator interactions of the plant

  1. Advances in numerical simulation of nonlinear water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Qingwei

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Earth's surface is covered by water. Our everyday lives and activities are affected by water waves in oceans, such as the tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean on 26 December 2004. This indicates how important it is for us to fully understand water waves, in particular the very large ones. One way to do so is to perform numerical simulation based on the nonlinear theory. Considerable research advances have been made in this area over the past decade by developing various numerical methods and applying them to emerging problems; however, until now there has been no comprehensive

  2. Light Water Reactor Generic Safety Issues Database (LWRGSIDB). User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    resolved in other plants and which can be used in reassessing the safety of individual operating plants. The IAEA-TECDOC-1044, Generic Safety Issues for Nuclear Power Plants with Light Water Reactors and Measures Taken for Their Resolution (September 1998), is a compilation of such safety issues which is based on broad international experience. This compilation is one element within the framework of IAEA activities to assist Member States in reassessing the safety of operating nuclear power plants. It is a compilation not only of the generic safety issues identified in nuclear power plants but also, in almost all cases, the measures taken to resolve these issues. The safety issues, which are generic in nature with regard to light water reactors (LWRs), and the measures taken for their resolution, are intended for use as a reference in the reassessment of the safety of operating plants.The information contained in the main body of the TECDOC has been used to establish a database. This database has search, query and report functions. This information is thus available in an electronic form which can be selectively queried and with which reports can be produced according to the requirements of the user. The database also enables the IAEA to update the data periodically on the basis of information made available by Member States

  3. Recent advances in light outcoupling from white organic light-emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gather, M.C.; Reineke, S.

    2015-01-01

    M.C.G. is grateful to the Scottish Funding Council (via SUPA) for financial support. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been successfully introduced to the smartphone display market and have geared up to become contenders for applications in general illumination where they promise to combine efficient generation of white light with excellent color quality, glare-free illumination, and highly attractive designs. Device efficiency is the key requirement for such white OLEDs, not only...

  4. Advanced Strategies for Outdoor LED Lighting Applications and Technologies to Curtail Regional Light Pollution Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrad, Christian Karl; Benya, James R.

    2015-08-01

    LED lighting systems for outdoor lighting applications continue to evolve as do strategies to mitigate related effects upon regional astronomical and ecological assets. The improving availability and relative lumen-per-watt efficiencies of blue-suppressed low correlated color temperature emitters, narrow band amber, phosphor converted amber, and various combinations of broadband emitters and sub-550NM and sub-500NM filters allow for a wide palette of choices to be assessed to suit site-specific and task-specific lighting needs. In addition to static spectral content options, readily available luminaire designs also include precise geometric beam shape selections and adaptive controls to include dimming, dynamic spectral shifting, motion detection, and dynamic beam shaping to minimize total environmental lumen emissions throughout the course of the nighttime hours.Regional and international light pollution mitigation regulations will also be briefly addressed in the context of luminaire shielding and spectral content control efforts to better protect human quality of life issues as well as astronomical and ecological interests.The presentation will include numerous spectral content graphs for various luminaire options as well as project-specific case studies to document comparisons of legacy lighting systems versus high-performance LED systems with regard to total lumen emissions, skyglow contributions, energy efficiency, and end-user satisfaction with the installed LED lighting systems. Physical samples of various luminaires will also be available for hands-on assessments.

  5. Application of acoustic leak detection technology for the detection and location of leaks in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the adequacy of leak detection systems in light water reactors. The sources of numerous reported leaks and methods of detection have been documented. Research to advance the state of the art of acoustic leak detection is presented, and procedures for implementation are discussed. 14 refs., 70 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Nondestructive examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  8. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 16% of the world's electricity. By the end of 1997, over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience had been accumulated. Global environmental change, and the continuing increase in global energy supply required to provide increasing populations with an improving standard of living, make the contribution from nuclear energy even more important for the next century. For nuclear power to achieve its full potential and make its needed contribution, it must be safe, economical, reliable and sustainable. All of these factors can be enhanced by judicious choice and development of advanced fuel cycle options. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Fuel Cycle Options for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on behalf of the Canadian Government and was jointly conducted within the frame of activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (IWG-LWR) and the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (IWG-HWR). The TCM provided the opportunity to have in-depth discussions on important technical topics which were highlighted in the International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies: Adjusting to New Realities, held in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. The main results and conclusions of the TCM were presented as input for discussion at the first meeting of the IAEA newly formed International Working Group on Fuel Cycle Options

  9. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  10. Effects of water light absorption properties of a radiographic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photon beam dosimetry using Kodak extended dose range (EDR2) radiographic film can provide accurate and high spatial resolution information especially for areas such as IMRT dosimetry where a higher dose level (100-400 cGy) is often required to be delivered for verification. For such dosimetry checks, it may sometimes be useful to place the film in a tank filled with water during irradiation. The effects of water on the film when packaged and when removed from the packaging have been examined. Results have shown that the EDR2 film when supplied in the ready pack form is provided in water proof packages and no significant absorption effects are observed or measured on the film even after 48 h of soaking in a water bath. When the film is removed from the ready packs and exposed to water directly, various effects are seen. In the visible spectrum region, small variations (up to 3%) in recorded optical density (OD) are recorded using a fluorescent light densitometer. These effects become much larger in the infrared region (e.g. 7.5% at 900 nm and 12.5% at 1000 nm) and are wavelength dependent. The changes produced by the water are relatively independent of the exposure time to water from 5 s up to 1 h or whether the water exposure occurred. (author)

  11. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation

  12. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammersley, R.J. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation.

  13. Status of advanced light water cooled reactor designs 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report, which is significantly more comprehensive than the previously one, addresses the rationale and basic motivations that lead to a continuing development of nuclear technology, provides an overview of the world status of current LWRs, describes the present market situations, and identifies desired characteristics for future plants. The report also provides a detailed description of utility requirements that largely govern today's nuclear development efforts, the situation with regard to enhanced safety objectives, a country wise description of the development activities, and a technical description of the various reactor designs in a consistent format. The reactor designs are presented in two categories: (1) evolutionary concepts that are expected to be commercially available soon; and (2) innovative designs. The report addresses the main technical characteristics of each concept without assessing or evaluating them from a particular point of view (e.g. safety or economics). Additionally, the report identifies basic reference documents that can provide further information for detailed evaluations. The report closes with an outlook on future energy policy developments

  14. Advanced Epi Tools for Gallium Nitride Light Emitting Diode Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patibandla, Nag; Agrawal, Vivek

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of this program, Applied Materials, Inc., with generous support from the United States Department of Energy, developed a world-class three chamber III-Nitride epi cluster tool for low-cost, high volume GaN growth for the solid state lighting industry. One of the major achievements of the program was to design, build, and demonstrate the world’s largest wafer capacity HVPE chamber suitable for repeatable high volume III-Nitride template and device manufacturing. Applied Materials’ experience in developing deposition chambers for the silicon chip industry over many decades resulted in many orders of magnitude reductions in the price of transistors. That experience and understanding was used in developing this GaN epi deposition tool. The multi-chamber approach, which continues to be unique in the ability of the each chamber to deposit a section of the full device structure, unlike other cluster tools, allows for extreme flexibility in the manufacturing process. This robust architecture is suitable for not just the LED industry, but GaN power devices as well, both horizontal and vertical designs. The new HVPE technology developed allows GaN to be grown at a rate unheard of with MOCVD, up to 20x the typical MOCVD rates of 3{micro}m per hour, with bulk crystal quality better than the highest-quality commercial GaN films grown by MOCVD at a much cheaper overall cost. This is a unique development as the HVPE process has been known for decades, but never successfully commercially developed for high volume manufacturing. This research shows the potential of the first commercial-grade HVPE chamber, an elusive goal for III-V researchers and those wanting to capitalize on the promise of HVPE. Additionally, in the course of this program, Applied Materials built two MOCVD chambers, in addition to the HVPE chamber, and a robot that moves wafers between them. The MOCVD chambers demonstrated industry-leading wavelength yield for GaN based LED wafers and industry

  15. The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: spectromicroscopy and fast timing

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    1999-01-01

    Two recently commissioned infrared beamlines on the 1.4 bending magnet port at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL, are described. Using a synchrotron as an IR source provides three primary advantages: increased brightness, very fast light pulses, and enhanced far-IRflux. The considerable brightness advantage manifests itself most beneficially when performing spectroscopy on a microscopic length scale. Beamline (BL) 1.4.3 is a dedicated FTIR spectromicroscopy beamline, where a diffraction-l...

  16. Nuclear Data Libraries for Hydrogen in Light Water Ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear data libraries were produced for hydrogen (H) in light water ice at different temperatures, 20, 30, 50, 77, 112, 180, 230 K.These libraries were produced using the NJOY nuclear data processing system.With this code we produce pointwise cross sections and related quantities, in the ENDF format, and in the ACE format for MCNP.Experimental neutron spectra at such temperatures were compared with MCNP4B simulations, based on the locally produced libraries, leading to satisfactory results

  17. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of fission-fusion hybrid reactors based on breeding light water thermal fission systems is investigated. The emphasis is on fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) hybrid power reactors that are fueled with natural uranium. Other LWHRs considered include FSS-LWHRs that are fueled with spent fuel from LWRs, and LWHRs which are to supplement LWRs to provide a tandem LWR-LWHR power economy that is fuel-self-sufficient

  18. Overview of core simulation methodologies for light water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current in-core fuel management calculation methods provide a very efficient route to predict neutronics behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cores and their prediction accuracy for current generation LWRs is generally sufficient. However, since neutronics calculations for LWRs are based on various assumptions and simplifications, we should also recognize many implicit limitations that are 'embedded' in current neutronics calculation methodologies. Continuous effort for improvement of core simulation methodologies is also discussed. (author)

  19. Post-treatment of reclaimed waste water based on an electrochemical advanced oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. D.; Salinas, Carlos E.; Rogers, Tom D.

    1992-01-01

    The purification of reclaimed water is essential to water reclamation technology life-support systems in lunar/Mars habitats. An electrochemical UV reactor is being developed which generates oxidants, operates at low temperatures, and requires no chemical expendables. The reactor is the basis for an advanced oxidation process in which electrochemically generated ozone and hydrogen peroxide are used in combination with ultraviolet light irradiation to produce hydroxyl radicals. Results from this process are presented which demonstrate concept feasibility for removal of organic impurities and disinfection of water for potable and hygiene reuse. Power, size requirements, Faradaic efficiency, and process reaction kinetics are discussed. At the completion of this development effort the reactor system will be installed in JSC's regenerative water recovery test facility for evaluation to compare this technique with other candidate processes.

  20. Recent advances in light outcoupling from white organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gather, Malte C.; Reineke, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been successfully introduced to the smartphone display market and have geared up to become contenders for applications in general illumination where they promise to combine efficient generation of white light with excellent color quality, glare-free illumination, and highly attractive designs. Device efficiency is the key requirement for such white OLEDs, not only from a sustainability perspective, but also because at the high brightness required for general illumination, losses lead to heating and may, thus, cause rapid device degradation. The efficiency of white OLEDs increased tremendously over the past two decades, and internal charge-to-photon conversion can now be achieved at ˜100% yield. However, the extraction of photons remains rather inefficient (typically <30%). Here, we provide an introduction to the underlying physics of outcoupling in white OLEDs and review recent progress toward making light extraction more efficient. We describe how structures that scatter, refract, or diffract light can be attached to the outside of white OLEDs (external outcoupling) or can be integrated close to the active layers of the device (internal outcoupling). Moreover, the prospects of using top-emitting metal-metal microcavity designs for white OLEDs and of tuning the average orientation of the emissive molecules within the OLED are discussed.

  1. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in UV-A LEDs and semi

  2. Advances in Membrane Distillation for Water Desalination and Purification Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane distillation is a process that utilizes differences in vapor pressure to permeate water through a macro-porous membrane and reject other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. This review considers the fundamental heat and mass transfer processes in membrane distillation, recent advances in membrane technology, module configurations, and the applications and economics of membrane distillation, and identifies areas that may lead to technological improvements in membrane distillation as well as the application characteristics required for commercial deployment.

  3. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was attended by 20 participants from 12 countries who reviewed and discussed the status and progress of national programmes on advanced water-cooled reactors and recommended to the Scientific Secretary a comprehensive programme for 1991/1992 which would support technology development programmes in IWGATWR Member States. This summary report outlines the activities of IWGATWR since its Second Meeting in June 1988 and main results of the Third Meeting

  4. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status of national programmes, the progress achieved since the last meeting held in June 1988 in the field of advanced technologies and design trends for existing and future water cooled reactors. 24 specialists from 14 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting and 12 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Neutronic challenges of advanced boiling water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of Boiling Water Reactor technology has been under investigation at the Center for Advance Nuclear Energy Systems at MIT. The advanced concepts under study provide economic incentives through enabling further power uprates (i.e. increasing vessel power density) or better fuel cycle uranium utilization. The challenges in modeling of three advanced concepts with focus on neutronics are presented. First, the Helical Cruciform Fuel rod has been used in some Russian reactors, and studied at MIT for uprating the power in LWRs through increased heat transfer area per unit core volume. The HCF design requires high fidelity 3D tools to assess its reactor physics behavior as well as thermal and fuel performance. Second, an advanced core design, the BWR-HD, was found to promise 65% higher power density over existing BWRs, while using current licensing tools and existing technology. Its larger assembly size requires stronger coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics compared to the current practice. Third is the reduced moderation BWRs, which had been proposed in Japan to enable breeding and burning of fuel as an alternative to sodium fast reactors. Such technology suffers from stronger sensitivity of its neutronics to the void fraction than the traditional BWRs, thus requiring exact modeling of the core conditions such as bypass voiding, to correctly characterize its performance. (author)

  6. Research of application of new material to light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Nuclear Equipment Research Institute (ANERI) has been doing the research to apply the new material including metal, fine ceramics and high polymer which were developed and applied in other industries to components and parts of light water reactor for the purpose of Improvement of reliability of components, improvement of efficiency of periodic inspection, improvement of repair and reduction of radiation exposure of worker. This project started upon the sponsorship of Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) by the schedule of FY1985-FY1993 (9 years) and effective results has been obtained. (author)

  7. Computer code for thermal hydraulic analysis of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer programme (THAL) has been developed to perform thermal hydraulic analysis of a single channel in a light water moderated core. In this code the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic equations describing one-dimensional axial flow have been discretized and solved explicitly stepwise up the coolant channel for an arbitrary power profile. THAL has been developed for use on small computers and it is capable of predicting the coolant, clad and fuel temperature profiles, steam quality, void fraction, pressure drop, critical heat flux and DNB ratio throughout the core. A boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor have been analyzed as test cases. The results obtained through the use of THAL compare favourably with those given in the design reports of these reactor systems. (author)

  8. The Advanced Light Source Accelerator Control System at Ten Years from Commissioning

    OpenAIRE

    Biocca, A.; Brown, W.; Domning, E.; Fowler, K; Jacobson, S; McDonald, J.; Molinari, P.; Robb, A; Shalz, L.; Spring, J; Timossi, C.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source was commissioned 10 years ago using the newly constructed control system. Further experience with the control system was reported in 1993. In this publication, we report on recent experience with the operation and especially growth of the computer control system and expansion to accommodate the new superconducting bend magnets and fast orbit feedback for the ALS electron storage ring.

  9. Advanced light source's approach to ensure conditions for safe top-off operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to outline the Advanced Light Source (ALS) approach for preventing a radiation accident scenario on the ALS experimental floor due to top-off operation. The document will describe the potential risks, the analysis, and the resulting specifications for the controls.

  10. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept

  11. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO2, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as cogeneration

  12. Aging management of major light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Review of technical literature and field experience has identified stress corrosion cracking as one of the major degradation mechanisms for the major light water reactor components. Three of the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms of current concern are (a) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactors, and (b) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in boiling water reactors. Effective aging management of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms includes evaluation of interactions between design, materials, stressors, and environment; identification and ranking of susceptible sites; reliable inspection of any damage; assessment of damage rate; mitigation of damage; and repair and replacement using corrosion-resistant materials. Management of PWSCC includes use of lower operating temperatures, reduction in residual tensile stresses, development of reliable inspection techniques, and use of Alloy 690 as replacement material. Management of IGSCC of nozzle and attachment welds includes use of Alloy 82 as weld material, and potential use of hydrogen water chemistry. Management of IASCC also includes potential use of hydrogen water chemistry

  13. Latest laser and light-based advances for ethnic skin rejuvenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsaie Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in nonablative skin rejuvenation technologies have sparked a renewed interest in the cosmetic treatment of aging skin. More options exist now than ever before to reverse cutaneous changes caused by long-term exposure to sunlight. Although Caucasian skin is more prone to ultraviolet light injury, ethnic skin (typically classified as types IV to VI also exhibits characteristic photoaging changes. Widespread belief that inevitable or irreversible textural changes or dyspigmentation occurs following laser- or light-based treatments, has been challenged in recent years by new classes of devices capable of protecting the epidermis from injury during treatment. Objective: The purpose of this article is to review recent clinical advances in the treatment of photoaging changes in ethnic skin. This article provides a basis for the classification of current advances in nonablative management of ethnic skin.

  14. Critical heat flux measurements in rod bundles using light water and heavy water as coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of Critical Heat Flux (CHF), subchannel mixing and pressure drop tests were performed on a full scale simulated 37 element fuel bundle at the Heat Transfer Research Facility of Columbia University for Siemens/Kraftwerk Union Ag. of Germany. The experimental program consisted of thermal hydraulic testing of a full scale 37 element fuel bundle 3000 mm long to determine two phase pressure drop and CHF characteristics. The test were performed on the simulated fuel bundle in a vertical circular test housing with an outer diameter of 108.25 mm. The axial power distribution was uniform, while the radial power distribution was non-uniform with a heat flux depression of about 35%. The bundle geometry was maintained by spacer grids. In this experimental program, 92 CHF runs were performed using light water (H2O) as the coolant, and 22 CHF runs were performed using heavy water (D2O) as the coolant to reduce the risk of heavy water loss. The CHF tests covered the following parameter ranges: pressure from 70 to 150 bars in light water and at 100 and 115 bars in heavy water; mass velocities from 1000 to 5600 kg/m2s, and inlet temperatures from 200 to 320 degree C. The experiments carried out in heavy water were in essence a duplication of the test conditions of the ones obtained in light water, facilitating a direct comparison of the results using both fluids. Furthermore, an evaluation of the experiments using the subchannel analysis method was made with the results being presented. Analysis shows that CHF with heavy water as a coolant can be predicted with sufficient accuracy by applying Ahmad's scaling laws for fluid -to fluid modeling. Therefore, CHF correlations developed and verified for light water reactors can be applied to design heavy water cooled reactor cores

  15. Trend of inspection and evaluation, repair and preventive maintenance guidelines for light water reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspection and Evaluation Guidelines for Light Water Reactor Internals have been enacted because the damages of stress corrosion cracking etc. were found recently in light water reactor internals. This paper describes the trend of the guidelines. (author)

  16. Neutronical study of gadolinium solution in light water lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study the effect on light water lattices of a gadolinium solution and to participate to the validation of critical calculations. The objective of the experiments and calculations we have performed were to obtain the ksub(infinity) in function of the concentration of poison in water. With the experimental values obtained, we can qualify calcula - tion of regular light water lattices consisting of UO2 pins and highly poisonned moderator (with bore or Gd). We have obtained through the results of this work the iso-ksub(infinity) curb (ksub(infinity)sup(B) ksub(infinity)sup(Gd) in an infinite lattice. The precision on the equivalence factor (A = Csub(B)/Csub(Gd)), which allows to switch from a Gd concentration to an equivalent bore concentration, is good (1%). Moreover, the interpretation hs demonstrated that this experiment is able to qualify the thermal capture of Gd. The exp.-calc. difference on Gd thermal cross sections is -0.4+-1%

  17. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  18. Hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical review of the literature now available on hydrogen considerations in light-water power reactors (LWRs) and a bibliography of that literature are presented. The subject matter includes mechanisms for the generation of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures, a description of the fundamental properties of such mixtures, and their spontaneous ignition in both static and dynamic systems. The limits for hydrogen flammability and flame propagation are examined in terms of the effects of pressure, temperature, and additives; the emphasis is on the effects of steam and water vapor. The containment systems for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs) are compared, and methods to control hydrogen and oxygen under the conditions of both normal operation and postulated accidents are reviewed. It is concluded that hydrogen can be controlled so that serious complications from the production of hydrogen will not occur. The bibliography contains abstracts from the computerized files of the Nuclear Safety Information Center. Key-word, author, and permuted-title indexes are provided. The bibliography includes responses to questions asked by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which relate to hydrogen, as well as information on normal operations and postulated accidents including generation of hydrogen from core sprays. Other topics included in the ten sections of the bibliography are metal-water reactions, containment atmosphere, radiolytic gas, and recombiners

  19. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7. Model and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method of FEMAXI-7, and its improvements and extensions. (author)

  20. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7; model and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, and improvements and extensions. (author)

  1. Environment sensitive cracking in light water reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the paper is to review the available methods and the most promising future possibilities of preventive maintenance to counteract the various forms of environment sensitive cracking of pressure boundary materials in light water reactors. Environment sensitive cracking is considered from the metallurgical, mechanical and environmental point of view. The main emphasis is on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and high strenght Ni-base alloys, as well as on corrosion fatigue of low alloy and stainless steels. Finally, some general ideas how to predict, reduce or eliminate environment sensitive cracking in service are presented

  2. Stainless steel clad for light water reactor fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proper reactor operation and design guidelines are necessary to assure fuel integrity. The occurrence of fuel rod failures for operation in compliance with existing guidelines suggests the need for more adequate or applicable operation/design criteria. The intent of this study is to develop such criteria for light water reactor fuel rods with stainless steel clad and to indicate the nature of uncertainties in its development. The performance areas investigated herein are: long term creepdown and fuel swelling effects on clad dimensional changes and on proximity to clad failure; and short term clad failure possibilities during up-power ramps

  3. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  4. Control and safety of light water reactors fuelled with plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes the main results of safety analyses which allow to compare the behaviour of plutonium and uranium fuelled cores with particular reference to BWR cores (Garigliano and Caorso) and to a PWR core - Trinovercellese. The control and safety study is focused on the following accidental events: control rod ejection and steam line break for the PWR and control rod drop, failure of the main heat sink heat-up phase of a Loca for the BWRs. Moreover, the report contains the main conclusions of a propaedentic study of the impact of plutonium recycle on light water reactors core safety

  5. Preliminary concepts: safeguards for spent light-water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology available for safeguarding spent nuclear fuels from light-water power reactors is reviewed, and preliminary concepts for a spent-fuel safeguards system are presented. Essential elements of a spent-fuel safeguards system are infrequent on-site inspections, containment and surveillance systems to assure the integrity of stored fuel between inspections, and nondestructive measurements of the fuel assemblies. Key safeguards research and development activities necessary to implement such a system are identified. These activities include the development of tamper-indicating fuel-assembly identification systems and the design and development of nondestructive spent-fuel measurement systems

  6. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel

  7. Core burnup characteristics of high conversion light water reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate core burnup characteristics of a high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR) with tight pitched lattice, core burnup calculation was made using two dimensional diffusion method. The volume ratio of moderator to fuel is about 0.8 in the reactor (HCLWR-J1) under study. The burnup calculations were carried out under the assumption of three batch and out-in fuel loading from the first cycle to the equilibrium cycle. A detailed evaluation was made for discharge burnup, conversion ratio, power distribution, and reactivity coefficients and so on. (author)

  8. The economics of the fuel cycle (light water reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economical characteristics of the fuel cycle (of light water reactors) as well as the definition and calculation method for the average updated cost of the kWh are recalled. The evolution followed by the unit prices of the different operations of the cycle, their total cost and the part taken by this cost in the overall cost of nuclear kWh are described. The effects on the cost of fuel of certain hypotheses, operating requirements and additional cost factors are considered

  9. Domestic light water reactor fuel design evolution. Volume III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume III of this report examines the design evolution of domestic light water reactor fuel. The fuel of each vendor is individually described. Tables and figures detail the fuel's design parameters. A data base of this nature is required for the design of an underwater fuel disassembly and rod storage system. An assessment of fuel failure mechanisms and fuel performance is presented showing that spent fuel pool operational problems will be minimal or nonexistent. A summary and projection of spent fuel discharges, organized by reactor and fuel design type, is included to show the magnitude and composition of the spent fuel situation facing the nuclear industry

  10. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design... the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis...

  11. Preliminary study of advanced turboprop and turboshaft engines for light aircraft. [cost effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knip, G.; Plencner, R. M.; Eisenberg, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of engine configuration, advanced component technology, compressor pressure ratio and turbine rotor-inlet temperature on such figures of merit as vehicle gross weight, mission fuel, aircraft acquisition cost, operating, cost and life cycle cost are determined for three fixed- and two rotary-wing aircraft. Compared with a current production turboprop, an advanced technology (1988) engine results in a 23 percent decrease in specific fuel consumption. Depending on the figure of merit and the mission, turbine engine cost reductions required to achieve aircraft cost parity with a current spark ignition reciprocating (SIR) engine vary from 0 to 60 percent and from 6 to 74 percent with a hypothetical advanced SIR engine. Compared with a hypothetical turboshaft using currently available technology (1978), an advanced technology (1988) engine installed in a light twin-engine helicopter results in a 16 percent reduction in mission fuel and about 11 percent in most of the other figures of merit.

  12. Advanced methods for light trapping in optically thin silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, James Richard

    2011-12-01

    The field of light trapping is the study of how best to absorb light in a thin film of material when most light either reflects away at the surface or transmits straight through to the other side. This has tremendous application to the field of photovoltaics where thin silicon films can be manufactured cheaply, but also fail to capture all of the available photons in the solar spectrum. Advancements in light trapping therefore bring us closer to the day when photovoltaic devices may reach grid parity with traditional fossil fuels on the electrical energy market. This dissertation advances our understanding of light trapping by first modeling the effects of loss in planar dielectric waveguides. The mathematical framework developed here can be used to model any arbitrary three-layer structure with mixed gain or loss and then extract the total field solution for the guided modes. It is found that lossy waveguides possess a greater number of eigenmodes than their lossless counterparts, and that these "loss guided" modes attenuate much more rapidly than conventional modes. Another contribution from this dissertation is the exploration of light trapping through the use of dielectric nanospheres embedded directly within the active layer of a thin silicon film. The primary benefit to this approach is that the device can utilize a surface nitride layer serving as an antireflective coating while still retaining the benefits of light trapping within the film. The end result is that light trapping and light injection are effectively decoupled from each other and may be independently optimized within a single photovoltaic device. The final contribution from this work is a direct numerical comparison between multiple light trapping schemes. This allows us to quantify the relative performances of various design techniques against one another and objectively determine which ideas tend to capture the most light. Using numerical simulation, this work directly compares the absorption

  13. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4th generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6th Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  14. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  15. Toward visible light response: Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Extensive energy conversion of solar energy can only be achieved by large-scale collection of solar flux. The technology that satisfies this requirement must be as simple as possible to reduce capital cost. Overall water splitting by powder-form photocatalysts directly produces a mixture of H 2 and O2 (chemical energy) in a single reactor, which does not require any complicated parabolic mirrors and electronic devices. Because of its simplicity and low capital cost, it has tremendous potential to become the major technology of solar energy conversion. Development of highly efficient photocatalysts is desired. This review addresses why visible light responsive photocatalysts are essential to be developed. The state of the art for the photocatalysts for overall water splitting is briefly described. Moreover, various fundamental aspects for developing efficient photocatalysts, such as particle size of photocatalysts, cocatalysts, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 De Gruyter.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of rotating shallow water methods and advances

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitlin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    The rotating shallow water (RSW) model is of wide use as a conceptual tool in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD), because, in spite of its simplicity, it contains all essential ingredients of atmosphere and ocean dynamics at the synoptic scale, especially in its two- (or multi-) layer version. The book describes recent advances in understanding (in the framework of RSW and related models) of some fundamental GFD problems, such as existence of the slow manifold, dynamical splitting of fast (inertia-gravity waves) and slow (vortices, Rossby waves) motions, nonlinear geostrophic adjustment and wa

  17. Digital control application for the advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is a 1300 MWe class Nuclear Power Plant whose design studies and demonstration tests are being performed by the three manufacturers, General Electric, Toshiba and Hitachi, under requirement specifications from the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The goals are to apply new technology to the BWR in order to achieve enhanced operational efficiencies, improved safety measures and cost reductions. In the plant instrumentation and control areas, traditional analog control equipment and wire cables will be replaced by distributed digital microprocessor based control units communicating with each other and the control room over fiber optic multiplexed data buses

  18. Reflector modeling in advanced nodal analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in the modeling of the reflector regions of pressurized water reactors within the framework of advanced nodal diffusion analysis methods is reviewed. Attention is focused on the modeling of the radial reflector of a PWR which is most problematic because of its irregular and heterogeneous structure. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the high accuracy of the methods which are now available for generating nodal reflector parameters and it is shown that errors due to reflector modeling in multi-dimensional nodal reactor analysis can be practically eliminated. (author). 23 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  19. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h)-1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  20. Requirements for next generation light water reactors for the 21st century in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nuclear power generation with light water reactors has been successfully employed and developed in Japan, further improvements in economics and safety are desirable in order to achieve further development and maturity of nuclear power. At the present time advanced light water reactors have successfully been developed and construction of two units has started in Japan. Large LWRs of highly developed function and performance have been studied as a candidate for the next-generation power reactor adopting the newest technological concepts as for Advanced LWRs such as ABWR and APWR. On the other hand, innovative design ideas which differ from conventional concepts are being advocated abroad and in Japan. Issues on the energy situation, labor force, etc. likely to arise in the 21st century in relation to the design of LWRs and of nuclear power development and requirements for Japan are discussed. The anticipated social changes toward the future have been considered as the surrounding conditions for defining the required specifications of the new-concept reactors. The results of the discussion are summarized below for the items most likely to be encountered from the aspects of energy demand, labor issues and technical development. (author). 4 figs

  1. Guidebook on quality control of mixed oxides and gadolinium bearing fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the coverage of an efficient quality assurance system, quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication is an essential element to assure the reliable performance of all its components in service. Incentives to increase fuel performance, by extending reactor cycles or achieving higher burnups and, in some countries to use recycled plutonium in light water reactors (LWRs) necessitated the development of new types of fuels. In the first case, due to higher uranium enrichments, a burnable neutron absorber was integrated to the fuel pellets. Gadolinia was found to form a solid solution with Uranium dioxide and, to present a burnup rate which matches fissile uranium depletion. (U,Gd)O2 fuels which have been successfully used since the seventies, in boiling water reactors have more recently found an increased utilization, in pressurized water reactors. This amply justifies the publication of this TECDOC to encourage authorities, designers and manufacturers of these types of fuel to establish a more uniform, adapted and effective system of control, thus promoting improved materials reliability and good performance in advanced fuel for light water reactors. The Guidebook is subdivided into four chapters written by different authors. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these chapters. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. High performance light water reactor core design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is the European version of the various supercritical water cooled reactor proposals. The paper presents the activity of KFKI-AEKI in the field of neutronic core design within the framework of the European funded project: 'HPLWR Phase 2'. As the coolant density along the axial direction shows remarkable change, coupled neutronic-thermohydraulic calculations are essential which take into account the heating of moderator in the special water rods of the assemblies. A parametrized diffusion cross section library was prepared for the HPLWR assembly with the MULTICELL neutronic transport code. The parametrized cross sections are used by the KARATE program system, which was verified by comparative Monte Carlo calculations. Methodical core calculations have been carried out. Without thermal insulation in the second superheater of the three pass core, the temperature of moderator water exceeds the pseudocritical temperature resulting in poor moderation. Applying heat insulators helps to avoid the extreme heat up of moderator, so it provides better moderation for neutrons. The increase of the local multiplication in the superheaters favorably affects the power distribution and keff of the core. Preliminary loadings of the HPLWR core were assessed, which contain insulated assemblies with Gd burnable absorbers. The initial reactivity excess was compensated by control rods. The reactivity coefficients of HPLWR with respect to temperatures show substantial negative feedback at normal operating conditions. (author)

  3. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas

  4. Ultraviolet light in the use of water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet light is an effective method in the use of water disinfection for swimming pools, potable water and industry required water. For many reasons UV light and UV compounded with chlorine (UV/chlorine) has been brought to attention in resent years. In this research, a swimming pool water disinfection was carried out by means of a system with the use of a reactor which was made of stainless steel (SS-304) and with many another standards required. Operation of system was carried out at first in the pilot plant and then installation in essential water treatment integrated. Inactivation of pollution index, E. Coli or Total coliform and Pseudomonas aeroginosa studied with 6000,16000 and 30000 μW.s/cm2 UV dose and then in presence of 0.3,0.6,0.9 and 1.2 mg/1 free chlorine (UV/chlorine). In swimming pools minimum free chlorine residual usually is 1.5 mg/1. Optimum UV dose was 16000 μW.s/cm2 attention to 50 percent UV absorption caused to TSS,TDS and turbidity. In the UV/chlorine system suitable rate was 16000μW.s/cm2 UV dose /0.6 mg/1 chlorine in the 2.4 * 105 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 3600CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most probable number(MPN) estimated multiple tube fermentation technique. In this way the flow rate for system indicated about 240 cm3/s or 0.9 m3/h. The samples polluted for secondary pollution with 54000 CFU/100 ml for E.Coli and 1800 CFU/100ml Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The number of microbes decreased to zero duration after 45 minutes contact time in presence of free chlorine residual in samples. In practical conditions which that disinfectant system was installed in essential water treatment circuit under 1.4 atm hydraulic pressure no growth was seen for pollution index in disinfected water with UV in microbial density about 840 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 12CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Attention to lower turbidity, TSS and TDS in tap water, higher flow rate about 560 cm3/s or 2 m3/h acessesed. Transparent

  5. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  6. Study on a decay heat removal system of light water reactors using air coolers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a passive decay heat removal system for light water reactors (LWRs) based on a new concept is studied referring to an air cooling system (ACS) of the fast breeder reactor Monju. The present study will contribute to the reduction of severe accident risks of nuclear power plants. In this system, a blower for an air cooler (AC) is operated using the rotation of a small steam turbine by generated steam in order to cool heat transfer tubes by forced convection of air. The purpose of the present work is to investigate the plant transient caused by a station blackout (SBO) using the plant system code NETFLOW++ and decay heat removal characteristics. A calculation model is the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) in Japan. (author)

  7. Application of water-assisted pulsed light treatment to decontaminate raspberries and blueberries from Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaoxin; Sido, Robert; Huang, Runze; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-09-01

    We developed and evaluated a small scaled-up water-assisted pulsed light (WPL) system, in which berries were washed in a flume washer while being irradiated by pulsed light (PL). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used in combination with PL as an advanced oxidation process and chlorine wash was used as a control. The effects of organic load, water turbidity, berry type and PL energy output on the inactivation of Salmonella using the WPL system were investigated. The combination of WPL and 1% H2O2 (WPL-H2O2) was the most effective treatment which reduced Salmonella on raspberries and blueberries by 4.0 and >5.6logCFU/g, respectively, in clear water. When high organic load and SiO2, as a soil simulator, were added in wash water, the free chlorine level in chlorinated water decreased significantly (P0.05) was observed for the decontamination efficacy of 1-min WPL-H2O2 treatment. Even in the presence of high organic load and water turbidity, no viable bacterial cells were recovered from the wash water, which showed that WPL-H2O2 could effectively prevent the risk of cross-contamination during treatment. Taken together, 1-min WPL treatment without H2O2 could provide a chemical free alternative to chlorine washing with similar and in some cases significantly higher bactericidal efficacy. Compared with chlorine washing, the combination of WPL and H2O2 resulted in significantly higher (Pprocessing of small berries intended for fresh-cut and frozen berry products. PMID:26047537

  8. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  9. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749

  10. Photocatalytic Water Splitting—The Untamed Dream: A Review of Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Jafari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Photocatalytic water splitting using sunlight is a promising technology capable of providing high energy yield without pollutant byproducts. Herein, we review various aspects of this technology including chemical reactions, physiochemical conditions and photocatalyst types such as metal oxides, sulfides, nitrides, nanocomposites, and doped materials followed by recent advances in computational modeling of photoactive materials. As the best-known catalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen and oxygen evolution, TiO2 is discussed in a separate section, along with its challenges such as the wide band gap, large overpotential for hydrogen evolution, and rapid recombination of produced electron-hole pairs. Various approaches are addressed to overcome these shortcomings, such as doping with different elements, heterojunction catalysts, noble metal deposition, and surface modification. Development of a photocatalytic corrosion resistant, visible light absorbing, defect-tuned material with small particle size is the key to complete the sunlight to hydrogen cycle efficiently. Computational studies have opened new avenues to understand and predict the electronic density of states and band structure of advanced materials and could pave the way for the rational design of efficient photocatalysts for water splitting. Future directions are focused on developing innovative junction architectures, novel synthesis methods and optimizing the existing active materials to enhance charge transfer, visible light absorption, reducing the gas evolution overpotential and maintaining chemical and physical stability.

  11. Development of an advanced water treatment system for wastewater reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, H; Ku, B; Gregory, J

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this research was to develop an optimal reuse system applying various types of advanced oxidation processes such as titanium dioxide (TiO2), ozone (O3) and electro-coagulation/oxidation methods. This system is suitable for improving the treatment efficiency of difficult wastewaters, and for the efficient reuse of wastewater. The connecting systems were divided into various types to investigate the stability and treatment efficiency according to the kinds of waste load. Different treatment sequences were examined taking into consideration the characteristics and economical efficiency. In the case of electro-coagulation/oxidation + ozone system, the mean treatment efficiency in terms of BOD5, CODCr and SS removal was 98.7%. The effluent concentration was 50.2 mg l(-1), 38.3 mg l(-1), 30.4 mg l(-1), respectively. In considering the economical efficiency and commercial use, around an eighth of the treatment expenses and around a fifth of the maintenance expenses could be saved compared with existing water treatment systems. The initial construction expenses could be reduced by a third to a fifth. Therefore, if a proper implementation of this research is carried out in relation to site conditions and the purpose of the water reuse, the water reuse rate will be higher and water resources can be protected. PMID:18844120

  12. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Nobumichi

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings i...

  13. Status of advanced light-duty transportation technologies in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases is driving a fundamental change toward more efficient, advanced vehicles, and fuels in the transportation sector. The paper reviews the current status of light duty vehicles in the US and discusses policies to improve fuel efficiency, advanced electric drives, and sustainable cellulosic biofuels. The paper describes the cost, technical, infrastructure, and market barriers for alternative technologies, i.e., advanced biofuels and light-duty vehicles, including diesel vehicles, natural-gas vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell electric vehicles. The paper also presents R and D targets and technology validation programs of the US government. - Highlights: ► Summary of the current status of LDVs and fuels. ► Overview of government policies and incentives for advanced vehicles and fuels. ► Technical and infrastructure barriers for biofuels, PHEVs, and FCEVs. ► Cost targets and research challenges for batteries and fuel cells. ► Summary of near- to mid-term market considerations for vehicles and fuels.

  14. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  15. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided

  16. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  17. Retrieval of water optical properties using polarization of light underwater: case I and II waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilerson, Alexander; Ibrahim, Amir; Foster, Robert; Carrizo, Carlos; El-Habashi, Ahmed; Ahmed, Samir

    2014-10-01

    The relationship between the degree of linear polarization (DoLP) and attenuation-to-absorption coefficients ratio (c/a) of the water from which the scattering coefficient is readily computed (b = c-a) for two main types of oceanic waters (Case I and II) was investigated using the vector radiative transfer simulation. It is found the for Case I waters that only the green channels of the spectrum can be used to retrieve the scattering coefficient of the water whereas blue and red channels are dominated by the pure water effects of either Rayleigh scattering or high water absorption showing no variability between DoLP and c/a. On the other hand, Case II waters showed a strong relationship between DoLP and c/a for all wavelength of light under study (440, 550, 665 nm). Those relationships have been parameterized for all possible viewing geometries (sensor zenith and azimuth relative to the Sun's principle plane) and for varying Sun zenith angles. That relationship has been tested and validated against a dataset of in-situ measurements using a custom developed underwater polarimeter that measures the DoLP and an in-water package of instruments (WetLabs ac-s) that measure the absorption and the attenuation coefficients. Another polarimeter fixed on a platform in Long Island Sound at the LISCO station measures the DoLP of the light above water while a moored instrument package (WQM and C-star) that measures in-water optical properties have been used for a time serious validation.

  18. Universal Long-Range Nanometric Bending of Water by Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-10-01

    Resolving mechanical effects of light on fluids has fundamental importance with wide applications. Most experiments to date on optofluidic interface deformation exploited radiation forces exerted by normally incident lasers. However, the intriguing effects of photon momentum for any configuration, including the unique total internal reflection regime, where an evanescent wave leaks above the interface, remain largely unexplored. A major difficulty in resolving nanomechanical effects has been the lack of a sensitive detection technique. Here, we devise a simple setup whereby a probe laser produces high-contrast Newton-ring-like fringes from a sessile water drop. The mechanical action of the photon momentum of a pump beam modulates the fringes, thus allowing us to perform a direct noninvasive measurement of a nanometric bulge with sub-5-nm precision. Remarkably, a high precision data validate the century-old Minkowski theory for a general angle and offer potential for novel optofluidic devices and noncontact nanomanipulation strategies.

  19. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation

  20. Development of light water reactors and cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of Light Water Reactors (LWR) started in US. Japan imported this technology from US, and its construction and improvement had been done by adding Japanese original technologies. This article outlined development history of LWR, its plant system and main components, ECCS and accident management. Most operating LWR were those rapidly developed from 1960 to 1970 and associated accident response was so designed for all assumed conditions at that time. At the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, needed works could not be down well due to all losses of AC and DC power, inability to assure plant state at control room under power stoppage, work interruption caused by aftershock and road blockage by Tsunami drift, and accident management was not effective and accident was enlarged. After the Fukushima nuclear accident, enhanced measures against more stringent conditions such as external events should be prepared to assure safety of nuclear power station using latest knowledge. (T. Tanaka)

  1. NEPTUNE: a modular system for light water reactor computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NEPTUNE is a modular system for light water reactor calculations: at present time the APOLLO, DIANE and ELECTRE functions are available. The multigroupe transport equation is solved by APOLLO for a cell, a group of cells or a fuel assembly; the diffusion coefficient is eventually determined and depletion calculation performed; the NEPLIB interface for few group diffusion calculations is automatically generated. The finite difference diffusion equation is solved by DIANE for 1D and 2D problems with any number of meshes and groups and Doppler and moderator density feed-back are taken into account; moreover the depletion equation are solved with user provided chains. ELECTRE is based on the finite element method for the solution of 2D and 3D diffusion equation: a macroscopic depletion calculation is provided and an automated critical search is allowed by variation of a poison concentration. A module added to ELECTRE is devoted to fuel management: an optimal shuffling procedure is determined by linear programming

  2. Standard Guide for Benchmark Testing of Light Water Reactor Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers general approaches for benchmarking neutron transport calculations in light water reactor systems. A companion guide (Guide E2005) covers use of benchmark fields for testing neutron transport calculations and cross sections in well controlled environments. This guide covers experimental benchmarking of neutron fluence calculations (or calculations of other exposure parameters such as dpa) in more complex geometries relevant to reactor surveillance. Particular sections of the guide discuss: the use of well-characterized benchmark neutron fields to provide an indication of the accuracy of the calculational methods and nuclear data when applied to typical cases; and the use of plant specific measurements to indicate bias in individual plant calculations. Use of these two benchmark techniques will serve to limit plant-specific calculational uncertainty, and, when combined with analytical uncertainty estimates for the calculations, will provide uncertainty estimates for reactor fluences with ...

  3. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork

  4. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M R

    2000-01-11

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  5. Roadmap for implementation of light water reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While decommissioning of Tokai-mura reactor and JATR reactor has already started in Japan, Tsuruga reactor is announced shutdown in 2010 as the first decommissioning of commercial light water reactor (LWR). In 2030s or may be more earlier due to economic reasons, decommissioning of LWRs will take place in succession. Since rational decommissioning needs operating data of individual plants, ample time should be allowed for planning the reactor decommissioning. Committee of Nuclear Power Engineering Cooperation (NUPEC) had identified relevant issues to implement LWR decommissioning and established roadmaps showing fundamental approaches to solve seventeen items categorized in seven areas as action items. Harmonization of policy, regulations and technology development as a whole and reflection of accumulated lessons learned from overseas decommissioning experiences needed further study. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Waste disposal from the light water reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative nuclear fuel cycles for support of light water reactors are described and wastes containing naturally occurring or artificially produced radioactivity reviewed. General principles and objectives in radioactive waste management are outlined, and methods for their practical application to fuel cycle wastes discussed. The paper concentrates upon management of wastes from upgrading processes of uranium hexafluoride manufacture and uranium enrichment, and, to a lesser extent, nuclear power reactor wastes. Some estimates of radiological dose commitments and health effects from nuclear power and fuel cycle wastes have been made for US conditions. These indicate that the major part of the radiological dose arises from uranium mining and milling, operation of nuclear reactors, and spent fuel reprocessing. However, the total dose from the fuel cycle is estimated to be only a small fraction of that from natural background radiation

  7. Advanced analytical techniques for boiling water reactor chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical techniques applied can be divided into 5 classes: OFF-LINE (discontinuous, central lab), AT-LINE (discontinuous, analysis near loop), ON-LINE (continuous, analysis in bypass). In all cases pressure and temperature of the water sample are reduced. In a strict sense only IN-LINE (continuous, flow disturbance) and NON-INVASIVE (continuous, no flow disturbance) techniques are suitable for direct process control; - the ultimate goal. An overview of the analytical techniques tested in the pilot loop is given. Apart from process and overall water quality control, standard for BWR operation, the main emphasis is on water impurity characterization (crud particles, hot filtration, organic carbon); on stress corrosion crackling control for materials (corrosion potential, oxygen concentration) and on the characterization of the oxide layer on austenites (impedance spectroscopy, IR-reflection). The above mentioned examples of advanced analytical techniques have the potential of in-line or non-invasive application. They are different stages of development and are described in more detail. 28 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs

  8. Advanced Water Recovery Technologies for Long Duration Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Scan X.

    2005-01-01

    Extended-duration space travel and habitation require recovering water from wastewater generated in spacecrafts and extraterrestrial outposts since the largest consumable for human life support is water. Many wastewater treatment technologies used for terrestrial applications are adoptable to extraterrestrial situations but challenges remain as constraints of space flights and habitation impose severe limitations of these technologies. Membrane-based technologies, particularly membrane filtration, have been widely studied by NASA and NASA-funded research groups for possible applications in space wastewater treatment. The advantages of membrane filtration are apparent: it is energy-efficient and compact, needs little consumable other than replacement membranes and cleaning agents, and doesn't involve multiphase flow, which is big plus for operations under microgravity environment. However, membrane lifespan and performance are affected by the phenomena of concentration polarization and membrane fouling. This article attempts to survey current status of membrane technologies related to wastewater treatment and desalination in the context of space exploration and quantify them in terms of readiness level for space exploration. This paper also makes specific recommendations and predictions on how scientist and engineers involving designing, testing, and developing space-certified membrane-based advanced water recovery technologies can improve the likelihood of successful development of an effective regenerative human life support system for long-duration space missions.

  9. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm-2, and at 35 to 900C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm-2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 900C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H2O at 0.2 A cm-2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H2O at 0.5 A cm-2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H2O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  10. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR). Annex I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design was developed through a collaborative effort sponsored by the nuclear energy research initiative (NERI) programme of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The design and testing team was comprised of staff from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oregon State University (OSU), and NEXANT-Bechtel. The primary objectives of the project were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate its technical feasibility by conducting testing in a scaled integral test facility. The design has evolved from an initial concept that employed a primary system layout similar to a traditional pressurized water reactor (PWR), with U-tube steam generators external to the reactor vessel, with the thermal centers of the steam generators elevated to enhance natural circulation. The preliminary estimates for the early design indicated that the busbar cost would be about 5.7 cents/kWh, which is far above the goal of 4 cents/kWh. It was concluded that cost reductions could be achieved by using smaller, simpler, factory-assembled units. Therefore, the focus of the project was redirected to a self-contained modular reactor design consisting of an integrated reactor vessel, steam generator, and high-pressure containment vessel. The entire reactor module would be shop fabricated and transportable to a site on most railways or roads. This sealed modular design eliminates the need for on-site refuelling. The MASLWR concept relies on available nuclear technologies. The nuclear core and turbine generators designs were based on configurations used in a typical PWR. This allows the use of current industry expertise and manufacturing capabilities. The novelty of the system comes from the integration of the entire primary side into a single modular unit with an

  11. Advancing Water and Water-Energy-Food Cluster Activities within Future Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, R. G.; Bhaduri, A.; Pahl-Wostl, C.

    2014-12-01

    In building its emerging program, Future Earth has encouraged former Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) projects to redefine their objectives, priorities and problem approaches so they are aligned with those of Future Earth. These new projects will be characterized by more integrated applications of natural and social sciences as well as dialogue and science integrated across disciplinary boundaries to address a wide range of environmental and social issues. The Global Water System Project (GWSP) has had a heritage of integrating natural and social sciences, and recently started to also look at issues within the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) cluster using similar integrated approaches. As part of the growth of the scientific elements of this cluster, GWSP has approached Future Earth opportunities by addressing the sustainability for Water, Energy, and Food through integrated water information and improved governance.In this presentation the approaches being considered for promoting integration in both water and the WEF cluster will be discussed. In particular, potential contributions of Future Earth to research related to the use and management of water and to issues and science underpinning the W-E-F nexus deliberations will be identified. In both cases the increasing ability to utilize Earth observations and big data will advance this research agenda. In addition, the better understanding of the implications of governance structures in addressing these issues and the options for harmonizing the use of scientific knowledge and technological advances will be explored. For example, insights gained from water management studies undertaken within the GWSP are helping to focus plans for a "sustainable water futures" project and a WEF cluster within Future Earth. The potential role of the Sustainable Development Goals in bringing together the monitoring and science capabilities, and understanding of governance approaches, will be discussed as a framework for facilitating

  12. Advancements in sensing and perception using structured lighting techniques :an LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novick, David Keith; Padilla, Denise D.; Davidson, Patrick A. Jr. (.; .); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled ''Advancements in Sensing and Perception using Structured Lighting Techniques''. There is an ever-increasing need for robust, autonomous ground vehicles for counterterrorism and defense missions. Although there has been nearly 30 years of government-sponsored research, it is undisputed that significant advancements in sensing and perception are necessary. We developed an innovative, advanced sensing technology for national security missions serving the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and other government agencies. The principal goal of this project was to develop an eye-safe, robust, low-cost, lightweight, 3D structured lighting sensor for use in broad daylight outdoor applications. The market for this technology is wide open due to the unavailability of such a sensor. Currently available laser scanners are slow, bulky and heavy, expensive, fragile, short-range, sensitive to vibration (highly problematic for moving platforms), and unreliable for outdoor use in bright sunlight conditions. Eye-safety issues are a primary concern for currently available laser-based sensors. Passive, stereo-imaging sensors are available for 3D sensing but suffer from several limitations : computationally intensive, require a lighted environment (natural or man-made light source), and don't work for many scenes or regions lacking texture or with ambiguous texture. Our approach leveraged from the advanced capabilities of modern CCD camera technology and Center 6600's expertise in 3D world modeling, mapping, and analysis, using structured lighting. We have a diverse customer base for indoor mapping applications and this research extends our current technology's lifecycle and opens a new market base for outdoor 3D mapping. Applications include precision mapping, autonomous navigation, dexterous

  13. New ambient pressure photoemission endstation at Advanced Light Source beamline 9.3.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decade, the application of ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy (APPES) has been recognized as an important in situ tool to study environmental and materials science, energy related science, and many other fields. Several APPES endstations are currently under planning or development at the USA and international light sources, which will lead to a rapid expansion of this technique. The present work describes the design and performance of a new APPES instrument at the Advanced Light Source beamline 9.3.2 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This new instrument, Scienta R4000 HiPP, is a result of collaboration between Advanced Light Source and its industrial partner VG-Scienta. The R4000 HiPP provides superior electron transmission as well as spectromicroscopy modes with 16 μm spatial resolution in one dimension and angle-resolved modes with simulated 0.5 deg. angular resolution at 24 deg. acceptance. Under maximum transmission mode, the electron detection efficiency is more than an order of magnitude better than the previous endstation at beamline 9.3.2. Herein we describe the design and performance of the system, which has been utilized to record spectra above 2 mbar.

  14. New ambient pressure photoemission endstation at Advanced Light Source beamline 9.3.2

    KAUST Repository

    Grass, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the application of ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy (APPES) has been recognized as an important in situ tool to study environmental and materials science, energy related science, and many other fields. Several APPES endstations are currently under planning or development at the USA and international light sources, which will lead to a rapid expansion of this technique. The present work describes the design and performance of a new APPES instrument at the Advanced Light Source beamline 9.3.2 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This new instrument, Scienta R4000 HiPP, is a result of collaboration between Advanced Light Source and its industrial partner VG-Scienta. The R4000 HiPP provides superior electron transmission as well as spectromicroscopy modes with 16 μm spatial resolution in one dimension and angle-resolved modes with simulated 0.5° angular resolution at 24° acceptance. Under maximum transmission mode, the electron detection efficiency is more than an order of magnitude better than the previous endstation at beamline 9.3.2. Herein we describe the design and performance of the system, which has been utilized to record spectra above 2 mbar. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  15. An Investigation into Water Chemistry in Primary Coolant Circuit of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure operation safety, an optimization on the coolant chemistry in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor is essential no matter what type or generation the reactor belongs to. For a better understanding toward the water chemistry in an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), such as the one being constructed in the northern part of Taiwan, and for a safer operation of this ABWR, we conducted a proactive, thorough water chemistry analysis prior to the completion of this reactor in this study. A numerical simulation model for water chemistry analyses in ABWRs has been developed, based upon the core technology we established in the past. This core technology for water chemistry modeling is basically an integration of water radiolysis, thermal-hydraulics, and reactor physics. The model, by the name of DEMACE-ABWR, is an improved version of the original DEMACE model and was used for radiolysis and water chemistry prediction in the Longmen ABWR in Taiwan. Predicted results pertinent to the water chemistry variation and the corrosion behavior of structure materials in the primary coolant circuit of this ABWR under rated-power operation were reported in this paper. (authors)

  16. Cooling of concrete structure in advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovative nuclear power plants are being designed by incorporation of passive systems to the extent possible for enhancing the safety by elimination of active components. BARC has designed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) incorporating several passive systems to facilitate the fulfillment of safety functions of the reactor during normal operation, residual heat removal, emergency core cooling, confinement of radioactivity etc. In addition to these passive systems, an innovative passive technology is being developed to protect, the concrete structure in high temperature zone (V1-volume). Passive Concrete Cooling System (PConCS) uses the principle of natural circulation to provide cooling outside the insulation cabinet encompassing high temperature piping. Cooling water is circulated from overhead GDWP in cooling pipes fixed over corrugated plate on outer surface of insulation cabinet and maintains low temperature of concrete structure. Modular construction of insulation cabinet and cooling pipes external to the concrete surface simplifies the design, construction and refurbishment if required. The paper describes the details of passive technology for concrete cooling. (author)

  17. Water-light interaction: A novel pathway for multi hallmark therapy in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Santana-Blank

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser photobiomodulation (LPBM has been proposed as a multi-target (multi-hallmark therapy for cancer and other complex diseases based on an approach that aims to substitute and/or complement metabolic energy pathways through oxygen-dependent (e.g., cytochrome c oxidase (CcO and/or oxygen-independent (e.g., light-water interactions (e.g., F0-F1 motors mechanisms with critical signaling pathways in primarily aqueous media. Cellular and molecular bases for water-mediated, long-range, energy supplementation aimed at inducing and modulating physiologically reparative processes, including apoptosis, have been previously presented through a mechanism termed Photo Infrared Pulsed Biomodulation (PIPBM. Water’s role as an oscillator in LPBM has also been documented. These ideas were recently complemented by integrating the role of the quasi-crystalline exclusion zone (EZ described by Pollack as the fourth phase of water. This is retrospective analysis of experimental and clinical data using an infrared pulsed laser device (IPLD. It found photo-induced effects over the water dynamics of burned rat tissue monitored by 1H-NMR transverse relaxation times (1/T2, indicating significantly greater structuring of water. In addition, a microdensitometry study of T2 weighted tumor heterogeneities from a phase I clinical trial of the IPLD in patients with advanced neoplasias and an algorithm for tumor characterization indicated significantly increased structuring of water, possibly proving a photobiomodulation effect over the EZ associated with histologically-confirmed selective photo-induced tumor cell death. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical demonstration of light-induced effects over the EZ. It supports our premise that LPBM can increase potential energy in the EZ, which then acts as a rechargeable electrolytic bio-battery for the external selective supplementation of the energy demand required for cellular work, signaling pathways and

  18. Plutonium breeding in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of breeding in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) and light water reactors (LWRs) are compared in two ways. The feasibility of breeding has been demonstrated in the Phenix reactor with a measured gain of 0.14. The gain in Superphenix will amount to about0.20. The studies show that while maintaining the performance of commercial reactors their breeding gain can be further increased either by the concept of heterogeneous cores or by using carbide or nitride fuel (breeding gain about0.35). Recently, the old idea of breeding in advanced pressurized water reactors (PWRs) has been taken up again with the objective of attaining a gain of 0.05. Unfortunately, these objectives had to be limited to a conversion ratio of 0.9 for safety reasons, and it is not certain whether operation will be rewarding economically. The strategy of substituting PWRs is examined using the French example. By gradually introducing LMFBRs, the cumulated uranium supplies in France can be kept within reasonable limits, which means that they attain three to four times the home resources. This is not possible with advanced LWRs, which can be considered only as a possible backup solution for plutonium recycling into PWRs

  19. Measurements of the speed of light in water using Foucault's technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Jed; Griffin, Laura; Segre, Phil

    2010-06-01

    We describe how to modify an existing speed-of-light apparatus to measure the speed of light in water. We derive the necessary formulas to account for refraction and light's passage through both water and air. We obtain (3.00±0.09)×108 m/s for the speed of light in air and (2.1±0.1)×108 m/s for the speed of the light in water. Both results are within 7% of established values.

  20. ANALYSIS ON EFFLUENT WATER QUALITY AND ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION AFTER INTRODUCING ADVANCED SEWAGE TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiojiri, Yasuo; Maekawa, Shunich

    We analyze effluent water quality and electricity consumption after in troducing advanced treatment in sewage treatment plant. We define 'advanced treatment ratio' as volume of treated water through advanced treatment processes divided by total volume of treated water in plant. Advanced treatment ratio represents degree of introducing advanced treatment. We build two types of equation. One represents relation between effluent water quality and advanced treatment ratio, the other between electricity consumption and advanced treatment ratio. Each equation is fitted by least squares on 808 samples: 8 fiscal years operation data of 101 plants working in Kanagawa, Tokyo, Saitama and Chiba areas, and coefficient of advanced treatment ratio is estimated. The result is as follows. (1) After introducing advanced treatment aimed at nitrogen removal, T-N in effluent water decreases by 51.3% and electricity consum ption increases by 52.2%. (2) After introducing advanced treatment aimed at phosphorus removal, T-P in effluent water decreases by 27.8%. Using the above result, we try prioritizing 71 plants in Tokyo Bay watershed about raising advanced treatment ratio, so that, in total, pollutant in effluent water decreases with minimized increase of electricity consumption.

  1. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light waters reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1988 through September 1988. 33 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs.

  2. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light waters reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1988 through September 1988. 33 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1991 through March 1992

  4. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR's); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991

  5. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992

  6. Compost admixture impact study on water infiltration depth, water front advance and recession in irrigated environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is an important life supporting resource and is essential for sustainable food production. Its continued decrease has diverted the attention of researchers to find new ways of efficient irrigation management. Decomposed bio-solids (for example leaves, crop residue, animal waste, municipal solid waste) form the compost and provide friendly environment for enhancing crop production. The present study investigates the effects of compost admixture on water infiltration depth, water advance and recession phase of irrigation event in the field having loamy sand texture. Compost from two sources was used. There were nine experimental plots with 3.5 m width and 45 m length. Compost at the rate of 5 % was incorporated up to a depth of 3 cm in six plots (3 plots of each compost source) and in the remaining three plots no compost was applied. The field was irrigated twice. The results revealed that by using 5% compost admixture by weight the advance time reduced by 23.96% and 26.83 % for first and second irrigation, respectively compared to non compost admixture plots. Results revealed that by using 5 % compost up to 3 cm mixing depth the water infiltration depth decreased 42.97 % at head side of the field and 10.37 % at tail side of field during first irrigation, during second irrigation the water infiltration depth decreased 48.67 % at upper end of the field and 11.28 % at lower end of the field. The significant decrease in water infiltration depth at head side gives uniformity in water infiltration depth along the length of field. The faster movement of the water front with the application of compost admixture reduces the difference in intake opportunity times between the head and far end of the field, thus it improves the performance of the irrigation system. Reduction in the applied water volume to the tone of 23.96% during first irrigation and 26.83% during second irrigation, further supports this improvement in irrigation performance, considering on the advance

  7. Advanced light source technologies that enable high-volume manufacturing of DUV lithography extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacouris, Theodore; Rao, Rajasekhar; Rokitski, Rostislav; Jiang, Rui; Melchior, John; Burfeindt, Bernd; O'Brien, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    Deep UV (DUV) lithography is being applied to pattern increasingly finer geometries, leading to solutions like double- and multiple-patterning. Such process complexities lead to higher costs due to the increasing number of steps required to produce the desired results. One of the consequences is that the lithography equipment needs to provide higher operating efficiencies to minimize the cost increases, especially for producers of memory devices that experience a rapid decline in sales prices of these products over time. In addition to having introduced higher power 193nm light sources to enable higher throughput, we previously described technologies that also enable: higher tool availability via advanced discharge chamber gas management algorithms; improved process monitoring via enhanced on-board beam metrology; and increased depth of focus (DOF) via light source bandwidth modulation. In this paper we will report on the field performance of these technologies with data that supports the desired improvements in on-wafer performance and operational efficiencies.

  8. Development of scanning X-ray microscopes for materials science spectromicroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third generation synchrotron sources of soft x-rays provide an excellent opportunity to apply established x-ray spectroscopic materials analysis techniques to surface imaging on a sub-micron scale. This paper describes an effort underway at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to pursue this development using Fresnel zone plate lenses. These are used to produce a sub-micron spot of x-rays for use in scanning microscopy. Several groups have developed microscopes using this technique. A specimen is rastered in the focused x-ray spot and a detector signal is acquired as a function of position to generate an image. Spectroscopic capability is added by holding the small spot on a feature of interest and scanning through the spectrum. The authors are pursuing two spectroscopic techniques: Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) which together provide a powerful capability for light element analysis in materials science

  9. Safety aspects of designs for future light water reactors (evolutionary reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this document is to describe the major innovations of proposed designs of future light water reactors, to describe specific safety characteristics and safety analysis methodologies, and to give a general overview of the most important safety aspects related to future reactors. The reactors considered in this report are limited to those intended for fixed station electrical power production, excluding most revolutionary concepts. More in depth discussion is devoted to those designs that are in a more advanced state of completion and have been more extensively described and analysed in the open literature. Other designs will be briefly described, as evidence of the large spectrum of new proposals. Some designs are similar; others implement unique features and require specific discussion (not all aspects of designs with unique features are fully discussed in this document). 131 refs, 22 figs

  10. Plan for research to improve the safety of light-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's first annual report to Congress on recommendations for research on improving the safety of light-water nuclear power plants. Suggestions for reactor safety research were identified in, or received from, various sources, including the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the NRC regulatory staff, and the consultants to the Research Review Group. After an initial screening to eliminate those not related to improved reactor safety, all the suggestions were consolidated into research topics. It is recommended that the following research projects be carried out: alternate containment concepts, especially vented containments; alternate decay heat removal concepts, especially add-on bunkered systems; alternate emergency core cooling concepts; improved in-plant accident response; and advanced seismic designs

  11. Description and user's manual of light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV (Ver.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FEMAXI-IV is an advanced version of FEMAXI-III, the analysis code of light water reactor fuel behavior in which various functions and improvements have been incorporated. The present report describes in detail the basic theories and structure, the models and numerical solutions applied, and the material properties adopted in the version 2 which is an improved version of the first version of FEMAXI-IV. In FEMAXI-IV (Ver.2), bugs have been fixed, pellet thermal conductivity properties have been updated, and thermal-stress-induced FP gas release model have been incorporated. In order to facilitate effective and wide-ranging application of the code, types and methods of input/output of the code are also described, and a sample output in an actual form is included. (author)

  12. Design of end magnetic structures for the Advanced Light Source wigglers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vertical magnetic structures for the Advanced Light planar wiggler and 20 cm period elliptical hybrid permanent magnet design. The ends of these structures are characterized by diminishing scalar potential distributions the poles which control beam trajectories. They incorporate electromagnetic correction coils to dynamically correct for variations in the first integral of the field as a function of gap. A permanent magnet trim mechanism is incorporated to minimize the transverse integrated error field distribution. The ends were designed using analytic and computer modeling techniques. The design and modeling results are presented

  13. Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

    1998-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

  14. Hybrid nuclear light bulb-nuclear-pumped laser propulsion for advanced missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, G. H.

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid ``nuclear light bulb'' gaseous core reactor that can radiantly transfer energy to a propellant or alternately activate laser action is proposed for advanced space missions. The propellant mode would be employed in the phases of the mission requiring a higher thrust. However, for the bulk of the travel, the propellant would be turned off and the ultrahigh specific impulse laser mode of operation would be employed. The concept is reviewed, research and development issues are identified, and steps necessary for a feasibility demonstration are discussed.

  15. Successful Completion of the Top-off Upgrade of the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steier, C.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Barry, W.; Biocca, A.; Byrne, W.; Casey, P.; Chin, M.; Donahue, R.; Duarte, R.; Fahmie, M.; Gath, B.; Jacobson, S.; Julian, J.; Jung, J.Y.; Kritscher, M.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Marks, S.; McKean, P.; Mueller, R.; Nishimura, H.; ONeill, J.; Portmann, G.; Prestemon, S.; Robin, D.; Rossi, S.; Sannibale, F.; Scarvie, T.; Schlueter, R.; Shuman, D.; Smith-Baumann, A.; Stover, G.; Timossi, C.; Wan, W.; Warwick, T.; Wells, R.; Weber, J.; Williams, E.

    2010-01-31

    An upgrade of the Advanced Light Source to enable top-off operation has been completed during the last four years. The final work centered around radiation safety aspects, culminating in a systematic proof that top-off operation is equally safe as decaying beam operation. Commissioning and transition to full user operations happened in late 2008 and early 2009. Top-off operation at the ALS provides a very large increase in time-averaged brightness (by about a factor of 10) as well as improvements in beam stability. The following sections provide an overview of the radiation safety rationale, commissioning results, as well as experience in user operations.

  16. Advanced Light Source. Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998

  17. Decommissioning of light-water reactor nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the technical and economic questions posed by the decommissioning of light-water reactor nuclear power plants of the 900-1300 MW class, account being taken of the distinctions between boiling- and pressurized-water reactors. Possible decommissioning alternatives and the disposal or confinement of activity are discussed. It emerges from the discussion that decommissioning, and even total dismantlement of these nuclear power plants is in principle feasible. The activity inventory, one year after shutdown, is calculated to be about 3 X 107 Ci for the BWR and 4 X 106 Ci for the PWR; 40 years after shutdown these figures are reduced to 2 X 106 and 4 X 105 Ci, respectively. The decommissioning costs to be expected are also estimated. This estimate serves as the basis for an economic comparison by the present worth method. The economic comparison shows that total dismantlement after a cooling time of one year is more than four times as expensive as interim confinement followed by total dismantlement waiting period of 40 years. The present worths for immediate total dismantlement are estimated at DM 200 million for the BWR and DM 170 million for the PWR; for the other alternative, they are put at DM 45 million for the BWR and DM 42 million for the PWR. A still open question is posed by the final storage of the large quantities of bulky radioactive waste arising in partial or total dismantlement. Since no decision on the storage method has yet been taken, disposal in casks is stipulated as a boundary condition in the estimation of the costs, although this is an unrealistic assumption. It is to be presumed that the costs of disposal can be reduced given appropriate final storage. (Auth.)

  18. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to perform a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). In particular pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor. Using uranium-based fuel and transuranic (TRU) based fuel in TRistructural ISOtropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the TRU based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, feasibility of core designs fully loaded with TRU FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator.

  19. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO{sub 2} rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  20. Temperature effects studies in light water reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CREOLE experiments performed in the EOLE critical facility located in the Nuclear Center of CADARACHE - CEA (UO2 and UO2-PuO2 lattice reactivity temperature coefficient continuous measurements between 200C and 3000C; integral measurements by boron equivalent effect in the moderator; water density effects measurements with the use of over cladding aluminium tubes to remove moderator) allow to get an interesting and complete information on the temperature effects in the light water reactor lattices. A very elaborated calcurated scheme using the transport theory and the APOLLO cross sections library, has been developed. The analysed results of the whole lot of experiments show that the discrepancy between theory and experiment strongly depends on the temperature range and on the type of lattices considered. The error is mainly linked with the thermal spectrum effects. A study on the temperature coefficient sensitivity to the different cell neutron parameters has shown that only the shapes of the 235U and 238U thermal cross sections have enough weight and uncertainty margins to explain the observed experimental/calculation bias. Instead of arbitrarily fitting the identified wrong data on the calculation of the reactivity temperature coefficient we have defined a procedure of modification of the cross sections based on the consideration of the basic nuclear data: resonance parameters and associated statistic laws. The implementation of this procedure has led to propose new thermal cross sections sets for 235U and 238U consistent with the uncertainty margins associated with the previously accepted values and with some experimental data

  1. Enhanced Performance of the Advanced Light Source Through Periodicity Restoration of the Linear Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An essential feature of third generation storage ring based light sources is the magnetic lattice is designed with a high degree of periodicity. Tracking simulations show that if the periodicity is perturbed (by focusing errors for example), non-linear resonances become excited, which causes a reduction in the dynamic aperture. Therefore it is important to have a method to measure and correct perturbed periodicity. In this paper we study the effect of broken and restored periodicity at an actual third generation light source: the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. First we show that it is possible to accurately determine the storage ring optic and thus the perturbation of the periodicity by fitting measured orbit response matrices. This method allows us to determine individual field gradient errors in quadrupoles and closed orbit errors in sextupoles. By varying individual quadrupole field strengths it is possible to correct the optic, largely restoring the lattice periodicity. A comparison is made of the performance of the ALS before and after the optic is corrected. Measurements of the electron beam tails and the synchrotron light image reveal a large suppression in resonance excitation after the optic is corrected. Correcting the optic also improves the injection efficiency and lifetime

  2. Prospects of small light-water reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OKB Mechanical Engineering (OKBM) has accumulated a many years of experience of designing world famous low power PWRs, including the KLT-40 type propulsion reactors and has gained from the positive experience of their operation and technical perfection. With reliance on this experience, a whole range of prospective small power reactor plants with KLT-40S-type reactors has been developed, including ABV, ATEC co-generation power plants, SAKHA etc., which may be recommended for the immediate future as small power nuclear sources of energy for regions with a decentralized power supply, where the utilization of traditional Diesel generators in entails, in the majority of cases, considerable difficulties associated with the need for stable provision of large quantities of liquid fuel and lubricants. The report contains information on the peculiarities of small power RPs utilization. We also consider the major characteristics of nuclear power plants based on the advanced reactors of the above mentioned types, which meet all modern safety requirements. We demonstrate the possibility of the use of small power RPs in complexes for electric power, heat and fresh water co-generation. (author)

  3. Integral design concepts of advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the sub-programme on non-electrical applications of advanced reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing a worldwide forum for exchange of information on integral reactor concepts. Two Technical Committee meetings were held in 1994 and 1995 on the subject where state-of-the-art developments were presented. Efforts are continuing for the development of advanced nuclear reactors of both evolutionary and innovative design, for electricity, co-generation and heat applications. While single purpose reactors for electricity generation may require small and medium sizes under certain conditions, reactors for heat applications and co-generation would be necessary in the small and medium range and need to be located closer to the load centres. The integral design approach to the development of advanced light water reactors has received special attention over the past few years. Several designs are in the detailed design stage, some are under construction, one prototype is in operation. A need has been felt for guidance on a number of issues, ranging from design objectives to the assessment methodology needed to show how integral designs can meet these objectives, and also to identify their advantages and problem areas. The technical document addresses the current status of the design, safety and operational issues of integral reactors and recommends areas for future development

  4. Advanced water processing system (AWPS), including advanced filtration system (AFS) and advanced ion selective system (AISS) for improved utility (PWR/BWR) water processing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced water processing system (AWPS) has the potential for wide spread success on a worldwide scale in both PWR and BWRs. The AWPS incorporates the advanced features (patent pending) of advanced filtration and advanced ion selective technologies (patented). Typical problems encountered in current filtration systems include: (1) poor effluent quality, (2) short run lengths on filters, (3) frequent filter change-outs/backwashes, (4) large waste volumes, and (5) failed filter cartridges. The advanced filtration system (AFS) features reduced waste production per million gallons of water processed, cleaner water for recycle or release to the environment, filter element volume 100 times less than that of competitive filters, and a far lower capital cost compared to systems with similar performance. The AWPS should be of interest to plants that are upgrading, or to new plants to lower both their capital and operating costs, as well as total curie discharge levels. In addition, the AWPS will function in non-nuclear, as well as nuclear, applications of water purification, specially where pre coat filtration/ion exchange or reverse osmosis (RO) is being applied to process water with high concentrations of colloidal contaminants. Pilot testing has been successfully completed in the U. S. at the Byron (PWR), LaSalle (BWR), and Dresden(BWR) nuclear plants for Commonwealth Edison, and the Bruce several spent filters in a High Integrated Container these bench- and pilot-scale demonstrations will be presented herein. Full-scale designs or systems have been shipped to these locations. In all cases, the testing demonstrated: (1) longer run lengths (300,000 gallons between backwashes--a 100 fold improvement), (2) recoverability of cartridge filters after backwash (cartridge lives of approximately 6 months to a year--a 5 to 10 fold improvement in filter life), (3) large removal efficiencies for colloidal particles (reduced discharge curies), and (4) reduced waste volumes

  5. The ISS Water Processor Catalytic Reactor as a Post Processor for Advanced Water Reclamation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalette, Tim; Snowdon, Doug; Pickering, Karen D.; Callahan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Advanced water processors being developed for NASA s Exploration Initiative rely on phase change technologies and/or biological processes as the primary means of water reclamation. As a result of the phase change, volatile compounds will also be transported into the distillate product stream. The catalytic reactor assembly used in the International Space Station (ISS) water processor assembly, referred to as Volatile Removal Assembly (VRA), has demonstrated high efficiency oxidation of many of these volatile contaminants, such as low molecular weight alcohols and acetic acid, and is considered a viable post treatment system for all advanced water processors. To support this investigation, two ersatz solutions were defined to be used for further evaluation of the VRA. The first solution was developed as part of an internal research and development project at Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) and is based primarily on ISS experience related to the development of the VRA. The second ersatz solution was defined by NASA in support of a study contract to Hamilton Sundstrand to evaluate the VRA as a potential post processor for the Cascade Distillation system being developed by Honeywell. This second ersatz solution contains several low molecular weight alcohols, organic acids, and several inorganic species. A range of residence times, oxygen concentrations and operating temperatures have been studied with both ersatz solutions to provide addition performance capability of the VRA catalyst.

  6. Isotopic signature of atmospheric xenon released from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global monitoring system for atmospheric xenon radioactivity is being established as part of the International Monitoring System to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The isotopic activity ratios of 135Xe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 131mXe are of interest for distinguishing nuclear explosion sources from civilian releases. Simulations of light water reactor (LWR) fuel burn-up through three operational reactor power cycles are conducted to explore the possible xenon isotopic signature of nuclear reactor releases under different operational conditions. It is studied how ratio changes are related to various parameters including the neutron flux, uranium enrichment and fuel burn-up. Further, the impact of diffusion and mixing on the isotopic activity ratio variability are explored. The simulations are validated with reported reactor emissions. In addition, activity ratios are calculated for xenon isotopes released from nuclear explosions and these are compared to the reactor ratios in order to determine whether the discrimination of explosion releases from reactor effluents is possible based on isotopic activity ratios

  7. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  8. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 27000C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (21500C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  9. Effective use of uranium resources in light water reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed an idea of recycling uranium recovered from spent fuels of light water reactors (LWRs), where the recovered uranium is to be re-enriched by a centrifuge cascade conventionally treating natural uranium. The idea is of making it possible to reuse the fuels reproduced in a multi-cycle of re-enrichment. The uranium recycle not only economizes on uranium resources but also gets rid of accumulation of spent fuel masses. In this work, we consider additional processes for effective use of uranium, which are of re-enriching the depleted uranium. The still-more-depleted uranium is advantageous as the matrix of MOX fuels used in LWRs for the purpose of surplus plutonium disposition, because a decrease of 235U in MOX fuel is made up by increasing a dose of plutonium. However, the depleted uranium derived from the cascade enriching the recovered uranium issues a little troublesome problem of 236U concerning its existence and deliveries to the product and the waste. We made a work to investigate the burn-up performance of these remade uranium fuels in model reactors of 1.1GWe-grade PWR and the mass balance in fuel recycles. The results suggest a strategy of effective use of uranium resources in the LWR system. (author)

  10. Studies of severe accidents in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 10 to 12 November 1986 some 80 delegates met under the auspices of the CEC working group on the safety of light-water reactors. The participants from EC Member States were joined by colleagues from Sweden, Finland and the USA and met to discuss the subject of severe accidents in LWRs. Although this seminar had been planned well before Chernobyl, the ''severe-accident-that-really-happened'' made its mark on the seminar. The four main seminar topics were: (i) high source-term accident sequences identified in PSAs, (ii) containment performance, (iii) mitigation of core melt consequences, (iv) severe accident management in LWRs. In addition to the final panel discussion there was also a separate panel discussion on lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident. These proceedings include the papers presented during the seminar and they are arranged following the seminar programme outline. The presentations and discussions of the two panels are not included in the proceedings. The general conclusions and directions following from these two panels were, however, considered in a seminar review paper which was published in the March 1987 issue of Nuclear Engineering International

  11. Impact of inflow transport approximation on light water reactor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Smith, Kord; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Deokjung

    2015-10-01

    The impact of the inflow transport approximation on light water reactor analysis is investigated, and it is verified that the inflow transport approximation significantly improves the accuracy of the transport and transport/diffusion solutions. A methodology for an inflow transport approximation is implemented in order to generate an accurate transport cross section. The inflow transport approximation is compared to the conventional methods, which are the consistent-PN and the outflow transport approximations. The three transport approximations are implemented in the lattice physics code STREAM, and verification is performed for various verification problems in order to investigate their effects and accuracy. From the verification, it is noted that the consistent-PN and the outflow transport approximations cause significant error in calculating the eigenvalue and the power distribution. The inflow transport approximation shows very accurate and precise results for the verification problems. The inflow transport approximation shows significant improvements not only for the high leakage problem but also for practical large core problem analyses.

  12. Light water reactor pressure isolation valve performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Light Water Reactor Valve Performance Testing Program was initiated by the NRC to evaluate leakage as an indication of valve condition, provide input to Section XI of the ASME Code, evaluate emission monitoring for condition and degradation and in-service inspection techniques. Six typical check and gate valves were purchased for testing at typical plant conditions (550F at 2250 psig) for an assumed number of cycles for a 40-year plant lifetime. Tests revealed that there were variances between the test results and the present statement of the Code; however, the testing was not conclusive. The life cycle tests showed that high tech acoustic emission can be utilized to trend small leaks, that specific motor signature measurement on gate valves can trend and indicate potential failure, and that in-service inspection techniques for check valves was shown to be both feasible and an excellent preventive maintenance indicator. Life cycle testing performed here did not cause large valve leakage typical of some plant operation. Other testing is required to fully understand the implication of these results and the required program to fully implement them. (author)

  13. Capital costs of light water reactors: the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cost of building a modern nuclear power plant is greater than that of almost any other single civilian project - costs of individual plants are reckoned in hundreds of millions of pounds in the UK, and up to a billion dollars or more in the USA. Hence, depending on the size of nuclear programmes and their funding, escalation of nuclear capital costs may have important economic and social consequences through its effects on overall resource allocation. It is therefore important to analyse the extent and, as far as possible, the sources of cost increases and escalation, in order to see if the experience yields implications for technology policy. The USA has much the greatest experience in nuclear construction: it also has by far the largest amount of published information on the subject of capital costs. As all other countries lack either sufficient experience and/or adequate published cost information, it is impossible to conduct a genuine international comparison, and this paper is confined to an examination of US experience. This paper therefore assembles and evaluates currently available data on light water reactor (PWR and BWR) capital costs in the USA. (author)

  14. Analysis of tally correlation in large light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of tally correlation was performed for a 2-D radial slice of the BEAVRS light water reactor. This reactor has a dominance ratio of approximately 0.995. Convergence rates of fission source tallies of an assembly and pin mesh were analyzed. Results of this study indicate that these tallies do not converge at the ideal rate of the inverse of the square root of number of tally realizations. Ideal convergence rates are achieved only when tally realizations are uncorrelated. Correlation exists because source sites of one generation of neutrons are from fission sites produced from a previous generation. The degree of correlation was investigated by computing autocorrelation coefficients. High autocorrelation coefficients of about 0.7 for lag one were observed for assembly mesh tallies. Pin mesh tallies were much less correlated. In addition, autocorrelation coefficients were not affected by increasing number of neutrons in a tally batch. Three methods are discussed to reduce correlation: increasing number of initial discard batches, multiple generations per tally batch and CMFD feedback. The only significant decrease in correlation was observed when applying CMFD feedback. Lag one autocorrelation coefficients decreased from about 0.7 to 0.4. No significant difference in tally convergence rates were observed when applying CMFD feedback. (author)

  15. Job-related doses in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Treaty of 1957 establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, (EURATOM) was an essential prerequisite for the development of a strong nuclear industry in Europe. Among other things the Treaty provides that the Community shall lay down Basic Safety Standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation and ensure that they are applied. Following adoption of the Council Directive of 1980, the European Commission defined the basic principles of Justification, Optimization and Limitation to be applied in order to ensure the greatest possible protection of workers and the general public. Subsequently the Commission took initiatives in order to find ways of implementing these three basic principles in practical radiation protection. In 1980 the Commission in close collaboration with the leading nuclear power station operators, set up its own system of 'occupational radiation dose statistics from light water reactors operating in Western Europe'. This was designed for PWRs and BWRs, and the Commission benefited from the experience of neighbouring non-EC countries such as Sweden, Finland, Switzerland and Spain (not yet a member) operating nuclear power stations made by different manufacturers. The paper provides some general information on developments and trends in collective and individual doses to workers in nuclear power stations, based on a unique European databank of approximately 1000 operating reactor years. 9 figs

  16. Thermal hydraulic analysis due to the changes in heat removal for advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a natural circulation light water cooled and heavy water moderated pressure tube reactor. Changes in heat removal by primary heat transport system of the reactor have significant impact on various important system parameters like pressures, qualities, reactor power and flows. Increase in heat removal leads to the cooldown of the system subsequently reducing pressure, void increase and changes in power and flows of the system. Decrease in heat removal leads to warm-up of the system subsequently raising pressure, void collapse, and changes in power and flows of the system. The behaviour is complex as system under consideration is natural circulation system. This article presents the results of simulations made with the RELAP5-MOD3.2 code that show first the impact of a decrease in feed water temperature on fluid temperature, steam drum pressure, core exit void, reactivity, reactor power, core flow, steam flow and clad temperature and secondly the impact of a loss of normal feed water flow on steam drum pressure, channel flow, core quality, clad surface temperature. For lowering of feed water temperature transient and in isolation condensers cold water injection, the reactor power increases and the reactor trips on the high power signal. Simultaneous flow increment due to the 2 phase natural circulation characteristic has caused the clad temperature to limit to their steady state value. In case of loss of feed transient the reactor trips on high pressure. The clad surface temperature rise from steady state operating value is marginal and it is well within the safety limit as per the acceptance criteria

  17. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  18. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas...

  19. An advanced CANDU reactor with supercritical water coolant: conceptual design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is studying an advanced CANDU reactor concept, with supercritical steam as coolant. The coolant, being a high density gas, at a pressure above 22 MPa and temperatures above 370 deg C, does not encounter the two-phase region with its associated fuel-dryout and flow-instability problems. Increased coolant temperature leads directly to increased plant thermodynamic efficiency, thereby reducing unit energy cost through reduced specific capital cost and reduced fueling cost. The reduced coolant in-core density leads to sufficiently reduced void reactivity, so that light water becomes a coolant option. The use of supercritical water coolant also opens up the possibility of enhanced safety with a natural circulation primary flow, taking advantage of the gas expansion coefficient. To preserve neutron economy, especially at high coolant temperatures, a fuel channel that is currently being developed has a pressure tube that is thermally insulated from high-temperature coolant and is in contact with the cold heavy-water moderator. Two stages of development of a supercritical-cooled CANDU reactor were identified. The first uses conventional or near-conventional zirconium-alloy fuel cladding with coolant core-mean temperatures near 400 deg C, and the second uses advanced high-temperature fuel cladding at coolant core-mean temperatures near 500 deg C. A first-stage cost reduction of 20% from the CANDU 6 design is estimated as a result of improved thermodynamic efficiency. A large change in coolant density across the core leads to a factor 3 or 4 reduction in heavy-water inventory and a corresponding reduction in coolant void reactivity. The latter leads to improved fuel burnup and reduced demands on the safety shutdown systems. (author)

  20. Immobilization biological activated carbon used in advanced drinking water treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria separated from a mature filter bed of groundwater treatment plants were incubated in a culture media containing iron and manganese. A consortium of 5 strains of bacteria removing iron and manganese were obtained by repeated enrichment culturing. It was shown from the experiments of effect factors that ironmanganese removal bacteria in the culture media containing both Fe and Mn grew better than in that containing only Fe, however, they were unable to grow in the culture media containing only Mn. When comparing the bacteria biomass in the case ofρ (DO) =2.8 mg/L andρ (DO) =9.0 mg/L, no significant difference was found.The engineering bacteria removing the organic and the bacteria removing iron and manganese were simultaneously inoculated into activated carbon reactor to treat the effluent of distribution network. The experimental results showed that by using IBAC ( Immobilization Biological Activated Carbon) treatment, the removal efficiency of iron, manganese and permanganate index was more than 98% , 96% and 55% , respectively. After the influent with turbidity of 1.5 NTU, color of 25 degree and offensive odor was treated, the turbidity and color of effluence were less than 0.5 NTU and 15 degree, respectively, and it was odorless. It is determined that the cooperation function of engineering bacteria and activated carbon achieved advanced drinking water treatment.

  1. Modelling containment passive safety systems in advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most designs of advanced passive reactors incorporate Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS) relying on steam condensation to cope with possible pressure increase that would result in the case of a postulated accident. As a consequence, experimental and analytical research programmes have been launched worldwide to investigate new configurations and conditions involved in these new scenarios. This paper summarises the major outcomes of the joint research of CIEMAT, UPV, and UW in developing predictive models to address anticipated conditions in the Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (CIEMAT-UPV) and in the AP600 (CIEMAT-UW). Even though both models share some of their fundamental characteristics (such as being mass/heat transfer analogy based), samples of their validation against independent databases illustrate their intrinsic differences in formulation according to the scenarios addressed by each one. Relative importance of condensate film or gas mixture velocity are discussed, and the effect of key factors such as noncondensable gas presence and pressure are stated. Experimental data from University of Berkeley (UCB) and from University of Wisconsin - Madison (UW) will be used to support comparisons and discussions held in the paper. In short, this work demonstrates that heat/mass transfer analogy-based models, particularly those relying on diffusion film modelling to account for noncondensable gas presence, are extremely useful in test interpretation and result in good agreement with reliable databases. (author)

  2. Destruction of estrogenic activity in water using UV advanced oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transformation of the steroidal Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), 17-β-estradiol (E2) and 17-α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) by direct UV photolysis and UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation was studied from the perspective of the removal of estrogenic activity associated with the compounds. First, experiments were performed to link the oxidation of E2 and EE2 with subsequent reduction in estrogenic activity. No statistically significant difference between removal rates was observed, implying that the oxidation products of E2 and EE2 are not as estrogenic (measured by the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES)) as the parent compounds. Utilizing the YES, 90% removal of estrogenic activity of E2 and EE2 at environmentally relevant concentrations (∼ 3 μg L-1) was achieved using a combination of 5 mg L-1 H2O2 and a UV fluence of less than 350 mJ cm-2. Thus, these compounds, when considered at environmentally relevant levels, are significantly degraded at much lower UV fluences than previously thought. A steady state OH radical model was used to predict oxidation of EE2 in laboratory and natural waters

  3. Destruction of estrogenic activity in water using UV advanced oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeldt, Erik J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Chen, P.J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Kullman, Seth [Integrated Toxicology Program, Nicolas School of Environment and Earth Science, Duke University (United States); Linden, Karl G. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, Box 90287, 121 Hudson Hall Engineering Building, Durham, NC 27708-0287 (United States)]. E-mail: kglinden@duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    The transformation of the steroidal Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs), 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) and 17-{alpha}-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) by direct UV photolysis and UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} advanced oxidation was studied from the perspective of the removal of estrogenic activity associated with the compounds. First, experiments were performed to link the oxidation of E2 and EE2 with subsequent reduction in estrogenic activity. No statistically significant difference between removal rates was observed, implying that the oxidation products of E2 and EE2 are not as estrogenic (measured by the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES)) as the parent compounds. Utilizing the YES, 90% removal of estrogenic activity of E2 and EE2 at environmentally relevant concentrations ({approx} 3 {mu}g L{sup -1}) was achieved using a combination of 5 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a UV fluence of less than 350 mJ cm{sup -2}. Thus, these compounds, when considered at environmentally relevant levels, are significantly degraded at much lower UV fluences than previously thought. A steady state OH radical model was used to predict oxidation of EE2 in laboratory and natural waters.

  4. Economics of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited natural uranium resources together with their low utilization in current lightwater reactors (LWR) on the one hand and the high capital investments for a LWR and fast breeder reactor system resulting in a high fuel utilization are the most important reasons for research and development (R+D) work related to a high converting APWR system. It is the main task of this analysis to study the economic behaviour of an APWR combining its technical and physical parameters with an economic data base. After introductional remarks chapter II presents the potential improvements of the uranium utilization and their importance for a whole national economy. Chapter III shows the micro-economic aspects for an electricity producing utility using such an APWR plant. The chapter is restricted to the fuel cycle costs and their dependence on various parameters. The corresponding costs of other nuclear power plants are described in chapter IV and compared to those of the APWR in chapter V. Finally a cost comparison on the basis of the electricity generating costs will complete the economic picture of an advanced pressurized water reactor. (orig./UA)

  5. Antimicrobial Materials for Advanced Microbial Control in Spacecraft Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele; Caro, Janicce; Newsham, Gerard; Roberts, Michael; Morford, Megan; Wheeler, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Microbial detection, identification, and control are essential for the maintenance and preservation of spacecraft water systems. Requirements set by NASA put limitations on the energy, mass, materials, noise, cost, and crew time that can be devoted to microbial control. Efforts are being made to attain real-time detection and identification of microbial contamination in microgravity environments. Research for evaluating technologies for capability enhancement on-orbit is currently focused on the use of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis for detection purposes and polymerase chain reaction (peR) for microbial identification. Additional research is being conducted on how to control for microbial contamination on a continual basis. Existing microbial control methods in spacecraft utilize iodine or ionic silver biocides, physical disinfection, and point-of-use sterilization filters. Although these methods are effective, they require re-dosing due to loss of efficacy, have low human toxicity thresholds, produce poor taste, and consume valuable mass and crew time. Thus, alternative methods for microbial control are needed. This project also explores ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), surface passivation methods for maintaining residual biocide levels, and several antimicrobial materials aimed at improving current microbial control techniques, as well as addressing other materials presently under analysis and future directions to be pursued.

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  7. Distribution of characteristics of LWR [light water reactor] spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, W.J.; Notz, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Moore, R.S. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop a collective description of the entire spent fuel inventory in terms of various fuel properties relevant to Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) using information available from the Characteristics Data Base (CBD), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. A number of light-water reactor (LWR) characteristics were analyzed including assembly class representation, fuel burnup, enrichment, fuel fabrication data, defective fuel quantities, and, at PNL`s specific request, linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and the utilization of burnable poisons. A quantitative relationships was developed between burnup and enrichment for BWRs and PWRs. The relationship shows that the existing BWR ATM is near the center of the burnup-enrichment distribution, while the four PWR ATMs bracket the center of the burnup range but are on the low side of the enrichment range. Fuel fabrication data are based on vendor specifications for new fuel. Defective fuel distributions were analyzed in terms of assembly class and vendor design. LHGR values were calculated from utility data on burnup and effective full-power days; these calculations incorporate some unavoidable assumptions which may compromise the value of the results. Only a limited amount of data are available on burnable poisons at this time. Based on this distribution study, suggestions for additional ATMs are made. These are based on the class and design concepts and include BWR/2,3 barrier fuel, and the WE 17 {times} 17 class with integral burnable poison. Both should be at relatively high burnups. 16 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  9. Light water reactor safety. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a review of the past, present and possible future developments in light water reactor (LWR) safety. The paper divides the past into two periods: the distant past i.e., before the TMI-2 accident when the main concern was with the design basis, the general design criteria, the concept of the defense in depth, the thermal hydraulics of the large loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and the success of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS), and the near past, i.e., after the TMI-2 accident when the main concern was with the physics of the postulated severe accidents: their prevention and mitigation. The present period is chosen as the translation of the research on the design basis and severe accidents into practical designs of Gen III+ with their core catchers and severe accident management (SAM) strategies, which could, in fact, provide ample assurances of public safety even for very severe accidents. The paper attempts to describe the remaining safety issues for both the Gen II and Gen III+ nuclear plants. The more important safety challenges are being posed by the recent moves of (1) extension of the life of the presently installed Gen II LWRs to 60 years (and perhaps to 80 years) and (2) the large uprates in power that are being sought for the Gen II LWRs. Clearly, the safety margins will be tested by these moves of long extended operations with greater power ratings of the Gen II plants. A prognosis of the emerging development trends in the LWR safety has been attempted with some suggestions. (author)

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  11. Improved once-through fuel cycles for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is being presented at this time to provide preliminary technical and economic data to INFCE for use in comparisons of alternate nuclear systems. Programs to develop improved once-through fuel cycles for the light water reactor are under way in the United States; therefore, the information presented in this report is preliminary and will be updated in the future as it becomes available. In the meantime, the following limitations should be recognized when using the information in this report: 1. The paper quantifies fuel utilization improvements which should be technically feasible in reactors now operating or under construction and indicates the approximate time frame when the necessary development and demonstration could be completed. It does not attempt to estimate the rate at which these improvements would attain acceptance and use by the industry. 2. One particular set of PWR and one particular set of BWR nuclear reactor and fuel design characteristics are used as base cases, from which many of the improvements are estimated. Many plants operating and being built throughout the world of course differ in design features, fuel management schemes, and fuel utilization efficiencies from the base cases used in this paper. The degree of improvement obtainable in these other designs, for each type of change considered, will vary with each design. 3. The changes emphasized here could all be backfitted in existing plants. Other possible improvements are limited by the need to avoid reducing the power output or capacity factor of the plants. New plants could be designed to accommodate such changes without reducing the power output or capacity factor. This could yield greater improvement in fuel utilization than can be obtained in existing plants. This longer range potential has not been examined here

  12. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [INL; Busby, Jeremy [ORNL; Hallbert, Bruce [INL; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [INL; Smith, Curtis [INL; Barnard, Cathy [INL

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  13. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  14. Neutronic study of a light water core reflected with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the design of the high flux reactor with extracted beams, we have performed an experimental study on a light water and highly enriched uranium core surrounded by a thick heavy water reflector. This study was made with a critical facility specially designed. The scope of the measurements was double: i) to check the calculation methods then available ii) to evaluate effects not easily calculated owing to the reactor geometry. The main experiments were the following - criticality measurements for various core geometries - measurement of void and temperature coefficients - distribution of neutron density and fission sources - study of kinetic parameters and calibration of control elements - measurements of spectral indices and of flux perturbations due to the presence in the reflector of channels for the neutron beam extraction. The primary analysis of the experimental results gives generally a satisfactory agreement with calculations and shows that in some cases better hypotheses should be taken. (authors)

  15. The key design features of the Indian advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 235 MWe Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a vertical, pressure tube type, boiling light water cooled reactor. The three key specific features of design of the AHWR, having a large impact on its viability, safety and economics, relate to its reactor physics, coolant channel, and passive safety features. The reactor physics design is tuned for maximising use of thorium based fuel, and achieving a slightly negative void coefficient of reactivity. The fulfilment of these requirements has been possible through use of PuO2-ThO2 MOX, and ThO2 -U233O2 MOX in different pins of the same fuel cluster, and use of a heterogeneous moderator consisting of pyrolytic carbon and heavy water in 80%-20% volume ratio. The coolant channels of AHWR are designed for easy replaceability of pressure tubes, during normal maintenance shutdowns. The removal of pressure tube along with bottom end-fitting, using rolled joint detachment technology, can be done in AHWR coolant channels without disturbing the top end-fitting, tail pipe and feeder connections, and all other appendages of the coolant channel. The AHWR incorporates several passive safety features. These include core heat removal through natural circulation, direct injection of Emergency Core Coolant System (ECCS) water in fuel, passive systems for containment cooling and isolation, and availability of a large inventory of borated water in overhead Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP) to facilitate sustenance of core decay heat removal, ECCS injection, and containment cooling for three days without invoking any active systems or operator action. Incorporation of these features has been done together with considerable design simplifications, and elimination of several reactor grade equipment. A rigorous evaluation of feasibility of AHWR design concept has been completed. The economy enhancing aspects of its key design features are expected to compensate for relative complexity of the thorium fuel cycle activities required to

  16. Comparison between water distillation process and hydrogen isotope exchange process for depletion and enrichment of tritium in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical comparison between the water distillation column process and multiunit separated-bed hydrogen isotopic exchange column process with hydrophobic Pt-catalyst shows that the column inner diameter and the column height in the hydrogen isotope exchange process are shorter than in the water distillation process for the case of the depletion and the enrichment of the tritium in light water. (author)

  17. On the physics design of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The AHWR is a 920 MWth, vertical pressure tube type thorium-based reactor cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. The prime objective is to produce power utilizing thorium available abundantly in India from a relatively simple system with enhanced safety level. It is endowed with several innovative safety features such as negative coolant void reactivity, heat removal through natural circulation and passive containment cooling. The development of reactor design has drawn heavily on the experience generated through design and operation of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) in India. It was an opportunity to develop a reactor system using thorium-based fuel and gain some valuable experience. A non-proliferative thorium/U-233 based closed fuel cycle is chosen for AHWR. Plutonium discharged from PHWRs is used as the fissile seed fuel with thorium for the generation of U-233 and then as a top-up fuel in the equilibrium core along with self-sustaining U-233 in the thorium matrix. The physics design has several challenges in achieving negative void reactivity, spatial core control, on-line fuelling and minimization of inventory of plutonium fuel. It is difficult to achieve negative coolant void coefficient in a heavy water moderated pressure tube type reactor. For this a multi-pronged approach involving pitch reduction, heterogeneous cluster design and use of mild absorbers is chosen. Plutonium bearing fuel is located separately in the outer region of the cluster with self-sustaining U-233 bearing fuel in the inner region of the cluster. A small amount of mild absorber is located in the centre of the cluster. The void coefficient varies with burnup and it is a challenge to have it negative throughout the core. The state of nuclear data for the elements of interest and type of neutron spectrum in the reactor puts heavy demand on the calculation models and validation of reactivity coefficients to ensure

  18. Fruit cuticle lipid composition and fruit post-harvest water loss in an advanced backcross generation of pepper (Capsicum sp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Parsons, Eugene P.

    2012-03-05

    To understand the role of fruit cuticle lipid composition in fruit water loss, an advanced backcross population, the BC2F2, was created between the Capsicum annuum (PI1154) and the Capsicum chinense (USDA162), which have high and low post-harvest water loss rates, respectively. Besides dramatic differences in fruit water loss, preliminary studies also revealed that these parents exhibited significant differences in both the amount and composition of their fruit cuticle. Cuticle analysis of the BC2F2 fruit revealed that although water loss rate was not strongly associated with the total surface wax amount, there were significant correlations between water loss rate and cuticle composition. We found a positive correlation between water loss rate and the amount of total triterpenoid plus sterol compounds, and negative correlations between water loss and the alkane to triterpenoid plus sterol ratio. We also report negative correlations between water loss rate and the proportion of both alkanes and aliphatics to total surface wax amount. For the first time, we report significant correlations between water loss and cutin monomer composition. We found positive associations of water loss rate with the total cutin, total C16 monomers and 16-dihydroxy hexadecanoic acid. Our results support the hypothesis that simple straight-chain aliphatic cuticle constituents form more impermeable cuticular barriers than more complex isoprenoid-based compounds. These results shed new light on the biochemical basis for cuticle involvement in fruit water loss. © 2012 Physiologia Plantarum.

  19. The tip-sample water bridge and light emission from scanning tunnelling microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Michael G.; Mitra, J.; Dawson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Light emission spectrum from a scanning tunnelling microscope (LESTM) is investigated as a function of relative humidity and shown to be a novel and sensitive means for probing the growth and properties of a water meniscus in the nm-scale. An empirical model of the light emission process is formulated and applied successfully to replicate the decay in light intensity and spectral changes observed with increasing relative humidity. The modelling indicates a progressive water filling of the tip...

  20. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors. Semiannual report, October 1990--March 1991: Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties.

  1. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  2. Thermal core design of the high performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a SCWR concept, operated at an inlet pressure of 25 MPa with a core outlet temperature of 500 deg. C. A thermal core design for this reactor has been worked out by a consortium of Euratom member states within the 6th European Framework Program. Aiming at peak cladding temperatures of less than 630 deg. C, including uncertainties and allowances for operation, the coolant is heated up in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing to eliminate hot streaks. Each fuel assembly is built from 40 fuel pins with 8 mm diameter and a pitch of 9.4mm, housed in a thermally insulated assembly box. Additional moderator water is foreseen in water rods inside each assembly and in gaps between the assembly boxes. With a thermal power of 2300 MW, a net electric power of 1000 MW shall be achieved, resulting in a net efficiency of 43.5%. This concept has been studied with neutronic, thermal-hydraulic and structural analyses to assess its feasibility, which will be summarized in this paper. Coupled neutronic / thermal-hydraulic analyses by Maraczy et al. with the 2 group diffusion code KARATE and the one-dimensional code SPROD are defining an initial distribution of fuel enrichment, the positioning of the control rods, and the use of the burnable Gd absorbers to reach the envisaged power distribution. An equilibrium cycle analysis is showing radial form factors and the discharge burn-up. Different from conventional reactors, the radial power profile is intended to be non-uniform, with the highest power in the first heat up step in the core center and the lowest power in the second superheater step to result in the same peak cladding temperatures in each region. Sub-channel analyses by Himmel et al. performed for different radial power gradients demonstrate the excellent coolant mixing inside assemblies thanks to the wire wrap spacers used in this design. Coolant mixing above and underneath the core has been studied by Wank et al

  3. Advanced Oxidation Technology for Potable Water Disinfection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The availability of high-quality potable water is essential in crewed space missions. Closed loop water recycling systems as well as potable water holding tanks and...

  4. Efficient nanorod-based amorphous silicon solar cells with advanced light trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a simple, low-cost, and scalable approach for the fabrication of efficient nanorod-based solar cells. Templates with arrays of self-assembled ZnO nanorods with tunable morphology are synthesized by chemical bath deposition using a low process temperature at 80 °C. The nanorod templates are conformally coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon light absorber layers of 100 nm and 200 nm thickness. An initial efficiency of up to 9.0% is achieved for the optimized design. External quantum efficiency measurements on the nanorod cells show a substantial photocurrent enhancement both in the red and the blue parts of the solar spectrum. Key insights in the light trapping mechanisms in these arrays are obtained via a combination of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, optical absorption, and external quantum efficiency measurements. Front surface patterns enhance the light incoupling in the blue, while rear side patterns lead to enhanced light trapping in the red. The red response in the nanorod cells is limited by absorption in the patterned Ag back contact. With these findings, we develop and experimentally realize a further advanced design with patterned front and back sides while keeping the Ag reflector flat, showing significantly enhanced scattering from the back reflector with reduced parasitic absorption in the Ag and thus higher photocurrent generation. Many of the findings in this work can serve to provide insights for further optimization of nanostructures for thin-film solar cells in a broad range of materials

  5. Efficient nanorod-based amorphous silicon solar cells with advanced light trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Y. [Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, High Tech Campus, Building 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Plasma & Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lare, M. C. van; Polman, A. [Center for Nanophotonics, FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veldhuizen, L. W.; Schropp, R. E. I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Plasma & Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rath, J. K. [Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, High Tech Campus, Building 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-11-14

    We present a simple, low-cost, and scalable approach for the fabrication of efficient nanorod-based solar cells. Templates with arrays of self-assembled ZnO nanorods with tunable morphology are synthesized by chemical bath deposition using a low process temperature at 80 °C. The nanorod templates are conformally coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon light absorber layers of 100 nm and 200 nm thickness. An initial efficiency of up to 9.0% is achieved for the optimized design. External quantum efficiency measurements on the nanorod cells show a substantial photocurrent enhancement both in the red and the blue parts of the solar spectrum. Key insights in the light trapping mechanisms in these arrays are obtained via a combination of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, optical absorption, and external quantum efficiency measurements. Front surface patterns enhance the light incoupling in the blue, while rear side patterns lead to enhanced light trapping in the red. The red response in the nanorod cells is limited by absorption in the patterned Ag back contact. With these findings, we develop and experimentally realize a further advanced design with patterned front and back sides while keeping the Ag reflector flat, showing significantly enhanced scattering from the back reflector with reduced parasitic absorption in the Ag and thus higher photocurrent generation. Many of the findings in this work can serve to provide insights for further optimization of nanostructures for thin-film solar cells in a broad range of materials.

  6. Microfluidic reactors for visible-light photocatalytic water purification assisted with thermolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ning; Tan, Furui; Wan, Li; Wu, Mengchun; Zhang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water purification using visible light is under intense research in the hope to use sunlight efficiently, but the conventional bulk reactors are slow and complicated. This paper presents an integrated microfluidic planar reactor for visible-light photocatalysis with the merits of fine flow control, short reaction time, small sample volume, and long photocatalyst durability. One additional feature is that it enables one to use both the light and the heat energy of the light sour...

  7. Toxicity of irradiated advanced heavy water reactor fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, N D; Richardson, R B; Edwards, G W R

    2013-02-01

    The good neutron economy and online refueling capability of the CANDU® heavy water moderated reactor (HWR) enable it to use many different fuels such as low enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium, or thorium, in addition to its traditional natural uranium (NU) fuel. The toxicity and radiological protection methods for these proposed fuels, unlike those for NU, are not well established. This study uses software to compare the fuel composition and toxicity of irradiated NU fuel against those of two irradiated advanced HWR fuel bundles as a function of post-irradiation time. The first bundle investigated is a CANFLEX® low void reactor fuel (LVRF), of which only the dysprosium-poisoned central element, and not the outer 42 LEU elements, is specifically analyzed. The second bundle investigated is a heterogeneous high-burnup (LEU,Th)O(2) fuelled bundle, whose two components (LEU in the outer 35 elements and thorium in the central eight elements) are analyzed separately. The LVRF central element was estimated to have a much lower toxicity than that of NU at all times after shutdown. Both the high burnup LEU and the thorium fuel had similar toxicity to NU at shutdown, but due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as (238)Pu, (240)Pu, (242)Am, (242)Cm, and (244)Cm (in high burnup LEU), and (232)U and (228)Th (in irradiated thorium), the toxicity of these fuels was almost double that of irradiated NU after 2,700 d of cooling. New urine bioassay methods for higher actinoids and the analysis of thorium in fecal samples are recommended to assess the internal dose from these two fuels. PMID:23274823

  8. Transient subchannel analysis of turbine trip without bypass with IC of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The proposed advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWth vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. Safety analysis is carried out for various postulated initiating events (PIE) for AHWR. Turbine trip without bypass is one such PIE. Turbine trip results in rise in system pressure. Absence of bypass flow may lead to actuation of relief and safety valves depending upon system characteristics. System pressure rise activates various protective and engineered safeguard systems like reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator limiting the consequences of the event. In this paper, a turbine trip without bypass is analysed, using a two-fluid code RELAPS/MOD3.2 [Fletcher, 1995] and subchannel analysis code COBRA IV-I. [Wheeler, 1976] Global analysis does not take into account the effect of different fuel pins with different peaking factors, effect of axial and radial cross flow mixing between adjacent subchannels. Combination of these two codes gives a better insight into the problem. The maximum rated reactor channel which houses 54 pin fuel bundle is modeled for COBRA IV-I simulation. The transient forcing function option of COBRA IV-I, validated by [Iwamura, 1994] with their flow-power transient experiments, has been used for transient thermal hydraulic parameter prediction for this study. Transient inlet pressure, inlet mass flow rate, inlet temperature, outlet enthalpy and the heat flux/power obtained from RELAPS /MOD3.2 simulation are among the boundary conditions employed on the COBRA-IV-I simulation. The thermal-hydraulic parameters predicted by RELAPS/MOD3.2 along with the effect of subchannel flow on the fuel element temperatures predicted by COBRA-IV-I are presented and discussed in this paper

  9. Materials Ageing in Light Water Reactors - Handbook of Destructive Assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ; - Martensitic steels rupture and SCC; - SS atmospheric corrosion; Materials Ageing in Light Water Reactors - Hydrogen embrittlement; - Boric acid corrosion; - Dead legs issues; - Hard facing materials degradation; - Mechanical fatigue failure; - Thermal fatigue failure; - Thermal ageing; - Irradiation embrittlement; - BoralR corrosion; - Wear; - Miscellaneous; - BWRs cracking. The SG tubes bundle has a dedicated chapter because the SG has always been given special treatment in the industry, for many reasons including the large variety of degradation it has experienced and its significant impact on plant operation (especially on outages duration). The last chapter is the conclusion

  10. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  11. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany 19 nuclear power plants with an electrical output of 22 GWe are in operation. Annually about 450 t of spent fuel are unloaded from the reactors. Currently most of the spent fuel elements are shipped to France and the United Kingdom for reprocessing according to contracts which have been signed since the late 70es. By the amendment of the Atomic Energy Act in 1994 the previous priority for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel was substituted by a legal equivalency of the reprocessing and direct disposal option. As a consequence some utilities take into consideration the direct disposal of their spent fuel for economical reasons. The separated plutonium will be recycled as MOX fuel in light water reactors. About 30 tons of fissile plutonium will be available to German utilities for recycling by the year 2000. Twelve German reactors are already licensed for the use of MOX fuel, five others have applied for MOX use. Eight reactors are currently using MOX fuel or used it in the past. The spent fuel elements which shall be disposed of without reprocessing will be stored in two interim dry storage facilities at Gorleben and Ahaus. The storage capacities are 3800 and 4200 tHM, respectively. The Gorleben salt dome is currently investigated to prove its suitability as a repository for high level radioactive waste, either in a vitrified form or as conditioned spent fuel. The future development of the nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management depends on the future role of nuclear energy in Germany. According to estimations of the German utilities no additional nuclear power plants are needed in the near future. Around the middle of the next decade it will have to be decided whether existing plants should be substituted by new ones. For the foreseeable time German utilities are interested in a highly flexible approach to the nuclear fuel cycle and waste management keeping open both spent fuel management options: the closed fuel cycle and direct disposal of

  12. A closed-loop photon beam control study for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third generation Advanced Light Source (ALS) will produce extremely bright photon beams using undulators and wigglers. In order to position the photon beams accurate to the micron level, a closed-loop feedback system is being developed. Using photon position monitors and dipole corrector magnets, a closed-loop system can automatically compensate for modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. The following paper will present a dynamics model for the perturbations of the closed orbit of the electron beam in the ALS storage ring including the vacuum chamber magnetic field penetration effects. Using this reference model, two closed-loop feedback algorithms will be compared -- a classical PI controller and a two degree-of-freedom approach. The two degree-of-freedom method provides superior disturbance rejection while maintaining the desired performance goals. Both methods will address the need to gain schedule the controller due to the time varying dynamics introduced by changing field strengths when scanning the insertion devices

  13. The perihelion of Mercury advance and the light bending calculated in (enhanced) Newton's theory

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, M A; Wielgus, M

    2013-01-01

    We show that results of a simple dynamical gedanken experiment interpreted according to standard Newton's gravitational theory, may reveal that three-dimensional space is curved. The experiment may be used to reconstruct the curved geometry of space, i.e. its non-Euclidean metric. The perihelion of Mercury advance and the light bending calculated from the Poisson equation and the equation of motion in the curved geometry have the correct (observed) values. Independently, we also show that Newtonian gravity theory may be enhanced to incorporate the curvature of three dimensional space by adding an extra equation which links the Ricci scalar with the density of matter. Like in Einstein's general relativity, matter is the source of curvature. In the spherically symmetric (vacuum) case, the metric of space 3gik that follows from this extra equation agrees, to the expected accuracy, with the metric measured by the Newtonian gedanken experiment mentioned above.

  14. Trace element analysis using the fluorescence microprobe at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluorescence microprobe beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a unique instrument for analysis of trace elements. The beamline is on a bending magnet port of the synchrotron and uses a pair of multilayer-coated mirrors to focus the x-ray source to a spot size of 1 endash 5 μm2. Since the multilayer mirrors limit the energy bandpass of the system to 5 endash 10%, the trace element sensitivity is significantly improved compared to the use of grazing incidence mirrors. Different pairs of mirrors have been used to operate at 8.5, 10, and 12.5 keV. The detection limits for elements from Si to As will be presented for operation at both 1.5 GeV and 1.9 GeV. Results that illustrate the features of the instrument will be presented from the many samples that have been studies. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

  16. An Aberration Corrected Photoemission Electron Microscope at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design of a new aberration corrected Photoemission electron microscope PEEM3 at the Advanced Light Source is outlined. PEEM3 will be installed on an elliptically polarized undulator beamline and will be used for the study of complex materials at high spatial and spectral resolution. The critical components of PEEM3 are the electron mirror aberration corrector and aberration-free magnetic beam separator. The models to calculate the optical properties of the electron mirror are discussed. The goal of the PEEM3 project is to achieve the highest possible transmission of the system at resolutions comparable to our present PEEM2 system (50 nm) and to enable significantly higher resolution, albeit at the sacrifice of intensity. We have left open the possibility to add an energy filter at a later date, if it becomes necessary driven by scientific need to improve the resolution further

  17. High Energy Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using electron beam ion traps and advanced light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Bernitt, Sven; Eberle, Sita; Hell, Natalie; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kelley, Rich; Leutenegger, Maurice; Porter, F. Scott; Rudolph, Jan; Steinbrugge, Rene; Traebert, Elmar; Crespo-Lopez-Urritia, Jose R.

    2015-08-01

    We have used the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT-I electron beam ion trap coupled with a NASA/GSFC microcalorimeter spectrometer instrument to systematically address problems found in the analysis of high resolution X-ray spectra from celestial sources, and to benchmark atomic physics codes employed by high resolution spectral modeling packages. Our results include laboratory measurements of transition energies, absolute and relative electron impact excitation cross sections, charge exchange cross sections, and dielectronic recombination resonance strengths. More recently, we have coupled to the Max-Plank Institute for Nuclear Physics-Heidelberg's FLASH-EBIT electron beam ion trap to third and fourth generation advanced light sources to measure photoexcitation and photoionization cross sections, as well as, natural line widths of X-ray transitions in highly charged iron ions. Selected results will be presented.

  18. A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, N.; Kunz, M.; Chen, K.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Warwick, T.

    2009-03-10

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to {approx} 1 um size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  19. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  20. A superbend X-ray microdiffraction beamline at the advanced light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to X-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to ∼1 μm size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  1. Soft x-ray spectromicroscopy development for materials science at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several third generation synchrotron radiation facilities are now operational and the high brightness of these photon sources offers new opportunities for x-ray microscopy. Well developed synchrotron radiation spectroscopy techniques are being applied in new instruments capable of imaging the surface of a material with a spatial resolution smaller than one micron. There are two aspects to this. One is to further the field of surface science by exploring the effects of spatial variations across a surface on a scale not previously accessible to x-ray measurements. The other is to open up new analytical techniques in materials science using x-rays, on a spatial scale comparable to that of the processes or devices to be studied. The development of the spectromicroscopy program at the Advanced Light Source will employ a variety of instruments, some are already operational. Their development and use will be discussed, and recent results will be presented to illustrate their capabilities

  2. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air Water Purification Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated TIO2 catalyst visible light responsive (VLR) and achieve high and sustaining catalytic activity under the visible region of the solar spectrum.

  3. Advances in the Coupled Soil Water and Groundwater Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉峥; 王志敏

    2014-01-01

    Models simulating the reciprocal transformation between the soil water and groundwater are of great practical importance to the development and utilization of water resources and prevention and remedy of water pollution. In this paper, popular coupled models of soil water and groundwater will be analyzed. Besides, advantages and disadvantages of different models will be summarized as a reference for the numerical model of soil water and groundwater.

  4. A Review of Water Isotopes in Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Xi

    2014-01-01

    Stable water isotopologues, mainly ^1H_2O, ^1H^2HO (HDO), and ^1H_2 ^(18)O, are useful tracers for processes in the global hydrological cycle. The incorporation of water isotopes into Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs) since 1984 has helped scientists gain substantial new insights into our present and past climate. In recent years, there have been several significant advances in water isotopes modeling in AGCMs. This paper reviews and synthesizes key advances accomplis...

  5. Research advances on thereasonable water resources allocation in irrigation district

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xuebin, Qi; Zhongdong, Huang; Dongmei, Qiao;

    2015-01-01

    The rational allocation of water resources for irrigation is important to improve the efficiency in utilization of water resources and ensuring food security, but also effective control measures need to be in place for the sustainable utilization of water resources in an irrigation area. The...... progress of research on the rational allocation of water resources in irrigation districts both at home and abroad may be summarized in four key aspects of the policy regarding water re?sources management:① The mechanism of water resource cycle and ② Transformation in irrigation district, ③ The water...... resources optimal allocation model and④The hydrological ecosystem analysis in irrigation district. Our analysis showed that there are four major problems in domestic irrigation water resources allocation:Policies for rational water resources allocation and protection are not in place, unified management...

  6. Selective Extraction of Heavy and Light Lanthanides from Aqueous Solution by Advanced Magnetic Nanosorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijin; McDowell, Rocklan G; Martin, Leigh R; Qiang, You

    2016-04-13

    Rare earth elements (REEs) make unique and vital contributions to our current world of technology. Separating and recycling REEs is of great importance to diversify the sources of REEs and advance the efficient use of REE resources when the supply is limited. In light of separation nanotechnology, diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) functionalized magnetic nanosorbents have been synthesized and investigated for the highly selective extraction of heavy (Sm-Ho) and light (La-Nd) lanthanides (Ln) from aqueous solutions. The results demonstrated that the separation factor (SF) between heavy-Ln and light-Ln groups reached the maximal value of 11.5 at low pH value of 2.0 in 30 min. For example, the SFs of Gd/La and Dy/La pairs were up to 10 times higher than that reported by other studies. Besides the excellent selectivity, our double-coated magnetic nanoparticles coupled with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (dMNP-DTPA) nanosorbents are more advantageous in that the Ln(III) sorption was effectively and quickly (in 30 min) achieved in acid solutions with pH values as low as 2.0. Such attributes ensure a stronger adaptability to the harsh environments of REE recycling processes. Displacement phenomena were subsequently observed between the heavy-Ln and light-Ln ions that were coexisting in solution and competing for the same sorption sites, causing the increase in sorption capacity of heavy Ln on the surface of nanosorbents with time. The order of affinity of Ln(III) to DTPA-functionalized magnetic nanosorbents perfectly followed the corresponding stability constants between Ln(III) and nonimmobilized DTPA. Displacement phenomena and lanthanide contraction, as well as the surface nanostructures of DTPA-functionalized nanosorbents, significantly improved the separation factors of heavy-Ln/light-Ln pairs. The Ln(III) interaction with DTPA-functionalized magnetic nanosorbents followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics with a correlation coefficient extremely high and

  7. Advances in the interpretation and analysis of lunar occultation light curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, A.; Glindemann, A.

    2012-02-01

    Context. The introduction of fast 2D detectors and the use of very large telescopes have significantly advanced the sensitivity and accuracy of the lunar occultation technique. Recent routine observations at the ESO Very Large Telescope have yielded hundreds of events with results, especially in the area of binary stars, which are often beyond the capabilities of any other techniques. Aims: With the increase in the quality and in the number of the events, subtle features in the light curve patterns have occasionally been detected which challenge the standard analytical definition of the lunar occultation phenomenon as diffraction from an infinite straight edge. We investigate the possible causes for the observed peculiarities. Methods: We have evaluated the available statistics of distortions in occultation light curves observed at the ESO VLT, and compared it to data from other facilities. We have developed an alternative approach to model and interpret lunar occultation light curves, based on 2D diffraction integrals describing the light curves in the presence of an arbitrary lunar limb profile. We distinguish between large limb irregularities requiring the Fresnel diffraction formalism, and small irregularities described by Fraunhofer diffraction. We have used this to generate light curves representative of several limb geometries, and attempted to relate them to some of the peculiar data observed. Results: We conclude that the majority of the observed peculiarities is due to limb irregularities, which can give origin both to anomalies in the amplitude of the diffraction fringes and to varying limb slopes. We investigate also other possible effects, such as detector response and atmospheric perturbations, finding them negligible. We have developed methods and procedures that for the first time allow us to analyze data affected by limb irregularities, with large ones bending the fringe pattern along the shape of the irregularity, and small ones creating fringe

  8. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Squeezed and Non-classical Light

    CERN Document Server

    Pike, E; Squeezed and Non-classical Light

    1988-01-01

    The recent generation in the laboratory of phase squeezed and intensity squeezed light beams has brought to fruition the theoretical predictions of such non-classical phenomena which have been made and developed in recent years by a number of workers in the field of quantum optics. A vigorous development is now underway of both theory and experiment and the first measurements have been coi:Jfirmed and extended already in some half dozen laboratories. Although the fields of application of these novellight sources are as yet somewhat hazy in our minds and some inspired thinking is required along these lines, the pace and excitement of the research is very clear. It is to he hoped that the new possibilities of: making measurements below the quantum shot noise lirnit which is made possible by these squeezed states of light willlead to further fundamental advances in the near future. In this NATO ARW a number of the leaders in the field met in the extremely pleasant surroundings of Cortina d'Ampezzo and th...

  9. High security chaotic multiple access scheme for visible light communication systems with advanced encryption standard interleaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Junchao; Zhang, Lin; Li, Diyang; Liu, Xingcheng

    2016-06-01

    Chaotic sequences can be applied to realize multiple user access and improve the system security for a visible light communication (VLC) system. However, since the map patterns of chaotic sequences are usually well known, eavesdroppers can possibly derive the key parameters of chaotic sequences and subsequently retrieve the information. We design an advanced encryption standard (AES) interleaving aided multiple user access scheme to enhance the security of a chaotic code division multiple access-based visible light communication (C-CDMA-VLC) system. We propose to spread the information with chaotic sequences, and then the spread information is interleaved by an AES algorithm and transmitted over VLC channels. Since the computation complexity of performing inverse operations to deinterleave the information is high, the eavesdroppers in a high speed VLC system cannot retrieve the information in real time; thus, the system security will be enhanced. Moreover, we build a mathematical model for the AES-aided VLC system and derive the theoretical information leakage to analyze the system security. The simulations are performed over VLC channels, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness and high security of our presented AES interleaving aided chaotic CDMA-VLC system.

  10. Analysis of the multi-application small light-water reactor (MASLWR) design natural circulation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today the use of advanced nuclear power plants, have an important role in the environment and economic sustainability of country energy strategy considering the capacity of a nuclear reactor of producing energy in safe and stable way contributing in cutting the CO2 emissions. In the last 20 years, in fact, the international community, taking into account the excellent operational experience of the nuclear reactors, starts the development of new advanced reactor designs, by including also the use of the natural circulation for the cooling of the core in normal and transient conditions. In this international framework, Oregon State University has constructed, under a U.S. Department of Energy grant, a system level test facility to examine natural circulation phenomena of importance to Multi-Application Small Light-Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. The MASLWR is a small modular integral pressurized water reactor relying on natural circulation during both steady state and transient operation, including an integrated helical coil steam generator. Starting from an experimental campaign in support of the MASLWR concept design verification, the planned work, related to the OSU-MASLWR test facility, will be not only to specifically investigate the MASLWR concept design further but also advance the broad understanding of integral natural circulation reactor plants and accompanying passive safety features as well. Four tests have been performed at this facility in order to assess the thermal hydraulic behavior of the MASLWR design in normal and transient operation and to assess the passive safety system under transient condition. This paper illustrates a preliminary analyses, performed by TRACE code, aiming at the evaluation of the code capability in predicting natural circulation, heat exchange from primary to secondary side by helical steam generator in superheated condition and primary/containment coupling phenomena typical of the MASLWR design. The tests take into account

  11. Report of the consultancy on review of thermophysical properties of materials for advanced water-cooled reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1990 the IAEA's Nuclear Power Technology Development Section has carried out a coordinated research programme on thermophysical properties of materials for advanced water cooled reactors. The objective of this activity has been to collect and systematize a thermophysical properties data base for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating and transient conditions. This activity has been organized within the frame of IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-cooled Reactors. The important thermophysical properties include thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, enthalpy, thermal expansion and others. Several organizations involved in this CRP have suggested establishment of a new programme to extend the database to include properties in the liquid region applicable to severe accidents, to critically assess and peer review the property data and correlations, and to recommend the most appropriate data. The purpose of the consultancy was to examine the interest in further cooperation, and, if appropriate, to prepare the scope and approach for a potential new international collaborative programme to collect and review thermophysical properties data for advanced water cooled reactors and to recommend the most appropriate data. Figs

  12. In-operation inspection technology development 'development of a rational maintenance management method for light-water reactor plant'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, the Japanese national project named 'In-Operation Inspection Technology Development (IOI)' was initiated, as a part of the activities for advancing the LWR(light water reactor)technology in Japan. This project developed the techniques for in-operation monitoring and detecting of early anomalies of nuclear power equipment such as rotating machines, valves and piping. Further, the estimation systems for diagnosing and predicting a degradation rate of these items of equipment were constructed. Based on these results, a new maintenance management technology was constructed. This paper describes the outline of the new maintenance management concept. (authors)

  13. Seawater desalination using small and medium light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water is an essential substance for sustaining human life. As Japan is an island country, surrounded by the sea and having abundant rainfall, there is no scarcity of water in daily life except during abnormally dry summers or after disasters such as earthquakes. Consequently, there is hardly any demand for seawater desalination plants except on remote islands, Okinawa and a part of Kyushu. However, the IAEA has forecast a scarcity of drinking water in developing countries at the beginning of the 21st century. Further, much more irrigation water will be required every year to prevent cultivated areas from being lost by desertification. If developing countries were to produce such water by seawater desalination using current fossil fuel energy technology, it would cause increased air pollution and global warming. This paper explains the concept of seawater desalination plants using small and medium water reactors (hereinafter called 'nuclear desalination'), as well as important matters regarding the export nuclear desalination plants to developing countries. (author)

  14. An Advanced Microturbine System with Water-Lubricated Bearings

    OpenAIRE

    Susumu Nakano; Tadaharu Kishibe; Tomoaki Inoue; Hiroyuki Shiraiwa

    2009-01-01

    A prototype of the next-generation, high-performance microturbine system was developed for laboratory evaluation. Its unique feature is its utilization of water. Water is the lubricant for the bearings in this first reported application of water-lubricated bearings in gas turbines. Bearing losses and limitations under usage conditions were found from component tests done on the bearings and load tests done on the prototype microturbine. The rotor system using the water-lubricated bearings ach...

  15. Advanced Decentralized Water/Energy Network Design for Sustainable Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to provide a water infrastructure that is more sustainable into and beyond the 21st century, drinking water distribution systems and wastewater collection systems must account for our diminishing water supply, increasing demands, climate change, energy cost and availabil...

  16. Advances in Biological Water-saving Research: Challenge and Perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun Shan; Xiping Deng; Suiqi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Increasing the efficiency of water use by crops continues to escalate as a topic of concern because drought is a restrictive environmental factor for crop productivity worldwide. Greater yield per unit rainfall is one of the most important challenges in water-saving agriculture. Besides water-saving by irrigation engineering and conservation tillage, a good understanding of factors limiting and/or regulating yield now provides us with an opportunity to identify and then precisely select for physiological and breeding traits that increase the efficiency of water use and drought tolerance under water-limited conditions, biological water-saving is one means of achieving this goat. A definition of biological water-saving measures is proposed which embraces improvements in water-use efficiency (WUE) and drought tolerance, by genetic improvement and physiological regulation. The preponderance of biological water-saving measures is discussed and strategies identified for working within natural resource constraints. The technology and future perspectives of biological water saving could provide not only new water-saving techniques but also a scientific base for application of water-saving irrigation and conservation tillage.

  17. Recent Developments in Homogeneous Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water and Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muruganandham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on recent developments in homogeneous Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs for the treatment of water and wastewater. It has already been established that AOPs are very efficient compared to conventional treatment methods for degradation and mineralization of recalcitrant pollutants present in water and wastewater. AOPs generate a powerful oxidizing agent, hydroxyl radical, which can react with most of the pollutants present in wastewater. Therefore, it is important to discuss recent developments in AOPs. The homogeneous AOPs such as O3, UV/O3, UV/O3/H2O2, and UV/H2O2, Fe2+/H2O2, UV/Fe2+/H2O2 on the degradation of pollutants are discussed in this paper. The influence on the process efficiency of various experimental parameters such as solution pH, temperature, oxidant concentration, and the dosage of the light source is discussed. A list of contaminants used for degradation by various AOPs and the experimental conditions used for the treatment are discussed in detail.

  18. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  19. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ''Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs

  20. Enhancing hydrophilicity and water permeability of PET track-etched membranes by advanced oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolkov, Ilya V.; Mashentseva, Anastassiya A.; Güven, Olgun; Zdorovets, Maxim V.; Taltenov, Abzal A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we present results on the application of advanced oxidation systems for effective and non-toxic oxidation of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track-etched membranes (PET TeMs) to improve their wettability and water transport properties. Two oxidizing systems: H2O2 under UV irradiation (H2O2/UV) and Fenton system under visible light (Fenton/H2O2/Vis) were compared. The surface of functionalized PET TeMs was characterized by using colorimetric assay, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results clearly showed that water permeability of PET TeMs treated with H2O2/UV was improved by 28 ± 5% compared with etched-only membrane, the same parameter was found to increase by 13 ± 4% in the case of Fenton/H2O2/Vis treatment. The proposed oxidation technique is very simple, environment friendly and not requiring special equipment or expensive chemicals. The surface hydrophilicity of the membranes stored for 360 days in air between paper sheets was analyzed by contact angle test, colorimetric assay to measure concentration of carboxylic groups on the surface with toluidine blue and XPS analysis. The hydrophilic properties of oxidized PET TeMs were found to be stable for a long period of time.

  1. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change. PMID:27155416

  2. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  3. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors and the role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors was carried out from 1995-1998. It was included into the IAEA's Programme following endorsement in 1995 by the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The overall goal was to promote International Information exchange and cooperation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships that are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water-cooled reactors. (authors)

  4. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors, and the role of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors was carried out from 1995-1999. It was included into the IAEA's Programme following endorsement in 1995 by the IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The overall goal was to promote international information exchange and cooperation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships that are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. (authors)

  5. Marination effects on water states and water-holding capacity of broiler pectoralis major muscle with different color lightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    A total of four experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of marination on water states and water-holding capacity (WHC) of broiler pectoralis (p.) major muscle selected based on raw muscle color lightness. Boneless, skinless p. major were collected at 6-8 h postmortem from deboning li...

  6. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  7. Recent Advances in Point-of-Access Water Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostynska, O.; Arshak, K.; Velusamy, V.; Arshak, A.; Vaseashta, Ashok

    Clean water is one of our most valuable natural resources. In addition to providing safe drinking water it assures functional ecosystems that support fisheries and recreation. Human population growth and its associated increased demands on water pose risks to maintaining acceptable water quality. It is vital to assess source waters and the aquatic systems that receive inputs from industrial waste and sewage treatment plants, storm water systems, and runoff from urban and agricultural lands. Rapid and confident assessments of aquatic resources form the basis for sound environmental management. Current methods engaged in tracing the presence of various bacteria in water employ bulky laboratory equipment and are time consuming. Thus, real-time water quality monitoring is essential for National and International Health and Safety. Environmental water monitoring includes measurements of physical characteristics (e.g. pH, temperature, conductivity), chemical parameters (e.g. oxygen, alkalinity, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds), and abundance of certain biological taxa. Monitoring could also include assays of biological activity such as alkaline phosphatase, tests for toxins such as microcystins and direct measurements of pollutants such as heavy metals or hydrocarbons. Real time detection can significantly reduce the level of damage and also the cost to remedy the problem. This paper presents overview of state-of-the-art methods and devices used for point-of-access water quality monitoring and suggest further developments in this area.

  8. Fuel cycle flexibility in Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) with the use of Th-LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is being designed for large scale commercial utilization of thorium (Th) and integrated technological demonstration of the thorium cycle in India. The AHWR is a 920 MW(th), vertical pressure tube type cooled by boiling light water and moderated by heavy water. Heat removal through natural circulation and on-line fuelling are some of the salient features of AHWR design. The physics design of AHWR offers considerable flexibility to accommodate different kinds of fuel cycles. Our recent efforts have been directed towards a case study for the use of Th-LEU fuel cycle in a once-through mode. The discharged Uranium from Th-LEU cycle has proliferation resistant characteristics. This paper gives the initial core, fuel cycle characteristics and online refueling strategy of Th-LEU fuel in AHWR. (author)

  9. Photonics—Advances in Fundamental Sciences and Engineering Technologies of Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Tansu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Photonics is a field of sciences that focuses on the pursuit of the understanding basic properties of light, the interaction of light with materials, the fundamental concepts and technologies for generating and controlling the properties of light, the concept and technologies for transmitting and signal processing of light, the engineering of these technologies for manipulating light applicable for systems implementation. [...

  10. An Advanced Microturbine System with Water-Lubricated Bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Nakano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of the next-generation, high-performance microturbine system was developed for laboratory evaluation. Its unique feature is its utilization of water. Water is the lubricant for the bearings in this first reported application of water-lubricated bearings in gas turbines. Bearing losses and limitations under usage conditions were found from component tests done on the bearings and load tests done on the prototype microturbine. The rotor system using the water-lubricated bearings achieved stable rotating conditions at a rated rotational speed of 51,000 rpm. An electrical output of 135 kW with an efficiency of more than 33% was obtained. Water was also utilized to improve electrical output and efficiency through water atomizing inlet air cooling (WAC and a humid air turbine (HAT. The operation test results for the WAC and HAT revealed the WAC and HAT operations had significant effects on both electrical output and electrical efficiency.

  11. Water on Mediterranean Islands:Advanced Study Course SUSTAINIS

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Water is a scarce resource today and even more so in the near future. On many of the Mediterranean Islands the demand for water exceeds the supply, a tendency that is going to worsen in view of anticipated climate change. How is this scarce resource going to be distributed among the many user groups: agriculture, tourism, private households and industry? How did previous generations deal with this problem, and what would be strategies for a sustainable and equitable water management in the fu...

  12. Current status of light water reactor and Hitachi's technical improvements for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradual technical improvements in Japan over the years has improved the reliability of light water reactors, and has achieved the highest capacity factor level in the world. Commercial operation of Fukushima 2-2 (1,100 MW) of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. was started in February, 1984, as the first standardized BWR base plant, ushering in a new age of domestic light water reactor technology. The ABWR (1,300 MW class) has been developed as Japan's next generation light water reactor, with construction aimed at the latter half of the 1980's. Hitachi's extensive efforts range from key nuclear equipment to various related robots, directed at improving safety, reliability, and the capacity factor, while reducing radiation exposure. This paper presents an outline of Hitachi's participation in the light water reactor's improvement and standardization, and the current status of our role in the international cooperation plan for the ABWR. (author)

  13. Catalogue and classification of technical safety rules for light-water reactors and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report on the cataloguing and classification of technical rules for land-based light-water reactors and reprocessing plants contains a list of classified rules. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  14. Advanced Water Purification System For In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prior to electrolysis, the water generated as an intermediate product must be treated to remove absorbed hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, byproducts derived...

  15. Combined effects of light and water stress on chloroplast volume regulation.

    OpenAIRE

    McCain, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance technique was used to measure changes in the water content of Acer platanoides chloroplasts in leaf discs that had reached osmotic equilibrium with external solutions either in the dark or under exposure to light. Results showed that chloroplast volume regulation (CVR) maintained constant water content in the chloroplasts over a range of water potentials in the dark, but CVR failed when the water potential fell below a critical value. The critical potential was lo...

  16. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels have been investigated. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-sulfur-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor water, and in air. Analytical studies focused on the behavior of carbon steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. Crack-growth rates of composite fracture-mechanics specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B steel were determined under small-amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼300 pbb dissolved oxygen. Radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence also have been investigated. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  17. Seawater desalination using small and medium light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Kazuo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Water is an essential substance for sustaining human life. As Japan is an island country, surrounded by the sea and having abundant rainfall, there is no scarcity of water in daily life except during abnormally dry summers or after disasters such as earthquakes. Consequently, there is hardly any demand for seawater desalination plants except on remote islands, Okinawa and a part of Kyushu. However, the IAEA has forecast a scarcity of drinking water in developing countries at the beginning of the 21st century. Further, much more irrigation water will be required every year to prevent cultivated areas from being lost by desertification. If developing countries were to produce such water by seawater desalination using current fossil fuel energy technology, it would cause increased air pollution and global warming. This paper explains the concept of seawater desalination plants using small and medium water reactors (hereinafter called 'nuclear desalination'), as well as important matters regarding the export nuclear desalination plants to developing countries. (author)

  18. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  19. Advanced Product Water Removal and Management (APWR) Fuel Cell System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a passive, self-regulating, gravity-independent Advanced Product Water Removal (APWR) system for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)...

  20. Advanced Air Evaporation System with Reusable Wicks for Water Recovery Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A microgravity-compatible Advanced Air Evaporation System (AAES) is proposed for recovering nearly 100% of water from highly contaminated wastewater without concern...