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Sample records for advanced hippotherapy simulator

  1. HIPPOTHERAPY SIMULATOR AS ALTERNATIVE METHOD FOR HIPPOTHERAPY TREATMENT IN HEMIPLEGIC CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Elshafey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hippotherapy considered as worldwide techniques used in rehabilitation of children with neurological disorders as it improved gait pattern, balance, postural control, strengthen, range of motion and gross and fine motor skills development but it encounter some technical problems. Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to compare between hippotherapy and hippotherapy simulators effect on back geometry and balance in hemiplegic children. Materials and Methods: Thirty ambulant hemiplegic children, their age ranges from four to six years old participated in this study. They were randomly divided into two matched groups (control and study. The control group treated with hippotherapy for half hour in addition to the selected physical therapy program, while the study group treated with hippotherapy simulators for half hour in addition to the selected physical therapy program also. All children received the treatment three times weekly for three successive months. Spinal geometry were evaluated by Formatric instrumentation systems and balance were evaluated by pediatric balance scale before and after treatment Results: There was significant improvement in all the measured variables for both groups after comparing of their pre and post-treatment mean values with non-significant difference between both groups post treatment. Conclusion: Hippotherapy simulators is an alternative method for hippotherapy could be used for modulation of back geometry and for improving balance in hemiplegic children. Brief summary and potential implication: Hippotherapy simulator was used in treatment of back geometry and balance in hemiplegic children, all the measurements were compared with hippotherapy. The results were nearly the same in both groups.

  2. Study of the therapeutic effects of an advanced hippotherapy simulator in children with cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliván Barbara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although hippotherapy treatment has been demonstrated to have therapeutic effects on children with cerebral palsy, the samples used in research studies have been very small. In the case of hippotherapy simulators, there are no studies that either recommend or advise against their use in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy. The aim of this randomised clinical study is to analyse the therapeutic effects or the contraindications of the use of a commercial hippotherapy simulator on several important factors relating to children with cerebral palsy such as their motor development, balance control in the sitting posture, hip abduction range of motion and electromyographic activity of adductor musculature. Methods/Design The study is a randomised controlled trial. It will be carried out with a sample of 37 children with cerebral palsy divided into two treatment groups. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive either (a Treatment Group with hippotherapy simulator, maintaining sitting posture, with legs in abduction and rhythmic movement of the simulator or (b Treatment Group maintaining sitting posture, with legs in abduction and without rhythmic movement of the simulator. Data collection and analysis: all measurements will be carried out by a specially trained blind assessor. To ensure standardization quality of the assessors, an inter-examiner agreement will be worked out at the start of the study. The trial is funded by the Department of Research, Innovation and Development of the Regional Government of Aragon (Official Bulletin of Aragon 23 July 2007, project number PM059/2007. Discussion Interest in this project is due to the following factors: Clinical originality (there are no previous studies analysing the effect of simulators on the population group of children with CP, nor any studies using as many variables as this project; Clinical impact (infantile cerebral palsy is a chronic multisystemic

  3. Effects of Hippotherapy on Recovery of Gait and Balance Ability in Patients with Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chae-Woo; Kim, Seong Gil; Yong, Min Sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the the effects of hippotherapy on gait and balance ability in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly divided into a hippotherapy group and a treadmill group and they conducted exercise for eight weeks. [Results] Berg Balance Scale score, gait velocity, and step length asymmetry ratio were significantly improved in the group receiving hippotherapy training. However, in the group receiving treadmill train...

  4. Hippotherapy: quality of life for the elderly on the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Mara Wibelinger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hippotherapy is a technique of rehabilitation and education that uses horse riding and equestrian activities to provide physical benefits to the practitioner, psychological, educational and social. This activity requires the participation of the entire body, the practitioner working in a global horse being used as a therapeutic method that will help develop equilibrium, muscle tone, muscle strength, body awareness, improvement of motor coordination, attention, self-confidence, self-esteem and quality of life. Hippotherapy in the elderly will use the horse as a therapeutic agent in treating various pathologies providing welfare and thus improved quality of life, and a pleasurable treatment, because it runs away from offices and indoor environments. Moreover, threedimensional movement, rhythmic rocking horse and will stimulate the vestibular system, the improvement of consciousness space-time, concentration, equilibrium and consolidation of security gravitational leaving the elderly less vulnerable to falls and related disabilities. Therefore, this article literature review aimed to determine the effects and show the importance of the practice of hippotherapy in order to obtain better quality of life and longevity.

  5. [Dynamics of hip joint biomechanics in patients with coxarthrosis at the time of hippotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nareklishvili, T M

    2008-02-01

    The problems of degenerative-dystrophic abnormalities stimulate the development of new skills and methods of treatment and rehabilitation of the diseases. The goal of the study was to determine the efficacy of hippotherapy in patients with coxarthrosis, according to functional and biomechanical parameters. Hippotherapy involves the utilization of horseback riding to stimulate the patient's normal reactions and locomotion; to improve the balance and coordination of movement, normalize muscle tension, and eliminate pathological reflexes. The advantage of the hippotherapy is in the specific posture, which is adopted by hip joint at the time of riding and in movement, which is accomplished by rider, at different paces of the horse. 10 female patients from 14 to 32 years old with coxarthrosis were under the observation. The rehabilitation of the patients was carried out by means of hippotherapy, which consisted of three months riding three times a week. To evaluate the efficacy of treatment, a new method of biomechanical registration of hip joint movement during hippotherapy on pacing horse was developed. The dynamics of biomechanical curves before and after the treatment, as well as the clinical and functional parameters of the patients allowed the authors to conclude: hippotherapy improves a hip joint functional state in patients with coxarthrosis; improves the muscle-tendineous component of hip joint movement. Hippotherapy may be considered as the pathogenetic method of treatment of coxarthrosis. Drawing the biomechanical curve of hip joint movement at the time of riding is the objective method of studying its function. PMID:18401052

  6. Influence of hippotherapy on psychomotor development of people with special needs

    OpenAIRE

    Gardenia de Oliveira Barbosa; Mey de Abreu van Munster

    2013-01-01

    Hippotherapy is a therapeutic and educational process that uses a horse with the purpose of providing physical and psychological improvement for people with special needs. In this study, the goal was to analyze the influence of hippotherapy on psychomotor development of people with special needs. In order to do this, an extensive bibliographical research was performed and from the items found an analysis was carried out through reading the abstracts and selecting the works which involved psyc...

  7. Towards advanced code simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) uses advanced thermohydraulic codes extensively to support PWR safety analyses. A system has been developed to allow fully interactive execution of any code with graphical simulation of the operator desk and mimic display. The system operates in a virtual machine environment, with the thermohydraulic code executing in one virtual machine, communicating via interrupts with any number of other virtual machines each running other programs and graphics drivers. The driver code itself does not have to be modified from its normal batch form. Shortly following the release of RELAP5 MOD1 in IBM compatible form in 1983, this code was used as the driver for this system. When RELAP5 MOD2 became available, it was adopted with no changes needed in the basic system. Overall the system has been used for some 5 years for the analysis of LOBI tests, full scale plant studies and for simple what-if studies. For gaining rapid understanding of system dependencies it has proved invaluable. The graphical mimic system, being independent of the driver code, has also been used with other codes to study core rewetting, to replay results obtained from batch jobs on a CRAY2 computer system and to display suitably processed experimental results from the LOBI facility to aid interpretation. For the above work real-time execution was not necessary. Current work now centers on implementing the RELAP 5 code on a true parallel architecture machine. Marconi Simulation have been contracted to investigate the feasibility of using upwards of 100 processors, each capable of a peak of 30 MIPS to run a highly detailed RELAP5 model in real time, complete with specially written 3D core neutronics and balance of plant models. This paper describes the experience of using RELAP5 as an analyzer/simulator, and outlines the proposed methods and problems associated with parallel execution of RELAP5

  8. Hippotherapy as a treatment for socialization after sexual abuse and emotional stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerino, Marcelo R; Briel, Alysson F; Araújo, Maria das Graças Rodrigues

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Hippotherapy is a therapeutic resource that uses the horse as a kinesiotherapy instrument to elicit motor and cognitive improvements in individuals with special needs. [Subjects and Methods] This research evaluated two women aged 18 and 21 years, who had suffered sexual violence when they were children between the ages of 6 and 7 years old. The subjects did not have mental dysfunction but they were regular students registered at a school of special education. The patients presented severe motor limitation, difficulty with coordination, significant muscular retractions, thoracic and cervical kyphosis, cervical protrusion wich was basically a function of the postures they had adopted when victims of the sexual violence suffered in childhood. The patients performed twenty sessions of 30 minutes of hippotherapy on a horse. The activities were structured to stimulate coordination, proprioception, the vestibular and motor-sensorial systems for the improvement of posture, muscle activity and cognition. [Results] The activities provided during the hippotherapy sessions elicited alterations in postural adjustment resulting in 30% improvement, 80% improvement in coordination in, 50% improvement in corporal balance and in sociability and self-esteem. [Conclusion] Hippotherapy proved to be an effective treatment method for coordination, balance and postural correction, and also improved the patients' self-esteem that had suffered serious emotional stress. PMID:25931769

  9. The effect of hippotherapy on gait in patients with spastic cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Fízková

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disorders of motor skills, especially regarding gait, are prevalent in nearly all forms of cerebral palsy. Through a horse’s back movement, the patient is exposed to proprioceptive stimulation, thus improvement in gait performance could be expected. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to determine the effect of hippotherapy on gait in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. METHODS: Eleven subjects (age 14.3 ± 4.8 years, height 148.2 ± 17.6 cm, weight 43.3 ± 20.2 kg with spastic cerebral palsy participated in the study. Gait assessment was performed before and after a weeklong stay. The hippotherapy was conducted daily. Kinematic data from three trials for each child was obtained using the Vicon MX system (seven infrared cameras, frequency 200 Hz. Comparison of ankle, knee, hip and pelvis movement before and after hippotherapy intervention was performed in Statistica (version 10.0 using the Wilcoxon test. To determine the effect size, Cohen’s d was used. RESULTS: After completing the short-term hippotherapy intervention, we observed a decrease in the second plantar flexion during initial swing (p < .05, decrease in knee flexion during the stance phase (p < .05, decrease in the hip range of motion in sagittal plane (p < .05 and decrease in the pelvic obliquity (p < .05. The effect size for all statistically significant differences was low. CONCLUSIONS: Hippotherapy combined with individually defined physiotherapy can lead to some changes in bipedal locomotion in terms of improvement and thus contribute to greater self-sufficiency, self-reliance and independence of patients with cerebral palsy.

  10. Effects of Hippotherapy on Psychosocial Aspects in Children With Cerebral Palsy and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chul Hwan; Joo, Min Cheol; Noh, Se Eung; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Dae Bo; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Ho Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of hippotherapy on psychosocial and emotional parameters in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and their caregivers. Methods Eight children with CP were recruited (three males and five females; mean age, 7.3 years; Gross Motor Function Classification System levels 1–3). Hippotherapy sessions were conducted for 30 minutes once weekly for 10 consecutive weeks in an indoor riding arena. The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS), and the Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index were evaluated. All children were evaluated by the Children's Depression Inventory, Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children, State Anxiety Inventory for Children, Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale, and the Korean-Satisfaction with Life Scale (K-SWLS). Their caregivers were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the K-SWLS. We assessed children and their caregivers with the same parameters immediately after hippotherapy. Results Significant improvements on the GMFM, dimension E in the GMFM, and the PBS were observed after hippotherapy compared with the baseline assessment (p<0.05). However, no improvements were detected in the psychosocial or emotional parameters in children with CP or their caregivers. None of the participants showed any adverse effects or accidents during the 10 weeks hippotherapy program. Conclusions Hippotherapy was safe and effectively improved gross motor and balance domains in children with CP. However, no improvements were observed in psychosocial or emotional parameters. PMID:27152272

  11. Hippotherapy as a treatment for socialization after sexual abuse and emotional stress

    OpenAIRE

    Guerino, Marcelo R.; Briel, Alysson F.; Araújo, Maria das Graças Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Hippotherapy is a therapeutic resource that uses the horse as a kinesiotherapy instrument to elicit motor and cognitive improvements in individuals with special needs. [Subjects and Methods] This research evaluated two women aged 18 and 21 years, who had suffered sexual violence when they were children between the ages of 6 and 7 years old. The subjects did not have mental dysfunction but they were regular students registered at a school of special education. The patients presented ...

  12. Interactive Simulations and advanced Visualization with Modelica

    OpenAIRE

    Bellmann, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a Modelica library for interactive simulation and advanced visualization called ExternalDevices is introduced and presented. Providing support for standard input devices like keyboard and joystick as well as for communication via UDP and shared memory, this library allows the user to interact with a running simulation and process the output data of the simulation in other processes capable of UDP connections. An advanced visualization system replaces t...

  13. Advanced circuit simulation using Multisim workbench

    CERN Document Server

    Báez-López, David; Cervantes-Villagómez, Ofelia Delfina

    2012-01-01

    Multisim is now the de facto standard for circuit simulation. It is a SPICE-based circuit simulator which combines analog, discrete-time, and mixed-mode circuits. In addition, it is the only simulator which incorporates microcontroller simulation in the same environment. It also includes a tool for printed circuit board design.Advanced Circuit Simulation Using Multisim Workbench is a companion book to Circuit Analysis Using Multisim, published by Morgan & Claypool in 2011. This new book covers advanced analyses and the creation of models and subcircuits. It also includes coverage of transmissi

  14. Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S.; Doughty, C.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Moridis, G.J.; Pan,L.; Xu, T.; Zhang, Y.; Pruess, K.

    2007-02-01

    The vadose zone can be characterized as a complex subsurfacesystem in which intricate physical and biogeochemical processes occur inresponse to a variety of natural forcings and human activities. Thismakes it difficult to describe, understand, and predict the behavior ofthis specific subsurface system. The TOUGH nonisothermal multiphase flowsimulators are well-suited to perform advanced vadose zone studies. Theconceptual models underlying the TOUGH simulators are capable ofrepresenting features specific to the vadose zone, and of addressing avariety of coupled phenomena. Moreover, the simulators are integratedinto software tools that enable advanced data analysis, optimization, andsystem-level modeling. We discuss fundamental and computationalchallenges in simulating vadose zone processes, review recent advances inmodeling such systems, and demonstrate some capabilities of the TOUGHsuite of codes using illustrative examples.

  15. Advances in Intelligent Modelling and Simulation Simulation Tools and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oplatková, Zuzana; Carvalho, Marco; Kisiel-Dorohinicki, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The human capacity to abstract complex systems and phenomena into simplified models has played a critical role in the rapid evolution of our modern industrial processes and scientific research. As a science and an art, Modelling and Simulation have been one of the core enablers of this remarkable human trace, and have become a topic of great importance for researchers and practitioners. This book was created to compile some of the most recent concepts, advances, challenges and ideas associated with Intelligent Modelling and Simulation frameworks, tools and applications. The first chapter discusses the important aspects of a human interaction and the correct interpretation of results during simulations. The second chapter gets to the heart of the analysis of entrepreneurship by means of agent-based modelling and simulations. The following three chapters bring together the central theme of simulation frameworks, first describing an agent-based simulation framework, then a simulator for electrical machines, and...

  16. Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2011-03-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  17. 14 CFR Appendix H to Part 121 - Advanced Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Simulation H Appendix H to Part... Simulation This appendix provides guidelines and a means for achieving flightcrew training in advanced... simulator, as appropriate. Advanced Simulation Training Program For an operator to conduct Level C or...

  18. Assessment of training simulators with advanced models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training quality received by the nuclear power plants operators is related to the reliability degree reached by the models which constitute the calculation basis. TECNATOM began, in the middle of the 80's, the PWR and BWR training simulators upgrading to reproduce all type of transients with long term operation and a very high reliability degree. As a result of this, the Simulation Advanced Models Project (MAS) has been developed for both PWR and BWR simulators. The simulators software is the TRAC code running in real time on the CRAY X-MP 14 vectorial computer. The validation methodology followed in the MAS Project is based on the EPRI's one. The main goal is the detailed analysis of the variables and physical phenomena to validate ('dynamic modes') included in the validation transients matrix. The reference results are supplied by plant data or best estimate codes: TRAC-PF1/MOD1 and TRACG for PWR and BWR training simulators, respectively. This paper shows the main results of validation transients and the main conclusions: improvement of simulation scope and reliability, EOP's scenarios simulation with long term recovery and physical phenomena analysis similar to best estimate codes. (orig.) (13 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.)

  19. Advanced simulation for fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This talk broadly reviews recent research aimed at applying advanced simulation techniques specifically to fast neutron reactors. By advanced simulation we generally refer to attempts to do more science-based simulation - that is, to numerically solve the three-dimensional governing physical equations on fine scales and observe and study the holistic phenomena that emerge. In this way simulation is treated more akin to a traditional physical experiment, and can can be used both separately and in conjunction with physical experiments to develop more accurate predictive theories on reactor behavior. Many existing fast reactor modeling tools were developed for last generation's computational resources. They were built by engineers and physicists with deep physical insight - insight that both shaped and was informed by existing theory, and was underpinned by a vast repository of experimental data. Their general approach was to develop models that were tailored to varying degrees to the details of the reactor design, using free model parameters that were subsequently calibrated to match existing experimental data. The resulting codes were thus extremely useful for their specific purpose but highly limited in their predictive capability (neutronics to a lesser degree). They tended to represent more the state-of-the-art in our understanding rather than tools of exploration and innovation. Recently, a number of researchers have attempted to study the feasibility of solving more fundamental governing equations on realistic, three-dimensional geometries for different fast reactor sub-domains. This includes solving the Navier-Stokes equations for single-phase sodium flow (Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddie Simulation, and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Equations) in the core, upper plenum, primary and intermediate loop, etc.; the non-homogenized transport equations at very fine group, angle, and energy discretization, and thermo-mechanical feedback based on

  20. Advanced ST plasma scenario simulations for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated scenario simulations are done for NSTX that address four primary milestones for developing advanced ST configurations: high β and high βN inductive discharges to study all aspects of ST physics in the high beta regime; non-inductively sustained discharges for flattop times greater than the skin time to study the various current drive techniques; non-inductively sustained discharges at high βfor flattop times much greater than a skin time which provides the integrated advanced ST target for NSTX; and non-solenoidal startup and plasma current rampup. The simulations done here use the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) and are based on a discharge 109070. TRANSP analysis of the discharge provided the thermal diffusivities for electrons and ions, the neutral beam (NB) deposition profile and other characteristics. CURRAY is used to calculate the High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating depositions and current drive. GENRAY/CQL3D is used to establish the heating and CD deposition profiles for electron Bernstein waves (EBW). Analysis of the ideal MHD stability is done with JSOLVER, BALMSC, and PEST2. The simulations indicate that the integrated advanced ST plasma is reachable, obtaining stable plasmas with β ∼ 40% at βN's of 7.7-9, IP = 1.0 MA and BT = 0.35 T. The plasma is 100% non-inductive and has a flattop of 4 skin times. The resulting global energy confinement corresponds to a multiplier of H98(y,2) = 1.5. The simulations have demonstrated the importance of HHFW heating and CD, EBW off-axis CD, strong plasma shaping, density control, and early heating/H-mode transition for producing and optimizing these plasma configurations (author)

  1. Hippotherapy acute impact on heart rate variability non-linear dynamics in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiddu, Ramona; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Trimer, Renata; Trimer, Vitor; Ricci, Paula Angélica; Italiano Monteiro, Clara; Camargo Magalhães Maniglia, Marcela; Silva Pereira, Ana Maria; Rodrigues das Chagas, Gustavo; Carvalho, Eliane Maria

    2016-05-15

    Neurological disorders are associated with autonomic dysfunction. Hippotherapy (HT) is a therapy treatment strategy that utilizes a horse in an interdisciplinary approach for the physical and mental rehabilitation of people with physical, mental and/or psychological disabilities. However, no studies have been carried out which evaluated the effects of HT on the autonomic control in these patients. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a single HT session on cardiovascular autonomic control by time domain and non-linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). The HRV signal was recorded continuously in twelve children affected by neurological disorders during a HT session, consisting in a 10-minute sitting position rest (P1), a 15-minute preparatory phase sitting on the horse (P2), a 15-minute HT session (P3) and a final 10-minute sitting position recovery (P4). Time domain and non-linear HRV indices, including Sample Entropy (SampEn), Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA), were calculated for each treatment phase. We observed that SampEn increased during P3 (SampEn=0.56±0.10) with respect to P1 (SampEn=0.40±0.14, pdisabilities attributable to neurological disorders by eliciting an acute autonomic response during the therapy and during the recovery period. PMID:26988283

  2. Advanced numerical simulations of selected metallurgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kokot

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to present numerical simulations of large structures in metallurgical industry. Some examples of finite element analysis are presented. The calculations were performed for the determining the stress effort of the metallurgical units mainly blast furnace, throath’s gas pipelines, hot blast stoves, etc. during the working conditions and for the repairing purpose.Design/methodology/approach: The way of conducting simulations and analysis were the finite element method connected with the optimization process.Findings: Performing the numerical analysis the changes in the structures design were applied what extremely influenced on the state effort and the durability of considered structures.Research limitations/implications: Development of the presented approach solving the coupled field and CFD problems, the application of the parallel computing and domain decomposition methods in the large structure simulations.Practical implications: Presented results shows the possibility of application the advanced computational methods in the computer aided engineering processes of designing and analysing the large structure as the metallurgical units are. It can dramatically influence on the recognizing of the effort stets and helps in the monitoring, overhauls and redesigning process. Those methods gives the global very precise information which cannot be obtain in other ways (analytical solutions, experimental methods.Originality/value: The paper present the original research results comes from the complex numerical simulations of the main metallurgical units in the blast furnace train. The original value of the paper is the introduction of the advanced finite element simulation in the field of iron steel industry structures design and developing.

  3. Motion control in advanced driving simulators

    OpenAIRE

    Elloumi, Hatem

    2006-01-01

    Driving simulators are advanced devices composed of four components: a virtual scene projected on a wide screen to imitate the road and the traffic, an audio system to play the driving sounds (horn, squeal of brakes, etc.), a car cockpit (including a real dashboard, the pedals and the seat of the driver) to copy the body position and the interaction of the driver with a real vehicle and finally a robot carrying the car cockpit to provide its motion. While the first three components could be c...

  4. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  5. TNO-ADVANCE: a modular powertrain simulation and design tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venne, J.W.C. van de; Smokers, R.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    To support its activities in the field of conventional and hybrid vehicles, TNO has developed ADVANCE, a modular simulation tool for the design and evaluation of advanced powertrains. In this paper the various features and the potential of ADVANCE are described and illustrated by means of three case

  6. Advanced TCAD Simulations and Characterization of Semiconductor Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Ewert, Tony

    2006-01-01

    Today, micro- and nano-electronic devices are becoming more complex and advanced as the dimensions are shrinking. It is therefore a very challenging task to develop new device technologies with performance that can be predicted. This thesis focuses on advanced measurement techniques and TCAD simulations in order to characterize and understand the device physics of advanced semiconductor devices. TCAD simulations were made on a novel MOSFET device with asymmetric source and drain structures. ...

  7. Precision Casting via Advanced Simulation and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program was conducted to develop and commercially implement selected casting manufacturing technologies to enable significant reductions in the costs of castings, increase the complexity and dimensional accuracy of castings, and reduce the development times for delivery of high quality castings. The industry-led R&D project was cost shared with NASA's Aerospace Industry Technology Program (AITP). The Rocketdyne Division of Boeing North American, Inc. served as the team lead with participation from Lockheed Martin, Ford Motor Company, Howmet Corporation, PCC Airfoils, General Electric, UES, Inc., University of Alabama, Auburn University, Robinson, Inc., Aracor, and NASA-LeRC. The technical effort was organized into four distinct tasks. The accomplishments reported herein. Task 1.0 developed advanced simulation technology for core molding. Ford headed up this task. On this program, a specialized core machine was designed and built. Task 2.0 focused on intelligent process control for precision core molding. Howmet led this effort. The primary focus of these experimental efforts was to characterize the process parameters that have a strong impact on dimensional control issues of injection molded cores during their fabrication. Task 3.0 developed and applied rapid prototyping to produce near net shape castings. Rocketdyne was responsible for this task. CAD files were generated using reverse engineering, rapid prototype patterns were fabricated using SLS and SLA, and castings produced and evaluated. Task 4.0 was aimed at developing technology transfer. Rocketdyne coordinated this task. Casting related technology, explored and evaluated in the first three tasks of this program, was implemented into manufacturing processes.

  8. Simulation of advanced ultrasound systems using Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    impulse responses is explained. A simulation example for a synthetic aperture spread spectrum flow systems is described. It is shown how the advanced coded excitation can be set up, and how the simulation can be parallelized to reduce the simulation time from 17 months to 391 hours using a 32 CPU Linux...

  9. Recent advances in nuclear power plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of industrial simulation has experienced very significant progress in recent years, and power plant simulation in particular has been an extremely active area. Improvements may be recorded in practically all simulator subsystems. In Europe, the construction of new full- or optimized-scope nuclear power plant simulators during the middle 1990's has been remarkable intense. In fact, it is possible to identify a distinct simulator generation, which constitutes a new de facto simulation standard. Thomson Training and Simulation has taken part in these developments by designing, building, and validation several of these new simulators for Dutch, German and French nuclear power plants. Their characteristics are discussed in this paper. The following main trends may be identified: Process modeling is clearly evolving towards obtaining engineering-grade performance, even under the added constraints of real-time operation and a very wide range of operating conditions to be covered; Massive use of modern graphic user interfaces (GUI) ensures an unprecedented flexibility and user-friendliness for the Instructor Station; The massive use of GUIs also allows the development of Trainee Stations (TS), which significantly enhance the in-depth training value of the simulators; The development of powerful Software Development Environments (SDE) enables the simulator maintenance teams to keep abreast of modifications carried out in the reference plants; Finally, simulator maintenance and its compliance with simulator fidelity requirements are greatly enhanced by integrated Configuration Management Systems (CMS). In conclusion, the power plant simulation field has attained a strong level of maturity, which benefits its approximately forty years of service to the power generation industry. (author)

  10. Does the rider influence the horse's movement in hippotherapy? [Ovlivňuje jezdec pohyb koně v hipoterapii?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Janura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In hippotherapy, in comparison to equitation, it is assumed that the rider is a passive element, only stimulated by mechanical impulses produced by the moving horse's back. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine the influence of the rider on the horse's movement in hippotherapy. METHODS: Two sound thoroughbreds with a similar body shape and size (age: 19 and 14 years, withers height: 1.65 m both, weight: 548 and 500 kg participated in the study. The test group of riders consisted of twelve healthy young women (age: 23.3 ± 2.8, weight: 59.2 ± 5.3, height: 167.3 ± 4.2 without any previous horse riding experience. For each rider 36 trials in total (6 strides in 6 hippotherapy sessions held during the course of five weeks were evaluated. The movement was recorded by 4 videocameras (frequency 50 Hz. Spatiotemporal variables, the vertical displacement of selected points on the horse's limbs and the back and angle displacement of tarsus joint were analyzed by the APAS programme. Statistical processing was performed by the Statistica programme (one way ANOVA. RESULTS: In our study, we didn't find any statistically significant difference (p CONCLUSIONS: In hippotherapy, basic spatiotemporal variables of a horse's natural walking aren't influenced by the rider. As for the vertical displacement of points on the limbs and the horse's back, the results are not explicit. A larger number of horses is necessary for future study. The patient and the horse in hippotherapy are to be rather considered as interactive elements than as passive and active elements.[VÝCHODISKA: V hipoterapii je, na rozdíl od jezdectví, jezdec považován za pasivní prvek, který je stimulován impulsy, které vycházejí z pohybujícího se hřbetu koně. CÍLE: Cílem studie bylo zjistit, zda jezdec ovlivňuje pohyb koně v hipoterapii. METODIKA: Do studie byli zařazeni dva angličtí plnokrevníci podobné tělesné konstituce (věk: 19 a 14 let, v

  11. Virtual Environments for Advanced Trainers and Simulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jense, G.J.; Kuijper, F.

    1993-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is expected to make a big impact on future training and simulation systems. Direct stimulation of human senses (eyesight, auditory, tactile) and new paradigms for user input will improve the realism of simulations and thereby the effectiveness of training systems. Afte

  12. Hybrid and Electric Advanced Vehicle Systems Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, R. F.; Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    Predefined components connected to represent wide variety of propulsion systems. Hybrid and Electric Advanced Vehicle System (HEAVY) computer program is flexible tool for evaluating performance and cost of electric and hybrid vehicle propulsion systems. Allows designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict performance of proposed drive train.

  13. ADVANCE, a modular vehicle simulation environment in MATLAB/SIMULINK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelkema, J.; Vink, W.; Tillaart, E. van den

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a hybrid electric powertrain test platform. In the development process use has been made of ADVANCE, a modular vehicle simulation environment in MATLAB/Simulink. The background, philosophy, and the concept of the ADVANCE tool are discussed and a brief introduct

  14. The benefit of hippotherapy for improvement of attention and memory in children with cerebral palsy: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Krejčí

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The research is based on an assumption that the hypokinesia induced by cerebral palsy (CP leads to inhibition of some mental functions. The method we used to treat patients with CP, hippotherapy (HT, is a treatment using horses and belongs to proprioceptive-neuromuscular-facilitative methods. Objective: The aim of the research was to determine the benefit of HT on attention and memory of patients with CP. Methods: There were two groups of patients: short-term HT (n = 11; 8 females and 3 males, age 15.4 ± 5.3 years and long-term HT (n = 9; 7 females and 2 males, age 10.8 ± 2.7 years. The short-term HT group participated in daily 30 minute-long HT sessions for duration of a week-long summer therapy camp; while with the long-term HT group, HT sessions of the same length were used weekly for 5-6 weeks. Attention and memory skills were assessed with "Numeric square test" and "Verbal learning test", respectively. Both tests were undertaken before starting and after concluding the camp or the 5-6 week long HT period. Results: Attention improvement demonstrated in a significant decrease of an average time of "Numeric square test". The improvement was seen in both long-term HT (15.7 seconds overall average time reduction after HT, p < .01 and short-term HT (20.8 seconds reduction, p < .01 groups. Short-term memory improvement was found in the long-term HT group, demonstrated by a higher number of memorized words (more than half of the patients memorized on average 10.5 more words after HT (p < .05. While the short-term HT group did not show significant improvement of attention or short-term memory, the average number of memorized words after a diversion of attention and a 30 minute delay increased by 4.1, showing an improvement (p < .05 of long-term memory. Conclusions: Our results suggest that hippotherapy as a part of comprehensive therapy in patients with CP leads to improvement of memory and

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing Business Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummel, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    To maintain a credible nuclear weapons program, the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Office of Defense Programs (DP) needs to make certain that the capabilities, tools, and expert staff are in place and are able to deliver validated assessments. This requires a complete and robust simulation environment backed by an experimental program to test ASC Program models. This ASC Business Plan document encapsulates a complex set of elements, each of which is essential to the success of the simulation component of the Nuclear Security Enterprise. The ASC Business Plan addresses the hiring, mentoring, and retaining of programmatic technical staff responsible for building the simulation tools of the nuclear security complex. The ASC Business Plan describes how the ASC Program engages with industry partners—partners upon whom the ASC Program relies on for today’s and tomorrow’s high performance architectures. Each piece in this chain is essential to assure policymakers, who must make decisions based on the results of simulations, that they are receiving all the actionable information they need.

  16. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery - Advanced Reservoir Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sidsel Marie

    to formation of biofilm. The construction of a one-dimensional simulator enables us to investigate how the different mechanisms and the combination of these influence the displacement processes, the saturation profiles and thus the oil recovery curves. The reactive transport model describes...... of the relative permeabilities. Overall, these methods produce similar results. Separate investigations of the surfactant effect have been performed through exemplifying simulation cases, where no biofilm is formed. The water phase saturation profiles are found to contain a waterfront initially...... investigated. A super efficient surfactant produces an incremental recovery recovery around 40 % OOIP over that of waterflooding. Application of the less efficient -- and probably more realistic -- surfactant results in an incremental oil recovery of 9 % OOIP, but it is still considered a significant...

  17. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery - Advanced Reservoir Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2010-01-01

    In this project, a generic model has been set up to include the two main mechanisms in the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process; reduction of the interfacial tension (IFT) due to surfactant production, and microscopic fluid diversion as a part of the overall fluid diversion mechanism due to formation of biofilm. The construction of a one-dimensional simulator enables us to investigate how the different mechanisms and the combination of these influence the displacement processes, the...

  18. Advanced numerical techniques in core simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole core simulations are one of the most CPU intensive calculations in reactor physics design and analyses. For a designer it is imperative to perform these calculations with good accuracy and in least time possible to try out various options. It is important for the code developers to use techniques involving minimum approximations and to use most recent numerical methods applied in tandem with huge computing power available today. In the presented paper, some of these methods are discussed. (author)

  19. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  20. Process simulation for advanced composites production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Ferko, S.M.; Griffiths, S. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency and lower the cost of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes used to manufacture advanced ceramics by providing the physical and chemical understanding necessary to optimize and control these processes. Project deliverables include: numerical process models; databases of thermodynamic and kinetic information related to the deposition process; and process sensors and software algorithms that can be used for process control. Target manufacturing techniques include CVD fiber coating technologies (used to deposit interfacial coatings on continuous fiber ceramic preforms), chemical vapor infiltration, thin-film deposition processes used in the glass industry, and coating techniques used to deposit wear-, abrasion-, and corrosion-resistant coatings for use in the pulp and paper, metals processing, and aluminum industries.

  1. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaolin [SUNY at Stony Brook

    2013-01-14

    Our final report on the accomplishments of ITAPS at Stony Brook during period covered by the research award includes component service, interface service and applications. On the component service, we have designed and implemented a robust functionality for the Lagrangian tracking of dynamic interface. We have migrated the hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic solver from stage-wise second order toward global second order schemes. We have implemented high order coupling between interface propagation and interior PDE solvers. On the interface service, we have constructed the FronTier application programer's interface (API) and its manual page using doxygen. We installed the FronTier functional interface to conform with the ITAPS specifications, especially the iMesh and iMeshP interfaces. On applications, we have implemented deposition and dissolution models with flow and implemented the two-reactant model for a more realistic precipitation at the pore level and its coupling with Darcy level model. We have continued our support to the study of fluid mixing problem for problems in inertial comfinement fusion. We have continued our support to the MHD model and its application to plasma liner implosion in fusion confinement. We have simulated a step in the reprocessing and separation of spent fuels from nuclear power plant fuel rods. We have implemented the fluid-structure interaction for 3D windmill and parachute simulations. We have continued our collaboration with PNNL, BNL, LANL, ORNL, and other SciDAC institutions.

  2. The use of advanced computer simulation in structural design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, C.J.; Mole, A. [Arup, San Fransisco, CA (United States); Arkinstall, M. [Arup, Sydney (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    The benefits that can be gained from the application of advanced numerical simulation in building design were discussed. A review of current practices in structural engineering was presented along with an illustration of a range of international project case studies. Structural engineers use analytical methods to evaluate both static and dynamic loads. Structural design is prescribed by a range of building codes, depending on location, building type and loading, but often, buildings do not fit well within the codes, particularly if one wants to take advantage of new technologies and developments in design that are not covered by the code. Advanced simulation refers to the use of mathematical modeling to complex problems to allow a wider consideration of building types and conditions that can be designed reliably using standard practices. Advanced simulation is used to address virtual testing and prototyping, verifying innovative design ideas, forensic engineering, and design optimization. The benefits of advanced simulation include enhanced creativity, improved performance, cost savings, risk management, sustainable design solutions, and better communication. The following 5 case studies illustrated the value gained by using advanced simulation as an integral part of the design process: the earthquake resistant Maison Hermes in Tokyo; the seismic resistant braces known as the Unbonded Brace for use in the United States; a simulation of the existing Disney Museum to evaluate its capacity to resist earthquakes; simulation of the MIT Brain and Cognitive Science Project to evaluate the effect of different foundation types on the vibration entering the building; and, the Beijing Aquatic Center whose design was streamlined by optimized structural analysis. It was suggested that industry should encourage the transfer of technology from other professions and should try to collaborate towards a global building model to construct buildings in a more efficient manner. 7 refs

  3. Equipping simulators with an advanced thermal hydraulics model EDF's experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of an accelerated version of the advanced CATHARe-1 thermal hydraulics code designed for EDF training simulators (CATHARE-SIMU) was successfully completed as early as 1991. Its successful integration as the principal model of the SIPA Post-Accident Simulator meant that its use could be extended to full-scale simulators as part of the renovation of the stock of existing simulators. In order to further extend the field of application to accidents occurring in shutdown states requiring action and to catch up with developments in respect of the CATHARE code, EDF initiated the SCAR Project designed to adapt CATHARE-2 to simulator requirements (acceleration, parallelization of the computation and extension of the simulation range). In other respects, the installation of SIPA on workstations means that the authors can envisage the application of this remarkable training facility to the understanding of thermal hydraulics accident phenomena

  4. Safety Assessment of Advanced Imaging Sequences II: Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    . The simulation time is between 0.67 ms to 2.8 ms per emission and imaging point, making it possible to simulate even complex emission sequences in less than 1 s for a single spatial position. The linear simulations yield a relative accuracy on MI between -12.1% to 52.3% and for Ispta.3 between -38......An automatic approach for simulating the emitted pressure, intensity, and MI of advanced ultrasound imaging sequences is presented. It is based on a linear simulation of pressure fields using Field II, and it is hypothesized that linear simulation can attain the needed accuracy for predicting...... Mechanical Index (MI) and Ispta.3 as required by FDA. The method is performed on four different imaging schemes and compared to measurements conducted using the SARUS experimental scanner. The sequences include focused emissions with an F-number of 2 with 64 elements that generate highly non-linear fields...

  5. Free-boundary simulations of ITER advanced scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful operation of ITER advanced scenarios is likely to be a major step forward in the development of controlled fusion as a power production source. ITER advanced scenarios raise specific challenges that are not encountered in presently-operated tokamaks. In this thesis, it is argued that ITER advanced operation may benefit from optimal control techniques. Optimal control ensures high performance operation while guaranteeing tokamak integrity. The application of optimal control techniques for ITER operation is assessed and it is concluded that robust optimisation is appropriate for ITER operation of advanced scenarios. Real-time optimisation schemes are discussed and it is concluded that the necessary conditions of optimality tracking approach may potentially be appropriate for ITER operation, thus offering a viable closed-loop optimal control approach. Simulations of ITER advanced operation are necessary in order to assess the present ITER design and uncover the main difficulties that may be encountered during advanced operation. The DINA-CH and CRONOS full tokamak simulator is used to simulate the operation of the ITER hybrid and steady-state scenarios. It is concluded that the present ITER design is appropriate for performing a hybrid scenario pulse lasting more than 1000 sec, with a flat-top plasma current of 12 MA, and a fusion gain of Q ≅ 8. Similarly, a steady-state scenario without internal transport barrier, with a flat-top plasma current of 10 MA, and with a fusion gain of Q ≅ 5 can be realised using the present ITER design. The sensitivity of the advanced scenarios with respect to transport models and physical assumption is assessed using CRONOS. It is concluded that the hybrid scenario and the steady-state scenario are highly sensitive to the L-H transition timing, to the value of the confinement enhancement factor, to the heating and current drive scenario during ramp-up, and, to a lesser extent, to the density peaking and pedestal

  6. Simulating advanced life support systems to test integrated control approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, D.; Bell, S.

    Simulations allow for testing of life support control approaches before hardware is designed and built. Simulations also allow for the safe exploration of alternative control strategies during life support operation. As such, they are an important component of any life support research program and testbed. This paper describes a specific advanced life support simulation being created at NASA Johnson Space Center. It is a discrete-event simulation that is dynamic and stochastic. It simulates all major components of an advanced life support system, including crew (with variable ages, weights and genders), biomass production (with scalable plantings of ten different crops), water recovery, air revitalization, food processing, solid waste recycling and energy production. Each component is modeled as a producer of certain resources and a consumer of certain resources. The control system must monitor (via sensors) and control (via actuators) the flow of resources throughout the system to provide life support functionality. The simulation is written in an object-oriented paradigm that makes it portable, extensible and reconfigurable.

  7. Patient Simulation Software to Augment an Advanced Pharmaceutics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonder, Kristine

    2011-01-01

    Objective To implement and assess the effectiveness of adding a pharmaceutical care simulation program to an advanced therapeutics course. Design PharmaCAL (University of Pittsburgh), a software program that uses a branched-outcome decision making model, was used to create patient simulations to augment lectures given in the course. In each simulation, students were presented with a challenge, given choices, and then provided with consequences specific to their choices. Assessments A survey was administered at the end of the course and students indicated the simulations were enjoyable (92%), easy to use (90%), stimulated interest in critically ill patients (82%), and allowed for application of lecture material (91%). A 5-item presimulation and postsimulation test on the anemia simulation was administered to assess learning. Students answered significantly more questions correctly on the postsimulation test than on the presimulation test (p < 0.001). Seventy-eight percent of students answered the same 5 questions correctly on the final examination. Conclusion Patient simulation software that used a branched-outcome decision model was an effective supplement to class lectures in an advanced pharmaceutics course and was well-received by pharmacy students. PMID:21519411

  8. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  9. Integration of Advanced Simulation and Visualization for Manufacturing Process Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenn; Wang, Jichao; Tang, Guangwu; Moreland, John; Fu, Dong; Wu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    The integration of simulation and visualization can provide a cost-effective tool for process optimization, design, scale-up and troubleshooting. The Center for Innovation through Visualization and Simulation (CIVS) at Purdue University Northwest has developed methodologies for such integration with applications in various manufacturing processes. The methodologies have proven to be useful for virtual design and virtual training to provide solutions addressing issues on energy, environment, productivity, safety, and quality in steel and other industries. In collaboration with its industrial partnerships, CIVS has provided solutions to companies, saving over US38 million. CIVS is currently working with the steel industry to establish an industry-led Steel Manufacturing Simulation and Visualization Consortium through the support of National Institute of Standards and Technology AMTech Planning Grant. The consortium focuses on supporting development and implementation of simulation and visualization technologies to advance steel manufacturing across the value chain.

  10. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY17 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Michel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Archer, Bill [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hendrickson, Bruce [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wade, Doug [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and Institutional Research and Development; Hoang, Thuc [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States). Computational Systems and Software Environment

    2016-08-29

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources that support annual stockpile assessment and certification, study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balance of resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. ASC is now focused on increasing predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (sufficient resolution, dimensionality, and scientific details), and quantifying critical margins and uncertainties. Resolving each issue requires increasingly difficult analyses because the aging process has progressively moved the stockpile further away from the original test base. Where possible, the program also enables the use of high performance computing (HPC) and simulation tools to address broader national security needs, such as foreign nuclear weapon assessments and counter nuclear terrorism.

  11. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  12. Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

  13. Advances in Simulation of Wave Interaction with Extended MHD Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) provides a framework within which some of the most advanced, massively-parallel fusion modeling codes can be interoperated to provide a detailed picture of the multi-physics processes involved in fusion experiments. The presentation will cover four topics: (1) recent improvements to the IPS, (2) application of the IPS for very high resolution simulations of ITER scenarios, (3) studies of resistive and ideal MHD stability in tokamk discharges using IPS facilities, and (4) the application of RF power in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies to control slowly growing MHD modes in tokamaks and initial evaluations of optimized location for RF power deposition.

  14. Advanced simulation of windmills in electric power supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Knudsen, Hans; Nielsen, Arne Hejde

    2000-01-01

    An advanced model of a grid-connected windmill is set up where the windmill is a complex electro-mechanical system. The windmill model is implemented as a standardised component in the dynamic simulation tool, PSS/E, which makes it possible to investigate dynamic behaviour of grid-connected windm......An advanced model of a grid-connected windmill is set up where the windmill is a complex electro-mechanical system. The windmill model is implemented as a standardised component in the dynamic simulation tool, PSS/E, which makes it possible to investigate dynamic behaviour of grid......-connected windmills as a part of realistic electrical grid models. That means an arbitrary number of wind farms or single windmills within an arbitrary network configuration. The windmill model may be applied to study of electric power system stability and of power quality as well. It is found that a grid...

  15. Advanced 3D Photocathode Modeling and Simulations Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High brightness electron beams required by the proposed Next Linear Collider demand strong advances in photocathode electron gun performance. Significant improvement in the production of such beams with rf photocathode electron guns is hampered by the lack high-fidelity simulations. The critical missing piece in existing gun codes is a physics-based, detailed treatment of the very complex and highly nonlinear photoemission process

  16. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  17. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  18. Advanced studies on Simulation Methodologies for very Complicated Fracture Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nowadays, computational techniques are well developed, for Extremely Complicated Fracture Phenomena, they are still very difficult to simulate, for general engineers, researchers. To overcome many difficulties in those simulations, we have developed not only Simulation Methodologies but also theoretical basis and concepts. We sometimes observe extremely complicated fracture patterns, especially in dynamic fracture phenomena such as dynamic crack branching, kinking, curving, etc. For examples, although the humankind, from primitive men to modern scientists such as Albert Einstein had watched the post-mortem patterns of dynamic crack branching, the governing condition for the onset of the phenomena had been unsolved until our experimental study. From in these studies, we found the governing condition of dynamic crack bifurcation, as follows. When the total energy flux per unit time into a propagating crack tip reaches the material crack resistance, the crack braches into two cracks [total energy flux criterion]. The crack branches many times whenever the criterion is satisfied. Furthermore, the complexities also arise due to their time-dependence and/or their-deformation dependence. In order to make it possible to simulate such extremely complicated fracture phenomena, we developed many original advanced computational methods and technologies. These are (i) moving finite element method based on Delaunay automatic triangulation (MFEMBOAT), path independent, (ii) equivalent domain integral expression of the dynamic J integral associated with a continuous auxiliary function, (iii) Mixed phase path-prediction mode simulation, (iv) implicit path prediction criterion. In this paper, these advanced computational methods are thoroughly explained together with successful comparison with the experimental results. Since multiple dynamic crack branching phenomena may be most complicated fracture due to complicated fracture paths, and its time dependence (transient

  19. Advance simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM) - 59065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) determined that uniform application of advanced modeling in the subsurface could help reduce the cost and risks associated with its environmental cleanup mission. In response to this determination, the EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development (OTID), Groundwater and Soil Remediation (GW and S) began the program Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for integrating data and scientific understanding to enable prediction of contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. This initiative supports the reduction of uncertainties and risks associated with EM?s environmental cleanup and closure programs through better understanding and quantifying the subsurface flow and contaminant transport behavior in complex geological systems. This involves the long-term performance of engineered components, including cementitious materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities that may be sources for future contamination of the subsurface. This paper describes the ASCEM tools and approach and the ASCEM programmatic accomplishments completed in 2010 including recent advances and technology transfer. The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management has begun development of an Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management, (ASCEM). This program will provide predictions of the end states of contaminated areas allowing for cost and risk reduction of EM remedial activities. ASCEM will provide the tools and approaches necessary to standardize risk and performance assessments across the DOE complex. Through its Phase One demonstration, the ASCEM team has shown value to the EM community in the areas of High Performance Computing, Data Management, Visualization, and Uncertainty Quantification. In 2012, ASCEM will provide an initial limited release of a community code for

  20. Simulated herbivory advances autumn phenology in Acer rubrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkner, Rebecca E.

    2014-05-01

    To determine the degree to which herbivory contributes to phenotypic variation in autumn phenology for deciduous trees, red maple ( Acer rubrum) branches were subjected to low and high levels of simulated herbivory and surveyed at the end of the season to assess abscission and degree of autumn coloration. Overall, branches with simulated herbivory abscised ˜7 % more leaves at each autumn survey date than did control branches within trees. While branches subjected to high levels of damage showed advanced phenology, abscission rates did not differ from those of undamaged branches within trees because heavy damage induced earlier leaf loss on adjacent branch nodes in this treatment. Damaged branches had greater proportions of leaf area colored than undamaged branches within trees, having twice the amount of leaf area colored at the onset of autumn and having ˜16 % greater leaf area colored in late October when nearly all leaves were colored. When senescence was scored as the percent of all leaves abscised and/or colored, branches in both treatments reached peak senescence earlier than did control branches within trees: dates of 50 % senescence occurred 2.5 days earlier for low herbivory branches and 9.7 days earlier for branches with high levels of simulated damage. These advanced rates are of the same time length as reported delays in autumn senescence and advances in spring onset due to climate warming. Thus, results suggest that should insect damage increase as a consequence of climate change, it may offset a lengthening of leaf life spans in some tree species.

  1. Advances in numerical simulation of nonlinear water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Qingwei

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Earth's surface is covered by water. Our everyday lives and activities are affected by water waves in oceans, such as the tsunami that occurred in the Indian Ocean on 26 December 2004. This indicates how important it is for us to fully understand water waves, in particular the very large ones. One way to do so is to perform numerical simulation based on the nonlinear theory. Considerable research advances have been made in this area over the past decade by developing various numerical methods and applying them to emerging problems; however, until now there has been no comprehensive

  2. New Developments in the Simulation of Advanced Accelerator Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved computational methods are essential to the diverse and rapidly developing field of advanced accelerator concepts. We present an overview of some computational algorithms for laser-plasma concepts and high-brightness photocathode electron sources. In particular, we discuss algorithms for reduced laser-plasma models that can be orders of magnitude faster than their higher-fidelity counterparts, as well as important on-going efforts to include relevant additional physics that has been previously neglected. As an example of the former, we present 2D laser wakefield accelerator simulations in an optimal Lorentz frame, demonstrating and gt;10 GeV energy gain of externally injected electrons over a 2 m interaction length, showing good agreement with predictions from scaled simulations and theory, with a speedup factor of ∼2,000 as compared to standard particle-in-cell.

  3. Advanced Simulations of Optical Transition and Diffraction Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2078350; Bobb, Lorraine Marie; Bolzon, B; Bravin, Enrico; Karataev, Pavel; Kruchinin, Konstantin; Lefevre, Thibaut; Mazzoni, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the “eyes” of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  4. Advanced electrical simulation of thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced electrical simulation of copper indium gallium diselenide solar cells is illustrated by setting up a demonstration case in SCAPS (Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator), the solar cell simulation programme of the University of Gent. The model includes band gap grading, multivalent defects and metastable transitions between defects. This simplified demonstration model clearly and quantitatively illustrates some topics that were extensively discussed in recent literature: metastable defects exist in either an acceptor or in a donor configuration; the occupation of these configurations is set during initial conditions at higher temperature, and then frozen in during cell operation at lower temperature. These occupations can strongly influence the effective doping profile in the absorber, and hence possible energy barriers in the structure. The dependence of such barriers on the initial conditions and on the operating voltage can cause a considerable dependence of the current–voltage characteristics on the initial conditions, especially of the fill factor. At the same time, the demonstration model illustrates some of the recent extensions of SCAPS. - Highlights: ► SCAPS, the Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator of UGent is freely available. ► SCAPS is keeping up with the sophistication of state-of-the-art solar cells. ► It can now handle: multivalent and metastable defects; grading of all properties. ► It is shown how metastable defects can lead to metastable cell characteristics. ► A relation conduction band barrier-fill factor is numerically established

  5. Conjugate heat transfer simulations of advanced research reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Temperature predictions are enhanced by coupling heat transfer in solid and fluid zones. • Seven different cases are considered to observe trends in predicted temperature and pressure. • The seven cases consider high/medium/low power, flow, burnup, fuel material and geometry. • Simulations provide temperature predictions for performance/safety. Boiling is unlikely. • Simulations demonstrate that a candidate geometry can enhance performance/safety. - Abstract: The current work presents numerical simulations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer of advanced U–Mo/Al and U–Mo/Mg research reactor fuels in support of performance and safety analyses. The objective of this study is to enhance predictions of the flow regime and fuel temperatures through high fidelity simulations that better capture various heat transfer pathways and with a more realistic geometric representation of the fuel assembly in comparison to previous efforts. Specifically, thermal conduction, convection and radiation mechanisms are conjugated between the solid and fluid regions. Also, a complete fuel element assembly is represented in three dimensional space, permitting fluid flow and heat transfer to be simulated across the entire domain. Seven case studies are examined that vary the coolant inlet conditions, specific power, and burnup to investigate the predicted changes in the pressure drop in the coolant and the fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. In addition, an alternate fuel geometry is considered with helical fins (replacing straight fins in the existing design) to investigate the relative changes in predicted fluid and solid temperatures. Numerical simulations predict that the clad temperature is sensitive to changes in the thermal boundary layer in the coolant, particularly in simultaneously developing flow regions, while the temperature in the fuel is anticipated to be unaffected. Finally, heat transfer between fluid and solid regions is enhanced with

  6. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering

  7. Tools for advanced simulations to nuclear propulsion systems in rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Sepulveda, A.; Perez Vara, R.

    2004-07-01

    While chemical propulsion rockets have dominated space exploration, other forms of rocket propulsion based on nuclear power, electrostatic and magnetic drive, and other principles besides chemical reactions, have been considered from the earliest days of the field. The goal of most of these advanced rocket propulsion schemes is improved efficiency through higher exhaust velocities, in order to reduce the amount of fuel the rocket vehicle needs to carry, though generally at the expense of high thrust. Nuclear propulsion seems to be the most promising short term technology to plan realistic interplanetary missions. The development of a nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft shall require the development of models to analyse the mission and to understand the interaction between the related subsystems (nuclear reactor, electrical converter, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion) during the different phases of the mission. This paper explores the modelling of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft type using EcosimPro simulation software. This software is a multi-disciplinary simulation tool with a powerful object-oriented simulation language and state-of-the-art solvers. EcosimPro is the recommended ESA simulation tool for environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and has been used successfully within the framework of the European activities of the International Space Station programme. Furthermore, propulsion libraries for chemical and electrical propulsion are currently being developed under ESA contracts to set this tool as standard usage in the propulsion community. At present, there is not any workable NEP spacecraft, but a standardized-modular, multi-purpose interplanetary spacecraft for post-2000 missions, called ISC-2000, has been proposed in reference. The simulation model presented on this paper is based on the preliminary designs for this spacecraft. (Author)

  8. Investigations and advanced concepts on gyrotron interaction modeling and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avramidis, K. A., E-mail: konstantinos.avramidis@kit.edu [Institute for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technologies, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe 76131 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In gyrotron theory, the interaction between the electron beam and the high frequency electromagnetic field is commonly modeled using the slow variables approach. The slow variables are quantities that vary slowly in time in comparison to the electron cyclotron frequency. They represent the electron momentum and the high frequency field of the resonant TE modes in the gyrotron cavity. For their definition, some reference frequencies need to be introduced. These include the so-called averaging frequency, used to define the slow variable corresponding to the electron momentum, and the carrier frequencies, used to define the slow variables corresponding to the field envelopes of the modes. From the mathematical point of view, the choice of the reference frequencies is, to some extent, arbitrary. However, from the numerical point of view, there are arguments that point toward specific choices, in the sense that these choices are advantageous in terms of simulation speed and accuracy. In this paper, the typical monochromatic gyrotron operation is considered, and the numerical integration of the interaction equations is performed by the trajectory approach, since it is the fastest, and therefore it is the one that is most commonly used. The influence of the choice of the reference frequencies on the interaction simulations is studied using theoretical arguments, as well as numerical simulations. From these investigations, appropriate choices for the values of the reference frequencies are identified. In addition, novel, advanced concepts for the definitions of these frequencies are addressed, and their benefits are demonstrated numerically.

  9. Advanced modeling and simulation to design and manufacture high performance and reliable advanced microelectronics and microsystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettleship, Ian (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Hinklin, Thomas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Tandon, Rajan; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr. (,; .); Dempsey, James Franklin; Ewsuk, Kevin Gregory; Neilsen, Michael K.; Lanagan, Michael (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA)

    2007-07-01

    An interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers having broad expertise in materials processing and properties, materials characterization, and computational mechanics was assembled to develop science-based modeling/simulation technology to design and reproducibly manufacture high performance and reliable, complex microelectronics and microsystems. The team's efforts focused on defining and developing a science-based infrastructure to enable predictive compaction, sintering, stress, and thermomechanical modeling in ''real systems'', including: (1) developing techniques to and determining materials properties and constitutive behavior required for modeling; (2) developing new, improved/updated models and modeling capabilities, (3) ensuring that models are representative of the physical phenomena being simulated; and (4) assessing existing modeling capabilities to identify advances necessary to facilitate the practical application of Sandia's predictive modeling technology.

  10. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinase, Sakae [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of {sup 137}Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for

  11. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of 137Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for designing a

  12. TID Simulation of Advanced CMOS Devices for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper focuses on Total Ionizing Dose (TID) effects caused by accumulation of charges at silicon dioxide, substrate/silicon dioxide interface, Shallow Trench Isolation (STI) for scaled CMOS bulk devices as well as at Buried Oxide (BOX) layer in devices based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology to be operated in space radiation environment. The radiation induced leakage current and corresponding density/concentration electrons in leakage current path was presented/depicted for 180nm, 130nm and 65nm NMOS, PMOS transistors based on CMOS bulk as well as SOI process technologies on-board LEO and GEO satellites. On the basis of simulation results, the TID robustness analysis for advanced deep sub-micron technologies was accomplished up to 500 Krad. The correlation between the impact of technology scaling and magnitude of leakage current with corresponding total dose was established utilizing Visual TCAD Genius program.

  13. A study of reset mode in advanced alarm system simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automation function has been widely applied in main control room of nuclear power plants. That leads to a new issue of human-automation interaction, which considers human operational performance in automated systems. In this research is the automation alarm reset in the advanced alarm system (AAS) of Advanced Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan. Since alarms are very crucial for the understanding of the status of the plant as well as the reset function of alarm system will be changed from fully manual to fully automatic, it is very important to test and evaluate the performance and the effect of reset modes in AAS. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of the auto-reset alarm system on the plant performance and on operators' preference and task load. To develop a dynamic simulator as an AAS was conducted to compare manual and automatic reset function of alarm system on task performance and subjective ratings of task workload, comprehension, and preference. The simulation includes PCTRAN model and alarm software processing. The final results revealed that, using the auto-reset mode, participants had lower task load index (TLX) on effort in the first test trial and was more satisfied in multiple tasks condition. In contrast, using manual reset mode, participants were more satisfied on alarm handling, monitoring, and decision making. In other words, either reset mode in the study has unique features to assist operator, but is insufficient. The reset function in AAS therefore should be very flexible. Additionally, the experimental results also pointed out that the user interfaces need to be improved. Those experiences will be helpful for human factors verification and validation in the near future. (authors)

  14. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  15. Advancements in Afterbody Radiative Heating Simulations for Earth Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Panesi, Marco; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Four advancements to the simulation of backshell radiative heating for Earth entry are presented. The first of these is the development of a flow field model that treats electronic levels of the dominant backshell radiator, N, as individual species. This is shown to allow improvements in the modeling of electron-ion recombination and two-temperature modeling, which are shown to increase backshell radiative heating by 10 to 40%. By computing the electronic state populations of N within the flow field solver, instead of through the quasi-steady state approximation in the radiation code, the coupling of radiative transition rates to the species continuity equations for the levels of N, including the impact of non-local absorption, becomes feasible. Implementation of this additional level of coupling between the flow field and radiation codes represents the second advancement presented in this work, which is shown to increase the backshell radiation by another 10 to 50%. The impact of radiative transition rates due to non-local absorption indicates the importance of accurate radiation transport in the relatively complex flow geometry of the backshell. This motivates the third advancement, which is the development of a ray-tracing radiation transport approach to compute the radiative transition rates and divergence of the radiative flux at every point for coupling to the flow field, therefore allowing the accuracy of the commonly applied tangent-slab approximation to be assessed for radiative source terms. For the sphere considered at lunar-return conditions, the tangent-slab approximation is shown to provide a sufficient level of accuracy for the radiative source terms, even for backshell cases. This is in contrast to the agreement between the two approaches for computing the radiative flux to the surface, which differ by up to 40%. The final advancement presented is the development of a nonequilibrium model for NO radiation, which provides significant backshell

  16. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummond, L.A.; Marques, O.

    2002-05-21

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  17. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz Pitsch

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high-fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation, a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet tranformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  18. Enabling Advanced Modeling and Simulations for Fuel-Flexible Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitsch, Heinz

    2010-05-31

    The overall goal of the present project is to enable advanced modeling and simulations for the design and optimization of fuel-flexible turbine combustors. For this purpose we use a high fidelity, extensively-tested large-eddy simulation (LES) code and state-of-the-art models for premixed/partially-premixed turbulent combustion developed in the PI's group. In the frame of the present project, these techniques are applied, assessed, and improved for hydrogen enriched premixed and partially premixed gas-turbine combustion. Our innovative approaches include a completely consistent description of flame propagation; a coupled progress variable/level set method to resolve the detailed flame structure, and incorporation of thermal-diffusion (non-unity Lewis number) effects. In addition, we have developed a general flamelet-type transformation holding in the limits of both non-premixed and premixed burning. As a result, a model for partially premixed combustion has been derived. The coupled progress variable/level method and the general flamelet transformation were validated by LES of a lean-premixed low-swirl burner that has been studied experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The model is extended to include the non-unity Lewis number effects, which play a critical role in fuel-flexible combustor with high hydrogen content fuel. More specifically, a two-scalar model for lean hydrogen and hydrogen-enriched combustion is developed and validated against experimental and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. Results are presented to emphasize the importance of non-unity Lewis number effects in the lean-premixed low-swirl burner of interest in this project. The proposed model gives improved results, which shows that the inclusion of the non-unity Lewis number effects is essential for accurate prediction of the lean-premixed low-swirl flame.

  19. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts

  20. Active-Learning Diabetes Simulation in an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience to Develop Patient Empathy

    OpenAIRE

    Whitley, Heather P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop and integrate an active-learning diabetes simulation into an advanced pharmacy practice experience to improve pharmacy students’ empathy toward patients with diabetes mellitus.

  1. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow

  2. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management: Development and Demonstrations - 12532

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), Technology Innovation and Development is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of capabilities, which are organized into Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and a High-Performance Computing Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities target a level of functionality to allow end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model and management of data for model input. The High-Performance Computing capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The new capabilities are demonstrated through working groups, including one focused on the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone. The ASCEM program focused on planning during the first year and executing a prototype tool-set for an early demonstration of individual components. Subsequently, ASCEM has focused on developing and demonstrating an integrated set of capabilities, making progress toward a version of the capabilities that can be used to engage end users. Demonstration of capabilities continues to be implemented through working groups. Three different working groups, one focused on EM problems in the deep vadose zone, another investigating attenuation mechanisms for metals and radionuclides, and a third focusing on waste tank performance assessment, continue to make progress. The project

  3. Design and simulation of advanced charge recovery piezoactuator drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German Artificial Sphincter System project aims at the development of an implantable sphincter prosthesis driven by a piezoelectrically actuated micropump. The system has been designed to be fully implantable, i.e. the power supply is provided by a rechargeable lithium polymer battery. In order to provide sufficient battery duration and to limit battery dimensions, special effort has to be made to minimize power consumption of the whole system and, in particular, of the piezoactuator driver circuitry. Inductive charge recovery can be used to recover part of the charge stored within the actuator. We are going to present a simplified inductor-based circuit capable of voltage inversion across the actuator without the need of an additional negative voltage source. The dimension of the inductors required for such a concept is nevertheless significant. We therefore present a novel alternative concept, called direct switching, where the equivalent capacitance of the actuator is charged directly by a step-up converter and discharged by a step-down converter. We achieved superior performance compared to a simple inductor-based driver with the advantage of using small-size chip inductors. As a term of comparison, the performance of the aforementioned drivers is compared to a conventional driver that does not implement any charge recovery technique. With our design we have been able to achieve more than 50% reduction in power consumption compared to the simplest conventional driver. The new direct switching driver performs 15% better than an inductor-based driver. A novel, whole-system SPICE simulation is presented, where both the driving circuit and the piezoactuator are modeled making use of advanced nonlinear models. Such a simulation is a precious tool to design and optimize piezoactuator drivers

  4. Modeling and simulation challenges pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Kothe, Douglas B.

    2016-05-01

    The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the first Energy Innovation Hub of the Department of Energy, was established in 2010 with the goal of providing modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities that support and accelerate the improvement of nuclear energy's economic competitiveness and the reduction of spent nuclear fuel volume per unit energy, and all while assuring nuclear safety. To accomplish this requires advances in M&S capabilities in radiation transport, thermal-hydraulics, fuel performance and corrosion chemistry. To focus CASL's R&D, industry challenge problems have been defined, which equate with long standing issues of the nuclear power industry that M&S can assist in addressing. To date CASL has developed a multi-physics "core simulator" based upon pin-resolved radiation transport and subchannel (within fuel assembly) thermal-hydraulics, capitalizing on the capabilities of high performance computing. CASL's fuel performance M&S capability can also be optionally integrated into the core simulator, yielding a coupled multi-physics capability with untapped predictive potential. Material models have been developed to enhance predictive capabilities of fuel clad creep and growth, along with deeper understanding of zirconium alloy clad oxidation and hydrogen pickup. Understanding of corrosion chemistry (e.g., CRUD formation) has evolved at all scales: micro, meso and macro. CFD R&D has focused on improvement in closure models for subcooled boiling and bubbly flow, and the formulation of robust numerical solution algorithms. For multiphysics integration, several iterative acceleration methods have been assessed, illuminating areas where further research is needed. Finally, uncertainty quantification and data assimilation techniques, based upon sampling approaches, have been made more feasible for practicing nuclear engineers via R&D on dimensional reduction and biased sampling. Industry adoption of CASL's evolving M

  5. The Vienna LTE-advanced simulators up and downlink, link and system level simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rupp, Markus; Taranetz, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the Vienna Simulator Suite for 3rd-Generation Partnership Project (3GPP)-compatible Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) simulators and presents applications to demonstrate their uses for describing, designing, and optimizing wireless cellular LTE-A networks. Part One addresses LTE and LTE-A link level techniques. As there has been high demand for the downlink (DL) simulator, it constitutes the central focus of the majority of the chapters. This part of the book reports on relevant highlights, including single-user (SU), multi-user (MU) and single-input-single-output (SISO) as well as multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) transmissions. Furthermore, it summarizes the optimal pilot pattern for high-speed communications as well as different synchronization issues. One chapter is devoted to experiments that show how the link level simulator can provide input to a testbed. This section also uses measurements to present and validate fundamental results on orthogonal frequency division multiple...

  6. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for

  7. Editorial: Advances in Health Education Applying E-Learning, Simulations and Distance Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Andre W. Kushniruk (ACMI Fellow; CAHS Fellow)

    2011-01-01

    This special issue of the KM&EL international journal is dedicated to coverage of novel advances in health professional education applying e-Learning, simulations and distance education technologies. Modern healthcare is beginning to be transformed through the emergence of new information technologies and rapid advances in health informatics. Advances such as electronic health record systems (EHRs), clinical decision support systems and other advanced information systems such as public health...

  8. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    OpenAIRE

    Kulesza Joel A.; Franceschini Fausto; Evans Thomas M.; Gehin Jess C.

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR) operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a fir...

  9. Using Simulated Debates to Teach History of Engineering Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Terry S.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a technique for utilizing debates of past engineering controversies in the classroom as a means of teaching the history of engineering advances. Included is a bibliography for three debate topics relating to important controversies. (SL)

  10. Advances in Computational Social Science and Social Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Quesada, Francisco J.; Amblard, Frédéric; Juan A. Barceló; Madella, Marco; Aguirre, Cristián; Ahrweiler, Petra; Aldred, Rachel; Ali Abbas, Syed Muhammad; Lopez Rojas, Edgar Alonso; Alonso Betanzos, Amparo; Alvarez Galvez, Javier; Andrighetto, Giulia; Antunes, Luis; Araghi, Yashar; Asatani, Kimitaka

    2014-01-01

    Aquesta conferència és la celebració conjunta de la "10th Artificial Economics Conference AE", la "10th Conference of the European Social Simulation Association ESSA" i la "1st Simulating the Past to Understand Human History SPUHH". Conferència organitzada pel Laboratory for Socio­-Historical Dynamics Simulation (LSDS-­UAB) de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. Readers will find results of recent research on computational social science and social simulation economics, management, so...

  11. Vision and Displays for Military and Security Applications The Advanced Deployable Day/Night Simulation Project

    CERN Document Server

    Niall, Keith K

    2010-01-01

    Vision and Displays for Military and Security Applications presents recent advances in projection technologies and associated simulation technologies for military and security applications. Specifically, this book covers night vision simulation, semi-automated methods in photogrammetry, and the development and evaluation of high-resolution laser projection technologies for simulation. Topics covered include: advances in high-resolution projection, advances in image generation, geographic modeling, and LIDAR imaging, as well as human factors research for daylight simulation and for night vision devices. This title is ideal for optical engineers, simulator users and manufacturers, geomatics specialists, human factors researchers, and for engineers working with high-resolution display systems. It describes leading-edge methods for human factors research, and it describes the manufacture and evaluation of ultra-high resolution displays to provide unprecedented pixel density in visual simulation.

  12. ALICES: advanced software engineering workshop for real-time simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, A.; Rouault, G. [Tractebel, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-01

    The ALICES software workshop is presently being applied for the development of a multifunctional simulator for Belgium`s Tihange-1 nuclear power unit. This will be the best validation for all the functions included in the tools. It is believed that ALICES will permit the development of quality realtime simulators at a significantly lower price.

  13. Development of Kinetic Mechanisms for Next-Generation Fuels and CFD Simulation of Advanced Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNenly, Matt J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whitesides, Russell [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Killingsworth, Nick J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Predictive chemical kinetic models are needed to represent next-generation fuel components and their mixtures with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels. These kinetic models will allow the prediction of the effect of alternative fuel blends in CFD simulations of advanced spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines. Enabled by kinetic models, CFD simulations can be used to optimize fuel formulations for advanced combustion engines so that maximum engine efficiency, fossil fuel displacement goals, and low pollutant emission goals can be achieved.

  14. Advanced Algebraic Multigrid Solvers for Subsurface Flow Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Meng-Huo

    2015-09-13

    In this research we are particularly interested in extending the robustness of multigrid solvers to encounter complex systems related to subsurface reservoir applications for flow problems in porous media. In many cases, the step for solving the pressure filed in subsurface flow simulation becomes a bottleneck for the performance of the simulator. For solving large sparse linear system arising from MPFA discretization, we choose multigrid methods as the linear solver. The possible difficulties and issues will be addressed and the corresponding remedies will be studied. As the multigrid methods are used as the linear solver, the simulator can be parallelized (although not trivial) and the high-resolution simulation become feasible, the ultimately goal which we desire to achieve.

  15. Development and implementation of advanced control methods for hybrid simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid simulation is an effective way of testing structures that combines the benefits of a computational analysis and experimental testing techniques. Innovative structures consists of state-ofthe-art components and assemblages whose function as a system needs to be tested experimentally. Often times, these components and assemblages push the controller and other testing equipment to its limits. Performing hybrid simulation with the controller in displacement control mode does not always suf...

  16. Advance Reservation based DAG Application Scheduling Simulator for Grid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Prajapati, Harshad B.; Shah, Vipul A.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, scheduling of Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG) application in the context of Grid environment has attracted attention of many researchers. However, deployment of Grid environment requires skills, efforts, budget, and time. Although various simulation toolkits or frameworks are available for simulating Grid environment, either they support different possible studies in Grid computing area or takes lot of efforts in molding them to make them suitable for scheduling of DAG applic...

  17. Advances in the Simulation-Based Analysis of Attitude Change

    OpenAIRE

    Voinea, Camelia Florela

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of the most relevant research work on the simulation of attitudes which evolved in the late 90’s and mainly after the year 2000. The general framework for the modeling, simulation and computational research on attitudes integrates research approaches (both fundamental and applicative) which combine theories from sociology, social psychology, social economics, political science, conflict theories, human-computer interaction areas with complexity theory, com...

  18. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of nextgeneration accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphic...

  19. Numerical Simulations and Optimisation in Forming of Advanced Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huétink, J.

    2007-04-01

    With the introduction of new materials as high strength steels, metastable steels and fiber reinforce composites, the need for advanced physically valid constitutive models arises. A biaxial test equipment is developed and applied for the determination of material data as well as for validation of material models. An adaptive through- thickness integration scheme for plate elements is developed, which improves the accuracy of spring back prediction at minimal costs. An optimization strategy is proposed that assists an engineer to model an optimization problem.

  20. Advancements on the simulation of the micro injection moulding process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhöfer, David Maximilian; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2013-01-01

    Process simulations are applied in micro injection molding with the same purpose as in conventional injection molding: aiming at optimization and support of the design of mold, inserts, plastic products, and the process itself. Available software packages are however not well suited for micro...... injection molding, because they are developed for macro plastic parts and they are therefore limited in the capability of modeling the polymer flow in micro cavities properly. However, new opportunities for improved accuracy have opened up due to current developments of the simulation technology. Hence, new...... strategies and aspects for comprehensive simulation models which provide more precise results for micro injection molding are discussed. Modeling and meshing recommendations are presented, leading to a multi-scale mesh of all relevant units in the injection molding process. The implementation of the process...

  1. Advance in research on aerosol deposition simulation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive analysis of the health effects of inhaled toxic aerosols requires exact data on airway deposition. A knowledge of the effect of inhaled drugs is essential to the optimization of aerosol drug delivery. Sophisticated analytical deposition models can be used for the computation of total, regional and generation specific deposition efficiencies. The continuously enhancing computer seem to allow us to study the particle transport and deposition in more and more realistic airway geometries with the help of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation method. In this article, the trends in aerosol deposition models and lung models, and the methods for achievement of deposition simulations are also reviewed. (authors)

  2. Advancing Simulation Reusability - Report on NATO MSG-042 Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reif, B.M.; Wharton, W.D.; Gonzalez-Godoy, S.; McGlynn, L.; San Jose, A.; Elliot, R.; Franzen, S.; Lecinq, X.; Huiskamp, W.; Edmondson, D.

    2006-01-01

    In many cases, the training and decision support needs of military users are urgent; operations can not wait and missions have to be accomplished. Simulators, wargames scenarios and experiments should be ready 'yesterday'. New kinds of operations, environments, tactics, equipment and force configura

  3. Advancing Simulation Reusability - Report on NATO MSG-042 Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reif, B.M.; Wharton, W.D.; Gonzalez-Godoy, S.; McGlynn, L.; San Jose, A.; Elliot, R.; Franzen, S.; Lecenq, X.; Huiskamp, W.; Edmondson, D.

    2007-01-01

    In many cases, the training and decision support needs of military users are urgent; operations cannot wait and missions have to be accomplished. Simulators, wargames scenarios and experiments should be ready 'yesterday'. New kinds of operations, environments, tactics, equipment and force configurat

  4. Recent Advances in Underwater Acoustic Modelling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETTER, P. C.

    2001-02-01

    A comprehensive review of international developments in underwater acoustic modelling is used to construct an updated technology baseline containing 107 propagation models, 16 noise models, 17 reverberation models and 25 sonar performance models. This updated technology baseline represents a 30% increase over a previous baseline published in 1996. When executed in higher-level simulations, these models can generate predictive and diagnostic outputs that are useful to acoustical oceanographers or sonar technologists in the analysis of complex systems operating in the undersea environment. Recent modelling developments described in the technical literature suggest two principal areas of application: low-frequency, inverse acoustics in deep water; and high-frequency, bottom-interacting acoustics in coastal regions. Rapid changes in global geopolitics have opened new avenues for collaboration, thereby facilitating the transfer of modelling and simulation technologies among members of the international community. This accelerated technology transfer has created new imperatives for international standards in modelling and simulation architectures. National and international activities to promote interoperability among modelling and simulation efforts in government, industry and academia are reviewed and discussed.

  5. Advanced Simulation and Computing Co-Design Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, James A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoang, Thuc T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelly, Suzanne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McPherson, Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neely, Rob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This ASC Co-design Strategy lays out the full continuum and components of the co-design process, based on what we have experienced thus far and what we wish to do more in the future to meet the program’s mission of providing high performance computing (HPC) and simulation capabilities for NNSA to carry out its stockpile stewardship responsibility.

  6. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Farhana Tisa; Abdul Aziz Abdul Raman; Wan Mohd Ashri Wan Daud

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simp...

  7. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) simulator development for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation development associated with the network models of both the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures is documented. The ISIS Network Model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communications satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete event simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters, and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  8. Use of simulators for validation of advanced plant monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes how the full-scope nuclear power plant simulator of Doel (Belgium) was used to assess Situation Awareness for the validation of a process monitoring and supervision system, named DIMOS. The method (derived from a method originally developed for the aerospace industry) has been adapted and applied to compare the efficiency of two versions of the monitoring system: Alarm-masking and non alarm-masking versions of DIMOS have been analysed in their ability to support Situation Awareness, to improve performance and to fulfil the satisfaction of operators. Both normal power plant operating conditions and abnormal operating conditions were simulated and a large number of power plant operators were involved in the evaluation. The paper focuses on the rationale behind the 'Situation Awareness' evaluation, the experiment environment and the results regarding the added value of the alarm masking version of the monitoring system. (author)

  9. Use of advanced simulations in fuel performance codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulation of the cylindrical fuel rod behaviour in a reactor or a storage pool for spent fuel requires a fuel performance code. Such tool solves the equations for the heat transfer, the stresses and strains in fuel and cladding, the evolution of several isotopes and the behaviour of various fission products in the fuel rod. The main equations along with their limitations are briefly described. The current approaches adopted for overcoming these limitations and the perspectives are also outlined. (author)

  10. Advanced vectorial simulation of VCSELs with nano structures invited paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The single-mode properties and design issues of three vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures incorporating nano structures are rigorously investigated. Nano structuring enables to deliver selective pumping or loss to the fundamental mode as well as stabilizing the output...... polarization state. Comparison of three vectorial simulation methods reveals that the modal expansion method is suitable for treating the nano structured VCSEL designs....

  11. Advanced Dynamically Adaptive Algorithms for Stochastic Simulations on Extreme Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiu, Dongbin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-06-21

    The focus of the project is the development of mathematical methods and high-performance com- putational tools for stochastic simulations, with a particular emphasis on computations on extreme scales. The core of the project revolves around the design of highly e cient and scalable numer- ical algorithms that can adaptively and accurately, in high dimensional spaces, resolve stochastic problems with limited smoothness, even containing discontinuities.

  12. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  13. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements

  14. An advanced leakage scheme for neutrino treatment in astrophysical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, Albino; Käppeli, Roger

    2015-01-01

    We present an Advanced Spectral Leakage (ASL) scheme to model neutrinos in the context of core-collapse supernovae and compact binary mergers. Based on previous gray leakage schemes, the ASL scheme computes the neutrino cooling rates by interpolating local production and diffusion rates (relevant in optically thin and thick regimes, respectively), separately for discretized values of the neutrino energy. Neutrino trapped components are also modeled, based on equilibrium and timescale arguments. The better accuracy achieved by the spectral treatment allows a more reliable computation of neutrino heating rates in optically thin conditions. The scheme has been calibrated and tested against Boltzmann transport in the context of Newtonian spherically symmetric models of core-collapse supernovae. ASL shows a very good qualitative and a partial quantitative agreement, for key quantities from collapse to a few hundreds of milliseconds after core bounce. We have proved the adaptability and flexibility of our ASL schem...

  15. Computational modeling, optimization and manufacturing simulation of advanced engineering materials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents recent research work focused in the development of adequate theoretical and numerical formulations to describe the behavior of advanced engineering materials.  Particular emphasis is devoted to applications in the fields of biological tissues, phase changing and porous materials, polymers and to micro/nano scale modeling. Sensitivity analysis, gradient and non-gradient based optimization procedures are involved in many of the chapters, aiming at the solution of constitutive inverse problems and parameter identification. All these relevant topics are exposed by experienced international and inter institutional research teams resulting in a high level compilation. The book is a valuable research reference for scientists, senior undergraduate and graduate students, as well as for engineers acting in the area of computational material modeling.

  16. Advanced Simulation Technology to Design Etching Process on CMOS Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    Prediction and control of plasma-induced damage is needed to mass-produce high performance CMOS devices. In particular, side-wall (SW) etching with low damage is a key process for the next generation of MOSFETs and FinFETs. To predict and control the damage, we have developed a SiN etching simulation technique for CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma processes using a three-dimensional (3D) voxel model. This model includes new concepts for the gas transportation in the pattern, detailed surface reactions on the SiN reactive layer divided into several thin slabs and C-F polymer layer dependent on the H/N ratio, and use of ``smart voxels''. We successfully predicted the etching properties such as the etch rate, polymer layer thickness, and selectivity for Si, SiO2, and SiN films along with process variations and demonstrated the 3D damage distribution time-dependently during SW etching on MOSFETs and FinFETs. We confirmed that a large amount of Si damage was caused in the source/drain region with the passage of time in spite of the existing SiO2 layer of 15 nm in the over etch step and the Si fin having been directly damaged by a large amount of high energy H during the removal step of the parasitic fin spacer leading to Si fin damage to a depth of 14 to 18 nm. By analyzing the results of these simulations and our previous simulations, we found that it is important to carefully control the dose of high energy H, incident energy of H, polymer layer thickness, and over-etch time considering the effects of the pattern structure, chamber-wall condition, and wafer open area ratio. In collaboration with Masanaga Fukasawa and Tetsuya Tatsumi, Sony Corporation. We thank Mr. T. Shigetoshi and Mr. T. Kinoshita of Sony Corporation for their assistance with the experiments.

  17. Electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles advanced simulation methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, Bogdan Ovidiu; Moldovanu, Dan; Iclodean, Calin

    2015-01-01

    This book is designed as an interdisciplinary platform for specialists working in electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles powertrain design and development, and for scientists who want to get access to information related to electric and hybrid vehicle energy management, efficiency and control. The book presents the methodology of simulation that allows the specialist to evaluate electric and hybrid vehicle powertrain energy flow, efficiency, range and consumption. The mathematics behind each electric and hybrid vehicle component is explained and for each specific vehicle the powertrain

  18. Silicon and beyond advanced device models and circuit simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Shur, Michael S

    2000-01-01

    The steady downscaling of device-feature size combined with a rapid increase in circuit complexity as well as the introduction of new device concepts based on non-silicon-material systems poses great challenges for device and circuit designers. One of the major tasks is the development of new and improved device models needed for accurate device and circuit design. Another task is the development of new circuit-simulation tools to handle very large and complex circuits. This book addresses both these issues with up-to-date reviews written by leading experts in the field.The first three chapter

  19. Microwave Processing of Simulated Advanced Nuclear Fuel Pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the three-year project funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and lead by Virginia Tech (VT), project tasks were modified by consensus to fit the changing needs of the DOE with respect to developing new inert matrix fuel processing techniques. The focus throughout the project was on the use of microwave energy to sinter fully stabilized zirconia pellets using microwave energy and to evaluate the effectiveness of techniques that were developed. Additionally, the research team was to propose fundamental concepts as to processing radioactive fuels based on the effectiveness of the microwave process in sintering the simulated matrix material.

  20. Recent Advances in the Numerical Simulations of Binary Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Marronetti, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Since the breakthrough papers from 2005/2006, the field of numerical relativity has experienced a growth spurt that took the two-body problem in general relativity from the category of "really-hard-problems" to the realm of "things-we-know-how-to-do". Simulations of binary black holes in circular orbits, the holy grail of numerical relativity, are now tractable problems that lead to some of the most spectacular results in general relativity in recent years. We cover here some of the latest achievements and highlight the field's next challenges.

  1. Advances in comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations of transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ*) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated. (author)

  2. Simulation models and designs for advanced Fischer-Tropsch technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, G.N.; Kramer, S.J.; Tam, S.S. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Process designs and economics were developed for three grass-roots indirect Fischer-Tropsch coal liquefaction facilities. A baseline and an alternate upgrading design were developed for a mine-mouth plant located in southern Illinois using Illinois No. 6 coal, and one for a mine-mouth plane located in Wyoming using Power River Basin coal. The alternate design used close-coupled ZSM-5 reactors to upgrade the vapor stream leaving the Fischer-Tropsch reactor. ASPEN process simulation models were developed for all three designs. These results have been reported previously. In this study, the ASPEN process simulation model was enhanced to improve the vapor/liquid equilibrium calculations for the products leaving the slurry bed Fischer-Tropsch reactors. This significantly improved the predictions for the alternate ZSM-5 upgrading design. Another model was developed for the Wyoming coal case using ZSM-5 upgrading of the Fischer-Tropsch reactor vapors. To date, this is the best indirect coal liquefaction case. Sensitivity studies showed that additional cost reductions are possible.

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Advances in the Computer Simulations of Liquid Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zannoni, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Computer simulations provide an essential set of tools for understanding the macroscopic properties of liquid crystals and of their phase transitions in terms of molecular models. While simulations of liquid crystals are based on the same general Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques as are used for other fluids, they present a number of specific problems and peculiarities connected to the intrinsic properties of these mesophases. The field of computer simulations of anisotropic fluids is interdisciplinary and is evolving very rapidly. The present volume covers a variety of techniques and model systems, from lattices to hard particle and Gay-Berne to atomistic, for thermotropics, lyotropics, and some biologically interesting liquid crystals. Contributions are written by an excellent panel of international lecturers and provides a timely account of the techniques and problems in the field.

  4. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  5. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E X B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  6. Advanced simulation of damage of reinforced concrete structures under impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of the discrete element method for studying the fracture of heterogeneous media has been demonstrated, but it is limited by the size of the computational model. A coupling between the discrete element and the finite element methods is proposed to handle the simulation of impacts on large structures. The structure is split into sub-domains in each of which the method of analysis is adapted to optimise the modelling of the structure behaviour under impact. The DEM takes naturally into account the discontinuities and is used to model the media in the impact zone. The remaining structure is modelled by the FEM. Proposed combined DE/FE algorithm is implemented in the Europlexus fast dynamics software and parallelized with MPI formalism. The efficiency of the Europlexus multi-domain MPI parallel version is tested. (authors)

  7. Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 user manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondy, L.A.; Duda, L.E.

    1984-11-01

    GEOTEMP2 is a wellbore thermal simulator computer code designed for geothermal drilling and production applications. The code treats natural and forced convection and conduction within the wellbore and heat conduction within the surrounding rock matrix. A variety of well operations can be modeled including injection, production, forward, and reverse circulation with gas or liquid, gas or liquid drilling, and two-phase steam injection and production. Well completion with several different casing sizes and cement intervals can be modeled. The code allows variables suchas flow rate to change with time enabling a realistic treatment of well operations. This user manual describes the input required to properly operate the code. Ten sample problems are included which illustrate all the code options. Complete listings of the code and the output of each sample problem are provided.

  8. Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

  9. The role of advanced calculation and simulation tools in the evolution of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article is focused on the role of the advanced calculation/simulation tools on the development of the fuel designs as well as in the assessment of the effect of the changes in the operation. With this purpose, the article describes and shows some examples of the use by ENUSA of some of these tools in the fuel engineering. To conclude, the future on the evolution of the advanced tools is also presented. (Author)

  10. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  11. State of the Art Assessment of Simulation in Advanced Materials Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher E.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in both the underlying theory and in the practical implementation of molecular modeling techniques have increased their value in the advanced materials development process. The objective is to accelerate the maturation of emerging materials by tightly integrating modeling with the other critical processes: synthesis, processing, and characterization. The aims of this report are to summarize the state of the art of existing modeling tools and to highlight a number of areas in which additional development is required. In an effort to maintain focus and limit length, this survey is restricted to classical simulation techniques including molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Numerical simulation of production from tight-gas reservoirs by advanced stimulation technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Friedel, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    The present thesis focusses on two main issues: (i) the development of a multi-phase simulation tool for the characteristics of tight-gas reservoirs, and (ii) the investigation of advanced stimulation techniques. The latter mainly implies the analysis of certain damaging mechanisms, as well as the derivation of general modelling guidelines for fractured wells and underbalanced drilling. A special simulation tool is developed, realised in a Fortran-MATLAB coupling. The numerical model is based...

  13. Iron Resources and Oceanic Nutrients: Advancement of Global Environment Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaar, H. J.

    2002-12-01

    simulated. An existing plankton ecosystem model already well predicts limitation by four nutrients (N, P, Si, Fe) of two algal groups (diatoms and nanoplankton) including export and CO2 air/sea exchange. This is being expanded with 3 other groups of algae and DMS(P)pathways. Next this extended ecosystem model is being simplified while maintaining reliable output for export and CO2/DMS gas exchange. This unit will then be put into two existing OBCM's. Inputs of Fe from above and below into the oceans have been modeled. Moreover a simple global Fe cycling model has been verified versus field data and insights. Two different OBCM's with same upper ocean ecosystem/DMS unit and Fe cycling will be verified versus pre-industrial and present conditions. Next climate change scenario's, notably changes in Fe inputs, will be run, with special attention to climatic feedbacks (warming) on the oceanic cycles and fluxes.

  14. Advances in multi-physics and high performance computing in support of nuclear reactor power systems modeling and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant advances in computational performance have occurred over the past two decades, achieved not only by the introduction of more powerful processors but the incorporation of parallelism in computer hardware at all levels. Simultaneous with these hardware and associated system software advances have been advances in modeling physical phenomena and the numerical algorithms to allow their usage in simulation. This paper presents a review of the advances in computer performance, discusses the modeling and simulation capabilities required to address the multi-physics and multi-scale phenomena applicable to a nuclear reactor core simulator, and present examples of relevant physics simulation codes' performances on high performance computers.

  15. The role of experience and advanced training on performance in a motorcycle simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundall, David; Stedmon, Alex W; Crundall, Elizabeth; Saikayasit, Rossukorn

    2014-12-01

    Motorcyclists are over-represented in collision statistics. While many collisions may be the direct fault of another road user, a considerable number of fatalities and injuries are due to the actions of the rider. While increased riding experience may improve skills, advanced training courses may be required to evoke the safest riding behaviours. The current research assessed the impact of experience and advanced training on rider behaviour using a motorcycle simulator. Novice riders, experienced riders and riders with advanced training traversed a virtual world through varying speed limits and roadways of different curvature. Speed and lane position were monitored. In a comparison of 60 mph and 40 mph zones, advanced riders rode more slowly in the 40 mph zones, and had greater variation in lane position than the other two groups. In the 60 mph zones, both advanced and experienced riders had greater lane variation than novices. Across the whole ride, novices tended to position themselves closer to the kerb. In a second analysis across four classifications of curvature (straight, slight, medium, tight) advanced and experienced riders varied their lateral position more so than novices, though advanced riders had greater variation in lane position than even experienced riders in some conditions. The results suggest that experience and advanced training lead to changes in behaviour compared to novice riders which can be interpreted as having a potentially positive impact on road safety. PMID:25180786

  16. Proposing "the burns suite" as a novel simulation tool for advancing the delivery of burns education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadideen, Hazim; Wilson, David; Moiemen, Naiem; Kneebone, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Educational theory highlights the importance of contextualized simulation for effective learning. We explored this concept in a burns scenario in a novel, low-cost, high-fidelity, portable, immersive simulation environment (referred to as distributed simulation). This contextualized simulation/distributed simulation combination was named "The Burns Suite" (TBS). A pediatric burn resuscitation scenario was selected after high trainee demand. It was designed on Advanced Trauma and Life Support and Emergency Management of Severe Burns principles and refined using expert opinion through cognitive task analysis. TBS contained "realism" props, briefed nurses, and a simulated patient. Novices and experts were recruited. Five-point Likert-type questionnaires were developed for face and content validity. Cronbach's α was calculated for scale reliability. Semistructured interviews captured responses for qualitative thematic analysis allowing for data triangulation. Twelve participants completed TBS scenario. Mean face and content validity ratings were high (4.6 and 4.5, respectively; range, 4-5). The internal consistency of questions was high. Qualitative data analysis revealed that participants felt 1) the experience was "real" and they were "able to behave as if in a real resuscitation environment," and 2) TBS "addressed what Advanced Trauma and Life Support and Emergency Management of Severe Burns didn't" (including the efficacy of incorporating nontechnical skills). TBS provides a novel, effective simulation tool to significantly advance the delivery of burns education. Recreating clinical challenge is crucial to optimize simulation training. This low-cost approach also has major implications for surgical education, particularly during increasing financial austerity. Alternative scenarios and/or procedures can be recreated within TBS, providing a diverse educational immersive simulation experience. PMID:23877145

  17. Development of advanced driver assistance systems with vehicle hardware-in-the-loop simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, O.J.; Ploeg, J.; Schutter, B.de; Verhaegen, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for the design and validation of advanced driver assistance systems (ADASs). With vehicle hardware-in-the-loop (VEHIL) simulations, the development process, and more specifically the validation phase, of intelligent vehicles is carried out safer, cheaper, and is more

  18. Simulation research and optimal design for digital power regulating system of China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on SimPort simulation platform of nuclear power plant, a simulation model for Digital Power Regulating System (DPRS) of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) was established. By simulating the transient state of DPRS using this model, the adjusting parameters for the digital PID controller were determined. According to the features of the driving mechanism, the effects of the driving accuracy of the control rod and the displacement delay between electromagnetic coil and armature upon system stability and the regulating performance were analyzed, furthermore, their stability limit values were obtained respectively. The research results of this paper have some engineering practical value. (authors)

  19. Development of a VOR/DME model for an advanced concepts simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, G. G.; Bowles, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents a definition of a VOR/DME, airborne and ground systems simulation model. This description was drafted in response to a need in the creation of an advanced concepts simulation in which flight station design for the 1980 era can be postulated and examined. The simulation model described herein provides a reasonable representation of VOR/DME station in the continental United States including area coverage by type and noise errors. The detail in which the model has been cast provides the interested researcher with a moderate fidelity level simulator tool for conducting research and evaluation of navigator algorithms. Assumptions made within the development are listed and place certain responsibilities (data bases, communication with other simulation modules, uniform round earth, etc.) upon the researcher.

  20. Advanced manned space flight simulation and training: An investigation of simulation host computer system concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Bruce C.; Bishop, Alfred M.; Redfield, Joe B.

    1989-01-01

    The findings of a preliminary investigation by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in simulation host computer concepts is presented. It is designed to aid NASA in evaluating simulation technologies for use in spaceflight training. The focus of the investigation is on the next generation of space simulation systems that will be utilized in training personnel for Space Station Freedom operations. SwRI concludes that NASA should pursue a distributed simulation host computer system architecture for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) rather than a centralized mainframe based arrangement. A distributed system offers many advantages and is seen by SwRI as the only architecture that will allow NASA to achieve established functional goals and operational objectives over the life of the Space Station Freedom program. Several distributed, parallel computing systems are available today that offer real-time capabilities for time critical, man-in-the-loop simulation. These systems are flexible in terms of connectivity and configurability, and are easily scaled to meet increasing demands for more computing power.

  1. Advanced Simulation of Coupled Earthquake and Tsunami Events (ASCETE) - Simulation Techniques for Realistic Tsunami Process Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Joern; Bader, Michael; Breuer, Alexander N.; van Dinther, Ylona; Gabriel, Alice-A.; Galvez Barron, Percy E.; Rahnema, Kaveh; Vater, Stefan; Wollherr, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    At the End of phase 1 of the ASCETE project a simulation framework for coupled physics-based rupture generation with tsunami propagation and inundation is available. Adaptive mesh tsunami propagation and inundation by discontinuous Galerkin Runge-Kutta methods allows for accurate and conservative inundation schemes. Combined with a tree-based refinement strategy to highly optimize the code for high-performance computing architectures, a modeling tool for high fidelity tsunami simulations has been constructed. Validation results demonstrate the capacity of the software. Rupture simulation is performed by an unstructured tetrahedral discontinuous Galerking ADER discretization, which allows for accurate representation of complex geometries. The implemented code was nominated for and was selected as a finalist for the Gordon Bell award in high-performance computing. Highly realistic rupture events can be simulated with this modeling tool. The coupling of rupture induced wave activity and displacement with hydrodynamic equations still poses a major problem due to diverging time and spatial scales. Some insight from the ASCETE set-up could be gained and the presentation will focus on the coupled behavior of the simulation system. Finally, an outlook to phase 2 of the ASCETE project will be given in which further development of detailed physical processes as well as near-realistic scenario computations are planned. ASCETE is funded by the Volkswagen Foundation.

  2. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 1. Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Buscombe; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the first of a pair of papers which address the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted natural granular material, a method is presented for simulation of two-phase (solid, void) assemblages of discrete non-cohesive particles. The purpose is to have a flexible, yet computationally and theoretically simple, suite of tools with well constrained and well known statistical properties, in order to simulate realistic granular material as a discrete element model with realistic size and shape distributions, for a variety of purposes. The stochastic modeling framework is based on three-dimensional tessellations with variable degrees of order in particle-packing arrangement. Examples of sediments with a variety of particle size distributions and spatial variability in grain size are presented. The relationship between particle shape and porosity conforms to published data. The immediate application is testing new algorithms for automated measurements of particle properties (mean and standard deviation of particle sizes, and apparent porosity) from images of natural sediment, as detailed in the second of this pair of papers. The model could also prove useful for simulating specific depositional structures found in natural sediments, the result of physical alterations to packing and grain fabric, using discrete particle flow models. While the principal focus here is on naturally occurring sediment and sedimentary rock, the methods presented might also be useful for simulations of similar granular or cellular material encountered in engineering, industrial and life sciences.

  3. Editorial: Advances in Health Education Applying E-Learning, Simulations and Distance Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre W. Kushniruk

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the KM&EL international journal is dedicated to coverage of novel advances in health professional education applying e-Learning, simulations and distance education technologies. Modern healthcare is beginning to be transformed through the emergence of new information technologies and rapid advances in health informatics. Advances such as electronic health record systems (EHRs, clinical decision support systems and other advanced information systems such as public health surveillance systems are rapidly being deployed worldwide. The education of health professionals such as medical, nursing and allied health professionals will require an improved understanding of these technologies and how they will transform their healthcare practice. However, currently there is a lack of integration of knowledge and skills related to such technology in health professional education. In this issue of the journal we present articles that describe a set of novel approaches to integrating essential health information technology into the education of health professionals, as well as the use of advanced information technologies and e-Learning approaches for improving health professional education. The approaches range from use of simulations to development of novel Web-based platforms for allowing students to interact with the technologies and healthcare practices that are rapidly changing healthcare.

  4. The role of numerical simulation for the development of an advanced HIFU system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kohei; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Takagi, Shu; Matumoto, Yoichiro

    2014-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used clinically and is under clinical trials to treat various diseases. An advanced HIFU system employs ultrasound techniques for guidance during HIFU treatment instead of magnetic resonance imaging in current HIFU systems. A HIFU beam imaging for monitoring the HIFU beam and a localized motion imaging for treatment validation of tissue are introduced briefly as the real-time ultrasound monitoring techniques. Numerical simulations have a great impact on the development of real-time ultrasound monitoring as well as the improvement of the safety and efficacy of treatment in advanced HIFU systems. A HIFU simulator was developed to reproduce ultrasound propagation through the body in consideration of the elasticity of tissue, and was validated by comparison with in vitro experiments in which the ultrasound emitted from the phased-array transducer propagates through the acrylic plate acting as a bone phantom. As the result, the defocus and distortion of the ultrasound propagating through the acrylic plate in the simulation quantitatively agree with that in the experimental results. Therefore, the HIFU simulator accurately reproduces the ultrasound propagation through the medium whose shape and physical properties are well known. In addition, it is experimentally confirmed that simulation-assisted focus control of the phased-array transducer enables efficient assignment of the focus to the target. Simulation-assisted focus control can contribute to design of transducers and treatment planning.

  5. The Osseus platform: a prototype for advanced web-based distributed simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Derrick; Riecken, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Recent technological advances in web-based distributed computing and database technology have made possible a deeper and more transparent integration of some modeling and simulation applications. Despite these advances towards true integration of capabilities, disparate systems, architectures, and protocols will remain in the inventory for some time to come. These disparities present interoperability challenges for distributed modeling and simulation whether the application is training, experimentation, or analysis. Traditional approaches call for building gateways to bridge between disparate protocols and retaining interoperability specialists. Challenges in reconciling data models also persist. These challenges and their traditional mitigation approaches directly contribute to higher costs, schedule delays, and frustration for the end users. Osseus is a prototype software platform originally funded as a research project by the Defense Modeling & Simulation Coordination Office (DMSCO) to examine interoperability alternatives using modern, web-based technology and taking inspiration from the commercial sector. Osseus provides tools and services for nonexpert users to connect simulations, targeting the time and skillset needed to successfully connect disparate systems. The Osseus platform presents a web services interface to allow simulation applications to exchange data using modern techniques efficiently over Local or Wide Area Networks. Further, it provides Service Oriented Architecture capabilities such that finer granularity components such as individual models can contribute to simulation with minimal effort.

  6. FY05-FY06 Advanced Simulation and Computing Implementation Plan, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, A L

    2004-07-19

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program will require the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapon design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile life extension programs and the resolution of significant finding investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced system of technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions.

  7. Advanced simulation technology for etching process design for CMOS device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Plasma etching is a critical process for the realization of high performance in the next generation of CMOS devices. To predict and control fluctuations in the etching properties accurately during mass production, it is essential that etching process simulation technology considers fluctuations in the plasma chamber wall conditions, the effects of by-products on the critical dimensions, the Si recess dependence on the wafer open area ratio and local pattern structure, and the time-dependent plasma-induced damage distribution associated with the three-dimensional feature scale profile at the 100 nm level. This consideration can overcome the issues with conventional simulations performed under the assumed ideal conditions, which are not accurate enough for practical process design. In this article, these advanced process simulation technologies are reviewed, and, from the results of suitable process simulations, a new etching system that automatically controls the etching properties is proposed to enable stable CMOS device fabrication with high yields.

  8. CAPE-OPEN Integration for Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2006-11-01

    This paper highlights the use of the CAPE-OPEN (CO) standard interfaces in the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) developed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The APECS system uses the CO unit operation, thermodynamic, and reaction interfaces to provide its plug-and-play co-simulation capabilities, including the integration of process simulation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. APECS also relies heavily on the use of a CO COM/CORBA bridge for running process/CFD co-simulations on multiple operating systems. For process optimization in the face of multiple and some time conflicting objectives, APECS offers stochastic modeling and multi-objective optimization capabilities developed to comply with the CO software standard. At NETL, system analysts are applying APECS to a wide variety of advanced power generation systems, ranging from small fuel cell systems to commercial-scale power plants including the coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant.

  9. The advanced simulation of fatigue crack growth in complex 3D structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Karsten; Kuhn, Guenther [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    An advanced incremental crack growth algorithm for the three-dimensional (3D) simulation of fatigue crack growth in complex 3D structures with linear elastic material behavior is presented. To perform the crack growth simulation as effectively as possible an accurate stress analysis is done by the boundary-element method (BEM) in terms of the 3D dual BEM. The question concerning a reliable 3D crack growth criterion is answered based on experimental observations. All criteria under consideration are numerically realized by a predictor-corrector procedure. The agreement between numerically determined and experimentally observed crack fronts will be shown on both fracture specimens and an industrial application. (orig.)

  10. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnes, B

    2009-06-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that

  11. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, R; Hopson, J; Peery, J; McCoy, M

    2008-10-07

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  12. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY09-FY10 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissel, L

    2009-04-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one that

  13. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY10-FY11 Implementation Plan Volume 2, Rev. 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, R; Peery, J; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2009-09-08

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering (D&E) programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable stockpile Life Extension Programs (LEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional (3D) simulation environment while maintaining support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model

  14. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan, Volume 2, Revision 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D; Bickel, T; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2007-09-13

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the surety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future non-nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC)1 is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from

  15. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY08-09 Implementation Plan Volume 2 Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, M; Kusnezov, D; Bikkel, T; Hopson, J

    2007-04-25

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from one

  16. Advanced Simulation and Computing FY07-08 Implementation Plan Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D; Hale, A; McCoy, M; Hopson, J

    2006-06-22

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is a single, highly integrated technical program for maintaining the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses past nuclear test data along with current and future nonnuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program will require the continued use of current facilities and programs along with new experimental facilities and computational enhancements to support these programs. The Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASC) is a cornerstone of the SSP, providing simulation capabilities and computational resources to support the annual stockpile assessment and certification, to study advanced nuclear-weapons design and manufacturing processes, to analyze accident scenarios and weapons aging, and to provide the tools to enable Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs) and the resolution of Significant Finding Investigations (SFIs). This requires a balanced resource, including technical staff, hardware, simulation software, and computer science solutions. In its first decade, the ASC strategy focused on demonstrating simulation capabilities of unprecedented scale in three spatial dimensions. In its second decade, ASC is focused on increasing its predictive capabilities in a three-dimensional simulation environment while maintaining the support to the SSP. The program continues to improve its unique tools for solving progressively more difficult stockpile problems (focused on sufficient resolution, dimensionality and scientific details); to quantify critical margins and uncertainties (QMU); and to resolve increasingly difficult analyses needed for the SSP. Moreover, ASC has restructured its business model from

  17. Numerical Simulation of Polarity Characteristics of Vector Elastic Wave of Advanced Detection in the Roadway

    OpenAIRE

    Deng Shuaiqi; Yue Jianhua; Cao Jing; Zhang Xin

    2013-01-01

    The high-order staggering grid Finite-Difference (FD) scheme based on first-order velocity-stress elastic wave equation has been deduced. The calculation method of PML boundary condition and stability condition established in this study can be used for numerical simulation of advanced detection of elastic wave in roadway, with the obtaining of high-precision seismogram. Then we systematically analyze the polarity of vector wave field in post-source observation system. The results indicate tha...

  18. Transition of Monju simulator training owing to Monju accident and upgrade of Monju advanced reactor simulator (MARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monju advanced reactor simulator (MARS) has been operated for training of Monju operators and for verification of Monju operating manual's appropriateness since 1991 for over 11 years. This report covers transition of Monju training system and modified of MARS owing to Monju accident as operating experience of MARS on from 1994 to 2001. The principal points mentioned are as follows: (1) Improved Monju training system owing to Monju accident 1) Reinforcement of sodium handling and sodium fire-fighting exercise. 2) Improved of training system and revised of training frequency. 3) Introduced of evaluation and analysis system regarding training results. 4) Providing of training guide line. 5) Step up of fundamental education by introducing of CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction System). (2) Upgrade of MARS for Monju restarting. 1) Reflected of the real plant data obtained from Monju performance test. 2) Addition of malfunction items. 3) Development of simulation software and addition of simulation panel concerning reinforced sodium leakage corresponding training. 4) Improvement of simulation ability and remodeling of calculating model by renewal of computer system. 5) Up graded program in the future. (author)

  19. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a first-principles approach. In order to pursue these goals, CASL has participation from laboratory, academic, and industry partners. These partners are pursuing the solution of ten major “Challenge Problems” in order to advance the state-of-the-art in reactor design and analysis to permit power uprates, higher burnup, life extension, and increased safety. At present, the problems being addressed by CASL are primarily reactor physics-oriented; however, this paper is intended to introduce CASL to the reactor dosimetry community because of the importance of reactor physics modelling and nuclear data to define the source term for that community and the applicability and extensibility of the transport methods being developed.

  20. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulesza, Joel A.; Franceschini, Fausto; Evans, Thomas M.; Gehin, Jess C.

    2016-02-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR) operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a first-principles approach. In order to pursue these goals, CASL has participation from laboratory, academic, and industry partners. These partners are pursuing the solution of ten major "Challenge Problems" in order to advance the state-of-the-art in reactor design and analysis to permit power uprates, higher burnup, life extension, and increased safety. At present, the problems being addressed by CASL are primarily reactor physics-oriented; however, this paper is intended to introduce CASL to the reactor dosimetry community because of the importance of reactor physics modelling and nuclear data to define the source term for that community and the applicability and extensibility of the transport methods being developed.

  1. Planning of development strategy for establishment of advanced simulation of nuclear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this product, the long term development plan in each technical area has been prosed with the plan of coupled code system. The consolidated code system for safety analysis has been proposing for future needs. The computing hardware needed for te advanced simulation is also proposing. The best approach for future safety analysis simulation capabilities may be a dual-path program. i. e. the development programs for an integrated analysis tool and multi-scale/multi-physic analysis tools, where the former aims at reducing uncertainty and the latter at enhancing accuracy. Integrated analysis tool with risk informed safety margin quantification It requires a significant extension of the phenomenological and geometric capabilities of existing reactor safety analysis software, capable of detailed simulations that reduce the uncertainties. Multi-scale, multi-physics analysis tools. Simplifications of complex phenomenological models and dependencies have been made in current safety analyses to accommodate computer hardware limitations. With the advent of modern computer hardware, these limitations may be removed to permit greater accuracy in representation of physical behavior of materials in design basis and beyond design basis conditions, and hence more accurate assessment of the true safety margins based on first principle methodology. The proposals can be utilized to develop the advanced simulation project and formulation of organization and establishment of high performance computing system in KAERI

  2. Technical Basis for Physical Fidelity of NRC Control Room Training Simulators for Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsk, Brian S.; Branch, Kristi M.; Bates, Edward K.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Gore, Bryan F.; Faris, Drury K.

    2009-10-09

    The objective of this study is to determine how simulator physical fidelity influences the effectiveness of training the regulatory personnel responsible for examination and oversight of operating personnel and inspection of technical systems at nuclear power reactors. It seeks to contribute to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) understanding of the physical fidelity requirements of training simulators. The goal of the study is to provide an analytic framework, data, and analyses that inform NRC decisions about the physical fidelity requirements of the simulators it will need to train its staff for assignment at advanced reactors. These staff are expected to come from increasingly diverse educational and experiential backgrounds.

  3. Simulation research and optimal design for digital power regulating system of China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on SimPort simulation platform of nuclear power plant, a simulation model for Digital Power Regulating System (DPRS) of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) was established. The transient state of DPRS was simulation studied using this model. According to the characteristics of the driving mechanism of the control rods, the effects of the driving precision of the control rod and its displacement delay upon the system stability were analyzed. Considering the process requirements of CARR and the function characteristic of DRPS, the adjusting parameters for the digital PID controller and the stability limits of the driving mechanism of the control rods were obtained. The sampling period of the digital PID controller is 100 ms and its proportion gain is 300. The stability limit of the driving precision of the control rod is 0.4 mm. The stability limit of displacement delay between electromagnetic coil and armature is 6.0 mm. (authors)

  4. Benchmarks for interface-tracking codes in the consortium for advanced simulation of LWRs (CASL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major innovation pursued by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL) is the use of Interface Tracking Methods (ITM) to generate high-fidelity closure relations for two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena (e.g. nucleate boiling, bubble break-up and coalescence, vapor condensation, etc.), to be used in coarser CFD, subchannel and system codes. ITMs do not assume an idealized geometry of the interface between the liquid and vapor phases, but rather calculate it from ‘first principles’. Also, used within the context of high-fidelity turbulence simulations, such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or Large Eddy Simulation (LES), ITMs can resolve the velocity (including the fluctuating field) and temperature/scalar gradients near the liquid-vapor interface, so prediction of the exchange of momentum, mass and heat at the interface in principle requires no empirical correlations. The physical complexity of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena encountered in LWRs naturally lends itself to an ITM analysis approach. Several codes featuring ITM capabilities are available within CASL. These are TransAT, STAR-CCM+, PHASTA, FTC3D and FELBM. They use a variety of ITMs ranging from Volume-Of- Fluid to Level-Set, from Front-Tracking to Lattice-Boltzmann. A series of benchmark simulations is being developed to test the key capabilities of these codes and their ITMs. In this paper, three such benchmark simulations, testing DNS, LES and interface tracking, respectively, are briefly described. (author)

  5. Advanced char burnout models for the simulation of pulverized coal fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Severin; S. Wirtz; V. Scherer [Ruhr-University, Bochum (Germany). Institute of Energy Plant Technology (LEAT)

    2005-07-01

    The numerical simulation of coal combustion processes is widely used as an efficient means to predict burner or system behaviour. In this paper an approach to improve CFD simulations of pulverized coal fired boilers with advanced coal combustion models is presented. In simple coal combustion models, first order Arrhenius rate equations are used for devolatilization and char burnout. The accuracy of such simple models is sufficient for the basic aspects of heat release. The prediction of carbon-in-ash is one aspect of special interest in the simulation of pulverized coal fired boilers. To determine the carbon-in-ash levels in the fly ash of coal fired furnaces, the char burnout model has to be more detailed. It was tested, in how far changing operating conditions affect the carbon-in-ash prediction of the simulation. To run several test cases in a short time, a simplified cellnet model was applied. To use a cellnet model for simulations of pulverized coal fired boilers, it was coupled with a Lagrangian particle model, used in CFD simulations, too. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation in Advanced Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, J. D.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Barta, D. J.; Dragg, J.; Henninger, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines mission simulation as an approach to develop requirements for automation and robotics for Advanced Life Support Systems (ALSS). The focus is on requirements and applications for command and control, control and monitoring, situation assessment and response, diagnosis and recovery, adaptive planning and scheduling, and other automation applications in addition to mechanized equipment and robotics applications to reduce the excessive human labor requirements to operate and maintain an ALSS. Based on principles of systems engineering, an approach is proposed to assess requirements for automation and robotics using mission simulation tools. First, the story of a simulated mission is defined in terms of processes with attendant types of resources needed, including options for use of automation and robotic systems. Next, systems dynamics models are used in simulation to reveal the implications for selected resource allocation schemes in terms of resources required to complete operational tasks. The simulations not only help establish ALSS design criteria, but also may offer guidance to ALSS research efforts by identifying gaps in knowledge about procedures and/or biophysical processes. Simulations of a planned one-year mission with 4 crewmembers in a Human Rated Test Facility are presented as an approach to evaluation of mission feasibility and definition of automation and robotics requirements.

  7. Advanced graphic interface man machine for a simulator of nuclear processes for training in classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a working prototype that will serve as experimental platform for the specification and development of a commercial classroom analysis simulator. The classroom analysis simulator will be used as analytical tool for an optimal and more efficient training of operation personnel of Laguna Verde Power Plant. The focus of this work is on the advanced graphical interface of the classroom analysis simulator and those issues involved with its design. This interface offers two distinctive features: 1) virtual representation of instrumentation and controls of different control panels; and 2) direct manipulation as main interaction method. These features provide an easy and intuitive way to manipulate and monitor virtual instrumentation as well as an effortless manner to control the interface. By using object menus with special control features, it is possible to perform visualization functions such as navigation among control panels, location of instrumentation, panning, zooming and reset. The system and its interface provide immediate feedback and reversible operation capabilities allowing an easy, fast and natural human-machine interaction within a graphical environment that the operator is familiar with. The system gives also access and displays a functional copy of the Laguna Verde Safety Parameters Display System. In addition, a special set of graphic displays representing the full animation of transients and severe accidents via output data files from specialized nuclear codes are being designed. The features of the system mentioned above, supported by advanced mathematical models, currently under development, will provide an exceptional simulation environment. It is expected that the simulator will be used not only as an alternative to reduce expensive load of the current hard wire simulator, but also as a powerful extension analytical tool. (Author)

  8. Advanced virtual energy simulation training and research: IGCC with CO2 capture power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitney, S.; Liese, E.; Mahapatra, P.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Provost, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this presentation, we highlight the deployment of a real-time dynamic simulator of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture at the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM) Center. The Center was established as part of the DOE's accelerating initiative to advance new clean coal technology for power generation. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option, generating low-cost electricity by converting coal and/or other fuels into a clean synthesis gas mixture in a process that is efficient and environmentally superior to conventional power plants. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Fueled with coal, petroleum coke, and/or biomass, the gasification island of the simulated IGCC plant consists of two oxygen-blown, downward-fired, entrained-flow, slagging gasifiers with radiant syngas coolers and two-stage sour shift reactors, followed by a dual-stage acid gas removal process for CO{sub 2} capture. The combined cycle island consists of two F-class gas turbines, steam turbine, and a heat recovery steam generator with three-pressure levels. The dynamic simulator can be used for normal base-load operation, as well as plant start-up and shut down. The real-time dynamic simulator also responds satisfactorily to process disturbances, feedstock blending and switchovers, fluctuations in ambient conditions, and power demand load shedding. In addition, the full-scope simulator handles a wide range of abnormal situations, including equipment malfunctions and failures, together with changes initiated through actions from plant field operators. By providing a comprehensive IGCC operator training system, the

  9. Simulation of fission products behavior in severe accidents for advanced passive PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A fission product analysis model based on thermal hydraulic module is developed. • An assessment method for fission product release and transport is constructed. • Fission products behavior during three modes of containment response is investigated. • Source term results for the three modes of containment response are obtained. - Abstract: Fission product behavior for common Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) has been studied for many years, and some analytical tools have developed. However, studies specifically on the behavior of fission products related to advanced passive PWR is scarce. In the current study, design characteristics of advanced passive PWR influencing fission product behavior are investigated. An integrated fission products analysis model based on a thermal hydraulic module is developed, and the assessment method for fission products release and transport for advanced passive PWR is constructed. Three modes of containment response are simulated, including intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure. Fission products release from the core and corium, fission products transport and deposition in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS), fission products transport and deposition in the containment considering fission products retention in the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) and in the secondary side of steam generators (SGs) are simulated. Source term results of intact containment, containment bypass and containment overpressure failure are obtained, which can be utilized to evaluate the radiological consequences

  10. The importance of simulation facilities for the development of review criteria for advanced human system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced control room (ACR) concepts are being developed in the commercial nuclear industry as part of future reactor designs. The ACRs will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role (function) in the system, the method of information presentation, the ways in which the operator interacts with the system, and the requirements on the operator to understand and supervise an increasingly complex system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The NRC is developing guidelines to support their review of these advanced designs. As part of this effort, a methodology for guidance development was established, and topics in need of further research were identified. Simulators of various kinds are likely to play important roles in the development of review guidelines and in the evaluation of ACRs. This paper describes a general approach to review criteria development, and discusses the role of simulators in addressing research needs

  11. Analysis of PV Advanced Inverter Functions and Setpoints under Time Series Simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seuss, John [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Reno, Matthew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Broderick, Robert Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grijalva, Santiago [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Utilities are increasingly concerned about the potential negative impacts distributed PV may have on the operational integrity of their distribution feeders. Some have proposed novel methods for controlling a PV system's grid - tie inverter to mitigate poten tial PV - induced problems. This report investigates the effectiveness of several of these PV advanced inverter controls on improving distribution feeder operational metrics. The controls are simulated on a large PV system interconnected at several locations within two realistic distribution feeder models. Due to the time - domain nature of the advanced inverter controls, quasi - static time series simulations are performed under one week of representative variable irradiance and load data for each feeder. A para metric study is performed on each control type to determine how well certain measurable network metrics improve as a function of the control parameters. This methodology is used to determine appropriate advanced inverter settings for each location on the f eeder and overall for any interconnection location on the feeder.

  12. Improving advanced cardiovascular life support skills in medical students: simulation-based education approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Reihani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this trial, we intend to assess the effect of simulation-based education approach on advanced cardiovascular life support skills among medical students. Methods: Through convenient sampling method, 40 interns of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in their emergency medicine rotation (from September to December 2012 participated in this study. Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS workshops with pretest and post-test exams were performed. Workshops and checklists for pretest and post-test exams were designed according to the latest American Heart Association (AHA guidelines. Results: The total score of the students increased significantly after workshops (24.6 out of 100 to 78.6 out of 100. This demonstrates 53.9% improvement in the skills after the simulation-based education (P< 0.001. Also the mean score of each station had a significant improvement (P< 0.001. Conclusion: Pretests showed that interns had poor performance in practical clinical matters while their scientific knowledge, such as ECG interpretation was acceptable. The overall results of the study highlights that Simulation based-education approach is highly effective in Improving ACLS skills among medical students.

  13. Development of an advanced thermal hydraulics model for nuclear power plant simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the development of an advanced digital computer thermal hydraulics model for nuclear power plant simulation. A review of thermal hydraulics code design options is presented together with a review of existing engineering models. CAE has developed an unequal temperatures-unequal velocities five equation model based on the drift flux formalism. CAE has selected the model on the basis that phase separation and thermal non-equilibrium are required to simulate complex and important phenomena occurring in systems such as reactor cooling systems (RCS) and steam generators (SG). The drift flux approach to phase separation and countercurrent flow was selected because extensive testing and validation data supports full-range drift flux parameters correlations. The five equation model was also chosen because it conserves important quantities, i.e. mass and energy of each phase, and because of numerical advantages provided by the case of coupling phasic mass conservation equations with phasic energy conservation equations. The basis of CAE's model as well as supporting models for convection and conduction heat transfer, break flow, interphase mass and heat transfer are described. Comparison of code calculations with experimental measurements taken during a small break LOCA test with the OTIS facility are presented. The use of such advanced thermal hydraulics model as plant analyzer considerably improves simulation capabilities of severe transient as well as of normal operation of two phase systems in nuclear power plants. (orig./HP)

  14. Simulation for Supporting Scale-Up of a Fluidized Bed Reactor for Advanced Water Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Tisa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP. The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe3+ and Fe2+ mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40–90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment.

  15. Simulation for supporting scale-up of a fluidized bed reactor for advanced water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisa, Farhana; Raman, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan

    2014-01-01

    Simulation of fluidized bed reactor (FBR) was accomplished for treating wastewater using Fenton reaction, which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The simulation was performed to determine characteristics of FBR performance, concentration profile of the contaminants, and various prominent hydrodynamic properties (e.g., Reynolds number, velocity, and pressure) in the reactor. Simulation was implemented for 2.8 L working volume using hydrodynamic correlations, continuous equation, and simplified kinetic information for phenols degradation as a model. The simulation shows that, by using Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) mixtures as catalyst, TOC degradation up to 45% was achieved for contaminant range of 40-90 mg/L within 60 min. The concentration profiles and hydrodynamic characteristics were also generated. A subsequent scale-up study was also conducted using similitude method. The analysis shows that up to 10 L working volume, the models developed are applicable. The study proves that, using appropriate modeling and simulation, data can be predicted for designing and operating FBR for wastewater treatment. PMID:25309949

  16. Experimental study and advanced CFD simulation of fire safety performance of building external wall insulation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhenghua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Large scale fire tests of building external wall insulation system were conducted. In the experiment, thermal-couples were mounted to measure the insulation system surface temperature and the gas temperature inside rooms at the second and third floors. Photos were also taken during the fire tests. The measurement provides information of the ignition and fire spread of the external insulation system which consists of surface protection layer, glass fibre net, bonding thin layer, anchor and the load bearing wall. Comprehensive simulations of the fire tests were carried out using an advanced CFD fire simulation software Simtec (Simulation of Thermal Engineering Complex [1, 2], which is now released by Simtec Soft Sweden, with the turbulent flow, turbulent combustion, thermal radiation, soot formation, convective heat transfer, the fully coupled three dimensional heat transfer inside solid materials, the ‘burn-out' of the surface protection layer and the pyrolysis of the insulation layer, etc, all computed. The simulation is compared with experimental measurement for validation. The simulation well captured the burning and fire spread of the external insulation wall.

  17. Simulation study of detached plasmas by using advanced particle model and fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluid simulations and particle simulations are performed to understand the physics of detached plasmas in the tokamak divertor. Two dimensional fluid simulations show that detached divertor plasmas are formed for the high density operation in the W-shaped divertor configuration of JT-60U tokamak. Charge-exchange and recombination processes play important roles to cause the detachment. The asymmetry of inner-and-outer divertor plasmas is studied based on a fluid model, and the bifurcated nature of the asymmetry caused by the SOL current is found. Advanced particle simulations demonstrate that the ExB drift by the radial electric field in a SOL plasma causes the asymmetry of flow pattern and density profile. A detached plasma is formed in the divertor region from which the drift flows out, when the ratio of the ExB drift speed to the sound speed exceeds a threshold. Effects of the radial gradient including diamagnetic drift flow on SOL and divertor plasmas are also studied with the two-dimensional particle simulation. (author)

  18. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Enabling Computational Technologies FY09 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diachin, L F; Garaizar, F X; Henson, V E; Pope, G

    2009-10-12

    In this document we report on the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) effort. In particular, we provide the context for ECT In the broader NEAMS program and describe the three pillars of the ECT effort, namely, (1) tools and libraries, (2) software quality assurance, and (3) computational facility (computers, storage, etc) needs. We report on our FY09 deliverables to determine the needs of the integrated performance and safety codes (IPSCs) in these three areas and lay out the general plan for software quality assurance to meet the requirements of DOE and the DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). We conclude with a brief description of our interactions with the Idaho National Laboratory computer center to determine what is needed to expand their role as a NEAMS user facility.

  19. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  20. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hongbing [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bukkapatnam, Satish; Harimkar, Sandip; Singh, Raman; Bardenhagen, Scott

    2014-01-09

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  1. Simulations of Failure via Three-Dimensional Cracking in Fuel Cladding for Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhancing performance of fuel cladding and duct alloys is a key means of increasing fuel burnup. This project will address the failure of fuel cladding via three-dimensional cracking models. Researchers will develop a simulation code for the failure of the fuel cladding and validate the code through experiments. The objective is to develop an algorithm to determine the failure of fuel cladding in the form of three-dimensional cracking due to prolonged exposure under varying conditions of pressure, temperature, chemical environment, and irradiation. This project encompasses the following tasks: 1. Simulate 3D crack initiation and growth under instantaneous and/or fatigue loads using a new variant of the material point method (MPM); 2. Simulate debonding of the materials in the crack path using cohesive elements, considering normal and shear traction separation laws; 3. Determine the crack propagation path, considering damage of the materials incorporated in the cohesive elements to allow the energy release rate to be minimized; 4. Simulate the three-dimensional fatigue crack growth as a function of loading histories; 5. Verify the simulation code by comparing results to theoretical and numerical studies available in the literature; 6. Conduct experiments to observe the crack path and surface profile in unused fuel cladding and validate against simulation results; and 7. Expand the adaptive mesh refinement infrastructure parallel processing environment to allow adaptive mesh refinement at the 3D crack fronts and adaptive mesh merging in the wake of cracks. Fuel cladding is made of materials such as stainless steels and ferritic steels with added alloying elements, which increase stability and durability under irradiation. As fuel cladding is subjected to water, chemicals, fission gas, pressure, high temperatures, and irradiation while in service, understanding performance is essential. In the fast fuel used in advanced burner reactors, simulations of the nuclear

  2. Simulation Research on Neutron Guide System CNGC for China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Guo-hai; HAN; Song-bai; HE; Lin-feng; WANG; Yu; WANG; Hong-li; LIU; Yun-tao; CHEN; Dong-feng; ZHAO; Zhi-xiang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The out-pile section of the neutron guide CNGC at CARR (China Advanced Research Reactor) was designed by Monte Carlo simulation with VITESS. The out-pile section of CNGC will be spitted to CNGC-S and CNGC-N, the cold neutron imaging facility and small angle neutron scattering facility will be installed at the end of guides respectively. XRD patterns of Bi1-xLaxFe1-yScyO3 were shown in Fig. 1.

  3. Advanced modeling and simulation of integrated gasification combined cycle power plants with CO2-capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this thesis is to provide an extensive description of the correlations in some of the most crucial sub-processes for hard coal fired IGCC with carbon capture (CC-IGCC). For this purpose, process simulation models are developed for four industrial gasification processes, the CO-shift cycle, the acid gas removal unit, the sulfur recovery process, the gas turbine, the water-/steam cycle and the air separation unit (ASU). Process simulations clarify the influence of certain boundary conditions on plant operation, performance and economics. Based on that, a comparative benchmark of CC-IGCC concepts is conducted. Furthermore, the influence of integration between the gas turbine and the ASU is analyzed in detail. The generated findings are used to develop an advanced plant configuration with improved economics. Nevertheless, IGCC power plants with carbon capture are not found to be an economically efficient power generation technology at present day boundary conditions.

  4. 3rd International Workshop on Advances in Simulation-Driven Optimization and Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Leifsson, Leifur; Yang, Xin-She

    2016-01-01

    This edited volume is devoted to the now-ubiquitous use of computational models across most disciplines of engineering and science, led by a trio of world-renowned researchers in the field. Focused on recent advances of modeling and optimization techniques aimed at handling computationally-expensive engineering problems involving simulation models, this book will be an invaluable resource for specialists (engineers, researchers, graduate students) working in areas as diverse as electrical engineering, mechanical and structural engineering, civil engineering, industrial engineering, hydrodynamics, aerospace engineering, microwave and antenna engineering, ocean science and climate modeling, and the automotive industry, where design processes are heavily based on CPU-heavy computer simulations. Various techniques, such as knowledge-based optimization, adjoint sensitivity techniques, and fast replacement models (to name just a few) are explored in-depth along with an array of the latest techniques to optimize the...

  5. Motion-base simulator results of advanced supersonic transport handling qualities with active controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, J. B.; Joshi, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Handling qualities of the unaugmented advanced supersonic transport (AST) are deficient in the low-speed, landing approach regime. Consequently, improvement in handling with active control augmentation systems has been achieved using implicit model-following techniques. Extensive fixed-based simulator evaluations were used to validate these systems prior to tests with full motion and visual capabilities on a six-axis motion-base simulator (MBS). These tests compared the handling qualities of the unaugmented AST with several augmented configurations to ascertain the effectiveness of these systems. Cooper-Harper ratings, tracking errors, and control activity data from the MBS tests have been analyzed statistically. The results show the fully augmented AST handling qualities have been improved to an acceptable level.

  6. Neural network setpoint control of an advanced test reactor experiment loop simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, G.A.; Bryan, S.R.; Powell, R.H.; Chick, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the design, implementation, and application of artificial neural networks to achieve temperature and flow rate control for a simulation of a typical experiment loop in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The goal of the project was to research multivariate, nonlinear control using neural networks. A loop simulation code was adapted for the project and used to create a training set and test the neural network controller for comparison with the existing loop controllers. The results for three neural network designs are documented and compared with existing loop controller action. The neural network was shown to be as accurate at loop control as the classical controllers in the operating region represented by the training set. 9 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Efeito da equoterapia na estabilidade postural de portadores de esclerose múltipla: estudo preliminar Efecto de la hipoterapia en la estabilidad postural de portadores de esclerosis múltiple: estudio preliminar Effect of hippotherapy on the postural stability of patients with multiple sclerosis: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Mendonça Menezes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo se propôs a verificar se a estimulação por meio da equoterapia é capaz de desencadear alterações no controle postural de portadores de esclerose múltipla (EM. MÉTODO: Fizeram parte deste estudo 11 portadores de EM divididos em Grupo Intervenção (GI e Grupo Controle (GC. O GI foi inserido num programa de hipoterapia durante 4 meses, sendo conduzidas 2 sessões semanais com duração de 50 minutos cada. A estabilidade postural foi avaliada utilizando uma plataforma de força (para calcular o deslocamento do centro de pressão (COP, durante 30 segundos, em postura ereta quasi-estática, com olhos abertos e fechados, antes e após o treinamento com equoterapia. O tratamento estatístico foi feito através do ANOVA e Post hoc de Tukey com pOBJETIVO: El objetivo de éste estudio fue identificar los efectos de la hipoterapia sobre el control postural en pacientes con esclerosis múltiple (EM. MÉTODO: Hicieron parte de este estudio 11 portadores de EM divididos en Grupo Intervención (GI y Grupo Control (GC. El GI fue insertado en un programa de hipoterapia durante cuatro meses, siendo realizadas dos sesiones semanales con duración de 50 minutos cada una. La estabilidad postural fue evaluada utilizando una plataforma de fuerza (para calcular el desplazamiento del centro de presión (COP, durante 30 segundos en postura erecta casi-estática, con ojos abiertos y cerrados, antes y después del entrenamiento con hipoterapia. El tratamiento estadístico fue realizado a través de ANOVA y Post hoc de Tukey con pOBJECTIVE: This study intended to identify the effects of hippotherapy on the postural control of multiple sclerosis (MS patients. METHODS: Eleven MS patients were separated into two groups: Intervention Group (IG and Control Group (CG. Hippotherapy consisted of two 50-minute sessions each week for four months. Postural stability was evaluated before and after hippotherapy using a force plate to calculate the center of

  8. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well

  9. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  10. Core library for advanced scenario simulation, C. L. A. S. S.: Principle and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global warming, the increase of world population and the depletion of fossil resources have lead us in a major energy crisis. Using electronuclear energy could be one of the means to solve a part of these issues. The way out of this crisis may be enlightened by the study of transitional scenarios, guiding the political decisions. The reliability of those studies passes through the wide variety of the simulation tools and the comparison between them. From this perspective and in order to perform complex electronuclear scenario simulation, the open source Core Library for Advance Scenario Simulation (CLASS) is being developed. CLASS main asset is its ability to include any kind of reactor, whether the system is innovative or standard. A reactor is fully described by its evolution database that must contain a set of different fuel compositions in order to simulate transitional scenarios. CLASS aims at being a useful tool to study scenarios involving Generation IV reactors as well as innovative fuel cycles, like the Thorium cycle. The following contribution will present in detail the CLASS software. Starting with the working principle of this tool, one will explain the working process of the different modules such as the evolution module. It will be followed by an exhaustive presentation of the UOX-MOX bases generation procedure. Finally a brief analysis of the error made by the CLASS evolution module will be presented. (author)

  11. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. Achieving the objective of modeling the performance of a disposal scenario requires describing processes involved in waste form degradation and radionuclide release at the subcontinuum scale, beginning with mechanistic descriptions of chemical reactions and chemical kinetics at the atomic scale, and upscaling into effective, validated constitutive models for input to high-fidelity continuum scale codes for coupled multiphysics simulations of release and transport. Verification and validation (V&V) is required throughout the system to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities, including at the subcontiunuum scale and the constitutive models they inform or generate. This Report outlines the nature of the V&V challenge at the subcontinuum scale, an approach to incorporate V&V concepts into subcontinuum scale modeling and simulation (M&S), and a plan to incrementally incorporate effective V&V into subcontinuum scale M&S destined for use in the NEAMS Waste IPSC work flow to meet requirements of quantitative confidence in the constitutive models informed by subcontinuum scale phenomena.

  12. Advanced optical system simulation in a coupled CAD/optical analysis package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Michael A.; Campillo, Chris J.; Jenkins, David G.

    1999-05-01

    Software packages capable of simulating complex optical systems have the power to shorten the design process for non-imaging illumination, projection display, and other imaging illumination systems, Breault Research Organization's Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) and Robert McNeel and Associates' Rhinoceros computer aided design software, together, allow complicated optical systems to be simulated and analyzed. Through the use of Rhinoceros, an optical system can be accurately modeled in a 3D design environment. ASAP is then used to assign optical properties to the Rhinoceros CAD model. After the optical system has been characterized, it can be analyzed and optimized, by way of features specific to the ASAP optical analysis engine. Using this simulation technique, an HID arc source manufactured by Ushio America, Inc. is accurately represented. 2D CCD images are gathered for the source's emitting-volume across its spectral bandwidth. The images are processed within ASAP, via the inverse Abel command, to produce a 3D emitting-volume. This emitting-volume is combined with an accurate model of the source geometry and its optical properties, to finalize a functioning virtual source model. The characterized source is then joined with a simulated optical system for detailed performance analysis: namely, a projection display system.

  13. Advanced Simulation of Fuel Behavior Under Irradiation in the Pleiades Software Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A “multi design” new generation software environment called PLEIADES has been developed by the CEA in the framework of a research cooperative program with EDF and AREVA. In this general software environment, ALCYONE is the PWR fuel performance simulation code. It is a multi-dimensional simulation software (1D, 2D and 3D), with applications for normal, transient and accidental conditions. It also has several levels of modelling, from industrial models to mechanistic ones depending on the amount of multi-scale details expected in the results of the simulation. The different dimensional schemes share the same thermomechanical Finite Element Method code CAST3M. The 1D scheme describes the behaviour of the whole rod and gives access to integral values such as rod fission gas release, clad profilometry and elongation. The 3D scheme allows a local study of Pellet Clad Mechanical Interaction (PCMI) by modelling the thermo-mechanical behaviour of one or several pellet fragments and overlying cladding. The 2D scheme is a compromise between calculation time and the accuracy of the local fuel description. Recently the 3D approach has been extended to a short fuel rod model in order to simulate the ballooning phenomenon during accidental transients. In this paper, we will present the general description of the ALCYONE simulation code in the PLEIADES environment (general computation algorithm, advanced fission gas model for UO2 and MOX fuels, 3D computation scheme). A focus will be presented on specific developments which have already been done to simulate accidental conditions such as LOCA and fast transients for different dimensional models. (author)

  14. Advanced CFD simulation for the assessment of nuclear safety issues at EDF. Some examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF R and D has computer power that puts it amongst the top industrial research centers in the world. Its supercomputers and in-house codes as well as its experts represent important capabilities to support EDF activities (safety analyses, support to the design of new reactors, analysis of accidental situations non reproducible by experiments, better understanding of physics or complex system response, effects of uncertainties and identification of prominent parameters, qualification and optimization of processes and materials...). Advanced numerical simulation is a powerful tool allowing EDF to increase its competitiveness, improve its performance and the safety of its plants. On this issue, EDF made the choice to develop its own in-house codes, instead of using commercial software, in order to be able to capitalize its expertise and methodologies. This choice allowed as well easier technological transfer to the concerned business units or engineering divisions, fast adaptation of our simulation tools to emerging needs and the development of specific physics or functionalities not addressed by the commercial offer. During the last ten years, EDF has decided to open its in-house codes, through the Open Source way. This is the case for Code–Aster (structure analysis), Code–Saturne (computational fluid dynamics, CFD), TELEMAC (flow calculations in aquatic environment), SALOME (generic platform for Pre and Post-Processing) and SYRTHES (heat transfer in complex geometries), among others. The 3 open source software: Code–Aster, Code–Saturne and TELEMAC, are certified by the French Nuclear Regulatory Authority for many «Important to Safety» studies. Advanced simulation, which treats complex, multi-field and multi-physics problems, is of great importance for the assessment of nuclear safety issues. This paper will present 2 examples of advanced simulation using Code–Saturne for safety issues of nuclear power plants in the fields of R and D and engineering: 1

  15. A Tool for Satellite Communications: Advanced DVB-RCS / DVB-S2 System and Protocol Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Boussemart, Vincent; Brandt, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    A tool has been designed to simulate broadband satellite communication systems and techniques: a system and protocol simulator based on advanced DVB-RCS and DVB-S2 standards. As a powerful and flexible tool, it can be used to investigate and optimize current and future satellite communication systems, mainly to develop resource management algorithms and assess system performances. It is capable of simulating a satellite system using Ka-Band with multi-beam European coverage. It integrates rai...

  16. Advanced Maintenance Simulation by Means of Hand-Based Haptic Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappi, Michele; Paolino, Luca; Ricciardi, Stefano; Sebillo, Monica; Vitiello, Giuliana

    Aerospace industry has been involved in virtual simulation for design and testing since the birth of virtual reality. Today this industry is showing a growing interest in the development of haptic-based maintenance training applications, which represent the most advanced way to simulate maintenance and repair tasks within a virtual environment by means of a visual-haptic approach. The goal is to allow the trainee to experiment the service procedures not only as a workflow reproduced at a visual level but also in terms of the kinaesthetic feedback involved with the manipulation of tools and components. This study, conducted in collaboration with aerospace industry specialists, is aimed to the development of an immersive virtual capable of immerging the trainees into a virtual environment where mechanics and technicians can perform maintenance simulation or training tasks by directly manipulating 3D virtual models of aircraft parts while perceiving force feedback through the haptic interface. The proposed system is based on ViRstperson, a virtual reality engine under development at the Italian Center for Aerospace Research (CIRA) to support engineering and technical activities such as design-time maintenance procedure validation, and maintenance training. This engine has been extended to support haptic-based interaction, enabling a more complete level of interaction, also in terms of impedance control, and thus fostering the development of haptic knowledge in the user. The user’s “sense of touch” within the immersive virtual environment is simulated through an Immersion CyberForce® hand-based force-feedback device. Preliminary testing of the proposed system seems encouraging.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of the vacuum performance of differential pumps at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo computer simulations have been successfully applied in the design of vacuum systems. These simulations allow the user to check the vacuum performance without the need of making a prototype of the vacuum system. In this paper we demonstrate the effectiveness and aptitude of these simulations in the design of differential pumps for synchrotron radiation beamlines. Eventually a good number of the beamline front ends at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will use differential pumps to protect the synchrotron storage ring vacuum. A Monte Carlo computer program is used to calculate the molecular flow transmission and pressure distribution across the differential pump. A differential pump system, which consists of two 170 l/s ion pumps with three conductance-limiting apertures, was previously tested on an APS insertion-device beamline front end. Pressure distribution measurements using controlled leaks demonstrated a pressure difference of over two decades across the differential pump. A new differential pump utilizes a fixed mask between two 170 l/s ion pumps. The fixed mask, which has a conical channel with a small cross section of 4.5x4.5 mm2 in the far end, is used in the beamline to confine the photon beam. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this configuration with the fixed mask significantly improves the pressure reduction capability of the differential pump, to ∼3x10-5, within the operational range from ∼10-4 to 10-10 Torr. The lower end of pressure is limited by outgassing from front-end components and the higher end by the pumping ability of the ion pump. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V and V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V and V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V and V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V and V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M and S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V and V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M and S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T

  19. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear

  20. A graphical simulator for teaching basic and advanced MR imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars G

    2007-01-01

    for radiologists, radiographers, and technical staff alike, but it is notoriously challenging to explain spin dynamics by using traditional teaching tools. The author developed a freely available graphical simulator based on the Bloch equations to aid in the teaching of topics ranging from precession...... and relaxation to advanced concepts such as stimulated echoes, spin tagging, and k-space-methods. A graphical user interface provides the user with a three-dimensional view of spin isochromates that can be manipulated by selecting radiofrequency pulses and gradient events. Even complicated sequences can...... be visualized in an intuitive way. The cross-platform software is primarily designed for use in lectures, but is also useful for self studies and student assignments. Movies available at http://radiographics.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/e27/DC1 ....

  1. Advanced Simulation and Computing Fiscal Year 2016 Implementation Plan, Version 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Archer, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hendrickson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    The Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) is an integrated technical program for maintaining the safety, surety, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile. The SSP uses nuclear test data, computational modeling and simulation, and experimental facilities to advance understanding of nuclear weapons. It includes stockpile surveillance, experimental research, development and engineering programs, and an appropriately scaled production capability to support stockpile requirements. This integrated national program requires the continued use of experimental facilities and programs, and the computational capabilities to support these programs. The purpose of this IP is to outline key work requirements to be performed and to control individual work activities within the scope of work. Contractors may not deviate from this plan without a revised WA or subsequent IP.

  2. Advanced adaptive computational methods for Navier-Stokes simulations in rotorcraft aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, S. T.; Bass, J. M.; Oden, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 research and development effort was conducted in area transonic, compressible, inviscid flows with an ultimate goal of numerically modeling complex flows inherent in advanced helicopter blade designs. The algorithms and methodologies therefore are classified as adaptive methods, which are error estimation techniques for approximating the local numerical error, and automatically refine or unrefine the mesh so as to deliver a given level of accuracy. The result is a scheme which attempts to produce the best possible results with the least number of grid points, degrees of freedom, and operations. These types of schemes automatically locate and resolve shocks, shear layers, and other flow details to an accuracy level specified by the user of the code. The phase 1 work involved a feasibility study of h-adaptive methods for steady viscous flows, with emphasis on accurate simulation of vortex initiation, migration, and interaction. Phase 2 effort focused on extending these algorithms and methodologies to a three-dimensional topology.

  3. Virtual charge state separator as an advanced tool coupling measurements and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaramyshev, S.; Vormann, H.; Adonin, A.; Barth, W.; Dahl, L.; Gerhard, P.; Groening, L.; Hollinger, R.; Maier, M.; Mickat, S.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.

    2015-05-01

    A new low energy beam transport for a multicharge uranium beam will be built at the GSI High Current Injector (HSI). All uranium charge states coming from the new ion source will be injected into GSI heavy ion high current HSI Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), but only the design ions U4 + will be accelerated to the final RFQ energy. A detailed knowledge about injected beam current and emittance for pure design U4 + ions is necessary for a proper beam line design commissioning and operation, while measurements are possible only for a full beam including all charge states. Detailed measurements of the beam current and emittance are performed behind the first quadrupole triplet of the beam line. A dedicated algorithm, based on a combination of measurements and the results of advanced beam dynamics simulations, provides for an extraction of beam current and emittance values for only the U4 + component of the beam. The proposed methods and obtained results are presented.

  4. Photocatalytic Removal of Microcystin-LR by Advanced WO3-Based Nanoparticles under Simulated Solar Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of advanced WO3-based photocatalysts including CuO/WO3, Pd/WO3, and Pt/WO3 were synthesized for the photocatalytic removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR under simulated solar light. In the present study, Pt/WO3 exhibited the best performance for the photocatalytic degradation of MC-LR. The MC-LR degradation can be described by pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Chloride ion (Cl− with proper concentration could enhance the MC-LR degradation. The presence of metal cations (Cu2+ and Fe3+ improved the photocatalytic degradation of MC-LR. This study suggests that Pt/WO3 photocatalytic oxidation under solar light is a promising option for the purification of water containing MC-LR.

  5. Advanced Simulation and Computing: A Summary Report to the Director's Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, M G; Peck, T

    2003-06-01

    It has now been three years since the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASCI), as managed by Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT) Directorate, has been reviewed by this Director's Review Committee (DRC). Since that time, there has been considerable progress for all components of the ASCI Program, and these developments will be highlighted in this document and in the presentations planned for June 9 and 10, 2003. There have also been some name changes. Today, the Program is called ''Advanced Simulation and Computing,'' Although it retains the familiar acronym ASCI, the initiative nature of the effort has given way to sustained services as an integral part of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). All computing efforts at LLNL and the other two Defense Program (DP) laboratories are funded and managed under ASCI. This includes the so-called legacy codes, which remain essential tools in stockpile stewardship. The contract between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC) specifies an independent appraisal of Directorate technical work and programmatic management. Such represents the work of this DNT Review Committee. Beginning this year, the Laboratory is implementing a new review system. This process was negotiated between UC, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Laboratory Directors. Central to this approach are eight performance objectives that focus on key programmatic and administrative goals. Associated with each of these objectives are a number of performance measures to more clearly characterize the attainment of the objectives. Each performance measure has a lead directorate and one or more contributing directorates. Each measure has an evaluation plan and has identified expected documentation to be included in the ''Assessment File''.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Polarity Characteristics of Vector Elastic Wave of Advanced Detection in the Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Shuaiqi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The high-order staggering grid Finite-Difference (FD scheme based on first-order velocity-stress elastic wave equation has been deduced. The calculation method of PML boundary condition and stability condition established in this study can be used for numerical simulation of advanced detection of elastic wave in roadway, with the obtaining of high-precision seismogram. Then we systematically analyze the polarity of vector wave field in post-source observation system. The results indicate that the relationship between the vector wave field and the polarity of direct wave is related to reflection coefficient on the interface, while the polarity relationship between horizontal and vertical components of vector wave field is related to vertical position of the interface. During data processing for advanced detection of elastic waves, the sign of the reflection coefficient on the interface ahead can be determined based on the polarity relationship between reflected wave and direct wave from the seismograms; the soft and hard rock and other geological information on both sides of the interface is thus be determined. In addition, the direction of source wave depends on polarity relationship between horizontal and vertical components of reflected wave and is used to achieve the separation of up going and down going waves.

  7. Comprehensive support for nuclear decommissioning based on 3D simulation and advanced user interface technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing international focus on the need to optimise decommissioning strategies, driven by the anticipation of high costs and major effort for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the coming decades. The goals are to control and mitigate costs and negative impacts on workers, the general public, and the environment. The methods presently employed for many decommissioning tasks do not apply the latest advancements of science and technology. Therefore, there is growing interest in research and development into the adoption of novel techniques for improving safety, reducing costs, and increasing transparency. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the authors' results from investigating how current and emerging technologies can be applied to enhance the international decommissioning strategy, focussing in particular on three-dimensional simulation, virtual reality, advanced user interfaces, mobile and wearable devices, and geographical information systems. Our results demonstrate that emerging technologies have great potential for supporting adoption of new instrumentation, improving data and knowledge management, optimising project plans, briefing and training field operators, and for communication, surveillance, and education in general. (author)

  8. Advances in direct numerical simulation for MHD modeling of free surface flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of FLiBe (LiF-BeF2) free-surface flow as a chamber protection scheme is considered in advanced nuclear fusion reactor. At the design of the nuclear fusion reactor from the viewpoint of thermofluid research, it would be very important to understand the influence of a magnetic field in turbulent free surface flow. On the other hand, turbulent free surface flow (called open channel flow) by direct numerical simulation (DNS) with non-deformable surface was first succeeded by imposing free-slip and non-slip conditions as velocity boundary conditions at the upper and lower, respectively. After that, the research by DNS has been advanced more, it has been clarified that turbulent structures generated from the lower wall travels to the free surface and affected the mechanism of heat and mass transfer at the free surface. The behavior of the structures is affected by the strong magnetic field in the nuclear fusion reactor. Therefore, a DNS of liquid film cooling in the nuclear fusion reactor is performed by authors, and the relations between a magnetic orientation and turbulent flow statistics are clearly observed. In this paper, the DNS result is introduced, and the trial turbulence modeling for MHD free-surface flow by using the DNS database is also discussed

  9. Gamma-gamma density and lithology tools simulation based on GEANT4 advanced low energy Compton scattering (GALECS) package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geophysical bore-hole data represent the physical properties of rocks, such as density and formation lithology, as a function of depth in a well. Properties of rocks are obtained from gamma ray transport logs. Transport of gamma rays, from a 137Cs point gamma source situated in a bore-hole tool, through rock media to detectors, has been simulated using a GEANT4 radiation transport code. The advanced Compton scattering concepts were used to gain better analyses about well formation. The simulation and understanding of advanced Compton scattering highly depends on how accurately the effects of Doppler broadening and Rayleigh scattering are taken into account. A Monte Carlo package that simulates the gamma-gamma well logging tools based on GEANT4 advanced low energy Compton scattering (GALECS).

  10. Fast and Accurate Icepak-PSpice Co-Simulation of IGBTs under Short-Circuit with an Advanced PSpice Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Wang, Huai;

    2014-01-01

    A basic problem in the IGBT short-circuit failure mechanism study is to obtain realistic temperature distribution inside the chip, which demands accurate electrical simulation to obtain power loss distribution as well as detailed IGBT geometry and material information. This paper describes an...... unprecedented fast and accurate approach to electro-thermal simulation of power IGBTs suitable to simulate normal as well as abnormal conditions based on an advanced physics-based PSpice model together with ANSYS/Icepak FEM thermal simulator in a closed loop. Through this approach, significantly faster...... simulation speed with respect to conventional double-physics simulations, together with very accurate results can be achieved. A case study is given which presents the detailed electrical and thermal simulation results of an IGBT module under short circuit conditions. Furthermore, thermal maps in the case of...

  11. Technology advancement for the ASCENDS mission using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obland, M. D.; Antill, C.; Browell, E. V.; Campbell, J. F.; CHEN, S.; Cleckner, C.; Dijoseph, M. S.; Harrison, F. W.; Ismail, S.; Lin, B.; Meadows, B. L.; Mills, C.; Nehrir, A. R.; Notari, A.; Prasad, N. S.; Kooi, S. A.; Vitullo, N.; Dobler, J. T.; Bender, J.; Blume, N.; Braun, M.; Horney, S.; McGregor, D.; Neal, M.; Shure, M.; Zaccheo, T.; Moore, B.; Crowell, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Welch, W.

    2013-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a NASA Langley Research Center project funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technologies being advanced are: (1) multiple transmitter and telescope-aperture operations, (2) high-efficiency CO2 laser transmitters, (3) a high bandwidth detector and transimpedance amplifier (TIA), and (4) advanced algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The instrument architecture is being developed for ACES to operate on a high-altitude aircraft, and it will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. The above technologies are critical for developing an airborne simulator and spaceborne instrument with lower platform consumption of size, mass, and power, and with improved performance. This design employs several laser transmitters and telescope-apertures to demonstrate column CO2 retrievals with alignment of multiple laser beams in the far-field. ACES will transmit five laser beams: three from commercial lasers operating near 1.57-microns, and two from the Exelis atmospheric oxygen (O2) fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1.26-microns. The Master Oscillator Power Amplifier at 1.57-microns measures CO2 column concentrations using an Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach. O2 column amounts needed for calculating the CO2 mixing ratio will be retrieved using the Exelis laser system with a similar IPDA approach. The three aperture telescope design was built to meet the constraints of the Global Hawk high-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). This assembly integrates fiber-coupled transmit collimators for all of the laser transmitters and fiber-coupled optical signals from the three telescopes to the aft optics and detector package. The detector

  12. Propulsion Simulations Using Advanced Turbulence Models with the Unstructured Grid CFD Tool, TetrUSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Frink, Neal T.; Deere, Karen A.; Pandya, Mohangna J.

    2004-01-01

    A computational investigation has been completed to assess the capability of TetrUSS for exhaust nozzle flows. Three configurations were chosen for this study (1) an axisymmetric supersonic jet, (2) a transonic axisymmetric boattail with solid sting operated at different Reynolds number and Mach number, and (3) an isolated non-axisymmetric nacelle with a supersonic cruise nozzle. These configurations were chosen because existing experimental data provided a means for measuring the ability of TetrUSS for simulating complex nozzle flows. The main objective of this paper is to validate the implementation of advanced two-equation turbulence models in the unstructured-grid CFD code USM3D for propulsion flow cases. USM3D is the flow solver of the TetrUSS system. Three different turbulence models, namely, Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST), basic k epsilon, and the Spalart-Allmaras (SA) are used in the present study. The results are generally in agreement with other implementations of these models in structured-grid CFD codes. Results indicate that USM3D provides accurate simulations for complex aerodynamic configurations with propulsion integration.

  13. The Synergy Between Total Scattering and Advanced Simulation Techniques: Quantifying Geopolymer Gel Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Claire [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bloomer, Breaunnah E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Provis, John L. [The University of Melbourne; Henson, Neil J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Page, Katharine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16

    With the ever increasing demands for technologically advanced structural materials, together with emerging environmental consciousness due to climate change, geopolymer cement is fast becoming a viable alternative to traditional cements due to proven mechanical engineering characteristics and the reduction in CO2 emitted (approximately 80% less CO2 emitted compared to ordinary Portland cement). Nevertheless, much remains unknown regarding the kinetics of the molecular changes responsible for nanostructural evolution during the geopolymerization process. Here, in-situ total scattering measurements in the form of X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis are used to quantify the extent of reaction of metakaolin/slag alkali-activated geopolymer binders, including the effects of various activators (alkali hydroxide/silicate) on the kinetics of the geopolymerization reaction. Restricting quantification of the kinetics to the initial ten hours of reaction does not enable elucidation of the true extent of the reaction, but using X-ray PDF data obtained after 128 days of reaction enables more accurate determination of the initial extent of reaction. The synergies between the in-situ X-ray PDF data and simulations conducted by multiscale density functional theory-based coarse-grained Monte Carlo analysis are outlined, particularly with regard to the potential for the X-ray data to provide a time scale for kinetic analysis of the extent of reaction obtained from the multiscale simulation methodology.

  14. A Modified Time Advancement Algorithm for Optimizing Channel Flow Analysis in Direct Numerical Simulation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rajabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research a direct numerical simulation (DNS of turbulent flow is performed in a geometrically standard case like plane channel flow. Pseudo spectral (PS method is used due to geometry specifications and very high accuracy achieved despite relatively few grid points. A variable time-stepping algorithm is proposed which may reduce requirement of computational cost in simulation of such wall-bounded flow. Channel flow analysis is performed with both constant and varied time-step for 128 × 65×128 grid points. The time advancement is carried out by implicit third-order backward differentiation scheme for linear terms and explicit forward Euler for nonlinear convection term. PS method is used in Cartesian coordinates with Chebychev polynomial expansion in normal direction for one non-periodic boundary condition. Also Fourier series is employed in stream-wise and span-wise directions for two periodic boundary conditions. The friction Reynolds number is about Reτ=175 based on a friction velocity and channel half width. Standard common rotational form was chosen for discritization of nonlinear convective term of Navier-Stocks equation. The comparison is made between turbulent quantities such as the turbulent statistics, Reynolds stress, wall shear velocity, standard deviation of (u and total normalized energy of instantaneous velocities in both time-discretization methods. The results show that if final decision rests on economics, the proposed variable time-stepping algorithm will be proper choice which satisfies the accuracy and reduces the computational cost.

  15. Discrete-event simulation of coordinated multi-point joint transmission in LTE-Advanced with constrained backhaul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2014-01-01

    Inter-cell interference in LTE-Advanced can be mitigated using coordinated multi-point (CoMP) techniques with joint transmission of user data . However, this requires tight coordination of the eNodeBs, usin g the X2 interface. In this paper we use discrete-event simulation to evaluate the latency...

  16. Development of advanced spent fuel management process. The fabrication and oxidation behavior of simulated metallized spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simulated metallized spent fuel ingots were fabricated and evaluated the oxidation rates and the activation energies under several temperature conditions to develop an advanced spent fuel management process. It was also checked the alloying characteristics of the some elements with metal uranium. (Author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 36 figs

  17. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations

  18. Computer simulation of homogenization of boric acid in a pressurizer of the advanced nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Jose E.P. da; Moreira, Maria de L., E-mail: jeduird@hotmail.com, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Andre F. de, E-mail: eafoliveira@ien.gov.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The reactivity of a water cooled reactor is controlled using control rods or boron dilution in water of the primary circuit. The boron-10 ({sup 10} B) is an efficient neutron absorber, especially when used in the absorption of thermal neutrons. Transient studies with disabilities in the homogenization of boron in PWR reactors become important as the boric acid solution is added to the primary circuit coolant in order to help control the fission rate in the reactor core. After reactor shutdown, the boron present in coolant has the function of maintaining reactor subcriticality. If low concentrated boron solution enters in the primary circuit, it becomes necessary to inject boron and to assure that the coolant will be well homogenized in order to increase the concentration and thus preventing water with small amounts of boron to reach the core. The aim of this study is to simulate the boron homogenization in the pressurizer of an advanced nuclear reactor. It is used a test section, which represents a quarter of a modular nuclear reactor pressurizer. By using the CFX code, a computer program that allows thermal hydraulic analysis of different types of flow, three examples were simulated using different operating conditions. With the results, it was analyzed the parameters that could influence this homogenization. Case studies such as variation of the dimensions of the water inlet and outlet tubes, flow variation and change in positioning of entrances and exits were made with the goal of finding parameters that could help the optimization of the homogenization of boron. The results confirm that the issues analyzed can be changed in the project in order to obtain the best operating condition. (author)

  19. SIROCCO project: 15 advanced instructor desk and 4 simulated control room for 900MW and 1300MW EDF power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the fifteen advanced instructors station and four simulated control delivered to EDF in the frame of the SIROCCO project by the Consortium formed by ATOS Origin, CORYS Tess, for the Electricite de France (EDF). These instructor stations are installed on fifteen replica training simulators located on different sites throughout France for the purposes of improving the job-related training of the EDF PWR nuclear power plant operating teams. This covers all 900 MW and 1300MW nuclear power plant of EDF. The simulated control rooms are installed on maintenance platform located at EDF and the consortium facilities. The consortium uses it to maintain and upgrade the simulators. EDF uses it to validate the upgrade delivered by the consortium before on site installation and to perform engineering analysis. This presentation sets out successively: - The major advantages of the generic and configurable connected module concept for flexible and quick adaptation to different simulators; - The innovative functionalities of the advanced Instructor Desk (IS) which make the instructor's tasks of preparation, monitoring and postanalysis of a training session easier and more homogeneous; - The use of the Simulated Control Room (SCR) for training purposes but also for those of maintenance and design studies for upgrades of existing control rooms

  20. Advanced Research and Education in Electrical Drives by Using Digital Real-Time Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojoi, R.; Profumo, F.; Griva, G.;

    2002-01-01

    The authors present in this paper a digital real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulation of a three-phase induction motor drive. The main real-time simulation tool is the dSPACE DS1103 PPC Controller Board which simulates the power and signal conditioning parts. The control algorithm of the virtual...... drive has been implemented on the Evaluation Board of TMS320F240 DSP. The experimental results validate this solution as a powerful tool to be used in research and advanced education. Thus, the students can put in practic the theory without spending too much time with details concerning the hardware...

  1. Performance experiments with alternative advanced teleoperator control modes for a simulated solar maximum satellite repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were conducted at the JPL Advanced Teleoperator Lab to demonstrate and evaluate the effectiveness of various teleoperator control modes in the performance of a simulated Solar Max Satellite Repair (SMSR) task. THe SMSR was selected as a test because it is very rich in performance capability requirements and it actually has been performed by two EVA astronauts in the Space Shuttle Bay in 1984. The main subtasks are: thermal blanket removal; installation of a hinge attachment for electrical panel opening; opening of electrical panel; removal of electrical connectors; relining of cable bundles; replacement of electrical panel; securing parts and cables; re-mate electrical connectors; closing of electrical panel; and reinstating thermal blanket. The current performance experiments are limited to thermal blanket cutting, electrical panel unbolting and handling electrical bundles and connectors. In one formal experiment even different control modes were applied to the unbolting and reinsertion of electrical panel screws subtasks. The seven control modes are alternative combinations of manual position and rate control with force feedback and remote compliance referenced to force-torque sensor information. Force-torque sensor and end effector position data and task completion times were recorded for analysis and quantification of operator performance.

  2. Numerical simulation and performance investigation of an advanced adsorption desalination cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature waste heat-driven adsorption desalination (AD) cycles offer high potential as one of the most economically viable and environmental-friendly desalination methods. This article presents the development of an advanced adsorption desalination cycle that employs internal heat recovery between the evaporator and the condenser, utilizing an encapsulated evaporator-condenser unit for effective heat transfer. A simulation model has been developed based on the actual sorption characteristics of the adsorbent-adsorbate pair, energy and mass balances applied to the components of the AD cycle. With an integrated design, the temperature in the evaporator and the vapor pressurization of the adsorber are raised due to the direct heat recovery from the condenser, resulting in the higher water production rates, typically improved by as much as three folds of the conventional AD cycle. In addition, the integrated design eliminates two pumps, namely, the condenser cooling water and the chilled water pumps, lowering the overall electricity consumption. The performance of the cycle is analyzed at assorted heat source and cooling water temperatures, and different cycle times as well as the transient heat transfer coefficients of the evaporation and condensation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. An expanded framework for the advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Osni A.; Drummond, Leroy A.

    2003-11-09

    The Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit is a set of computational tools developed primarily at DOE laboratories and is aimed at simplifying the solution of common and important computational problems. The use of the tools reduces the development time for new codes and the tools provide functionality that might not otherwise be available. This document outlines an agenda for expanding the scope of the ACTS Project based on lessons learned from current activities. Highlights of this agenda include peer-reviewed certification of new tools; finding tools to solve problems that are not currently addressed by the Toolkit; working in collaboration with other software initiatives and DOE computer facilities; expanding outreach efforts; promoting interoperability, further development of the tools; and improving functionality of the ACTS Information Center, among other tasks. The ultimate goal is to make the ACTS tools more widely used and more effective in solving DOE's and the nation's scientific problems through the creation of a reliable software infrastructure for scientific computing.

  4. Advisor 2.0: A Second-Generation Advanced Vehicle Simulator for Systems Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wipke, K.; Cuddy, M.; Bharathan, D.; Burch, S.; Johnson, V.; Markel, A.; Sprik, S.

    1999-03-23

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has recently publicly released its second-generation advanced vehicle simulator called ADVISOR 2.0. This software program was initially developed four years ago, and after several years of in-house usage and evolution, the tool is now available to the public through a new vehicle systems analysis World Wide Web page. ADVISOR has been applied to many different systems analysis problems, such as helping to develop the SAE J1711 test procedure for hybrid vehicles and helping to evaluate new technologies as part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) technology selection process. The model has been and will continue to be benchmarked and validated with other models and with real vehicle test data. After two months of being available on the Web, more than 100 users have downloaded ADVISOR. ADVISOR 2.0 has many new features, including an easy-to-use graphical user interface, a detailed exhaust aftertreatment thermal model, and complete browser-based documentation. Future work will include adding to the library of components available in ADVISOR, including optimization functionality, and linking with a more detailed fuel cell model.

  5. Investigation of Alien Wavelength Quality in Live Multi-Domain, Multi-Vendor Link Using Advanced Simulation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Nordal; Nuijts, Roeland; Bjorn, Lars Lange

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an advanced optical model for simulation of alien wavelengths in multi-domain and multi-vendor dense wavelength-division multiplexing networks. The model aids optical network planners with a better understanding of the non-linear effects present in dense wavelength-division ......This article presents an advanced optical model for simulation of alien wavelengths in multi-domain and multi-vendor dense wavelength-division multiplexing networks. The model aids optical network planners with a better understanding of the non-linear effects present in dense wavelength......-division multiplexing systems and better utilization of alien wavelengths in future applications. The limiting physical effects for alien wavelengths are investigated in relation to power levels, channel spacing, and other factors. The simulation results are verified through experimental setup in live multi...

  6. Analysis of simulation tools for the study of advanced marine power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Brochard, Paul Eugene

    1992-01-01

    The United States Navy is at a crossroads in the design of ship's engineering plants. Advances in solid-state power electronics combined with a shift to gas turbine powered propulsion and electric plants has placed renewed emphasis on developing advanced power systems. These advanced power systems may combine the prime movers associated with propulsion and electric power generation into an integrated system. The development of advanced electric distribution systems and propulsion derived ship...

  7. Advanced Unsteady Turbulent Combustion Simulation Capability for Space Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a high performance, high fidelity simulation capability to enable accurate, fast and robust simulation of unsteady turbulent,...

  8. Update on ORNL TRANSFORM Tool: Simulating Multi-Module Advanced Reactor with End-to-End I&C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Richard Edward [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    The Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Dynamic System Modeling Tool project is in the fourth year of development. The project is designed to support collaborative modeling and study of various advanced SMR (non-light water cooled reactor) concepts, including the use of multiple coupled reactors at a single site. The focus of this report is the development of a steam generator and drum system model that includes the complex dynamics of typical steam drum systems, the development of instrumentation and controls for the steam generator with drum system model, and the development of multi-reactor module models that reflect the full power reactor innovative small module design concept. The objective of the project is to provide a common simulation environment and baseline modeling resources to facilitate rapid development of dynamic advanced reactor models; ensure consistency among research products within the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface technical area; and leverage cross-cutting capabilities while minimizing duplication of effort. The combined simulation environment and suite of models are identified as the TRANSFORM tool. The critical elements of this effort include (1) defining a standardized, common simulation environment that can be applied throughout the Advanced Reactors Technology program; (2) developing a library of baseline component modules that can be assembled into full plant models using available geometry, design, and thermal-hydraulic data; (3) defining modeling conventions for interconnecting component models; and (4) establishing user interfaces and support tools to facilitate simulation development (i.e., configuration and parameterization), execution, and results display and capture.

  9. Advanced Approach to Consider Aleatory and Epistemic Uncertainties for Integral Accident Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of best-estimate codes together with realistic input data generally requires that all potentially important epistemic uncertainties which may affect the code prediction are considered in order to get an adequate quantification of the epistemic uncertainty of the prediction as an expression of the existing imprecise knowledge. To facilitate the performance of the required epistemic uncertainty analyses, methods and corresponding software tools are available like, for instance, the GRS-tool SUSA (Software for Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis). However, for risk-informed decision-making, the restriction on epistemic uncertainties alone is not enough. Transients and accident scenarios are also affected by aleatory uncertainties which are due to the unpredictable nature of phenomena. It is essential that aleatory uncertainties are taken into account as well, not only in a simplified and supposedly conservative way but as realistic as possible. The additional consideration of aleatory uncertainties, for instance, on the behavior of the technical system, the performance of plant operators, or on the behavior of the physical process provides a quantification of probabilistically significant accident sequences. Only if a safety analysis is able to account for both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties in a realistic manner, it can provide a well-founded risk-informed answer for decision-making. At GRS, an advanced probabilistic dynamics method was developed to address this problem and to provide a more realistic modeling and assessment of transients and accident scenarios. This method allows for an integral simulation of complex dynamic processes particularly taking into account interactions between the plant dynamics as simulated by a best-estimate code, the dynamics of operator actions and the influence of epistemic and aleatory uncertainties. In this paper, the GRS method MCDET (Monte Carlo Dynamic Event Tree) for probabilistic dynamics analysis is explained

  10. WRF4G project: Advances in running climate simulations on the EGI Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos; Cofino, Antonio S.; Fernández Quiruelas, Valvanuz; García, Markel; Fernández, Jesús

    2014-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting For Grid (WRF4G) project is a two-year Spanish National R&D project, which has started in 2011. It is now a well established project, involving scientists and technical staff from several institutions, which contribute results to international initiatives such as CORDEX and European FP7 projects such as SPECS and EUPORIAS. The aim of the WRF4G project is to homogenize access hybrid Distributed Computer Infrastructures (DCIs), such as HPC and Grid infrastructures, for climate researchers. Additionally, it provides a productive interface to accomplish ambitious climate experiments such as regional hind-cast/forecast and sensitivity studies. Although Grid infrastructures are very powerful, they have some drawbacks for executing climate applications such as the WRF model. This makes necessary to encapsulate the applications in a middleware in order to provide the appropriate services for monitoring and management. Therefore, the challenge of the WRF4G project is to develop a generic adaptation framework (WRF4G framework) to disseminate it to the scientific community. The framework aims at simplifying the model access by releasing climate scientists from technical and computational aspects. In this contribution, we present some new advances of the WRF4G framework, including new components for designing experiments, simulation monitoring and data management. Additionally, we will show how WRF4G makes possible to run complex experiments on EGI infrastructures concurrently over several VOs such as esr and earth.vo.ibergrid. http://www.meteo.unican.es/software/wrf4g This work has been partially funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the Spanish National R&D Plan 2008-2011 (CGL2011-28864, WRF4G)

  11. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  12. Development of Advanced Wear and Corrosion Resistant Systems Through Laser Surface Alloying and Materials Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Martukanitz and S. Babu

    2007-05-03

    Laser surfacing in the form of cladding, alloying, and modifications are gaining widespread use because of its ability to provide high deposition rates, low thermal distortion, and refined microstructure due to high solidification rates. Because of these advantages, laser surface alloying is considered a prime candidate for producing ultra-hard coatings through the establishment or in situ formation of composite structures. Therefore, a program was conducted by the Applied Research Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop the scientific and engineering basis for performing laser-based surface modifications involving the addition of hard particles, such as carbides, borides, and nitrides, within a metallic matrix for improved wear, fatigue, creep, and corrosion resistance. This has involved the development of advanced laser processing and simulation techniques, along with the refinement and application of these techniques for predicting and selecting materials and processing parameters for the creation of new surfaces having improved properties over current coating technologies. This program has also resulted in the formulation of process and material simulation tools capable of examining the potential for the formation and retention of composite coatings and deposits produced using laser processing techniques, as well as positive laboratory demonstrations in producing these coatings. In conjunction with the process simulation techniques, the application of computational thermodynamic and kinetic models to design laser surface alloying materials was demonstrated and resulted in a vast improvement in the formulation of materials used for producing composite coatings. The methodology was used to identify materials and to selectively modify microstructures for increasing hardness of deposits produced by the laser surface alloying process. Computational thermodynamic calculations indicated that it was possible to induce the

  13. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture

  14. Nuclear energy advance modeling and simulation program-Fuels integrated performance and safety code program - A multi-scale approach to modeling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased use of nuclear energy in the nations energy portfolio has been suggested recently by various social, economical and political organizations. Several options for the extension of nuclear energy being considered are; 1- Life Extension of Current Nuclear Reactors (operations at high burn ups), 2-Advanced New Generation Reactors (Gen III systems), 3- Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (particularly Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) concentrating on high temperature applications), and Advance Fuel Cycle Initiatives (AFCI) (fast reactor and advanced transmutation fuels). These new technology concepts will require new types of fuels (except the first option that may require more understanding of fuel behavior than development or minor modifications of fuels), and the new fuels have be developed and qualified. In the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) program we initially focus to the multi-scale modeling and simulation of new fuel types that AFCI Transmutation Fuel Campaign (TFC) program is developing. TFC is a natural customer of the NEMAS fuels IPSC project and a strong interaction and integration between the campaign and IPSC must be implemented. The program plan in terms of approach is general enough to be applicable to other fuel types of the future nuclear technology solutions. Requirements, however, may need to be updated for fuels not considered by TFC, depending upon the new physics findings. The advanced fuels of interest to AFCI programs are more complex than the traditional fuels previously and currently used in existing reactors. It is clear that using a traditional, heavily empirical approach to develop and qualify fuels over the entire range of variables pertinent to AFCI on a timely basis with available funds would be very challenging and costly, if not impossible. As a result, AFCI TFC has launched an advanced modeling and simulation campaign to revolutionize fuel

  15. CFD Simulations of a Regenerative Process for Carbon Dioxide Capture in Advanced Gasification Based Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arastoopour, Hamid [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Abbasian, Javad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This project describes the work carried out to prepare a highly reactive and mechanically strong MgO based sorbents and to develop a Population Balance Equations (PBE) approach to describe the evolution of the particle porosity distribution that is linked with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to perform simulations of the CO2 capture and sorbent regeneration. A large number of MgO-based regenerable sorbents were prepared using low cost and abundant dolomite as the base material. Among various preparation parameters investigated the potassium/magnesium (K/Mg) ratio was identified as the key variable affecting the reactivity and CO2 capacity of the sorbent. The optimum K/Mg ratio is about 0.15. The sorbent formulation HD52-P2 was identified as the “best” sorbent formulation and a large batch (one kg) of the sorbent was prepared for the detailed study. The results of parametric study indicate the optimum carbonation and regeneration temperatures are 360° and 500°C, respectively. The results also indicate that steam has a beneficial effect on the rate of carbonation and regeneration of the sorbent and that the reactivity and capacity of the sorbent decreases in the cycling process (sorbent deactivation). The results indicate that to achieve a high CO2 removal efficiency, the bed of sorbent should be operated at a temperature range of 370-410°C which also favors production of hydrogen through the WGS reaction. To describe the carbonation reaction kinetics of the MgO, the Variable Diffusivity shrinking core Model (VDM) was developed in this project, which was shown to accurately fit the experimental data. An important advantage of this model is that the changes in the sorbent conversion with time can be expressed in an explicit manner, which will significantly reduce the CFD computation time. A Computational Fluid Dynamic/Population Balance Equations (CFD/PBE) model was developed that accounts for the particle (sorbent) porosity distribution and a new version of

  16. Big data to smart data in Alzheimer's disease: Real-world examples of advanced modeling and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Magali; Stephenson, Diane; Romero, Klaus; Gordon, Mark Forrest; Zach, Neta; Geerts, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Many disease-modifying clinical development programs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have failed to date, and development of new and advanced preclinical models that generate actionable knowledge is desperately needed. This review reports on computer-based modeling and simulation approach as a powerful tool in AD research. Statistical data-analysis techniques can identify associations between certain data and phenotypes, such as diagnosis or disease progression. Other approaches integrate domain expertise in a formalized mathematical way to understand how specific components of pathology integrate into complex brain networks. Private-public partnerships focused on data sharing, causal inference and pathway-based analysis, crowdsourcing, and mechanism-based quantitative systems modeling represent successful real-world modeling examples with substantial impact on CNS diseases. Similar to other disease indications, successful real-world examples of advanced simulation can generate actionable support of drug discovery and development in AD, illustrating the value that can be generated for different stakeholders. PMID:27327540

  17. Large-scale simulations on thermal-hydraulics in fuel bundles of advanced nuclear reactors (Annual Report of the Earth Simulator Center, Dec 2008, 2007 issue)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to predict the water-vapor two-phase flow dynamics in a fuel bundle of an advanced light-water reactor, large-scale numerical simulations were performed using a highly parallel-vector supercomputer, the earth simulator. Although conventional analysis methods such as subchannel codes and system analysis codes need composition equations based on the experimental data, it is difficult to obtain high prediction accuracy when experimental data to obtain the composition equations. Then, the present large-scale direct simulation method of water-vapor two-phase flow was proposed. The void fraction distribution in a fuel bundle under boiling heat transfer condition was analyzed and the bubble dynamics around the fuel rod surface were predicted quantitatively. (author)

  18. Recent advances on mesoscopic simulation of dislocation dynamics; Recientes avances en simulacion mesoscopica de la dinamica de dislocaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Garcia, D.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Devincre, B.; Kubin, L. P.

    2001-07-01

    Recent advances in the description of dislocation dynamics are presented. Systems considered have realistic dislocation densities (i.e. densities close to those measured during the plastic deformation of single crystals {approx_equal}10''12 m''-2). The description is made through computer simulations in a bidimensional frame. Special emphasis will be made concerning the simplifications adopted, as well as the achievements. (Author) 3 refs.

  19. Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Lixing [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Shirey, Don [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Raustad, Richard [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Nigusse, Bereket [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Sharma, Chandan [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Lawrie, Linda [DHL Consulting, Bonn (Germany); Strand, Rick [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Pedersen, Curt [COPA, Panama City (Panama); Fisher, Dan [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Lee, Edwin [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Witte, Mike [GARD Analytics, Arlington Heights, IL (United States); Glazer, Jason [GARD Analytics, Arlington Heights, IL (United States); Barnaby, Chip [Wrightsoft, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2011-09-30

    EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE's Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Florida's Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced

  20. Understanding the impact of recent advances in isoprene photooxidation on simulations of regional air quality

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Y.; F. Paulot; W. P. L. Carter; C. G. Nolte; Luecken, D. J.; W. T. Hutzell; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Pinder, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    The CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) us model in combination with observations for INTEX-NA/ICARTT (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment–North America/International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation) 2004 are used to evaluate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry and provide constraints on isoprene nitrate yields, isoprene nitrate lifetimes, and NOx recycling rates. We incorporate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry into...

  1. Understanding the impact of recent advances in isoprene photooxidation on simulations of regional air quality

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Y.; W. P. L. Carter; C. G. Nolte; Luecken, D. J.; W. T. Hutzell; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.; Pinder, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    The CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) us model in combination with observations for INTEX-NA/ICARTT (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment–North America/International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation) 2004 are used to evaluate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry and provide constraints on isoprene nitrate yields, isoprene nitrate lifetimes, and NO_x recycling rates. We incorporate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry int...

  2. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    OpenAIRE

    Marinak M.M.; Kerbel G.D.; Koning J.M.; Patel M.V.; Sepke S.M.; McKinley M.S.; O'Brien M.J.; Procassini R.J.; Munro D.

    2013-01-01

    A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition capsule whi...

  3. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples

  4. Accurately fitting advanced training. Flexible simulator training by modular training course concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every employee of a power plant contributes with his individual expertise to the success of the enterprise. Certainly personal skills of employees differ from each other as well as power plants are different. With respect to effective simulator training this means that no two simulator training courses can be identical. To exactly meet the requirements of our customers KWS has developed modules for simulation training courses. Each module represents either a technical subject or addresses a topic in the field of soft skills. An accurately fitting combination of several of these modules to the needs of our customers allows for most efficient simulator training courses. (orig.)

  5. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinak M.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF ignition capsule which models the full capsule solid angle. This simulation contains a severely rough ablator perturbation and provides diagnostics signatures of capsule failure due to excessive instability growth.

  6. Advances in HYDRA and its applications to simulations of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new set of capabilities has been implemented in the HYDRA 2D/3D multiphysics inertial confinement fusion simulation code. These include a Monte Carlo particle transport library. It models transport of neutrons, gamma rays and light ions, as well as products they generate from nuclear and coulomb collisions. It allows accurate simulations of nuclear diagnostic signatures from capsule implosions. We apply it to here in a 3D simulation of a National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition capsule which models the full capsule solid angle. This simulation contains a severely rough ablator perturbation and provides diagnostics signatures of capsule failure due to excessive instability growth. (authors)

  7. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented

  8. Advanced Techniques for Reservoir Simulation and Modeling of Non-Conventional Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durlofsky, Louis J.; Aziz, Khalid

    2001-08-23

    Research results for the second year of this project on the development of improved modeling techniques for non-conventional (e.g., horizontal, deviated or multilateral) wells were presented. The overall program entails the development of enhanced well modeling and general simulation capabilities. A general formulation for black-oil and compositional reservoir simulation was presented.

  9. Brain-wave measures of workload in advanced cockpits: The transition of technology from laboratory to cockpit simulator, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.; Munson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The present Phase 2 small business innovation research study was designed to address issues related to scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) indices of mental workload and to transition this technology from the laboratory to cockpit simulator environments for use as a systems engineering tool. The project involved five main tasks: (1) Two laboratory studies confirmed the generality of the ERP indices of workload obtained in the Phase 1 study and revealed two additional ERP components related to workload. (2) A task analysis' of flight scenarios and pilot tasks in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) defined cockpit events (i.e., displays, messages, alarms) that would be expected to elicit ERPs related to workload. (3) Software was developed to support ERP data analysis. An existing ARD-proprietary package of ERP data analysis routines was upgraded, new graphics routines were developed to enhance interactive data analysis, and routines were developed to compare alternative single-trial analysis techniques using simulated ERP data. (4) Working in conjunction with NASA Langley research scientists and simulator engineers, preparations were made for an ACFS validation study of ERP measures of workload. (5) A design specification was developed for a general purpose, computerized, workload assessment system that can function in simulators such as the ACFS.

  10. A Visual Basic simulation software tool for performance analysis of a membrane-based advanced water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, P; Kumar, R; Srivastava, N; Chowdhury, J

    2014-02-01

    A Visual Basic simulation software (WATTPPA) has been developed to analyse the performance of an advanced wastewater treatment plant. This user-friendly and menu-driven software is based on the dynamic mathematical model for an industrial wastewater treatment scheme that integrates chemical, biological and membrane-based unit operations. The software-predicted results corroborate very well with the experimental findings as indicated in the overall correlation coefficient of the order of 0.99. The software permits pre-analysis and manipulation of input data, helps in optimization and exhibits performance of an integrated plant visually on a graphical platform. It allows quick performance analysis of the whole system as well as the individual units. The software first of its kind in its domain and in the well-known Microsoft Excel environment is likely to be very useful in successful design, optimization and operation of an advanced hybrid treatment plant for hazardous wastewater. PMID:23982824

  11. Simulation Augmented Manoeuvring Design and Monitoring - a New Method for Advanced Ship Handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knud Benedict

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A fast time simulation tool box is under development to simulate the ships motion with complex dynamic models and to display the ships track immediately for the intended or actual rudder or engine manoeuvre. Based on this approach the innovative Simulation Augmented Manoeuvring Design and Monitoring - SAMMON tool box will allow for (a a new type of design of a manoeuvring plan as enhancement exceeding the common pure way point planning (b an unmatched monitoring of ship handling processes to follow the underlying manoeuvring plan. During the manoeuvring process the planned manoeuvres can be constantly displayed together with the actual ship motion and the predicted future track which is based on actual input data from the ship's sensors and manoeuvring handle positions. This SAMMON tool box is intended be used on board of real ships but it is in parallel an effective tool for training in ship handling simulators: (a in the briefing for preparing a manoeuvring plan for the whole exercise in some minutes, (b during the exercise run to see the consequences of the use of manoeuvring equipment even before the ship has changed her motion and (c in debriefing sessions to discuss potential alternatives of the students decisions by simulating fast variations of their choices during the exercises. Examples will be given for results from test trials on board and in the full mission ship handling simulator of the Maritime Simulation Centre Warnemuende.

  12. TNO ADVANCE: a modular simulation tool for combined chassis and powertrain analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillaart, E. van den; Mourad, S.; Lupker, H.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper TNO-Advance is presented. It is built in a modular way, therefore allowing quick assembling of specific vehicle configurations and easy integration of new component models and future evolutions of existing models. Its entensive library is built in Matlab/Simulink, taking advantage of i

  13. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Korpio, T.; Leerink, S.; Nora, M. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, J.A. [VTT, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Ogando, F. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Advances in simulated modeling of vibration systems based on computational intelligence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Computational intelligence is the computational simulation of the bio-intelligence, which includes artificial neural networks, fuzzy systems and evolutionary computations. This article summarizes the state of the art in the field of simulated modeling of vibration systems using methods of computational intelligence, based on some relevant subjects and the authors' own research work. First, contributions to the applications of computational intelligence to the identification of nonlinear characteristics of packaging are reviewed. Subsequently, applications of the newly developed training algorithms for feedforward neural networks to the identification of restoring forces in multi-degree-of-freedom nonlinear systems are discussed. Finally, the neural-network-based method of model reduction for the dynamic simulation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using generalized Hebbian algorithm (GHA) and robust GHA is outlined. The prospects of the simulated modeling of vibration systems using techniques of computational intelligence are also indicated.

  16. Akuna - Integrated Toolsets Supporting Advanced Subsurface Flow and Transport Simulations for Environmental Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuchardt, Karen L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, Deborah A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Finsterle, Stefan A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gable, Carl W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, Ian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gosink, Luke J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keating, Elizabeth H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lansing, Carina S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meyer, Joerg [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Moeglein, William A.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pau, George S.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Porter, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Purohit, Sumit [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rockhold, Mark L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, Arie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-04-24

    A next generation open source subsurface simulator and user environment for environmental management is being developed through a collaborative effort across Department of Energy National Laboratories. The flow and transport simulator, Amanzi, will be capable of modeling complex subsurface environments and processes using both unstructured and adaptive meshes at very fine spatial resolutions that require supercomputing-scale resources. The user environment, Akuna, provides users with a range of tools to manage environmental and simulator data sets, create models, manage and share simulation data, and visualize results. Underlying the user interface are core toolsets that provide algorithms for sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. Akuna is open-source, cross platform software that is initially being demonstrated on the Hanford BC Cribs remediation site. In this paper, we describe the emerging capabilities of Akuna and illustrate how these are being applied to the BC Cribs site.

  17. Advances in large-eddy simulation of a wind turbine wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, A; Crespo, A; Migoya, E; Garcia, J [Departamento de IngenierIa Energetica y Fluidomecanica, ETSII, Universidad iPolitecnica de Madrid. C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, CP., 28006, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-15

    A CFD code has been developed based on a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) approach. The turbine is simulated by concentrated drag forces, and is placed in an environment with turbulence anisotropy properties similar to the ones of the real atmosphere. Comparisons with experimental data and with analytical correlations have been performed, and the results are found to be in good agreement with both, suggesting that LES is a potentially useful tool in the investigation of detailed wake flow.

  18. CORBA and MPI-based 'backbone' for coupling advanced simulation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a growing international interest in using coupled, multidisciplinary computer simulations for a variety of purposes, including nuclear reactor safety analysis. Reactor behaviour can be modeled using a suite of computer programs simulating phenomena or predicting parameters that can be categorized into disciplines such as Thermalhydraulics, Neutronics, Fuel, Fuel Channels, Fission Product Release and Transport, Containment and Atmospheric Dispersion, and Severe Accident Analysis. Traditionally, simulations used for safety analysis individually addressed only the behaviour within a single discipline, based upon static input data from other simulation programs. The limitation of using a suite of stand-alone simulations is that phenomenological interdependencies or temporal feedback between the parameters calculated within individual simulations cannot be adequately captured. To remove this shortcoming, multiple computer simulations for different disciplines must exchange data during runtime to address these interdependencies. This article describes the concept of a new framework, which we refer to as the 'Backbone', to provide the necessary runtime exchange of data. The Backbone, currently under development at AECL for a preliminary feasibility study, is a hybrid design using features taken from the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), a standard defined by the Object Management Group, and the Message Passing Interface (MPI), a standard developed by a group of researchers from academia and industry. Both have well-tested and efficient implementations, including some that are freely available under the GNU public licenses. The CORBA component enables individual programs written in different languages and running on different platforms within a network to exchange data with each other, thus behaving like a single application. MPI provides the process-to-process intercommunication between these programs. This paper outlines the different CORBA and

  19. A study on optimization of hybrid drive train using Advanced Vehicle Simulator (ADVISOR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Same, Adam; Stipe, Alex; Grossman, David; Park, Jae Wan

    This study investigates the advantages and disadvantages of three hybrid drive train configurations: series, parallel, and "through-the-ground" parallel. Power flow simulations are conducted with the MATLAB/Simulink-based software ADVISOR. These simulations are then applied in an application for the UC Davis SAE Formula Hybrid vehicle. ADVISOR performs simulation calculations for vehicle position using a combined backward/forward method. These simulations are used to study how efficiency and agility are affected by the motor, fuel converter, and hybrid configuration. Three different vehicle models are developed to optimize the drive train of a vehicle for three stages of the SAE Formula Hybrid competition: autocross, endurance, and acceleration. Input cycles are created based on rough estimates of track geometry. The output from these ADVISOR simulations is a series of plots of velocity profile and energy storage State of Charge that provide a good estimate of how the Formula Hybrid vehicle will perform on the given course. The most noticeable discrepancy between the input cycle and the actual velocity profile of the vehicle occurs during deceleration. A weighted ranking system is developed to organize the simulation results and to determine the best drive train configuration for the Formula Hybrid vehicle. Results show that the through-the-ground parallel configuration with front-mounted motors achieves an optimal balance of efficiency, simplicity, and cost. ADVISOR is proven to be a useful tool for vehicle power train design for the SAE Formula Hybrid competition. This vehicle model based on ADVISOR simulation is applicable to various studies concerning performance and efficiency of hybrid drive trains.

  20. Advanced Variance Reduction for Global k-Eigenvalue Simulations in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    between fission source estimates. In the new FMC method, the eigenvalue problem (expressed in terms of the Boltzmann equation) is integrated over the energy and direction variables. Then these equations are multiplied by J special 'tent' functions in space and integrated over the spatial variable. This yields J equations that are exactly satisfied by the eigenvalue k and J space-angle-energy moments of the eigenfunction. Multiplying and dividing by suitable integrals of the eigenfunction, one obtains J algebraic equations for k and the space-angle-energy moments of the eigenfunction, which contain nonlinear functionals that depend weakly on the eigenfunction. In the FMC method, information from the standard Monte Carlo solution for each active cycle is used to estimate the functionals, and at the end of each cycle the J equations for k and the space-angle-energy moments of the eigenfunction are solved. Finally, these results are averaged over N active cycles to obtain estimated means and standard deviations for k and the space-angle-energy moments of the eigenfunction. Our limited testing shows that for large single fissile systems such as a commercial reactor core, (i) the FMC estimate of the eigenvalue is at least one order of magnitude more accurate than estimates obtained from the standard Monte Carlo approach, (ii) the FMC estimate of the eigenfunction converges and is several orders of magnitude more accurate than the standard estimate, and (iii) the FMC estimate of the standard deviation in k is at least one order of magnitude closer to the correct standard deviation than the standard estimate. These advances occur because: (i) the Monte Carlo estimates of the nonlinear functionals are much more accurate than the direct Monte Carlo estimates of the eigenfunction, (ii) the system of discrete equations that determines the FMC estimates of k is robust, and (iii) the functionals are only very weakly correlated between different fission generations. The FMC method was

  1. Advanced CFD simulations of turbulent flows around appendages in CANDU fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the coolant flow in a modified 37-element CANDU fuel bundle, in order to investigate the effects of the appendages on the flow field. First, a subchannel model was created to qualitatively analyze the capabilities of different turbulence models such as k.ε, Reynolds Normalization Group (RNG), Shear Stress Transport (SST) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Then, the turbulence model with the acceptable quality was used to investigate the effects of positioning appendages, normally used in CANDU 37-element Critical Heat Flux (CHF) experiments, on the flow field. It was concluded that the RNG and SST models both show improvements over the k.ε method by predicting cross flow rates closer to those predicted by the LES model. Also the turbulence effects in the k.ε model dissipate quickly downstream of the appendages, while in the RNG and SST models appear at longer distances similar to the LES model. The RNG method simulation time was relatively feasible and as a result was chosen for the bundle model simulations. In the bundle model simulations it was shown that the tunnel spacers and leaf springs, used to position the bundles inside the pressure tubes in the experiments, have no measureable dominant effects on the flow field. The flow disturbances are localized and disappear at relatively short streamwise distances. (author)

  2. SciDAC Advances in Beam Dynamics Simulation: From Light Sources to Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on progress that has been made in beam dynamics simulation, from light sources to colliders, during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project 'Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS).' Several parallel computational tools for beam dynamics simulation are described. Also presented are number of applications in current and future accelerator facilities (e.g., LCLS, RHIC, Tevatron, LHC, and ELIC). Particle accelerators are some of most important tools of scientific discovery. They are widely used in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and other basic and applied sciences to study the interaction of elementary particles, to probe the internal structure of matter, and to generate high-brightness radiation for research in materials science, chemistry, biology, and other fields. Modern accelerators are complex and expensive devices that may be several kilometers long and may consist of thousands of beamline elements. An accelerator may transport trillions of charged particles that interact electromagnetically among themselves, that interact with fields produced by the accelerator components, and that interact with beam-induced fields. Large-scale beam dynamics simulations on massively parallel computers can help provide understanding of these complex physical phenomena, help minimize design cost, and help optimize machine operation. In this paper, we report on beam dynamics simulations in a variety of accelerators ranging from next generation light sources to high-energy ring colliders that have been studied during the first year of the SciDAC-2 accelerator project.

  3. Numerical models for the simulation of the cyclic behaviour of RC structures incorporating new advanced materials

    OpenAIRE

    Varma, Rajendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Estrutural Engenharia This work deals with material modelling and numerical implementation for nonlinear finite element analysis of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Since the behaviour of concrete and steel being crucial for any RC structure under loading, uniaxial cyclic constitutive models for both were implemented in FEMIX, finite element software. Various advanced materials have been developed with specific purposes, like fibre reinforced c...

  4. Investigation of advanced strain-path dependent material models for sheet metal forming simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Haddag, Badis; BALAN, Tudor; ABED-MERAIM, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Sheet metal forming processes often involve complex loading sequences. To improve the prediction of some undesirable phenomena, such as springback, physical behavior models should be considered. This paper investigates springback behavior predicted by advanced elastoplastic hardening models which combine isotropic and kinematic hardening and take strain-path changes into account. A dislocation-based microstructural hardening model formulated from physical observations and the more classical c...

  5. Discrete event simulation methods applied to advanced importance measures of repairable components in multistate network flow systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discrete event models are frequently used in simulation studies to model and analyze pure jump processes. A discrete event model can be viewed as a system consisting of a collection of stochastic processes, where the states of the individual processes change as results of various kinds of events occurring at random points of time. We always assume that each event only affects one of the processes. Between these events the states of the processes are considered to be constant. In the present paper we use discrete event simulation in order to analyze a multistate network flow system of repairable components. In order to study how the different components contribute to the system, it is necessary to describe the often complicated interaction between component processes and processes at the system level. While analytical considerations may throw some light on this, a simulation study often allows the analyst to explore more details. By producing stable curve estimates for the development of the various processes, one gets a much better insight in how such systems develop over time. These methods are particulary useful in the study of advanced importancez measures of repairable components. Such measures can be very complicated, and thus impossible to calculate analytically. By using discrete event simulations, however, this can be done in a very natural and intuitive way. In particular significant differences between the Barlow–Proschan measure and the Natvig measure in multistate network flow systems can be explored

  6. Quantifying the Effect of Fast Charger Deployments on Electric Vehicle Utility and Travel Patterns via Advanced Simulation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.; Neubauer, J.; Burton, E.

    2015-02-01

    The disparate characteristics between conventional (CVs) and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) in terms of driving range, refill/recharge time, and availability of refuel/recharge infrastructure inherently limit the relative utility of BEVs when benchmarked against traditional driver travel patterns. However, given a high penetration of high-power public charging combined with driver tolerance for rerouting travel to facilitate charging on long-distance trips, the difference in utility between CVs and BEVs could be marginalized. We quantify the relationships between BEV utility, the deployment of fast chargers, and driver tolerance for rerouting travel and extending travel durations by simulating BEVs operated over real-world travel patterns using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles (BLAST-V). With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, BLAST-V has been developed to include algorithms for estimating the available range of BEVs prior to the start of trips, for rerouting baseline travel to utilize public charging infrastructure when necessary, and for making driver travel decisions for those trips in the presence of available public charging infrastructure, all while conducting advanced vehicle simulations that account for battery electrical, thermal, and degradation response. Results from BLAST-V simulations on vehicle utility, frequency of inserted stops, duration of charging events, and additional time and distance necessary for rerouting travel are presented to illustrate how BEV utility and travel patterns can be affected by various fast charge deployments.

  7. Advanced methods in global gyrokinetic full f particle simulation of tokamak transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new full f nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation code, named ELMFIRE, has been developed for simulating transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas. The code is based on a gyrokinetic particle-in-cell algorithm, which can consider electrons and ions jointly or separately, as well as arbitrary impurities. The implicit treatment of the ion polarization drift and the use of full f methods allow for simulations of strongly perturbed plasmas including wide orbit effects, steep gradients and rapid dynamic changes. This article presents in more detail the algorithms incorporated into ELMFIRE, as well as benchmarking comparisons to both neoclassical theory and other codes.Code ELMFIRE calculates plasma dynamics by following the evolution of a number of sample particles. Because of using an stochastic algorithm its results are influenced by statistical noise. The effect of noise on relevant magnitudes is analyzed.Turbulence spectra of FT-2 plasma has been calculated with ELMFIRE, obtaining results consistent with experimental data

  8. Validation of advanced NSSS simulator model for loss-of-coolant accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, S.P.; Chang, S.K.; Huang, H.C. [Nuclear Training Branch, Northeast Utilities, Waterford, CT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The replacement of the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) model on the Millstone 2 full-scope simulator has significantly increased its fidelity to simulate adverse conditions in the RCS. The new simulator NSSS model is a real-time derivative of the Nuclear Plant Analyzer by ABB. The thermal-hydraulic model is a five-equation, non-homogeneous model for water, steam, and non-condensible gases. The neutronic model is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion model. In order to certify the new NSSS model for operator training, an extensive validation effort has been performed by benchmarking the model performance against RELAP5/MOD2. This paper presents the validation results for the cases of small-and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Detailed comparisons in the phenomena of reflux-condensation, phase separation, and two-phase natural circulation are discussed.

  9. Simulation of Electric Faults in Doubly-Fed Induction Generators Employing Advanced Mathematical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Sebastian; Mijatovic, Nenad; Holbøll, Joachim;

    2015-01-01

    many areas of electrical machine analysis. However, for fault investigations, the phase-coordinate representation has been found more suitable. This paper presents a mathematical model in phase coordinates of the DFIG with two parallel windings per rotor phase. The model has been implemented in Matlab...... and its properties in context of fault simulations and investigations has been investigated. Some of the most common faults have been simulated, namely broken rotor bars or windings, dynamic eccentricities and stator phase winding short circuits. These fault conditions propagate to the stator current...

  10. A review of recent advances in numerical simulations of microscale fuel processor for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (methanol as the fuel due to methanol's low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. The increased computational power and more complex codes have led to improved accuracy of numerical simulations. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included plate reactors, microchannel reactors, and annulus reactors for both wash-coated and packed bed systems.

  11. Material properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride for modeling and calibrating the simulation of advanced isolation structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeys, Peter I. L.; Griffin, Peter B.; Saraswat, Krishna C.

    1995-08-01

    The increasing cost and complexity of semiconductor process development has lead to the widespread use of multidimensional semiconductor process simulators. The success of a program like SUPREM-IV is primarily due to the fact that it is based on physical models, rather than empirical equations. This is in contrast to the first generation of process simulators, which calculated impurity profiles and oxide thickness in one dimension based on semiempirical approaches. SUPREM-IV incorporates two-dimensional coupled stress-dependent oxidation and impurity diffusion, which allows the accurate simulations of state-of-the-art integrated processes, provided that accurate model parameter sets are available. In this article we present an improved calibration methodology for simulation of advanced isolation technologies using SUPREM-IV, based on the experimental determination of the material properties of silicon nitride. The proposed strategy is applicable not only to SUPREM-IV but to any numerical simulator that uses the stress-dependent oxidation models to calculate oxide growth. In order to simulate experimental isolation boundary shapes, the oxidation models in SUPREM-IV must be calibrated. This requires a set of five fitting parameters, i.e., the material viscosities and activation volumes for stress-dependent diffusion, reaction rate, and critical stress. These parameters form a quintuplet but are not unique. Multiplying the viscosity values and dividing the activation volumes by a constant will yield exactly the same isolation structure boundary shape. The calculated stresses in the substrate however do not remain constant when different quintuplets are used. This has serious implications since isolation structures require the stress levels in the silicon substrate to remain well below the yield stress of silicon. If a nonoptimal parameter set is used, incorrect designs will result. Based on the experimental extraction of the silicon nitride viscosity by measuring the

  12. CFD simulations of moderator flow inside Calandria of the Passive Moderator Cooling System of an advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Eshita [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Kumar, Mukesh [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400019 India (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • CFD simulations in the Calandria of an advanced reactor under natural circulation. • Under natural convection, majority of the flow recirculates within the Calandria. • Maximum temperature is located at the top and center of the fuel channel matrix. • During SBO, temperature inside Calandria is stratified. - Abstract: Passive systems are being examined for the future Advanced Nuclear Reactor designs. One of such concepts is the Passive Moderator Cooling System (PMCS), which is designed to remove heat from the moderator in the Calandria vessel passively in case of an extended Station Black Out condition. The heated heavy-water moderator (due to heat transferred from the Main Heat Transport System (MHTS) and thermalization of neutrons and gamma from radioactive decay of fuel) rises upward due to buoyancy, gets cooled down in a heat exchanger and returns back to Calandria, completing a natural circulation loop. The natural circulation should provide sufficient cooling to prevent the increase of moderator temperature and pressure beyond safe limits. In an earlier study, a full-scale 1D transient simulation was performed for the reactor including the MHTS and the PMCS, in the event of a station blackout scenario (Kumar et al., 2013). The results indicate that the systems remain within the safe limits for 7 days. However, the flow inside a geometry like Calandria is quite complex due to its large size and inner complexities of dense fuel channel matrix, which was simplified as a 1D pipe flow in the aforesaid analysis. In the current work, CFD simulations are performed to study the temperature distributions and flow distribution of moderator inside the Calandria vessel using a three-dimensional CFD code, OpenFoam 2.2.0. First, a set of steady state simulation was carried out for a band of inlet mass flow rates, which gives the minimum mass flow rate required for removing the maximum heat load, by virtue of prediction of hot spots inside the Calandria

  13. CFD simulations of moderator flow inside Calandria of the Passive Moderator Cooling System of an advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CFD simulations in the Calandria of an advanced reactor under natural circulation. • Under natural convection, majority of the flow recirculates within the Calandria. • Maximum temperature is located at the top and center of the fuel channel matrix. • During SBO, temperature inside Calandria is stratified. - Abstract: Passive systems are being examined for the future Advanced Nuclear Reactor designs. One of such concepts is the Passive Moderator Cooling System (PMCS), which is designed to remove heat from the moderator in the Calandria vessel passively in case of an extended Station Black Out condition. The heated heavy-water moderator (due to heat transferred from the Main Heat Transport System (MHTS) and thermalization of neutrons and gamma from radioactive decay of fuel) rises upward due to buoyancy, gets cooled down in a heat exchanger and returns back to Calandria, completing a natural circulation loop. The natural circulation should provide sufficient cooling to prevent the increase of moderator temperature and pressure beyond safe limits. In an earlier study, a full-scale 1D transient simulation was performed for the reactor including the MHTS and the PMCS, in the event of a station blackout scenario (Kumar et al., 2013). The results indicate that the systems remain within the safe limits for 7 days. However, the flow inside a geometry like Calandria is quite complex due to its large size and inner complexities of dense fuel channel matrix, which was simplified as a 1D pipe flow in the aforesaid analysis. In the current work, CFD simulations are performed to study the temperature distributions and flow distribution of moderator inside the Calandria vessel using a three-dimensional CFD code, OpenFoam 2.2.0. First, a set of steady state simulation was carried out for a band of inlet mass flow rates, which gives the minimum mass flow rate required for removing the maximum heat load, by virtue of prediction of hot spots inside the Calandria

  14. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation

  15. Comparison of simplified and advanced building simulation tool with measured data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik; Schiønning, Peder; Dethlefsen, Espen

    2013-01-01

    In the future building design must progress to a format where CO 2 neutral societies are optimized as a whole and innovative technologies integrated. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the problems using a simplified design tool to simulate a complicated building and how this may not give...

  16. Advanced Signal Processing for Integrated LES-RANS Simulations: Anti-aliasing Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlueter, J. U.

    2003-01-01

    Currently, a wide variety of flow phenomena are addressed with numerical simulations. Many flow solvers are optimized to simulate a limited spectrum of flow effects effectively, such as single parts of a flow system, but are either inadequate or too expensive to be applied to a very complex problem. As an example, the flow through a gas turbine can be considered. In the compressor and the turbine section, the flow solver has to be able to handle the moving blades, model the wall turbulence, and predict the pressure and density distribution properly. This can be done by a flow solver based on the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. On the other hand, the flow in the combustion chamber is governed by large scale turbulence, chemical reactions, and the presence of fuel spray. Experience shows that these phenomena require an unsteady approach. Hence, for the combustor, the use of a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) flow solver is desirable. While many design problems of a single flow passage can be addressed by separate computations, only the simultaneous computation of all parts can guarantee the proper prediction of multi-component phenomena, such as compressor/combustor instability and combustor/turbine hot-streak migration. Therefore, a promising strategy to perform full aero-thermal simulations of gas-turbine engines is the use of a RANS flow solver for the compressor sections, an LES flow solver for the combustor, and again a RANS flow solver for the turbine section.

  17. RECENT ADVANCES OF UPSCALING METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF FLOW TRANSPORT THROUGH HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Chen

    2006-01-01

    We review some of our recent efforts in developing upscaling methods for simulating the flow transport through heterogeneous porous media. In particular, the steady flow transport through highly heterogeneous porous media driven by extraction wells and the flow transport through unsaturated porous media will be considered.

  18. ANNUAL REPORT. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED ELECTROCHEMICAL EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY FOR MONITORING CORROSION IN SIMULATED DOE LIQUID WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current report summarizes work performed on the project over the past calendar year (2001). The work concentrated on four areas: the fracture of AISI 4340 steel simulating weld heat affected zones in DOE liquid waste storage tanks, investigation of the passive state on nickel...

  19. Advances in Chimera Grid Tools for Multi-Body Dynamics Simulations and Script Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, William M.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation contains information about (1) Framework for multi-body dynamics - Geometry Manipulation Protocol (GMP), (2) Simulation procedure using Chimera Grid Tools (CGT) and OVERFLOW-2 (3) Further recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools OVERGRID, Grid modules, Script library and (4) Future work.

  20. Predicting Earthquake Occurrence at Subduction-Zone Plate Boundaries Through Advanced Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsu'Ura, M.; Hashimoto, C.; Fukuyama, E.

    2004-12-01

    In general, predicting the occurrence of earthquakes is very difficult, because of the complexity of actual faults and nonlinear interaction between them. From the standpoint of earthquake prediction, however, our target is limited to the large events that completely break down a seismogenic zone. To such large events we may apply the concept of the earthquake cycle. The entire process of earthquake generation cycles generally consists of tectonic loading due to relative plate motion, quasi-static rupture nucleation, dynamic rupture propagation and stop, and restoration of fault strength. This process can be completely described by a coupled nonlinear system, which consists of an elastic/viscoelastic slip-response function that relates fault slip to shear stress change and a fault constitutive law that prescribes change in shear strength with fault slip and contact time. The shear stress and the shear strength are related with each other through boundary conditions on the fault. The driving force of this system is observed relative plate motion. The system to describe the earthquake generation cycle is conceptually quite simple. The complexity in practical modeling mainly comes from complexity in structure of the real earth. Recently, we have developed a physics-based, predictive simulation system for earthquake generation at plate boundaries in and around Japan, where the four plates of Pacific, North American, Philippine Sea and Eurasian are interacting with each other. The simulation system consists of a crust-mantle structure model, a quasi-static tectonic loading model, and a dynamic rupture propagation model. First, we constructed a realistic 3D model of plate interfaces in and around Japan by applying an inversion technique to ISC hypocenter data, and computed viscoelastic slip-response functions for this structure model. Second, we introduced the slip- and time-dependent fault constitutive law with an inherent strength-restoration mechanism as a basic

  1. Data Collection Methods for Validation of Advanced Multi-Resolution Fast Reactor Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhiro, Akiro; Ruggles, Art; Pointer, David

    2015-01-22

    In pool-type Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) the regions most susceptible to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure (UIS) and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). This project experimentally and computationally (CFD) investigated the thermal mixing in the region exiting the reactor core to the UIS. The thermal mixing phenomenon was simulated using two vertical jets at different velocities and temperatures as prototypic of two adjacent channels out of the core. Thermal jet mixing of anticipated flows at different temperatures and velocities were investigated. Velocity profiles are measured throughout the flow region using Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (UDV), and temperatures along the geometric centerline between the jets were recorded using a thermocouple array. CFD simulations, using COMSOL, were used to initially understand the flow, then to design the experimental apparatus and finally to compare simulation results and measurements characterizing the flows. The experimental results and CFD simulations show that the flow field is characterized into three regions with respective transitions, namely, convective mixing, (flow direction) transitional, and post-mixing. Both experiments and CFD simulations support this observation. For the anticipated SFR conditions the flow is momentum dominated and thus thermal mixing is limited due to the short flow length associated from the exit of the core to the bottom of the UIS. This means that there will be thermal striping at any surface where poorly mixed streams impinge; rather unless lateral mixing is ‘actively promoted out of the core, thermal striping will prevail. Furthermore we note that CFD can be considered a ‘separate effects (computational) test’ and is recommended as part of any integral analysis. To this effect, poorly mixed streams then have potential impact on the rest of the SFR design and scaling, especially placement of internal components, such as the IHX that may see poorly mixed

  2. Data Collection Methods for Validation of Advanced Multi-Resolution Fast Reactor Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pool-type Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) the regions most susceptible to thermal striping are the upper instrumentation structure (UIS) and the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). This project experimentally and computationally (CFD) investigated the thermal mixing in the region exiting the reactor core to the UIS. The thermal mixing phenomenon was simulated using two vertical jets at different velocities and temperatures as prototypic of two adjacent channels out of the core. Thermal jet mixing of anticipated flows at different temperatures and velocities were investigated. Velocity profiles are measured throughout the flow region using Ultrasonic Doppler Velocimetry (UDV), and temperatures along the geometric centerline between the jets were recorded using a thermocouple array. CFD simulations, using COMSOL, were used to initially understand the flow, then to design the experimental apparatus and finally to compare simulation results and measurements characterizing the flows. The experimental results and CFD simulations show that the flow field is characterized into three regions with respective transitions, namely, convective mixing, (flow direction) transitional, and post-mixing. Both experiments and CFD simulations support this observation. For the anticipated SFR conditions the flow is momentum dominated and thus thermal mixing is limited due to the short flow length associated from the exit of the core to the bottom of the UIS. This means that there will be thermal striping at any surface where poorly mixed streams impinge; rather unless lateral mixing is actively promoted out of the core, thermal striping will prevail. Furthermore we note that CFD can be considered a separate effects (computational) test and is recommended as part of any integral analysis. To this effect, poorly mixed streams then have potential impact on the rest of the SFR design and scaling, especially placement of internal components, such as the IHX that may see poorly mixed streams

  3. Recent advances in renal hypoxia: insights from bench experiments and computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Anita T

    2016-07-01

    The availability of oxygen in renal tissue is determined by the complex interactions among a host of processes, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, arterial-to-venous oxygen shunting, medullary architecture, Na(+) transport, and oxygen consumption. When this delicate balance is disrupted, the kidney may become susceptible to hypoxic injury. Indeed, renal hypoxia has been implicated as one of the major causes of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of renal hypoxia; some of these studies were published in response to a recent Call for Papers of this journal: Renal Hypoxia. PMID:27147670

  4. Assessing the performance of an advanced integrated facade by means of simulation: The ACTRESS facade case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Favoino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for both building energy efficiency and indoor environmental comfort is leading to a substantial evolution of the traditional concept of the building envelope. The future building skin is required to be responsive and dynamic, actively regulating the flows of heat, light, air and water from outdoor to indoor and vice versa, in order to effectively respond to ever-changing climatic conditions, occupant comfort and energy efficiency requirements. In the framework of a decade-long research activity on Advanced Integrated Facade, AIF, a new Multifunctional Facade Module called ACTRESS has been conceived: the ACTive, RESponsive and Solar envelope is designedto play different roles through its ability to change its thermo-physical behaviour in order to suit the different environmental conditions. This paper briefly illustrates the ACTRESS MFM concept and its functional strategies, focusing on the simulation and the assessment of the performance of such a dynamic envelope. The numerical study was conducted in order to evaluate the potential energy savings achievable with such a facade and to evaluate different functional strategies and options. The evaluation of the performance in terms of energy savings was done at both component and whole-building level. Moreover this work presents an example of the applicability of Building Performance Simulation tools to the design of an innovative and dynamic facade system, discussing the capability of BPS software in simulating and evaluating the performance of such systems. The results show that the ACTRESS MFM can effectively reduce the total primary energy consumption of an office building up to 55% compared with a reference facade complying with national regulations. On the other hand modelling assumptions and simplifications are needed in order to evaluate the performance of such a system with BPS software, representing a barrier to the design and the adoption of advanced facade systems in

  5. Advanced fluid modelling and PIC/MCC simulations of low-pressure ccrf discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Markus M; Sun, Anbang; Bonitz, Michael; Loffhagen, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies of capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in helium and argon at pressures between 10 and 80 Pa are presented applying two different fluid modelling approaches as well as two independently developed particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) codes. The focus is on the analysis of the range of applicability of a recently proposed fluid model including an improved drift-diffusion approximation for the electron component as well as its comparison with fluid modelling results using the classical drift-diffusion approximation and benchmark results obtained by PIC/MCC simulations. Main features of this time- and space-dependent fluid model are given. It is found that the novel approach shows generally quite good agreement with the macroscopic properties derived by the kinetic simulations and is largely able to characterize qualitatively and quantitatively the discharge behaviour even at conditions when the classical fluid modelling approach fails. Furthermore, the excellent agreem...

  6. Casting directly from a computer model by using advanced simulation software FLOW-3D Cast ®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sirviö

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ConiferRob - A patternless casting technique, originally conceived at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and furtherdeveloped at its spin-off company, Simtech Systems, offers up to 40% savings in product development costs, and up to two months shorterdevelopment times compared to conventional techniques. Savings of this order can be very valuable on today's highly competitivemarkets. Casting simulation is commonly used for designing of casting systems. However, most of the software are today old fashioned and predicting just shrinkage porosity. Flow Science, VTT and Simtech have developed new software called FLOW-3D Cast ® , whichcan simulate surface defects, air entrainment, filters, core gas problems and even a cavitation.

  7. Springback Simulation: Impact of Some Advanced Constitutive Models and Numerical Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddag, Badis; Balan, Tudor; Abed-Meraim, Farid

    2005-08-01

    The impact of material models on the numerical simulation of springback is investigated. The study is focused on the strain-path sensitivity of two hardening models. While both models predict the Bauschinger effect, their response in the transient zone after a strain-path change is fairly different. Their respective predictions are compared in terms of sequential test response and of strip-drawing springback. For this purpose, an accurate and general time integration algorithm has been developed and implemented in the Abaqus code. The impact of several numerical parameters is also studied in order to assess the overall accuracy of the finite element prediction. For some test geometries, both material and numerical parameters are shown to clearly influence the springback behavior at a large extent. Moreover, a general trend cannot always be extracted, thus justifying the need for the finite element simulation of the stamping process.

  8. Advanced time integration algorithms for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sills, Ryan B.; Aghaei, Amin; Cai, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Efficient time integration is a necessity for dislocation dynamics simulations of work hardening to achieve experimentally relevant strains. In this work, an efficient time integration scheme using a high order explicit method with time step subcycling and a newly-developed collision detection algorithm are evaluated. First, time integrator performance is examined for an annihilating Frank–Read source, showing the effects of dislocation line collision. The integrator with subcycling is found to significantly out-perform other integration schemes. The performance of the time integration and collision detection algorithms is then tested in a work hardening simulation. The new algorithms show a 100-fold speed-up relative to traditional schemes. Subcycling is shown to improve efficiency significantly while maintaining an accurate solution, and the new collision algorithm allows an arbitrarily large time step size without missing collisions.

  9. A review of recent advances of numerical simulations of microscale fuel processors for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microscale (<5W) reformers for hydrogen production have been investigated for over a decade. These devices are intended to provide hydrogen for small fuel cells. Due to the reformer’s small size, numerical simulations are critical to understand heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the systems. This paper reviews the development of the numerical codes and details the reaction equations used. The majority of the devices utilized methanol as the fuel due to methanol’s low reforming temperature and high conversion, although, there are several methane fueled systems. As computational power has decreased in cost and increased in availability, the codes increased in complexity and accuracy. Initial models focused on the reformer, while more recently, the simulations began including other unit operations such as vaporizers, inlet manifolds, and combustors. These codes are critical for developing the next generation systems. The systems reviewed included, plate reactors, microchannel reactors, annulus reactors, wash-coated, packed bed systems.

  10. Casting directly from a computer model by using advanced simulation software FLOW-3D Cast ®

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sirviö; M. Woś

    2009-01-01

    ConiferRob - A patternless casting technique, originally conceived at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and furtherdeveloped at its spin-off company, Simtech Systems, offers up to 40% savings in product development costs, and up to two months shorterdevelopment times compared to conventional techniques. Savings of this order can be very valuable on today's highly competitivemarkets. Casting simulation is commonly used for designing of casting systems. However, most of the software are ...

  11. Advanced thermohydraulic simulation code for pool-type LMFBRs (SSC-P code)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madni, I.K.; Cazzoli, E.G.

    1980-09-01

    Models for components and processes that are needed for simulation of thermohydraulic transient in a pool-type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) plant are described in this report. A computer code, SSC-P, has been developed as a part of the Super System Code (SSC) development project. A user's manual is being prepared as a separate document. 27 refs., 26 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Monte Carlo 2000 Conference : Advanced Monte Carlo for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baräo, Fernando; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Távora, Luis; Vaz, Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This book focusses on the state of the art of Monte Carlo methods in radiation physics and particle transport simulation and applications, the latter involving in particular, the use and development of electron--gamma, neutron--gamma and hadronic codes. Besides the basic theory and the methods employed, special attention is paid to algorithm development for modeling, and the analysis of experiments and measurements in a variety of fields ranging from particle to medical physics.

  13. Simulation of emittance growth in the ALS [Advanced Light Source] pre-injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transverse and longitudinal beam dynamics in the ALS preinjector were simulated with a 2 1/2 D code. Strong space charge-forces at low energy and nonlinearities caused emittances to grow. However, careful tuning of the bunching system and the linac reduced emittance growth to an acceptable label. About 1/3 of the gun output are within the required energy spread and the normalized rms emittance is significantly lower than the expected value. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  14. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  15. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Ter Maat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS, coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C, and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables.

    The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  16. Recent advances in computational methodology for simulation of mechanical circulatory assist devices

    OpenAIRE

    Marsden, Alison L.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Long, Christopher C.; Behr, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to offload the work of one or both ventricles during heart failure. They are used in the clinical setting as destination therapy, as bridge to transplant, or more recently as bridge to recovery to allow for myocardial remodeling. Recent developments in computational simulation allow for detailed assessment of VAD hemodynamics for device design and optimization for both children and adults. Here, we provide a focused revi...

  17. Advances in Disaster Modeling, Simulation and Visualization for Sandstorm Risk Management in North China

    OpenAIRE

    Hang Lei; Zhaohui Lin; Jason K. Levy; Bell, Michelle L.

    2012-01-01

    Dust storms in North China result in high concentrations of airborne dust particles, which cause detrimental effects on human health as well as social and economic losses and environmental degradation. To investigate the impact of land surface processes on dust storms, we simulate two dust storm events in North China during spring 2002 using two versions of a dust storm prediction system developed by the Institute for Atmospheric Physics (IAP) in Beijing, China. The primary difference between...

  18. Recent Advances in Computational Simulation of Macro-, Meso-, and Micro-Scale Biomimetics Related Fluid Flow Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Y. Yan

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade, computational methods have been intensively applied to a variety of scientific researches and engineering designs. Although the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method has played a dominant role in studying and simulating transport phenomena involving fluid flow and heat and mass transfers, in recent years, other numerical methods for the simulations at meso- and micro-scales have also been actively applied to solve the physics of complex flow and fluid-interface interactions. This paper presents a review of recent advances in multi-scale computational simulation of biomimetics related fluid flow problems. The state-of-the-art numerical techniques, such as lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), molecular dynamics (MD), and conventional CFD, applied to different problems such as fish flow, electro-osmosis effect of earthworm motion, and self-cleaning hydrophobic surface, and the numerical approaches are introduced. The new challenging of modelling biomimetics problems in developing the physical conditions of self-clean hydrophobic surfaces is discussed.

  19. Simulation of nucleation and growth of atomic layer deposition phosphorus for doping of advanced FinFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations for the nucleation and growth of phosphorus films were carried out using density functional theory. The surface was represented by a Si9H12 truncated cluster surface model with 2 × 1-reconstructured (100) Si-OH terminations for the initial reaction sites. Chemistries included phosphorous halides (PF3, PCl3, and PBr3) and disilane (Si2H6). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) reaction sequences were illustrated with three-dimensional molecular models using sequential PF3 and Si2H6 reactions and featuring SiFH3 as a byproduct. Exothermic reaction pathways were developed for both nucleation and growth for a Si-OH surface. Energetically favorable reactions for the deposition of four phosphorus atoms including lateral P–P bonding were simulated. This paper suggests energetically favorable thermodynamic reactions for the growth of elemental phosphorus on (100) silicon. Phosphorus layers made by ALD are an option for doping advanced fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs). Phosphorus may be thermally diffused into the silicon or recoil knocked in; simulations of the recoil profile of phosphorus into a FinFET surface are illustrated

  20. Demonstration of structural performance of IP-2 packages by advanced analytical simulation and full-scale drop test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new types of IP-2 (Industrial Package Type 2) to transport low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) steel drums from nuclear power plants to a disposal facility have been developed in accordance with the IAEA and Korean regulations for radioactive materials. According to the regulations, both packages must preserve their structural performance after they are subjected to 0.9 m free drop tests, which are prescribed as normal conditions. In this study, an advanced analytical simulation and an evaluation process using the finite element (FE) method have been developed for the design assessment of the newly developed IP-2s. Then, analytical simulations for the various drop orientations were performed to evaluate the structural performance of the packages and demonstrate their compliance with the regulatory requirements. Also, full-scale drop tests were carried out to verify the numerical tools and modeling methodology used in the analyses and to confirm the performance of the IP-2s. In addition, parametric studies are carried out to investigate the sensitivity of the analytical variables, such as the material model and modeling methodology. In addition, this paper intends to provide basic guidance on the analytical simulation and evaluation process specifically for Korean types of transport packages, because numerous transport packages must now be developed for the various kinds of LILW that have accumulated in temporary storage facilities in Korea.

  1. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : FY10 development and integration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Sassani, David Carl; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  2. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC): FY10 development and integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the progress in fiscal year 2010 in developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. Waste IPSC activities in fiscal year 2010 focused on specifying a challenge problem to demonstrate proof of concept, developing a verification and validation plan, and performing an initial gap analyses to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. This year-end progress report documents the FY10 status of acquisition, development, and integration of thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) code capabilities, frameworks, and enabling tools and infrastructure.

  3. Simulation of nucleation and growth of atomic layer deposition phosphorus for doping of advanced FinFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Thomas E., E-mail: zoomtotom@gmail.com [Seitek50, Palm Coast, Florida 32135 (United States); Goldberg, Alexander; Halls, Mat D. [Schrödinger, Inc., San Diego, California 92122 (United States); Current, Michael I. [Current Scientific, San Jose, California 95124 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Simulations for the nucleation and growth of phosphorus films were carried out using density functional theory. The surface was represented by a Si{sub 9}H{sub 12} truncated cluster surface model with 2 × 1-reconstructured (100) Si-OH terminations for the initial reaction sites. Chemistries included phosphorous halides (PF{sub 3}, PCl{sub 3}, and PBr{sub 3}) and disilane (Si{sub 2}H{sub 6}). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) reaction sequences were illustrated with three-dimensional molecular models using sequential PF{sub 3} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 6} reactions and featuring SiFH{sub 3} as a byproduct. Exothermic reaction pathways were developed for both nucleation and growth for a Si-OH surface. Energetically favorable reactions for the deposition of four phosphorus atoms including lateral P–P bonding were simulated. This paper suggests energetically favorable thermodynamic reactions for the growth of elemental phosphorus on (100) silicon. Phosphorus layers made by ALD are an option for doping advanced fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs). Phosphorus may be thermally diffused into the silicon or recoil knocked in; simulations of the recoil profile of phosphorus into a FinFET surface are illustrated.

  4. Simulation of concomitant magnetic fields on fast switched gradient coils used in advanced application of MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Muciño, G.; Torres-García, E.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.

    2012-10-01

    The process to produce an MR image includes nuclear alignment, RF excitation, spatial encoding, and image formation. To form an image, it is necessary to perform spatial localization of the MR signals, which is achieved using gradient coils. MRI requires the use of gradient coils that generate magnetic fields, which vary linearly with position over the imaging volume. Safety issues have been a motivation to study deeply the relation between the interaction of gradient magnetic field and the peripheral nerve stimulation. In this work is presented a numerical modeling between the concomitant magnetic fields produced by the gradient coils and the electric field induced in a cube with σ conductivity by the gradient field switching in pulse sequences as Eco planar Imaging (EPI), due to this kind of sequence is the most used in advance applications of magnetic resonance imaging as functional MRI, cardiac imaging or diffusion.

  5. A Simulation Study Comparing Incineration and Composting in a Mars-Based Advanced Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, John; Kang, Sukwon; Cavazzoni, Jim; Levri, Julie; Finn, Cory; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to compare incineration and composting in a Mars-based advanced life support (ALS) system. The variables explored include waste pre-processing requirements, reactor sizing and buffer capacities. The study incorporates detailed mathematical models of biomass production and waste processing into an existing dynamic ALS system model. The ALS system and incineration models (written in MATLAB/SIMULINK(c)) were developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. The composting process is modeled using first order kinetics, with different degradation rates for individual waste components (carbohydrates, proteins, fats, cellulose and lignin). The biomass waste streams are generated using modified "Eneray Cascade" crop models, which use light- and dark-cycle temperatures, irradiance, photoperiod, [CO2], planting density, and relative humidity as model inputs. The study also includes an evaluation of equivalent system mass (ESM).

  6. Advances in Intelligent Modelling and Simulation Artificial Intelligence-Based Models and Techniques in Scalable Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee; Burczy´nski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in today’s large-scale computational modeling and design is to effectively manage the complex distributed environments, such as computational clouds, grids, ad hoc, and P2P networks operating under  various  types of users with evolving relationships fraught with  uncertainties. In this context, the IT resources and services usually belong to different owners (institutions, enterprises, or individuals) and are managed by different administrators. Moreover, uncertainties are presented to the system at hand in various forms of information that are incomplete, imprecise, fragmentary, or overloading, which hinders in the full and precise resolve of the evaluation criteria, subsequencing and selection, and the assignment scores. Intelligent scalable systems enable the flexible routing and charging, advanced user interactions and the aggregation and sharing of geographically-distributed resources in modern large-scale systems.   This book presents new ideas, theories, models...

  7. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Microscopic Simulations of Complex Hydrodynamic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Holian, Brad

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute which was held in Alghero, Sardinia, in July 1991. The development of computers in the recent years has lead to the emergence of unconventional ideas aiming at solving old problems. Among these, the possibility of computing directly fluid flows from the trajectories of constituent particles has been much exploited in the last few years: lattice gases cellular automata and more generally Molecular Dynamics have been used to reproduce and study complex flows. Whether or not these methods may someday compete with more traditional approaches is a question which cannot be answered at the present time: it will depend on the new computer architectures as well as on the possibility to develop very simple models to reproduce the most complex phenomena taking place in the approach of fully developed turbulence or plastic flows. In any event, these molecular methods are already used, and sometimes in an applied engineering context, to study strong s...

  8. Understanding the impact of recent advances in isoprene photooxidation on simulations of regional air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Xie

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality us model in combination with observations for INTEX-NA/ICARTT (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment–North America/International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation 2004 are used to evaluate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry and provide constraints on isoprene nitrate yields, isoprene nitrate lifetimes, and NOx recycling rates. We incorporate recent advances in isoprene oxidation chemistry into the SAPRC-07 chemical mechanism within the US EPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency CMAQ model. The results show improved model performance for a range of species compared against aircraft observations from the INTEX-NA/ICARTT 2004 field campaign. We further investigate the key processes in isoprene nitrate chemistry and evaluate the impact of uncertainties in the isoprene nitrate yield, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2 recycling efficiency, dry deposition velocity, and RO2 + HO2 reaction rates. We focus our examination on the southeastern United States, which is impacted by both abundant isoprene emissions and high levels of anthropogenic pollutants. We find that NOx concentrations increase by 4–9% as a result of reduced removal by isoprene nitrate chemistry. O3 increases by 2 ppbv as a result of changes in NOx. OH concentrations increase by 30%, which can be primarily attributed to greater HOx production. We find that the model can capture observed total alkyl and multifunctional nitrates (∑ANs and their relationship with O3 by assuming either an isoprene nitrate yield of 6% and daytime lifetime of 6 hours or a yield of 12% and lifetime of 4 h. Uncertainties in the isoprene nitrates can impact ozone production by 10% and OH concentrations by 6%. The uncertainties in NOx recycling efficiency appear to have larger effects than uncertainties in isoprene nitrate yield and dry deposition velocity. Further progress depends on improved understanding of

  9. Advances in Disaster Modeling, Simulation and Visualization for Sandstorm Risk Management in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dust storms in North China result in high concentrations of airborne dust particles, which cause detrimental effects on human health as well as social and economic losses and environmental degradation. To investigate the impact of land surface processes on dust storms, we simulate two dust storm events in North China during spring 2002 using two versions of a dust storm prediction system developed by the Institute for Atmospheric Physics (IAP in Beijing, China. The primary difference between the IAP Sandstorm Prediction System (IAPS 1.0 and more recent version (IAPS 2.0 is the land surface modeling. IAPS 1.0 is based on the Oregon State University (OSU land surface model, whereas the latest version of the dust storm prediction (IAPS 2.0 uses NOAH land surface schemes for land surface modeling within a meteorological model, MM5. This work investigates whether the improved land surface modeling affects modeling of sandstorms. It is shown that an integrated sandstorm management system can be used to aid the following tasks: ensure sandstorm monitoring and warning; incorporate weather forecasts; ascertain the risk of a sandstorm disaster; integrate multiple technologies (for example, GIS, remote sensing, and information processing technology; track the progress of the storm in real-time; exhibit flexibility, accuracy and reliability (by using multiple sources of data, including in-situ meteorological observations; and monitor PM10 and PM2.5 dust concentrations in airborne dustfalls. The results indicate that with the new land surface scheme, the simulation of soil moisture is greatly improved, leading to a better estimate of the threshold frictional velocity, a key parameter for the estimating surface dust emissions. In this study, we also discuss specific mechanisms by which land surface processes affect dust storm modeling and make recommendations for further improvements to numerical dust storm simulations.

  10. Development of an Advanced Stimulation / Production Predictive Simulator for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritchett, John W. [Leidos, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    There are several well-known obstacles to the successful deployment of EGS projects on a commercial scale, of course. EGS projects are expected to be deeper, on the average, than conventional “natural” geothermal reservoirs, and drilling costs are already a formidable barrier to conventional geothermal projects. Unlike conventional resources (which frequently announce their presence with natural manifestations such as geysers, hot springs and fumaroles), EGS prospects are likely to appear fairly undistinguished from the earth surface. And, of course, the probable necessity of fabricating a subterranean fluid circulation network to mine the heat from the rock (instead of simply relying on natural, pre-existing permeable fractures) adds a significant degree of uncertainty to the prospects for success. Accordingly, the basic motivation for the work presented herein was to try to develop a new set of tools that would be more suitable for this purpose. Several years ago, the Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office recognized this need and funded a cost-shared grant to our company (then SAIC, now Leidos) to partner with Geowatt AG of Zurich, Switzerland and undertake the development of a new reservoir simulator that would be more suitable for EGS forecasting than the existing tools. That project has now been completed and a new numerical geothermal reservoir simulator has been developed. It is named “HeatEx” (for “Heat Extraction”) and is almost completely new, although its methodology owes a great deal to other previous geothermal software development efforts, including Geowatt’s “HEX-S” code, the STAR and SPFRAC simulators developed here at SAIC/Leidos, the MINC approach originally developed at LBNL, and tracer analysis software originally formulated at INEL. Furthermore, the development effort was led by engineers with many years of experience in using reservoir simulation software to make meaningful forecasts for real geothermal

  11. Synergia an advanced object-oriented framework for beam dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dechow, Douglas R; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Stoltz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Synergia is a 3-D, parallel, particle-in-cell beam dynamics simulation toolkit. At heart of the software development effort is the integration of two extant object-oriented accelerator modeling frameworks–Impact written in Fortran 90 and mxyptlk written in C++–so that they may be steered by a third, a more flexible human interface framework, written in Python. Recent efforts are focused on the refactoring of the Impact-Fortran 90 codes in order to expose more loosely-coupled interfaces to the Python interface framework.

  12. Recent advances in the theory and simulation of pellet ablation and fast fuel relocation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper presents new theory and simulation of pellet ablation, and the rapid cross-field relocation ionized pellet substance following HFS pellet injection in tokamaks. A unique time-dependent 2-D Eulerian code CAP, was developed that is the first to self- consistently treat the key B-field effects: (1) Pellet deformation into a 'pancake' shape, driven by the anisotropic surface ablation pressure, can cut pellet lifetimes by almost ∼3x (2) J x B funneling of the flow into a field-aligned cigar-shaped structure enhances shielding. Near-pellet cloud parameters from CAP are critical inputs for PRL and AMR codes that model fast advection of the 'detached' clouds accelerated by the ∇B effect. PRL contains new geometrical effects of toroidicity, magnetic shear, and curvature drifts by parallel flows. Consequently, the calculated fuel deposition is in better accord with density measurements on DIII-D, providing improved predictive capability for ITER. A new 3-D MHD simulation code AMR can provide the required fine-scale mesh size needed for accurate modeling of strongly localized pellet clouds. (author)

  13. Development of advanced computational fluid dynamics tools and their application to simulation of internal turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, V. N.; Karpenko, A. G.; Volkov, K. N.

    2015-06-01

    Modern graphics processing units (GPU) provide architectures and new programming models that enable to harness their large processing power and to design computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations at both high performance and low cost. Possibilities of the use of GPUs for the simulation of internal fluid flows are discussed. The finite volume method is applied to solve three-dimensional (3D) unsteady compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured meshes. Compute Inified Device Architecture (CUDA) technology is used for programming implementation of parallel computational algorithms. Solution of some fluid dynamics problems on GPUs is presented and approaches to optimization of the CFD code related to the use of different types of memory are discussed. Speedup of solution on GPUs with respect to the solution on central processor unit (CPU) is compared with the use of different meshes and different methods of distribution of input data into blocks. Performance measurements show that numerical schemes developed achieve 20 to 50 speedup on GPU hardware compared to CPU reference implementation. The results obtained provide promising perspective for designing a GPU-based software framework for applications in CFD.

  14. Lessons learned from the development and application of an advanced engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's state-of-the-art safety analysis tool. This system integrates large computer simulation codes with well-developed color graphics display capabilities and numerous support packages and data bases. Users nationwide have been accessing and utilizing the NPA for a variety of applications such as nuclear power plant safety analyses and experiment evaluation. From the experiences of these users and the NPA support organization at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a number of lessons have been learned about developing and operating such a complex engineering simulator. These lessons include; first, the use of prototypes for planning and system standardization are invaluable and lead to an overall cost savings; second, strict configuration control of software, hardware, and communications systems must be maintained; third, transporting this type of mainframe computer software to another brand of mainframe is best performed by the software authors and not the staff of the new computer facility,; and fourth, as with any intricate system, the dedication and commitment of the project personnel are the key ingredients to success

  15. Recent advances on thermohydraulic simulation of HTR-10 nuclear reactor core using realistic CFD approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandro S., E-mail: alexandrossilva@ifba.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Mazaira, Leorlen Y.R., E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (INSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Dominguez, Dany S.; Hernandez, Carlos R.G., E-mail: alexandrossilva@gmail.com, E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Computacional; Lira, Carlos A.B.O., E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) have the potential to be used as possible energy generation sources in the near future, owing to their inherently safe performance by using a large amount of graphite, low power density design, and high conversion efficiency. However, safety is the most important issue for its commercialization in nuclear energy industry. It is very important for safety design and operation of an HTGR to investigate its thermal-hydraulic characteristics. In this article, it was performed the thermal-hydraulic simulation of compressible flow inside the core of the pebble bed reactor HTR (High Temperature Reactor)-10 using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The realistic approach was used, where every closely packed pebble is realistically modelled considering a graphite layer and sphere of fuel. Due to the high computational cost is impossible simulate the full core; therefore, the geometry used is a FCC (Face Centered Cubic) cell with the half height of the core, with 21 layers and 95 pebbles. The input data used were taken from the thermal-hydraulic IAEA Bechmark. The results show the profiles of velocity and temperature of the coolant in the core, and the temperature distribution inside the pebbles. The maximum temperatures in the pebbles do not exceed the allowable limit for this type of nuclear fuel. (author)

  16. Development of the supporting system of the Monju advanced reactor simulator (MARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MARS has been operating for operator training and operation procedure's verification of the prototype fast breeder reactor 'Monju' since April 1991. In order to carry out the above results more effectively, the MARS supporting system which consists of several computer system has being developed. This report covers the following three supporting systems developed from 1994 to 2001 and study on evaluation method of Monju operator training data. Expanded Monju visual animation system. The Monju visual animation system was developed to visualize the inner structure of equipments and the parameters without measuring points. This system is used for training form 1993. And then, the training limits of the system has been extended. Development of the Monju min simulator for reactor core analysis. Development of the Monju min simulator which analyzes thermo-hydraulic behavior in the Monju reactor in detail is proceeding with the aims; of upgrading Monju operator training effect. The obtained results will be reflected to remodeling of MARS's reactor core analysis mode. Development of the severe accident CAI (Computer Assisted Instruction) system. The prototype system which supports study on accident management was developed. This system will be converted when the severe accident procedure of Monju is fixed, and it will be used for training. Study on evaluation method of Monju operate training data. In order to reconstruct the operator training system, the evaluation method of training data was considered. The availability has been checked as a result of evaluating crew communication using this method. (author)

  17. Advanced computer simulation and modelling for solving single phase hydraulic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the methods to perform single phase hydraulic calculations for complex piping networks and applications which require a high degree of accuracy. Two separate computer programs are utilized for the simulation and modeling of the networks. Equivalent length of piping and corresponding flows and pressures are calculated by using Overthruster and Kypipe computer programs respectively. The Overthruster Program is designed to perform standardized inplant L/D hydraulic calculations. This program contains certain empirical equations and data. The Kypipe Program is designed specifically to simulate steady state pressure and flow calculations in piping distribution system transporting fluids. Fluor Daniel, completed the modification design and Southern California Edison installed the modification and performed start-up testing of the system. The actual test results, pressures and flows, correlated well within 2 percent of the values predicted by analytical methods. This unique example demonstrates analytical capabilities and the level of accuracies achieved by using this method versus the conventional methods with typical inaccuracies of 10 to 15 percent

  18. An Advanced Robust AVR-PSS Based H2 and H∞ Frequency Approachs Simulated Under a Realized GUI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KABI Wahiba

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article present a comparative study between two advanced robust frequency control strategies and their implementation using our realised Graphical User Interface ‘GUI’ under MATLAB software: the first method based on loop-shaping H∞ optimization technique and the second on robust H2 control method (LQG controller associated with KALMAN filter, and applied on automatic excitation control of synchronous generators, to improve transient stability and robustness of a single machine- infinite bus (SMIB system operating in different several conditions. The computer simulation results (static and dynamic stability, with test of robustness against machine parameters uncertainty (electric and mechanic, have proved that good dynamic performances, showing a stable system responses almost insensitive to large parameters variations, and more robustness using robust H∞ controller in comparison with H2 approach by exploiting our developed GUI interface in this work.

  19. Dynamics and Control of Switched Electronic Systems Advanced Perspectives for Modeling, Simulation and Control of Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Iannelli, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The increased efficiency and quality constraints imposed on electrical energy systems have inspired a renewed research interest in the study of formal approaches to the analysis and control of power electronics converters. Switched systems represent a useful framework for modeling these converters and the peculiarities of their operating conditions and control goals justify the specific classification of “switched electronic systems”. Indeed, idealized switched models of power converters introduce problems not commonly encountered when analyzing generic switched models or non-switched electrical networks. In that sense the analysis of switched electronic systems represents a source for new ideas and benchmarks for switched and hybrid systems generally. Dynamics and Control of Switched Electronic Systems draws on the expertise of an international group of expert contributors to give an overview of recent advances in the modeling, simulation and control of switched electronic systems. The reader is provided...

  20. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical ExB rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons

  1. Advanced simulations for signatures of charge exchange in heterogeneous plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an advanced theory of x-dips in spectral lines emitted from laser-produced plasmas. We compare predictions of this theory with our previous experimental results where, in the process of a laser irradiation of targets made out of aluminum carbide, we observed two dips in the Lyγ aluminum line perturbed by fully stripped carbon. Our theory gives a reasonable agreement with our experimental results. The results are of importance for the diagnostics of fundamental processes as it opens up a way to experimentally produce not-yet-available fundamental data on charge exchange between multi-charged ions, virtually inaccessible by other experimental methods. From the theoretical viewpoint, the x-dips are the only one signature of charge exchange in profiles of spectral lines emitted by plasmas and they are the only one quasi-molecular phenomenon that could be observed at relatively 'low' densities of laser-produced plasmas, all those aspects emphasize the interest for studying heterogeneous plasma emission

  2. PEM Fuel Cells with Bio-Ethanol Processor Systems A Multidisciplinary Study of Modelling, Simulation, Fault Diagnosis and Advanced Control

    CERN Document Server

    Feroldi, Diego; Outbib, Rachid

    2012-01-01

    An apparently appropriate control scheme for PEM fuel cells may actually lead to an inoperable plant when it is connected to other unit operations in a process with recycle streams and energy integration. PEM Fuel Cells with Bio-Ethanol Processor Systems presents a control system design that provides basic regulation of the hydrogen production process with PEM fuel cells. It then goes on to construct a fault diagnosis system to improve plant safety above this control structure. PEM Fuel Cells with Bio-Ethanol Processor Systems is divided into two parts: the first covers fuel cells and the second discusses plants for hydrogen production from bio-ethanol to feed PEM fuel cells. Both parts give detailed analyses of modeling, simulation, advanced control, and fault diagnosis. They give an extensive, in-depth discussion of the problems that can occur in fuel cell systems and propose a way to control these systems through advanced control algorithms. A significant part of the book is also given over to computer-aid...

  3. Simulation Manikin Modifications for High-Fidelity Training of Advanced Airway Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jan; Generoso, Jose R; Latoures, Renee; Acar, Yahya; Fidler, Richard L

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic anesthesia procedures are challenging to master during anesthesia training. A Laerdal ALS Simulator® manikin was modified by adding a bronchial tree module to create fidelity to the fourth generation. After modification, placement of endotracheal tubes up to 8.0 mm is possible by direct laryngoscopy, video laryngoscopy, and fiberoptically; in addition, it allows fiberoptically guided insertion of endobronchial blockers. Insertion of left and right 35-Fr double-lumen tubes permits double- and single-lung ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure and positive end-expiratory pressure. This anatomical modification created a high-fidelity training tool for thoracic anesthesia that has been incorporated into educational curricula for anesthesia. PMID:26752178

  4. Main control panel design and simulator in advanced boiling water reactor [ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ABWR type main control panel has been developed to enhance the reliability of plant monitoring and operation. This panel consists of large display panels and a compact main console, which enables operators to work from their seated position. Primary plant and system status information is presented on large display panels so that the information can be shared by the entire operating crew. This panel is applied to Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 6 which is scheduled to begin commercial operation in 1996. The ABWR type main control panel is quite different from the conventional one. Consequently the full-scope ABWR simulator is under construction, which will be completed in 1994, so that the operators will be trained sufficiently. (author)

  5. Desing and Simulation of Advanced Fiber Optic Sensors for High Energy Physics Application

    CERN Document Server

    Saccomanno, Andrea

    In the last two decades, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor were been widely studied and employed in temperature and strain sensing application. Due to their high potentiality in term of radiation hardness and EMI insensitivity, they constitute the ideal device to operate in harsh environments, under ionizing radiation and strong magnetic fields. This thesis work is focused on the research, development and simulation of novel sensors and monitoring systems suitable to operete in these environmental conditions.In particular, the monitoring applications regards room temperature of Compact Muon Solenoid (CERN), cryogenic temperature (up to 4.2 K) of the powerful cooling system of the LHC's superconducting magnets, and magnetic field with magnetostrictive and magneto-optic approaches.

  6. Advances in simulating non-congruent phase transitions of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is being developed to simulate UO2 at very high temperatures incorporating the effects of non-congruent phase transitions. In particular, the melting transformation and the possible 'Λ-transition' is being investigated to help support the design and analysis of experimental work being conducted as part of nuclear safety research. This work includes the interpretation of the behaviour of operating CANDU fuel under upset conditions, where centerline melting may potentially occur (particularly if the fuel is oxidized). The model presented here numerically solves a system of coupled nonlinear differential equations as derived from fundamental principles. The results of the model present here compare well against laser flash experiments in recently published literature. (author)

  7. Numerical simulation of the reactive flow in advanced (HSR) combustors using KIVA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winowich, Nicholas S.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work has been done with the goal of establishing ultralow emission aircraft gas turbine combustors. A significant portion of the effort is the development of three dimensional computational combustor models. The KIVA-II computer code which is based on the Implicit Continuous Eulerian Difference mesh Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ICED-ALE) numerical scheme is one of the codes selected by NASA to achieve these goals. This report involves a simulation of jet injection through slanted slots within the Rich burn/Quick quench/Lean burn (RQL) baseline experimental rig. The RQL combustor distinguishes three regions of combustion. This work specifically focuses on modeling the quick quench mixer region in which secondary injection air is introduced radially through 12 equally spaced slots around the mixer circumference. Steady state solutions are achieved with modifications to the KIVA-II program. Work currently underway will evaluate thermal mixing as a function of injection air velocity and angle of inclination of the slots.

  8. Advancing interprofessional education through the use of high fidelity human patient simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kane-Gill SL

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modern medical care increasingly requires coordinated teamwork and communication between healthcare professionals of different disciplines. Unfortunately, healthcare professional students are rarely afforded the opportunity to learn effective methods of interprofessional (IP communication and teamwork strategies during their education. The question of how to best incorporate IP interactions in the curricula of the schools of health professions remains unanswered.Objective: We aim to solve the lack of IP education in the pharmacy curricula through the use of high fidelity simulation (HFS to allow teams of medical, pharmacy, nursing, physician assistant, and social work students to work together in a controlled environment to solve cases of complex medical and social issues.Methods: Once weekly for a 4-week time period, students worked together to complete complex simulation scenarios in small IP teams consisting of pharmacy, medical, nursing, social work, and physician assistant students. Student perception of the use of HFS was evaluated by a survey given at the conclusion of the HFS sessions. Team communication was evaluated through the use of Communication and Teamwork Skills (CATS Assessment by 2 independent evaluators external to the project.Results: The CATS scores improved from the HFS sessions 1 to 2 (p = 0.01, 2 to 3 (p = 0.035, and overall from 1 to 4 (p = 0.001. The inter-rater reliability between evaluators was high (0.85, 95% CI 0.71, 0.99. Students perceived the HFS improved: their ability to communicate with other professionals (median =4; confidence in patient care in an IP team (median=4. It also stimulated student interest in IP work (median=4.5, and was an efficient use of student time (median=4.5Conclusion: The use of HFS improved student teamwork and communication and was an accepted teaching modality. This method of exposing students of the health sciences to IP care should be incorporated throughout the

  9. The role of advanced calculation and simulation tools in the evolution of fuel; El papel de las herramientas avanzadas de calculo y simulacion en la evolucion del combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Reja, C.; Cerracin, A.; Corpa, R.

    2015-07-01

    This article is focused on the role of the advanced calculation/simulation tools on the development of the fuel designs as well as in the assessment of the effect of the changes in the operation. With this purpose, the article describes and shows some examples of the use by ENUSA of some of these tools in the fuel engineering. To conclude, the future on the evolution of the advanced tools is also presented. (Author)

  10. Advancing adaptive optics technology: Laboratory turbulence simulation and optimization of laser guide stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampy, Rachel A.

    Since Galileo's first telescope some 400 years ago, astronomers have been building ever-larger instruments. Yet only within the last two decades has it become possible to realize the potential angular resolutions of large ground-based telescopes, by using adaptive optics (AO) technology to counter the blurring effects of Earth's atmosphere. And only within the past decade have the development of laser guide stars (LGS) extended AO capabilities to observe science targets nearly anywhere in the sky. Improving turbulence simulation strategies and LGS are the two main topics of my research. In the first part of this thesis, I report on the development of a technique for manufacturing phase plates for simulating atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory. The process involves strategic application of clear acrylic paint onto a transparent substrate. Results of interferometric characterization of the plates are described and compared to Kolmogorov statistics. The range of r0 (Fried's parameter) achieved thus far is 0.2--1.2 mm at 650 nm measurement wavelength, with a Kolmogorov power law. These plates proved valuable at the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at University of California, Santa Cruz, where they have been used in the Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics testbed, during integration and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager, and as part of the calibration system of the on-sky AO testbed named ViLLaGEs (Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiments). I present a comparison of measurements taken by ViLLaGEs of the power spectrum of a plate and the real sky turbulence. The plate is demonstrated to follow Kolmogorov theory well, while the sky power spectrum does so in a third of the data. This method of fabricating phase plates has been established as an effective and low-cost means of creating simulated turbulence. Due to the demand for such devices, they are now being distributed to other members of the AO community. The second topic of this thesis pertains to understanding and

  11. Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngada, N M

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and cost of building and running high-power electrical systems make the use of simulations unavoidable. The simulations available today provide great understanding about how systems really operate. This paper helps the reader to gain an insight into simulation in the field of power converters for particle accelerators. Starting with the definition and basic principles of simulation, two simulation types, as well as their leading tools, are presented: analog and numerical simulations. Some practical applications of each simulation type are also considered. The final conclusion then summarizes the main important items to keep in mind before opting for a simulation tool or before performing a simulation.

  12. Science-Based Approach for Advancing Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy: Integrating Numerical Simulations with Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, F.; Kang, S.; Chamorro, L. P.; Hill, C.

    2011-12-01

    The field of MHK energy is still in its infancy lagging approximately a decade or more behind the technology and development progress made in wind energy engineering. Marine environments are characterized by complex topography and three-dimensional (3D) turbulent flows, which can greatly affect the performance and structural integrity of MHK devices and impact the Levelized Cost of Energy (LCoE). Since the deployment of multi-turbine arrays is envisioned for field applications, turbine-to-turbine interactions and turbine-bathymetry interactions need to be understood and properly modeled so that MHK arrays can be optimized on a site specific basis. Furthermore, turbulence induced by MHK turbines alters and interacts with the nearby ecosystem and could potentially impact aquatic habitats. Increased turbulence in the wake of MHK devices can also change the shear stress imposed on the bed ultimately affecting the sediment transport and suspension processes in the wake of these structures. Such effects, however, remain today largely unexplored. In this work a science-based approach integrating state-of-the-art experimentation with high-resolution computational fluid dynamics is proposed as a powerful strategy for optimizing the performance of MHK devices and assessing environmental impacts. A novel numerical framework is developed for carrying out Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) in arbitrarily complex domains with embedded MHK devices. The model is able to resolve the geometrical complexity of real-life MHK devices using the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method along with a wall model for handling the flow near solid surfaces. Calculations are carried out for an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of rectangular open channel on a grid with nearly 200 million grid nodes. The approach flow corresponds to fully developed turbulent open channel flow and is obtained from a separate LES calculation. The specific case corresponds to that studied

  13. Reactor fault simulation at the closure of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor: analysis of reactor transient tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing of fault transient analysis methods by direct simulation of fault sequences on a commercial reactor is clearly excluded on safety and economic grounds. The closure of the Windscale prototype advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) therefore offered a unique opportunity to test fault study methods under extreme conditions relatively unfettered by economic constraints, although subject to appropriate safety regulations. One aspect of these important experiments was a series of reactor transient tests. The objective of these reactor transients was to increase confidence in the fault study computer models used for commercial AGR safety assessment by extending their range of validation to cover large amplitude and fast transients in temperature, power and flow, relevant to CAGR faults, and well beyond the conditions achievable experimentally on commercial reactors. A large number of tests have now been simulated with the fault study code KINAGRAX. Agreement with measurement is very good and sensitivity studies show that such discrepancies as exist may be due largely to input data errors. It is concluded that KINAGRAX is able to predict steady state conditions and transient amplitudes in both power and temperature to within a few percent. (author)

  14. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - integrated multi-scale multi-physics hierarchical modeling and simulation framework Part III: cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tome, Carlos N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, J A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lebensohn, R A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arsenlis, A [LLNL; Marian, J [LLNL; Pasamehmetoglu, K [INL

    2010-01-01

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Reactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems to develop predictive tools is critical. Not only are fabrication and performance models needed to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. In this paper we review the current status of the advanced modeling and simulation of nuclear reactor cladding, with emphasis on what is available and what is to be developed in each scale of the project, how we propose to pass information from one scale to the next, and what experimental information is required for benchmarking and advancing the modeling at each scale level.

  15. Simulation of the hybrid Tunka Advanced International Gamma-ray and Cosmic ray Astrophysics (TAIGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnas, M.; Astapov, I.; Barbashina, N.; Beregnev, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bogorodskii, D.; Boreyko, V.; Brückner, M.; Budnev, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Chvalaev, O.; Dyachok, A.; Epimakhov, S.; Eremin, T.; Gafarov, A.; Gorbunov, N.; Grebenyuk, V.; Gress, O.; Gress, T.; Grinyuk, A.; Grishin, O.; Horns, D.; Ivanova, A.; Karpov, N.; Kalmykov, N.; Kazarina, Y.; Kindin, V.; Kirichkov, N.; Kiryuhin, S.; Kokoulin, R.; Kompaniets, K.; Konstantinov, E.; Korobchenko, A.; Korosteleva, E.; Kozhin, V.; Kuzmichev, L.; Lenok, V.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lubsandorzhiev, N.; Mirgazov, R.; Mirzoyan, R.; Monkhoev, R.; Nachtigall, R.; Pakhorukov, A.; Panasyuk, M.; Pankov, L.; Perevalov, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Platonov, V.; Poleschuk, V.; Popescu, M.; Popova, E.; Porelli, A.; Porokhovoy, S.; Prosin, V.; Ptuskin, V.; Romanov, V.; Rubtsov, G. I.; Müger; Rybov, E.; Samoliga, V.; Satunin, P.; Saunkin, A.; Savinov, V.; Semeney, Yu; Shaibonov (junior, B.; Silaev, A.; Silaev (junior, A.; Skurikhin, A.; Slunecka, M.; Spiering, C.; Sveshnikova, L.; Tabolenko, V.; Tkachenko, A.; Tkachev, L.; Tluczykont, M.; Veslopopov, A.; Veslopopova, E.; Voronov, D.; Wischnewski, R.; Yashin, I.; Yurin, K.; Zagorodnikov, A.; Zirakashvili, V.; Zurbanov, V.

    2015-08-01

    Up to several 10s of TeV, Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) have proven to be the instruments of choice for GeV/TeV gamma-ray astronomy due to their good reconstrucion quality and gamma-hadron separation power. However, sensitive observations at and above 100 TeV require very large effective areas (10 km2 and more), which is difficult and expensive to achieve. The alternative to IACTs are shower front sampling arrays (non-imaging technique or timing-arrays) with a large area and a wide field of view. Such experiments provide good core position, energy and angular resolution, but only poor gamma-hadron separation. Combining both experimental approaches, using the strengths of both techniques, could optimize the sensitivity to the highest energies. The TAIGA project plans to combine the non-imaging HiSCORE [8] array with small (∼10m2) imaging telescopes. This paper covers simulation results of this hybrid approach.

  16. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-07-14

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society.

  17. Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

    2014-08-13

    Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

  18. Advancement in polarimetric glucose sensing: simulation and measurement of birefringence properties of cornea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bilal H.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical guidelines dictate that frequent blood glucose monitoring in diabetic patients is critical towards proper management of the disease. Although, several different types of glucose monitors are now commercially available, most of these devices are invasive, thereby adversely affecting patient compliance. To this end, optical polarimetric glucose sensing through the eye has been proposed as a potential noninvasive means to aid in the control of diabetes. Arguably, the most critical and limiting factor towards successful application of such a technique is the time varying corneal birefringence due to eye motion artifact. We present a spatially variant uniaxial eye model to serve as a tool towards better understanding of the cornea's birefringence properties. The simulations show that index-unmatched coupling of light is spatially limited to a smaller range when compared to the index-matched situation. Polarimetric measurements on rabbits' eyes indicate relative agreement between the modeled and experimental values of corneal birefringence. In addition, the observed rotation in the plane of polarized light for multiple wavelengths demonstrates the potential for using a dual-wavelength polarimetric approach to overcome the noise due to timevarying corneal birefringence. These results will ultimately aid us in the development of an appropriate eye coupling mechanism for in vivo polarimetric glucose measurements.

  19. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONALMETHODS FOR COMPLEX SIMULATION OF THERMAL PROCESSES IN POWER ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto V. Filkoski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The overall frame and principal steps of complex numerical modelling of thermal processes in power boiler furnaces on pulverised coal with tangential disposition of the burners are presented in the paper. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD technique is used as a tool to perform comprehensive thermal analysis in two test cases. The methodology for creation of three-dimensional models of boiler furnaces is briefly described. Standard steady k- model is employed for description of the turbulent flow. The coupling of continuity and momentum is achieved by the SIMPLEC method. Coal combustion is modelled by the mixture fraction/probability density function approach for the reaction chemistry, with equilibrium assumption applied for description of the system chemistry. Thermal radiation is computed by means of the simplified P-N model, based on expansion of the radiation intensity into an orthogonal series of spherical harmonics.Comparison between the simulation predictions and available site measurements leads to a conclusion that the model produces realistic insight into the furnace processes. Qualitative agreement of the results indicates reasonability of the calculations and validates the employed sub-models. The described test cases and other experiences with CFD modelling stress the advantages over a purely field data study, such as the ability to quickly and cheaply analyse a variety of design options without actually modifying the object and the availability of significantly more data to interpret the results.

  20. Recent advances in radiation transport simulation capabilities at Point Lepreau Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of SCALE 4.3 and the ITS 3.0 codes by Atlantic Nuclear Services Ltd. for the Point Lepreau Generating Station offers an efficient and accurate means to solve radiation transport problems in many diverse areas, including health physics, plant operation and accident analysis. Two recent studies demonstrate the usefulness of these tow code suites for solving highly complex problems involving channel decay heat following shut-down and hydrogen radiolysis in containment, following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). This paper summarizes the application of the SCALE 4.3 and ITS 3.0 codes in modelling and simulation in these studies. The objective of the decay heat study was to determine the distribution of heat in the fuel channel and its surrounding after a reactor shutdown. The purpose of the study of hydrogen radiolysis occurring in containment, following a LOCA was to determine the production rate of hydrogen gas in the sump water in the reactor building

  1. An advanced object-based software framework for complex ecosystem modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sydelko, P. J.; Dolph, J. E.; Majerus, K. A.; Taxon, T. N.

    2000-06-29

    Military land managers and decision makers face an ever increasing challenge to balance maximum flexibility for the mission with a diverse set of multiple land use, social, political, and economic goals. In addition, these goals encompass environmental requirements for maintaining ecosystem health and sustainability over the long term. Spatiotemporal modeling and simulation in support of adaptive ecosystem management can be best accomplished through a dynamic, integrated, and flexible approach that incorporates scientific and technological components into a comprehensive ecosystem modeling framework. The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) integrates ecological models and decision support techniques through a geographic information system (GIS)-based backbone. Recently, an object-oriented (OO) architectural framework was developed for IDLAMS (OO-IDLAMS). This OO-IDLAMS Prototype was built upon and leverages from the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) developed by Argonne National Laboratory. DIAS is an object-based architectural framework that affords a more integrated, dynamic, and flexible approach to comprehensive ecosystem modeling than was possible with the GIS-based integration approach of the original IDLAMS. The flexibility, dynamics, and interoperability demonstrated through this case study of an object-oriented approach have the potential to provide key technology solutions for many of the military's multiple-use goals and needs for integrated natural resource planning and ecosystem management.

  2. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  3. Development of an advanced real time simulation tool, ARTIST and its verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Cheol; Moon, S. K.; Yoon, B. J.; Sim, S. K.; Lee, W. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    A real time reactor system analysis code ARTIST, based on drift flux model has been developed to investigate the transient system behavior under low pressure, low flow and low power conditions with noncondensable gas present in the system. The governing equations of the ARTIST code consist of three mass continuity equations (steam, liquid and noncondensables), two energy equations (steam and mixture) and one mixture equation constituted with the drift flux model. The drift flux model of ARTIST has been validated against the THETIS experimental data by comparing the void distribution in the system. Especially, the calculated void fraction by Chexal-Lellouche void fraction correlation at low pressure and low flow, is better than the results of both the homogeneous model of TASS code and the two-fluid model of RELAP5/MOD3 code. When noncondensable gas exists, thermal-hydraulic state solution scheme and the calculation methods of the partial derivatives are developed. Numerical consistency and convergence was tested with the one volume problems and the manometric oscillation was assessed to examine the calculation methods of the partial derivatives. Calculated thermal-hydraulic state for each test shows the consistent and expected behaviour. In order to evaluate the ARTIST code capability in predicting the two phase thermal-hydraulic phenomena of the loss of RHR accident during midloop operation, BETHSY test 6.9d is simulated. From the results, it is judged that the reflux condensation model and the critical flow model for the noncondensable gas are necessary to correctly predict the thermal-hydraulic behaviour. Finally, the verification run was performed without the drift flux model and the noncondensable gas model for the postulated accidents of the real plants. The ARTIST code well reproduces the parametric trends which are calculated by TASS code. Therefore, the integrity of ARTIST code was verified. 35 refs., 70 figs., 3 tabs. (Author)

  4. An advanced disruption predictor for JET tested in a simulated real-time environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattá, G. A.; Vega, J.; Murari, A.; Vagliasindi, G.; Johnson, M. F.; de Vries, P. C.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2010-02-01

    Disruptions are sudden and unavoidable losses of confinement that may put at risk the integrity of a tokamak. However, the physical phenomena leading to disruptions are very complex and non-linear and therefore no satisfactory model has been devised so far either for their avoidance or their prediction. For this reason, machine learning techniques have been extensively pursued in the last years. In this paper a real-time predictor specifically developed for JET and based on support vector machines is presented. The main aim of the present investigation is to obtain high recognition rates in a real-time simulated environment. To this end the predictor has been tested on the time slices of entire discharges exactly as in real world operation. Since the year 2000, the experiments at JET have been organized in campaigns named sequentially beginning with campaign C1. In this paper results from campaign C1 (year 2000) and up to C19 (year 2007) are reported. The predictor has been trained with data from JET's campaigns up to C7 with particular attention to reducing the number of missed alarms, which are less than 1%, for a test set of discharges from the same campaigns used for the training. The false alarms plus premature alarms are of the order of 6.4%, for a total success rate of more than 92%. The robustness of the predictor has been proven by testing it with a wide subset of shots of more recent campaigns (from C8 to C19) without any retraining. The success rate over the period between C8 and C14 is on average 88% and never falls below 82%, confirming the good generalization capabilities of the developed technique. After C14, significant modifications were implemented on JET and its diagnostics and consequently the success rates of the predictor between C15 and C19 decays to an average of 79%. Finally, the performance of the developed detection system has been compared with the predictions of the JET protection system (JPS). The new predictor clearly outperforms JPS

  5. An advanced disruption predictor for JET tested in a simulated real-time environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disruptions are sudden and unavoidable losses of confinement that may put at risk the integrity of a tokamak. However, the physical phenomena leading to disruptions are very complex and non-linear and therefore no satisfactory model has been devised so far either for their avoidance or their prediction. For this reason, machine learning techniques have been extensively pursued in the last years. In this paper a real-time predictor specifically developed for JET and based on support vector machines is presented. The main aim of the present investigation is to obtain high recognition rates in a real-time simulated environment. To this end the predictor has been tested on the time slices of entire discharges exactly as in real world operation. Since the year 2000, the experiments at JET have been organized in campaigns named sequentially beginning with campaign C1. In this paper results from campaign C1 (year 2000) and up to C19 (year 2007) are reported. The predictor has been trained with data from JET's campaigns up to C7 with particular attention to reducing the number of missed alarms, which are less than 1%, for a test set of discharges from the same campaigns used for the training. The false alarms plus premature alarms are of the order of 6.4%, for a total success rate of more than 92%. The robustness of the predictor has been proven by testing it with a wide subset of shots of more recent campaigns (from C8 to C19) without any retraining. The success rate over the period between C8 and C14 is on average 88% and never falls below 82%, confirming the good generalization capabilities of the developed technique. After C14, significant modifications were implemented on JET and its diagnostics and consequently the success rates of the predictor between C15 and C19 decays to an average of 79%. Finally, the performance of the developed detection system has been compared with the predictions of the JET protection system (JPS). The new predictor clearly outperforms JPS

  6. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    for software development and applications accounts for the natural domain areas (beam dynamics, electromagnetics, and advanced acceleration), and all areas depend on the enabling technologies activities, such as solvers and component technology, to deliver the desired performance and integrated simulation environment. The ComPASS applications focus on computationally challenging problems important for design or performance optimization to all major HEP, NP, and BES accelerator facilities. With the cost and complexity of particle accelerators rising, the use of computation to optimize their designs and find improved operating regimes becomes essential, potentially leading to significant cost savings with modest investment.

  7. Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Steve

    2013-09-11

    Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

  8. Advancements for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obland, M. D.; Nehrir, A. R.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Kooi, S. A.; Choi, Y.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.; Antill, C.; Campbell, J. F.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.; Meadows, B.; Dobler, J. T.; Zaccheo, T. S.; Moore, B., III; Crowell, S.

    2014-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave lidar system recently developed at NASA Langley Research Center that seeks to advance technologies and techniques critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. These advancements include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. ACES simultaneously transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1571 nm, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1260 nm. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number densities and retrieve the average column CO2 mixing ratio. The outgoing laser beams are aligned to the field of view of ACES' three fiber-coupled 17.8-cm diameter athermal telescopes. The backscattered light collected by the three telescopes is sent to the detector/TIA subsystem, which has a bandwidth of 4.7 MHz and operates service-free using a tactical dewar and cryocooler. Two key laser modulation approaches are being tested to significantly mitigate the effects of thin clouds on the retrieved CO2 column amounts. Full instrument development concluded in the

  9. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control design of an advanced micro-hydro power plant for distributed generation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, J.L. [Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste 1109, J5400ARL San Juan (Argentina); Molina, M.G. [CONICET, Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste 1109, J5400ARL San Juan (Argentina); Pacas, J.M. [Institut fuer Leistungselektronik und Elektrische Antriebe, Universitaet Siegen, Fachbereich 12 Hoelderlinstr 3, D 57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    A small-scale hydropower station is usually a run-of-river plant that uses a fixed speed drive with mechanical regulation of the turbine water flow rate for controlling the active power generation. This design enables to reach high efficiency over a wide range of water flows but using a complex operating mechanism, which is in consequence expensive and tend to be more affordable for large systems. This paper proposes an advanced structure of a micro-hydro power plant (MHPP) based on a smaller, lighter, more robust and more efficient higher-speed turbine. The suggested design is much simpler and eliminates all mechanical adjustments through a novel electronic power conditioning system for connection to the electric grid. In this way, it allows obtaining higher reliability and lower cost of the power plant. A full detailed model of the MHPP is derived and a new three-level control scheme is designed. The dynamic performance of the proposed MHPP is validated through digital simulations and employing a small-scale experimental set-up. (author)

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  11. Leveraging data analytics, patterning simulations and metrology models to enhance CD metrology accuracy for advanced IC nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Narender; Zhang, Yunlin; Kagalwala, Taher; Hu, Lin; Bailey, Todd

    2014-04-01

    Integrated Circuit (IC) technology is changing in multiple ways: 193i to EUV exposure, planar to non-planar device architecture, from single exposure lithography to multiple exposure and DSA patterning etc. Critical dimension (CD) control requirement is becoming stringent and more exhaustive: CD and process window are shrinking., three sigma CD control of patterning. The accuracy of CD-AFM is ~1 nm and precision in TEM is poor due to limited statistics. CD-SEM, scatterometry and MBIR need to be calibrated by reference measurements for ensuring the accuracy of patterned CDs and patterning models. There is a dire need of measurement with patterning simulation and metrology models, and data integration techniques to selected applications demonstrating the potential solution and practicality of such an approach to enhance CD metrology accuracy. Data from multiple metrology techniques has been analyzed in multiple ways to extract information with associated uncertainties and integrated to extract the useful and more accurate CD and profile information of the structures. This paper presents the optimization of scatterometry and MBIR model calibration and feasibility to extrapolate not only in design and process space but from one process step to a previous process step. Well calibrated scatterometry model or patterning simulation model can be used to accurately extrapolate and interpolate in the design and process space for lithography patterning where AFM is not capable to accurately measure sub-40 nm trenches. Uncertainty associated with extrapolation can be large and needs to be minimized. We have made use of measurements from CD-SEM and CD-AFM, along with the patterning and scatterometry simulation models to estimate the uncertainty associated with extrapolation and methods to reduce it. First time we have reported the application of machine learning (Artificial Neural Networks) to the resist shrinkage systematic phenomenon to accurately predict the preshrink CD

  12. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D L

    2009-05-01

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex

  13. Editorial, Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because plasma-boundary physics encompasses some of the most important unresolved issues for both the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and future fusion power reactors, there is a strong interest in the fusion community for better understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interactions. Chemical and physical sputtering cause the erosion of the limiters/divertor plates and vacuum vessel walls (made of C, Be and W, for example) and degrade fusion performance by diluting the fusion fuel and excessively cooling the core, while carbon redeposition could produce long-term in-vessel tritium retention, degrading the superior thermo-mechanical properties of the carbon materials. Mixed plasma-facing materials are proposed, requiring optimization for different power and particle flux characteristics. Knowledge of material properties as well as characteristics of the plasma-material interaction are prerequisites for such optimizations. Computational power will soon reach hundreds of teraflops, so that theoretical and plasma science expertise can be matched with new experimental capabilities in order to mount a strong response to these challenges. To begin to address such questions, a Workshop on New Directions for Advanced Computer Simulations and Experiments in Fusion-Related Plasma-Surface Interactions for Fusion (PSIF) was held at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 21 to 23 March, 2005. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers in fusion related plasma-wall interactions in order to address these topics and to identify the most needed and promising directions for study, to exchange opinions on the present depth of knowledge of surface properties for the main fusion-related materials, e.g., C, Be and W, especially for sputtering, reflection, and deuterium (tritium) retention properties. The goal was to suggest the most important next steps needed for such basic computational and experimental work to be facilitated

  14. Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Complex Networked Systems: A Program Plan for DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many complex systems of importance to the U.S. Department of Energy consist of networks of discrete components. Examples are cyber networks, such as the internet and local area networks over which nearly all DOE scientific, technical and administrative data must travel, the electric power grid, social networks whose behavior can drive energy demand, and biological networks such as genetic regulatory networks and metabolic networks. In spite of the importance of these complex networked systems to all aspects of DOE's operations, the scientific basis for understanding these systems lags seriously behind the strong foundations that exist for the 'physically-based' systems usually associated with DOE research programs that focus on such areas as climate modeling, fusion energy, high-energy and nuclear physics, nano-science, combustion, and astrophysics. DOE has a clear opportunity to develop a similarly strong scientific basis for understanding the structure and dynamics of networked systems by supporting a strong basic research program in this area. Such knowledge will provide a broad basis for, e.g., understanding and quantifying the efficacy of new security approaches for computer networks, improving the design of computer or communication networks to be more robust against failures or attacks, detecting potential catastrophic failure on the power grid and preventing or mitigating its effects, understanding how populations will respond to the availability of new energy sources or changes in energy policy, and detecting subtle vulnerabilities in large software systems to intentional attack. This white paper outlines plans for an aggressive new research program designed to accelerate the advancement of the scientific basis for complex networked systems of importance to the DOE. It will focus principally on four research areas: (1) understanding network structure, (2) understanding network dynamics, (3) predictive modeling and simulation for complex networked systems

  15. Evaluation of materials' corrosion and chemistry issues for advanced gas cooled reactor steam generators using full scale plant simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRS) employ once-through steam Generators of unique design to provide steam at approximately 530 degrees C and 155 bar to steam turbines of similar design to those of fossil plants. The steam generators are highly compact, and have either a serpentine or helical tube geometry. The tubes are heated on the outside by hot C02 gas, and steam is generated on the inside of the tubes. Each individual steam generator tube consists of a carbon steel feed and primary economiser section, a 9%Cr steel secondary economiser, evaporator and primary superheater, and a Type 316L austenitic stainless steel secondary superheater, all within a single tube pass. The multi-material nature of the individual tube passes, the need to maintain specific thermohydraulic conditions within the different material sections, and the difficulties of steam generator inspection and repair, have required extensive corrosion-chemistry test programmes to ensure waterside corrosion does not present a challenge to their integrity. A major part of these programmes has been the use of a full scale steam generator test facility capable of simulating all aspects of the waterside conditions which exist in the plant. This facility has been used to address a wide variety of possible plant drainage/degradation processes. These include; single- and two-phase flow accelerated corrosion of carbon steel, superheat margins requirements and the stress-corrosion behaviour of the austenitic superheaters, on-load corrosion of the evaporator materials, and iron transport and oxide deposition behaviour. The paper outlines a number of these, and indicates how they have been of value in helping to maintain reliable operation of the plant. (author)

  16. In-Service Design and Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final report on ''In-Service Design and Performance Prediction of Advanced Fusion Material Systems by Computational Modeling and Simulation'' (DE-FG03-01ER54632) consists of a series of summaries of work that has been published, or presented at meetings, or both. It briefly describes results on the following topics: (1) A Transport and Fate Model for Helium and Helium Management; (2) Atomistic Studies of Point Defect Energetics, Dynamics and Interactions; (3) Multiscale Modeling of Fracture consisting of: (3a) A Micromechanical Model of the Master Curve (MC) Universal Fracture Toughness-Temperature Curve Relation, KJc(T - To), (3b) An Embrittlement DTo Prediction Model for the Irradiation Hardening Dominated Regime, (3c) Non-hardening Irradiation Assisted Thermal and Helium Embrittlement of 8Cr Tempered Martensitic Steels: Compilation and Analysis of Existing Data, (3d) A Model for the KJc(T) of a High Strength NFA MA957, (3e) Cracked Body Size and Geometry Effects of Measured and Effective Fracture Toughness-Model Based MC and To Evaluations of F82H and Eurofer 97, (3f) Size and Geometry Effects on the Effective Toughness of Cracked Fusion Structures; (4) Modeling the Multiscale Mechanics of Flow Localization-Ductility Loss in Irradiation Damaged BCC Alloys; and (5) A Universal Relation Between Indentation Hardness and True Stress-Strain Constitutive Behavior. Further details can be found in the cited references or presentations that generally can be accessed on the internet, or provided upon request to the authors. Finally, it is noted that this effort was integrated with our base program in fusion materials, also funded by the DOE OFES

  17. Understanding advances in the simulation of intraseasonal variability in the ECMWF model. Part II: the application of process-based diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    L. C. Hirons; Inness, P.; F. Vitart; Bechtold , P.

    2013-01-01

    In Part I of this study it was shown that moving from a moisture-convergent- to a relative-humidity-dependent organized entrainment rate in the formulation for deep convection was responsible for significant advances in the simulation of the Madden – Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the ECMWF model. However, the application of traditional MJO diagnostics were not adequate to understand why changing the control on convection had such a pronounced impact on the representation of the ...

  18. Computer programs for capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes for laser fusion and other advanced technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three FORTRAN programs, CAPITAL, VENTURE, and INDEXER, have been developed to automate computations used in assessing the economic viability of proposed or conceptual laser fusion and other advanced-technology facilities, as well as conventional projects. The types of calculations performed by these programs are, respectively, capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes. The codes permit these three topics to be addressed with considerable sophistication commensurate with user requirements and available data

  19. Interactive Graphic Simulation: An Advanced Methodology to Improve the Teaching-Learning Process in Nuclear Engineering Education and Training

    OpenAIRE

    Ahnert Iglesias, Carolina; Cuervo Gómez, Diana; García Herranz, Nuria; Cabellos de Francisco, Oscar Luis; Gallego Díaz, Eduardo F.; Mínguez Torres, Emilio; Lorente, A; Piedra, David; Rebollo, Luis; J Blanco

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, computer simulators are becoming basic tools for education and training in many engineering fields. In the nuclear industry, the role of simulation for training of operators of nuclear power plants is also recognized of the utmost relevance. As an example, the International Atomic Energy Agency sponsors the development of nuclear reactor simulators for education, and arranges the supply of such simulation programs. Aware of this, in 2008 Gas Natural Fenosa, a Spanish gas...

  20. A Quick-Simulation Tool for Induction Motor Drives Controlled Using Advanced Space-Vector-Based PWM Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Hari, Pavan Kumar VSS; Narayanan, G.

    2013-01-01

    Space-vector-based pulse width modulation (PWM) for a voltage source inverter (VSI) offers flexibility in terms of different switching sequences. Numerical simulation is helpful to assess the performance of a PWM method before actual implementation. A quick-simulation tool to simulate a variety of space-vector-based PWM strategies for a two-level VSI-fed squirrel cage induction motor drive is presented. The simulator is developed using C and Python programming languages, and has a graphica...

  1. Effect of High-Fidelity Simulation on Medical Students' Knowledge about Advanced Life Support: A Randomized Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cortegiani

    Full Text Available High-fidelity simulation (HFS is a learning method which has proven effective in medical education for technical and non-technical skills. However, its effectiveness for knowledge acquisition is less validated. We performed a randomized study with the primary aim of investigating whether HFS, in association with frontal lessons, would improve knowledge about advanced life support (ALS, in comparison to frontal lessons only among medical students. The secondary aims were to evaluate the effect of HFS on knowledge acquisition of different sections of ALS and personal knowledge perception. Participants answered a pre-test questionnaire consisting of a subjective (evaluating personal perception of knowledge and an objective section (measuring level of knowledge containing 100 questions about algorithms, technical skills, team working/early warning scores/communication strategies according to ALS guidelines. All students participated in 3 frontal lessons before being randomized in group S, undergoing a HFS session, and group C, receiving no further interventions. After 10 days from the end of each intervention, both groups answered a questionnaire (post-test with the same subjective section but a different objective one. The overall number of correct answers of the post-test was significantly higher in group S (mean 74.1, SD 11.2 than in group C (mean 65.5, SD 14.3, p = 0.0017, 95% C.I. 3.34 - 13.9. A significantly higher number of correct answers was reported in group S than in group C for questions investigating knowledge of algorithms (p = 0.0001; 95% C.I 2.22-5.99 and team working/early warning scores/communication strategies (p = 0.0060; 95% C.I 1.13-6.53. Students in group S showed a significantly higher score in the post-test subjective section (p = 0.0074. A lower proportion of students in group S confirmed their perception of knowledge compared to group C (p = 0.0079. HFS showed a beneficial effect on knowledge of ALS among medical students

  2. Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gould, Derek A; Chalmers, Nicholas; Johnson, Sheena J;

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of the many limitations of traditional apprenticeship training is driving new approaches to learning medical procedural skills. Among simulation technologies and methods available today, computer-based systems are topical and bring the benefits of automated, repeatable, and reliable...... performance assessments. Human factors research is central to simulator model development that is relevant to real-world imaging-guided interventional tasks and to the credentialing programs in which it would be used....

  3. Advanced nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Razali

    2012-01-01

    While theories based on classical physics have been very successful in helping experimentalists design microelectronic devices, new approaches based on quantum mechanics are required to accurately model nanoscale transistors and to predict their characteristics even before they are fabricated. Advanced Nanoelectronics provides research information on advanced nanoelectronics concepts, with a focus on modeling and simulation. Featuring contributions by researchers actively engaged in nanoelectronics research, it develops and applies analytical formulations to investigate nanoscale devices. The

  4. High-fidelity Simulation of Jet Noise from Rectangular Nozzles . [Large Eddy Simulation (LES) Model for Noise Reduction in Advanced Jet Engines and Automobiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    This Phase II project validated a state-of-the-art LES model, coupled with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FW-H) far-field acoustic solver, to support the development of advanced engine concepts. These concepts include innovative flow control strategies to attenuate jet noise emissions. The end-to-end LES/ FW-H noise prediction model was demonstrated and validated by applying it to rectangular nozzle designs with a high aspect ratio. The model also was validated against acoustic and flow-field data from a realistic jet-pylon experiment, thereby significantly advancing the state of the art for LES.

  5. Grid-Free LES 3D Vortex Method for the Simulation of Tubulent Flows Over Advanced Lifting Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Turbulent flows associated with advanced aerodynamic designs represent a considerable challenge for accurate prediction. For example, the flow past low-speed wings...

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of a Bonner sphere spectrometer for application to the determination of neutron field in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak experimental hall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z M; Xie, X F; Chen, Z J; Peng, X Y; Du, T F; Cui, Z Q; Ge, L J; Li, T; Yuan, X; Zhang, X; Hu, L Q; Zhong, G Q; Lin, S Y; Wan, B N; Gorini, G; Li, X Q; Zhang, G H; Chen, J X; Fan, T S

    2014-11-01

    To assess the neutron energy spectra and the neutron dose for different positions around the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) device, a Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was developed at Peking University, with totally nine polyethylene spheres and a SP9 (3)He counter. The response functions of the BSS were calculated by the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and GEANT4 with dedicated models, and good agreement was found between these two codes. A feasibility study was carried out with a simulated neutron energy spectrum around EAST, and the simulated "experimental" result of each sphere was obtained by calculating the response with MCNP, which used the simulated neutron energy spectrum as the input spectrum. With the deconvolution of the "experimental" measurement, the neutron energy spectrum was retrieved and compared with the preset one. Good consistence was found which offers confidence for the application of the BSS system for dose and spectrum measurements around a fusion device. PMID:25430324

  7. Study and Development of a Simulation System for Dynamic Evaluation on Man-machine Interface Design of Advanced Main Control Rooms of Nuclear Power Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangXiaojing; ZhouZhiwei; ChenXiaoming; MaYuanle; LiFu; DongYujie; WuWei; OhiTadashi

    2005-01-01

    Since the man-machine interfaces (MMI) of a main control room provide the control platform of a nuclear power plant (NPP),the development of the design quality of MMIs plays a very important role in the operation of a NPP. With the development of digital technology, the development of the advanced main control rooms (AMCRs) has become an inexorable trend. Therefore, the positive and the negative effects of AMCRs on human factors engineering need to be evaluated. For this p~, a simulation system has been studied and developed to quantitatively evaluate a MMI design from the viewpoint of human factors. The simulation system takes advantage of computer simulation technology to simulate an operating process of an interaction between operators and a MMI design under an instruction of an operation procedure of the AMCR of a NPP. Meanwhile, the necessary data are recorded for evaluation. It integrates two editors and one simulator. In the paper, the simulation system is presented in detail. Furthermore, one sample is given to show the results of each of these three subsystems.

  8. Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sheldon

    2006-01-01

    Ross's Simulation, Fourth Edition introduces aspiring and practicing actuaries, engineers, computer scientists and others to the practical aspects of constructing computerized simulation studies to analyze and interpret real phenomena. Readers learn to apply results of these analyses to problems in a wide variety of fields to obtain effective, accurate solutions and make predictions about future outcomes. This text explains how a computer can be used to generate random numbers, and how to use these random numbers to generate the behavior of a stochastic model over time. It presents the statist

  9. Recent advances on simulation and theory of hydrogen storage in metal–organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Sang Soo; Mendoza-Cortés, José L.; Goddard, William A.

    2009-01-01

    This critical review covers the application of computer simulations, including quantum calculations (ab initio and DFT), grand canonical Monte-Carlo simulations, and molecular dynamics simulations, to the burgeoning area of the hydrogen storage by metal–organic frameworks and covalent-organic frameworks. This review begins with an overview of the theoretical methods obtained from previous studies. Then strategies for the improvement of hydrogen storage in the porous materials are discussed in...

  10. Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-12-31

    This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer

  11. Advancing Virtual Patient Simulations through Design Research and InterPLAY: Part I--Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Kleinsmith, Andrea; Johnsen, Kyle; Kubovec, Stacey; Eakins, Michael; Bogert, Kenneth; Rivera-Gutierrez, Diego J.; Reyes, Ramsamooj Javier; Lok, Benjamin; Cendan, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled studies conclude that virtual patient simulations are consistently associated with higher learning outcomes compared to other educational methods. However, we cannot assume that students will learn from simply exposing students to the simulations. The instructional features that are…

  12. Modeling and Event-Driven Simulation of Coordinated Multi-Point in LTE-Advanced with Constrained Backhaul

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artuso, Matteo; Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    multi-point joint transmission (CoMP JT). Field tests are generally considered impractical and costly for CoMP JT, therefore the need to provide a comprehensive and high-fidelity computer model to understand the impact of different design attributes and the applicability use cases. This paper presents a...... novel approach to the modelling and simulation of an LTE-A system with CoMP JT by means of discrete event simulation (DES) using OPNET modeler. Simulation results are provided for a full buffer traffic model and varying the characteristics of the interface between cooperating points. Gains of up to 120...

  13. Is the advanced trauma life support simulation exam more stressful for the surgeon than emergency department trauma care? O stress afeta cirurgiões durante o aprendizado tanto quanto na sua carreira profissional?

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Quilici; Renato Sergio Pogetti; Belchor Fontes; Luis Fernando Correa Zantut; Eliana Torrea Chaves; Dario Birolini

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress affects surgeons both during training and during professional activity. OBJECTIVE: To compare stress levels affecting surgical residents during the simulated initial assessment and management in the Advanced Trauma Life Support practical exam vs initial assessment and management of trauma patients in the emergency room. METHOD: Eighteen surgical residents were evaluated under basal conditions, during the Advanced Trauma Life Support simulation, and during emergency room ini...

  14. Advanced simulations of energy demand and indoor climate of passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    In building design the requirements for energy consumption for ventilation, heating and cooling and the requirements for increasingly better indoor climate are two opposing factors. This paper presents the schematic layout and simulation results of an innovative multifunctional ventilation concep...

  15. COUPLING STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE SUBSURFACE SIMULATION WITH ADVANCED USER INTERFACE AND PARALLEL VISUALIZATION: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a Phase I report on a project to significantly enhance existing subsurface simulation software using leadership-class computing resources, allowing researchers to solve problems with greater speed and accuracy. Subsurface computer simulation is used for monitoring the behavior of contaminants around nuclear waste disposal and storage areas, groundwater flow, environmental remediation, carbon sequestration, methane hydrate production, and geothermal energy reservoir analysis. The Phase I project was a collaborative effort between Thunderhead Engineering (project lead and developers of a commercial pre- and post-processor for the TOUGH2 simulator) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (developers of the TOUGH2 simulator for subsurface flow). The Phase I project successfully identified the technical approaches to be implemented in Phase II.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan. Part 2, Mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices. Version 1.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Molly A.; Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, 'ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines'. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  18. Design and simulation of an automation system of a production process and fractionation of 131I, using strategies of advanced control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the results are obtained in the design and simulation of a control system using advanced strategies in a production cell in the Plant Production of Radioisotopes of IPEN. The results demonstrate that the temperature of the coalition oven is stabilized after 30 minutes, being constituted in an advantage to obtain the maximum yield of the cell production of 131I; also, an integral good controller has been designed that allows to obtain a mathematical model that reproduces with enough accuracy the behavior of the process. With the final simulation it has been to demonstrate that the System Control of Temperature of the Cell Production of 131I is a controllable system and allows to carry out the respective sequence with other variables of control of the production cell. (author)

  19. A Design Method of System Level Simulation for LTE-Advanced%一种LTE-Advanced系统级仿真方法建模实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路兆铭; 温向明; 赵岩琨; 郑伟

    2011-01-01

    根据3GPP对4G无线通信系统性能提出的要求,通过系统建模,设计并搭建了LTE-Advanced无线通信系统仿真平台.该仿真平台主要包括地理拓扑、wrap-aronnd,大/小尺度衰落,干扰计算,自适应调制编码,HARQ,分组调度等功能模块.在仿真平台的建模过程中,应用了蒙特卡洛思想,对系统性能进行多次随机独立采样,统计采样结果作为有效数据.在VISUAL STUDIO 2008环境下搭建了LTE-Ad-vanced系统级仿真平台,并通过比较轮询算法和正比公平算法评估了仿真平台的性能,仿真结果表明,该系统级仿真平台达到了3GPP对系统设计的要求,为LTE-Advanced的标准化工作奠定了基础.%According to the 3GPP requirements for 4G wireless communication system performances,through modeling, the LTE-Advanced wireless simulation platform has been designed and built. This simulation platform includes geographical topology, Wrap-around, large small scale fading, adaptive modulation and coding, interference calculation,packet scheduling and HARQ module,etc. In the process of modeling simulation platform,the Monte Carlo method has been used. Through repeated random independent sampling on system performance, statistical performance is regarded as an effective result. Finally LTE-Advanced system level simulation platform is built in VISUAL STUDIO 2008,and the performance of simulation platform is estimated by comparing Round Robin and Proportional Fair scheduling algorithm. In terms of the results of simulation, the performance indices of simulation platform satisy the 3GPP system requirements.

  20. A novel approach to the design and optimisation of aluminium cast component heat treatment processes using advanced UMSA physical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of this publication is to present a new laboratory methodology for simulation of industrial melting, solidification and heat treatment using the patented Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer (UMSA Technology Platform [10]. Two examples to demonstrate UMSA’s capabilities are presented for optimized heat treatment processes at the request of the North American automotive industry.Design/methodology/approach: The unique UMSA Platform was used to rapidly physically simulate very complex industrial heat treatment processes using stationary macro test samples and computer controlled heating and cooling source.Findings: The UMSA simulations proved to be very accurate in order to simulate the non-linear temperature/time profile of the solidification process combined with the continuous heat treatment operation. Moreover, the complex industrial heat treatment process was successfully replicated for an 800g test sample and the targeted structural and mechanical properties were met.Research limitations/implications: Selected examples of the heat treatment have been presented for aluminum based alloys only. The current research addresses Mg and Ti based alloys and thermal processing under vacuum and inert/active environments.Practical implications: The presented methodology is capable of dissecting all processes and linking the cast component’s optimized performance with individual production steps. The technical capabilities of the UMSA Platform have been recognized and have already been applied by industrial partners.Originality/value: The simulation method that is presented here will greatly improve the ability of laboratory investigators to simulate and assess the effects of the heat treatment variables.

  1. Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

    2013-12-31

    The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of– state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a user’s guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

  2. Hybrid deterministic and stochastic x-ray transport simulation for transmission computed tomography with advanced detector noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Lucretiu M.

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for simulation of noisy X-ray computed tomography data sets. The model is made of two main components, a photon transport simulation component that generates the noiseless photon field incident on the detector, and a detector response model that takes as input the incident photon field parameters and given the X-ray source intensity and exposure time can generate noisy data sets, accordingly. The photon transport simulation component combines direct ray-tracing of polychromatic X-rays for calculation of transmitted data, with Monte Carlo simulation for calculation of the scattered-photon data. The Monte Carlo scatter simulation is accelerated by implementing particle splitting and importance sampling variance reduction techniques. The detector-incident photon field data are stored as energy expansion coefficients on a refined grid that covers the detector area. From these data the detector response model is able to generate noisy detector data realizations, by reconstituting the main parameters that describe each detector element response in statistical terms, including spatial correlations. The model is able to generate very fast, on the fly, CT data sets corresponding to different radiation doses, as well as detector response characteristics, facilitating data management in extensive optimization studies by reducing the computation time and storage space demands.

  3. An Advanced Robust AVR-PSS Based H2 and H∞ Frequency Approachs Simulated Under a Realized GUI

    OpenAIRE

    KABI Wahiba; GHOURAF Djamel Eddine; NACERI Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    This article present a comparative study between two advanced robust frequency control strategies and their implementation using our realised Graphical User Interface ‘GUI’ under MATLAB software: the first method based on loop-shaping H∞ optimization technique and the second on robust H2 control method (LQG controller associated with KALMAN filter), and applied on automatic excitation control of synchronous generators, to improve transient stability and robustness of a single machine- infinit...

  4. Advances in space target space-based optical imaging simulation%空间目标天基光学成像仿真研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩意; 孙华燕

    2012-01-01

    Space target optical imaging simulation has play an important role in the demonstration, design and performance evaluation of space-based optical observation system. The visible light and laser imaging simulation of space object were taken as research subjects, the general simulation research contents, key technologies and methods were discussed, the advances of foreign and domestic typical researches from three respects including laser imaging simulation, visible imaging simulation and hybrid imaging and detecting simulation were introduced. At last the development orientation were put forward, which can provide references for the next research thought and methods.%空间目标光学成像仿真在天基光学观测系统研制开发过程中具有重要的价值和意义.以天基空间目标的可见光和激光成像仿真为研究对象,分析了空间目标成像仿真的研究内容、关键技术和方法,重点介绍了天基空间目标激光成像仿真、可见光成像仿真与复合成像探测仿真研究方面的国内外典型研究单位的研究成果以及下一步的研究发展方向,可为空间目标成像仿真研究思路与方法提供借鉴.

  5. Designing and simulation smart multifunctional continuous logic device as a basic cell of advanced high-performance sensor systems with MIMO-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolskyy, Aleksandr I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a design and simulation of hardware realizations of smart multifunctional continuous logic devices (SMCLD) as advanced basic cells of the sensor systems with MIMO- structure for images processing and interconnection. The SMCLD realize function of two-valued, multi-valued and continuous logics with current inputs and current outputs. Such advanced basic cells realize function nonlinear time-pulse transformation, analog-to-digital converters and neural logic. We showed advantages of such elements. It's have a number of advantages: high speed and reliability, simplicity, small power consumption, high integration level. The conception of construction of SMCLD consists in the use of a current mirrors realized on 1.5μm technology CMOS transistors. Presence of 50÷70 transistors, 1 PD and 1 LED makes the offered circuits quite compact. The simulation results of NOT, MIN, MAX, equivalence (EQ), normalize summation, averaging and other functions, that implemented SMCLD, showed that the level of logical variables can change from 0.1μA to 10μA for low-power consumption variants. The SMCLD have low power consumption <1mW and processing time about 1÷11μS at supply voltage 2.4÷3.3V.

  6. r.avaflow: An advanced open source computational framework for the GIS-based simulation of two-phase mass flows and process chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, Martin; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Fellin, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Alexander; Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical mass flows stand for a broad range of processes and process chains such as flows and avalanches of snow, soil, debris or rock, and their interactions with water bodies resulting in flood waves. Despite considerable efforts put in model development, the simulation, and therefore the appropriate prediction of these types of events still remains a major challenge in terms of the complex material behaviour, strong phase interactions, process transformations and the complex mountain topography. Sophisticated theories exist, but they have hardly been brought to practice yet. We fill this gap by developing a novel and unified high-resolution computational tool, r.avaflow, representing a comprehensive and advanced open source GIS simulation environment for geophysical mass flows. Based on the latest and most advanced two-phase physical-mathematical models, r.avaflow includes the following features: (i) it is suitable for a broad spectrum of mass flows such as rock, rock-ice and snow avalanches, glacial lake outburst floods, debris and hyperconcentrated flows, and even landslide-induced tsunamis and submarine landslides, as well as process chains involving more than one of these phenomena; (ii) it accounts for the real two-phase nature of many flow types: viscous fluids and solid particles are considered separately with advanced mechanics and strong phase interactions; (iii) it is freely available and adoptable along with the GRASS GIS software. In the future, it will include the intrinsic topographic influences on the flow dynamics and morphology as well as an advanced approach to simulate the entrainment and deposition of solid and fluid material. As input r.avaflow needs information on (a) the mountain topography, (b) the material properties and (c) the spatial distribution of the solid and fluid release masses or one or more hydrographs of fluid and solid material. We demonstrate the functionalities and performance of r.avaflow by using some generic and real

  7. Advanced layout parameter extraction and detailed timing simulation of GaAs gate arrays in MagiCAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, Kevin J.; Rowlands, David O.; Prentice, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Barry K.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the features and function of three specific computer aided design tools contained in the Mayo Graphical Integrated Computer Aided Design (MagiCAD) system a complete electronic CAD software package optimized for the design and layout of semicustom (i. e. gate array) Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) integrated circuits. The first design tool the Layout Extractor processes data from placed and routed gate arrays. The Extractor verifies that the layout represents the original logic design and calculates the parasitic capacitance of the individual wiring segments in the logic nets after they have been routed. The capacitance information as calculated by the Layout Extractor is significant in GaAs work since the delay in signals traveling through the routing is often much greater than the delay of the signals traveling through the gates themselves. Once the capacitance data has been processed by the Layout Extractor it becomes available to the second CAD tool discussed here the MagiCAD timing simulation program Sting. Sting a digital event-driven simulator depends on user generation of C language-like behavioral models for all root nodes to be simulated. Through the use of delays calculated by the Extractor from the actual routing and input pin capacitances Sting assures that the entire chip design will operate correctly at the intended clock rate. The third design tool is a set of programs allowing simulation of the electromagnetic behavior of integrated circuit packages circuit

  8. Multi-Domain Modeling and Simulation of an Aircraft System for Advanced Vehicle-Level Reasoning Research and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    : F. Khan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a simulation based health monitoring system test-bed for aircraft systems. The purpose of the test-bed is to provide a technology neutral basis for implementing and evaluation of reasoning systems on vehicle level and software architecture in support of the safety and maintenance process. This simulation test-bed will provide the sub-system level results and data which can be fed to the VLRS to generate vehicle level reasoning to achieve broader level diagnoses. This paper describes real-time system architecture and concept of operations for the aircraft major sub-systems. The four main components in the real-time test-bed are the aircraft sub-systems (e.g. battery, fuel, engine, generator, heating and lighting system simulation model, fault insertion unit, health monitoring data processing and user interface. In this paper, we adopted a component based modelling paradigm for the implementation of the virtual aircraft systems. All of the fault injections are currently implemented via software. The fault insertion unit allows for the repeatable injection of faults into the system. The simulation test-bed has been tested with many different faults which were undetected on system level to process and detect on the vehicle level reasoning. This article also shows how one system fault can affect the overall health of the vehicle.

  9. High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2): Large Eddy Simulation Study Over Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipankar, A.; Stevens, B. B.; Zängl, G.; Pondkule, M.; Brdar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of clouds on large scale dynamics is represented in climate models through parameterization of various processes, of which the parameterization of shallow and deep convection are particularly uncertain. The atmospheric boundary layer, which controls the coupling to the surface, and which defines the scale of shallow convection, is typically 1 km in depth. Thus, simulations on a O(100 m) grid largely obviate the need for such parameterizations. By crossing this threshold of O(100m) grid resolution one can begin thinking of large-eddy simulation (LES), wherein the sub-grid scale parameterization have a sounder theoretical foundation. Substantial initiatives have been taken internationally to approach this threshold. For example, Miura et al., 2007 and Mirakawa et al., 2014 approach this threshold by doing global simulations, with (gradually) decreasing grid resolution, to understand the effect of cloud-resolving scales on the general circulation. Our strategy, on the other hand, is to take a big leap forward by fixing the resolution at O(100 m), and gradually increasing the domain size. We believe that breaking this threshold would greatly help in improving the parameterization schemes and reducing the uncertainty in climate predictions. To take this forward, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research has initiated a project on HD(CP)2 that aims for a limited area LES at resolution O(100 m) using the new unified modeling system ICON (Zängl et al., 2014). In the talk, results from the HD(CP)2 evaluation simulation will be shown that targets high resolution simulation over a small domain around Jülich, Germany. This site is chosen because high resolution HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment took place in this region from 1.04.2013 to 31.05.2013, in order to critically evaluate the model. Nesting capabilities of ICON is used to gradually increase the resolution from the outermost domain, which is forced from the COSMO-DE data, to the

  10. Development of advanced materials for spallation neutron sources and radiation damage simulation based on multi-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the status review of the JSPS Grant Team to develop advanced materials for the spallation neutron sources and modeling of radiation damage. One of the advanced materials is a toughness enhanced, fine-grained tungsten material (W-TiC) having four-times larger fracture toughness than ordinary tungsten and appreciable RT ductility in the recrystallized state. The other is an intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless steel which was processed by the grain-boundary engineering (GBE). The experimental results are devoted to corrosion in a lead–bismuth eutectic, arrest of corrosion of weld-decay, radiation damage and creep rupture as well as new technique of GBE using a laser and annealing procedure. New technique seems to be applicable to large or complicated-shaped components. A series of the multi-scale models is built up from nuclear reaction between incident particles and medium nuclei to material property change due to radiation damage. Sample calculation is made on 3 mm-thick nickel bombarded by 3 GeV protons.

  11. Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

    2012-08-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

  12. Simulations of Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Using Advanced Lithium Batteries and Ultracapacitors on Various Driving Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Andy; Zhao, Hengbing

    2010-01-01

    The use of ultracapacitors in plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) with high energy density lithium-ion and zinc-air batteries is studied. Simulations were performed for various driving cycles with the PHEVs operating in the charge depleting and charge sustaining modes. The effects of the load leveling of the power demand from the batteries using the ultracapacitors are evident. The average and the peak currents from the batteries are lower by a factor of 2-3.

  13. MO-E-18C-04: Advanced Computer Simulation and Visualization Tools for Enhanced Understanding of Core Medical Physics Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S [Saint Agnes Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Most medical physics programs emphasize proficiency in routine clinical calculations and QA. The formulaic aspect of these calculations and prescriptive nature of measurement protocols obviate the need to frequently apply basic physical principles, which, therefore, gradually decay away from memory. E.g. few students appreciate the role of electron transport in photon dose, making it difficult to understand key concepts such as dose buildup, electronic disequilibrium effects and Bragg-Gray theory. These conceptual deficiencies manifest when the physicist encounters a new system, requiring knowledge beyond routine activities. Methods: Two interactive computer simulation tools are developed to facilitate deeper learning of physical principles. One is a Monte Carlo code written with a strong educational aspect. The code can “label” regions and interactions to highlight specific aspects of the physics, e.g., certain regions can be designated as “starters” or “crossers,” and any interaction type can be turned on and off. Full 3D tracks with specific portions highlighted further enhance the visualization of radiation transport problems. The second code calculates and displays trajectories of a collection electrons under arbitrary space/time dependent Lorentz force using relativistic kinematics. Results: Using the Monte Carlo code, the student can interactively study photon and electron transport through visualization of dose components, particle tracks, and interaction types. The code can, for instance, be used to study kerma-dose relationship, explore electronic disequilibrium near interfaces, or visualize kernels by using interaction forcing. The electromagnetic simulator enables the student to explore accelerating mechanisms and particle optics in devices such as cyclotrons and linacs. Conclusion: The proposed tools are designed to enhance understanding of abstract concepts by highlighting various aspects of the physics. The simulations serve as

  14. MO-E-18C-04: Advanced Computer Simulation and Visualization Tools for Enhanced Understanding of Core Medical Physics Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Most medical physics programs emphasize proficiency in routine clinical calculations and QA. The formulaic aspect of these calculations and prescriptive nature of measurement protocols obviate the need to frequently apply basic physical principles, which, therefore, gradually decay away from memory. E.g. few students appreciate the role of electron transport in photon dose, making it difficult to understand key concepts such as dose buildup, electronic disequilibrium effects and Bragg-Gray theory. These conceptual deficiencies manifest when the physicist encounters a new system, requiring knowledge beyond routine activities. Methods: Two interactive computer simulation tools are developed to facilitate deeper learning of physical principles. One is a Monte Carlo code written with a strong educational aspect. The code can “label” regions and interactions to highlight specific aspects of the physics, e.g., certain regions can be designated as “starters” or “crossers,” and any interaction type can be turned on and off. Full 3D tracks with specific portions highlighted further enhance the visualization of radiation transport problems. The second code calculates and displays trajectories of a collection electrons under arbitrary space/time dependent Lorentz force using relativistic kinematics. Results: Using the Monte Carlo code, the student can interactively study photon and electron transport through visualization of dose components, particle tracks, and interaction types. The code can, for instance, be used to study kerma-dose relationship, explore electronic disequilibrium near interfaces, or visualize kernels by using interaction forcing. The electromagnetic simulator enables the student to explore accelerating mechanisms and particle optics in devices such as cyclotrons and linacs. Conclusion: The proposed tools are designed to enhance understanding of abstract concepts by highlighting various aspects of the physics. The simulations serve as

  15. Advances in Large-eddy Simulation of Two-phase Combustion (I) LES of Spray Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周力行; 李科; 王方

    2012-01-01

    Spray combustion is widely used in power, transportation, chemical and metallurgical, iron and steel making, aeronautical and astronautical engineering. In recent years, large-eddy simulation (LES) becomes more and more attractive, because it can give the instantaneous flow and flame structures, and may give more accurate statistical results than the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling. In this paper, the present status of the studies on LES of spray combustion is reviewed, and the future research needs are discussed.

  16. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  17. Community petascale project for accelerator science and simulation: advancing computational science for future accelerators and accelerator technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R and D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors

  18. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  19. Simulation experimental investigation of plasma off-normal events on advanced silicon doped CFC-NS31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion devices high heat loading due to off-normal events (e.g., plasma disruption, slow transients and ELMs, which can occur during a transition from detached to attached divertor operation) requires high thermal conductivity materials. Therefore, carbon fiber composites (CFCs) with high thermal conductivity are favorable. In the framework of the European Fusion Technology program, a great effort has been made to develop Si doped CFCs. NS31 is a 3D CFC containing about 8-10 at.% of silicon. The previous results showed, that NS31 poses lower chemical erosion, lower tritium retention and higher resistivity to water/oxygen reaction in comparing with undoped CFCs. Off-normal simulation experiments were performed under two conditions: (a) 700 MW/m2, 10 ms and (b) slow transient 20 MW/m2, 2 and 4 s. NS31 behaved very stable even under these extremely severe conditions. In this paper, the detailed results of simulation experiment on high heat loading due to off-normal events are presented and consequences are discussed

  20. Simulation and experimental design of a new advanced variable step size Incremental Conductance MPPT algorithm for PV systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukriz, Abdelhamid; Haddadi, Mourad; Messalti, Sabir

    2016-05-01

    Improvement of the efficiency of photovoltaic system based on new maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithms is the most promising solution due to its low cost and its easy implementation without equipment updating. Many MPPT methods with fixed step size have been developed. However, when atmospheric conditions change rapidly , the performance of conventional algorithms is reduced. In this paper, a new variable step size Incremental Conductance IC MPPT algorithm has been proposed. Modeling and simulation of different operational conditions of conventional Incremental Conductance IC and proposed methods are presented. The proposed method was developed and tested successfully on a photovoltaic system based on Flyback converter and control circuit using dsPIC30F4011. Both, simulation and experimental design are provided in several aspects. A comparative study between the proposed variable step size and fixed step size IC MPPT method under similar operating conditions is presented. The obtained results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed MPPT algorithm in terms of speed in MPP tracking and accuracy. PMID:26337741

  1. Simulation of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases in horizontal condenser tubes using RELAP5 for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horizontal heat exchangers are used in advanced light water nuclear reactors in their passive cooling systems, such as residual heat removal (RHRS) and passive containment cooling system (PCCS). Condensation studies of steam and noncondensable gases mixtures in these heat exchangers are very important due to the phenomena multidimensional nature and the condensate stratification effects. This work presents a comparison between simulation results and experimental data in steady state conditions for some inlet pressure, steam and noncondensable gases (air) inlet mass fractions. The test section is three meters long and consists of two concentric tubes containing pressure, temperature and flow rate sensors. The internal tube, called condenser, contains steam-air mixture flow and external tube is a counter current cooler with water flow rate at low temperature. This test section was modeled and simulations were performed with RELAP5 code. Experimental tests were carried out for 200 to 400 kPa inlet pressure and 5, 10, 15 and 20% of inlet air mass fractions. Comparisons between experimental data and simulation results are presented for 200 and 400 kPa pressure conditions and showed good agreement. However, for 400 kPa inlet steam pressure and inlet air mass fractions above 5%, the simulated temperatures are lower than the experimental data at the final third from the inlet condenser tube, indicating a code overestimation of heat transfer coefficient. New correlations for heat transfer coefficient in these steam-air conditions must be theoretical and experimentally studied and implemented in RELAP5 code for better representing the condensation phenomena. (author)

  2. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr. (,; .); Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  3. Two-surface plasticity Model and Its Application to Spring-back Simulation of Automotive Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taejoon; Seok, Dong-Yoon; Lee, Chul-Hwan; Noma, Nobuyasu; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Chung, Kwansoo

    2011-08-01

    A two-surface isotropic-kinematic hardening law was developed based on a two-surface plasticity model previously proposed by Lee et al., (2007, Int. J. Plast. 23, 1189-1212). In order to properly represent the Bauschinger and transient behaviors as well as permanent softening during reverse loading with various pre-strains, both the inner yield surface and the outer bounding surface expand (isotropic hardening) and translate (kinematic hardening) in this two-surface model. As for the permanent softening, both the isotropic hardening and the kinematic hardening evolution of the outer bounding surface were modified by introducing softening parameters. The numerical formulation was also developed based on the incremental plasticity theory and the developed constitutive law was implemented into the commercial finite element program, ABAQUS/Explicit and ABAQUS/Standard using the user-defined material subroutines. In this work, a dual phase (DP) steel was considered as an advanced high strength steel sheet and uni-axial tension tests and uni-axial tension-compression-tension tests were performed for the characterization of the material property. For a validation purpose, the developed two-surface plasticity model was applied to the 2-D draw bending test proposed as a benchmark problem of the NUMISHEET 2011 conference and successfully validated with experiments.

  4. Application of artificial neural network coupled with genetic algorithm and simulated annealing to solve groundwater inflow problem to an advancing open pit mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Saeed; Doulati Ardejani, Faramarz; Baafi, Ernest

    2016-05-01

    In this study, hybrid models are designed to predict groundwater inflow to an advancing open pit mine and the hydraulic head (HH) in observation wells at different distances from the centre of the pit during its advance. Hybrid methods coupling artificial neural network (ANN) with genetic algorithm (GA) methods (ANN-GA), and simulated annealing (SA) methods (ANN-SA), were utilised. Ratios of depth of pit penetration in aquifer to aquifer thickness, pit bottom radius to its top radius, inverse of pit advance time and the HH in the observation wells to the distance of observation wells from the centre of the pit were used as inputs to the networks. To achieve the objective two hybrid models consisting of ANN-GA and ANN-SA with 4-5-3-1 arrangement were designed. In addition, by switching the last argument of the input layer with the argument of the output layer of two earlier models, two new models were developed to predict the HH in the observation wells for the period of the mining process. The accuracy and reliability of models are verified by field data, results of a numerical finite element model using SEEP/W, outputs of simple ANNs and some well-known analytical solutions. Predicted results obtained by the hybrid methods are closer to the field data compared to the outputs of analytical and simple ANN models. Results show that despite the use of fewer and simpler parameters by the hybrid models, the ANN-GA and to some extent the ANN-SA have the ability to compete with the numerical models.

  5. Comparison of the Glidescope® and Pentax AWS® laryngoscopes to the Macintosh laryngoscope for use by Advanced Paramedics in easy and simulated difficult intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O' Donnell John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intubation of the trachea in the pre-hospital setting may be lifesaving in severely ill and injured patients. However, tracheal intubation is frequently difficult to perform in this challenging environment, is associated with a lower success rate, and failed tracheal intubation constitutes an important cause of morbidity. Novel indirect laryngoscopes, such as the Glidescope® and the AWS® laryngoscopes may reduce this risk. Methods We compared the efficacy of these devices to the Macintosh laryngoscope when used by 25 Advanced Paramedics proficient in direct laryngoscopy, in a randomized, controlled, manikin study. Following brief didactic instruction with the Glidescope® and the AWS® laryngoscopes, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation with each device, in an easy intubation scenario and following placement of a hard cervical collar, in a SimMan® manikin. Results Both the Glidescope® and the AWS® performed better than the Macintosh, and demonstrate considerable promise in this context. The AWS® had the least number of dental compressions in all three scenarios, and in the cervical spine immobilization scenario it required fewer maneuvers to optimize the view of the glottis. Conclusion The Glidescope® and AWS® devices possess advantages over the conventional Macintosh laryngoscope when used by Advanced Paramedics in normal and simulated difficult intubation scenarios in this manikin study. Further studies are required to extend these findings to the clinical setting.

  6. Comparison of the Glidescope and Pentax AWS laryngoscopes to the Macintosh laryngoscope for use by advanced paramedics in easy and simulated difficult intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nasim, Sajid

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intubation of the trachea in the pre-hospital setting may be lifesaving in severely ill and injured patients. However, tracheal intubation is frequently difficult to perform in this challenging environment, is associated with a lower success rate, and failed tracheal intubation constitutes an important cause of morbidity. Novel indirect laryngoscopes, such as the Glidescope and the AWS laryngoscopes may reduce this risk. METHODS: We compared the efficacy of these devices to the Macintosh laryngoscope when used by 25 Advanced Paramedics proficient in direct laryngoscopy, in a randomized, controlled, manikin study. Following brief didactic instruction with the Glidescope and the AWS laryngoscopes, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation with each device, in an easy intubation scenario and following placement of a hard cervical collar, in a SimMan manikin. RESULTS: Both the Glidescope and the AWS performed better than the Macintosh, and demonstrate considerable promise in this context. The AWS had the least number of dental compressions in all three scenarios, and in the cervical spine immobilization scenario it required fewer maneuvers to optimize the view of the glottis. CONCLUSION: The Glidescope and AWS devices possess advantages over the conventional Macintosh laryngoscope when used by Advanced Paramedics in normal and simulated difficult intubation scenarios in this manikin study. Further studies are required to extend these findings to the clinical setting.

  7. Recent Advances in Agent-Based Tsunami Evacuation Simulations: Case Studies in Indonesia, Thailand, Japan and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Erick; Koshimura, Shunichi; Imamura, Fumihiko; Suppasri, Anawat; Muhari, Abdul; Adriano, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    As confirmed by the extreme tsunami events over the last decade (the 2004 Indian Ocean, 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan tsunami events), mitigation measures and effective evacuation planning are needed to reduce disaster risks. Modeling tsunami evacuations is an alternative means to analyze evacuation plans and possible scenarios of evacuees' behaviors. In this paper, practical applications of an agent-based tsunami evacuation model are presented to demonstrate the contributions that agent-based modeling has added to tsunami evacuation simulations and tsunami mitigation efforts. A brief review of previous agent-based evacuation models in the literature is given to highlight recent progress in agent-based methods. Finally, challenges are noted for bridging gaps between geoscience and social science within the agent-based approach for modeling tsunami evacuations.

  8. CFD simulation of automotive I.C. engines with advanced moving grid and multi-domain methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y. G.; Przekwas, A. J.; Sun, R. L. T.

    1993-07-01

    An efficient numerical method is presented with multi-domain and moving grid capabilities to best suit internal combustion engine applications. Multi-domain capability allows a user to arbitrarily cut the solution domain into many topologically simpler domains. Consequently, simultaneous coupling among components becomes natural and the task of grid generation becomes easier. The moving grid capability allows the computational grid to move and conform to the piston motion. As a result, the grid always fits the flow boundaries and no special remapping or interpolation is needed. The method has been implemented to solve 2D and 3D flows in a body-fitted coordinate system. Air ingestion and scavenging flow problems in a generic four-stroke engine and a two-stroke engine are simulated to demonstrate the proposed approach.

  9. Advances in the simulation and automated measurement of well-sorted granular material: 2. Direct measures of particle properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscombe, Daniel D.; Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    1. In this, the second of a pair of papers on the structure of well-sorted natural granular material (sediment), new methods are described for automated measurements from images of sediment, of: 1) particle-size standard deviation (arithmetic sorting) with and without apparent void fraction; and 2) mean particle size in material with void fraction. A variety of simulations of granular material are used for testing purposes, in addition to images of natural sediment. Simulations are also used to establish that the effects on automated particle sizing of grains visible through the interstices of the grains at the very surface of a granular material continue to a depth of approximately 4 grain diameters and that this is independent of mean particle size. Ensemble root-mean squared error between observed and estimated arithmetic sorting coefficients for 262 images of natural silts, sands and gravels (drawn from 8 populations) is 31%, which reduces to 27% if adjusted for bias (slope correction between observed and estimated values). These methods allow non-intrusive and fully automated measurements of surfaces of unconsolidated granular material. With no tunable parameters or empirically derived coefficients, they should be broadly universal in appropriate applications. However, empirical corrections may need to be applied for the most accurate results. Finally, analytical formulas are derived for the one-step pore-particle transition probability matrix, estimated from the image's autocorrelogram, from which void fraction of a section of granular material can be estimated directly. This model gives excellent predictions of bulk void fraction yet imperfect predictions of pore-particle transitions.

  10. The function of the alarm system in advanced control rooms: an analysis of operator visual activity during a simulated nuclear power plant disturbance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Brookhaven National Laboratory (US), and the OECD Halden Reactor Project conducted a large experiment, investigating the effects of alarm reduction and display on operator and plant performance (O'Hara et al., 1997), The results from this experiment indicated that the number of alarms presented to the operators, and the type of alarm display, had no impact on human performance during simulated disturbances. One possible interpretation of these surprising results is that operators in advanced control rooms use the alarm system only for limited purposes, i.e., the introduction of process formats, trend curves, overview displays, and computerized support systems have made the alarm system superfluous. Given the massive efforts put into the design and development of sophisticated alarm systems intended to maximize safety, this would be a paradoxical conclusion. To explore the role of the alarm system in more detail, we performed an analysis of eye-movement tracking data collected in the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLAB). The objective of the study was to examine to which extent, and for what purposes, licensed operators use the alarm system in advanced control rooms during complex problem solving. According to Funke (1991), complex problem solving situations are non-transparent, ill-defined, and dynamic, i.e., the underlying state of the system must be inferred from symptoms, the goal state is ambiguous, and the problem is in continuous change. This seems to be an appropriate description of the working conditions when operators are confronted with challenging scenarios in a full scope nuclear simulator. Five experts on nuclear power plant operation from the OECD Halden Reactor Project were convened in order to generate initial hypotheses about the operators' use of the alarm system. The expert panel estimated that operators in advanced control rooms would use the alarm system less than 10 percent of the available

  11. Advanced Simulation and Optimization Tools for Dynamic Aperture of Non-scaling FFAGs and Accelerators including Modern User Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the U.S. experimental effort in HEP largely located at laboratories supporting the operations of large, highly specialized accelerators, colliding beam facilities, and detector facilities, the understanding and prediction of high energy particle accelerators becomes critical to the success, overall, of the DOE HEP program. One area in which small businesses can contribute to the ongoing success of the U.S. program in HEP is through innovations in computer techniques and sophistication in the modeling of high-energy accelerators. Accelerator modeling at these facilities is performed by experts with the product generally highly specific and representative only of in-house accelerators or special-interest accelerator problems. Development of new types of accelerators like FFAGs with their wide choices of parameter modifications, complicated fields, and the simultaneous need to efficiently handle very large emittance beams requires the availability of new simulation environments to assure predictability in operation. In this, ease of use and interfaces are critical to realizing a successful model, or optimization of a new design or working parameters of machines. In Phase I, various core modules for the design and analysis of FFAGs were developed and Graphical User Interfaces (GUI) have been investigated instead of the more general yet less easily manageable console-type output COSY provides.

  12. Computational Models of Human Performance: Validation of Memory and Procedural Representation in Advanced Air/Ground Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Labacqz, J. Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    procedures. We show how the data produced by MIDAS compares with flight crew performance data from full mission simulations. Finally, we discuss the use of these features to study communication issues connected with aircraft-based separation assurance.

  13. Advances in the evaluation of wind-induced undercatch using CFD-based simulations of snow gauge performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca; Rasmussen, Roy; Thériault, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Despite its importance, accurate measurements of precipitation remains a challenge. Measurement errors for solid precipitation, which are often ignored for automated systems, frequently range from 20% to 70% due to undercatch in windy conditions. While solid precipitation measurements have been the subject of many studies, there have been only a limited number of numerical modeling efforts to estimate the collection efficiency of solid precipitation gauges when exposed to the wind, in both shielded and unshielded configurations. The available models use CFD simulations of the airflow pattern generated by the aerodynamic response of the gauge/shield geometry to perform the Lagrangian tracking of solid precipitation particles (Thériault et al., 2012; Colli et al. 2016a and 2016b). Validation of the results against field observations yields similarities in the overall behavior, but the model output only approximately reproduces the dependence of the experimental collection efficiency on wind speed. We present recent developments of such a modelling approach including various gauge/shield configurations, the influence of the drag coefficient calculation on the model performance, and the role of the particle size distribution in explaining the scatter of the collection efficiency observed at any particular wind speed (Colli et al. 2015). Comparison with observations at the Marshall (CO) field test site is used to validate results of the various modelling schemes and to support the analysis of the microphysical characteristics of ice crystals. References: Colli, M., Rasmussen, R.M., Thèriault, J.M., Lanza, L.G., Baker, B.C. and J. Kochendorfer (2015). An improved trajectory model to evaluate the collection performance of snow gauges. J.Appl.Meteor.Climatol., 54(8), pages 1826-1836. Colli, M., Lanza, L.G., Rasmussen, R.M. and J.M. Thèriault (2016a). The collection efficiency of shielded and unshielded precipitation gauges. Part I: CFD airflow modelling. J. of

  14. Technology Advancement for Active Remote Sensing of Carbon Dioxide from Space Using the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obland, Michael D.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Lin, Bing; Harrison, F. Wallace; Kooi, Susan; Choi, Yonghoon; Plant, James; Yang, Melissa; Antill, Charles; Campbell, Joel; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Meadows, Byron; Dobler, Jeremy; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Moore, Berrien; Crowell, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) is a newly developed lidar developed at NASA Langley Research Center and funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) that seeks to advance technologies critical to measuring atmospheric column carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. The technology advancements targeted include: (1) increasing the power-aperture product to approach ASCENDS mission requirements by implementing multi-aperture telescopes and multiple co-aligned laser transmitters; (2) incorporating high-efficiency, high-power Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers (EDFAs); (3) developing and incorporating a high-bandwidth, low-noise HgCdTe detector and transimpedence amplifier (TIA) subsystem capable of long-duration autonomous operation on Global Hawk aircraft, and (4) advancing algorithms for cloud and aerosol discrimination. The ACES instrument architecture is being developed for operation on high-altitude aircraft and will be directly scalable to meet the ASCENDS mission requirements. These technologies are critical towards developing not only spaceborne instruments but also their airborne simulators, with lower platform requirements for size, mass, and power, and with improved instrument performance for the ASCENDS mission. ACES transmits five laser beams: three from commercial EDFAs operating near 1.57 microns, and two from the Exelis oxygen (O2) Raman fiber laser amplifier system operating near 1.26 microns. The three EDFAs are capable of transmitting up to 10 watts average optical output power each and are seeded by compact, low noise, stable, narrow-linewidth laser sources stabilized with respect to a CO2 absorption line using a multi-pass gas absorption cell. The Integrated-Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar approach is used at both wavelengths to independently measure the CO2 and O2 column number

  15. Application of advance simulation examination in perimetry%提前模拟检查在视野检查中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘彬彬; 柳月红; 董愉; 许雪静

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the application of advance simulation check in perimetry. Methods A total of 80 perimetry patients were selected as control group ( traditional method) from October 2013 to December 2013 in Ophthalmology Department. They were divided into middle aged group (aged 30-49) and old age group (aged 50-70) on average because big range of ages. A total of 80 perimetry patients with a visual field analyzer were selected as observation group (advance simulation check method) from January 2014 to March 2014. They were also divided into two groups as the same method. We recorded and compared the examination time and the pass rate of perimetry of two groups. Results The mean time of examination in middle aged patients was (5.35 ±0.45)min in the control group and (5. 27 ± 0. 38) min in the observation group. There was no significant difference in the time of visual field examination between two groups (t=0. 848, P>0. 05). There was a significant difference between two groups in first-pass rate of middle aged patients (65. 00% in the control group vs 90. 00% in the observation group) (χ2 =7. 17, P0.05),两组中年患者的一次通过率比较差异有统计学意义(χ2=7.17,P<0.01).对照组老年患者检查时间平均为(6.17±0.92)min,一次通过率为62.5%;观察组老年患者所用时间平均为(5.68±0.52)min,一次通过率为82.5%;两组老年患者比较,差异均有统计学意义(t/χ2值分别为2.93,6.67;P<0.05).结论 采用提前模拟检查的方法,可以提高中年患者的检查一次通过率,在提高视野检查一次通过率的基础上缩短了年龄较大患者检查所用的时间.这样既提高了检查的质量,又节约时间,减轻了患者检查的痛苦,提高工作效率.

  16. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M and S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V and V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M and S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V and V rigor to each and every M and S capability, M and S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M and S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V and V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M and S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M and S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V and V plan.

  17. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) verification and validation plan. version 1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Urbina, Angel; Bouchard, Julie F.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Wang, Yifeng; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); McCornack, Marjorie Turner

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (NEAMS Waste IPSC) is to provide an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive-waste storage facility or disposal repository. To meet this objective, NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities will be applied to challenging spatial domains, temporal domains, multiphysics couplings, and multiscale couplings. A strategic verification and validation (V&V) goal is to establish evidence-based metrics for the level of confidence in M&S codes and capabilities. Because it is economically impractical to apply the maximum V&V rigor to each and every M&S capability, M&S capabilities will be ranked for their impact on the performance assessments of various components of the repository systems. Those M&S capabilities with greater impact will require a greater level of confidence and a correspondingly greater investment in V&V. This report includes five major components: (1) a background summary of the NEAMS Waste IPSC to emphasize M&S challenges; (2) the conceptual foundation for verification, validation, and confidence assessment of NEAMS Waste IPSC M&S capabilities; (3) specifications for the planned verification, validation, and confidence-assessment practices; (4) specifications for the planned evidence information management system; and (5) a path forward for the incremental implementation of this V&V plan.

  18. Phenolic acids inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products in food simulation systems depending on their reducing powers and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hengye; Virk, Muhammad Safiullah; Chen, Fusheng

    2016-06-01

    The concentration of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in foods, which are formed by Maillard reaction, has demonstrated as risk factors associated with many chronic diseases. The AGEs inhibitory activities of five common phenolic acids (protocatechuic acid, dihydroferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and salicylic acid) with different chemical properties had been investigated in two food simulation systems (glucose-bovine serum albumin (BSA) and oleic acid-BSA). The results substantiated that the AGEs inhibitory abilities of phenolic acids in the oleic acid BSA system were much better than the glucose-BSA system for their strong reducing powers and structures. Among them, dihydrogenferulic acid showed strong inhibition of AGEs formation in oleic acid-BSA system at 0.01 mg/mL compared to nonsignificant AGEs inhibitory effect in oleic acid-BSA system at 10-fold higher concentration (0.1 mg/mL). This study suggests that edible plants rich in phenolic acids may be used as AGEs inhibitor during high-fat cooking. PMID:27102241

  19. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  20. Advanced photocathode simulation and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, K. L.; Feldman, D. W.; O'Shea, P. G.

    2003-07-01

    A low work function dispenser type photocathode that is self-annealing or repairing would have a substantial impact on Free Electron Lasers (FELs). On such a cathode, the emitting surface is constantly renewed by replenishment of low-work-function material. A photo-dispenser cathode should operate at a relatively low temperature compared to a conventional dispenser cathode and is anticipated to be robust and long-lived. Coatings cause a reduction in the transport barrier experienced by the electrons through a complex modification of the potential at the surface, e.g., a reduction in work function due to dipole effects. In this work, we describe our theoretical program to address such effects, as part of a program concurrent with experimental efforts to develop dispenser cathodes for use in high power RF photoinjectors. In particular, we discuss the development of a generalised Transmission Coefficient approach, its application to photoemission from metals, and progress towards developing a methodology for the determination of the general emission barrier profile.

  1. Advanced photocathode simulation and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low work function dispenser type photocathode that is self-annealing or repairing would have a substantial impact on Free Electron Lasers (FELs). On such a cathode, the emitting surface is constantly renewed by replenishment of low-work-function material. A photo-dispenser cathode should operate at a relatively low temperature compared to a conventional dispenser cathode and is anticipated to be robust and long-lived. Coatings cause a reduction in the transport barrier experienced by the electrons through a complex modification of the potential at the surface, e.g., a reduction in work function due to dipole effects. In this work, we describe our theoretical program to address such effects, as part of a program concurrent with experimental efforts to develop dispenser cathodes for use in high power RF photoinjectors. In particular, we discuss the development of a generalised Transmission Coefficient approach, its application to photoemission from metals, and progress towards developing a methodology for the determination of the general emission barrier profile

  2. Advances in simulation of PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important diagnosis tool in molecular biology, which have been greatly improved by PCR. However, optimizing the experimental conditions is still a problem for PRC. Computer biology can be a solution to this problem. In this paper, developments of the mathematical models for PCA are reviewed. It is believed that this kind of research efforts shall be helpful for optimizing the experimental conditions and providing guidance for the biologists and understanding the mechanism of PCR. (authors)

  3. Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) : gap analysis for high fidelity and performance assessment code development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon H.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.; Webb, Stephen Walter; Dewers, Thomas A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Fuller, Timothy J.; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Wang, Yifeng

    2011-03-01

    This report describes a gap analysis performed in the process of developing the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of computational modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with rigorous verification, validation, and software quality requirements. The gap analyses documented in this report were are performed during an initial gap analysis to identify candidate codes and tools to support the development and integration of the Waste IPSC, and during follow-on activities that delved into more detailed assessments of the various codes that were acquired, studied, and tested. The current Waste IPSC strategy is to acquire and integrate the necessary Waste IPSC capabilities wherever feasible, and develop only those capabilities that cannot be acquired or suitably integrated, verified, or validated. The gap analysis indicates that significant capabilities may already exist in the existing THC codes although there is no single code able to fully account for all physical and chemical processes involved in a waste disposal system. Large gaps exist in modeling chemical processes and their couplings with other processes. The coupling of chemical processes with flow transport and mechanical deformation remains challenging. The data for extreme environments (e.g., for elevated temperature and high ionic strength media) that are

  4. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and

  5. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Emily B.; Zavodsky, Bradley T; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Elmer, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) reanalysis, and Rapid Refresh analyses.

  6. Impact of the Assimilation of Hyperspectral Infrared Retrieved Profiles on Advanced Weather and Research Model Simulations of a Non-Convective Wind Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Folmer, M. J.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-convective wind events commonly occur with passing extratropical cyclones and have significant societal and economic impacts. Since non-convective winds often occur in the absence of specific phenomena such as a thunderstorm, tornado, or hurricane, the public are less likely to heed high wind warnings and continue daily activities. Thus non-convective wind events result in as many fatalities as straight line thunderstorm winds. One physical explanation for non-convective winds includes tropopause folds. Improved model representation of stratospheric air and associated non-convective wind events could improve non-convective wind forecasts and associated warnings. In recent years, satellite data assimilation has improved skill in forecasting extratropical cyclones; however errors still remain in forecasting the position and strength of extratropical cyclones as well as the tropopause folding process. The goal of this study is to determine the impact of assimilating satellite temperature and moisture retrieved profiles from hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounders (i.e. Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS), and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)) on the model representation of the tropopause fold and an associated high wind event that impacted the Northeast United States on 09 February 2013. Model simulations using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW) were conducted on a 12-km grid with cycled data assimilation mimicking the operational North American Model (NAM). The results from the satellite assimilation run are compared to a control experiment (without hyperspectral IR retrievals), 32-km North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) interpolated to a 12-km grid, and 13-km Rapid Refresh analyses.

  7. Feasibility of breast conservation surgery in locally advanced breast cancer downstaged by neoadjuvant chemotherapy: A study in mastectomy specimens using simulation lumpectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswambharan Jaiganesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The response of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT offers these patients previously treated by mastectomy, the chance for breast conservation. AIM : This study aims to assess the feasibility of lumpectomy in patients with LABC treated by NACT, with residual tumor 5 cm. SETTINGS, DESIGN : Single group prospective study from August 2001 to June 2003 in a teaching hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Thirty patients with LABC whose tumors reduced with NACT to 5 cm were included. Simulation lumpectomy was performed on the mastectomy specimens to achieve 1 to 2 cm clearance from tumor and hence margin negativity. Multiple sections of the inked margin were studied. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS : Margin positivity was correlated with patient factors. Chi square test and Fisher′s exact test used as appropriate. P value 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS : After three cycles of NACT, 4 patients (13% had complete clinical response including 2 with complete pathological response. Twenty-two (73% showed partial response and 4, no response. Fourteen out of thirty (47% had tumor involvement of margins. Tumors with post-chemotherapy size> 4 cm were margin positive in 10/13 (77%. Tumors with post-chemotherapy size>3 cm were margin positive in 13/24 (54%. Tumors with post-chemotherapy size 3 cm were margin negative in 5/6 (83%. Pre-chemotherapy tumor size and post-chemotherapy tumor size were significantly associated with margin positivity (P=0.003. Tumors in the subareolar location had significantly higher incidence of residual tumor in the nipple areola complex. (P=0.04. Margin positivity of lumpectomy on downstaged tumors can be reduced by removing the nipple areola complex in subareolar tumors and by limiting breast conservation to tumors with post-chemotherapy size 3 cm.

  8. Feasibility of breast conservation surgery in locally advanced breast cancer downstaged by neoadjuvant chemotherapy: A study in mastectomy specimens using simulation lumpectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswambharan Jaiganesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The response of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT offers these patients previously treated by mastectomy, the chance for breast conservation. AIM: This study aims to assess the feasibility of lumpectomy in patients with LABC treated by NACT, with residual tumor 5 cm. SETTINGS, DESIGN: Single group prospective study from August 2001 to June 2003 in a teaching hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients with LABC whose tumors reduced with NACT to 5 cm were included. Simulation lumpectomy was performed on the mastectomy specimens to achieve 1 to 2 cm clearance from tumor and hence margin negativity. Multiple sections of the inked margin were studied. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Margin positivity was correlated with patient factors. Chi square test and Fisher′s exact test used as appropriate. P value 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: After three cycles of NACT, 4 patients (13% had complete clinical response including 2 with complete pathological response. Twenty-two (73% showed partial response and 4, no response. Fourteen out of thirty (47% had tumor involvement of margins. Tumors with post-chemotherapy size >4 cm were margin positive in 10/13 (77%. Tumors with post-chemotherapy size>3 cm were margin positive in 13/24 (54%. Tumors with post-chemotherapy size 3 cm were margin negative in 5/6 (83%. Pre-chemotherapy tumor size and post-chemotherapy tumor size were significantly associated with margin positivity (P=0.003. Tumors in the subareolar location had significantly higher incidence of residual tumor in the nipple areola complex. (P=0.04. Margin positivity of lumpectomy on downstaged tumors can be reduced by removing the nipple areola complex in subareolar tumors and by limiting breast conservation to tumors with post-chemotherapy size 3 cm.

  9. An LED-Based, Laboratory-Scale Solar Simulator for Advanced 3, 4, 5 & 6 Junction Space Photovoltaic Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As a result of significant technical effort, the Phase I was successful in delivering a solar simulator prototype that not only proved the initial concept but will...

  10. The RD53 Collaboration's SystemVerilog-UVM Simulation Framework and its General Applicability to Design of Advanced Pixel Readout Chips

    OpenAIRE

    Marconi, S; Conti, E; Placidi, P; Christiansen, J.; Hemperek, T.

    2014-01-01

    The foreseen Phase 2 pixel upgrades at the LHC have very challenging requirements for the design of hybrid pixel readout chips. A versatile pixel simulation platform is as an essential development tool for the design, verification and optimization of both the system architecture and the pixel chip building blocks (Intellectual Properties, IPs). This work is focused on the implemented simulation and verification environment named VEPIX53, built using the SystemVerilog language and the Universa...

  11. Quality standardisation for casting wind powered turbine parts using advanced process simulation; Estandarizaciond e la calidad en fundicion de grandes piezas eolicas mediante la simulacion avanzada del proceso de fabricacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez Arranz, A.; Anglada Izaguirre, E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper arose from a work on advanced simulation on casting wind powered turbine parts made from high tenacity ductile iron. The technical target was extracted from the Haizelan Project, carried out with Basque Country Foundrymens Association (Spanish Foundrymens Federation), two foundries, TS Fundiciones (Zestoa-Guipuzcoa) and Fundiciones Urbina (Urbina-Alava) as process suppliers and Gamesa Eolica (Huarte-Navarra) as part and geometry supplier. The study shows it is now possible to obtain highly accurate predictions in pouring and solidification using microstructure calculations simultaneously, and from then on good predictions about final microstructures and subsequent mechanical properties of castings. All related tasks in simulation were performed using FEM (Finite Elemets Method). Referred to metallographic studies and tests, which were done at Inasmet-Tecnalia laboratories. (Author)

  12. Feasibility of breast conservation surgery in locally advanced breast cancer downstaged by neoadjuvant chemotherapy: A study in mastectomy specimens using simulation lumpectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Viswambharan Jaiganesh; Kadambari D; Iyengar Krishnan; Srinivasan K

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND : The response of locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) offers these patients previously treated by mastectomy, the chance for breast conservation. AIM : This study aims to assess the feasibility of lumpectomy in patients with LABC treated by NACT, with residual tumor 5 cm. SETTINGS, DESIGN : Single group prospective study from August 2001 to June 2003 in a teaching hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS : Thirty patients with LABC whose tumors reduced...

  13. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.)

  14. 液流储能电池模拟研究的进展%Advance in simulation research of redox flow battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢枫; 张华民; 马相坤; 王晓丽

    2011-01-01

    The state of simulation research of redox flow battery was introduced. The characteristics, research progress and limitations of mathematic models of zero dimension, one dimension, two dimension and leakage current were reviewed. The commercialized simulation softwares for redox flow battery were outlined, the development direction of simulating was discussed.%介绍了液流储能电池模拟研究的现状,综述了零维、一维、二维及漏电电流等数学模型的特点、研究进展及局限性,论述了液流储能电池用的商业化模拟软件,并展望了模拟的发展方向.

  15. An a(α)-stable variable order ODE-solver and its application as advancement procedure for simulations in thermo- and fluid-dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations in thermo- and fluiddynamics often require the numerical solution of large initial value problems with stiffness caused by eigenvalues close to the imaginary axis. The regions of absolute stability of the most widely used ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers, for stiff problems, do not properly account for this. The paper introduces a general purpose ODE-solver with considerably larger stability regions. Its reliability is illustrated by test problems, with complex eigenvalues, from a well known test package. Applications in large codes, for simulations in thermo- and fluiddynamics, demonstrate its practical usability. (orig.)

  16. A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

  17. Evaluation of Landing Characteristics Achieved by Simulations and Flight Tests on a Small-scaled Model Related to Magnetically Levitated Advanced Take-off and Landing Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohacs, D.; Voskuijl, M.; Siepenkotter, N.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate and measure on a small-scaled model the landing characteristics related to take-off and landing (TOL) operations supported by a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) system as ground-based power supply. The technical feasibility and the potential benefits of using ground

  18. Handbook of Advanced Magnetic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi; Shindo, Daisuke

    2006-01-01

    From high-capacity, inexpensive hard drives to mag-lev trains, recent achievements in magnetic materials research have made the dreams of a few decades ago reality. The objective of Handbook of Advanced Magnetic Materials is to provide a timely, comprehensive review of recent progress in magnetic materials research. This broad yet detailed reference consists of four volumes: 1.) Nanostructured advanced magnetic materials, 2.) Characterization and simulation of advanced magnetic materials, 3.) Processing of advanced magnetic materials, and 4.) Properties and applications of advanced magnetic materials The first volume documents and explains recent development of nanostructured magnetic materials, emphasizing size effects. The second volume provides a comprehensive review of both experimental methods and simulation techniques for the characterization of magnetic materials. The third volume comprehensively reviews recent developments in the processing and manufacturing of advanced magnetic materials. With the co...

  19. Is the advanced trauma life support simulation exam more stressful for the surgeon than emergency department trauma care? O stress afeta cirurgiões durante o aprendizado tanto quanto na sua carreira profissional?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Quilici

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stress affects surgeons both during training and during professional activity. OBJECTIVE: To compare stress levels affecting surgical residents during the simulated initial assessment and management in the Advanced Trauma Life Support practical exam vs initial assessment and management of trauma patients in the emergency room. METHOD: Eighteen surgical residents were evaluated under basal conditions, during the Advanced Trauma Life Support simulation, and during emergency room initial care. Heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, and diastolic arterial pressure were measured. The Student t test was used to test for differences between means, with statistical significance declared when P OBJETIVO: Comparar os níveis de stress que afetam os residentes de cirurgia durante a avaliação inicial simulada nos cursos Advanced Trauma Life Support versus a avaliação do trauma do paciente na sala de emergência. MÉTODO: Dezoito residentes em cirurgia foram avaliados em condições basais no curso de Advanced Trauma Life Support e na sala de emergência. Foram medidas a freqüência cardíaca, pressões arterial sistólica e diastólica. ESTATÍSTICAS: Teste t do Estudante. Significantemente p<0.05. RESULTADOS: No início da avaliação no Advanced Trauma Life Support, a freqüência cardíaca e pressão arterial sistólica foram mais altas do que (e pressão arterial diastólica foi similar a os valores basais respectivos; no começo da avaliação na sala de emergência foram observadas respostas similares. No fim da avaliação no Advanced Trauma Life Support e na sala de emergência, os valores de freqüência cardíaca, pressão arterial sistólica e pressão arterial diastólica foram maiores do que no começo, exceto que a pressão arterial diastólica não variou significantemente durante a avaliação inicial na sala de emergência. Comparando os dois procedimentos, observa-se que o Advanced Trauma Life Support produziu eleva

  20. The RD53 Collaboration's SystemVerilog-UVM Simulation Framework and its General Applicability to Design of Advanced Pixel Readout Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Marconi, S; Placidi, Pisana; Christiansen, Jorgen; Hemperek, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    The foreseen Phase 2 pixel upgrades at the LHC have very challenging requirements for the design of hybrid pixel readout chips. A versatile pixel simulation platform is as an essential development tool for the design, verification and optimization of both the system architecture and the pixel chip building blocks (Intellectual Properties, IPs). This work is focused on the implemented simulation and verification environment named VEPIX53, built using the SystemVerilog language and the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) class library in the framework of the RD53 Collaboration. The environment supports pixel chips at different levels of description: its reusable components feature the generation of different classes of parameterized input hits to the pixel matrix, monitoring of pixel chip inputs and outputs, conformity checks between predicted and actual outputs and collection of statistics on system performance. The environment has been tested performing a study of shared architectures of the trigger late...

  1. The RD53 collaboration's SystemVerilog-UVM simulation framework and its general applicability to design of advanced pixel readout chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foreseen Phase 2 pixel upgrades at the LHC have very challenging requirements for the design of hybrid pixel readout chips. A versatile pixel simulation platform is as an essential development tool for the design, verification and optimization of both the system architecture and the pixel chip building blocks (Intellectual Properties, IPs). This work is focused on the implemented simulation and verification environment named VEPIX53, built using the SystemVerilog language and the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) class library in the framework of the RD53 Collaboration. The environment supports pixel chips at different levels of description: its reusable components feature the generation of different classes of parameterized input hits to the pixel matrix, monitoring of pixel chip inputs and outputs, conformity checks between predicted and actual outputs and collection of statistics on system performance. The environment has been tested performing a study of shared architectures of the trigger latency buffering section of pixel chips. A fully shared architecture and a distributed one have been described at behavioral level and simulated; the resulting memory occupancy statistics and hit loss rates have subsequently been compared

  2. Design and verification of the integration of simulation environments, models of a nucleo electric plant and advanced computation languages, in the creation of multimedia applications for training and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design process of a reliable and stable integration system is presented among the models that represent present elements in a nucleo electric plant and advanced programming environments in Windows platform. In particular it is analyzed in the case of the integration of the pattern corresponding to the system of feeding water and their associate controller in a graphic structure and of control of superior graphic capacities to the existent desk simulators, mainly because it gives direct access to the graph area and of maximum speed in their execution. In turn it is proven the capacity of the models to behave chord to the prospective answer for that type of systems and a comparative of the found answers is made directly in the models and that shown graphically. They are also described the characteristics that provide to the execution of real time, and jointly, a panorama of the diverse possibilities of representation of the graphic interface is given. Also, the capacities of the simulation environments are analyzed and of used programming, highlighting the advantages and disadvantages that took to the elected solution, considering the support objective in training and teaching. The design proposes a reliable methodology that can be used in the development of simulators, in graphic demonstration of concepts, prototypes, among other applications. (Author)

  3. Simulation of forest tree species' bud burst dates for different climate scenarios: chilling requirements and photo-period may limit bud burst advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Maximilian; Schaber, Jörg; Marx, Andreas; Jäckel, Greta; Badeck, Franz-Werner; Seppelt, Ralf; Doktor, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates whether the assumed increase of winter and spring temperatures is depicted by phenological models in correspondingly earlier bud burst (BB) dates. Some studies assume that rising temperatures lead to an earlier BB, but even later BB has been detected. The phenological model PIM (promoter-inhibitor-model) fitted to the extensive phenological database of the German Weather Service was driven by several climate scenarios. This model accounts for the complicated mechanistic interactions between chilling requirements, temperature and photo-period. It predicts BB with a r 2 between 0.41 and 0.62 and a RMSE of around 1 week, depending on species. Parameter sensitivities depict species dependent interactions between growth and chilling requirements as well as photo-period. A mean trend to earlier BB was revealed for the period 2002- 2100, varying between -0.05 and -0.11 days per year, depending on species. These trends are lower than for the period 1951- 2009. Within climate scenario period, trends are decreasing for beech and chestnut, stagnating for birch and increasing for oak. Results suggest that not fulfilled chilling requirements accompanied by an increasing dependency on photo-period potentially limit future BB advancement. The combination of a powerful phenological model, a large scale phenological database and several climate scenarios, offers new insights into the mechanistic comprehension of spring phenology.

  4. N-body Simulation for Astronomical Collisional Systems with a New SIMD Instruction Set Extension to the x86 Architecture, Advanced Vector Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Tanikawa, Ataru; Okamoto, Takashi; Nitadori, Keigo

    2011-01-01

    We present a high-performance N-body code for astronomical collisional systems accelerated with the aid of a new SIMD instruction set extension of the x86 architecture: Advanced Vector eXtensions (AVX), an enhanced version of the Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE). With one processor core of Intel Core i7-2600 processor (8MB cache and 3.40 GHz) based on Sandy Bridge micro-architecture, we achieved the performance of ~ 20 giga floating point number operations per second (GFlops) for double-precision accuracy, which is two times and five times higher than that of the previously developed code implemented with the SSE instructions (Nitadori et al., 2006b), and that of a code implemented without any explicit use of SIMD instructions with the same processor core. We have parallelized the collisional N-body code by using so-called NINJA scheme (Nitadori et al., 2006a), and achieved ~ 90 GFlops for a system containing more than N = 8192 particles with 8 MPI processes on four cores. We can expect to achieve about 10 ter...

  5. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two main phases. The original objectives of the reservoir-characterization phase of the project were (1) to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two representative fields of the Delaware Mountain Group, Geraldine Ford and Ford West, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, (2) to chose a demonstration area in one of the fields, and (3) to simulate a CO 2 flood in the demonstration area

  6. THETA - an advanced simulation program for 3D fluid, heat and solute transfer in porous media. Enhanced version 5.1 for PC environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THETA is a computer simulation model for 3-dimensional coupled fluid, heat, and solute transport in porous media. The numerical solution used in the model is based on a finite difference approximation (FDM). For convective heat transport, an upwind scheme is used. THETA version 5.1 is a microcomputer version of the earlier main frame computer version of the model, developed also at the Helsinki University of Technology. Although some simplifications have been made, the essential features of the main frame version of THETA (e.g., fully homogeneous and anisotropic permeability) have been retained in the new version. THETA is intended for use in numerous applications of flow in porous media, such as aquifers (thermal energy storage, water supply, environmental issues) or fissured rock (nuclear waste disposal, gas storage) (15 refs., 13 figs.)

  7. Advance in research on aerosol deposition simulation methods%气溶胶沉降模拟方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘克洋; 李劲松

    2011-01-01

    对吸入颗粒物致病作用的评估,需要了解气溶胶颗粒在呼吸道中的沉积特征.由于气溶胶进入呼吸道引发的呼吸道疾病致病机制研究和临床药物气溶胶吸入治疗的需要,人们越发关注如气溶胶颗粒在呼吸道特定区域滞留率,研究气溶胶粒子在呼吸道中分布和沉降比例的关系.这些都需要借助沉降模型来模拟颗粒的区域沉积特征.沉降模型经过半个多世纪的发展,已经形成了成熟的分析模型.计算机流体动力学(CFD)模拟技术的出现,让沉降模拟进入了一个崭新的时代.该文综述了目前研究气溶胶沉降的主要方法和肺模型的发展趋势.%A comprehensive analysis of the health effects of inhaled toxic aerosols requires exact data on airway deposition. A knowledge of the effect of inhaled drugs is essential to the optimization of aerosol drug delivery. Sophisticated analytical deposition models can be used for the computation of total, regional and generation specific deposition efficiencies. The continuously enhancing computer capacities seem to allow us to study the particle transport and deposition in more and more realistic airway geometries with the help of computational fluid dynamics( CFD ) simulation method. In this article. the trends in aerosol deposition models and lung models , and the methods for achievement of deposition simulations are also reviewed.

  8. ADVANCE PAYMENTS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative Circular Nº 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  9. Advance payments

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2003-01-01

    Administrative Circular N 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  10. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  11. Comparison of the Airtraq® and Truview® laryngoscopes to the Macintosh laryngoscope for use by Advanced Paramedics in easy and simulated difficult intubation in manikins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O' Donnell John

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paramedics are frequently required to perform tracheal intubation, a potentially life-saving manoeuvre in severely ill patients, in the prehospital setting. However, direct laryngoscopy is often more difficult in this environment, and failed tracheal intubation constitutes an important cause of morbidity. Novel indirect laryngoscopes, such as the Airtraq® and Truview® laryngoscopes may reduce this risk. Methods We compared the efficacy of these devices to the Macintosh laryngoscope when used by 21 Paramedics proficient in direct laryngoscopy, in a randomized, controlled, manikin study. Following brief didactic instruction with the Airtraq® and Truview® laryngoscopes, each participant took turns performing laryngoscopy and intubation with each device, in an easy intubation scenario and following placement of a hard cervical collar, in a SimMan® manikin. Results The Airtraq® reduced the number of optimization manoeuvres and reduced the potential for dental trauma when compared to the Macintosh, in both the normal and simulated difficult intubation scenarios. In contrast, the Truview® increased the duration of intubation attempts, and required a greater number of optimization manoeuvres, compared to both the Macintosh and Airtraq® devices. Conclusion The Airtraq® laryngoscope performed more favourably than the Macintosh and Truview® devices when used by Paramedics in this manikin study. Further studies are required to extend these findings to the clinical setting.

  12. Advances in Tube Hydroforming - An Enabling Technology for Low-Mass Vehicle Manufacturing - Material, Lubrication,Loading, Simulation Issues, and Alternatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muammer Ko(c)

    2004-01-01

    The tube hydroforming process (THF) has recently found a wide application opportunity in the automotive industry, and is of increasing interest to other industries as well. The increased interest stems from the fact that, through the THF process, manufacturers are able to produce complex, consolidated, lightweight parts with reduced number of post-processing than through alternative metal forming techniques. In order to fully realize the benefits of this technology, various aspects have been under investigation in academia and industry world-wide. In this paper, effect of loading path, incoming material variation, and lubrication on the robustness of the hydroforming process and final part specifications are summarized based on previous experimental and computational work. In addition, the simulation of hydroforming and examples are presented in comparison with experimental findings. Briefly, results emphasized the importance of the loading path design whereas material variation within the experimentally tested range was not found to be significantly effective on the final part specifications. Selection of a lubricant for hydroforming of a frame rail part was presented demonstrating several aspects of lubrication selection methodology. Results of friction experiments show that only thickness, axial feeding, and force measurements are good indications of lubricant performance as these are found to be strongly discriminative.

  13. Advancement of compressible multiphase flows and sodium-water reaction analysis program SERAPHIM. Validation of a numerical method for the simulation of highly underexpanded jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SERAPHIM is a computer program for the simulation of the compressible multiphase flow involving the sodium-water chemical reaction under a tube failure accident in a steam generator of sodium cooled fast reactors. In this study, the numerical analysis of the highly underexpanded air jets into the air or into the water was performed as a part of validation of the SERAPHIM program. The multi-fluid model, the second-order TVD scheme and the HSMAC method considering a compressibility were used in this analysis. Combining these numerical methods makes it possible to calculate the multiphase flow including supersonic gaseous jets. In the case of the air jet into the air, the calculated pressure, the shape of the jet and the location of a Mach disk agreed with the existing experimental results. The effect of the difference scheme and the mesh resolution on the prediction accuracy was clarified through these analyses. The behavior of the air jet into the water was also reproduced successfully by the proposed numerical method. (author)

  14. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, S.P.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Malik, M.A.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. This project involves reservoir characterization of two Late Permian slope and basin clastic reservoirs in the Delaware Basin, West Texas, followed by a field demonstration in one of the fields. The fields being investigated are Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields in Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Project objectives are divided into two major phases, reservoir characterization and implementation. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project were to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of the two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field. Reservoir characterization utilized 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once reservoir characterized was completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} at the northern end of the Ford Geraldine unit was chosen for reservoir simulation. This report summarizes the results of the second year of reservoir characterization.

  15. Recent Advances in Voltammetry

    OpenAIRE

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G.; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electr...

  16. Advanced Microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This video looks at a spinoff application of the technology from advanced microsensors -- those that monitor and determine conditions of spacecraft like the Space Shuttle. The application featured is concerned with the monitoring of the health of premature babies.

  17. Toward full-chip prediction of yield-limiting contact patterning failure: correlation of simulated image parameters to advanced contact metrology metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturtevant, John L.; Chou, Dyiann

    2006-03-01

    Electrical failure due to incomplete contacts or vias has arisen as one of the primary modes of yield loss for 130 nm and below designs in manufacturing. Such failures are generally understood to arise from both random and systematic sources. The addition of redundant vias, where possible, has long been an accepted DFM practice for mitigating the impact of random defects. Incomplete vias are often characterized by having a diameter near the target dimension but a depth of less than 100% of target. As such, it is a difficult problem to diagnose and debug in-line, since bright and dark field optical inspection systems cannot typically distinguish between a closed, partially open and fully open contact. Advanced metrology systems have emerged in recent years to meet this challenge, but no perfect manufacturing solution has yet been identified for full field verification of all contacts. Voltage Contrast (VC) SEM metrology biases the wafer to directly measure electrical conductivity after fill / polish, and can therefore easily discern a lack of electrical connection to the underlying conductor caused by incomplete photo, etch, or fill processing. While an entire wafer can in principal be VC scanned, throughput limitations dictate very sparse sampling in manufacturing. SEM profile grading (PG) leverages the rich content of the secondary electron waveform to decipher information about the bottom of the contact. Several authors have demonstrated an excellent response of the Profile Grade to intentional defocus vectors. However, the SEM can only target discreet or single digit groupings of contacts, and therefore requires intelligent guidance to identify those contacts which are most prone to failure, enabling protection of the fab WIP. An a-priori knowledge of which specific contacts in a layout are most likely to fail would prove very useful for proactive inspection in manufacturing. Model based pre-manufacturing verification allows for such knowledge to be communicated

  18. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Fan

    Full Text Available In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs. The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+, divalent (Mg(2+ or trivalent (Co(NH(3(6 (3+ cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+, to partial aggregation with Mg(2+ and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+. The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions.

  19. AdvancED Flex 4

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Shashank; Schulze, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    AdvancED Flex 4 makes advanced Flex 4 concepts and techniques easy. Ajax, RIA, Web 2.0, mashups, mobile applications, the most sophisticated web tools, and the coolest interactive web applications are all covered with practical, visually oriented recipes. * Completely updated for the new tools in Flex 4* Demonstrates how to use Flex 4 to create robust and scalable enterprise-grade Rich Internet Applications.* Teaches you to build high-performance web applications with interactivity that really engages your users.* What you'll learn Practiced beginners and intermediate users of Flex, especially

  20. Interplay of metabolism and transport in determining oral drug absorption and gut wall metabolism: a simulation assessment using the "Advanced Dissolution, Absorption, Metabolism (ADAM)" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, A S; Neuhoff, S; Jamei, M; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2010-11-01

    Bioavailability of orally administered drugs can be influenced by a number of factors including release from the formulation, dissolution, stability in the gastrointestinal (GI) environment, permeability through the gut wall and first-pass gut wall and hepatic metabolism. Although there are various enzymes in the gut wall which may contribute to gut first pass metabolism, Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A has been shown to play a major role. The efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) is the most extensively studied drug efflux transporter in the gut and might have a significant role in the regulation of GI absorption. Although not every CYP3A substrate will have a high extent of gut wall first-pass extraction, being a substrate for the enzyme increases the likelihood of a higher first-pass extraction. Similarly, being a P-gp substrate does not necessarily pose a problem with the gut wall absorption however it may reduce bioavailability in some cases (e.g. when drug has low passive permeability). An on-going debate has focused on the issue of the interplay between CYP3A and P-gp such that high affinity to P-gp increases the exposure of drug to CYP3A through repeated cycling via passive diffusion and active efflux, decreasing the fraction of drug that escapes first pass gut metabolism (F(G)). The presence of P-gp in the gut wall and the high affinity of some CYP3A substrates to this transporter are postulated to reduce the potential for saturating the enzymes, thus increasing gut wall first-pass metabolism for compounds which otherwise would have saturated CYP3A. Such inferences are based on assumptions in the modelling of oral drug absorption. These models should be as mechanistic as possible and tractable using available in vitro and in vivo information. We review, through simulation, this subject and examine the interplay between gut wall metabolism and efflux transporters by studying the fraction of dose absorbed into enterocytes (F(a)) and F(G) via

  1. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Nickerson, HK; Steenrod, NE

    2011-01-01

    ""This book is a radical departure from all previous concepts of advanced calculus,"" declared the Bulletin of the American Mathematics Society, ""and the nature of this departure merits serious study of the book by everyone interested in undergraduate education in mathematics."" Classroom-tested in a Princeton University honors course, it offers students a unified introduction to advanced calculus. Starting with an abstract treatment of vector spaces and linear transforms, the authors introduce a single basic derivative in an invariant form. All other derivatives - gradient, divergent, curl,

  2. Advanced ferroelectricity

    CERN Document Server

    Blinc, R

    2011-01-01

    Advances in the field of ferroelectricity have implications both for basic physics and for technological applications such as memory devices, spintronic applications and electro-optic devices, as well as in acoustics, robotics, telecommunications and medicine. This book provides an account of recent developments in the field.

  3. 高级模拟联合情景式教学在急诊心肺复苏培训中的应用%Application of Advanced Simulation Combined With Situational Teaching in the Training of Emergency Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永宁

    2015-01-01

    心肺复苏(CPR)是针对心搏呼吸骤停患者所采取的急救措施,是每一个医学生必须掌握的急救技术之一,早期高质量的心肺复苏是患者生存的关键,临床情景结合高级模拟演练加强医学生对心肺复苏的深刻理解、扎实掌握心肺复苏技术,能够提高急诊医学教学质量和培养学生临床思维应变能力。%CPR is a breathing aid measures for cardiac arrest patients taken, is one of every medical students must master first aid techniques, early quality CPR is the key to survival, clinical scenario combined with advanced simulation exercises to strengthen the medical students a deep understanding of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a solid grasp CPR technology can improve the quality of teaching and training of emergency medical students' clinical thinking resilience.

  4. Computer-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Antonoaie, C.; Antonoaie, N.

    2010-01-01

    A computer-based simulation replicates an environment through a computer program designed to consider multiple variables, interactions, and system constraints. Computer-based simulation is used in organization studies to model human social systems to better understand the dynamics between individual and group behaviours.These methods advance organization studies research in many ways. They can be used for extrapolating theory, validating hypotheses, or revealing emergent behaviour. Simulation...

  5. Advanced Virgo

    CERN Multimedia

    Virgo, a first-generation interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detector, located in the European Gravitational Observatory, EGO, Cascina (Pisa-Italy) and constructed by the collaboration of French and Italian institutes (CNRS and INFN) has successfully completed its long-duration data taking runs. It is now undergoing a fundamental upgrade that exploits available cutting edges technology to open an exciting new window on the universe, with the first detection of a gravitational wave signal. Advanced Virgo (AdV) is the project to upgrade the Virgo detector to a second-generation instrument. AdV will be able to scan a volume of the Universe 1000 times larger than initial Virgo. AdV will be hosted in the same infrastructures as Virgo. The Advanced VIRGO project is funded and at present carried on by a larger collaboration of institutes belonging to CNRS- France , RMKI - Hungary, INFN- Italy, Nikhef - The Netherlands Polish Academy of Science - Poland.

  6. Advanced Agriculture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas R. Zanwar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the advanced system which improves agriculture processes like cultivation on ploughed land, based on robotic platform. We have developed a robotic vehicle having four wheels and steered by DC motor. The advanced autonomous system architecture gives us the opportunity to develop a complete new range of agricultural equipment based on small smart machines. The machine will cultivate the farm by considering particular rows and specific column at fixed distance depending on crop. The obstacle detection problem will also be considered, sensed by infrared sensor. The whole algorithm, calculation, processing, monitoring are designed with motors & sensor interfaced with microcontroller. The result obtained through example activation unit is also presented. The dc motor simulation with feedforward and feedback technique shows precise output. With the help of two examples, a DC motor and a magnetic levitation system, the use of MATLAB and Simulink for modeling, analysis and control is designed.

  7. Advanced Nanoemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryd, Michael M.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in the growing field of nanoemulsions are opening up new applications in many areas such as pharmaceuticals, foods, and cosmetics. Moreover, highly controlled nanoemulsions can also serve as excellent model systems for investigating basic scientific questions about soft matter. Here, we highlight some of the most recent developments in nanoemulsions, focusing on methods of formation, surface modification, material properties, and characterization. These developments provide insight into the substantial advantages that nanoemulsions can offer over their microscale emulsion counterparts.

  8. Advanced LIGO

    OpenAIRE

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.; Ain, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry–Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recyc...

  9. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  10. Interoperable Technologies for Advanced Petascale Simulations (ITAPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shephard, Mark S

    2010-02-05

    Efforts during the past year have contributed to the continued development of the ITAPS interfaces and services as well as specific efforts to support ITAPS applications. The ITAPS interface efforts have two components. The first is working with the ITAPS team on improving the ITAPS software infrastructure and level of compliance of our implementations of ITAPS interfaces (iMesh, iMeshP, iRel and iGeom). The second is being involved with the discussions on the design of the iField fields interface. Efforts to move the ITAPS technologies to petascale computers has identified a number of key technical developments that are required to effectively execute the ITAPS interfaces and services. Research to address these parallel method developments has been a major emphasis of the RPI’s team efforts over the past year. Efforts to move the ITAPS technologies to petascale computers has identified a number of key technical developments that are required to effectively execute the ITAPS interfaces and services. Research to address these parallel method developments has been a major emphasis of the RPI’s team efforts over the past year. The development of parallel unstructured mesh methods has considered the need to scale unstructured mesh solves to massively parallel computers. These efforts, summarized in section 2.1 show that with the addition of the ITAPS procedures described in sections 2.2 and 2.3 we are able to obtain excellent strong scaling with our unstructured mesh CFD code on up to 294,912 cores of IBM Blue Gene/P which is the highest core count machine available. The ITAPS developments that have contributed to the scaling and performance of PHASTA include an iterative migration algorithm to improve the combined region and vertex balance of the mesh partition, which increases scalability, and mesh data reordering, which improves computational performance. The other developments are associated with the further development of the ITAPS parallel unstructured mesh adaptation procedures. Specific developments include: • Parallel boundary layer mesh adaptation integrated with parallel anisotropic mesh adaptation (section 2.4.1). • A new more scalable message packing library (section 2.4.2). • Support of periodic boundary conditions (section 2.4.3). We have continued to work closely with both the accelerator applications for COMPASS and fusion application for CEMM. For COMPASS, efforts have focused on providing specific unstructured mesh adaptation tools to deal with curved elements and mesh adaptation. For CEEM, we are working to provide the structures and methods needed for the M3D-C1 to go to full three dimensional configurations.

  11. Advances in beryllium powder consolidation simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuzzy logic based multiobjective genetic algorithm (GA) is introduced and the algorithm is used to optimize micromechanical densification modeling parameters for warm isopressed beryllium powder, HIPed copper powder and CIPed/sintered and HIPed tantalum powder. In addition to optimizing the main model parameters using the experimental data points as objective functions, the GA provides a quantitative measure of the sensitivity of the model to each parameter, estimates the mean particle size of the powder, and determines the smoothing factors for the transition between stage 1 and stage 2 densification. While the GA does not provide a sensitivity analysis in the strictest sense, and is highly stochastic in nature, this method is reliable and reproducible in optimizing parameters given any size data set and determining the impact on the model of slight variations in each parameter

  12. Simulation of advanced concepts for damage control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillis, M.P.W.; Keijer, W.; Smit, C.S.; Wolff, P.A.

    2003-01-01

    Damage control on board navy ships requires a lot of manpower. On a frigate-sized ship of the Royal Netherlands Navy, up to ninety people can be involved in tasks like fire fighting, battle damage repair and treatment of casualties. In present times this is no longer attainable or affordable. To red

  13. Advanced DVI+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae Soon; Lee, S. T.; Euh, D. J.; Chu, I. C.; Youn, Y. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A new advanced safety feature of DVI+ (Direct Vessel Injection Plus) for the APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus), to mitigate the ECC (Emergency Core Cooling) bypass fraction and to prevent switching an ECC outlet to a break flow inlet during a DVI line break, is presented for an advanced DVI system. In the current DVI system, the ECC water injected into the downcomer is easily shifted to the broken cold leg by a high steam cross flow which comes from the intact cold legs during the late reflood phase of a LBLOCA (Large Break Loss Of Coolant Accident). For the new DVI+ system, an ECBD (Emergency Core Barrel Duct) is installed on the outside of a core barrel cylinder. The ECBD has a gap (From the core barrel wall to the ECBD inner wall to the radial direction) of 3/25-7/25 of the downcomer annulus gap. The DVI nozzle and the ECBD are only connected by the ECC water jet, which is called a hydrodynamic water bridge, during the ECC injection period. Otherwise these two components are disconnected from each other without any pipes inside the downcomer. The ECBD is an ECC downward isolation flow sub-channel which protects the ECC water from the high speed steam crossflow in the downcomer annulus during a LOCA event. The injected ECC water flows downward into the lower downcomer through the ECBD without a strong entrainment to a steam cross flow. The outer downcomer annulus of the ECBD is the major steam flow zone coming from the intact cold leg during a LBLOCA. During a DVI line break, the separated DVI nozzle and ECBD have the effect of preventing the level of the cooling water from being lowered in the downcomer due to an inlet-outlet reverse phenomenon at the lowest position of the outlet of the ECBD.

  14. Advanced mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, CB; Kumar, V

    2009-01-01

    About the Book: This book `Advanced Mathematics` is primarily designed for B.Tech., IV Semester (EE and EC branch) students of Rajasthan Technical University. The subject matter is discussed in a lucid manner. The discussion is covered in five units: Unit I: deals with Numerical Analysis, Unit-II: gives different aspects of Numerical Analysis, Unit-III: Special Function, Unit-IV:Statistics and Probability, Calculus of Variation and Transforms are discussed in Unit V. All the theoretical concepts are explained through solved examples. Besides, a large number of unsolved problems on each top

  15. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2007-01-01

    This rigorous two-part treatment advances from functions of one variable to those of several variables. Intended for students who have already completed a one-year course in elementary calculus, it defers the introduction of functions of several variables for as long as possible, and adds clarity and simplicity by avoiding a mixture of heuristic and rigorous arguments.The first part explores functions of one variable, including numbers and sequences, continuous functions, differentiable functions, integration, and sequences and series of functions. The second part examines functions of several

  16. Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines describes the operational performance requirements of turbofan (commercial)engines from a controls systems perspective, covering industry-standard methods and research-edge advances. This book allows the reader to design controllers and produce realistic simulations using public-domain software like CMAPSS: Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation, whose versions are released to the public by NASA. The scope of the book is centered on the design of thrust controllers for both steady flight and transient maneuvers. Classical control theory is not dwelled on, but instead an introduction to general undergraduate control techniques is provided. This book also: Develops a thorough understanding of the challenges associated with engine operability from a control systems perspective, describing performance demands and operational constraints into the framework and language of modern control theory Presents solid theoretical support for classical and advanced engine co...

  17. Simulation tools for future interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, H.; Barton, M; Bhawal, B.; Evans, M; Yoshida, S.

    2006-01-01

    For the design and commissioning of the LIGO interferometer, simulation tools have been used explicitly and implicitly. The requirement of the advanced LIGO interferometer is much more demanding than the first generation interferometer. Development of revised simulation tools for future interferometers are underway in the LIGO Laboratory. The outline of those simulation tools and applications are discussed.

  18. Combinando simulação e sistemas baseados em conhecimento para o projeto de sistemas avançados de manufatura Combining simulation and knowledge-based systems for advanced manufacturing system design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Borenstein

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta um sistema inteligente desenvolvido para verificar se uma determinada opção de projeto de um Sistema Avançado de Manufatura (SAM respeita os objetivos de projeto fixados pelo time de projetistas. Se um problema é encontrado, o sistema começa um ciclo de análise-diagnóstico-recomendação no sentido de diagnosticar a causa do problema, bem como, sugerir possíveis ações no sentido de melhorar a alternativa de projeto em relação ao objetivo não respeitado. Para que este ciclo seja realizado com sucesso, o sistema desenvolvido combina simulação e sistemas baseados em conhecimento, utilizando a experiência e o conhecimento adquiridos por especialistas durante prévios projetos de SAM. Um exemplo ilustra a eficácia do sistema computacional.This article describes a tandem knowledge-based system developed to verify whether a specific advanced manufacturing system (AMS scenario meets the design requirements defined by the design team. If a problem is found, the system starts an analysis-diagnosis-recommendation cycle in order to identify the possible cause(s of the design deficiency as well as to propose changes to improve the performance of the AMS scenario. For this cycle to be successful, the developed system combines simulation and knowledge-based systems, using the experience and knowledge acquired by specialists during previous AMS projects. A case study illustrates the effectiveness of the system.

  19. Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, ...

  20. Advanced CANDU control centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 design is based upon the 900 MWe class Darlington station in Canada, which is among the world leading nuclear power stations for capacity factor with low operation, maintenance and administration costs. The CANDU 9 design provides an advanced control centre with enhanced operations features. The advanced AECL control centre design includes the proven functionality of existing CANDU control centres, those implementable characteristics identified by systematic design combined with a human factors analysis of operations requirements and features needed to improve station operability which are made possible by the application of current technology. The design strategy is to preserve the general main control room operations staff work area as unchanged as possible to facilitate the inclusion of past features and operational experience while incorporating operability improvements. The author will present those features of the advanced CANDU control centre which facilitates improved operability capabilities. As well, aspects of the design process utilized, application of simulation technology and conclusions regarding this design approach will be reviewed

  1. Production of Synthetic Lunar Simulants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Zybek Advanced Products has proven the ability to produce industrial quantities of lunar simulant materials, including glass, agglutinate and melt breccias. These...

  2. Nonelastomeric Rod Seals for Advanced Hydraulic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hady, W. F.; Waterman, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    Advanced high temperature hydraulic system rod sealing requirements can be met by using seals made of nonelastomeric (plastic) materials in applications where elastomers do not have adequate life. Exploratory seal designs were optimized for advanced applications using machinable polyimide materials. These seals demonstrated equivalent flight hour lives of 12,500 at 350 F and 9,875 at 400 F in advanced hydraulic system simulation. Successful operation was also attained under simulated space shuttle applications; 96 reentry thermal cycles and 1,438 hours of vacuum storage. Tests of less expensive molded plastic seals indicated a need for improved materials to provide equivalent performance to the machined seals.

  3. Situational simulations in interactive video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company Advanced Training Technologies section is using situational simulations in several Interactive Video training courses. Two applications of situational simulations will be discussed. In the first, used in the Hanford General Employee Training course, the student evaluates employee's actions in simulations of possible workplace situations. In the second, used in the Criticality Safety course, students must follow well-defined procedures to complete tasks. Design and incorporation of situational simulations will be discussed. 3 refs

  4. Future advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celesia, Gastone G; Hickok, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Future advances in the auditory systems are difficult to predict, and only educated guesses are possible. It is expected that innovative technologies in the field of neuroscience will be applied to the auditory system. Optogenetics, Brainbow, and CLARITY will improve our knowledge of the working of neural auditory networks and the relationship between sound and language, providing a dynamic picture of the brain in action. CLARITY makes brain tissue transparent and offers a three-dimensional view of neural networks, which, combined with genetically labeling neurons with multiple, distinct colors (Optogenetics), will provide detailed information of the complex brain system. Molecular functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will allow the study of neurotransmitters detectable by MRI and their function in the auditory pathways. The Human Connectome project will study the patterns of distributed brain activity that underlie virtually all aspects of cognition and behavior and determine if abnormalities in the distributed patterns of activity may result in hearing and behavior disorders. Similarly, the programs of Big Brain and ENIGMA will improve our understanding of auditory disorders. New stem-cell therapy and gene therapies therapy may bring about a partial restoration of hearing for impaired patients by inducing regeneration of cochlear hair cells. PMID:25726297

  5. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  6. Advanced Architectures for Astrophysical Supercomputing

    OpenAIRE

    Barsdell, Benjamin R.; Barnes, David G.; Fluke, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomers have come to rely on the increasing performance of computers to reduce, analyze, simulate and visualize their data. In this environment, faster computation can mean more science outcomes or the opening up of new parameter spaces for investigation. If we are to avoid major issues when implementing codes on advanced architectures, it is important that we have a solid understanding of our algorithms. A recent addition to the high-performance computing scene that highlights this point...

  7. Advances in the development and validation of CFD-BWR, a two-phase computational fluid dynamics model for the simulation of flow and heat transfer in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents recent advances in the validation of an advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer code (CFD-BWR) that allows the detailed analysis of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel bundles. The CFD-BWR code is being developed as a customized module built on the foundation of the commercial CFD-code STAR-CD which provides general two-phase flow modeling capabilities. We have described the model development strategy that has been adopted by the development team for the prediction of boiling flow regimes in a BWR fuel bundle. This strategy includes the use of local flow topology maps and flow topology specific phenomenological models. The paper reviews the key boiling phenomenological models and focuses on recent results of experiment analyses for the validation of two-phase BWR phenomena models including cladding-to-coolant heat transfer and Critical Heat Flux experiments and the BWR Full-size Assembly Boiling Test (BFBT). The two-phase flow models implemented in the CFD-BWR code can be grouped into three broad categories: models describing the vapor generation at the heated cladding surface, models describing the interactions between the vapor and the liquid coolant, and models describing the heat transfer between the fuel pin and the two-phase coolant. These models have been described and will be briefly reviewed. The boiling model used in the second generation of the CFD-BWR code includes a local flow topology map which allows the cell-by-cell selection of the local flow topology. Local flow topologies can range from a bubbly flow topology where the continuous phase is liquid, to a transition flow topology, to a droplet flow topology where the continuous phase is vapor, depending primarily on the local void fraction. The models describing the cladding-to-coolant heat transfer and the interplay between these models and the local flow topology are important in Critical Heat Flux (CHF) analyses, and will

  8. Focusing SANS using advanced reflective optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Focusing SANS using advanced reflective optics. We propose a new concept of neutron focusing on SANS spectrometers using a combination of curved super mirrors (SM). The aim is to design a focusing system which is achromatic and has no absorption. The proposed design combines advanced neutron optical element such as parabolic and elliptic SM. Some simulation results will be presented and discussed. (author)

  9. Design and simulation of an automation system of a production process and fractionation of {sup 131}I, using strategies of advanced control; Diseno y simulacion de un sistema de automatizacion del proceso de produccion y fraccionamiento de {sup 131}I, utilizando estrategias de control avanzado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paez, Jose; Arias, Pablo; Miranda, Jesus, E-mail: jpaez@jpen.gob.pe, E-mail: parias@ipen.gob.pe, E-mail: jmiranda@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (lPEN), Lima (Peru). Direccion de Servicios. Division de Instrumentacion Nuclear

    2013-10-01

    In this report, the results are obtained in the design and simulation of a control system using advanced strategies in a production cell in the Plant Production of Radioisotopes of IPEN. The results demonstrate that the temperature of the coalition oven is stabilized after 30 minutes, being constituted in an advantage to obtain the maximum yield of the cell production of {sup 131}I; also, an integral good controller has been designed that allows to obtain a mathematical model that reproduces with enough accuracy the behavior of the process. With the final simulation it has been to demonstrate that the System Control of Temperature of the Cell Production of {sup 131}I is a controllable system and allows to carry out the respective sequence with other variables of control of the production cell. (author)

  10. Nanomaterials design and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, Perla

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few decades, several approaches have been developed for designing nano-structured or molecularly-structured materials. These advances have revolutionized practically all fields of science and engineering, providing an additional design variable, the feature size of the nano-structures, which can be tailored to provide new materials with very special characteristics. Nanomaterials: Design and Simulation explores the role that such advances have made toward a rational design of nanostructures and covers a variety of methods from ab initio electronic structure techniques, ab initio

  11. Advanced materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced materials will require improved processing methods due to high melting points, low toughness or ductility values, high reactivity with air or ceramics and typically complex crystal structures with significant anisotropy in flow and/or fracture stress. Materials for structural applications at elevated temperature in critical systems will require processing with a high degree of control. This requires an improved understanding of the relationship between process variables and microstructure to enable control systems to achieve consistently high quality. One avenue to the required level of understanding is computer simulation. Past attempts to do process modeling have been hampered by incomplete data regarding thermophysical or mechanical material behavior. Some of the required data can be calculated. Due to the advances in software and hardware, accuracy and costs are in the realm of acquiring experimental data. Such calculations can, for example, be done at an atomic level to compute lattice energy, fault energies, density of states and charge densities. These can lead to fundamental information about the competition between slip and fracture, anisotropy of bond strength (and therefore cleavage strength), cohesive strength, adhesive strength, elastic modulus, thermal expansion and possibly other quantities which are difficult (and therefore expensive to measure). Some of these quantities can be fed into a process model. It is probable that temperature dependencies can be derived numerically as well. Examples are given of the beginnings of such an approach for Ni3Al and MoSi2. Solidification problems are examples of the state-of-the-art process modeling and adequately demonstrate the need for extensive input data. Such processes can be monitored in terms of interfacial position vs. time, cooling rate and thermal gradient

  12. Advances in Electrochemical Models for Predicting the Cycling Performance of Traction Batteries: Experimental Study on Ni-MH and Simulation Développement de modèles électrochimiques de batteries de traction pour la prédiction de performances : étude expérimentale de batteries NiMH et simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard J.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Rigorous electrochemical models to simulate the cycling performance of batteries have been successfully developed and reported in the literature. They constitute a very promising approach for State-of-Charge (SoC estimation based on the physics of the cell with regards to other methods since SoC is an internal parameter of these physical models. However, the computational time needed to solve electrochemical battery models for online applications requires to develop a simplified physics-based battery model. In this work, our goal is to present and validate an advanced 0D-electrochemical model of a Ni-MH cell, as an example. This lumped-parameter model will be used to design an extended Kalman filter to predict the SoC of a Ni-MH pack. It is presented, followed by an extensive experimental study conducted on Ni-MH cells to better understand the mechanisms of physico-chemical phenomena occurring at both electrodes and support the model development. The last part of the paper focuses on the evaluation of the model with regards to experimental results obtained on Ni-MH sealed cells but also on the related commercial HEV battery pack. Des modèles électrochimiques fins permettant de simuler le comportement de batteries ont été développés avec succès et reportés dans la littérature. Ils constituent une alternative aux méthodes classiques pour estimer l’état de charge (SoC pour State of Charge des batteries, cette variable étant ici un paramètre interne du modèle physique. Cependant, pour les applications embarquées, il est nécessaire de développer des modèles simplifiés sur la base de ces modèles physiques afin de diminuer le temps de calcul nécessaire à la résolution des équations. Ici, nous présenterons à titre d’exemple un modèle électrochimique 0D avancé d’un accumulateur NiMH et sa validation. Ce modèle à paramètres concentrés sera utilisé pour réaliser un filtre de Kalman qui permettra la prédiction de l

  13. Advanced median method for timing jitter compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chen; Zhu Jiangmiao; Jan Verspecht; Liu Mingliang; Li Yang

    2008-01-01

    Timing jitter is one of the main factors that influence on the accuracy of time domain precision measurement. Timing jitter compensation is one of the problems people concern. Because of the flaws of median method, PDF deconvolution method and synthetic method, we put forward a new method for timing jitter compensation, which is called advanced median method. The theory of the advanced median method based on probability and statistics is analyzed, and the process of the advanced median method is summarized in this paper. Simulation and experiment show that compared with other methods, the new method could compensate timing jitter effectively.

  14. Electromechanical Drivetrain Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego-Calderon, Juan; Branner, Kim; Natarajan, Anand;

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is another step from the DTU Wind Energy efforts to advance understanding of the electromechanical drive-train loads and its interaction with the rest of the components in the wind turbine. The main objective of the PhD is to investigate the modelling and simulation...... of a wind turbine’s drivetrain using an integrated simulation approach where different simulation tools are interconnected. Matlab and HAWC2 are used for this purpose. A contribution is expected to be in the study of the interaction between the mechanical loads in the gearbox due to gear mesh and...... bearing flexibilities, the generator dynamics and the grid, along with the structural loads in the wind turbine. In this paper, two simulation approaches are presented and conclusions are made according to their advantages and disadvantages. The drive-train is described by means of a torsional model...

  15. Simulators IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain papers on simulators with artificial intelligence, and the human decision making process; visuals for simulators: human factors, training, and psycho-physical impacts; the role of institutional structure on simulation projects; maintenance trainers for economic value and safety; biomedical simulators for understanding nature, for medical benefits, and the physiological effects of simulators; the mathematical models and numerical techniques that drive today's simulators; and the demography of simulators, with census papers identifying the population of real-time simulator training devices; nuclear reactors

  16. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.M. Tang; V.S. Chan

    2005-01-03

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology.

  17. Advances and Challenges in Computational Plasma Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientific simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Recent advances in simulations of magnetically-confined plasmas are reviewed in this paper with illustrative examples chosen from associated research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and other topics. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology

  18. Advances in water resources technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation of technological advances in the field of water resources will be the focus of Advances in Water Resources Technology, a conference to be held in Athens, Greece, March 20-23, 1991. Organized by the European Committee for Water Resources Management, in cooperation with the National Technical University of Athens, the conference will feature state-of-the art papers, contributed original research papers, and poster papers. Session subjects will include surface water, groundwater, water resources conservation, water quality and reuse, computer modeling and simulation, real-time control of water resources systems, and institutions and methods for technology.The official language of the conference will be English. Special meetings and discussions will be held for investigating methods of effective technology transfer among European countries. For this purpose, a wide representation of research institutions, universities and companies involved in water resources technology will be attempted.

  19. AGATA - Advanced Gamma Tracking Array

    CERN Document Server

    Akkoyun, S; Alikhani, B; Ameil, F; de Angelis, G; Arnold, L; Astier, A; Ataç, A; Aubert, Y; Aufranc, C; Austin, A; Aydin, S; Azaiez, F; Badoer, S; Balabanski, D L; Barrientos, D; Baulieu, G; Baumann, R; Bazzacco, D; Beck, F A; Beck, T; Bednarczyk, P; Bellato, M; Bentley, M A; Benzoni, G; Berthier, R; Berti, L; Beunard, R; Bianco, G Lo; Birkenbach, B; Bizzeti, P G; Bizzeti-Sona, A M; Blanc, F Le; Blasco, J M; Blasi, N; Bloor, D; Boiano, C; Borsato, M; Bortolato, D; Boston, A J; Boston, H C; Bourgault, P; Boutachkov, P; Bouty, A; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Brawn, I P; Brondi, A; Broussard, S; Bruyneel, B; Bucurescu, D; Burrows, I; Bürger, A; Cabaret, S; Cahan, B; Calore, E; Camera, F; Capsoni, A; Carrió, F; Casati, G; Castoldi, M; Cederwall, B; Cercus, J -L; Chambert, V; Chambit, M El; Chapman, R; Charles, L; Chavas, J; Clément, E; Cocconi, P; Coelli, S; Coleman-Smith, P J; Colombo, A; Colosimo, S; Commeaux, C; Conventi, D; Cooper, R J; Corsi, A; Cortesi, A; Costa, L; Crespi, F C L; Cresswell, J R; Cullen, D M; Curien, D; Czermak, A; Delbourg, D; Depalo, R; Descombes, T; Désesquelles, P; Detistov, P; Diarra, C; Didierjean, F; Dimmock, M R; Doan, Q T; Domingo-Pardo, C; Doncel, M; Dorangeville, F; Dosme, N; Drouen, Y; Duchêne, G; Dulny, B; Eberth, J; Edelbruck, P; Egea, J; Engert, T; Erduran, M N; Ertürk, S; Fanin, C; Fantinel, S; Farnea, E; Faul, T; Filliger, M; Filmer, F; Finck, Ch; de France, G; Gadea, A; Gast, W; Geraci, A; Gerl, J; Gernhäuser, R; Giannatiempo, A; Giaz, A; Gibelin, L; Givechev, A; Goel, N; González, V; Gottardo, A; Grave, X; Grȩbosz, J; Griffiths, R; Grint, A N; Gros, P; Guevara, L; Gulmini, M; Görgen, A; Ha, H T M; Habermann, T; Harkness, L J; Harroch, H; Hauschild, K; He, C; Hernández-Prieto, A; Hervieu, B; Hess, H; Hüyük, T; Ince, E; Isocrate, R; Jaworski, G; Johnson, A; Jolie, J; Jones, P; Jonson, B; Joshi, P; Judson, D S; Jungclaus, A; Kaci, M; Karkour, N; Karolak, M; Kaşkaş, A; Kebbiri, M; Kempley, R S; Khaplanov, A; Klupp, S; Kogimtzis, M; Kojouharov, I; Korichi, A; Korten, W; Kröll, Th; Krücken, R; Kurz, N; Ky, B Y; Labiche, M; Lafay, X; Lavergne, L; Lazarus, I H; Leboutelier, S; Lefebvre, F; Legay, E; Legeard, L; Lelli, F; Lenzi, S M; Leoni, S; Lermitage, A; Lersch, D; Leske, J; Letts, S C; Lhenoret, S; Lieder, R M; Linget, D; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lotodé, A; Lunardi, S; Maj, A; van der Marel, J; Mariette, Y; Marginean, N; Marginean, R; Maron, G; Mather, A R; Mȩczyński, W; Mendéz, V; Medina, P; Melon, B; Menegazzo, R; Mengoni, D; Merchan, E; Mihailescu, L; Michelagnoli, C; Mierzejewski, J; Milechina, L; Million, B; Mitev, K; Molini, P; Montanari, D; Moon, S; Morbiducci, F; Moro, R; Morrall, P S; Möller, O; Nannini, A; Napoli, D R; Nelson, L; Nespolo, M; Ngo, V L; Nicoletto, M; Nicolini, R; Noa, Y Le; Nolan, P J; Norman, M; Nyberg, J; Obertelli, A; Olariu, A; Orlandi, R; Oxley, D C; Özben, C; Ozille, M; Oziol, C; Pachoud, E; Palacz, M; Palin, J; Pancin, J; Parisel, C; Pariset, P; Pascovici, G; Peghin, R; Pellegri, L; Perego, A; Perrier, S; Petcu, M; Petkov, P; Petrache, C; Pierre, E; Pietralla, N; Pietri, S; Pignanelli, M; Piqueras, I; Podolyak, Z; Pouhalec, P Le; Pouthas, J; Pugnére, D; Pucknell, V F E; Pullia, A; Quintana, B; Raine, R; Rainovski, G; Ramina, L; Rampazzo, G; La Rana, G; Rebeschini, M; Recchia, F; Redon, N; Reese, M; Reiter, P; Regan, P H; Riboldi, S; Richer, M; Rigato, M; Rigby, S; Ripamonti, G; Robinson, A P; Robin, J; Roccaz, J; Ropert, J -A; Rossé, B; Alvarez, C Rossi; Rosso, D; Rubio, B; Rudolph, D; Saillant, F; Şahin, E; Salomon, F; Salsac, M -D; Salt, J; Salvato, G; Sampson, J; Sanchis, E; Santos, C; Schaffner, H; Schlarb, M; Scraggs, D P; Seddon, D; Şenyiğit, M; Sigward, M -H; Simpson, G; Simpson, J; Slee, M; Smith, J F; Sona, P; Sowicki, B; Spolaore, P; Stahl, C; Stanios, T; Stefanova, E; Stézowski, O; Strachan, J; Suliman, G; Söderström, P -A; Tain, J L; Tanguy, S; Tashenov, S; Theisen, Ch; Thornhill, J; Tomasi, F; Toniolo, N; Touzery, R; Travers, B; Triossi, A; Tripon, M; Tun-Lanoë, K M M; Turcato, M; Unsworth, C; Ur, C A; Valiente-Dobon, J J; Vandone, V; Vardaci, E; Venturelli, R; Veronese, F; Veyssiere, Ch; Viscione, E; Wadsworth, R; Walker, P M; Warr, N; Weber, C; Weisshaar, D; Wells, D; Wieland, O; Wiens, A; Wittwer, G; Wollersheim, H J; Zocca, F; Zamfir, N V; Ziȩbliński, M; Zucchiatti, A

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. This technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realization of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances. These include the development of encapsulated highly-segmented germanium detectors assembled in a triple cluster detector cryostat, an electronics system with fast digital sampling and a data acquisition system to process the data at a high rate. The full characterization of the crystals was measured and compared with detector-response simulations. This enabled pulse-shape analysis algorith...

  20. Advanced robot locomotion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.