WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced high temperature

  1. Advances in high temperature chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    1969-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 2 covers the advances in the knowledge of the high temperature behavior of materials and the complex and unfamiliar characteristics of matter at high temperature. The book discusses the dissociation energies and free energy functions of gaseous monoxides; the matrix-isolation technique applied to high temperature molecules; and the main features, the techniques for the production, detection, and diagnosis, and the applications of molecular beams in high temperatures. The text also describes the chemical research in streaming thermal plasmas, as w

  2. Advances in high temperature chemistry 1

    CERN Document Server

    Eyring, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Advances in High Temperature Chemistry, Volume 1 describes the complexities and special and changing characteristics of high temperature chemistry. After providing a brief definition of high temperature chemistry, this nine-chapter book goes on describing the experiments and calculations of diatomic transition metal molecules, as well as the advances in applied wave mechanics that may contribute to an understanding of the bonding, structure, and spectra of the molecules of high temperature interest. The next chapter provides a summary of gaseous ternary compounds of the alkali metals used in

  3. High Temperature Materials Characterization and Advanced Materials Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H.

    2007-06-01

    The project has been carried out for 2 years in stage III in order to achieve the final goals of performance verification of the developed materials, after successful development of the advanced high temperature material technologies for 3 years in Stage II. The mechanical and thermal properties of the advanced materials, which were developed during Stage II, were evaluated at high temperatures, and the modification of the advanced materials were performed. Moreover, a database management system was established using user-friendly knowledge-base scheme to complete the integrated-information material database in KAERI material division

  4. Advances in high temperature water chemistry and future issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper traces the development of advances in high temperature water chemistry with emphasis in the field of nuclear power. Many of the water chemistry technologies used in plants throughout the world today would not have been possible without the underlying scientific advances made in this field. In recent years, optimization of water chemistry has been accomplished by the availability of high temperature water chemistry codes such as MULTEQ. These tools have made the science of high temperature chemistry readily accessible for engineering purposes. The paper closes with a discussion of what additional scientific data and insights must be pursued in order to support the further development of water chemistry technologies for the nuclear industry. (orig.)

  5. Ceramic matrix composites -- Advanced high-temperature structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowden, R.A.; Ferber, M.K.; DiPietro, S.G.

    1995-01-01

    This symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites: Advanced High-Temperature Structural Materials was held at the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on November 28--December 2. The symposium was sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technology's Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites Program, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and NASA Lewis Research Center. Among the competing materials for advanced, high-temperature applications, ceramic matrix composites are leading candidates. The symposium was organized such that papers concerning constituents--fibers and matrices--were presented first, followed by composite processing, modeling of mechanical behavior, and thermomechanical testing. More stable reinforcements are necessary to enhance the performance and life of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, and to ensure final acceptance of these materials for high-temperature applications. Encouraging results in the areas of polymer-derived SiC fibers and single crystal oxide filaments were given, suggesting composites with improved thermomechanical properties and stability will be realized in the near future. The significance of the fiber-matrix interface in the design and performance of these materials is evident. Numerous mechanical models to relate interface properties to composite behavior, and interpret test methods and data, were enthusiastically discussed. One issue of great concern for any advanced material for use in extreme environments is stability. This theme arose frequently throughout the symposium and was the topic of focus on the final day. Fifty nine papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  6. High temperature electrical energy storage: advances, challenges, and frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinrong; Salari, Maryam; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-10-24

    With the ongoing global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emission and dependence on oil, electrical energy storage (EES) devices such as Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors have become ubiquitous. Today, EES devices are entering the broader energy use arena and playing key roles in energy storage, transfer, and delivery within, for example, electric vehicles, large-scale grid storage, and sensors located in harsh environmental conditions, where performance at temperatures greater than 25 °C are required. The safety and high temperature durability are as critical or more so than other essential characteristics (e.g., capacity, energy and power density) for safe power output and long lifespan. Consequently, significant efforts are underway to design, fabricate, and evaluate EES devices along with characterization of device performance limitations such as thermal runaway and aging. Energy storage under extreme conditions is limited by the material properties of electrolytes, electrodes, and their synergetic interactions, and thus significant opportunities exist for chemical advancements and technological improvements. In this review, we present a comprehensive analysis of different applications associated with high temperature use (40-200 °C), recent advances in the development of reformulated or novel materials (including ionic liquids, solid polymer electrolytes, ceramics, and Si, LiFePO 4 , and LiMn 2 O 4 electrodes) with high thermal stability, and their demonstrative use in EES devices. Finally, we present a critical overview of the limitations of current high temperature systems and evaluate the future outlook of high temperature batteries with well-controlled safety, high energy/power density, and operation over a wide temperature range.

  7. Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor for small laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato

    2006-01-01

    Advanced technologies related to a high temperature superconductor materials and small refrigerator are reviewed. Mini-RT/RT-1 is designed and constructed as a plasma examination device. The element technology of low temperature apparatus, the results of performance tests and application examples are explained. The superconductors such as Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 (Bi-2212) for the low temperature phase, Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 (Bi-2223) for the high temperature phase, and YBa 2 Cu 3 O y (YBCO or Y123) are described. Advanced 4K-Giford-Mcmahon (GM) refrigerator on the market put superconductor coil made of low temperature superconductor metals to practical use and extends its application field. Small laboratory is able to experiment on the high temperature superconductor materials. (S.Y.)

  8. High temperature material characterization and advanced materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Kim, D. H.; Kim, S. H. and others

    2005-03-01

    The study is to characterize the structural materials under the high temperature, one of the most significant environmental factors in nuclear systems. And advanced materials are developed for high temperature and/or low activation in neutron irradiation. Tensile, fatigue and creep properties have been carried out at high temperature to evaluate the mechanical degradation. Irradiation tests were performed using the HANARO. The optimum chemical composition and heat treatment condition were determined for nuclear grade 316NG stainless steel. Nitrogen, aluminum, and tungsten were added for increasing the creep rupture strength of FMS steel. The new heat treatment method was developed to form more stable precipitates. By applying the novel whiskering process, high density SiC/SiC composites with relative density above 90% could be obtained even in a shorter processing time than the conventional CVI process. Material integrated databases are established using data sheets. The databases of 6 kinds of material properties are accessible through the home page of KAERI material division

  9. Materials for advanced high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    Materials are studied in advanced applications of high temperature reactors: helium gas turbine and process heat. Long term creep behavior and corrosion tests are conducted in simulated HTR helium up to 1000 deg C with impurities additions in the furnace atmosphere. Corrosion studies on AISI 321 steels at 800-1000 deg C have shown that the O 2 partial pressure is as low as 10 -24+-3 atm, Ni and Fe cannot be oxidised above about 500 and 600 deg C, Cr cease to oxidise at 800 to 900 deg C and Ti at 900 to 1000 deg C depending on alloy composition γ' strengthened superalloys must depend on a protective corrosion mechanism assisted by the presence of Ti and possibly Cr. Carburisation has been identified metallographically in several high temperature materials: Hastelloy X and M21Z. Alloy TZM appears to be inert in HTR Helium at 900 and 1000 deg C. In alloy 800 and Inconel 625 surface cracks initiation is suppressed but crack propagation is accelerated but this was not apparent in AISI steels, Hastelloy X or fine grain Inconel at 750 deg C

  10. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel.

  11. Summary - Advanced high-temperature reactor for hydrogen and electricity production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, the production of electricity has been assumed to be the primary application of nuclear energy. That may change. The production of hydrogen (H 2 ) may become a significant application. The technology to produce H 2 using nuclear energy imposes different requirements on the reactor, which, in turn, may require development of new types of reactors. Advanced High Temperature reactors can meet the high temperature requirements to achieve this goal. This alternative application of nuclear energy may necessitate changes in the regulatory structure

  12. Advances in High Temperature Materials for Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Nurul Amira Binti; Johar, Muhammad Akmal Bin; Ibrahim, Mohd Halim Irwan Bin; Marwah, Omar Mohd Faizan bin

    2017-08-01

    In today’s technology, additive manufacturing has evolved over the year that commonly known as 3D printing. Currently, additive manufacturing have been applied for many industries such as for automotive, aerospace, medical and other commercial product. The technologies are supported by materials for the manufacturing process to produce high quality product. Plus, additive manufacturing technologies has been growth from the lowest to moderate and high technology to fulfil manufacturing industries obligation. Initially from simple 3D printing such as fused deposition modelling (FDM), poly-jet, inkjet printing, to selective laser sintering (SLS), and electron beam melting (EBM). However, the high technology of additive manufacturing nowadays really needs high investment to carry out the process for fine products. There are three foremost type of material which is polymer, metal and ceramic used for additive manufacturing application, and mostly they were in the form of wire feedstock or powder. In circumstance, it is crucial to recognize the characteristics of each type of materials used in order to understand the behaviours of the materials on high temperature application via additive manufacturing. Therefore, this review aims to provide excessive inquiry and gather the necessary information for further research on additive material materials for high temperature application. This paper also proposed a new material based on powder glass, which comes from recycled tempered glass from automotive industry, having a huge potential to be applied for high temperature application. The technique proposed for additive manufacturing will minimize some cost of modelling with same quality of products compare to the others advanced technology used for high temperature application.

  13. Research and Development of Some Advanced High Temperature Titanium Alloys for Aero-engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Jian-ming

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Some advanced high temperature titanium alloys are usually selected to be manufactured into blade, disc, case, blisk and bling under high temperature environment in compressor and turbine system of a new generation high thrust-mass ratio aero-engine. The latest research progress of 600℃ high temperature titanium alloy, fireproof titanium alloy, TiAl alloy, continuous SiC fiber reinforced titanium matrix composite and their application technology in recent years in China were reviewed in this paper. The key technologies need to be broken through in design, processing and application of new material and component are put forward, including industrial ingot composition of high purified and homogeneous control technology, preparation technology of the large size bar and special forgings, machining technology of blisk and bling parts, material property evaluation and application design technique. The future with the continuous application of advanced high temperature titanium alloys, will be a strong impetus to the development of China's aero-engine technology.

  14. Optimization of the Neutronics of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    In these studies, we have investigated the neutronic and safety performance of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for plutonium and uranium fuels and we extended the analysis to five different coolants. The AHTR is a graphite-moderated and molten salt-cooled high temperature reactor, which takes advantage of the TRISO particles technology for the fuel utilization. The conceptual design of the core, proposed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, aims to provide an alternative to helium as coolant of high-temperature reactors for industrial applications like hydrogen production. We evaluated the influence of the radial reflector on the criticality of the core for the uranium and plutonium fuels and we focused on the void coefficient of 5 different molten salts; since the safety of the reactor is enhanced also by the large and negative coefficient of temperature, we completed our investigation by observing the keff changes when the graphite temperature varies from 300 to 1800 K. (authors)

  15. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  16. Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig Brown; Ingvar Landalv; Ragnar Stare; Jerry Yuan; Nikolai DeMartini; Nasser Ashgriz

    2008-03-31

    Weyerhaeuser operates the world's only commercial high-temperature black liquor gasifier at its pulp mill in New Bern, NC. The unit was started-up in December 1996 and currently processes about 15% of the mill's black liquor. Weyerhaeuser, Chemrec AB (the gasifier technology developer), and the U.S. Department of Energy recognized that the long-term, continuous operation of the New Bern gasifier offered a unique opportunity to advance the state of high temperature black liquor gasification toward the commercial-scale pressurized O2-blown gasification technology needed as a foundation for the Forest Products Bio-Refinery of the future. Weyerhaeuser along with its subcontracting partners submitted a proposal in response to the 2004 joint USDOE and USDA solicitation - 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative'. The Weyerhaeuser project 'Advancement of High Temperature Black Liquor Gasification' was awarded USDOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42259 in November 2004. The overall goal of the DOE sponsored project was to utilize the Chemrec{trademark} black liquor gasification facility at New Bern as a test bed for advancing the development status of molten phase black liquor gasification. In particular, project tasks were directed at improvements to process performance and reliability. The effort featured the development and validation of advanced CFD modeling tools and the application of these tools to direct burner technology modifications. The project also focused on gaining a fundamental understanding and developing practical solutions to address condensate and green liquor scaling issues, and process integration issues related to gasifier dregs and product gas scrubbing. The Project was conducted in two phases with a review point between the phases. Weyerhaeuser pulled together a team of collaborators to undertake these tasks. Chemrec AB, the technology supplier, was intimately involved in most tasks, and focused primarily on the

  17. Diffusion barrier coatings for high temperature corrosion resistance of advanced carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh Raman, K.S.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon possesses an excellent combination of mechanical and thermal properties, viz., excellent creep resistance at temperatures up to 2400 deg C in non-oxidizing environment and a low thermal expansion coefficient. These properties make carbon a potential material for very high temperature applications. However, the use of carbon materials at high temperatures is considerably restricted due to their extremely poor oxidation resistance at temperatures above 400 deg C. The obvious choice for improving high temperature oxidation resistance of such materials is a suitable diffusion barrier coating. This paper presents an overview of recent developments in advanced diffusion- and thermal-barrier coatings for ceramic composites, with particular reference to C/C composites. The paper discusses the development of multiphase and multi-component ceramic coatings, and recent investigations on the oxidation resistance of the coated C/C composites. The paper also discusses the cases of innovative engineering solutions for traditional problems with the ceramic coatings, and the scope of intelligent processing in developing coatings for the C/C composites. Copyright (2000) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  18. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  19. Advance High Temperature Inspection Capabilities for Small Modular Reactors: Part 1 - Ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Leonard J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Bowler, John R. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2017-08-30

    The project objective was to investigate the development non-destructive evaluation techniques for advanced small modular reactors (aSMR), where the research sought to provide key enabling inspection technologies needed to support the design and maintenance of reactor component performance. The project tasks for the development of inspection techniques to be applied to small modular reactor are being addressed through two related activities. The first is focused on high temperature ultrasonic transducers development (this report Part 1) and the second is focused on an advanced eddy current inspection capability (Part 2). For both inspection techniques the primary aim is to develop in-service inspection techniques that can be carried out under standby condition in a fast reactor at a temperature of approximately 250°C in the presence of liquid sodium. The piezoelectric material and the bonding between layers have been recognized as key factors fundamental for development of robust ultrasonic transducers. Dielectric constant characterization of bismuth scantanate-lead titanate ((1-x)BiScO3-xPbTiO3) (BS-PT) has shown a high Curie temperature in excess of 450°C , suitable for hot stand-by inspection in liquid metal reactors. High temperature pulse-echo contact measurements have been performed with BS-PT bonded to 12.5 mm thick 1018-low carbon steel plate from 20C up to 260 C. High temperature air-backed immersion transducers have been developed with BS-PT, high temperature epoxy and quarter wavlength nickel plate, needed for wetting ability in liquid sodium. Ultrasonic immersion measurements have been performed in water up to 92C and in silicone oil up to 140C. Physics based models have been validated with room temperature experimental data with benchmark artifical defects.

  20. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-07-29

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  1. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-01-01

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the

  2. Structural instabilities of high temperature alloys and their use in advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.; Nickel, H.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.

    1989-01-01

    High-temperature, iron-nickel and nickel based alloys are the candidate heat exchanger materials for advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors supplying process heat for coal gasification, where operation temperatures can reach 850-950 deg. C and service lives of more than 100,000 h are necessary. In the present paper, typical examples of structural changes which occur in two representative alloys (Alloy 800 H, Fe-32Ni-20Cr and Alloy 617, Ni-22Cr-12Co-9Mo-1Al) during high temperature exposure will be given and the effects on the creep rupture properties discussed. At service temperatures, precipitation of carbides occurs which has a significant effect on the creep behaviour, especially in the early stages of creep when the precipitate particles are very fine. During coarsening of the carbides, carbides at grain boundaries restrict grain boundary sliding which retards the development of creep damage. In the service environments, enhanced carbide precipitation may occur due to the ingress of carbon from the environment (carburization). Although the creep rate is not adversely affected, the ductility of the carburized material at low and intermediate temperatures is very low. During simulated service exposures, the formation of surface corrosion scales, the precipitation of carbides and the formation of internal oxides below the surface leads to depletion of the matrix in the alloying elements involved in the corrosion processes. In thin-walled tubes the depletion of Cr due to Cr 2 O 3 formation on the surface can lead to a loss of creep strength. An additional depletion effect resulting from environmental-metal reactions is the loss of carbon (decarburization) which may occur in specific environments. The compositions of the cooling gases which decarburize the material have been determined; they are to be avoided during reactor operation

  3. Secondary heat exchanger design and comparison for advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; Kim, E. S.; Siahpush, A.; McKellar, M.; Patterson, M.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation nuclear reactors such as the advanced high temperature reactor (AHTR) are designed to increase energy efficiency in the production of electricity and provide high temperature heat for industrial processes. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process heat transport system. This study considers two different types of heat exchangers - helical coiled heat exchanger and printed circuit heat exchanger - as possible options for the AHTR secondary heat exchangers with distributed load analysis and comparison. Comparison is provided for all different cases along with challenges and recommendations. (authors)

  4. Methods for measuring the spectral reflectivity of advanced materials at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salikhov, T.P.; Kan, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    For investigation in the domain of advanced materials as well as for new technologies there is an urgent need for knowledge of the spectral reflectivity of the materials specially at high temperatures. However the methods available are mostly intended for measuring the model materials with specular or diffuse reflection surface. This is not quite correct since advanced materials have mixed specular diffuse reflection surfaces. New methods for reflectivity measurements of materials in the visible, near and middle infrared range at high temperature, regardless of surface texture, have been developed. The advantages of the methods proposed are as flows: (a) the facility of performing the reflectivity measurements for materials with mixed specular diffuse reflectance; (b) wide spectral range 0,38-8 micro m; (c) wide temperature range 300-3000 K; (d) high accuracy and rapid measurements. The methods are based on the following principals (i) Diffuse irradiation of the sample surface and the use of Helkholtz reciprocity principle to determine the directional hemispherical reflectivity ii) Pulse polychromatic probing of the sample by additional light source. The first principle excludes the influence of the angular reflection distribution of sample surface on data obtained. The second principle gives the possibility of simultaneous measurements of the reflectivity. The second principle gives the possibility of simultaneous measurements of the reflectivity in wide spectral range. On the basis of these principles for high temperature reflectometers have been developed and discussed here. (author)

  5. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  6. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  7. Material and component progress within ARCHER for advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.E.; Davies, M.; Pra, F.; Bonnamy, P.; Fokkens, J.; Heijna, M.; Bout, N. de; Vreeling, A.; Bourlier, F.; Lhachemi, D.; Woayehune, A.; Dubiez-le-Goff, S.; Hahner, P.; Futterer, M.; Berka, J.; Kalivodora, J.; Pouchon, M.A.; Schmitt, R.; Homerin, P.; Marsden, B.; Mummery, P.; Mutch, G.; Ponca, D.; Buhl, P.; Hoffmann, M.; Rondet, F.; Pecherty, A.; Baurand, F.; Alenda, F.; Esch, M.; Kohlz, N.; Reed, J.; Fachinger, J.; Klower, Dr.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R and D) integrated project started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7. Framework Programme (FP7) for a period of four years to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R and D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research and Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on materials and component technologies within ARCHER over the first two years of the project. (authors)

  8. Recent advances in high-temperature superconductor wire fabrication and applications development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, recent advances in fabrication of high-temperature superconductor wires are summarized and detailed discussion is provided on developments in near- and intermediate-term applications. Near-term applications, using presently obtainable current densities, include liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, cryostat current leads, and magnetic bearings. Intermediate-term applications, using current densities expected to be available in the near future, include fault-current limiters and short transmission lines

  9. Advanced High-Temperature Reactor for Production of Electricity and Hydrogen: Molten-Salt-Coolant, Graphite-Coated-Particle-Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is to provide the very high temperatures necessary to enable low-cost (1) efficient thermochemical production of hydrogen and (2) efficient production of electricity. The proposed AHTR uses coated-particle graphite fuel similar to the fuel used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), such as the General Atomics gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR). However, unlike the MHTGRs, the AHTR uses a molten salt coolant with a pool configuration, similar to that of the PRISM liquid metal reactor. A multi-reheat helium Brayton (gas-turbine) cycle, with efficiencies >50%, is used to produce electricity. This approach (1) minimizes requirements for new technology development and (2) results in an advanced reactor concept that operates at essentially ambient pressures and at very high temperatures. The low-pressure molten-salt coolant, with its high heat capacity and natural circulation heat transfer capability, creates the potential for (1) exceptionally robust safety (including passive decay-heat removal) and (2) allows scaling to large reactor sizes [∼1000 Mw(e)] with passive safety systems to provide the potential for improved economics

  10. A Soft-Switching Inverter for High-Temperature Advanced Hybrid Electric Vehicle Traction Motor Drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Jason [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yu, Wensong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Sun, Pengwei [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Leslie, Scott [Powerex, Inc., Harrison, OH (United States); Prusia, Duane [Powerex, Inc., Harrison, OH (United States); Arnet, Beat [Azure Dynamics, Oak Park, MI (United States); Smith, Chris [Azure Dynamics, Oak Park, MI (United States); Cogan, Art [Azure Dynamics, Oak Park, MI (United States)

    2012-03-31

    The state-of-the-art hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) require the inverter cooling system to have a separate loop to avoid power semiconductor junction over temperatures because the engine coolant temperature of 105°C does not allow for much temperature rise in silicon devices. The proposed work is to develop an advanced soft-switching inverter that will eliminate the device switching loss and cut down the power loss so that the inverter can operate at high-temperature conditions while operating at high switching frequencies with small current ripple in low inductance based permanent magnet motors. The proposed tasks also include high-temperature packaging and thermal modeling and simulation to ensure the packaged module can operate at the desired temperature. The developed module will be integrated with the motor and vehicle controller for dynamometer and in-vehicle testing to prove its superiority. This report will describe the detailed technical design of the soft-switching inverters and their test results. The experiments were conducted both in module level for the module conduction and switching characteristics and in inverter level for its efficiency under inductive and dynamometer load conditions. The performance will be compared with the DOE original specification.

  11. Global scaling analysis for the pebble bed advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, E.D.; Peterson, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    Scaled Integral Effects Test (IET) facilities play a critical role in the design certification process of innovative reactor designs. Best-estimate system analysis codes, which minimize deliberate conservatism, require confirmatory data during the validation process to ensure an acceptable level of accuracy as defined by the regulator. The modular Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), with a nominal power output of 900 MWth, is the most recent UC Berkeley design for a liquid fluoride salt cooled, solid fuel reactor. The PB-AHTR takes advantage of technologies developed for gas-cooled high temperature thermal and fast reactors, sodium fast reactors, and molten salt reactors. In this paper, non-dimensional scaling groups and similarity criteria are presented at the global system level for a loss of forced circulation transient, where single-phase natural circulation is the primary mechanism for decay heat removal following a primary pump trip. Due to very large margin to fuel damage temperatures, the peak metal temperature of primary-loop components was identified as the key safety parameter of interest. Fractional Scaling Analysis (FSA) methods were used to quantify the intensity of each transfer process during the transient and subsequently rank them by their relative importance while identifying key sources of distortion between the prototype and model. The results show that the development of a scaling hierarchy at the global system level informs the bottom-up scaling analysis. (author)

  12. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  13. Thermal hydraulics analysis of the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dean, E-mail: Dean_Wang@uml.edu [University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Yoder, Graydon L.; Pointer, David W.; Holcomb, David E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley RD #6167, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The TRACE AHTR model was developed and used to define and size the DRACS and the PHX. • A LOFF transient was simulated to evaluate the reactor performance during the transient. • Some recommendations for modifying FHR reactor system component designs are discussed. - Abstract: The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a liquid salt-cooled nuclear reactor design concept, featuring low-pressure molten fluoride salt coolant, a carbon composite fuel form with embedded coated particle fuel, passively triggered negative reactivity insertion mechanisms, and fully passive decay heat rejection. This paper describes an AHTR system model developed using the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) thermal hydraulic transient code TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE). The TRACE model includes all of the primary components: the core, downcomer, hot legs, cold legs, pumps, direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), the primary heat exchangers (PHXs), etc. The TRACE model was used to help define and size systems such as the DRACS and the PHX. A loss of flow transient was also simulated to evaluate the performance of the reactor during an anticipated transient event. Some initial recommendations for modifying system component designs are also discussed. The TRACE model will be used as the basis for developing more detailed designs and ultimately will be used to perform transient safety analysis for the reactor.

  14. An integrated approach to selecting materials for fuel cladding in advanced high-temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangacharyulu, C., E-mail: chary.r@usask.ca [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Guzonas, D.A.; Pencer, J.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Leung, L.K.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An integrated approach has been developed for selection of fuel cladding materials for advanced high-temperature reactors. Reactor physics, thermalhydraulic and material analyses are being integrated in a systematic study comparing various candidate fuel-cladding alloys. The analyses established the axial and radial neutron fluxes, power distributions, axial and radial temperature distributions, rates of defect formation and helium production using AECL analytical toolsets and experimentally measured corrosion rates to optimize the material composition for fuel cladding. The project has just been initiated at University of Saskatchewan. Some preliminary results of the analyses are presented together with the path forward for the project. (author)

  15. Thermo-Economic Assessment of Advanced,High-Temperature CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, Norman J.; Pontikakis, Nikos; Duffey, Romney B.

    2002-01-01

    Research underway on the advanced CANDU examines new, innovative, reactor concepts with the aim of significant cost reduction and resource sustainability through improved thermodynamic efficiency and plant simplification. The so-called CANDU-X concept retains the key elements of the current CANDU designs, including heavy-water moderator that provides a passive heat sink and horizontal pressure tubes. Improvement in thermodynamic efficiency is sought via substantial increases in both pressure and temperature of the reactor coolant. Following on from the new Next Generation (NG) CANDU, which is ready for markets in 2005 and beyond, the reactor coolant is chosen to be light water but at supercritical operating conditions. Two different temperature regimes are being studied, Mark 1 and Mark 2, based respectively on continued use of zirconium or on stainless-steel-based fuel cladding. Three distinct cycle options have been proposed for Mark 1: the High-Pressure Steam Generator (HPSG) cycle, the Dual cycle, and the Direct cycle. For Mark 2, the focus is on simplification via a Direct cycle. This paper presents comparative thermo-economic assessments of the CANDU-X cycle options, with the ultimate goal of ascertaining which particular cycle option is the best overall in terms of thermodynamics and economics. A similar assessment was already performed for the NG CANDU. The economic analyses entail obtaining cost estimates of major plant components, such as heat exchangers, turbines and pumps. (authors)

  16. Sodium effects on mechanical performance and consideration in high temperature structural design for advanced reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, K.; Li, Meimei; Chopra, O. K.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-07-01

    Sodium environmental effects are key limiting factors in the high temperature structural design of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. A guideline is needed to incorporate environmental effects in the ASME design rules to improve the performance reliability over long operating times. This paper summarizes the influence of sodium exposure on mechanical performance of selected austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels. Focus is on Type 316SS and mod.9Cr-1Mo. The sodium effects were evaluated by comparing the mechanical properties data in air and sodium. Carburization and decarburization were found to be the key factors that determine the tensile and creep properties of the steels. A beneficial effect of sodium exposure on fatigue life was observed under fully reversed cyclic loading in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic/martensitic steels. However, when hold time was applied during cyclic loading, the fatigue life was significantly reduced. Based on the mechanical performance of the steels in sodium, consideration of sodium effects in high temperature structural design of advanced fast reactors is discussed.

  17. High-temperature thermal storage systems for advanced solar receivers materials selections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. F.; Devan, J. H.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced space power systems that use solar energy and Brayton or Stirling heat engines require thermal energy storage (TES) systems to operate continuously through periods of shade. The receiver storage units, key elements in both Brayton and Stirling systems, are designed to use the latent heat of fusion of phase-change materials (PCMs). The power systems under current consideration for near-future National Aeronautics and Space Administration space missions require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1400 K range. The PCMs under current investigation that gave liquid temperatures within this range are the fluoride family of salts. However, these salts have low thermal conductivity, which causes large temperature gradients in the storage systems. Improvements can be obtained, however, with the use of thermal conductivity enhancements or metallic PCMs. In fact, if suitable containment materials can be found, the use of metallic PCMs would virtually eliminate the orbit associated temperature variations in TES systems. The high thermal conductivity and generally low volume change on melting of germanium and alloys based on silicon make them attractive for storage of thermal energy in space power systems. An approach to solving the containment problem, involving both chemical and physical compatibility, preparation of NiSi/NiSi2, and initial results for containment of germanium and NiSi/NiSi2, are presented.

  18. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases

  19. ARCHER Project: Progress on Material and component activities for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D) integrated project is a four year project which was started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7th Framework Programme (FP7) to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R&D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research & Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on ARCHER materials and component activities since the start of the project and underlines some of the main conclusions reached. (author)

  20. Conceptual designs for advanced, high-temperature CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushby, S.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Corrosion and Surface Science Branch, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Dimmick, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Fuel Channel Thermmalhydraulics Branch, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Duffey, R.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Principal Scientist, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, On (Canada); Spinks, N.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Researcher Emeritus, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Burrill, K.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Chan, P.S.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Reactor Core Physics Branch, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    AECL is studying advanced reactor concepts with the aim of significant cost reduction through improved thermodynamic efficiency and plant simplification. The program, generically called CANDU-X, also incorporates enhanced safety features, and flexible, proliferation-resistant fuel cycles, whilst retaining the fundamental design characteristics of CANDU: neutron economy, horizontal fuel channels, and a separate D{sub 2}O moderator that provides a passive heat sink. Where possible, proven, existing components and materials would be adopted, so that 'first-of-a-kind' costs and uncertainties are avoided. Three reactor concepts ranging in output from {approx}375 MW(e) to 1150 MW(e) are described. The modular design of a pressure tube reactor allows the plant size for each concept to be tailored to a given market through the addition or removal of fuel channels. Each concept uses supercritical water as the coolant at a nominal pressure of 25 MPa. Core outlet temperatures range from {approx}400degC to 625degC, resulting in substantial improvements in thermodynamic efficiencies compared to current nuclear stations. The CANDU-X Mark 1 concept is an extension of the present CANDU design. An indirect cycle is employed, but efficiency is increased due to higher coolant temperature, and changes to the secondary side; as well, the size and number of pumps and steam generators are reduced. Safety is enhanced through facilitation of thermo-siphoning of decay heat by increasing the temperature of the moderator. The CANDU-X NC concept is also based on an indirect cycle, but natural convection is used to circulate the primary coolant. This approach enhances cycle efficiency and safety, and is viable for reactors operating near the pseudo-critical temperature of water because of large changes in heat capacity and thermal expansion in that region. In the third concept (CANDUal-X), a dual cycle is employed. Supercritical water exits the core and feeds directly into a very high

  1. Materials for advanced high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    The results recently obtained from the Dragon program are presented to illustrate materials behavior: (a) effect of temperature on oxidation and carburisation in HTR helium (variation in oxide depth and in C content of AISI 321 after 5000 hours in HTR helium; effect of temperature on surface scale formation in the γ' strengthened alloys Nimonic 80A and 713LC); (b) effect of alloy composition on oxidation and carburisation behavior (influence of Nb and Ti on the corrosion of austenitic steels; influence of Ti and Al in IN-102; weight gain of cast high Ni alloys); (c) effect of environment on creep strength (results of tests for hastelloy X, grade I inconel 625, grade II inconel 625 and inconel 617 in He and air between 750 and 800 0 C)

  2. Advanced anodes for high-temperature fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, A.; Barnett, S.; Gorte, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Fuel cells will undoubtedly find widespread use in this new millennium in the conversion of chemical to electrical energy, as they offer very high efficiencies and have unique scalability in electricity-generation applications. The solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is one of the most exciting...... of these energy technologies; it is an all-ceramic device that operates at temperatures in the range 500-1,000degreesC. The SOFC offers certain advantages over lower temperature fuel cells, notably its ability to use carbon monoxide as a fuel rather than being poisoned by it, and the availability of high......-grade exhaust heat for combined heat and power, or combined cycle gas-turbine applications. Although cost is clearly the most important barrier to widespread SOFC implementation, perhaps the most important technical barriers currently being addressed relate to the electrodes, particularly the fuel electrode...

  3. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  4. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernández, Carlos García, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  5. Novel High Temperature Strain Gauge, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced high-temperature sensor technology and bonding methods are of great interests in designing and developing advanced future aircraft. Current state-of-the-art...

  6. Recent advances in design procedures for high temperature plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen papers cover several aspects of design for high temperature plant. These include design codes, computerized structural analysis and mechanical properties of materials at high temperatures. Seven papers are relevant for fast reactors and these are indexed separately. These cover shakedown design, design codes for thin shells subjected to cyclic thermal loading, the inelastic behaviour of stainless steels and creep and crack propagation in reactor structures under stresses caused by thermal cycling loading. (author)

  7. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvego, Edwin A.; McKellar, Michael G.; O'Brien, James E.; Herring, J. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  8. Microstructure characteristics and temperature-dependent high cycle fatigue behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qingjun; Lu, Fenggui; Cui, Haichao; Ding, Yuming; Liu, Xia; Gao, Yulai

    2014-01-01

    Advanced 9% Cr and CrMoV steels chosen as candidate materials are first welded by narrow-gap submerged arc welding (NG-SAW) to fabricate the heavy section rotor. The present work focuses on studying the high-cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint at different temperatures. Conditional fatigue strength of this dissimilarly welded joint was obtained by HCF tests at room temperature (RT), 400 °C and 470 °C. It was observed that the failure occurred at the side of CrMoV base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) of CrMoV side over 5×10 7 cycles for the specimens tested at RT, 400 °C and 470 °C. The detailed microstructures of BMs, WMs and HAZs as well as fracture appearance were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Precipitation and aggregation of carbides along the grain boundaries were clearly detected with the increase of temperature, which brought a negative effect on the fatigue properties. It is interesting to note that the inclusion size leading to crack initiation became smaller for the HCF test at higher temperature. Therefore, reduction in the inclusion size in a welded joint helps to improve the HCF performance at high temperature

  9. Microstructure characteristics and temperature-dependent high cycle fatigue behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qingjun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lu, Fenggui, E-mail: Lfg119@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Cui, Haichao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ding, Yuming; Liu, Xia [Shanghai Turbine Plant of Shanghai Electric Power Generation Equipment Co. Ltd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Gao, Yulai, E-mail: ylgao@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-10-06

    Advanced 9% Cr and CrMoV steels chosen as candidate materials are first welded by narrow-gap submerged arc welding (NG-SAW) to fabricate the heavy section rotor. The present work focuses on studying the high-cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint at different temperatures. Conditional fatigue strength of this dissimilarly welded joint was obtained by HCF tests at room temperature (RT), 400 °C and 470 °C. It was observed that the failure occurred at the side of CrMoV base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) of CrMoV side over 5×10{sup 7} cycles for the specimens tested at RT, 400 °C and 470 °C. The detailed microstructures of BMs, WMs and HAZs as well as fracture appearance were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Precipitation and aggregation of carbides along the grain boundaries were clearly detected with the increase of temperature, which brought a negative effect on the fatigue properties. It is interesting to note that the inclusion size leading to crack initiation became smaller for the HCF test at higher temperature. Therefore, reduction in the inclusion size in a welded joint helps to improve the HCF performance at high temperature.

  10. Inherent safe design of advanced high temperature reactors - concepts for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodzic, A.; Kugeler, K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the applicable solutions for a commercial size High Temperature Reactor (HTR) with inherent safety features. It describes the possible realization using an advanced concept which combines newly proposed design characteristics with some well known and proven HTR inherent safety features. The use of the HTR technology offers the conceivably best solution to meet the legal criteria, recently stated in Germany, for the future reactor generation. Both systems, block and pebble bed ,reactor, could be under certain design conditions self regulating in terms of core nuclear heat, mechanical stability and the environmental transfer. 23 refs., 7 figs

  11. Proceedings, phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedell, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Phenomenology and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1991, was sponsored by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Center for Materials Science, the Advanced Studies Program on High Temperature Superconductivity Theory (ASP) and the Exploratory Research and Development Center. This is the second symposium in the series. High Temperature Superconductivity, The Los Alamos Symposium: 1989, also published by Addison Wesley, focused on the cutting-edge theoretical and experimental issues in high temperature superconductors. This symposium, with its focus on the phenomenology and applications of high temperature superconductors, gives a complementary review of the aspects of the field closely related to the impact of high temperature superconductors on technology. The objective of ASP is to advance the field on a broad front with no specific point of view by bringing a team of leading academic theorists into a joint effort with the theoretical and experimental scientists of a major DOE national laboratory. The ASP consisted of fellows led by Robert Schrieffer (UCSB and now FSU) joined by David Pines (University of illinois), Elihu Abrahams (Rutgers), Sebastian Doniach (Stanford), and Maurice Rice (ETH, Zurich) and theoretical and experimental staff of Los Alamos National Laboratory. This synergism of academic, laboratory, theoretical and experimental research produced a level of interaction and excitement that would not be possible otherwise. This publication and the previous one in the series are just examples of how this approach to advancing science can achieve significant contributions

  12. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  13. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  14. Can slow-diffusing solute atoms reduce vacancy diffusion in advanced high-temperature alloys?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Kamal Nayan; Mottura, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The high-temperature mechanical properties of precipitate-strengthened advanced alloys can be heavily influenced by adjusting chemical composition. The widely-accepted argument within the community is that, under certain temperature and loading conditions, plasticity occurs only in the matrix, and dislocations have to rely on thermally-activated climb mechanisms to overcome the barriers to glide posed by the hard precipitates. This is the case for γ′-strengthened Ni-based superalloys. The presence of dilute amounts of slow-diffusing solute atoms, such as Re and W, in the softer matrix phase is thought to reduce plasticity by retarding the climb of dislocations at the interface with the hard precipitate phase. One hypothesis is that the presence of these solutes must hinder the flow of vacancies, which are essential to the climb process. In this work, density functional theory calculations are used to inform two analytical models to describe the effect of solute atoms on the diffusion of vacancies. Results suggest that slow-diffusing solute atoms are not effective at reducing the diffusion of vacancies in these systems

  15. Present status of high temperature engineering test and research, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors have excellent features such as the generation of high temperature close to 1000degC, very high inherent safety and high fuel burnup. By the advanced basic research under high temperature irradiation condition, the creation of various new technologies which become the momentum of future technical innovation can be expected. The construction of the high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR) was decided in 1987, which aims at the thermal output of 30 MW and the coolant temperature at reactor exit of 950degC. The initial criticality is scheduled in 1998. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the high temperature engineering test and research, and plans the safety verifying test of the HTTR, the test of connecting heat utilization plants and so on. In this report, mainly the results obtained for one year from May, 1993 are summarized. The outline of the high temperature engineering test and development of the HTTR technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakova, Jitka [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)], E-mail: jitka.zakova@neutron.kth.se; Talamo, Alberto [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, ANL, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2008-05-15

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF{sub 2}, LiF, ZrF{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large.

  17. Analysis of the reactivity coefficients of the advanced high-temperature reactor for plutonium and uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakova, Jitka; Talamo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual design of the advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) has recently been proposed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the intention to provide and alternative energy source for very high temperature applications. In the present study, we focused on the analyses of the reactivity coefficients of the AHTR core fueled with two types of fuel: enriched uranium and plutonium from the reprocessing of light water reactors irradiated fuel. More precisely, we investigated the influence of the outer graphite reflectors on the multiplication factor of the core, the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients and the void reactivity coefficient for five different molten salts: NaF, BeF 2 , LiF, ZrF 4 and Li 2 BeF 4 eutectic. In order to better illustrate the behavior of the previous parameters for different core configurations, we evaluated the moderating ratio of the molten salts and the absorption rate of the key fuel nuclides, which, of course, are driven by the neutron spectrum. The results show that the fuel and moderator temperature reactivity coefficients are always negative, whereas the void reactivity coefficient can be set negative provided that the fuel to moderator ratio is optimized (the core is undermoderated) and the moderating ratio of the coolant is large

  18. Production of advanced materials by methods of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tavadze, Giorgi F

    2013-01-01

    This translation from the original Russian book outlines the production of a variety of materials by methods of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). The types of materials discussed include: hard, refractory, corrosion and wear-resistant materials, as well as other advanced and speciality materials. The authors address the issue of optimal parameters for SHS reactions occurring during processes involving a preliminary metallothermic reduction stage, and they calculate this using thermodynamic approaches. In order to confirm the effectiveness of this approach, the authors describe experiments focussing on the synthesis of elemental crysalline boron, boron carbides and nitrides. Other parts of this brief include theoretical and experimental results on single-stage production of hard alloys on the basis of titanium and zirconium borides, as well as macrokinetics of degassing and compaciton of SHS-products.This brief is suitable for academics, as well as those working in industrial manufacturing com...

  19. Design, Qualification and Integration Testing of the High-Temperature Resistance Temperature Device for Stirling Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jack; Hill, Dennis H.; Elisii, Remo; White, Jonathan R.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Oriti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), developed from 2006 to 2013 under the joint sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to provide a high-efficiency power system for future deep space missions, employed Sunpower Incorporated's Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) with operating temperature up to 840 C. High-temperature operation was made possible by advanced heater head materials developed to increase reliability and thermal-to-mechanical conversion efficiency. During a mission, it is desirable to monitor the Stirling hot-end temperature as a measure of convertor health status and assist in making appropriate operating parameter adjustments to maintain the desired hot-end temperature as the radioisotope fuel decays. To facilitate these operations, a Resistance Temperature Device (RTD) that is capable of high-temperature, continuous long-life service was designed, developed and qualified for use in the ASRG. A thermal bridge was also implemented to reduce the RTD temperature exposure while still allowing an accurate projection of the ASC hot-end temperature. NASA integrated two flight-design RTDs on the ASCs and assembled into the high-fidelity Engineering Unit, the ASRG EU2, at Glenn Research Center (GRC) for extended operation and system characterization. This paper presents the design implementation and qualification of the RTD, and its performance characteristics and calibration in the ASRG EU2 testing.

  20. Very high temperature chemistry: Science justification for containerless experimentation in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Nordine, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of the justification for application of containerless processing in space to high temperature science. Low earth orbit offers a gravitational environment that allows samples to be positioned in an experimental apparatus by very small forces. Well controlled experiments become possible on reactive materials at high temperatures in a reasonably quiescent state and without container contamination. This provides an opportunity to advance the science of high temperature chemistry that can only be realized with a commitment by NASA to provide advanced facilities for in-space containerless study of materials at very high temperature.

  1. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  2. Status and aspects of fuel element development for advanced high-temperature reactors in the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.; Balthesen, E.

    1975-01-01

    In the FRG three basic fuel element designs for application in high temperature gas cooled reactors are being persued: the spherical element, the graphite block element, and the moulded block element (monolith). This report gives the state of development reached with the three types of elements but also views their specific merits and performance margin and presents aspects of their future development potential for operation in advanced HTGR plants. The development of coated feed and breed particles for application in all HTGR fuel elements is treated in more detail. Summarizing it can be said that all the fuel elements as well as their components have proved their aptitude for the dual cycle systems in numerous fuel element and particle performance tests. To adapt these fuel elements and coated particles for advanced reactor concepts and to develop them up to full technical maturity further testing is still necessary, however. Ways of overcoming problems arising from the more stringent requirements are shown. (orig.) [de

  3. High temperature study of flexible silicon-on-insulator fin field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Diab, Amer El Hajj

    2014-09-29

    We report high temperature electrical transport characteristics of a flexible version of the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced architecture: fin field-effect transistor on silicon-on-insulator with sub-20 nm fins and high-κ/metal gate stacks. Characterization from room to high temperature (150 °C) was completed to determine temperature dependence of drain current (Ids), gate leakage current (Igs), transconductance (gm), and extracted low-field mobility (μ0). Mobility degradation with temperature is mainly caused by phonon scattering. The other device characteristics show insignificant difference at high temperature which proves the suitability of inorganic flexible electronics with advanced device architecture.

  4. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  5. Platform for high temperature materials (PHiTEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baluc, N.; Hoffelner, W.; Michler, J.

    2007-01-01

    Advanced energy power systems like Generation IV fission reactors, thermonuclear fusion reactors, solar thermal/solar chemical reactors, gas turbines and coal gasification systems require materials that can operate at high temperatures in extreme environments: irradiation, corrosion, unidirectional and cyclic loads. On the path to development of new and adequate high temperature materials, understanding of damage formation and evolution and of damage effects is indispensable. Damage of materials in components takes place on different time and length scales. Component failure is usually a macroscopic event. Macroscopic material properties and their changes with time (e.g., hardening, creep embrittlement, corrosion) are determined by the micro- to nano-properties of the material. The multi scale is an ambitious and challenging attempt to take these facts into consideration by developing an unified model of the material behaviour. This requires, however, dedicated tools to test and analyse materials on different scales. The platform for high temperatures materials is being set up within the framework of collaboration between the EPFL, the PSI and the EMPA. It has three main goals: 1) Establish a platform that allows the multi scale characterization of relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties of advanced, high temperature materials, with a focus on irradiated, i.e. radioactive, materials, by combining the use of a focused ion beam and a nano indentation device with multi scale modelling and simulations. 2) Use the methods developed and the results gained for existing materials for developing improved high temperature materials to be used in advanced and sustainable future energy power plants. 3) Become an attractive partner for industry by providing a wide knowledge base, flexibility in answering technical questions and skills to better understand damage in already existing plants and to support development of new products at the industrial scale

  6. Advanced High-Temperature Reactor Dynamic System Model Development: April 2012 Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A L; Cetiner, M S; Wilson, Jr, T L

    2012-04-30

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a large-output fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). An early-phase preconceptual design of a 1500 MW(e) power plant was developed in 2011 [Refs. 1 and 2]. An updated version of this plant is shown as Fig. 1. FHRs feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR is designed to be a “walk away” reactor that requires no action to prevent large off-site releases following even severe reactor accidents. This report describes the development of dynamic system models used to further the AHTR design toward that goal. These models predict system response during warmup, startup, normal operation, and limited off-normal operating conditions. Severe accidents that include a loss-of-fluid inventory are not currently modeled. The scope of the models is limited to the plant power system, including the reactor, the primary and intermediate heat transport systems, the power conversion system, and safety-related or auxiliary heat removal systems. The primary coolant system, the intermediate heat transport system and the reactor building structure surrounding them are shown in Fig. 2. These systems are modeled in the most detail because the passive interaction of the primary system with the surrounding structure and heat removal systems, and ultimately the environment, protects the reactor fuel and the vessel from damage during severe reactor transients. The reactor silo also plays an important role during system warmup. The dynamic system modeling tools predict system performance and response. The goal is to accurately predict temperatures and pressures within the primary, intermediate, and power conversion systems and to study the impacts of design changes on those responses. The models are design tools and are not intended to be used in reactor qualification. The important details to capture in the primary

  7. Advanced CSiC composites for high-temperature nuclear heat transport with helium, molten salts, and sulphur-iodine thermochemical hydrogen process fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Forsberg, Ch.W.; Pickard, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of liquid-silicon-impregnated (LSI) carbon-carbon composites for the development of compact and inexpensive heat exchangers, piping, vessels and pumps capable of operating in the temperature range of 800 to 1 100 deg C with high-pressure helium, molten fluoride salts, and process fluids for sulfur-iodine thermochemical hydrogen production. LSI composites have several potentially attractive features, including ability to maintain nearly full mechanical strength to temperatures approaching 1 400 deg C, inexpensive and commercially available fabrication materials, and the capability for simple forming, machining and joining of carbon-carbon performs, which permits the fabrication of highly complex component geometries. In the near term, these materials may prove to be attractive for use with a molten-salt intermediate loop for the demonstration of hydrogen production with a gas-cooled high temperature reactor. In the longer term, these materials could be attractive for use with the molten-salt cooled advanced high temperature reactor, molten salt reactors, and fusion power plants. (author)

  8. Analytical and numerical study of graphite IG110 parts in advanced reactor under high temperature and irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Jinling, E-mail: Jinling_Gao@yeah.net; Yao, Wenjuan, E-mail: wj_yao@yeah.net; Ma, Yudong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An analytical model and a numerical procedure are developed to study the mechanical response of IG-110 graphite bricks in HTGR subjected to high temperature and irradiation. The calculation results show great accordance with each other. Rational suggestions on the calculation and design of the IG-110 graphite structure are proposed based on the sensitivity analyses including temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson’s ratio. - Highlights: • Analytical solution of stress and displacement of IG-110 graphite components in HTGR. • Finite element procedure developed for stress analysis of HTGR graphite component. • Parameters analysis of mechanical response of graphite components during the whole life of the reflector. - Abstract: Structural design of nuclear power plant project is an important sub-discipline of civil engineering. Especially after appearance of the fourth generation advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor, structural mechanics in reactor technology becomes a popular subject in structural engineering. As basic ingredients of reflector in reactor, graphite bricks are subjected to high temperature and irradiation and the stress field of graphite structures determines integrity of reflector and makes a great difference to safety of whole structure. In this paper, based on assumptions of elasticity, side reflector is regarded approximately as a straight cylinder structure and primary creep strain is ignored. An analytical study on stress of IG110 graphite parts is present. Meanwhile, a finite element procedure for calculating stresses in the IG110 graphite structure exposed in the high temperature and irradiation is developed. Subsequently, numerical solution of stress in IG110 graphite structure is obtained. Analytical solution agrees well with numerical solution, which indicates that analytical derivation is accurate. Finally, influence of temperature, irradiation dimensional change, creep and Poisson

  9. High temperature thermoelectric energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable advances were made in the late '50's and early early '60's in the theory and development of materials for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion. This early work culminated in a variety of materials, spanning a range of temperatures, with the product of the figure of merit, Z, and temperature, T, i.e., the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, of the order of one. This experimental limitation appeared to be universal and led a number of investigators to explore the possibility that a ZT - also represents a theoretical limitation. It was found not to be so

  10. Advanced error-prediction LDPC with temperature compensation for highly reliable SSDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokutomi, Tsukasa; Tanakamaru, Shuhei; Iwasaki, Tomoko Ogura; Takeuchi, Ken

    2015-09-01

    To improve the reliability of NAND Flash memory based solid-state drives (SSDs), error-prediction LDPC (EP-LDPC) has been proposed for multi-level-cell (MLC) NAND Flash memory (Tanakamaru et al., 2012, 2013), which is effective for long retention times. However, EP-LDPC is not as effective for triple-level cell (TLC) NAND Flash memory, because TLC NAND Flash has higher error rates and is more sensitive to program-disturb error. Therefore, advanced error-prediction LDPC (AEP-LDPC) has been proposed for TLC NAND Flash memory (Tokutomi et al., 2014). AEP-LDPC can correct errors more accurately by precisely describing the error phenomena. In this paper, the effects of AEP-LDPC are investigated in a 2×nm TLC NAND Flash memory with temperature characterization. Compared with LDPC-with-BER-only, the SSD's data-retention time is increased by 3.4× and 9.5× at room-temperature (RT) and 85 °C, respectively. Similarly, the acceptable BER is increased by 1.8× and 2.3×, respectively. Moreover, AEP-LDPC can correct errors with pre-determined tables made at higher temperatures to shorten the measurement time before shipping. Furthermore, it is found that one table can cover behavior over a range of temperatures in AEP-LDPC. As a result, the total table size can be reduced to 777 kBytes, which makes this approach more practical.

  11. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  12. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matrices; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  13. GHRSST Level 3P North Atlantic Regional Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA-19 (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  14. GHRSST Level 3C North Atlantic Regional Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA-19 (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  15. High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductor thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, N.

    2002-10-01

    High-temperature superconducting thin films offer unique properties which can be utilized for a variety of high-frequency device applications in many areas related to the strongly progressing market of information technology. One important property is an exceptionally low level of microwave absorption at temperatures attainable with low power cryocoolers. This unique property has initiated the development of various novel type of microwave devices and commercialized subsystems with special emphasis on application in advanced microwave communication systems. The second important achievement related to efforts in oxide thin and multilayer technology was the reproducible fabrication of low-noise Josephson junctions in high-temperature superconducting thin films. As a consequence of this achievement, several novel nonlinear high-frequency devices, most of them exploiting the unique features of the ac Josephson effect, have been developed and found to exhibit challenging properties to be utilized in basic metrology and Terahertz technology. On the longer timescale, the achievements in integrated high-temperature superconductor circuit technology may offer a strong potential for the development of digital devices with possible clock frequencies in the range of 100 GHz.

  16. High-frequency applications of high-temperature superconductor thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, N.

    2002-01-01

    High-temperature superconducting thin films offer unique properties which can be utilized for a variety of high-frequency device applications in many areas related to the strongly progressing market of information technology. One important property is an exceptionally low level of microwave absorption at temperatures attainable with low power cryocoolers. This unique property has initiated the development of various novel type of microwave devices and commercialized subsystems with special emphasis on application in advanced microwave communication systems. The second important achievement related to efforts in oxide thin and multilayer technology was the reproducible fabrication of low-noise Josephson junctions in high-temperature superconducting thin films. As a consequence of this achievement, several novel nonlinear high-frequency devices, most of them exploiting the unique features of the ac Josephson effect, have been developed and found to exhibit challenging properties to be utilized in basic metrology and Terahertz technology. On the longer timescale, the achievements in integrated high-temperature superconductor circuit technology may offer a strong potential for the development of digital devices with possible clock frequencies in the range of 100 GHz. (author)

  17. VARTM Processing of High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Criss, Jr, Jim M

    2008-01-01

    The overall technical objective of the Phase 1 effort was to extend and advance the state the-art in high temperature composite fabrication techniques by developing a High Tempera Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM...

  18. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters. Topical report for part 1 of high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spear, K.E.; Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-11

    This program consists of two separate research areas. Part 1, for which this report is written, studied the high temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic hot gas filters, while Part 2 studied the long-term durability of ceramic heat exchangers to coal combustion environments. The objectives of Part 1 were to select two candidate ceramic filter materials for flow-through hot corrosion studies and subsequent corrosion and mechanical properties characterization. In addition, a thermodynamic database was developed so that thermochemical modeling studies could be performed to simulate operating conditions of laboratory reactors and existing coal combustion power plants, and to predict the reactions of new filter materials with coal combustion environments. The latter would make it possible to gain insight into problems that could develop during actual operation of filters in coal combustion power plants so that potential problems could be addressed before they arise.

  19. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  20. High temperature component life assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Webster, G A

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book is to investigate and explain the rapid advances in the characterization of high temperature crack growth behaviour which have been made in recent years, with reference to industrial applications. Complicated mathematics has been minimized with the emphasis placed instead on finding solutions using simplified procedures without the need for complex numerical analysis.

  1. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnquist, Norman [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Qi, Xuele [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Raminosoa, Tsarafidy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Salas, Ken [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Samudrala, Omprakash [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Shah, Manoj [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Van Dam, Jeremy [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Yin, Weijun [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany); Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research, Munchen (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    This report summarizes the progress made during the April 01, 2010 – December 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-EE0002752 for the U.S. Department of Energy entitled “High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems.” The overall objective of this program is to advance the technology for well fluids lifting systems to meet the foreseeable pressure, temperature, and longevity needs of the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) industry for the coming ten years. In this program, lifting system requirements for EGS wells were established via consultation with industry experts and site visits. A number of artificial lift technologies were evaluated with regard to their applicability to EGS applications; it was determined that a system based on electric submersible pump (ESP) technology was best suited to EGS. Technical barriers were identified and a component-level technology development program was undertaken to address each barrier, with the most challenging being the development of a power-dense, small diameter motor that can operate reliably in a 300°C environment for up to three years. Some of the targeted individual component technologies include permanent magnet motor construction, high-temperature insulation, dielectrics, bearings, seals, thrust washers, and pump impellers/diffusers. Advances were also made in thermal management of electric motors. In addition to the overall system design for a full-scale EGS application, a subscale prototype was designed and fabricated. Like the full-scale design, the subscale prototype features a novel “flow-through-the-bore” permanent magnet electric motor that combines the use of high temperature materials with an internal cooling scheme that limits peak internal temperatures to <330°C. While the full-scale high-volume multi-stage pump is designed to lift up to 80 kg/s of process water, the subscale prototype is based on a production design that can pump 20 kg/s and has been modified

  2. Fuel properties effect on the performance of a small high temperature rise combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Waldo A.; Beckel, Stephen A.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an advanced small high temperature rise combustor was experimentally determined at NASA-Lewis. The combustor was designed to meet the requirements of advanced high temperature, high pressure ratio turboshaft engines. The combustor featured an advanced fuel injector and an advanced segmented liner design. The full size combustor was evaluated at power conditions ranging from idle to maximum power. The effect of broad fuel properties was studied by evaluating the combustor with three different fuels. The fuels used were JP-5, a blend of Diesel Fuel Marine/Home Heating Oil, and a blend of Suntec C/Home Heating Oil. The fuel properties effect on the performance of the combustion in terms of pattern factor, liner temperatures, and exhaust emissions are documented.

  3. Practical reasons for investigating ion transport in high temperature insulating materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonder, E.

    1976-01-01

    Practical problems encountered in a number of advanced technology appliations, particularly those related to energy conversion, are discussed. Refractory ionic compounds which are abundant and of high melting point are listed, and technological problems are discussed in terms of specific materials problems. The argument is made that basic information concerning transport properties in refractory compounds is lacking to such an extent that it is difficult to design and assess advanced energy generation systems. Technology applications include: a) ceramic nuclear fuels for high temperature fission reactors, b) high temperature gas turbine blades, c) insulators in controlled thermonuclear reactors, and d) magnetohydrodynamic generators. Some of the difficulties inherent in making transport property measurements at high temperatures are also listed

  4. Heat transfer from a high temperature condensable mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.; Cho, D.H.; Condiff, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    A new development in heat transfer is reported. It is concerned with heat transfer from a gaseous mixture that contains a condensable vapor and is at very high temperature. In the past, heat transfer associated with either a condensable mixture at low temperature or a noncondensable mixture at high temperature has been investigated. The former reduces to the classical problem of fog formation in, say, atmosphere where the rate of condensation is diffusion controlled (molecular or conductive diffusions). In the presence of noncondensable gases, heat transfer to a cooler boundary by this mechanism is known to be drastically reduced. In the latter case, where the high temperature mixture is noncondensable, radiative transfer may become dominant and a vast amount of existing literature exists on this class of problem. A fundamentally different type of problem of relevance to recent advances in open cycle MHD power plants and breeder reactor safety is considered. In the advanced coal-fired power plant using MHD as a topping cycle, a condensable mixture is encountered at temperatures of 2000 to 3000 0 . Condensation of the vaporized slag and seed materials at such a high temperature can take place in the MHD generator channel as well as in the radiant boiler. Similarly, in breeder reactor accident analyses involving hypothetical core disruptive accidents, a UO 2 vapor mixture at 400 0 K or higher is often considered. Since the saturation temperature of UO 2 at one atmosphere is close to 4000 0 K, condensation is also likely at a very high temperature. Accordingly, an objective of the present work is to provide an understanding of heat transfer and condensation mechanics insystems containing a high temperature condensable mixture. The results of the study show that, when a high temperature mixture is in contact with a cooler surface, a thermal boundary layer develops rapidly because of intensive radiative cooling from the mixture

  5. Development of advanced fabrication technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel. Reduction of coating failure fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Fukuda, Kousaku; Tobita, Tsutomu; Yoshimuta, Sigeharu; Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Tomimoto, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Oda, Takafumi

    1998-11-01

    The advanced fabrication technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel has been developed to reduce the coating failure fraction of the fuel particles, which leads to an improvement of the reactor safety. The present report reviews the results of the relevant work. The mechanisms of the coating failure of the fuel particles during coating and compaction processes of the fuel fabrication were studied to determine a way to reduce the coating failure fraction of the fuel. The coating process was improved by optimizing the mode of the particle fluidization and by developing the process without unloading and loading of the particles at intermediate coating process. The compaction process was improved by optimizing the combination of the pressing temperature and the pressing speed of the overcoated particles. Through these modifications of the fabrication process, the quality of the fuel was improved outstandingly. (author)

  6. GHRSST Level 3P Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the MetOp-A satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Level 3 Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the MetOp-A platform...

  7. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabharwall Piyush

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX. Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 °C, high-pressure (7 MPa helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF4 flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa, at a temperature of ∼450 °C. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  8. Testing and evaluation of high temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Anand; Puntambekar, Avinash; Manekar, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    National Institute for Inter-disciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Trivandrum (formerly Regional Research Laboratory) has accomplished a DAE-BRNS project with Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) as principal collaborator for the development of high temperature superconductor (HTS) current leads. These HTS current leads have self-field critical currents (Ic) ranging from 50 A to 1000 A at liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) temperature. These HTS are made out of silver sheathed Bismuth Strontium Calcium Copper Oxide (BSCCO-2223), for direct application in superconducting (SC) systems involving transportation of high electric currents from power sources at room temperature to superconducting devices at cryogenic temperatures. RRCAT has participated in this project by testing and evaluation of these HTS current leads and carried out actual load trials. In this paper, we will describe the HTS testing setup, tests performed with their testing procedure and the test results. The testing of these HTS has been done with joint effort of Materials Advanced Accelerator Science and Cryogenics Div. and Superconducting Technology Lab (SCT Lab), Advanced Accelerator Module Development Div., using the test facility available at the SCT Lab. (author)

  9. Experimental facility for development of high-temperature reactor technology: instrumentation needs and challenges - 15066

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabharwall, P.; O'Brien, J.E.; Yoon, S.J.; Sun, X.

    2015-01-01

    A high-temperature, multi-fluid, multi-loop test facility is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory for support of thermal hydraulic, materials, and system integration research for high-temperature reactors. The experimental facility includes a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The 3 loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuits heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions. Each loop will also include an interchangeable high-temperature test section that can be customized to address specific research issues associated with each working fluid. This paper also discusses needs and challenges associated with advanced instrumentation for the multi-loop facility, which could be further applied to advanced high-temperature reactors. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integrated System Test (ARTIST) facility. A preliminary design configuration of the ARTIST facility will be presented with the required design and operating characteristics of the various components. The initial configuration will include a high-temperature (750 C. degrees), high-pressure (7 MPa) helium loop thermally integrated with a molten fluoride salt (KF-ZrF 4 ) flow loop operating at low pressure (0.2 MPa), at a temperature of ∼ 450 C. degrees. The salt loop will be thermally integrated with the steam/water loop operating at PWR conditions. Experiment design challenges include identifying suitable materials and components that will withstand the required loop operating conditions. The instrumentation needs to be highly accurate (negligible drift) in measuring operational data for extended periods of times, as data collected will be

  10. Assessment of Candidate Molten Salt Coolants for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.F.

    2006-03-24

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a novel reactor design that utilizes the graphite-matrix high-temperature fuel of helium-cooled reactors, but provides cooling with a high-temperature fluoride salt. For applications at temperatures greater than 900 C the AHTR is also referred to as a Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR). This report provides an assessment of candidate salts proposed as the primary coolant for the AHTR based upon a review of physical properties, nuclear properties, and chemical factors. The physical properties most relevant for coolant service were reviewed. Key chemical factors that influence material compatibility were also analyzed for the purpose of screening salt candidates. Some simple screening factors related to the nuclear properties of salts were also developed. The moderating ratio and neutron-absorption cross-section were compiled for each salt. The short-lived activation products, long-lived transmutation activity, and reactivity coefficients associated with various salt candidates were estimated using a computational model. Table A presents a summary of the properties of the candidate coolant salts. Certain factors in this table, such as melting point, vapor pressure, and nuclear properties, can be viewed as stand-alone parameters for screening candidates. Heat-transfer properties are considered as a group in Sect. 3 in order to evaluate the combined effects of various factors. In the course of this review, it became apparent that the state of the properties database was strong in some areas and weak in others. A qualitative map of the state of the database and predictive capabilities is given in Table B. It is apparent that the property of thermal conductivity has the greatest uncertainty and is the most difficult to measure. The database, with respect to heat capacity, can be improved with modern instruments and modest effort. In general, ''lighter'' (low-Z) salts tend to

  11. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated-temperature

  12. Containerless processing at high temperatures using acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, C. A.; Merkley, D. R.; Hampton, S.; Devos, J.; Mapes-Riordan, D.; Zatarski, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced techniques are presented which facilitate the development of inert or reducing atmospheres in excess of 2000 K in order to improve processing of containerless capabilities at higher temperatures and to provide more contamination-free environments. Recent testing, in the laboratory and aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft, of a high-temperature acoustic positioner demonstrated the effectiveness of a specimen motion damping system and of specimen spin control. It is found that stable positioning can be achieved under ambient and heated conditions, including the transient states of heat-up and cool-down. An incorporated high-temperature levitator was found capable of processing specimens of up to 6-mm diameter in a high-purity environment without the contaminating effects of a container at high temperatures and with relative quiescence.

  13. The High Temperature Tensile and Creep Behaviors of High Entropy Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Te-Kang; Yeh, An-Chou; Kuo, Chen-Ming; Kakehi, Koji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2017-10-04

    This article presents the high temperature tensile and creep behaviors of a novel high entropy alloy (HEA). The microstructure of this HEA resembles that of advanced superalloys with a high entropy FCC matrix and L1 2 ordered precipitates, so it is also named as "high entropy superalloy (HESA)". The tensile yield strengths of HESA surpass those of the reported HEAs from room temperature to elevated temperatures; furthermore, its creep resistance at 982 °C can be compared to those of some Ni-based superalloys. Analysis on experimental results indicate that HESA could be strengthened by the low stacking-fault energy of the matrix, high anti-phase boundary energy of the strengthening precipitate, and thermally stable microstructure. Positive misfit between FCC matrix and precipitate has yielded parallel raft microstructure during creep at 982 °C, and the creep curves of HESA were dominated by tertiary creep behavior. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article is the first to present the elevated temperature tensile creep study on full scale specimens of a high entropy alloy, and the potential of HESA for high temperature structural application is discussed.

  14. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-18 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  15. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-17 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  16. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-16 satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  17. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  18. Creep behavior of materials for high-temperature reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.; Hartnagel, W.; Iischner, B.; Schepp, P.

    1984-01-01

    Materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) application are selected according to their creep behavior. For two alloys--Incoloy-800 used for the live steam tubing of the thorium high-temperature reactor and Inconel-617 evaluated for tubings in advanced HTGRs--creep curves are measured and described by equations. A microstructural interpretation is given. An essential result is that nonstable microstructures determine the creep behavior

  19. Low NOx combustion technologies for high-temperature natural gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamme, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Because of the high process temperature which is required for some processes like glass melting and the high temperature to which the combustion air is preheated, NOx emission are extremely high. Even at these high temperatures, NOx emissions could be reduced drastically by using advanced combustion techniques such as staged combustion or flame-less oxidation, as experimental work has shown. In the case of oxy-fuel combustion, the NOx emission are also very high if conventional burners are used. The new combustion techniques achieve similar NOx reductions. (author)

  20. ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WONG, CPC; MALANG, S; NISHIO, S; RAFFRAY, R; SAGARA, S

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED HIGH PERFORMANCE SOLID WALL BLANKET CONCEPTS. First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  1. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  2. High-temperature behavior of advanced spacecraft TPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallix, Joan

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this work has been to develop more efficient, lighter weight, and higher temperature thermal protection systems (TPS) for future reentry space vehicles. The research carried out during this funding period involved the design, analysis, testing, fabrication, and characterization of thermal protection materials to be used on future hypersonic vehicles. This work is important for the prediction of material performance at high temperature and aids in the design of thermal protection systems for a number of programs including programs such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), Pegasus and Pegasus/SWERVE, the Comet Rendezvous and Flyby Vehicle (CRAF), and the Mars mission entry vehicles. Research has been performed in two main areas including development and testing of thermal protection systems (TPS) and computational research. A variety of TPS materials and coatings have been developed during this funding period. Ceramic coatings were developed for flexible insulations as well as for low density ceramic insulators. Chemical vapor deposition processes were established for the fabrication of ceramic matrix composites. Experimental testing and characterization of these materials has been carried out in the NASA Ames Research Center Thermophysics Facilities and in the Ames time-of-flight mass spectrometer facility. By means of computation, we have been better able to understand the flow structure and properties of the TPS components and to estimate the aerothermal heating, stress, ablation rate, thermal response, and shape change on the surfaces of TPS. In addition, work for the computational surface thermochemistry project has included modification of existing computer codes and creating new codes to model material response and shape change on atmospheric entry vehicles in a variety of environments (e.g., earth and Mars atmospheres).

  3. GHRSST Level 3P North Atlantic Regional Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the MetOp-A satellite (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for HIgh Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic Region (NAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on...

  4. Optimization of advanced high-temperature Brayton cycles with multiple reheat stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F Peterson

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper presents an overview and a few point designs for multiple-reheat Brayton cycle power conversion systems using high temperature molten salts (or liquid metals). All designs are derived from the General Atomics GT-MHR power conversion unit (PCU). The GT-MHR PCU is currently the only closed helium cycle system that has undergone detailed engineering design analysis, and that has turbomachinery which is sufficiently large to extrapolate to a >1000 MW(e) multiple reheat gas cycle power conversion system. Analysis shows that, with relatively small engineering modifications, multiple GT-MHR PCU's can be connected together to create a power conversion system in the >1000 MW(e) class. The resulting power conversion system is quite compact, and results in what is likely the minimum gas duct volume possible for a multiple-reheat system. To realize this, compact offset fin plate type liquid-to-gas heat exchangers (power densities from 10 to 120 MW/m 3 ) are needed. Both metal and non-metal heat exchangers are being investigated for high-temperature, gas-cooled reactors for temperatures to 1000 deg. C. Recent high temperature heat exchanger studies for nuclear hydrogen production has suggested that carbon-coated composite materials such as liquid silicon infiltrated chopped fiber carbon-carbon preformed material potentially could be used to fabricate plate fin heat exchangers with reasonable price. Different fluids such as helium, nitrogen and helium mixture, and supercritical CO 2 are compared for these multiple reheat Brayton cycles. Nitrogen and helium mixture cycle need about 40% more total PCU volume than helium cycle while keeping the same net cycle efficiency. Supercritical CO 2 needs very high pressure to optimize. Due to relatively detailed design for components such as heat exchangers, turbomachinery, and duct system, relatively accurate total pressure loss can be obtained, which results in more credible net efficiency

  5. High temperature resistant materials and structural ceramics for use in high temperature gas cooled reactors and fusion plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1992-01-01

    Irrespective of the systems and the status of the nuclear reactor development lines, the availability, qualification and development of materials are crucial. This paper concentrates on the requirements and the status of development of high temperature metallic and ceramic materials for core and heat transferring components in advanced HTR supplying process heat and for plasma exposed, high heat flux components in Tokamak fusion reactor types. (J.P.N.)

  6. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, Gary [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Scott, Brian [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2014-06-30

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70μm) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50μm diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber

  7. Thermal fluid dynamics study of nuclear advanced reactors of high temperature using RELAP5-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scari, Maria Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Fourth Generation nuclear reactors (GEN-IV) are being designed with special features such as intrinsic safety, reduction of isotopic inventory and use of fuel in proliferation-resistant cycles. Therefore, the investigation and evaluation of operational and safety aspects of the GEN-IV reactors have been the subject of numerous studies by the international community and also in Brazil. In 2008, in Brazil, was created the National Institute of Science and Technology of Innovative Nuclear Reactors, focusing on studies of projects and systems of new generation reactors, which included GEN-IV reactors as well as advanced PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) concepts. The Department of Nuclear Engineering of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (DEN-UFMG) is a partner of this Institute, having started studies on the GEN-IV reactors in the year 2007. Therefore, in order to add knowledge to these studies, in this work, three projects of advanced reactors were considered to verify the simulation capability of the thermo-hydraulic RELAP5-3D code for these systems, either in stationary operation or in transient situations. The addition of new working fluids such as ammonia, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, various types of liquid salts, among them Flibe, lead, lithium-bismuth, lithium-lead, was a major breakthrough in this version of the code, allowing also the simulation of GEN-IV reactors. The modeling of the respective core of an HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor), HTR-10 (High Temperature Test Module Reactor) and LS-VHTR (Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very-High-Temperature Reactor) were developed and verified in steady state comparing the values found through the calculations with reference data from other simulations, when it is possible. The first two reactors use helium gas as coolant and the LS-VHTR uses a mixture of 66% LiF and 34% of BeF 2 , the LiF-BeF 2 , also know as Flibe. All the studied reactors use enriched uranium as fuel, in form of TRISO (Tristructural

  8. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg-1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  9. Technology Development Roadmap for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor Secondary Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; M. McCllar; A. Siahpush; D. Clark; M. Patterson; J. Collins

    2012-09-01

    This Technology Development Roadmap (TDRM) presents the path forward for deploying large-scale molten salt secondary heat exchangers (MS-SHX) and recognizing the benefits of using molten salt as the heat transport medium for advanced high temperature reactors (AHTR). This TDRM will aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for: power production (the first anticipated process heat application), hydrogen production, steam methane reforming, methanol to gasoline production, or ammonia production. This TDRM (a) establishes the current state of molten salt SHX technology readiness, (b) defines a path forward that systematically and effectively tests this technology to overcome areas of uncertainty, (c) demonstrates the achievement of an appropriate level of maturity prior to construction and plant operation, and (d) identifies issues and prioritizes future work for maturing the state of SHX technology. This study discusses the results of a preliminary design analysis of the SHX and explains the evaluation and selection methodology. An important engineering challenge will be to prevent the molten salt from freezing during normal and off-normal operations because of its high melting temperature (390°C for KF ZrF4). The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The need for efficiency, compactness, and safety challenge the capabilities of existing heat exchanger technology. The description of potential heat exchanger configurations or designs (such as printed circuit, spiral or helical coiled, ceramic, plate and fin, and plate type) were covered in an earlier report (Sabharwall et al. 2011). Significant future work, much of which is suggested in this report, is needed before the benefits and full potential of the AHTR can be realized. The execution of this TDRM will focuses

  10. Improved controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Wu, Yuehua; Jacobsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    fuel cells and electrolyzer cells. Here, we report on advanced improvements of our original controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope, CAHT-SPM. The new microscope can employ a broad range of the scanning probe techniques including tapping mode, scanning tunneling microscopy......, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, conductive atomic force microscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy. The temperature of the sample can be as high as 850 °C. Both reducing and oxidizing gases such as oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen can be added in the sample chamber and the oxygen partial pressure (pO2...

  11. Enhancing the Accuracy of Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing through Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Jones

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the advantages and enhanced accuracy thermography provides to high temperature mechanical testing. This technique is not only used to monitor, but also to control test specimen temperatures where the infra-red technique enables accurate non-invasive control of rapid thermal cycling for non-metallic materials. Isothermal and dynamic waveforms are employed over a 200–800 °C temperature range to pre-oxidised and coated specimens to assess the capability of the technique. This application shows thermography to be accurate to within ±2 °C of thermocouples, a standardised measurement technique. This work demonstrates the superior visibility of test temperatures previously unobtainable by conventional thermocouples or even more modern pyrometers that thermography can deliver. As a result, the speed and accuracy of thermal profiling, thermal gradient measurements and cold/hot spot identification using the technique has increased significantly to the point where temperature can now be controlled by averaging over a specified area. The increased visibility of specimen temperatures has revealed additional unknown effects such as thermocouple shadowing, preferential crack tip heating within an induction coil, and, fundamental response time of individual measurement techniques which are investigated further.

  12. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Brazing and high temperature brazing is a major joining technology within the economically important fields of energy technology, aerospace and automotive engineering, that play a leading role for technical development everywhere in the world. Moreover diffusion welding has gained a strong position especially in advanced technologies due to its specific advantages. Topics of the conference are: 1. high-temperature brazing in application; 2. basis of brazing technology; 3. brazing of light metals; 4. nondestructive testing; 5. diffusion welding; 6. brazing of hard metals and other hard materials; and 7. ceramic-metal brazing. 28 of 20 lectures and 20 posters were recorded separately for the database ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  13. Advanced high performance solid wall blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Malang, S.; Nishio, S.; Raffray, R.; Sagara, A.

    2002-01-01

    First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  14. Long duration performance of high temperature irradiation resistant thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.; Knudson, D.; Condie, K.; Cole, J.; Wilkins, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding, and structural materials. Data are needed to characterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, radiation conditions. However, traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1100 C degrees. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed and evaluated the performance of a high temperature irradiation-resistant thermocouple that contains alloys of molybdenum and niobium. To verify the performance of INL's recommended thermocouple design, a series of high temperature (from 1200 to 1800 C) long duration (up to six months) tests has been initiated. This paper summarizes results from the tests that have been completed. Data are presented from 4000 hour tests conducted at 1200 and 1400 C that demonstrate the stability of this thermocouple (less than 2% drift). In addition, post test metallographic examinations are discussed which confirm the compatibility of thermocouple materials throughout these long duration, high temperature tests. (authors)

  15. Junction temperature estimation for an advanced active power cycling test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Uimin; Blaabjerg, Frede; Jørgensen, S.

    2015-01-01

    estimation method using on-state VCE for an advanced active power cycling test is proposed. The concept of the advanced power cycling test is explained first. Afterwards the junction temperature estimation method using on-state VCE and current is presented. Further, the method to improve the accuracy...... of the maximum junction temperature estimation is also proposed. Finally, the validity and effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by experimental results.......On-state collector-emitter voltage (VCE) is a good indicator to determine the wear-out condition of power device modules. Further, it is a one of the Temperature Sensitive Electrical Parameters (TSEPs) and thus can be used for junction temperature estimation. In this paper, the junction temperature...

  16. High temperature cogeneration with thermionic burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The thermionic cogeneration combustor was conceived to meet industrial requirements for high-temperature direct heat, typically in the form of gas at temperatures from 800 to 1900 K, while at the same time supplying electricity. The thermionic combustor is entirely self-contained, with heat from the combustion region absorbed by the emitters of thermionic converters to be converted to electric power and the high-temperature reject heat from the converters used to preheat the air used for combustion. Depending on the temperature of the process gas produced, energy savings of around 10% with respect to that used to produce the same amount of electricity and heat without cogeneration are possible with present technology, and savings of up to 20% may be possible with advanced converters. Possible thermionic combustor designs currently under investigation include a configuration in which heat is collected by heat pipes lining the periphery of the combustion region, and a fire-tube converter in which combustion occurs within the cylindrical emitter of each converter. Preliminary component tests of these designs have been encouraging

  17. High temperature cogeneration with thermionic burners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, G. O.; Britt, E. J.; Dick, R. S.

    The thermionic cogeneration combustor was conceived to meet industrial requirements for high-temperature direct heat, typically in the form of gas at temperatures from 800 to 1900 K, while at the same time supplying electricity. The thermionic combustor is entirely self-contained, with heat from the combustion region absorbed by the emitters of thermionic converters to be converted to electric power and the high-temperature reject heat from the converters used to preheat the air used for combustion. Depending on the temperature of the process gas produced, energy savings of around 10% with respect to that used to produce the same amount of electricity and heat without cogeneration are possible with present technology, and savings of up to 20% may be possible with advanced converters. Possible thermionic combustor designs currently under investigation include a configuration in which heat is collected by heat pipes lining the periphery of the combustion region, and a fire-tube converter in which combustion occurs within the cylindrical emitter of each converter. Preliminary component tests of these designs have been encouraging.

  18. Progress In Developing an Impermeable, High Temperature Ceramic Composite for Advanced Reactor Clad And Structural Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, Herbert; Hao, Bernard; Fehrenbacher, Larry; Patterson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Most Advanced Reactors for Energy and Space Applications require higher temperature materials for fuel cladding and core internal structures. For temperatures above 500 deg. C, metal alloys do not retain sufficient strength or long term corrosion resistance for use in either water, liquid metal or gas cooled systems. In the case of water cooled systems, such metals react exo-thermically with water during core overheating accidents, thus requiring extensive and expensive emergency systems to protect against major releases. Past efforts to apply ceramic composites (oxide, carbide or nitride based) having passive safety characteristics, good strength properties at high temperatures, and reasonable resistance to crack growth, have not been successful, either because of irradiation induced effects, or lack of impermeability to fission gases. Under a Phase 1 SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) project sponsored by DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, the authors have developed a new material system that may solve these problems. A hybrid tubular structure (0.6 inches in outside diameter) consisting of an inner layer of monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) and outer layers of SiC-SiC composite, bonded to the inner layer, has been fabricated in small lengths. Room temperature permeability tests demonstrate zero gas leakage at pressures up to 120 psig internal pressure. Four point flexural bending tests on these hybrid tubular specimens demonstrate a 'graceful' failure mode: i.e. - the outer composite structure sustains a failure mode under stress that is similar to the yield vs. stress characteristics of metal structures. (authors)

  19. High-Pressure High-Temperature Phase Diagram of the Organic Crystal Paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Spencer; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Vohra, Yogesh

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) Raman spectroscopy studies have been performed on the organic crystal paracetamol in a diamond anvil cell utilizing boron-doped diamond as heating anvil. The HPHT data obtained from boron-doped diamond heater is cross-checked with data obtained using a standard block heater diamond anvil cell. Isobaric measurements were conducted at pressures up to 8.5 GPa and temperature up to 520 K in a number of different experiments. Solid state phase transitions from monoclinic Form I --> orthorhombic Form II were observed at various pressures and temperatures as well as transitions from Form II --> unknown Form IV. The melting temperature for paracetamol was observed to increase with increasing pressures to 8.5 GPa. Our previous angle dispersive x-ray diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source has confirmed the existence of two unknown crystal structures Form IV and Form V of paracetamol at high pressure and ambient temperature. The phase transformation from Form II to Form IV occurs at ~8.5 GPa and from Form IV to Form V occurs at ~11 GPa at ambient temperature. Our new data is combined with the previous ambient temperature high-pressure Raman and X- ray diffraction data to create the first HPHT phase diagram of paracetamol. Doe-NNSA Carnegie DOE Alliance Center (CDAC) under Grant Number DE-NA0002006.

  20. Development of ball bearing in high temperature water for in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism of advanced marine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Imayoshi, Shou; Ochiai, Masa-aki; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    An advanced marine reactor MRX designed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) adopts an in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism, which is installed inside the reactor vessel. Since the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism should work at a severe condition of a high temperature and high pressure water - 310degC and 12 MPa -, the JAERI has developed the components, a ball bearing of which especially is one of key technologies for realization of this type mechanism. The present report describes the development of the ball bearing containing a survey of materials, material screening tests on oxidation in an autoclave and rolling wear by a small facility, a trial fabrication of the full size ball bearing, and endurance test of it in the high temperature water. As a result, it was found from the development that the materials of cobalt alloy for both of the inner and outer races, cermet for the ball, and graphite for the retainer can satisfy the design condition of the ball bearing. (author)

  1. Recent advance in high manufacturing readiness level and high temperature CMOS mixed-signal integrated circuits on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, M. H.; Clark, D. T.; Wright, S. N.; Gordon, D. L.; Duncan, M. A.; Kirkham, S. J.; Idris, M. I.; Chan, H. K.; Young, R. A. R.; Ramsay, E. P.; Wright, N. G.; Horsfall, A. B.

    2017-05-01

    A high manufacturing readiness level silicon carbide (SiC) CMOS technology is presented. The unique process flow enables the monolithic integration of pMOS and nMOS transistors with passive circuit elements capable of operation at temperatures of 300 °C and beyond. Critical to this functionality is the behaviour of the gate dielectric and data for high temperature capacitance-voltage measurements are reported for SiO2/4H-SiC (n and p type) MOS structures. In addition, a summary of the long term reliability for a range of structures including contact chains to both n-type and p-type SiC, as well as simple logic circuits is presented, showing function after 2000 h at 300 °C. Circuit data is also presented for the performance of digital logic devices, a 4 to 1 analogue multiplexer and a configurable timer operating over a wide temperature range. A high temperature micro-oven system has been utilised to enable the high temperature testing and stressing of units assembled in ceramic dual in line packages, including a high temperature small form-factor SiC based bridge leg power module prototype, operated for over 1000 h at 300 °C. The data presented show that SiC CMOS is a key enabling technology in high temperature integrated circuit design. In particular it provides the ability to realise sensor interface circuits capable of operating above 300 °C, accommodate shifts in key parameters enabling deployment in applications including automotive, aerospace and deep well drilling.

  2. High-Pressure Design of Advanced BN-Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr O. Kurakevych

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to highlight the state of the art in high-pressure design of new advanced materials based on boron nitride. Recent experimental achievements on the governing phase transformation, nanostructuring and chemical synthesis in the systems containing boron nitride at high pressures and high temperatures are presented. All these developments allowed discovering new materials, e.g., ultrahard nanocrystalline cubic boron nitride (nano-cBN with hardness comparable to diamond, and superhard boron subnitride B13N2. Thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of high-pressure synthesis are described based on the data obtained by in situ and ex situ methods. Mechanical and thermal properties (hardness, thermoelastic equations of state, etc. are discussed. New synthetic perspectives, combining both soft chemistry and extreme pressure–temperature conditions are considered.

  3. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the

  4. Advanced Signal Processing for High Temperatures Health Monitoring of Condensed Water Height in Steam Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Takano, Nobuyuki; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    An advanced signal processing methodology is being developed to monitor the height of condensed water thru the wall of a steel pipe while operating at temperatures as high as 250deg. Using existing techniques, previous study indicated that, when the water height is low or there is disturbance in the environment, the predicted water height may not be accurate. In recent years, the use of the autocorrelation and envelope techniques in the signal processing has been demonstrated to be a very useful tool for practical applications. In this paper, various signal processing techniques including the auto correlation, Hilbert transform, and the Shannon Energy Envelope methods were studied and implemented to determine the water height in the steam pipe. The results have shown that the developed method provides a good capability for monitoring the height in the regular conditions. An alternative solution for shallow water or no water conditions based on a developed hybrid method based on Hilbert transform (HT) with a high pass filter and using the optimized windowing technique is suggested. Further development of the reported methods would provide a powerful tool for the identification of the disturbances of water height inside the pipe.

  5. Use of the inverse temperature profile in microwave processing of advanced ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binner, J.G.P.; Al-Dawery, I.A.; Aneziris, C.; Cross, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    Attempts are being made to exploit the inverse temperature profile which can be developed with microwave heating with respect to the processing of certain advanced ceramics. This paper discusses the results obtained to date during the microwave sintering of YBCO high-T c superconductors and the microwave reaction bonding of silicon nitride

  6. STATUS OF TRISO FUEL IRRADIATIONS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR SUPPORTING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR DESIGNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, Michael; Petti, D. A.; Palmer, Joe

    2016-11-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and completed in October 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this experiment was to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment was significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control

  7. High temperature PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianlu; Xie, Zhong; Zhang, Jiujun; Tang, Yanghua; Song, Chaojie; Navessin, Titichai; Shi, Zhiqing; Song, Datong; Wang, Haijiang; Wilkinson, David P.; Liu, Zhong-Sheng; Holdcroft, Steven [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1W5)

    2006-10-06

    There are several compelling technological and commercial reasons for operating H{sub 2}/air PEM fuel cells at temperatures above 100{sup o}C. Rates of electrochemical kinetics are enhanced, water management and cooling is simplified, useful waste heat can be recovered, and lower quality reformed hydrogen may be used as the fuel. This review paper provides a concise review of high temperature PEM fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs) from the perspective of HT-specific materials, designs, and testing/diagnostics. The review describes the motivation for HT-PEMFC development, the technology gaps, and recent advances. HT-membrane development accounts for {approx}90% of the published research in the field of HT-PEMFCs. Despite this, the status of membrane development for high temperature/low humidity operation is less than satisfactory. A weakness in the development of HT-PEMFC technology is the deficiency in HT-specific fuel cell architectures, test station designs, and testing protocols, and an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles behind these areas. The development of HT-specific PEMFC designs is of key importance that may help mitigate issues of membrane dehydration and MEA degradation. (author)

  8. High temperature mechanical performance of a hot isostatically pressed silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Jenkins, M.G.; Lin, C.K.J. [and others

    1996-01-01

    Silicon nitride ceramics are an attractive material of choice for designers and manufacturers of advanced gas turbine engine components for many reasons. These materials typically have potentially high temperatures of usefulness (up to 1400{degrees}C), are chemically inert, have a relatively low specific gravity (important for inertial effects), and are good thermal conductors (i.e., resistant to thermal shock). In order for manufacturers to take advantage of these inherent properties of silicon nitride, the high-temperature mechanical performance of the material must first be characterized. The mechanical response of silicon nitride to static, dynamic, and cyclic conditions at elevated temperatures, along with reliable and representative data, is critical information that gas turbine engine designers and manufacturers require for the confident insertion of silicon nitride components into gas turbine engines. This final report describes the high-temperature mechanical characterization and analyses that were conducted on a candidate structural silicon nitride ceramic. The high-temperature strength, static fatigue (creep rupture), and dynamic and cyclic fatigue performance were characterized. The efforts put forth were part of Work Breakdown Structure Subelement 3.2.1, {open_quotes}Rotor Data Base Generation.{close_quotes} PY6 is comparable to other hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitrides currently being considered for advanced gas turbine engine applications.

  9. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-18 satellite produced by NEODAAS (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Level 2P swath-based Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic area from the Advanced Very High Resolution...

  10. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-19 satellite produced by NEODAAS (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Level 2P swath-based Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic area from the Advanced Very High Resolution...

  11. GHRSST Level 2P North Atlantic Regional Bulk Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-17 satellite produced by NEODAAS (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Level 2P swath-based Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) dataset for the North Atlantic area from the Advanced Very High Resolution...

  12. HIRS-AMTS satellite sounding system test - Theoretical and empirical vertical resolving power. [High resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder - Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the vertical resolving power of satellite-borne temperature sounding instruments. Information is presented on the capabilities of the High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) and a proposed sounding instrument called the Advanced Moisture and Temperature Sounder (AMTS). Two quite different methods for assessing the vertical resolving power of satellite sounders are discussed. The first is the theoretical method of Conrath (1972) which was patterned after the work of Backus and Gilbert (1968) The Backus-Gilbert-Conrath (BGC) approach includes a formalism for deriving a retrieval algorithm for optimizing the vertical resolving power. However, a retrieval algorithm constructed in the BGC optimal fashion is not necessarily optimal as far as actual temperature retrievals are concerned. Thus, an independent criterion for vertical resolving power is discussed. The criterion is based on actual retrievals of signal structure in the temperature field.

  13. 3D printed high performance strain sensors for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; Moser, Russell; Zbib, Hussein M.; Ramana, C. V.; Panat, Rahul

    2018-01-01

    Realization of high temperature physical measurement sensors, which are needed in many of the current and emerging technologies, is challenging due to the degradation of their electrical stability by drift currents, material oxidation, thermal strain, and creep. In this paper, for the first time, we demonstrate that 3D printed sensors show a metamaterial-like behavior, resulting in superior performance such as high sensitivity, low thermal strain, and enhanced thermal stability. The sensors were fabricated using silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs), using an advanced Aerosol Jet based additive printing method followed by thermal sintering. The sensors were tested under cyclic strain up to a temperature of 500 °C and showed a gauge factor of 3.15 ± 0.086, which is about 57% higher than that of those available commercially. The sensor thermal strain was also an order of magnitude lower than that of commercial gages for operation up to a temperature of 500 °C. An analytical model was developed to account for the enhanced performance of such printed sensors based on enhanced lateral contraction of the NP films due to the porosity, a behavior akin to cellular metamaterials. The results demonstrate the potential of 3D printing technology as a pathway to realize highly stable and high-performance sensors for high temperature applications.

  14. High temperature ceramic-tubed reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph J.; Rosenberg, Robert A.; McDonough, Lane J.

    1990-03-01

    The overall objective of the HiPHES project is to develop an advanced high-pressure heat exchanger for a convective steam/methane reformer. The HiPHES steam/methane reformer is a convective, shell and tube type, catalytic reactor. The use of ceramic tubes will allow reaction temperature higher than the current state-of-the-art outlet temperatures of about 1600 F using metal tubes. Higher reaction temperatures increase feedstock conversion to synthesis gas and reduce energy requirements compared to currently available radiant-box type reformers using metal tubes. Reforming of natural gas is the principal method used to produce synthesis gas (primarily hydrogen and carbon monoxide, H2 and CO) which is used to produce hydrogen (for refinery upgrading), methanol, as well as several other important materials. The HiPHES reformer development is an extension of Stone and Webster's efforts to develop a metal-tubed convective reformer integrated with a gas turbine cycle.

  15. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  16. Acoustic levitation for high temperature containerless processing in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, C. A.; Sisler, R.; Merkley, D. R.; Danley, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    New facilities for high-temperature containerless processing in space are described, including the acoustic levitation furnace (ALF), the high-temperature acoustic levitator (HAL), and the high-pressure acoustic levitator (HPAL). In the current ALF development, the maximum temperature capabilities of the levitation furnaces are 1750 C, and in the HAL development with a cold wall furnace they will exceed 2000-2500 C. The HPAL demonstrated feasibility of precursor space flight experiments on the ground in a 1 g pressurized-gas environment. Testing of lower density materials up to 1300 C has also been accomplished. It is suggested that advances in acoustic levitation techniques will result in the production of new materials such as ceramics, alloys, and optical and electronic materials.

  17. Advanced targeted monitoring of high temperature components in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E; Maile, K; Jovanovic, A [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    The article presents the idea of targeted monitoring of high-temperature pressurized components in fossil-fueled power plants, implemented within a modular software system and using, in addition to pressure and temperature data, also displacement and strain measurement data. The concept has been implemented as a part of a more complex company-oriented Internet/Intranet system of MPA Stuttgart (ALIAS). ALIAS enables to combine smoothly the monitoring results with those of the off-line analysis, e. g. sensitivity analyses, comparison with preceding experience (case studies), literature search, search in material databases -(experimental and standard data), nonlinear FE-analysis, etc. The concept and the system have been implemented in real plant conditions several power plants in Germany and Europe: one of these applications and its results are described more in detail in the presentation. (orig.) 9 refs.

  18. Advanced targeted monitoring of high temperature components in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Maile, K.; Jovanovic, A. [MPA Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The article presents the idea of targeted monitoring of high-temperature pressurized components in fossil-fueled power plants, implemented within a modular software system and using, in addition to pressure and temperature data, also displacement and strain measurement data. The concept has been implemented as a part of a more complex company-oriented Internet/Intranet system of MPA Stuttgart (ALIAS). ALIAS enables to combine smoothly the monitoring results with those of the off-line analysis, e. g. sensitivity analyses, comparison with preceding experience (case studies), literature search, search in material databases -(experimental and standard data), nonlinear FE-analysis, etc. The concept and the system have been implemented in real plant conditions several power plants in Germany and Europe: one of these applications and its results are described more in detail in the presentation. (orig.) 9 refs.

  19. High Temperature Piezoelectric Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Shrout, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Venus is one of the planets in the solar systems that are considered for potential future exploration missions. It has extreme environment where the average temperature is 460 deg C and its ambient pressure is about 90 atm. Since the existing actuation technology cannot maintain functionality under the harsh conditions of Venus, it is a challenge to perform sampling and other tasks that require the use of moving parts. Specifically, the currently available electromagnetic actuators are limited in their ability to produce sufficiently high stroke, torque, or force. In contrast, advances in developing electro-mechanical materials (such as piezoelectric and electrostrictive) have enabled potential actuation capabilities that can be used to support such missions. Taking advantage of these materials, we developed a piezoelectric actuated drill that operates at the temperature range up to 500 deg C and the mechanism is based on the Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corer (USDC) configuration. The detailed results of our study are presented in this paper

  20. Advanced high temperature materials for the energy efficient automotive Stirling engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titran, R.H.; Stephens, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Stirling engine is under investigation jointly by the Department of Energy and NASA Lewis as an alternative to the internal combustion engine for automotive applications. The Stirling engine is an external combustion engine that offers the advantage of high fuel economy, low emissions, low noise, and low vibrations compared to current internal combustion automotive engines. The most critical component from a materials viewpoint is the heater head consisting of the cylinders, heating tubes, and regenerator housing. Materials requirements for the heater head include compatibility with hydrogen, resistance to hydrogen permeation, high temperature oxidation/corrosion resistance, and high temperature creep-rupture and fatigue properties. A continuing supporting materials research and technology program has identified the wrought alloys CG-27 and 12RN72, and the cast alloys XF-818 and NASAUT 4G-A1 as candidate replacements for the cobalt containing alloys used in current prototype engines. Based on the materials research program in support of the automotive Stirling engine it is concluded that manufacture of the engine is feasible from low cost iron-base alloys rather than the cobalt alloys used in prototype engines. This paper presents results of research that led to this conclusion

  1. Polymer nanocomposites for high-temperature composite repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Xia [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A novel repair agent for resin-injection repair of advanced high temperature composites was developed and characterized. The repair agent was based on bisphenol E cyanate ester (BECy) and reinforced with alumina nanoparticles. To ensure good dispersion and compatibility with the BECy matrix in nanocomposites, the alumina nanoparticles were functionalized with silanes. The BECy nanocomposites, containing bare and functionalized alumina nanoparticles, were prepared and evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, rheological, and viscoelastic properties. The monomer of BECy has an extremely low viscosity at ambient temperature, which is good for processability. The cured BECy polymer is a highly cross-linked network with excellent thermal mechanical properties, with a high glass transition temperature (Tg) of 270 C and decomposition temperature above 350 C. The incorporation of alumina nanoparticles enhances the mechanical and rheological properties of the BECy nanocomposites. Additionally, the alumina nanoparticles are shown to catalyze the cure of BECy. Characterization of the nanocomposites included dynamic mechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results show that the BECy nanocomposite is a good candidate as repair agent for resin-injection repair applications.

  2. High temperature x-ray micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDowell, Alastair A., E-mail: aamacdowell@lbl.gov; Barnard, Harold; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; Gludovatz, Bernd [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Haboub, Abdel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); current –Lincoln Univ., Jefferson City, Missouri, 65101 (United States); Larson, Natalie; Zok, Frank [University California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara CA 93106 (United States); Panerai, Francesco; Mansour, Nagi N. [NASA Ames Research Centre, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Bale, Hrishikesh [University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); current - Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy, 4385 Hopyard Rd #100, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Acevedo, Claire [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Liu, Dong [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TH (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Robert O. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    There is increasing demand for 3D micro-scale time-resolved imaging of samples in realistic - and in many cases extreme environments. The data is used to understand material response, validate and refine computational models which, in turn, can be used to reduce development time for new materials and processes. Here we present the results of high temperature experiments carried out at the x-ray micro-tomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source. The themes involve material failure and processing at temperatures up to 1750°C. The experimental configurations required to achieve the requisite conditions for imaging are described, with examples of ceramic matrix composites, spacecraft ablative heat shields and nuclear reactor core Gilsocarbon graphite.

  3. A porous ceramic membrane tailored high-temperature supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; He, Benlin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Tang, Qunwei

    2018-03-01

    The supercapacitor that can operate at high-temperature are promising for markedly increase in capacitance because of accelerated charge movement. However, the state-of-the-art polymer-based membranes will decompose at high temperature. Inspired by solid oxide fuel cells, we present here the experimental realization of high-temperature supercapacitors (HTSCs) tailored with porous ceramic separator fabricated by yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and nickel oxide (NiO). Using activated carbon electrode and supporting electrolyte from potassium hydroxide (KOH) aqueous solution, a category of symmetrical HTSCs are built in comparison with a conventional polymer membrane based device. The dependence of capacitance performance on temperature is carefully studied, yielding a maximized specific capacitance of 272 F g-1 at 90 °C for the optimized HTSC tailored by NiO/YSZ membrane. Moreover, the resultant HTSC has relatively high durability when suffer repeated measurement over 1000 cycles at 90 °C, while the polymer membrane based supercapacitor shows significant reduction in capacitance at 60 °C. The high capacitance along with durability demonstrates NiO/YSZ membrane tailored HTSCs are promising in future advanced energy storage devices.

  4. Thermal Protective Coating for High Temperature Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    The central theme of this research is the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticles as precursors to thermally protective coatings for high temperature polymer composites. In addition, we will investigate the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticle as a component to polymer composites. The objective of this research was the high temperature protection of polymer composites via novel chemistry. The significance of this research is the development of a low cost and highly flexible synthetic methodology, with a compatible processing technique, for the fabrication of high temperature polymer composites. We proposed to accomplish this broad goal through the use of a class of ceramic precursor material, alumoxanes. Alumoxanes are nano-particles with a boehmite-like structure and an organic periphery. The technical goals of this program are to prepare and evaluate water soluble carboxylate-alumoxane for the preparation of ceramic coatings on polymer substrates. Our proposed approach is attractive since proof of concept has been demonstrated under the NRA 96-LeRC-1 Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines, HITEMP Program. For example, carbon and Kevlar(tm) fibers and matting have been successfully coated with ceramic thermally protective layers.

  5. GRAPHENE-PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-17024 GRAPHENE-PEEK COMPOSITES AS HIGH TEMPERATURE ADHESIVES Proceedings of the Composites and Advanced...findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or...decision, unless so designated by other documentation. The citation in this report of the names of commercial firms or commercially available

  6. Advanced Packaging Technology Used in Fabricating a High-Temperature Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheim, Glenn M.

    2003-01-01

    The development of new aircraft engines requires the measurement of pressures in hot areas such as the combustor and the final stages of the compressor. The needs of the aircraft engine industry are not fully met by commercially available high-temperature pressure sensors, which are fabricated using silicon. Kulite Semiconductor Products and the NASA Glenn Research Center have been working together to develop silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors for use at high temperatures. At temperatures above 850 F, silicon begins to lose its nearly ideal elastic properties, so the output of a silicon pressure sensor will drift. SiC, however, maintains its nearly ideal mechanical properties to extremely high temperatures. Given a suitable sensor material, a key to the development of a practical high-temperature pressure sensor is the package. A SiC pressure sensor capable of operating at 930 F was fabricated using a newly developed package. The durability of this sensor was demonstrated in an on-engine test. The SiC pressure sensor uses a SiC diaphragm, which is fabricated using deep reactive ion etching. SiC strain gauges on the surface of the diaphragm sense the pressure difference across the diaphragm. Conventionally, the SiC chip is mounted to the package with the strain gauges outward, which exposes the sensitive metal contacts on the chip to the hostile measurement environment. In the new Kulite leadless package, the SiC chip is flipped over so that the metal contacts are protected from oxidation by a hermetic seal around the perimeter of the chip. In the leadless package, a conductive glass provides the electrical connection between the pins of the package and the chip, which eliminates the fragile gold wires used previously. The durability of the leadless SiC pressure sensor was demonstrated when two 930 F sensors were tested in the combustor of a Pratt & Whitney PW4000 series engine. Since the gas temperatures in these locations reach 1200 to 1300 F, the sensors were

  7. Comparison of Diesel Spray Combustion in Different High-temperature, High-pressure Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickett, Lyle M.; Genzale, Caroline L.; Bruneaux, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Diesel spray experimentation at controlled high-temperature and high-pressure conditions is intended to provide a more fundamental understanding of diesel combustion than can be achieved in engine experiments. This level of understanding is needed to develop the high-fidelity multi-scale CFD models...... participants in the ECN. Thus, in addition to the presentation of a comparative study, this paper demonstrates steps that are needed for other interested groups to participate in ECN spray research. We expect that this collaborative effort will generate a high-quality dataset to be used for advanced...

  8. The ARCHER project (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knol, S., E-mail: knol@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), PO Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fütterer, M.A. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Roelofs, F. [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), PO Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kohtz, N. [TÜV Rheinland, Köln (Germany); Laurie, M. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Buckthorpe, D. [UMAN, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Scheuermann, W. [IKE, Stuttgart University, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    The European HTR R&D project ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R&D) builds on a solid HTR technology foundation in Europe, established through former national UK and German HTR programs and in European framework programs. ARCHER runs from 2011 to 2015 and targets selected HTR R&D subjects that would specifically support demonstration, with a focus on experimental effort. In line with the R&D and deployment strategy of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNETP) ARCHER contributes to maintaining, strengthening and expanding the HTR knowledge base in Europe to lay the foundations for demonstration of nuclear cogeneration with HTR systems. The project consortium encompasses conventional and nuclear industry, utilities, Technical Support Organizations, R&D organizations and academia. ARCHER shares results with international partners in the Generation IV International Forum and collaborates directly with related projects in the US, China, Japan, the Republic of Korea and South Africa. The ARCHER project has finished, and the paper comprises an overview of the achievements of the project.

  9. Fiber Bragg Gratings for High-Temperature Thermal Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were used as a characterization tool to study the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the Nasa Marshal Space Flight Center. The motivation for this work was to support Nasa space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. Distributed high temperature measurements, up to 1150 deg. C, were made with FBG temperature sensors. Additionally, FBG strain measurements were taken at elevated temperatures to provide a strain profile of the core during operation. This paper will discuss the contribution of these measurements to meet the goals of Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center. (authors)

  10. Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong W. Lee

    2006-09-30

    The project entitled, ''Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification'', was successfully completed by the Principal Investigator, Dr. S. Lee and his research team in the Center for Advanced Energy Systems and Environmental Control Technologies at Morgan State University. The major results and outcomes were presented in semi-annual progress reports and annual project review meetings/presentations. Specifically, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement, the ultrasonic application in cleaning application, and spray coating process and the gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted during the first year. The results show that four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. Then the gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication as well as the systematic tests on hot model were completed to test the significant factors on temperature measurement in the second year. The advanced Industrial analytic methods such as statistics-based experimental design, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression methods were applied in the hot model tests. The results show that operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition) presented significant impact on the temperature measurement inside the gasifier simulator. The experimental design and ANOVA are very efficient way to design and analyze the experiments. The results show that the air flow rate and fine dust particle amount are statistically significant to the temperature measurement. The regression model provided the functional relation between the temperature and these factors with substantial accuracy. In the last year of the project period, the ultrasonic and subsonic cleaning methods and coating

  11. High temperature superconductor current leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimetz, B.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The use of superconductors in high electrical current applications (magnets, transformers, generators etc.) usually requires cooling with liquid Helium, which is very expensive. The superconductor itself produces no heat, and the design of Helium dewars is very advanced. Therefore most of the heat loss, i.e. Helium consumption, comes from the current lead which connects the superconductor with its power source at room temperature. The current lead usually consists of a pair of thick copper wires. The discovery of the High Temperature Superconductors makes it possible to replace a part of the copper with superconducting material. This drastically reduces the heat losses because a) the superconductor generates no resistive heat and b) it is a very poor thermal conductor compared with the copper. In this work silver-sheathed superconducting tapes are used as current lead components. The work comprises both the production of the tapes and the overall design of the leads, in order to a) maximize the current capacity ('critical current') of the superconductor, b) minimize the thermal conductivity of the silver clad, and c) optimize the cooling conditions

  12. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  13. Nickel-base alloy forgings for advanced high temperature power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donth, B.; Diwo, A.; Blaes, N.; Bokelmann, D. [Saarschmiede GmbH Freiformschmiede, Voelklingen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The strong efforts to reduce the CO{sub 2} emissions lead to the demand for improved thermal efficiency of coal fired power plants. An increased thermal efficiency can be realised by higher steam temperatures and pressures in the boiler and the turbine. The European development aims for steam temperatures of 700 C which requires the development and use of new materials and also associated process technology for large components. Temperatures of 700 C and above are too high for the application of ferritic steels and therefore only Nickel-Base Alloys can fulfill the required material properties. In particular the Nickel-Base Alloy A617 is the most candidate alloy on which was focused the investigation and development in several German and European programs during the last 10 years. The goal is to verify and improve the attainable material properties and ultrasonic detectability of large Alloy 617 forgings for turbine rotors and boiler parts. For many years Saarschmiede has been manufacturing nickel and cobalt alloys and is participating the research programs by developing the manufacturing routes for large turbine rotor forgings up to a maximum diameter of 1000 mm as well as for forged tubes and valve parts for the boiler side. The experiences in manufacturing and testing of very large forgings made from nickel base alloys for 700 C steam power plants are reported. (orig.)

  14. High-flux/high-temperature solar thermal conversion: technology development and advanced applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar Thermal Power Plants have generated in the last 10 years a dynamic market for renewable energy industry and a pro-active networking within R&D community worldwide. By end 2015, there are about 5 GW installed in the world, most of them still concentrated in only two countries, Spain and the US, though a rapid process of globalization is taking place in the last few years and now ambitious market deployment is starting in countries like South Africa, Chile, Saudi Arabia, India, United Arab Emirates or Morocco. Prices for electricity produced by today's plants fill the range from 12 to 16 c€/kWh and they are capital intensive with investments above 4000 €/kW, depending on the number of hours of thermal storage. The urgent need to speed up the learning curve, by moving forward to LCOE below 10 c€/kWh and the promotion of sun-to-fuel applications, is driving the R&D programmes. Both, industry and R&D community are accelerating the transformation by approaching high-flux/high-temperature technologies and promoting the integration with high-efficiency conversion systems.

  15. High thermal efficiency, radiation-based advanced fusion reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taussig, R.T.

    1977-04-01

    A new energy conversion scheme is explored in this study which has the potential of achieving thermal cycle efficiencies high enough (e.g., 60 to 70 percent) to make advanced fuel fusion reactors attractive net power producers. In this scheme, a radiation boiler admits a large fraction of the x-ray energy from the fusion plasma through a low-Z first wall into a high-Z working fluid where the energy is absorbed at temperatures of 2000 0 K to 3000 0 K. The hot working fluid expands in an energy exchanger against a cooler, light gas, transferring most of the work of expansion from one gas to the other. By operating the radiation/boiler/energy exchanger as a combined cycle, full advantage of the high temperatures can be taken to achieve high thermal efficiency. The existence of a mature combined cycle technology from the development of space power plants gives the advanced fuel fusion reactor application a firm engineering base from which it can grow rapidly, if need be. What is more important, the energy exchanger essentially removes the peak temperature limitations previously set by heat engine inlet conditions, so that much higher combined cycle efficiencies can be reached. This scheme is applied to the case of an advanced fuel proton-boron 11 fusion reactor using a single reheat topping and bottoming cycle. A wide variety of possible working fluid combinations are considered and particular cycle calculations for the thermal efficiency are presented. The operation of the radiation boiler and energy exchanger are both described. Material compatibility, x-ray absorption, thermal hydraulics, structural integrity, and other technical features of these components are analyzed to make a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of this concept

  16. Corrosion behaviour of high temperature alloys in the cooling gas of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.

    1989-01-01

    The reactive impurities in the primary cooling helium of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) can cause oxidation, carburization or decarburization of the heat exchanging metallic components. By studies of the fundamental aspects of the corrosion mechanisms it became possible to define operating conditions under which the metallic construction materials show, from the viewpoint of technical application, acceptable corrosion behaviour. By extensive test programmes with exposure times of up to 30,000 hours, a data base has been obtained which allows a reliable extrapolation of the corrosion effects up to the envisaged service lives of the heat exchanging components. (author). 6 refs, 7 figs

  17. Emission spectroscopy of highly ionized high-temperature plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belevtsev, A A; Chinnov, V F; Isakaev, E Kh [Associated Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2006-08-01

    This paper deals with advanced studies on the optical emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure highly ionized high-temperature argon and nitrogen plasma jets generated by a powerful arc plasmatron. The emission spectra are taken in the 200-1000 nm range with a spectral resolution of {approx}0.01-0.02 nm. The exposure times are 6 x 10{sup -6}-2 x 10{sup -2} s, the spatial resolution is 0.02-0.03 mm. The recorded jet spectra are abundant in spectral lines originating from different ionization stages. In nitrogen plasmas, tens of vibronic bands are also observed. To interpret and process these spectra such that plasma characteristics can be derived, a purpose-developed automated processing system is applied. The use of a CCD camera at the spectrograph output allows a simultaneous recording of the spectral and chord intensity distributions of spectral lines, which can yet belong to the overlapped spectra of the first and second orders of interference. The modern optical diagnostic means and methods used permit the determination of spatial distributions of electron number densities and temperatures and evaluation of rotational temperatures. The radial profiles of the irradiating plasma components can also be obtained. Special attention is given to the method of deriving rotational temperatures using vibronic bands with an incompletely identified rotational structure.

  18. Performance Testing of a High Temperature Linear Alternator for Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metscher, Jonathan F.; Geng, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has conducted performance testing of a high temperature linear alternator (HTLA) in support of Stirling power convertor development for potential future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). The high temperature linear alternator is a modified version of that used in Sunpower's Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC), and is capable of operation at temperatures up to 200 deg. Increasing the temperature capability of the linear alternator could expand the mission set of future Stirling RPS designs. High temperature Neodymium-Iron-Boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets were selected for the HTLA application, and were fully characterized and tested prior to use. Higher temperature epoxy for alternator assembly was also selected and tested for thermal stability and strength. A characterization test was performed on the HTLA to measure its performance at various amplitudes, loads, and temperatures. HTLA endurance testing at 200 deg is currently underway.

  19. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  20. High Temperature Electro-Mechanical Devices For Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, D.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require a number of electro-mechanical devices, for example, Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (CRDM's) to control the raising and lowering of control rods and Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP's) to circulate the primary coolant. There are potential benefits in locating electro-mechanical components in areas of the plant with high ambient temperatures. One such benefit is the reduced need to make penetrations in pressure vessels leading to simplified plant design and improved inherent safety. The feature that limits the ambient temperature at which most electrical machines may operate is the material used for the electrical insulation of the machine windings. Conventional electrical machines generally use polymer-based insulation that limits the ambient temperature they can operate in to below 200 degrees Celsius. This means that when a conventional electrical machine is required to operate in a hot area it must be actively cooled necessitating additional systems. This paper presents data gathered during investigations undertaken by Rolls-Royce into the design of high temperature electrical machines. The research was undertaken at Rolls-Royce's University Technology Centre in Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives at Sheffield University. Rolls- Royce has also been investigating high temperature wire and encapsulants and latterly techniques to provide high temperature insulation to terminations. Rolls-Royce used the experience gained from these tests to produce a high temperature electrical linear actuator at sizes representative of those used in reactor systems. This machine was tested successfully at temperatures equivalent to those found inside the reactor vessel of a pressurised water reactor through a full series of operations that replicated in service duty. The paper will conclude by discussing the impact of the findings and potential electro-mechanical designs that may utilise such high temperature technologies. (authors)

  1. Advanced multi-physics simulation capability for very high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Chul; Tak, Nam Il; Jo Chang Keun; Noh, Jae Man; Cho, Bong Hyun; Cho, Jin Woung; Hong, Ser Gi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop methodologies and computer code for high-fidelity multi-physics analysis of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors(VHTRs). The research project was performed through Korea-US I-NERI program. The main research topic was development of methodologies for high-fidelity 3-D whole core transport calculation, development of DeCART code for VHTR reactor physics analysis, generation of VHTR specific 190-group cross-section library for DeCART code, development of DeCART/CORONA coupled code system for neutronics/thermo-fluid multi-physics analysis, and benchmark analysis against various benchmark problems derived from PMR200 reactor. The methodologies and the code systems will be utilized a key technologies in the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration program. Export of code system is expected in the near future and the code systems developed in this project are expected to contribute to development and export of nuclear hydrogen production system

  2. Electro optical system to measure strains at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciammarella, Cesar A.

    1991-12-01

    The measurement of strains at temperatures of the order of 1000 C has become a very important field of research. Technological advances in areas such as the analysis of high speed aircraft structures and high efficiency thermal engines require operational temperatures of this order of magnitude. Current techniques for the measurement of strains, such as electrical strain gages, are at the limit of their useful range and new methods need to be developed. Optical techniques are very attractive in this type of application because of their noncontacting nature. Holography is of particular interest because a minimal preparation of the surfaces is required. Optoelectronics holography is specially suited for this type of application, from the point of view of industrial use. There are a number of technical problems that need to be overcome to measure strains using holographic interferometry at high temperatures. Some of these problems are discussed, and solutions are given. A specimen instrumented with high temperature strains gages is used to compare the results of both technologies.

  3. Development of High Temperature Transport System for Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2011-01-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is one of the the most promising technologies for the advanced fuel cycle with favorable economic potential and intrinsic proliferation-resistance. The electrorefining process, one of main processes which is composed of pyroprocess to recover the useful elements from spent fuel, is under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a sub process of the pyrochemical treatment of spent PWR fuel. High-temperature molten salt transport technologies are required because a molten salt should be transported from the electrorefiner to electrowiner after the electrorefining process. Therefore, in pyrometallurgical processing, the development of high-temperature molten salt transport technologies is a crucial prerequisite. However, there have been a few transport studies on high-temperature molten salt. In this study, an apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and constructed for the development of high temperature transport technology for molten salt, and the performance test of the apparatus was performed. And also, predissolution test of the salt was carried out using the reactor with furnace in experimental apparatus

  4. Advances in processing of NiAl intermetallic alloys and composites for high temperature aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenek, Kamil; Basista, Michal

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades intermetallic compounds such as NiAl have been considered as potential high temperature structural materials for aerospace industry. A large number of investigations have been reported describing complex fabrication routes, introducing various reinforcing/alloying elements along with theoretical analyses. These research works were mainly focused on the overcoming of main disadvantage of nickel aluminides that still restricts their application range, i.e. brittleness at room temperature. In this paper we present an overview of research on NiAl processing and indicate methods that are promising in solving the low fracture toughness issue at room temperature. Other material properties relevant for high temperature applications are also addressed. The analysis is primarily done from the perspective of NiAl application in aero engines in temperature regimes from room up to the operating temperature (over 1150 °C) of turbine blades.

  5. An inexpensive high-temperature optical fiber thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Travis J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Tree, Dale R.; Allred, David D.

    2017-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose tip is coated with a highly conductive, opaque material. When heated, this sensing tip becomes an isothermal cavity that emits like a blackbody. This emission is used to predict the sensing tip temperature. In this work, analytical and experimental research has been conducted to further advance the development of optical fiber thermometry. An inexpensive optical fiber thermometer is developed by applying a thin coating of a high-temperature cement onto the tip of a silica optical fiber. An FTIR spectrometer is used to detect the spectral radiance exiting the fiber. A rigorous mathematical model of the irradiation incident on the detection system is developed. The optical fiber thermometer is calibrated using a blackbody radiator and inverse methods are used to predict the sensing tip temperature when exposed to various heat sources. - Highlights: • An inexpensive coating for an optical fiber thermometer sensing tip is tested. • Inverse heat transfer methods are used to estimate the sensing tip temperature. • An FTIR spectrometer is used as the detector to test the optical fiber thermometer using various heat sources.

  6. High-Temperature Electronics: Status and Future Prospects in the 21st Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Touati

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of current electronics and states the drive toward high-temperature electronics. The problems specific to high-temperature effects on conventional electronics and prospects of alternative technologies like silicon-on-insulator, silicon carbide, and diamond are discussed. Improving petroleum recovery from oil wells with hightemperature coverage of downhole electronics, making combustion processes more efficient utilizing embedded electronics, programs for More Electric Aircraft and Vehicles necessitating distributed control systems, and environmental protection issues stress the need to use and develop high-temperature electronics. This makes high-temperature electronics a key-enabling technology in the 21st century. Actual applications using high-temperature electronics are discussed in some details. Also information and guidelines are included about supporting electronics needed to make a complete high-temperature system. The technology has been making major advancements and is expected to account for 20% of the electronics market by 2010. However, many technical challenges have to be solved.

  7. High Temperature Transducers for Online Monitoring of Microstructure Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lissenden, Cliff [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard [Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-30

    A critical technology gap exists relative to online condition monitoring (CM) of advanced nuclear plant components for damage accumulation; there are not capable sensors and infrastructure available for the high temperature environment. The sensory system, monitoring methodology, data acquisition, and damage characterization algorithm that comprise a CM system are investigated here. Thus this work supports the DOE mission to develop a fundamental understanding of advanced sensors to improve physical measurement accuracy and reduce uncertainty. The research involves a concept viability assessment, a detailed technology gap analysis, and a technology development roadmap.

  8. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion crack

  9. Understanding Fundamental Material Degradation Processes in High Temperature Aggressive Chemomechanical Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James; Gewirth, Andrew; Sehitoglu, Huseyin; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian

    2014-01-16

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that limit materials durability for very high-temperature applications. Current design limitations are based on material strength and corrosion resistance. This project will characterize the interactions of high-temperature creep, fatigue, and environmental attack in structural metallic alloys of interest for the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) or Next–Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and for the associated thermo-chemical processing systems for hydrogen generation. Each of these degradation processes presents a major materials design challenge on its own, but in combination, they can act synergistically to rapidly degrade materials and limit component lives. This research and development effort will provide experimental results to characterize creep-fatigue-environment interactions and develop predictive models to define operation limits for high-temperature structural material applications. Researchers will study individually and in combination creep-fatigue-environmental attack processes in Alloys 617, 230, and 800H, as well as in an advanced Ni-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel (ODS) system. For comparison, the study will also examine basic degradation processes in nichrome (Ni-20Cr), which is a basis for most high-temperature structural materials, as well as many of the superalloys. These materials are selected to represent primary candidate alloys, one advanced developmental alloy that may have superior high-temperature durability, and one model system on which basic performance and modeling efforts can be based. The research program is presented in four parts, which all complement each other. The first three are primarily experimental in nature, and the last will tie the work together in a coordinated modeling effort. The sections are (1) dynamic creep-fatigue-environment process, (2) subcritical crack processes, (3) dynamic corrosion – crack

  10. High Temperature Falling Particle Receiver (2012 - 2016) - Final DOE Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Clifford K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-15

    The objective of this work was to advance falling particle receiver designs for concentrating solar power applications that will enable higher temperatures (>700 °C) and greater power-cycle efficiencies (≥50% thermal-to-electric). Modeling, design, and testing of components in Phases 1 and 2 led to the successful on-sun demonstration in Phase 3 of the world’s first continuously recirculating high-temperature 1 MWt falling particle receiver that achieved >700 °C particle outlet temperatures at mass flow rates ranging from 1 – 7 kg/s.

  11. Studies of high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlikar, A.

    1989-01-01

    The high temperature superconductors (HTSCs) discovered are from the family of ceramic oxides. Their large scale utilization in electrical utilities and in microelectronic devices are the frontal challenges which can perhaps be effectively met only through consolidated efforts and expertise of a multidisciplinary nature. During the last two years the growth of the new field has occurred on an international scale and perhaps has been more rapid than in most other fields. There has been an extraordinary rush of data and results which are continually being published as short texts dispersed in many excellent journals, some of which were started to ensure rapid publication exclusively in this field. As a result, the literature on HTSCs has indeed become so massive and so diffuse that it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep abreast with the important and reliable facets of this fast-growing field. This provided the motivation to evolve a process whereby both professional investigators and students can have ready access to up-to- date in-depth accounts of major technical advances happening in this field. The present series Studies of High Temperature Superconductors has been launched to, at least in part, fulfill this need

  12. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  13. Hydrogen Production System with High Temperature Electrolysis for Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kentaro, Matsunaga; Eiji, Hoashi; Seiji, Fujiwara; Masato, Yoshino; Taka, Ogawa; Shigeo, Kasai

    2006-01-01

    Steam electrolysis with solid oxide cells is one of the most promising methods for hydrogen production, which has the potential to be high efficiency. Its most parts consist of environmentally sound and common materials. Recent development of ceramics with high ionic conductivity suggests the possibility of widening the range of operating temperature with maintaining the high efficiency. Toshiba is constructing a hydrogen production system with solid oxide electrolysis cells for nuclear power plants. Tubular-type cells using YSZ (Yttria-Stabilized- Zirconia) as electrolyte showed good performance of steam electrolysis at 800 to 900 deg C. Larger electrolysis cells with present configuration are to be combined with High Temperature Reactors. The hydrogen production efficiency on the present designed system is expected around 50% at 800 to 900 deg C of operating temperature. For the Fast Reactors, 'advanced cell' with higher efficiency at lower temperature are to be introduced. (authors)

  14. Technology development for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homan, F.J.; Turner, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    In the USA the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is in an advanced stage of design. The related HTGR program areas, the approaches to these programs along with sample results and a description of how these data are used are highlighted in the paper. (author). Figs and tabs

  15. AMSAHTS 1990: Advances in Materials Science and Applications of High Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Larry H. (Editor); Flom, Yury (Editor); Moorjani, Kishin (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    This publication is comprised of abstracts for oral and poster presentations scheduled for AMSAHTS '90. The conference focused on understanding high temperature superconductivity with special emphasis on materials issues and applications. AMSAHTS 90, highlighted the state of the art in fundamental understanding of the nature of high-Tc superconductivity (HTSC) as well as the chemistry, structure, properties, processing and stability of HTSC oxides. As a special feature of the conference, space applications of HTSC were discussed by NASA and Navy specialists.

  16. GHRSST L3C global sub-skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on Metop satellites (currently Metop-A) (GDS V2) produced by OSI SAF (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 3 Collated (L3C) dataset derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)...

  17. GHRSST L3C global sub-skin Sea Surface Temperature from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on Metop satellites (currently Metop-B) (GDS V2) produced by OSI SAF (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A global Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 3 Collated (L3C) dataset derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)...

  18. Reliable and repeatable bonding technology for high temperature automotive power modules for electrified vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Won; Shiozaki, Koji; Glover, Michael D; Mantooth, H Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the feasibility of highly reliable and repeatable copper–tin transient liquid phase (Cu–Sn TLP) bonding as applied to die attachment in high temperature operational power modules. Electrified vehicles are attracting particular interest as eco-friendly vehicles, but their power modules are challenged because of increasing power densities which lead to high temperatures. Such high temperature operation addresses the importance of advanced bonding technology that is highly reliable (for high temperature operation) and repeatable (for fabrication of advanced structures). Cu–Sn TLP bonding is employed herein because of its high remelting temperature and desirable thermal and electrical conductivities. The bonding starts with a stack of Cu–Sn–Cu metal layers that eventually transforms to Cu–Sn alloys. As the alloys have melting temperatures (Cu 3 Sn: > 600 °C, Cu 6 Sn 5 : > 400 °C) significantly higher than the process temperature, the process can be repeated without damaging previously bonded layers. A Cu–Sn TLP bonding process was developed using thin Sn metal sheets inserted between copper layers on silicon die and direct bonded copper substrates, emulating the process used to construct automotive power modules. Bond quality is characterized using (1) proof-of-concept fabrication, (2) material identification using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, and (3) optical analysis using optical microscopy and scanning acoustic microscope. The feasibility of multiple-sided Cu–Sn TLP bonding is demonstrated by the absence of bondline damage in multiple test samples fabricated with double- or four-sided bonding using the TLP bonding process. (paper)

  19. Installation for microwave investigations of high-temperature superconductivity in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Akhvlediani, I G; Mamniashvili, G I; Chigvinadze, D G

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes advanced EPR-spectrometer RE 1306 designed to investigate into structure of magnetic flux in high-temperature superconductors (HTSC). To measure in low fields one uses power source generating current within 0-600 mA limits and 10-500 Gauss field. To ensure temperature studies of HTSC within up to approx 15 K range one used helium and nitrogen cold steam blowing through resonator of EPR-spectrometer. To stabilize specimen temperature prior to cold steams enter double tube one fixed one more heater

  20. High-Temperature Piezoelectric Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric sensing is of increasing interest for high-temperature applications in aerospace, automotive, power plants and material processing due to its low cost, compact sensor size and simple signal conditioning, in comparison with other high-temperature sensing techniques. This paper presented an overview of high-temperature piezoelectric sensing techniques. Firstly, different types of high-temperature piezoelectric single crystals, electrode materials, and their pros and cons are discussed. Secondly, recent work on high-temperature piezoelectric sensors including accelerometer, surface acoustic wave sensor, ultrasound transducer, acoustic emission sensor, gas sensor, and pressure sensor for temperatures up to 1,250 °C were reviewed. Finally, discussions of existing challenges and future work for high-temperature piezoelectric sensing are presented.

  1. Advances in catalysts for internal reforming in high temperature fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, A. L.

    Catalytic steam reforming of natural gas is an attractive method of producing the hydrogen required by the present generation of fuel cells. The molten carbonate (MCFC) and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells operate at high enough temperatures for the endothermic steam reforming reaction to be carried out within the stack. For the MCFC, the conventional anodes have insufficient activity to catalyse the steam reforming of natural gas. For these cells, internal reforming can be achieved only with the addition of a separate catalyst, preferably located in close proximity to the anode. However, in the so-called `Direct Internal Reforming' configuration, attack from alkali in the MCFC may severely limit catalyst lifetime. In the case of the state-of-the-art SOFC, natural gas can be reformed directly on the nickel cermet anode. However, in the SOFC, temperature variations in the cell caused by the reforming reaction may limit the amount of internal reforming that can be allowed in practice. In addition, some external pre-reforming may be desirable to remove high molecular weight hydrocarbons from the fuel gas, which would otherwise crack to produce elemental carbon. Degradation of the SOFC anode may also be a problem when internal reforming is carried out. This has prompted several research groups to investigate the use of alternative anode materials.

  2. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Low Temperature Molecular Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Molecular spectroscopy has achieved rapid and significant progress in recent years, the low temperature techniques in particular having proved very useful for the study of reactive species, phase transitions, molecular clusters and crystals, superconductors and semiconductors, biochemical systems, astrophysical problems, etc. The widening range of applications has been accompanied by significant improvements in experimental methods, and low temperature molecular spectroscopy has been revealed as the best technique, in many cases, to establish the connection between experiment and theoretical calculations. This, in turn, has led to a rapidly increasing ability to predict molecular spectroscopic properties. The combination of an advanced tutorial standpoint with an emphasis on recent advances and new perspectives in both experimental and theoretical molecular spectroscopy contained in this book offers the reader insight into a wide range of techniques, particular emphasis being given to supersonic jet and matri...

  3. High temperature combustion facility: present capabilities and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccio, J.L.; Ginsberg, T.; Ciccarelli, G.

    1995-01-01

    The high-temperature combustion facility constructed and operated by the Department of Advanced Technology of Brookhaven National Laboratory to support and promote research in the area of hydrogen combustion phenomena in mixtures prototypical to light-water reactor containment atmospheres under potential severe accident conditions is reported. The facility can accommodate combustion research activities encompassing the fields of detonation physics, flame acceleration, and low-speed deflagration in a wide range of combustible gas mixtures at initial temperatures up to 700 K and post-combustion pressures up to 100 atmospheres. Some preliminary test results are presented that provide further evidence that the effect of temperature is to increase the sensitivity of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures to undergo detonation [ru

  4. Preliminary Study on the High Temperature Transport System for Molten Salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is one of the the most promising technologies for the advanced fuel cycle with favorable economic potential and intrinsic proliferation-resistance. The electrorefining process, one of main processes is compos- ed of pyroprocess to recover the useful elements from spent fuel, is under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute as a sub process of the pyrochemical treatment of spent PWR fuel. High-temperature molten salt transport technologies are required because a molten salt should be transported from the electrorefiner to electrowiner after the electrorefining process. Therefore, in pyroprocessing technology, the development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a crucial prerequisite. However, there have been a few transport studies on high-temperature molten salt. In this study, an apparatus for suction transport experiments was designed and constructed for the development of high temperature molten salt transport technology. Suction transport experiments were performed using LiC-KCl eutectic salt

  5. High-Temperature Hybrid Rotor Support System Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Gerald T.

    2004-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory Vehicle Technology Directorate and the NASA Glenn Research Center demonstrated a unique high-speed, high-temperature rotor support system in September 2003. Advanced turbomachinery is on its way to surpassing the capabilities of rolling-element bearings and conventional dampers. To meet these demands, gas turbine engines of the future will demand increased efficiency and thrust-to-weight ratio, and reduced specific fuel consumption and noise. The more-electric engine replaces oil-lubricated bearings, dampers, gears, and seals with electrical devices. One such device is the magnetic bearing. The Vehicle Technology Directorate and Glenn have demonstrated the operation of a radial magnetic bearing in combination with a hydrostatic bearing at 1000 F at 31,000 rpm (2.3 MDN1). This unique combination takes advantage of a high-temperature rub surface in the event of electrical power loss or sudden overloads. The hydrostatic bearings allow load sharing with the magnetic bearing. The magnetic-hydrostatic bearing combination eliminates wear and high contact stress from sudden acceleration of the rolling-element bearings and overheating. The magnetic bearing enables high damping, adaptive vibration control, and precise rotor positioning, diagnostics, and health monitoring. A model of the test facility used at Glenn for this technology demonstration is shown. A high-temperature heteropolar radial magnetic bearing is located at the center of gravity of the test rotor. There is a 0.022-in. radial air gap between the rotor and stator. Two rub surface hydrostatic bearings were placed on either side of the magnetic bearing. The rotor is supported by a 0.002-in. hydrostatic air film and the magnetic field. The prototype active magnetic bearing cost $24,000 to design and fabricate and a set of four high temperature, rub-surface, hydrostatic bearings cost $28,000. This work was funded by the Turbine-Based Combined Cycle program.

  6. Hypothetical air ingress scenarios in advanced modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Considering an extremely hypothetical scenario of complete cross duct failure and unlimited air supply into the reactor vessel of a modular high temperature gas cooled ractor, it is found that the potential air inflow remains limited due to the high friction pressure drop through the active core. All incoming air will be oxidized to CO and some local external burning would be temporarily possible in such a scenario. The accident would have to continue with unlimited air supply for hundreds of hours before the core structural integrity would be jeopardized

  7. Oxidation Study of an Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Coatings Based on HfSiCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Dagny; Waters, Deborah L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2018-01-01

    High temperature fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are important for aerospace applications because of their low density, high strength, and significantly higher-temperature capabilities compared to conventional metallic systems. The use of the SiCf/SiC and Cf/SiC CMCs allows the design of lighter-weight, more fuel efficient aircraft engines and also more advanced spacecraft airframe thermal protection systems. However, CMCs have to be protected with advanced environmental barrier coatings when they are incorporated into components for the harsh environments such as in aircraft engine or spacecraft applications. In this study, high temperature oxidation kinetics of an advanced HfSiCN coating on Cf/SiC CMC substrates were investigated at 1300 C, 1400 C, and 1500 C by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The coating oxidation reaction parabolic rate constant and activation energy were estimated from the experimental results. The oxidation reaction studies showed that the coatings formed the most stable, predominant HfSiO4-HfO2 scales at 1400 C. A peroxidation test at 1400 C then followed by subsequent oxidation tests at various temperatures also showed more adherent scales and slower scale growth because of reduced the initial transient oxidation stage and increased HfSiO4-HfO2 content in the scales formed on the HfSiCN coatings.

  8. Highly efficient high temperature electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    2008-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of water and steam may provide an efficient, cost effective and environmentally friendly production of H-2 Using electricity produced from sustainable, non-fossil energy sources. To achieve cost competitive electrolysis cells that are both high performing i.e. minimum...... internal resistance of the cell, and long-term stable, it is critical to develop electrode materials that are optimal for steam electrolysis. In this article electrolysis cells for electrolysis of water or steam at temperatures above 200 degrees C for production of H-2 are reviewed. High temperature...... electrolysis is favourable from a thermodynamic point of view, because a part of the required energy can be supplied as thermal heat, and the activation barrier is lowered increasing the H-2 production rate. Only two types of cells operating at high temperature (above 200 degrees C) have been described...

  9. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Thirteenth Annual Report: October 1999 Through September 2000; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasto, AE

    2001-01-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) is designed to assist American industries, universities, and governmental agencies develop advanced materials by providing a skilled staff and numerous sophisticated, often one-of-a-kind pieces of materials characterization equipment. It is a nationally designated user facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) office of Transportation Technologies, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Physically, it is a 64,500-ft(sup 2) building at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HTML houses six ''user centers,'' which are clusters of specialized equipment designed for specific types of properties measurements. The HTML was conceived and built in the mid-1980s in response to the oil embargoes of the 1970s. The concept was to build a facility that would allow direct work with American industry, academia, and government laboratories in providing advanced high-temperature materials such as structural ceramics for energy-efficient engines. The HTML's scope of work has since expanded to include other, non-high-temperature materials of interest to transportation and other industries

  10. High temperature structure design for FBRs and analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Koji

    1986-01-01

    In the case of FBRs, the operation temperature exceeds 500 deg C, therefore, the design taking the inelastic characteristics of structural materials, such as plasticity and creep, into account is required, and the high grade and detailed evaluation of design is demanded. This new high temperature structure design technology has been advanced in respective countries taking up experimental, prototype and demonstration reactors as the targets. The development of FBRs in Japan was begun with the experimental reactor 'Joyo' which has been operated since 1977, and now, the prototype FBR 'Monju' of 280 MWe is under construction, which is expected to attain the criticality in 1992. In order to realize FBRs which can compete with LWRs through the construction of a demonstration FBR, the construction of large scale plants and the heightening of the economy and reliability are necessary. The features and the role of FBR structural design, the method of high temperature structure design and the trend of its standardization, the trend of the structural analysis technology for FBRs such as inelastic analysis, buckling analysis and fluid and structure coupled vibration analysis, the present status of structural analysis programs, and the subjects for the future of high temperature structure design are explained. (Kako, I.)

  11. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1985-08-01

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  12. High temperature materials and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The use of high-temperature materials in current and future applications, including silicone materials for handling hot foods and metal alloys for developing high-speed aircraft and spacecraft systems, has generated a growing interest in high-temperature technologies. High Temperature Materials and Mechanisms explores a broad range of issues related to high-temperature materials and mechanisms that operate in harsh conditions. While some applications involve the use of materials at high temperatures, others require materials processed at high temperatures for use at room temperature. High-temperature materials must also be resistant to related causes of damage, such as oxidation and corrosion, which are accelerated with increased temperatures. This book examines high-temperature materials and mechanisms from many angles. It covers the topics of processes, materials characterization methods, and the nondestructive evaluation and health monitoring of high-temperature materials and structures. It describes the ...

  13. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, Don [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  14. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  15. High quality mask storage in an advanced Logic-Fab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jähnert, Carmen; Fritsche, Silvio

    2012-02-01

    High efficient mask logistics as well as safe and high quality mask storage are essential requirements within an advanced lithography area of a modern logic waferfab. Fast operational availability of the required masks at the exposure tool with excellent mask condition requires a safe mask handling, safeguarding of high mask quality over the whole mask usage time without any quality degradation and an intelligent mask logistics. One big challenge is the prevention of haze on high advanced phase shift masks used in a high volume production line for some thousands of 248nm or 193nm exposures. In 2008 Infineon Dresden qualified a customer specific developed semi-bare mask storage system from DMSDynamic Micro Systems in combination with a high advanced mask handling and an interconnected complex logistic system. This high-capacity mask storage system DMS M1900.22 for more than 3000 masks with fully automated mask and box handling as well as full-blown XCDA purge has been developed and adapted to the Infineon Lithotoollandscape using Nikon and SMIF reticle cases. Advanced features for ESD safety and mask security, mask tracking via RFID and interactions with the exposure tools were developed and implemented. The stocker is remote controlled by the iCADA-RSM system, ordering of the requested mask directly from the affected exposure tool allows fast access. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges for this approach as well as the practical experience gained during the implementation of the new system which improves the fab performance with respect to mask quality, security and throughput. Especially the realization of an extremely low and stable humidity level in addition with a well controlled air flow at each mask surface, preventing masks from haze degradation and particle contamination, turns out to be a notable technical achievement. The longterm stability of haze critical masks has been improved significantly. Relevant environmental parameters like

  16. High temperature refrigerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyert, W.A. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator is described which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle the working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot

  17. Secret high-temperature reactor concept for inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of our SCEPTRE project was to create an advanced second-generation inertial fusion reactor that offers the potential for either of the following: (1) generating electricity at 50% efficiency, (2) providing high temperature heat (850 0 C) for hydrogen production, or (3) producing fissile fuel for light-water reactors. We have found that these applications are conceptually feasible with a reactor that is intrinsically free of the hazards of catastrophic fire or tritium release

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE CORROSION RESISTANCE OF METALLIC MATERIALS IN HARSH CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Novello, Frederic; Dedry, Olivier; De Noose, Vincent; Lecomte-Beckers, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient energy recovery from renewable sources and from waste incineration causes new problems of corrosion at high temperature. A similar situation exists for new recycling processes and new energy storage units. These corrosions are generally considered to be caused by ashes or molten salts, the composition of which differs considerably from one plant to another. Therefore, for the assessment of corrosion-resistance of advanced materials, it is essential to precisely evaluate the c...

  19. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  20. New high-temperature flame-resistant resin matrix for RP/C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced thermoset and thermoplastic resins as matrices are discussed. The evaluated properties include anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and high-temperature mechanical properties. It is shown that graphite composites having the highest char yield exhibit optimum fire-resistant properties.

  1. The corrosion behavior of hafnium in high-temperature-water environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, D.M.; Smee, J.D.; Kammenzind, B.F.

    1999-10-01

    The high-temperature-water corrosion performance of hafnium is evaluated. Corrosion kinetic data are used to develop correlations that are a function of time and temperature. The evaluation is based on corrosion tests conducted in out-of-pile autoclaves and in out-of-flux locations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures ranging from 288 to 360 C. Similar to the corrosion behavior of unalloyed zirconium, the high-temperature-water corrosion response of hafnium exhibits three corrosion regimes: pretransition, posttransition, and spalling. In the pretransition regime, cubic corrosion kinetics are exhibited, whereas in the posttransition regime, linear corrosion kinetics are exhibited. Because of the scatter in the spalling regime data, it is not reasonable to use a best fit of the data to describe spalling regime corrosion. Data also show that neutron irradiation does not alter the corrosion performance of hafnium. Finally, the data illustrate that the corrosion rate of hafnium is significantly less than that of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4.

  2. Present state and future prospect of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanokawa, Konomo

    1994-01-01

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors can supply the heat of about 1000degC, and the high efficiency and the high rate of heat utilization can be attained. Also they have the features of excellent inherent safety, the easiness of operation, the high burnup of fuel and so on. The heat utilization of atomic energy in addition to electric power generation is very important in view of the protection of global environment and the diversification of energy supply. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has advanced the construction of the high temperature engineering test and research reactor (HTTR) of 30 MW thermal output, aiming at attaining the criticality in 1998. The progress of the development of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor is described. For 18 years, the design study of the reactor was advanced together with the research and development of the reactor physics, fuel and materials, high temperature machinery and equipment and others, and the decision of the design standard and the development of computation codes. The main specification and the construction schedule are shown. The reactor building was almost completed, and the reactor containment vessel was installed. The plan of the research and development by using the HTTR is investigated. (K.I.)

  3. Final Report for Project 13-4791: New Mechanistic Models of Creep-Fatigue Crack Growth Interactions for Advanced High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruzic, Jamie J [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Siegmund, Thomas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Tomar, Vikas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2018-03-20

    This project developed and validated a novel, multi-scale, mechanism-based model to quantitatively predict creep-fatigue crack growth and failure for Ni-based Alloy 617 at 800°C. Alloy 617 is a target material for intermediate heat exchangers in Generation IV very high temperature reactor designs, and it is envisioned that this model will aid in the design of safe, long lasting nuclear power plants. The technical effectiveness of the model was shown by demonstrating that experimentally observed crack growth rates can be predicted under both steady state and overload crack growth conditions. Feasibility was considered by incorporating our model into a commercially available finite element method code, ABAQUS, that is commonly used by design engineers. While the focus of the project was specifically on an alloy targeted for Generation IV nuclear reactors, the benefits to the public are expected to be wide reaching. Indeed, creep-fatigue failure is a design consideration for a wide range of high temperature mechanical systems that rely on Ni-based alloys, including industrial gas power turbines, advanced ultra-super critical steam turbines, and aerospace turbine engines. It is envisioned that this new model can be adapted to a wide range of engineering applications.

  4. Status for development of a capsule and instruments for high-temperature irradiation in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Lee, Chul Yong; Yang, Seong Woo; Shim, Kyue Taek; Chung, Hwan-Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    As the reactors planned in the Gen-IV program will be operated at high temperature and under high neutron flux, the requirements for irradiation of materials at high temperature are recently being gradually increased. The irradiation tests of materials in HANARO up to the present have been performed usually at temperatures below 300degC at which the RPV materials of the commercial reactors are being operated. To overcome the restriction for high-temperature use of Al thermal media of the existing standard capsule, a new capsule with double thermal media composed of two kinds of materials such as Al-Ti and Al-graphite was designed and fabricated as a more advanced capsule than the single thermal media capsule. (author)

  5. Development of leak detection system using high temperature-resistant microphones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Yoshitsugu; Mochizuki, Hiroyasu; Watanabe, Kenshiu; Nakamura, Takahisa; Nakazima, Yoshiaki; Yamauchi, Tatsuya

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development and testing of a coolant leak detection system for an inlet feeder pipe of an advanced thermal reactor (ATR) using high temperature-resistant microphones. Such microphones must be resistant to both high temperatures and high radiation doses. Leakage sound characteristics, attenuation of the sound level in a heat insulating box for the inlet feeder pipes, and background noise were investigated using the experimental facility and the prototype ATR 'FUGEN'. The optimum frequency ranges for the microphone were then determined based on the observed leakage sound and background noise. The ability of the microphone to discriminate between leaks and other burst-type noises was also investigated by statistical analyses. Finally, it was confirmed that the present method could detect a leak within a couple of seconds. (author)

  6. Frictional characteristics of silicon graphite lubricated with water at high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Eun Hyun; Park, Jin Seok; Kim, Jong In

    2001-01-01

    Experimental frictional and wear characteristics of silicon graphite materials is studied in this paper. Those specimens are lubricated with high temperature and highly pressurized water to simulate the same operating condition for the journal bearing and the thrust bearing on the main coolant pump bearing in the newly developing nuclear reactor named SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). Operating condition of the bearings is realized by the tribometer and the autoclave. Friction coefficient and wear loss are analyzed to choose the best silicon graphite material. Pin on plate test specimens are used and coned disk springs are used to control the applied force on the specimens. Wear loss and wear width are measured by a precision balance and a micrometer. The friction force is measured by the strain gauge which can be used under high temperature and high pressure. Three kinds of silicon graphite materials are examined and compared with each other, and each material shows similar but different results on frictional and wear characteristics

  7. Evaluation of Dynamic Reversible Chemical Energy Storage with High Temperature Electrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    McVay, Derek Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Renewable power generation is intermittent and non-dispatchable, but is steadily increasing in penetration due to lower costs associated with installation and demand for clean power generation. Without significant energy storage available to a grid with high renewable penetration, a mismatch between the load and the power available can. Furthermore, advanced high temperature nuclear reactors offer clean power generation, but only at a baseload operation scenario due to the significant thermal...

  8. ACBC to Balcite: Bioinspired Synthesis of a Highly Substituted High-Temperature Phase from an Amorphous Precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Michael L.; Joester, Derk (NWU)

    2017-04-28

    Energy-efficient synthesis of materials locked in compositional and structural states far from equilibrium remains a challenging goal, yet biomineralizing organisms routinely assemble such materials with sophisticated designs and advanced functional properties, often using amorphous precursors. However, incorporation of organics limits the useful temperature range of these materials. Herein, the bioinspired synthesis of a highly supersaturated calcite (Ca0.5Ba0.5CO3) called balcite is reported, at mild conditions and using an amorphous calcium–barium carbonate (ACBC) (Ca1- x Ba x CO3·1.2H2O) precursor. Balcite not only contains 50 times more barium than the solubility limit in calcite but also displays the rotational disorder on carbonate sites that is typical for high-temperature calcite. It is significantly harder (30%) and less stiff than calcite, and retains these properties after heating to elevated temperatures. Analysis of balcite local order suggests that it may require the formation of the ACBC precursor and could therefore be an example of nonclassical nucleation. These findings demonstrate that amorphous precursor pathways are powerfully enabling and provide unprecedented access to materials far from equilibrium, including high-temperature modifications by room-temperature synthesis.

  9. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía, Ignacio; Bedolla Jacuinde, Arnoldo; Maldonado, Cuauhtémoc; Cabrera Marrero, José M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 ◦C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s−1. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless,...

  10. High temperature pressure water's blowdown into water. Experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Toshihisa; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Hiromasa

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the present experimental study is to clarify the phenomena in blowdown of high temperature and pressure water in pressure vessel into the containment water for evaluation of design of an advanced marine reactor(MRX). The water blown into the containment water flushed and formed steam jet plume. The steam jet condensed in the water, but some stream penetrated to gas phase of containment and contributed to increase of containment pressure. (author)

  11. High-Temperature Switched-Reluctance Electric Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Gerald; Brown, Gerald; Morrison, Carlos; Provenza, Andy; Kascak, Albert; Palazzolo, Alan

    2003-01-01

    An eight-pole radial magnetic bearing has been modified into a switched-reluctance electric motor capable of operating at a speed as high as 8,000 rpm at a temperature as high as 1,000 F (=540 C). The motor (see figure) is an experimental prototype of starter-motor/generator units that have been proposed to be incorporated into advanced gas turbine engines and that could operate without need for lubrication or active cooling. The unique features of this motor are its electromagnet coils and, to some extent, its control software. Heretofore, there has been no commercial-off-the-shelf wire capable of satisfying all of the requirements for fabrication of electromagnet coils capable of operation at temperatures up to 1,000 F (=540 C). The issues addressed in the development of these electromagnet coils included thermal expansion, oxidation, pliability to small bend radii, micro-fretting, dielectric breakdown, tensile strength, potting compound, thermal conduction, and packing factor. For a test, the motor was supported, along with a rotor of 18 lb (.8-kg) mass, 3-in. (.7.6-cm) diameter, 21-in. (.53-cm) length, on bearings packed with high-temperature grease. The motor was located at the mid span of the rotor and wrapped with heaters. The motor stator was instrumented with thermocouples. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the motor had undergone 14 thermal cycles between room temperature and 1,000 F (.540 C) and had accumulated operating time >27.5 hours at 1,000 F (=540 C). The motor-controller hardware includes a personal computer equipped with analog-to-digital input and digital-to-analog output cards. The controller software is a C-language code that implements a switched-reluctance motor-control principle: that is, it causes the coils to be energized in a sequence timed to generate a rotating magnetic flux that creates a torque on a scalloped rotor. The controller can operate in an open- or closed-loop mode. In addition, the software has

  12. Iron-free moving coil high temperature displacement transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grindrod, A

    1976-07-01

    A unique, iron free, moving coil linear displacement transducer system is described, which is suitable for continuously monitoring linear movements, at varying temperatures up to 750/sup 0/C, in operational nuclear reactors. Although this device has been primarily developed for Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Systems, it also has uses where long term measurements on conventional high temperature plant are required. Furthermore it could be particularly useful in material creep laboratories where precise linear changes in specimen length need to be monitored at elevated temperatures, over several years. Since individual transducer installations demand specific mounting arrangements to suit particular component geometries, evaluations have been made only on standard operational modules or capsules which are designed for containment in a range of housing or fixtures to suit particular applications. The behaviour of these devices has been studied at temperatures up to 750/sup 0/C for periods of over 10,000 h. An evaluation is also included of a commercially designed sensor assembly employing the same principle, for monitoring the boiler-shield wall movement at Hinkley Point 'B' AGR Station.

  13. High-Pressure-High-Temperature Processing Reduces Maillard Reaction and Viscosity in Whey Protein-Sugar Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Xi, Bingyan; Minor, Marcel; Sala, Guido; van Boekel, Martinus; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Stieger, Markus

    2016-09-28

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of pressure in high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) processing on Maillard reactions and protein aggregation of whey protein-sugar solutions. Solutions of whey protein isolate containing either glucose or trehalose at pH 6, 7, and 9 were treated by HPHT processing or conventional high-temperature (HT) treatments. Browning was reduced, and early and advanced Maillard reactions were retarded under HPHT processing at all pH values compared to HT treatment. HPHT induced a larger pH drop than HT treatments, especially at pH 9, which was not associated with Maillard reactions. After HPHT processing at pH 7, protein aggregation and viscosity of whey protein isolate-glucose/trehalose solutions remained unchanged. It was concluded that HPHT processing can potentially improve the quality of protein-sugar-containing foods, for which browning and high viscosities are undesired, such as high-protein beverages.

  14. High thermoelectric figure of merit in nanocrystalline polyaniline at low temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nath, Chandrani; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ask@tezu.ernet.in, E-mail: okram@csr.res.in [Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784 028 (India); Kuo, Yung-Kang [Department of Physics, National Dong-Hwa University, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China); Okram, Gunadhor Singh, E-mail: ask@tezu.ernet.in, E-mail: okram@csr.res.in [Electrical Transport Laboratory, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 017 (India)

    2014-09-29

    Thermoelectric coolers with figure of merit (ZT) close to unity at low temperatures are the need of the hour with new advances in high temperature superconductors, superconducting microelectronic circuits, quantum computers, and photonics. Here, we demonstrate that the conducting polymer polyaniline (Pani) doped with camphor sulfonic acid synthesized in semi-crystalline nanostructures, possesses a giant Seebeck effect at low temperatures. The resulting enormously large Seebeck coefficient (up to 0.6 V/K) combined with an intrinsically low electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity give rise to a ZT = 0.77 at 45 K and ZT = 2.17 at 17 K.

  15. The irradiation behavior of atomized U-Mo alloy fuels at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Man; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.

    2001-04-01

    Post-irradiation examinations of atomized U-10Mo, U-6Mo, and U-6Mo-1.7Os dispersion fuels from the RERTR-3 experiment irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were carried out in order to investigate the fuel behavior of high uranium loading (8 gU/cc) at a high temperature (higher than 200°C). It was observed after about 40 at% BU that the U-Mo alloy fuels at a high temperature showed similar irradiation bubble morphologies compared to those at a lower temperature found in the RERTR-1 irradiation result, but there was a thick reaction layer with the aluminum matrix which was found to be greatly affected by the irradiation temperature and to a lesser degree by the fuel composition. In addition, the chemical analysis for the irradiated U-Mo fuels using the Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) method were conducted to investigate the compositional changes during the formation of the reaction product.

  16. R and D programme on generation IV nuclear energy systems: the high temperatures gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Billot, P.; Anzieu, P.; Brossard, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Generation IV Technology Roadmap selected, among others, a sequenced development of advanced high temperature gas cooled reactors as one of the main focus for R and D on future nuclear energy systems. The selection of this research objective originates both from the significance of high temperature and fast neutrons for nuclear energy to meet the needs for a sustainable development for the medium-long term (2020/2030 and beyond), and from the significant common R and D pathway that supports both medium term industrial projects and more advanced versions of gas cooled reactors. The first step of the 'Gas Technology Path' aims to support the development of a modular HTR to meet specific international market needs around 2020. The second step is a Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR (>950 C) - to efficiently produce hydrogen through thermo-chemical or electro-chemical water splitting or to generate electricity with an efficiency above 50%, among other applications of high temperature nuclear heat. The third step of the Path is a Gas Fast Reactor - GFR - that features a fast-spectrum helium-cooled reactor and closed fuel cycle, with a direct or indirect thermodynamic cycle for electricity production and full recycle of actinides. Hydrogen production is also considered for the GFR. The paper succinctly presents the R and D program currently under definition and partially launched within the Generation IV International Forum on this consistent set of advanced gas cooled nuclear systems. (orig.)

  17. LARGE-SCALE HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FROM NUCLEAR ENERGY USING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from water splitting with relatively high efficiency using high-temperature electrolysis. This technology makes use of solid-oxide cells, running in the electrolysis mode to produce hydrogen from steam, while consuming electricity and high-temperature process heat. When coupled to an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor, the overall thermal-to-hydrogen efficiency for high-temperature electrolysis can be as high as 50%, which is about double the overall efficiency of conventional low-temperature electrolysis. Current large-scale hydrogen production is based almost exclusively on steam reforming of methane, a method that consumes a precious fossil fuel while emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Demand for hydrogen is increasing rapidly for refining of increasingly low-grade petroleum resources, such as the Athabasca oil sands and for ammonia-based fertilizer production. Large quantities of hydrogen are also required for carbon-efficient conversion of biomass to liquid fuels. With supplemental nuclear hydrogen, almost all of the carbon in the biomass can be converted to liquid fuels in a nearly carbon-neutral fashion. Ultimately, hydrogen may be employed as a direct transportation fuel in a 'hydrogen economy.' The large quantity of hydrogen that would be required for this concept should be produced without consuming fossil fuels or emitting greenhouse gases. An overview of the high-temperature electrolysis technology will be presented, including basic theory, modeling, and experimental activities. Modeling activities include both computational fluid dynamics and large-scale systems analysis. We have also demonstrated high-temperature electrolysis in our laboratory at the 15 kW scale, achieving a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5500 L/hr.

  18. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  19. Archaeal Viruses from High-Temperature Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson-McGee, Jacob H; Snyder, Jamie C; Young, Mark J

    2018-02-27

    Archaeal viruses are some of the most enigmatic viruses known, due to the small number that have been characterized to date. The number of known archaeal viruses lags behind known bacteriophages by over an order of magnitude. Despite this, the high levels of genetic and morphological diversity that archaeal viruses display has attracted researchers for over 45 years. Extreme natural environments, such as acidic hot springs, are almost exclusively populated by Archaea and their viruses, making these attractive environments for the discovery and characterization of new viruses. The archaeal viruses from these environments have provided insights into archaeal biology, gene function, and viral evolution. This review focuses on advances from over four decades of archaeal virology, with a particular focus on archaeal viruses from high temperature environments, the existing challenges in understanding archaeal virus gene function, and approaches being taken to overcome these limitations.

  20. Archaeal Viruses from High-Temperature Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob H. Munson-McGee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaeal viruses are some of the most enigmatic viruses known, due to the small number that have been characterized to date. The number of known archaeal viruses lags behind known bacteriophages by over an order of magnitude. Despite this, the high levels of genetic and morphological diversity that archaeal viruses display has attracted researchers for over 45 years. Extreme natural environments, such as acidic hot springs, are almost exclusively populated by Archaea and their viruses, making these attractive environments for the discovery and characterization of new viruses. The archaeal viruses from these environments have provided insights into archaeal biology, gene function, and viral evolution. This review focuses on advances from over four decades of archaeal virology, with a particular focus on archaeal viruses from high temperature environments, the existing challenges in understanding archaeal virus gene function, and approaches being taken to overcome these limitations.

  1. Metrology to enable high temperature erosion testing - A new european initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fry, A.T.; Gee, M.G.; Clausen, Sønnik

    2014-01-01

    is required. However, limitations in current measurement capability within this form of test prevent the advancement. A new European initiative, METROSION, on the development of high temperature solid particle erosion testing has a primary aim to develop this metrological framework. Several key parameters...... have been identified for measurement and control; these include temperature (of the sample, gas and particles), flow rate, size and shape of the erodent, angle of incidence of the particle stream and nozzle design. This paper outlines the aims and objectives of this new initiative. With a particular...

  2. An overview of rotating machine systems with high-temperature bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Difan; Izumi, Mitsuru; Miki, Motohiro; Felder, Brice; Ida, Tetsuya; Kitano, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    The paper contains a review of recent advancements in rotating machines with bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTS). The high critical current density of bulk HTS enables us to design rotating machines with a compact configuration in a practical scheme. The development of an axial-gap-type trapped flux synchronous rotating machine together with the systematic research works at the Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology since 2001 are briefly introduced. Developments in bulk HTS rotating machines in other research groups are also summarized. The key issues of bulk HTS machines, including material progress of bulk HTS, in situ magnetization, and cooling together with AC loss at low-temperature operation are discussed.

  3. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  4. Testing of Sapphire Optical Fiber and Sensors in Intense Radiation Fields When Subjected to Very High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Thomas [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Windl, Wolfgang [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-12-15

    The primary objective of this project was to determine the optical attenuation and signal degradation of sapphire optical fibers & sensors (temperature & strain), in-situ, operating at temperatures up to 1500°C during reactor irradiation through experiments and modeling. The results will determine the feasibility of extending sapphire optical fiber-based instrumentation to extremely high temperature radiation environments. This research will pave the way for future testing of sapphire optical fibers and fiber-based sensors under conditions expected in advanced high temperature reactors.

  5. Proposed Advanced Reactor Adaptation of the Standard Review Plan NUREG-0800 Chapter 4 (Reactor) for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors and Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Moe, Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sofu, Tanju [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This report proposes adaptation of the previous regulatory gap analysis in Chapter 4 (Reactor) of NUREG 0800, Standard Review Plan (SRP) for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants: LWR [Light Water Reactor] Edition. The proposed adaptation would result in a Chapter 4 review plan applicable to certain advanced reactors. This report addresses two technologies: the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (mHTGR). SRP Chapter 4, which addresses reactor components, was selected for adaptation because of the possible significant differences in advanced non-light water reactor (non-LWR) technologies compared with the current LWR-based description in Chapter 4. SFR and mHTGR technologies were chosen for this gap analysis because of their diverse designs and the availability of significant historical design detail.

  6. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  7. The high temperature out-of-pile test of LVDT for elongation measurement of fuel pellet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J. M.; Kim, B. K.; Jo, M. S.; Joo, K. N.; Park, S. J.; Gang, Y. H.; Kim, Y. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    As a part of the development of instrumentation technologies for the nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Nuclear Application Reactor), the elongation measurement technique of the fuel pellet is being developed using LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer). The well qualified out-of-pile test were needed to understand the LVDT's detail characteristics at high temperature for the detail design of the fuel irradiation instrumented capsule, because LVDT is very sensitive to variation of temperature. Therefore, the high temperature out-of-pile test system for fuel pellet elongation was developed, and this test was performed under the temperature condition between room temperature and 300 .deg. C with increasing the elongation from 0 to 5 mm. The LVDT's high temperature characteristics and temperature sensitivity of LVDT were analyzed through this experiment. Based on the result of this test, the method for the application of LVDT and elongation detector at high temperature was introduced. It is known that the results will be used to predict accurately the elongation of fuel pellet during irradiation test.

  8. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This book discusses development in oxide materials with high superconducting transition temperature. Systems with Tc well above liquid nitrogen temperature are already a reality and higher Tc's are anticipated. The author discusses how the idea of a room-temperature superconductor appears to be a distinctly possible outcome of materials research

  9. Room to high temperature measurements of flexible SOI FinFETs with sub-20-nm fins

    KAUST Repository

    Diab, Amer El Hajj

    2014-12-01

    We report the temperature dependence of the core electrical parameters and transport characteristics of a flexible version of fin field-effect transistor (FinFET) on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) with sub-20-nm wide fins and high-k/metal gate-stacks. For the first time, we characterize them from room to high temperature (150 °C) to show the impact of temperature variation on drain current, gate leakage current, and transconductance. Variation of extracted parameters, such as low-field mobility, subthreshold swing, threshold voltage, and ON-OFF current characteristics, is reported too. Direct comparison is made to a rigid version of the SOI FinFETs. The mobility degradation with temperature is mainly caused by phonon scattering mechanism. The overall excellent devices performance at high temperature after release is outlined proving the suitability of truly high-performance flexible inorganic electronics with such advanced architecture.

  10. The materials programme for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the Federal Republic of Germany: Status of the development of high-temperature materials, integrity concept, and design codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.; Bodmann, E.; Seehafer, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the last 15 years, the research and development of materials for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) applications in the Federal Republic of Germany have been concentrated on the qualification of high-temperature structural alloys. Such materials are required for heat exchanger components of advanced HTGRs supplying nuclear process heat in the temperature range between 750 deg. and 950 deg. C. The suitability of the candidate alloys for service in the HTGR has been established, and continuing research is aimed at verification of the integrity of components over the envisaged service lifetimes. The special features of the HTGR which provide a high degree of safety are the use of ceramics for the core construction and the low power density of the core. The reactor integrity concept which has been developed is based on these two characteristics. Previously, technical guidelines and design codes for nuclear plants were tailored exclusively to light water reactor systems. An extensive research project was therefore initiated which led to the formulation of the basic principles on which a high temperature design code can be based. (author)

  11. High thermal efficiency x-ray energy conversion scheme for advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quimby, D.C.; Taussig, R.T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports on a new radiation energy conversion scheme which appears to be capable of producing electricity from the high quality x-ray energy with efficiencies of 60 to 70 percent. This new reactor concept incorporates a novel x-ray radiation boiler and a new thermal conversion device known as an energy exchanger. The low-Z first walls of the radiation boiler are semi-transparent to x-rays, and are kept cool by incoming working fluid, which is subsequently heated to temperatures of 2000 to 3000 0 K in the interior of the boiler by volumetric x-ray absorption. The radiation boiler may be a compact part of the reactor shell since x-rays are readily absorbed in high-Z materials. The energy exchanger transfers the high-temperature working fluid energy to a lower temperature gas which drives a conventional turbine. The overall efficiency of the cycle is characterized by the high temperature of the working fluid. The high thermal efficiencies which appear achievable with this cycle would make an otherwise marginal advanced fusion reactor into an attractive net power producer. The operating principles, initial conceptual design, and engineering problems of the radiation boiler and thermal cycle are presented

  12. High temperature oxidation characteristics of developed Ni-Cr-W superalloys in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tomio; Shindo, Masami

    1996-11-01

    For expanding utilization of the Ni-Cr-W superalloy, which has been developed as one of new high temperature structural materials used in the advanced High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), in various engineering fields including the structural material for heat utilization system, the oxidation behavior of this alloy in air as one of high oxidizing environments becomes one of key factors. The oxidation tests for the industrial scale heat of Ni-Cr-W superalloy with the optimized chemical composition and five kinds of experimental Ni-Cr-W alloys with different Cr/W ratio were carried out at high temperatures in the air compared with Hastelloy XR. The conclusions were obtained as follows. (1) The oxidation resistance of the industrial scale heat of Ni-Cr-W superalloy with the optimized chemical composition was superior to that of Hastelloy XR. (2) The most excellent oxidation resistance was obtained in an alloy with 19% Cr of the industrial scale heat of Ni-Cr-W superalloy. (author)

  13. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  14. Advances in ambient temperature secondary lithium cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, S.; Shen, D. H.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C-K.; Halpert, G.

    1989-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is involved in a Research and Development program sponsored by NASA/OAST on the development of ambient temperature secondary lithium cells for future space applications. Some of the projected applications are planetary spacecraft, planetary rovers, and astronaut equipment. The main objective is to develop secondary lithium cells with greater than 100 Wh/kg specific energy while delivering 1000 cycles at 50 percent Depth of Discharge (DOD). To realize these ambitious goals, the work was initially focused on several important basic issues related to the cell chemistry, selection of cathode materials and electrolytes, and component development. The performance potential of Li-TiS2, Li-MoS3, Li-V6O13 and Li-NbSe3 electrochemical systems was examined. Among these four, the Li-TiS2 system was found to be the most promising system in terms of realizable specific energy and cycle life. Some of the major advancements made so far in the development of Li-TiS2 cells are in the areas of cathode processing technology, mixed solvent electrolytes, and cell assembly. Methods were developed for the fabrication of large size high performance TiS2 cathodes. Among the various electrolytes examined, 1.5M LiAsF6/EC + 2-MeTHF mixed solvent electrolyte was found to be more stable towards lithium. Experimental cells activated with this electrolyte exhibited more than 300 cycles at 100 percent Depth of Discharge. Work is in progress in other areas such as selection of lithium alloys as candidate anode materials, optimization of cell design, and development of 5 Ah cells. The advances made at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on the development of secondary lithium cells are summarized.

  15. Corrosion tests of high temperature alloys in impure helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berka, Jan; Kalivodova, Jana; Vilemova, Monika; Skoumalova, Zuzana; Brabec, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Czech research organizations take part several projects concerning technologies and materials for advanced gas cooled reactors, as an example international project ARCHER supported by EU within FP7, also several national projects supported by Technology Agency of the Czech Republic are solved in cooperation with industrial and research organization. Within these projects the material testing program is performed. The results presented in these paper concerning high temperature corrosion and degradation of alloys (800 H, SS 316 and P91) in helium containing minor impurities (H_2, CO, CH_4, HZO) at temperatures up to 760°C. After corrosion tests (up to 1500 hours) the specimens was investigated by several methods (gravimetry, SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, hardness and micro-hardness testing etc. (author)

  16. Brazing Refractory Metals Used In High-Temperature Nuclear Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A.J.; Woolstenhulme, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR 1) experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed

  17. Brazing refractory metals used in high-temperature nuclear instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, A. J. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Woolstenhulme, C. J. [EG and G Services, Inc., (United States)

    2009-07-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) TRISO fuel experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed. (authors)

  18. Brazing refractory metals used in high-temperature nuclear instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Woolstenhulme, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Next Generation Nuclear Project (NGNP) currently ongoing at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the irradiation performance of candidate high-temperature gas reactor fuels and materials is being evaluated at INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The design of the first Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-1) TRISO fuel experiment, currently being irradiated in the ATR, required development of special techniques for brazing niobium and molybdenum. Brazing is one technique used to join refractory metals to each other and to stainless steel alloys. Although brazing processes are well established, it is difficult to braze niobium, molybdenum, and most other refractory metals because they quickly develop adherent oxides when exposed to room-temperature air. Specialized techniques and methods were developed by INL to overcome these obstacles. This paper describes the techniques developed for removing these oxides, as well as the ASME Section IX-qualified braze procedures that were developed as part of the AGR-1 project. All brazes were made using an induction coil with an inert or reducing atmosphere at low pressure. Other parameters, such as filler metals, fluxes used, and general setup procedures, are also discussed. (authors)

  19. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  20. HPCAT: an integrated high-pressure synchrotron facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Guoyin; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Meng, Yue; Yang, Wenge; Liermann, Hans-Peter; Shebanova, Olga; Rod, Eric; Bommannavar, Arunkumar; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2008-01-01

    The high pressure collaborative access team (HPCAT) was established to advance cutting edge, multidisciplinary, high-pressure (HP) science and technology using synchrotron radiation at sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. The integrated HPCAT facility has established four operating beamlines in nine hutches. Two beamlines are split in energy space from the insertion device (16ID) line, whereas the other two are spatially divided into two fans from the bending magnet (16BM) line. An array of novel X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques has been integrated with HP and extreme temperature instrumentation at HPCAT. With a multidisciplinary approach and multi-institution collaborations, the HP program at the HPCAT has been enabling myriad scientific breakthroughs in HP physics, chemistry, materials, and Earth and planetary sciences.

  1. Development of a leak detection system using high temperature-resistant microphones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Yoshitsugu; Mochizuki, Hiroyasu; Watanabe, Kenshiu; Nakamura, Takahisa; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Yamauchi, Tatsuya

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of a detection system of coolant leak from an inlet feeder pipe of an Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR) with high temperature-resistant microphones. A microphone having resistance to both high temperature and high radiation dose has been developed at first. The characteristics with regard to leakage sound, attenuation of sound level in a heat insulating box for the inlet feeder pipes and background noise were clarified by laboratory experiments and measurements in the prototype ATR 'Fugen'. On the basis of these experimental findings, appropriate frequency ranges were surveyed to detect the leakage sound with a high S/N ratio under the background noise. Reliability of the system to a malfunction caused by burst-type noises observed in the plant was also investigated by statistical analyses. Finally, it was confirmed that the present method could detect a leak within a couple of seconds. (author)

  2. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Feng; Yan, Lan; Xu, Xipeng

    2017-12-26

    The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM) model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE) simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  3. FEM Modeling of the Relationship between the High-Temperature Hardness and High-Temperature, Quasi-Static Compression Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The high-temperature hardness test has a wide range of applications, but lacks test standards. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element method (FEM model of the relationship between the high-temperature hardness and high-temperature, quasi-static compression experiment, which is a mature test technology with test standards. A high-temperature, quasi-static compression test and a high-temperature hardness test were carried out. The relationship between the high-temperature, quasi-static compression test results and the high-temperature hardness test results was built by the development of a high-temperature indentation finite element (FE simulation. The simulated and experimental results of high-temperature hardness have been compared, verifying the accuracy of the high-temperature indentation FE simulation.The simulated results show that the high temperature hardness basically does not change with the change of load when the pile-up of material during indentation is ignored. The simulated and experimental results show that the decrease in hardness and thermal softening are consistent. The strain and stress of indentation were analyzed from the simulated contour. It was found that the strain increases with the increase of the test temperature, and the stress decreases with the increase of the test temperature.

  4. Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various

  5. Supersymmetry at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, A.; Kaku, M.

    1978-01-01

    We investigate the properties of Green's functions in a spontaneously broken supersymmetric model at high temperatures. We show that, even at high temperatures, we do not get restoration of supersymmetry, at least in the one-loop approximation

  6. High temperature high vacuum creep testing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Creep is the term used to describe time-dependent plastic flow of metals under conditions of constant load or stress at constant high temperature. Creep has an important considerations for materials operating under stresses at high temperatures for long time such as cladding materials, pressure vessels, steam turbines, boilers,...etc. These two creep machines measures the creep of materials and alloys at high temperature under high vacuum at constant stress. By the two chart recorders attached to the system one could register time and temperature versus strain during the test . This report consists of three chapters, chapter I is the introduction, chapter II is the technical description of the creep machines while chapter III discuss some experimental data on the creep behaviour. Of helium implanted stainless steel. 13 fig., 3 tab

  7. Matching of experimental and statistical-model thermonuclear reaction rates at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, J. R.; Longland, R.; Iliadis, C.

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of extrapolating experimental thermonuclear reaction rates toward high stellar temperatures (T>1 GK) by using statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach) results. Reliable reaction rates at such temperatures are required for studies of advanced stellar burning stages, supernovae, and x-ray bursts. Generally accepted methods are based on the concept of a Gamow peak. We follow recent ideas that emphasized the fundamental shortcomings of the Gamow peak concept for narrow resonances at high stellar temperatures. Our new method defines the effective thermonuclear energy range (ETER) by using the 8th, 50th, and 92nd percentiles of the cumulative distribution of fractional resonant reaction rate contributions. This definition is unambiguous and has a straightforward probability interpretation. The ETER is used to define a temperature at which Hauser-Feshbach rates can be matched to experimental rates. This matching temperature is usually much higher compared to previous estimates that employed the Gamow peak concept. We suggest that an increased matching temperature provides more reliable extrapolated reaction rates since Hauser-Feshbach results are more trustwhorthy the higher the temperature. Our ideas are applied to 21 (p,γ), (p,α), and (α,γ) reactions on A=20-40 target nuclei. For many of the cases studied here, our extrapolated reaction rates at high temperatures differ significantly from those obtained using the Gamow peak concept

  8. Ultra-high temperature direct propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araj, K.J.; Slovik, G.; Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.

    1987-01-01

    Potential advantages of ultra-high exhaust temperature (3000 K - 4000 K) direct propulsion nuclear rockets are explored. Modifications to the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) to achieve these temperatures are described. Benefits of ultra-high temperature propulsion are discussed for two missions - orbit transfer (ΔV = 5546 m/s) and interplanetary exploration (ΔV = 20000 m/s). For such missions ultra-high temperatures appear to be worth the additional complexity. Thrust levels are reduced substantially for a given power level, due to the higher enthalpy caused by partial disassociation of the hydrogen propellant. Though technically challenging, it appears potentially feasible to achieve such ultra high temperatures using the PBR

  9. High Temperature Chemistry of Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Lawrence T. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Merkert Chemistry Center, Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-05-15

    The primary goal of this research was to uncover the principal reaction channels available to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at high temperatures in the gas phase and to establish the factors that determine which channels will be followed in varying circumstances. New structure-property relationships for PAHs were also studied. The efficient production of clean energy from fossil fuels will remain a major component of the DOE mission until alternative sources of energy eventually displace coal and petroleum. Hydrocarbons constitute the most basic class of compounds in all of organic chemistry, and as the dominant species in fossil fuels, they figure prominently into the programs of the DOE. Much is already known about the normal chemistry of hydrocarbons under ambient conditions, but far less is known about their intrinsic chemistry at temperatures close to those reached during combustion. An understanding of the fundamental molecular transformations, rearrangements, and interconversions of PAHs at high temperatures in the gas phase, as revealed by careful studies on small, well-designed, molecular systems, provides insights into the underlying chemistry of many important processes that are more complex, such as the generation of energy by the combustion of fossil fuels, the uncatalyzed gasification and liquefaction of coal, the production of fullerenes in fuel-rich flames, and the formation of soot and carcinogenic pollutants in smoke (e.g., benzo[a]pyrene). The rational control of any of these processes, whether it be the optimization of a desirable process or the minimization of an undesirable one, requires a clear knowledge of the basic chemistry that governs the fate of the species involved. Advances in chemistry at the most fundamental level come about primarily from the discovery of new reactions and from new insights into how reactions occur. Harnessing that knowledge is the key to new technologies. The recent commercialization of a combustion

  10. Advanced high-temperature thermal energy storage media for industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claar, T. D.; Waibel, R. T.

    1982-02-01

    An advanced thermal energy storage media concept based on use of carbonate salt/ceramic composite materials is being developed for industrial process and reject heat applications. The composite latent/sensible media concept and its potential advantages over state of the art latent heat systems is described. Media stability requirements, on-going materials development efforts, and planned thermal energy storage (TES) performance evaluation tests are discussed.

  11. Discussion on Design Transients of Pebble-bed High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Fu; Zheng Yanhua

    2014-01-01

    In order to assure high quality for the components and their supports in the reactor coolant system, etc., some thermal-hydraulic transient conditions will be selected and researched for equipment design evaluation to satisfy the requirements ASME code, which are based on the conservative estimates of the magnitude and frequency of the temperature and pressure transients resulting from various operating conditions in the plant. In the mature design on pressurized water reactor, five conditions are considered. For the developing advanced pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR), its design and operation has much difference with other reactors, so the transients of the pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor have distinctive characteristics. In this paper, the possible design transients of the pebble-bed HTGR will be discussed, and the frequency of design transients for equipment fatigue analysis and stress analysis due to cyclic stresses is also studied. The results will provide support for the design and construct of the pebble-bed HTGR. (author)

  12. Maximum Efficiency of Thermoelectric Heat Conversion in High-Temperature Power Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Khvesyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern trends in development of aircraft engineering go with development of vehicles of the fifth generation. The features of aircrafts of the fifth generation are motivation to use new high-performance systems of onboard power supply. The operating temperature of the outer walls of engines is of 800–1000 K. This corresponds to radiation heat flux of 10 kW/m2 . The thermal energy including radiation of the engine wall may potentially be converted into electricity. The main objective of this paper is to analyze if it is possible to use a high efficiency thermoelectric conversion of heat into electricity. The paper considers issues such as working processes, choice of materials, and optimization of thermoelectric conversion. It presents the analysis results of operating conditions of thermoelectric generator (TEG used in advanced hightemperature power devices. A high-temperature heat source is a favorable factor for the thermoelectric conversion of heat. It is shown that for existing thermoelectric materials a theoretical conversion efficiency can reach the level of 15–20% at temperatures up to 1500 K and available values of Ioffe parameter being ZT = 2–3 (Z is figure of merit, T is temperature. To ensure temperature regime and high efficiency thermoelectric conversion simultaneously it is necessary to have a certain match between TEG power, temperature of hot and cold surfaces, and heat transfer coefficient of the cooling system. The paper discusses a concept of radiation absorber on the TEG hot surface. The analysis has demonstrated a number of potentialities for highly efficient conversion through using the TEG in high-temperature power devices. This work has been implemented under support of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation; project No. 1145 (the programme “Organization of Research Engineering Activities”.

  13. Technological improvements to high temperature thermocouples for nuclear reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schley, R.; Leveque, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    The specific operating conditions of thermocouples in nuclear reactors have provided an incentive for further advances in high temperature thermocouple applications and performance. This work covers the manufacture and improvement of existing alloys, the technology of clad thermocouples, calibration drift during heat treatment, resistance to thermal shock and the compatibility of insulating materials with thermo-electric alloys. The results lead to specifying improved operating conditions for thermocouples in nuclear reactor media (pressurized water, sodium, uranium oxide) [fr

  14. High temperature structural silicides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Structural silicides have important high temperature applications in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Most prominent are MoSi 2 -based materials, which are borderline ceramic-intermetallic compounds. MoSi 2 single crystals exhibit macroscopic compressive ductility at temperatures below room temperature in some orientations. Polycrystalline MoSi 2 possesses elevated temperature creep behavior which is highly sensitive to grain size. MoSi 2 -Si 3 N 4 composites show an important combination of oxidation resistance, creep resistance, and low temperature fracture toughness. Current potential applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include furnace heating elements, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, aerospace turbine engine components, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing

  15. High temperature resistive phase transition in A15 high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, C.W.; Huang, C.Y.; Schmidt, P.H.; Sugawara, K.

    1976-01-01

    Resistive measurements were made on A15 high temperature superconductors. Anomalies indicative of a phase transition were observed at 433 0 K in a single crystal Nb 3 Sn and at 485 0 K in an unbacked Nb 3 Ge sputtered thin film. Results are compared with the high temperature transmission electron diffraction studies of Nb 3 Ge films by Schmidt et al. A possible instability in the electron energy spectrum is discussed

  16. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport

  17. High-entropy alloys as high-temperature thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafeie, Samrand [Surface and Microstructure Engineering Group, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Guo, Sheng, E-mail: sheng.guo@chalmers.se [Surface and Microstructure Engineering Group, Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Hu, Qiang [Institute of Applied Physics, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang 330029 (China); Fahlquist, Henrik [Bruker AXS Nordic AB, 17067 Solna (Sweden); Erhart, Paul [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Anders, E-mail: anders.palmqvist@chalmers.se [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-11-14

    Thermoelectric (TE) generators that efficiently recycle a large portion of waste heat will be an important complementary energy technology in the future. While many efficient TE materials exist in the lower temperature region, few are efficient at high temperatures. Here, we present the high temperature properties of high-entropy alloys (HEAs), as a potential new class of high temperature TE materials. We show that their TE properties can be controlled significantly by changing the valence electron concentration (VEC) of the system with appropriate substitutional elements. Both the electrical and thermal transport properties in this system were found to decrease with a lower VEC number. Overall, the large microstructural complexity and lower average VEC in these types of alloys can potentially be used to lower both the total and the lattice thermal conductivity. These findings highlight the possibility to exploit HEAs as a new class of future high temperature TE materials.

  18. Recovery Act: High-Temperature Circuit Boards for use in Geothermal Well Monitoring Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, Matthew [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States); Fabian, Paul [Composite Tehcnology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is leading the development of alternative energy sources that will ensure the long-term energy independence of our nation. One of the key renewable resources currently being advanced is geothermal energy. To tap into the large potential offered by generating power from the heat of the earth, and for geothermal energy to be more widely used, it will be necessary to drill deeper wells to reach the hot, dry rock located up to 10 km beneath the earth’s surface. In this instance, water will be introduced into the well to create a geothermal reservoir. A geothermal well produced in this manner is referred to as an enhanced geothermal system (EGS). EGS reservoirs are typically at depths of 3 to 10 km, and the temperatures at these depths have become a limiting factor in the application of existing downhole technologies. These high temperatures are especially problematic for electronic systems such as downhole data-logging tools, which are used to map and characterize the fractures and high-permeability regions in underground formations. Information provided by these tools is assessed so that underground formations capable of providing geothermal energy can be identified, and the subsequent drilling operations can be accurately directed to those locations. The mapping of geothermal resources involves the design and fabrication of sensor packages, including the electronic control modules, to quantify downhole conditions (300°C temperature, high pressure, seismic activity, etc.). Because of the extreme depths at which these measurements are performed, it is most desirable to perform the sensor signal processing downhole and then transmit the information to the surface. This approach necessitates the use of high-temperature electronics that can operate in the downhole environment. Downhole signal processing in EGS wells will require the development and demonstration of circuit boards that can withstand the elevated temperatures found at these

  19. High temperature vapors science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hastie, John

    2012-01-01

    High Temperature Vapors: Science and Technology focuses on the relationship of the basic science of high-temperature vapors to some areas of discernible practical importance in modern science and technology. The major high-temperature problem areas selected for discussion include chemical vapor transport and deposition; the vapor phase aspects of corrosion, combustion, and energy systems; and extraterrestrial high-temperature species. This book is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an introduction to the nature of the high-temperature vapor state, the scope and literature of high-temp

  20. Evaluation of high temperature pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, In-Mook; Woo, Sam-Yong; Kim, Yong-Kyu

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming more important to measure the pressure in high temperature environments in many industrial fields. However, there is no appropriate evaluation system and compensation method for high temperature pressure sensors since most pressure standards have been established at room temperature. In order to evaluate the high temperature pressure sensors used in harsh environments, such as high temperatures above 250 deg. C, a specialized system has been constructed and evaluated in this study. The pressure standard established at room temperature is connected to a high temperature pressure sensor through a chiller. The sensor can be evaluated in conditions of changing standard pressures at constant temperatures and of changing temperatures at constant pressures. According to the evaluation conditions, two compensation methods are proposed to eliminate deviation due to sensitivity changes and nonlinear behaviors except thermal hysteresis.

  1. The changes of ADI structure during high temperature annealing

    OpenAIRE

    A. Krzyńska; M. Kaczorowski

    2010-01-01

    The results of structure investigations of ADI during it was annealing at elevated temperature are presented. Ductile iron austempered at temperature 325oC was then isothermally annealed 360 minutes at temperature 400, 450, 500 and 550oC. The structure investigations showed that annealing at these temperatures caused substantial structure changes and thus essential hardness decrease, which is most useful property of ADI from point of view its practical application. Degradation advance of the ...

  2. Advanced Low Temperature Geothermal Power Cycles (The ENTIV Organic Project) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugerwa, Michael [Technip USA, Inc., Claremont, CA (United States)

    2015-11-18

    Feasibility study of advanced low temperature thermal power cycles for the Entiv Organic Project. Study evaluates amonia-water mixed working fluid energy conversion processes developed and licensed under Kalex in comparison with Kalina cycles. Both cycles are developed using low temperature thermal resource from the Lower Klamath Lake Geothermal Area. An economic feasibility evaluation was conducted for a pilot plant which was deemed unfeasible by the Project Sponsor (Entiv).

  3. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-15

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA.

  4. Design and Fabrication Technique of the Key Components for Very High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Song, Ki Nam; Kim, Yong Wan

    2006-12-01

    The gas outlet temperature of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may be beyond the capability of conventional metallic materials. The requirement of the gas outlet temperature of 950 .deg. C will result in operating temperatures for metallic core components that will approach very high temperature on some cases. The materials that are capable of withstanding this temperature should be prepared, or nonmetallic materials will be required for limited components. The Ni-base alloys such as Alloy 617, Hastelloy X, XR, Incoloy 800H, and Haynes 230 are being investigated to apply them on components operated in high temperature. Currently available national and international codes and procedures are needed reviewed to design the components for HTGR/VHTR. Seven codes and procedures, including five ASME Codes and Code cases, one French code (RCC-MR), and on British Procedure (R5) were reviewed. The scope of the code and code cases needs to be expanded to include the materials with allowable temperatures of 950 .deg. C and higher. The selection of compact heat exchangers technology depends on the operating conditions such as pressure, flow rates, temperature, but also on other parameters such as fouling, corrosion, compactness, weight, maintenance and reliability. Welding, brazing, and diffusion bonding are considered proper joining processes for the heat exchanger operating in the high temperature and high pressure conditions without leakage. Because VHTRs require high temperature operations, various controlled materials, thick vessels, dissimilar metal joints, and precise controls of microstructure in weldment, the more advanced joining processes are needed than PWRs. The improved solid joining techniques are considered for the IHX fabrication. The weldability for Alloy 617 and Haynes 230 using GTAW and SMAW processes was investigated by CEA

  5. The DARPA manufacturing initiative in high temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has a very aggressive Technology Base program in high temperature superconductivity. This program is expected to provide the basis for a specialized set of military products - passive microwave and millimeter wave devices - within the next three years. In order to get these high leverage products into military systems, a manufacturing base must be developed for HTSC components. A plan for DARPA in HTSC manufacturing is directly coupled with the ongoing DARPA materials and device oriented R and D program. In essence, this plan recommends a three phased effort: 1. Phase I (two years); Fund companies through R and D contracts for specialized HTSC components; prepare a detailed plan and develop an HTSC consortium. 2. Phase II (six years): Establish an HTSC Sematech initiative for electronic applications, including active devices. 3. Phase III (optional): Continue the HTSC Sematech with emphasis on high power applications

  6. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  7. Temperature effect on formation of advanced glycation end products in infant formula milk powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Ru-Gang; Cheng, Hong; Li, Li

    2018-01-01

    For a standard infant formula milk powder, browning reactions were shown to become limiting for shelflife for storage at higher temperature rather than lipid oxidation. Advanced glycation end (AGE) products were found in the temperature range 65e115 C to have an energy of activation...

  8. Temperature prediction in high speed bone grinding using motor PWM signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bruce L; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Anthony C; Sullivan, Stephen; Wang, Guangjun; Shih, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using motor electrical feedback to estimate temperature rise during a surgical bone grinding procedure. High-speed bone grinding is often used during skull base neurosurgery to remove cranial bone and approach skull base tumors through the nasal corridor. Grinding-induced heat could propagate and potentially injure surrounding nerves and arteries, and therefore, predicting the temperature in the grinding region would benefit neurosurgeons during the operation. High-speed electric motors are controlled by pulse-width-modulation (PWM) to alter the current input and thus maintain the rotational speed. Assuming full mechanical to thermal power conversion in the grinding process, PWM can be used as feedback for heat generation and temperature prediction. In this study, the conversion model was established from experiments under a variety of grinding conditions and an inverse heat transfer method to determine heat flux. Given a constant rotational speed, the heat conversion was represented by a linear function, and could predict temperature from the experimental data with less than 20% errors. Such results support the advance of this technology for practical application. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. High temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  10. High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    High Performance Grinding and Advanced Cutting Tools discusses the fundamentals and advances in high performance grinding processes, and provides a complete overview of newly-developing areas in the field. Topics covered are grinding tool formulation and structure, grinding wheel design and conditioning and applications using high performance grinding wheels. Also included are heat treatment strategies for grinding tools, using grinding tools for high speed applications, laser-based and diamond dressing techniques, high-efficiency deep grinding, VIPER grinding, and new grinding wheels.

  11. High Temperatures Health Monitoring of the Condensed Water Height in Steam Pipe Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Takano, Nobuyuki; Ostlund, Patrick; Blosiu, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic probes were designed, fabricated and tested for high temperature health monitoring system. The goal of this work was to develop the health monitoring system that can determine the height level of the condensed water through the pipe wall at high temperature up to 250 deg while accounting for the effects of surface perturbation. Among different ultrasonic probe designs, 2.25 MHz probes with air backed configuration provide satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity, receiving reflections from the target through the pipe wall. A series of tests were performed using the air-backed probes under irregular conditions, such as surface perturbation and surface disturbance at elevated temperature, to qualify the developed ultrasonic system. The results demonstrate that the fabricated air-backed probes combined with advanced signal processing techniques offer the capability of health monitoring of steam pipe under various operating conditions.

  12. Quantum electrodynamics at high temperature. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Estrada, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The photon sector of QED in d = 3 spatial dimensions is analyzed at high temperature thereby generalizing nontrivially a previous study for d = 1. The imaginary time formalism and an improved renormalized perturbation theory which incorporates second order Debye screening are used. General results are presented for the leading high temperature contributions to all renormalized connected photon Green's functions for fixed external momenta (much smaller than the temperature) to all orders in the improved perturbation theory. Those leading contributions are ultraviolet finite, infrared convergent and gauge invariant, and display an interesting form of dimensional reduction at high temperature. A new path integral representations is given for the high temperature partition function with an external photon source, which is shown to generate all leading high temperature Green's functions mentioned above, and, so, it displays neatly the kind of dimensional reduction which makes QED to become simpler at high temperature. This limiting partition function corresponds to an imaginary time dependent electron positron field interacting with an electromagnetic field at zero imaginary time, and it depends on the renormalized electron mass and electric charge, the second order contribution to the usual renormalization constant Z 3 and a new mass term, which is associated to the photon field with vanishing Lorentz index. The new mass term corresponds to a finite number of diagrams in the high temperature improved perturbation theory and carriers ultraviolet divergences which are compensated for by other contributions (so that the leading high temperature Green's functions referred to above are ultraviolet finite). The dominant high temperature contributions to the renormalized thermodynamic potential to all perturbative orders: i) are given in terms of the above leading high-temperature contributions to the photon Green's functions (except for a few diagrams of low order in the

  13. High-temperature materials and structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report gives a survey of research work in the area of high-temperature materials and structural ceramics of the KFA (Juelich Nuclear Research Center). The following topics are treated: (1) For energy facilities: ODS materials for gas turbine blades and heat exchangers; assessment of the remaining life of main steam pipes, material characterization and material stress limits for First-Wall components; metallic and graphitic materials for high-temperature reactors. (2) For process engineering plants: composites for reformer tubes and cracking tubes; ceramic/ceramic joints and metal/ceramic and metal/metal joints; Composites and alloys for rolling bearing and sliding systems up to application temperatures of 1000deg C; high-temperature corrosion of metal and ceramic material; porous ceramic high-temperature filters and moulding coat-mix techniques; electrically conducting ceramic material (superconductors, fuel cells, solid electrolytes); high-temperature light sources (high-temperature chemistry); oil vapor engines with caramic components; ODS materials for components in diesel engines and vehicle gas turbines. (MM) [de

  14. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Graf, D.F.; Millunzi, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    GA Technologies Inc. and other U.S. corporations, in a cooperative program with the U.S. Department of Energy, is developing a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that will provide highly reliable, economic, nuclear power. The MHTGR system assures maximum safety to the public, the owner/operator, and the environment. The MHTGR is being designed to meet and exceed rigorous requirements established by the user industry for availability, operation and maintenance, plant investment protection, safety and licensing, siting flexibility and economics. The plant will be equally attractive for deployment and operation in the U.S., other major industrialized nations including Korea, Japan, and the Republic of China, as well as the developing nations. The High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is an advanced, third generation nuclear power system which incorporates distinctive technical features, including the use of pressurized helium as a coolant, graphite as the moderator and core structural material, and fuel in the form of ceramic coated uranium particles. The modular HTGR builds upon generic gas-cooled reactor experience and specific HTGR programs and projects. The MHTGR offers unique technological features and the opportunity for the cooperative international development of an advanced energy system that will help assure adaquate world energy resources for the future. Such international joint venturing of energy development can offer significant benefits to participating industries and governments and also provides a long term solution to the complex problems of the international balance of payments

  15. X-ray imaging for studying behavior of liquids at high pressures and high temperatures using Paris-Edinburgh press

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Shen, Guoyin; Shibazaki, Yuki; Wang, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    Several X-ray techniques for studying structure, elastic properties, viscosity, and immiscibility of liquids at high pressures have been integrated using a Paris-Edinburgh press at the 16-BM-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. Here, we report the development of X-ray imaging techniques suitable for studying behavior of liquids at high pressures and high temperatures. White X-ray radiography allows for imaging phase separation and immiscibility of melts at high pressures, identified not only by density contrast but also by phase contrast imaging in particular for low density contrast liquids such as silicate and carbonate melts. In addition, ultrafast X-ray imaging, at frame rates up to ∼10 5 frames/second (fps) in air and up to ∼10 4 fps in Paris-Edinburgh press, enables us to investigate dynamics of liquids at high pressures. Very low viscosities of melts similar to that of water can be reliably measured. These high-pressure X-ray imaging techniques provide useful tools for understanding behavior of liquids or melts at high pressures and high temperatures

  16. X-ray imaging for studying behavior of liquids at high pressures and high temperatures using Paris-Edinburgh press

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Shen, Guoyin [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Shibazaki, Yuki [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki aza Aoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Wang, Yanbin [GeoSoilEnviroCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Several X-ray techniques for studying structure, elastic properties, viscosity, and immiscibility of liquids at high pressures have been integrated using a Paris-Edinburgh press at the 16-BM-B beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. Here, we report the development of X-ray imaging techniques suitable for studying behavior of liquids at high pressures and high temperatures. White X-ray radiography allows for imaging phase separation and immiscibility of melts at high pressures, identified not only by density contrast but also by phase contrast imaging in particular for low density contrast liquids such as silicate and carbonate melts. In addition, ultrafast X-ray imaging, at frame rates up to ∼10{sup 5} frames/second (fps) in air and up to ∼10{sup 4} fps in Paris-Edinburgh press, enables us to investigate dynamics of liquids at high pressures. Very low viscosities of melts similar to that of water can be reliably measured. These high-pressure X-ray imaging techniques provide useful tools for understanding behavior of liquids or melts at high pressures and high temperatures.

  17. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zong; Liang, Ting; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Qi, Lei; Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wangwang; Zhang, Diya; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-07-22

    The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations.

  18. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  19. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerred, N.; Zirker, L.; Charit, I.; Cole, J.; Frary, M.; Butt, D.; Meyer, M.; Murty, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400 C has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  20. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer's response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping

  1. The high temperature out-of-pile test of LVDT for internal pressure measurement of nuclear fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J. M.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, D. S.; Yoon, K. B.; Sin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Kang, Y. H. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    As a part of the development of instrumentation technologies for the nuclear fuel irradiation test in HANARO(High-flux Advanced Nuclear Application Reactor), the internal pressure measurement technique of the nuclear fuel rod is being developed using LVDT(Linear Variable Differential Transformer). As the results of out-of-pile test at room temperature, it was concluded that the well qualified out-of-pile tests were needed to understand the LVDT's detail characteristics at high temperature for the detail design of the fuel irradiation capsule, because LVDT is very sensitive to variation of temperature. Therefore, the high temperature out-of-pile test system for pressure measurement was developed, and this test was performed under the temperature condition between room temperature and 300 .deg. C increasing the pressure from 0 bar to 30 bar. The LVDT's high temperature characteristics and temperature sensitivity of LVDT were analyzed through this experiment. Based on the result of this test, the method for the application of LVDT at high temperature was introduced. It is known that the results will be used to predict accurately the internal pressure of fuel rod during irradiation test.

  2. Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of High Temperature Solders: Effects of High Temperature Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnine, M.; Tolla, B.; Vahora, N.

    2018-04-01

    This paper explores the effects of aging on the mechanical behavior, microstructure evolution and IMC formation on different surface finishes of two high temperature solders, Sn-5 wt.% Ag and Sn-5 wt.% Sb. High temperature aging showed significant degradation of Sn-5 wt.% Ag solder hardness (34%) while aging has little effect on Sn-5 wt.% Sb solder. Sn-5 wt.% Ag experienced rapid grain growth as well as the coarsening of particles during aging. Sn-5 wt.% Sb showed a stable microstructure due to solid solution strengthening and the stable nature of SnSb precipitates. The increase of intermetallic compound (IMC) thickness during aging follows a parabolic relationship with time. Regression analysis (time exponent, n) indicated that IMC growth kinetics is controlled by a diffusion mechanism. The results have important implications in the selection of high temperature solders used in high temperature applications.

  3. A High Temperature Liquid Plasma Model of the Sun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a liquid model of the Sun is presented wherein the entire solar mass is viewed as a high density/high energy plasma. This model challenges our current understanding of the densities associated with the internal layers of the Sun, advocating a relatively constant density, almost independent of radial position. The incompressible nature of liquids is advanced to prevent solar collapse from gravitational forces. The liquid plasma model of the Sun is a non-equilibrium approach, where nuclear reactions occur throughout the solar mass. The primary means of addressing internal heat transfer are convection and conduction. As a result of the convective processes on the solar surface, the liquid model brings into question the established temperature of the solar photosphere by highlighting a violation of Kirchhoff’s law of thermal emission. Along these lines, the model also emphasizes that radiative emission is a surface phenomenon. Evidence that the Sun is a high density/high energy plasma is based on our knowledge of Planckian thermal emission and condensed matter, including the existence of pressure ionization and liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures. Prior to introducing the liquid plasma model, the historic and scientific justifications for the gaseous model of the Sun are reviewed and the gaseous equations of state are also discussed.

  4. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia, I.; Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C.; Cabrera, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. → Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. → Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. → Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. → Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s -1 . Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of boron segregation towards

  5. Hot ductility behavior of a low carbon advanced high strength steel (AHSS) microalloyed with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia, I., E-mail: imejia@umich.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Maldonado, C. [Instituto de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Edificio ' U' , Ciudad Universitaria, 58066 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Cabrera, J.M. [Departament de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metal.lurgica, ETSEIB - Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. de las Bases de Manresa 1, 08240 Manresa (Spain)

    2011-05-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Effect of boron on the hot ductility behavior of a low carbon NiCrVCu AHSS. {yields} Boron addition of 117 ppm improves hot ductility over 100% in terms of RA. {yields} Hot ductility improvement is associated with segregation/precipitation of boron. {yields} Typical hot ductility recovery at lower temperatures does not appear in this steel. {yields} Hot ductility loss is associated with precipitates/inclusions coupled with voids. - Abstract: The current study analyses the influence of boron addition on the hot ductility of a low carbon advanced high strength NiCrVCu steel. For this purpose hot tensile tests were carried out at different temperatures (650, 750, 800, 900 and 1000 deg. C) at a constant true strain rate of 0.001 s{sup -1}. Experimental results showed a substantial improvement in hot ductility for the low carbon advanced high strength steel when microalloyed with boron compared with that without boron addition. Nevertheless, both steels showed poor ductility when tested at the lowest temperatures (650, 750 and 800 deg. C), and such behavior is associated to the precipitation of vanadium carbides/nitrides and inclusions, particularly MnS and CuS particles. The fracture mode of the low carbon advanced high strength steel microalloyed with boron seems to be more ductile than the steel without boron addition. Furthermore, the fracture surfaces of specimens tested at temperatures showing the highest ductility (900 and 1000 deg. C) indicate that the fracture mode is a result of ductile failure, while in the region of poor ductility the fracture mode is of the ductile-brittle type failure. It was shown that precipitates and/or inclusions coupled with voids play a meaningful role on the crack nucleation mechanism which in turn causes a hot ductility loss. Likewise, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) which always results in restoration of ductility only occurs in the range from 900 to 1000 deg. C. Results are discussed in terms of

  6. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Nati, F.; Niemack, M. D.; Niraula, P.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Stevens, J. R.; Vavagiakis, E. M.; Ward, J. T.; Wollack, E. J.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measurement of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 \\upmu m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detector wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered aluminum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97 %.

  7. Evaluation of advanced cooling therapy's esophageal cooling device for core temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, Melissa; Shanley, Patrick; Garrett, Frank; Kulstad, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Managing core temperature is critical to patient outcomes in a wide range of clinical scenarios. Previous devices designed to perform temperature management required a trade-off between invasiveness and temperature modulation efficiency. The Esophageal Cooling Device, made by Advanced Cooling Therapy (Chicago, IL), was developed to optimize warming and cooling efficiency through an easy and low risk procedure that leverages heat transfer through convection and conduction. Clinical data from cardiac arrest, fever, and critical burn patients indicate that the Esophageal Cooling Device performs very well both in terms of temperature modulation (cooling rates of approximately 1.3°C/hour, warming of up to 0.5°C/hour) and maintaining temperature stability (variation around goal temperature ± 0.3°C). Physicians have reported that device performance is comparable to the performance of intravascular temperature management techniques and superior to the performance of surface devices, while avoiding the downsides associated with both.

  8. Sandia_HighTemperatureComponentEvaluation_2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashion, Avery T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform independent evaluation of high temperature components to determine their suitability for use in high temperature geothermal tools. Development of high temperature components has been increasing rapidly due to demand from the high temperature oil and gas exploration and aerospace industries. Many of these new components are at the late prototype or first production stage of development and could benefit from third party evaluation of functionality and lifetime at elevated temperatures. In addition to independent testing of new components, this project recognizes that there is a paucity of commercial-off-the-shelf COTS components rated for geothermal temperatures. As such, high-temperature circuit designers often must dedicate considerable time and resources to determine if a component exists that they may be able to knead performance out of to meet their requirements. This project aids tool developers by characterization of select COTS component performances beyond published temperature specifications. The process for selecting components includes public announcements of project intent (e.g., FedBizOps), direct discussions with candidate manufacturers,and coordination with other DOE funded programs.

  9. Progress in DOE high temperature superconductivity electric power applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daley, J.G.; Sheahn, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) leads national R and D effort to develop US industry's capability to produce a wide range of advanced energy-efficient electric power products. The immediate need is to make high temperature superconductivity (HTS) wire. Wire developers at the DOE National laboratories are working wit industrial partners toward this objective. In this paper, the authors describe the progress to date, citing both the difficulties associated with making wire from these ceramic materials, and achievements at several organizations. Results for progress over the next five years are stated

  10. Proceedings of damage and oxidation protection in high temperature composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritos, G.K.; Ochoa, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    This book contains proceedings of Damage and Oxidation Protection in High Temperature Composites. Topics covered include: current issues in the development of new materials and structural concepts for the aerospace structures of the future; transportation vehicles of the future; materials and structural concepts; fundamental understanding and quantitative descriptions of the physical processes and mechanisms controlling the behavior of emerging materials and structures; and the critical need for advances in our understanding of how the interaction of service loads and environment influences the lifecycle of emerging structures and materials

  11. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  12. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  13. High-temperature superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.L.

    1987-07-01

    After a short account of the history of experimental studies on superconductivity, the microscopic theory of superconductivity, the calculation of the control temperature and its possible maximum value are presented. An explanation of the mechanism of superconductivity in recently discovered superconducting metal oxide ceramics and the perspectives for the realization of new high-temperature superconducting materials are discussed. 56 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Colloidal lenses allow high-temperature single-molecule imaging and improve fluorophore photostability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jerrod J.; Stavrakis, Stavros; Quake, Stephen R.

    2010-02-01

    Although single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy was first demonstrated at near-absolute zero temperatures (1.8 K), the field has since advanced to include room-temperature observations, largely owing to the use of objective lenses with high numerical aperture, brighter fluorophores and more sensitive detectors. This has opened the door for many chemical and biological systems to be studied at native temperatures at the single-molecule level both in vitro and in vivo. However, it is difficult to study systems and phenomena at temperatures above 37 °C, because the index-matching fluids used with high-numerical-aperture objective lenses can conduct heat from the sample to the lens, and sustained exposure to high temperatures can cause the lens to fail. Here, we report that TiO2 colloids with diameters of 2 µm and a high refractive index can act as lenses that are capable of single-molecule imaging at 70 °C when placed in immediate proximity to an emitting molecule. The optical system is completed by a low-numerical-aperture optic that can have a long working distance and an air interface, which allows the sample to be independently heated. Colloidal lenses were used for parallel imaging of surface-immobilized single fluorophores and for real-time single-molecule measurements of mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes at 70 °C. Fluorophores in close proximity to TiO2 also showed a 40% increase in photostability due to a reduction of the excited-state lifetime.

  15. Preliminary analysis of combined cycle of modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baogang, Z.; Xiaoyong, Y.; Jie, W.; Gang, Z.; Qian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is known as one of the most advanced nuclear reactors because of its inherent safety and high efficiency. The power conversion system of HTGR can be steam turbine based on Rankine cycle or gas turbine based on Brayton cycle respectively. The steam turbine system is mature and the gas turbine system has high efficiency but under development. The Brayton-Rankine combined cycle is an effective way to further promote the efficiency. This paper investigated the performance of combined cycle from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. The effect of non-dimensional parameters on combined cycle’s efficiency, such as temperature ratio, compression ratio, efficiency of compressor, efficiency of turbine, was analyzed. Furthermore, the optimal parameters to achieve highest efficiency was also given by this analysis under engineering constraints. The conclusions could be helpful to the design and development of combined cycle of HTGR. (author)

  16. Engineering for high heat loads on ALS [Advanced Light Source] beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiGennaro, R.; Swain, T.

    1989-08-01

    This paper discussed general thermal engineering problems and specific categories of thermal design issues for high photon flux beam lines at the LBL Advanced Light Source: thermal distortion of optical surfaces and elevated temperatures of thermal absorbers receiving synchrotron radiation. A generic design for water-cooled heat absorbers is described for use with ALS photon shutters, beam defining apertures, and heat absorbing masks. Also, results of in- situ measurements of thermal distortion of a water-cooled mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam line are compared with calculated performance estimates. 17 refs., 2 figs

  17. Consideration of emergency source terms for pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Liu; Jun, Zhao; Jiejuan, Tong; Jianzhu, Cao

    2009-01-01

    Being the last barrier in the nuclear power plant defense-in-depth strategy, emergency planning (EP) is an integrated project. One of the key elements in this process is emergency source terms selection. Emergency Source terms for light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) have been introduced in many technical documents, and advanced NPP emergency planning is attracting attention recently. Commercial practices of advanced NPP are undergoing in the world, pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is under construction in China which is considered as a representative of advanced NPP. The paper tries to find some pieces of suggestion from our investigation. The discussion of advanced NPP EP will be summarized first, and then the characteristics of pebble-bed HTGR relating to EP will be described. Finally, PSA insights on emergency source terms selection and current pebble-bed HTGR emergency source terms suggestions are proposed

  18. Advanced ceramic composite for high energy resistors. Characterization of electrical and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokh, Fattahi; Navid, Tagizadegan; Naser, Tabatabaei

    2005-01-01

    Full text : There is a need to characterize and apply advanced materials to improve the performance of components used in pulse power systems. One area for innovation is the use of bulk electrically conductive ceramics for non-inductive, high energy and high power electrical resistors. Standard Ceramics, Inc. has developed a unique silicon carbide structural ceramic composite which exhibits electrical conductivity. The new conductive bulk ceramic material has a controlled microstructure, which results an improved homogeneity, making the material suitable for use as a non-inductive, high energy resistor. The new material has higher density, highee peak of temperature limit and greater physical strength compared with bulk ceramics currently used for pulsed power resistors. This paper describes characterization of the material's physical and electrical properties and relates them to improvements in low-power density, as compared to existing components would be expected and derived from specific properties such as good thermal conductivity, high strength, thermal shock resistance and high temperature capability. The bulk resistor approach that weas proposed offers high reliability through better mechanical properties and simplicity of construction

  19. Ten years of high temperature materials research at PSI - An overview paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouchon, Manuel A.; Chen Jiachao

    2014-01-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute high temperature materials research for advanced nuclear systems is performed since a decade, formerly by the HT-Mat group and today the advanced nuclear materials (ANM) group. In this paper the activities being conducted in this time are summarized. This includes the study of three major materials classes, intermetallics with a titanium alluminide, nanostructured steel with different ODS candidates, and ceramics with silicon carbide composites. The studies being performed include experimental work, studying the mechanical behavior as function of irradiation exposure and temperature, including also in situ studies such as the creep under ion beam irradiation plus miniaturized samples such as pillars. The microstructure changes as function of these exposures, using electron microscopy on one hand and advanced beamline techniques on the other hand. Part of the finding lead to the development of new damage mechanism models. Complementary to the experimental approach, modelling activities were conducted to understand the basics of the damage mechanisms. The research lead to a consolidation of the candidate materials to the most promising ones, namely the oxide dispersion strengthened steels (ODS) and the silicon carbide based composite materials. The research lead to new, relevant data such as the creep behavior of material under extreme reactor conditions, the embitterment mechanism in advanced materials, and much more. A sketch of the research philosophy and an outline of the main results will be given. (author)

  20. High-temperature peridotites - lithospheric or asthenospheric?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hops, J.J.; Gurney, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    High-temperature peridotites by definition yield equilibration temperatures greater than 1100 degrees C. On the basis of temperature and pressure calculations, these high-temperature peridotites are amongst the deepest samples entrained by kimberlites on route to the surface. Conflicting models proposing either a lithospheric or asthenospheric origin for the high-temperature peridotites have been suggested. A detailed study of these xenoliths from a single locality, the Jagersfontein kimberlite in the Orange Free State, has been completed as a means of resolving this controversy. 10 refs., 2 figs

  1. High temperature corrosion of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Ennis, P.J.

    1988-08-01

    This paper covers three main topics: 1. high temperature oxidation of metals and alloys, 2. corrosion in sulfur containing environments and 3. structural changes caused by corrosion. The following 21 subjects are discussed: Influence of implanted yttrium and lanthanum on the oxidation behaviour of beta-NiA1; influence of reactive elements on the adherence and protective properties of alumina scales; problems related to the application of very fine markers in studying the mechanism of thin scale formation; oxidation behaviour of chromia forming Co-Cr-Al alloys with or without reactive element additions; growth and properties of chromia-scales on high-temperature alloys; quantification of the depletion zone in high temperature alloys after oxidation in process gas; effects of HC1 and of N2 in the oxidation of Fe-20Cr; investigation under nuclear safety aspects of Zircaloy-4 oxidation kinetics at high temperatures in air; on the sulfide corrosion of metallic materials; high temperature sulfide corrosion of Mn, Nb and Nb-Si alloys; corrosion behaviour or NiCrAl-based alloys in air and air-SO2 gas mixtures; sulfidation of cobalt at high temperatures; preoxidation for sulfidation protection; fireside corrosion and application of additives in electric utility boilers; transport properties of scales with complex defect structures; observations of whiskers and pyramids during high temperature corrosion of iron in SO2; corrosion and creep of alloy 800H under simulated coal gasification conditions; microstructural changes of HK 40 cast alloy caused by exploitation in tubes in steam reformer installation; microstructural changes during exposure in corrosive environments and their effect on mechanical properties; coatings against carburization; mathematical modeling of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in Ni-Cr-based alloys. (MM)

  2. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2006-03-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  3. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Oh

    2006-01-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 900 C and operational fuel temperatures above 1250 C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR's higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gases (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  4. High-temperature granulites and supercontinents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L.R. Touret

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of continents involves a combination of magmatic and metamorphic processes. These processes become indistinguishable at the crust-mantle interface, where the pressure-temperature (P-T conditions of (ultra high-temperature granulites and magmatic rocks are similar. Continents grow laterally, by magmatic activity above oceanic subduction zones (high-pressure metamorphic setting, and vertically by accumulation of mantle-derived magmas at the base of the crust (high-temperature metamorphic setting. Both events are separated from each other in time; the vertical accretion postdating lateral growth by several tens of millions of years. Fluid inclusion data indicate that during the high-temperature metamorphic episode the granulite lower crust is invaded by large amounts of low H2O-activity fluids including high-density CO2 and concentrated saline solutions (brines. These fluids are expelled from the lower crust to higher crustal levels at the end of the high-grade metamorphic event. The final amalgamation of supercontinents corresponds to episodes of ultra-high temperature metamorphism involving large-scale accumulation of these low-water activity fluids in the lower crust. This accumulation causes tectonic instability, which together with the heat input from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle, leads to the disruption of supercontinents. Thus, the fragmentation of a supercontinent is already programmed at the time of its amalgamation.

  5. High temperature materials; Materiaux a hautes temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this workshop is to share the needs of high temperature and nuclear fuel materials for future nuclear systems, to take stock of the status of researches in this domain and to propose some cooperation works between the different research organisations. The future nuclear systems are the very high temperature (850 to 1200 deg. C) gas cooled reactors (GCR) and the molten salt reactors (MSR). These systems include not only the reactor but also the fabrication and reprocessing of the spent fuel. This document brings together the transparencies of 13 communications among the 25 given at the workshop: 1) characteristics and needs of future systems: specifications, materials and fuel needs for fast spectrum GCR and very high temperature GCR; 2) high temperature materials out of neutron flux: thermal barriers: materials, resistance, lifetimes; nickel-base metal alloys: status of knowledge, mechanical behaviour, possible applications; corrosion linked with the gas coolant: knowledge and problems to be solved; super-alloys for turbines: alloys for blades and discs; corrosion linked with MSR: knowledge and problems to be solved; 3) materials for reactor core structure: nuclear graphite and carbon; fuel assembly structure materials of the GCR with fast neutron spectrum: status of knowledge and ceramics and cermets needs; silicon carbide as fuel confinement material, study of irradiation induced defects; migration of fission products, I and Cs in SiC; 4) materials for hydrogen production: status of the knowledge and needs for the thermochemical cycle; 5) technologies: GCR components and the associated material needs: compact exchangers, pumps, turbines; MSR components: valves, exchangers, pumps. (J.S.)

  6. Consideration of ultra-high temperature nuclear heat sources for MHD conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, R.R.; Tobin, J.M.; Young, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear technology reactors developed and tested in the Nuclear Engine Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program operated with fuel exit gas temperatures in excess of 2600 K. This experience provided a significant ultra-high temperature technology base and design insight for commercial power applications. Design approaches to accommodate fission product retention and other key prevailing requirements are examined in view of the basic overriding functional requirements, and some interesting reconsiderations are suggested. Predicted overall system performance potentials for a 2000 K MHD conversion system and reactor parameter requirements are compared and related to existing technology status. Needed verification and development efforts are suggested. A reconsideration of basic design approaches is suggested that could open the door for immediate development of ultrahigh temperature nuclear heat sources for advanced energy systems

  7. Preliminary design of high temperature ultrasonic transducers for liquid sodium environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowant, M. S.; Dib, G.; Qiao, H.; Good, M. S.; Larche, M. R.; Sexton, S. S.; Ramuhalli, P.

    2018-04-01

    Advanced reactor concepts include fast reactors (including sodium-cooled fast reactors), gas-cooled reactors, and molten-salt reactors. Common to these concepts is a higher operating temperature (when compared to light-water-cooled reactors), and the proposed use of new alloys with which there is limited operational experience. Concerns about new degradation mechanisms, such as high-temperature creep and creep fatigue, that are not encountered in the light-water fleet and longer operating cycles between refueling intervals indicate the need for condition monitoring technology. Specific needs in this context include periodic in-service inspection technology for the detection and sizing of cracking, as well as technologies for continuous monitoring of components using in situ probes. This paper will discuss research on the development and evaluation of high temperature (>550°C; >1022°F) ultrasonic probes that can be used for continuous monitoring of components. The focus of this work is on probes that are compatible with a liquid sodium-cooled reactor environment, where the core outlet temperatures can reach 550°C (1022°F). Modeling to assess sensitivity of various sensor configurations and experimental evaluation have pointed to a preferred design and concept of operations for these probes. This paper will describe these studies and ongoing work to fabricate and fully evaluate survivability and sensor performance over extended periods at operational temperatures.

  8. Electronic Structure of the Bismuth Family of High Temperature Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Lisa

    2002-03-07

    High temperature superconductivity remains the central intellectual problem in condensed matter physics fifteen years after its discovery. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) directly probes the electronic structure, and has played an important role in the field of high temperature superconductors. With the recent advances in sample growth and the photoemission technique, we are able to study the electronic structure in great detail, and address regimes that were previously inaccessible. This thesis work contains systematic photoemission studies of the electronic structure of the Bi-family of high temperature superconductors, which include the single-layer system (Bi2201), the bi-layer system (Bi2212), and the tri-layer system (Bi2223). We show that, unlike conventional BCS superconductors, phase coherence information emerges in the single particle excitation spectrum of high temperature superconductors as the superconducting peak in Bi2212. The universality and various properties of this superconducting peak are studied in various systems. We argue that the origin of the superconducting peak may provide the key to understanding the mechanism of High-Tc superconductors. In addition, we identified a new experimental energy scale in the bilayer material, the anisotropic intra-bilayer coupling energy. For a long time, it was predicted that this energy scale would cause bilayer band splitting. We observe this phenomenon, for the first time, in heavily overdoped Bi2212. This new observation requires the revision of the previous picture of the electronic excitation in the Brillouin zone boundary. As the first ARPES study of a trilayer system, various detailed electronic proper- ties of Bi2223 are examined. We show that, comparing with Bi2212, both superconducting gap and relative superconducting peak intensity become larger in Bi2223, however, the strength of the interlayer coupling within each unit cell is possibly weaker. These results suggest that the

  9. Scale hierarchy in high-temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlund, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Because of asymptotic freedom, QCD becomes weakly interacting at high temperature: this is the reason for the transition to a deconfined phase in Yang-Mills theory at temperature $T_c$. At high temperature $T \\gg T_c$, the smallness of the running coupling $g$ induces a hierachy betwen the "hard", "soft" and "ultrasoft" energy scales $T$, $g T$ and $g^2 T$. This hierarchy allows for a very successful effective treatment where the "hard" and the "soft" modes are successively integrated out. However, it is not clear how high a temperature is necessary to achieve such a scale hierarchy. By numerical simulations, we show that the required temperatures are extremely high. Thus, the quantitative success of the effective theory down to temperatures of a few $T_c$ appears surprising a posteriori.

  10. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  11. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part II. High Temperature Structural Integrity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A high temperature structural integrity assessment belongs to the Part II of a whole preliminary guideline for the high temperature structure. The main contents of this guideline are the evaluation procedures of the creep-fatigue crack initiation and growth in high temperature condition, the high temperature LBB evaluation procedure, and the inelastic evaluations of the welded joints in SFR structures. The methodologies for the proper inelastic analysis of an SFR structures in high temperatures are explained and the guidelines of inelastic analysis options using ANSYS and ABAQUS are suggested. In addition, user guidelines for the developed NONSTA code are included. This guidelines need to be continuously revised to improve the applicability to the design and analysis of the SFR structures.

  12. High-Glass-Transition-Temperature Polyimides Developed for Reusable Launch Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Kathy; Ardent, Cory P.

    2002-01-01

    Polyimide composites have been traditionally used for high-temperature applications in aircraft engines at temperatures up to 550 F (288 C) for thousands of hours. However, as NASA shifts its focus toward the development of advanced reusable launch vehicles, there is an urgent need for lightweight polymer composites that can sustain 600 to 800 F (315 to 427 C) for short excursions (hundreds of hours). To meet critical vehicle weight targets, it is essential that one use lightweight, high-temperature polymer matrix composites in propulsion components such as turbopump housings, ducts, engine supports, and struts. Composite materials in reusable launch vehicle components will heat quickly during launch and reentry. Conventional composites, consisting of layers of fabric or fiber-reinforced lamina, would either blister or encounter catastrophic delamination under high heating rates above 300 C. This blistering and delamination are the result of a sudden volume expansion within the composite due to the release of absorbed moisture and gases generated by the degradation of the polymer matrix. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Boeing Company (Long Beach, CA) recently demonstrated a successful approach for preventing this delamination--the use of three-dimensional stitched composites fabricated by resin infusion.

  13. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  14. ODS-materials for high temperature applications in advanced nuclear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Eiselt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A ferritic ODS-alloy (Fe-14Cr-1W-0.25Ti has been manufactured by application of the powder metallurgical production route involving at first mechanical alloying of ∼10kg pre-alloyed steel powder together with an Y2O3 addition for 12h in a high energy industrial ball mill under hydrogen atmosphere at the company ZOZ GmbH. As a next step, one part of the alloyed powder was hot extruded into rods while another portion was hot isostatically pressed into plates. Both materials were then heat treated. A characterization program on these ODS-alloy production forms included microstructural and mechanical investigations: SANS and TEM assume the existence of Y2Ti2O7 nano clusters and show a bimodal distribution of ODS-particle sizes in both ODS variants. EBSD maps showed a strong 〈110〉 texture corresponding to the α fiber for the hot extruded ODS and a slight 〈001〉 texture for the hipped ODS material. Fracture toughness tests in different specimen orientations (extruded ODS with mini 0.2T C(T specimens together with Charpy impact tests revealed anisotropic mechanical properties: Promising (fracture toughness levels were obtained in the specimen orientation perpendicular to the extrusion direction, while the toughness levels remained low in extrusion direction and generally for the hipped ODS material at all test temperatures. The fracture toughness tests were performed according to ASTM E 1921 and 1820 standards.

  15. Advances on development of suction and temperature controlled oedometer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Weimin; Zhang Yawei; Chen Bao; Wang Min

    2010-01-01

    Oedometer cells for unsaturated soils can be classified into two types, that is, conventional unsaturated oedometer cells (high-suction unsaturated oedometer cell, high-suction and high-pressure unsaturated oedometer cell) and temperature controlled unsaturated oedometer cells. Among them, the osmotic, vapor equilibrium and axis translation techniques are often employed for suction control. The thermostat bath method and thermostatically controlled heater method are commonly used for temperature control. The lever loading system, hydraulic loading system and air pressure loading system are commonly means used for vertical pressure. Combination of osmotic (or axis translation) technique with vapor equilibrium method employed for the full range suction control, thermostatically liquid temperature control method, and the hydraulic loading system, could be used for suction, temperature and loading control in the design for unsaturated oedometer cells in the future, which can be used for study of buffer/backfill materials under high-temperature, high pressure and full range suction conditions. (authors)

  16. High temperature pipeline design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenslade, J.G. [Colt Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada). Pipelines Dept.; Nixon, J.F. [Nixon Geotech Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Dyck, D.W. [Stress Tech Engineering Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    It is impractical to transport bitumen and heavy oil by pipelines at ambient temperature unless diluents are added to reduce the viscosity. A diluted bitumen pipeline is commonly referred to as a dilbit pipeline. The diluent routinely used is natural gas condensate. Since natural gas condensate is limited in supply, it must be recovered and reused at high cost. This paper presented an alternative to the use of diluent to reduce the viscosity of heavy oil or bitumen. The following two basic design issues for a hot bitumen (hotbit) pipeline were presented: (1) modelling the restart problem, and, (2) establishing the maximum practical operating temperature. The transient behaviour during restart of a high temperature pipeline carrying viscous fluids was modelled using the concept of flow capacity. Although the design conditions were hypothetical, they could be encountered in the Athabasca oilsands. It was shown that environmental disturbances occur when the fluid is cooled during shut down because the ground temperature near the pipeline rises. This can change growing conditions, even near deeply buried insulated pipelines. Axial thermal loads also constrain the design and operation of a buried pipeline as higher operating temperatures are considered. As such, strain based design provides the opportunity to design for higher operating temperature than allowable stress based design methods. Expansion loops can partially relieve the thermal stress at a given temperature. As the design temperature increase, there is a point at which above grade pipelines become attractive options, although the materials and welding procedures must be suitable for low temperature service. 3 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  17. 'Investigation on the heat dissipation characteristics of electromagnetic coil for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saran, Shiv Raj; Taly, Y. K.; Mahapatra, U.; Chandraker, D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Function of electromagnetic coil is to generate magnetic flux for electromechanical devices like linear actuator, motor etc. Electromagnetic coils are used in the Advanced Magnetic Jack Mechanism (AMJM) and In-Vessel Control Rod Drive Mechanism (IV CRDM) to control the motion of the rod in the reactor. This paper describes results of the thermal analysis with several candidate materials to design the electromagnetic coil for desired high temperature (∼ 350 deg C) service life by using well established software to study the thermal design for in-vessel control rod drive mechanism. A test model of electromagnetic coil is fabricated and tested at room temperature (30 deg C). The measured temperatures from the test model at selected locations (along radial and axial direction) have been used to validate the design methodology by finite element analysis. Various candidate materials (Ceramic fiber, glass fiber, mineral insulated conductors) for electromagnetic coil have been analyzed to investigate the suitability for high temperature (∼ 350 deg C) applications. This study will be useful for designing electromagnetic coils for in-vessel control rod drive mechanism

  18. Studies on high temperature research reactor in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yuanhui; Zuo Kanfen [Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1999-08-01

    China recognises the advantages of Modular HTGRs and has chosen Modular HTGRs as one of advanced reactors to be developed for the further intensive utilisation of nuclear power in the next century. In energy supply systems of the next century, HTGR is supposed to serve: 1. as supplement to water-cooled reactors for electricity generation and 2. as environmentally friendly heat source providing process heat at different temperatures for various applications like heavy oil recovery, coal gasification and liquefaction, etc.. The 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is a major project in the energy sector of the Chinese National High Technology Programme as the first step of development of Modular HTGRs in China. Its main objectives are: 1. to acquire know-how in the design, construction and operation of HTGRs, 2. to establish an irradiation and experimental facility, 3. to demonstrate the inherent safety features of Modular HTGR, 4. to test electricity and heat co-generation and closed cycle gas turbine technology and 5. to do research and development work on the nuclear process heat application. Now the HTR-10 is being constructed at the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET). The HTR-10 project is to be carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the reactor with an coolant outlet temperature of 700degC will be coupled with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electricity and heat co-generation basis. In the second phase, the reactor coolant outlet temperature is planned to be raised to 900degC. As gas turbine cycle and a steam reformer will be coupled to the reactor in addition to the steam turbine cycle. (author)

  19. Studies on high temperature research reactor in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuanhui; Zuo Kanfen

    1999-01-01

    China recognises the advantages of Modular HTGRs and has chosen Modular HTGRs as one of advanced reactors to be developed for the further intensive utilisation of nuclear power in the next century. In energy supply systems of the next century, HTGR is supposed to serve: 1. as supplement to water-cooled reactors for electricity generation and 2. as environmentally friendly heat source providing process heat at different temperatures for various applications like heavy oil recovery, coal gasification and liquefaction, etc.. The 10 MW High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTR-10) is a major project in the energy sector of the Chinese National High Technology Programme as the first step of development of Modular HTGRs in China. Its main objectives are: 1. to acquire know-how in the design, construction and operation of HTGRs, 2. to establish an irradiation and experimental facility, 3. to demonstrate the inherent safety features of Modular HTGR, 4. to test electricity and heat co-generation and closed cycle gas turbine technology and 5. to do research and development work on the nuclear process heat application. Now the HTR-10 is being constructed at the site of Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET). The HTR-10 project is to be carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the reactor with an coolant outlet temperature of 700degC will be coupled with a steam generator providing steam for a steam turbine cycle which works on an electricity and heat co-generation basis. In the second phase, the reactor coolant outlet temperature is planned to be raised to 900degC. As gas turbine cycle and a steam reformer will be coupled to the reactor in addition to the steam turbine cycle. (author)

  20. High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in Helium Environment of Very High Temperature Gas Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong-Geun; Jung, Sujin; Kim, Daejong; Jeong, Yong-Whan; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Alloy 617 is a Ni-base superalloy and a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) of a very high temperature gas reactor (VHTR) which is one of the next generation nuclear reactors under development. The high operating temperature of VHTR enables various applications such as mass production of hydrogen with high energy efficiency. Alloy 617 has good creep resistance and phase stability at high temperatures in an air environment. However, it was reported that the mechanical properties decreased at a high temperature in an impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850°C-950°C in a helium environment containing the impurity gases H_2, CO, and CH_4, in order to examine the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617. Until 250 h, Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures. The activation energy for oxidation in helium environment was 154 kJ/mol. The SEM and EDS results elucidated a Cr-rich surface oxide layer, Al-rich internal oxides and depletion of grain boundary carbides. The thickness and depths of degraded layers also showed a parabolic relationship with time. A normal grain growth was observed in the Cr-rich surface oxide layer. When corrosion tests were conducted in a pure helium environment, the oxidation was suppressed drastically. It was elucidated that minor impurity gases in the helium would have detrimental effects on the high temperature corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 for the VHTR application.

  1. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium – A dilatometry-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Savkliyildiz, Ilyas [Rutgers University (United States)

    2016-08-15

    S−200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 10{sup 20} cm{sup −2} peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100–200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation {sup 4}He and {sup 3}H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. The study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.

  2. Viability of Pushrod Dilatometry Techniques for High Temperature In-Pile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. C. Crepeau

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the performance of new fuel, cladding, and structural materials for use in advanced and existing nuclear reactors, robust instrumentation is needed. Changes in material deformation are typically evaluated out-of-pile, where properties of materials are measured after samples were irradiated for a specified length of time. To address this problem, a series of tests were performed to examine the viability of using pushrod dilatometer techniques for in-pile instrumentation to measure deformation. The tests were performed in three phases. First, familiarity was gained in the use and accuracy of this system by testing samples with well defined thermal elongation characteristics. Second, high temperature data for steels, specifically SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) Low Alloy Steel and Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), found in Light Water Reactor (LWR) vessels, were aquired. Finally, data were obtained from a short pushrod in a horizontal geometry to data obtained from a longer pushrod in a vertical geometry, the configuration likely to be used for in-situ measurements. Results of testing show that previously accepted data for the structural steels tested, SA533B1 and SS304, are inaccurate at high temperatures (above 500 oC) due to extrpolation of high temperature data. This is especially true for SA533B1, as previous data do not account for the phase transformation of the material between 730 oC and 830 oC. Also, comparison of results for horizontal and vertical configurations show a maximum percent difference of 2.02% for high temperature data.

  3. Utility industry evaluation of the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burstein, S.; Bitel, J.S.; Tramm, T.R.; High, M.D.; Neils, G.H.; Tomonto, J.R.; Weinberg, C.J.

    1990-02-01

    A team of utility industry representatives evaluated the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor plant design, a current design created by an industrial team led by General Atomics under Department of Energy sponsorship and with support provided by utilities through Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates. The utility industry team concluded that the plant design should be considered a viable application of an advanced nuclear concept and deserves continuing development. Specific comments and recommendations are provided as a contribution toward improving a very promising plant design. 2 refs

  4. Low temperature superconductor and aligned high temperature superconductor magnetic dipole system and method for producing high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ramesh; Scanlan, Ronald; Ghosh, Arup K.; Weggel, Robert J.; Palmer, Robert; Anerella, Michael D.; Schmalzle, Jesse

    2017-10-17

    A dipole-magnet system and method for producing high-magnetic-fields, including an open-region located in a radially-central-region to allow particle-beam transport and other uses, low-temperature-superconducting-coils comprised of low-temperature-superconducting-wire located in radially-outward-regions to generate high magnetic-fields, high-temperature-superconducting-coils comprised of high-temperature-superconducting-tape located in radially-inward-regions to generate even higher magnetic-fields and to reduce erroneous fields, support-structures to support the coils against large Lorentz-forces, a liquid-helium-system to cool the coils, and electrical-contacts to allow electric-current into and out of the coils. The high-temperature-superconducting-tape may be comprised of bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper-oxide or rare-earth-metal, barium-copper-oxide (ReBCO) where the rare-earth-metal may be yttrium, samarium, neodymium, or gadolinium. Advantageously, alignment of the large-dimension of the rectangular-cross-section or curved-cross-section of the high-temperature-superconducting-tape with the high-magnetic-field minimizes unwanted erroneous magnetic fields. Alignment may be accomplished by proper positioning, tilting the high-temperature-superconducting-coils, forming the high-temperature-superconducting-coils into a curved-cross-section, placing nonconducting wedge-shaped-material between windings, placing nonconducting curved-and-wedge-shaped-material between windings, or by a combination of these techniques.

  5. Advances in medium and high temperature solid oxide fuel cell technology

    CERN Document Server

    Salvatore, Aricò

    2017-01-01

    In this book well-known experts highlight cutting-edge research priorities and discuss the state of the art in the field of solid oxide fuel cells giving an update on specific subjects such as protonic conductors, interconnects, electrocatalytic and catalytic processes and modelling approaches. Fundamentals and advances in this field are illustrated to help young researchers address issues in the characterization of materials and in the analysis of processes, not often tackled in scholarly books.

  6. High-Density Superconducting Cables for Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J. A.; Duff, S. M.; Gallardo, P. A.; Grace, E.; Henderson, S. W.; Ho, S. P.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Advanced ACTPol (AdvACT) is an upcoming Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) receiver upgrade, scheduled to deploy in 2016, that will allow measure- ment of the cosmic microwave background polarization and temperature to the highest precision yet with ACT. The AdvACT increase in sensitivity is partly provided by an increase in the number of transition-edge sensors (TESes) per array by up to a factor of two over the current ACTPol receiver detector arrays. The high-density AdvACT TES arrays require 70 µ m pitch superconducting flexible cables (flex) to connect the detec- tor wafer to the first-stage readout electronics. Here, we present the flex fabrication process and test results. For the flex wiring layer, we use a 400-nm-thick sputtered alu- minum film. In the center of the cable, the wiring is supported by a polyimide substrate, which smoothly transitions to a bare (uncoated with polyimide) silicon substrate at the ends of the cable for a robust wedge wire-bonding interface. Tests on the first batch of flex made for the first AdvACT array show that the flex will meet the requirements for AdvACT, with a superconducting critical current above 1 mA at 500 mK, resilience to mechanical and cryogenic stress, and a room temperature yield of 97%.

  7. Fusion blanket high-temperature heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Deep penetration of 14 MeV neutrons makes two-temperature region blankets feasible. A relatively low-temperature (approx. 300 0 C) metallic structure is the vacuum/coolant pressure boundary, while the interior of the blanket, which is a simple packed bed of nonstructural material, operates at very high temperatures (>1000 0 C). The water-cooled shell structure is thermally insulated from the steam-cooled interior. High-temperature steam can dramatically increase the efficiency of electric power generation, as well as produce hydrogen and oxygen-based synthetic fuels at high-efficiency

  8. High Temperature Advanced Structural Composites. Volume 2. Ceramic Matrix Composites, Fiber Processing and Properties, and Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-02

    furfural . toughness and a pseudoplasticity. the latter of treated to a higher temperature. The mamx or acetylenic resins provide simple processing...crystalline by TU/SAD and has an effective surface area of 250 m /go based on BET measurments with N2 adsorption . This solid crystallizes to high purity

  9. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Boron Rich Solids Sensors for Biological and Chemical Detection, Ultra High Temperature Ceramics, Thermoelectrics, Armor

    CERN Document Server

    Orlovskaya, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this book is to discuss the current status of research and development of boron-rich solids as sensors, ultra-high temperature ceramics, thermoelectrics, and armor. Novel biological and chemical sensors made of stiff and light-weight boron-rich solids are very exciting and efficient for applications in medical diagnoses, environmental surveillance and the detection of pathogen and biological/chemical terrorism agents. Ultra-high temperature ceramic composites exhibit excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance for hypersonic vehicle applications. Boron-rich solids are also promising candidates for high-temperature thermoelectric conversion. Armor is another very important application of boron-rich solids, since most of them exhibit very high hardness, which makes them perfect candidates with high resistance to ballistic impact. The following topical areas are presented: •boron-rich solids: science and technology; •synthesis and sintering strategies of boron rich solids; •microcantileve...

  10. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of small renal masses: Clinical effectiveness and technological advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, G.; Goodman, C.; Melzer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The review summarises the technological advances in the application of high-intensity focused ultrasound for small renal masses presumed to be cancer including the systematic review of its clinical application. Current progress in the area of magnetic resonance image guided ultrasound ablation is also appraised. Specifically, organ tracking and real time monitoring of temperature changes during the treatment are discussed. Finally, areas of future research interest are outlined. PMID:21116349

  11. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of small renal masses: Clinical effectiveness and technological advances

    OpenAIRE

    Nabi, G.; Goodman, C.; Melzer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The review summarises the technological advances in the application of high-intensity focused ultrasound for small renal masses presumed to be cancer including the systematic review of its clinical application. Current progress in the area of magnetic resonance image guided ultrasound ablation is also appraised. Specifically, organ tracking and real time monitoring of temperature changes during the treatment are discussed. Finally, areas of future research interest are outlined.

  12. Superalloy Lattice Block Developed for Use in Lightweight, High-Temperature Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Krause, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Successful development of advanced gas turbine engines for aircraft will require lightweight, high-temperature components. Currently titanium-aluminum- (TiAl) based alloys are envisioned for such applications because of their lower density (4 g/cm3) in comparison to superalloys (8.5 g/cm3), which have been utilized for hot turbine engine parts for over 50 years. However, a recently developed concept (lattice block) by JAMCORP, Inc., of Willmington, Massachusetts, would allow lightweight, high-temperature structures to be directly fabricated from superalloys and, thus, take advantage of their well-known, characterized properties. In its simplest state, lattice block is composed of thin ligaments arranged in a three dimensional triangulated trusslike configuration that forms a structurally rigid panel. Because lattice block can be fabricated by casting, correctly sized hardware is produced with little or no machining; thus very low cost manufacturing is possible. Together, the NASA Glenn Research Center and JAMCORP have extended their lattice block methodology for lower melting materials, such as Al alloys, to demonstrate that investment casting of superalloy lattice block is possible. This effort required advances in lattice block pattern design and assembly, higher temperature mold materials and mold fabrication technology, and foundry practice suitable for superalloys (ref. 1). Lattice block panels have been cast from two different Ni-base superalloys: IN 718, which is the most commonly utilized superalloy and retains its strength up to 650 C; and MAR M247, which possesses excellent mechanical properties to at least 1100 C. In addition to the open-cell lattice block geometry, same-sized lattice block panels containing a thin (1-mm-thick) solid face on one side have also been cast from both superalloys. The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of the open cell and face-sheeted superalloy lattice block panels are currently being examined, and the

  13. Resonance analysis of a high temperature piezoelectric disc for sensitivity characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N; Bond, Leonard J

    2018-07-01

    Ultrasonic transducers for high temperature (200 °C+) applications are a key enabling technology for advanced nuclear power systems and in a range of chemical and petro-chemical industries. Design, fabrication and optimization of such transducers using piezoelectric materials remains a challenge. In this work, experimental data-based analysis is performed to investigate the fundamental causal factors for the resonance characteristics of a piezoelectric disc at elevated temperatures. The effect of all ten temperature-dependent piezoelectric constants (ε 33 , ε 11 , d 33 , d 31 , d 15 , s 11 , s 12 , s 13 , s 33 , s 44 ) is studied numerically on both the radial and thickness mode resonances of a piezoelectric disc. A sensitivity index is defined to quantify the effect of each of the temperature-dependent coefficients on the resonance modes of the modified lead zirconium titanate disc. The temperature dependence of s 33 showed highest sensitivity towards the thickness resonance mode followed by ε 33 , s 11 , s 13 , s 12 , d 31 , d 33 , s 44 , ε 11 , and d 15 in the decreasing order of the sensitivity index. For radial resonance modes, the temperature dependence of ε 33 showed highest sensitivity index followed by s 11 , s 12 and d 31 coefficient. This numerical study demonstrates that the magnitude of d 33 is not the sole factor that affects the resonance characteristics of the piezoelectric disc at high temperatures. It appears that there exists a complex interplay between various temperature dependent piezoelectric coefficients that causes reduction in the thickness mode resonance frequencies which is found to be agreement in with the experimental data at an elevated temperature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Scaling Studies for Advanced High Temperature Reactor Concepts, Final Technical Report: October 2014—December 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Brian; Gutowska, Izabela; Chiger, Howard

    2018-03-26

    Computer simulations of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic phenomena are often used in the design and licensing of nuclear reactor systems. In order to assess the accuracy of these computer simulations, computer codes and methods are often validated against experimental data. This experimental data must be of sufficiently high quality in order to conduct a robust validation exercise. In addition, this experimental data is generally collected at experimental facilities that are of a smaller scale than the reactor systems that are being simulated due to cost considerations. Therefore, smaller scale test facilities must be designed and constructed in such a fashion to ensure that the prototypical behavior of a particular nuclear reactor system is preserved. The work completed through this project has resulted in scaling analyses and conceptual design development for a test facility capable of collecting code validation data for the following high temperature gas reactor systems and events— 1. Passive natural circulation core cooling system, 2. pebble bed gas reactor concept, 3. General Atomics Energy Multiplier Module reactor, and 4. prismatic block design steam-water ingress event. In the event that code validation data for these systems or events is needed in the future, significant progress in the design of an appropriate integral-type test facility has already been completed as a result of this project. Where applicable, the next step would be to begin the detailed design development and material procurement. As part of this project applicable scaling analyses were completed and test facility design requirements developed. Conceptual designs were developed for the implementation of these design requirements at the Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF). The original HTTF is based on a ¼-scale model of a high temperature gas reactor concept with the capability for both forced and natural circulation flow through a prismatic core with

  15. A Delay Time Measurement of ULTRAS (Ultra-high Temperature Ultrasonic Response Analysis System) for a High Temperature Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Sang Baik

    2010-01-01

    The temperature measurement of very high temperature core melt is of importance in a high temperature as the molten pool experiment in which gap formation between core melt and the reactor lower head, and the effect of the gap on thermal behavior are to be measured. The existing temperature measurement techniques have some problems, which the thermocouple, one of the contact methods, is restricted to under 2000 .deg. C, and the infrared thermometry, one of the non-contact methods, is unable to measure an internal temperature and very sensitive to the interference from reacted gases. In order to solve these problems, the delay time technique of ultrasonic wavelets due to high temperature has two sorts of stage. As a first stage, a delay time measurement of ULTRAS (Ultra-high Temperature Ultrasonic Response Analysis System) is suggested. As a second stage, a molten material temperature was measured up to 2300 .deg. C. Also, the optimization design of the UTS (ultrasonic temperature sensor) with persistence at the high temperature was suggested in this paper. And the utilization of the theory suggested in this paper and the efficiency of the developed system are performed by special equipment and some experiments supported by KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science)

  16. Transformations of gold nanoparticles investigated using variable temperature high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, N.P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Huis, M.A. van; Zandbergen, H.W. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technolgy, Lorentzweg 1, NL-2628CJ, Delft, The Netherlands. (Netherlands); Xu, H. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, and Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Kirkland, A.I., E-mail: angus.kirkland@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    Recently designed advanced in-situ specimen holders for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in studies of gold nanoparticles. We report results of variable temperature TEM experiments in which structural transformations have been correlated with specimen temperature, allowing general trends to be identified. Transformation to a decahedral morphology for particles in the size range 5-12 nm was observed for the majority of particles regardless of their initial structure. Following in-situ annealing, decahedra were found to be stable at room temperature, confirming this as the equilibrium morphology, in agreement with recently calculated phase diagrams. Other transitions at low temperature in addition to surface roughening have also been observed and correlated with the same nanoscale phase diagram. Investigations of gold particles at high temperature have revealed evidence for co-existing solid and liquid phases. Overall, these results are important in a more precise understanding of the structure and action of catalytic gold nanoparticles and in the experimental verification of theoretical calculations.

  17. Concept of an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Yukio; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Masuro

    2012-01-01

    As the challenge to ensure no harmful release of radioactive materials at the accidents by deterministic approach instead to satisfy acceptance criteria or safety goal for risk by probabilistic approach, new concept of advanced reactor, an inherently-safe high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is proposed based on the experience of the operation of the actual High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) in Japan, High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), and the design of the commercial plant (GTHTR300), utilizing the inherent safety features of the HTGR (i.e., safety features based on physical phenomena). The safety design philosophy of the inherently-safe HTGR for the safety analysis of the radiological consequences is determined as the confinement of radioactive materials is assured by only inherent safety features without engineered safety features, AC power or prompt actions by plant personnel if the design extension conditions occur. Inherent safety features to prevent the loss or degradation of the confinement function are identified. It is proposed not to apply the probabilistic approach for the evaluation of the radiological consequences of the accidents in the safety analysis because no inherent safety features fail for the mitigation of the consequences of the accidents. Consequently, there are no event sequences to harmful release of radioactive materials if the design extension conditions occur in the inherently-safe HTGR concept. The concept and future R and D items for the inherently-safe HTGR are described in this paper.

  18. Melt processed high-temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    The achievement of large critical currents is critical to the applications of high-temperature superconductors. Recent developments have shown that melt processing is suitable for producing high J c oxide superconductors. Using magnetic forces between such high J c oxide superconductors and magnets, a person could be levitated.This book has grown largely out of research works on melt processing of high-temperature superconductors conducted at ISTEC Superconductivity Research Laboratory. The chapters build on melt processing, microstructural characterization, fundamentals of flux pinning, criti

  19. Very-high-temperature reactors for future use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Very-High-Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) show promise for economic generation of electricity and of high-temperature process heat. The key is the development of high-temperature materials which permit gas turbine VHTRs to generate electricity economically, at helium temperatures which can be used for fossil fuel conversion processes. 7 refs., 5 figs

  20. Very-high-temperature reactors for future use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1988-08-01

    Very-high-temperature reactors (VHTRs) show promise for economic generation of electricity and of high-temperature process heat. The key is the development of high-temperature materials which permit gas turbine VHTRs to generate electricity economically, at reactor coolant temperatures which can be used for fossil fuel conversion processes. 7 refs., 5 figs

  1. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Silicon Carbide and Pyrocarbon Coatings on Fuel Particles for High Temperature Reactors (HTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, V.; Charollais, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA, BP 1, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Dugne, O. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SCGS BP 17171 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Garcia, C. [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR CNRS 5801, 3 allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France); Perez, M. [CEA Grenoble DRT/DTH/LTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cea and AREVA NP have engaged an extensive research and development program on HTR (high temperature reactor) fuel. The improving of safety of (very) high temperature reactors (V/HTR) is based on the quality of the fuel particles. This requires a good knowledge of the properties of the four-layers TRISO particles designed to retain the uranium and fission products during irradiation or accident conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize exhaustively the structure and the thermomechanical properties of each unirradiated layer (silicon carbide and pyrocarbon coatings) by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), selected area electronic diffraction (SEAD), thermo reflectance microscopy and nano-indentation. The long term objective of this study is to define pertinent parameters for fuel performance codes used to better understand the thermomechanical behaviour of the coated particles. (authors)

  2. Advanced ceramic composite for high energy resistors. Characterization of electrical and physical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrokh, Fattahi; Navid, Tagizadegan; Naser, Tabatabaei; Ahmad, Rashtehizadeh

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to characterize and apply advanced materials to improve the performance of components used in pulse power systems. One area of innovation is the use of bulk electrically conductive ceramics for non-inductive, high energy and high power electrical resistors. Standard Ceramics Inc. has developed a unique silicon carbide structural ceramic composite which exhibits electrical conductivity. The new conductive bulk ceramic material has a controlled microstructure, which results in improved homogeneity, making the material suitable for use as a non-inductive high energy resistor. This paper describes characterization of the material's physical and electrical properties and relates them to improvements in low-inductance, high temperature, high power density and high energy density resistors. The bulk resistor approach offers high reliability through better mechanical properties and simplicity of construction

  3. High resolution temperature mapping of gas turbine combustor simulator exhaust with femtosecond laser induced fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert B.; Yun, Sangsig; Ding, Huimin; Charbonneau, Michel; Coulas, David; Lu, Ping; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Ramachandran, Nanthan

    2017-04-01

    Femtosecond infrared (fs-IR) laser written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), have demonstrated great potential for extreme sensing. Such conditions are inherent in advanced gas turbine engines under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and the ability to measure temperature gradients in these harsh environments is currently limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding the high temperature, pressure and corrosive conditions present. This paper discusses fabrication and deployment of several fs-IR written FBG arrays, for monitoring exhaust temperature gradients of a gas turbine combustor simulator. Results include: contour plots of measured temperature gradients, contrast with thermocouple data.

  4. Molybdenum Disilicide Oxidation Kinetics in High Temperature Steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Parker, Stephen Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andrew Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program’s Advanced Fuels Campaign is currently supporting a range of experimental efforts aimed at the development and qualification of ‘accident tolerant’ nuclear fuel forms. One route to enhance the accident tolerance of nuclear fuel is to replace the zirconium alloy cladding, which is prone to rapid oxidation in steam at elevated temperatures, with a more oxidation-resistant cladding. Several cladding replacement solutions have been envisaged. The cladding can be completely replaced with a more oxidation resistant alloy, a layered approach can be used to optimize the strength, creep resistance, and oxidation tolerance of various materials, or the existing zirconium alloy cladding can be coated with a more oxidation-resistant material. Molybdenum is one candidate cladding material favored due to its high temperature creep resistance. However, it performs poorly under autoclave testing and suffers degradation under high temperature steam oxidation exposure. Development of composite cladding architectures consisting of a molybdenum core shielded by a molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) coating is hypothesized to improve the performance of a Mo-based cladding system. MoSi2 was identified based on its high temperature oxidation resistance in O2 atmospheres (e.g. air and “wet air”). However, its behavior in H2O is less known. This report presents thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) results for MoSi2 exposed to 670-1498 K water vapor. Synthetic air (80-20%, Ar-O2) exposures were also performed, and those results are presented here for a comparative analysis. It was determined that MoSi2 displays drastically different oxidation behavior in water vapor than in dry air. In the 670-1498 K temperature range, four distinct behaviors are observed. Parabolic oxidation is exhibited in only 670

  5. High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric crystals like langasite (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 , LGS) and gallium orthophosphate (GaPO 4 ) exhibit piezoelectrically excited bulk acoustic waves at temperatures of up to at least 1450 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Consequently, resonant sensors based on those materials enable new sensing approaches. Thereby, resonant high-temperature microbalances are of particular interest. They correlate very small mass changes during film deposition onto resonators or gas composition-dependent stoichiometry changes of thin films already deposited onto the resonators with the resonance frequency shift of such devices. Consequently, the objective of the work is to review the high-temperature properties, the operation limits and the measurement principles of such resonators. The electromechanical properties of high-temperature bulk acoustic wave resonators such as mechanical stiffness, piezoelectric and dielectric constant, effective viscosity and electrical conductivity are described using a one-dimensional physical model and determined accurately up to temperatures as close as possible to their ultimate limit. Insights from defect chemical models are correlated with the electromechanical properties of the resonators. Thereby, crucial properties for stable operation as a sensor under harsh conditions are identified to be the formation of oxygen vacancies and the bulk conductivity. Operation limits concerning temperature, oxygen partial pressure and water vapor pressure are given. Further, application-relevant aspects such as temperature coefficients, temperature compensation and mass sensitivity are evaluated. In addition, approximations are introduced which make the exact model handy for routine data evaluation. An equivalent electrical circuit for high-temperature resonator devices is derived based on the one-dimensional physical model. Low- and high-temperature approximations are introduced. Thereby, the structure of the equivalent circuit corresponds to the

  6. High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric crystals like langasite (La3Ga5SiO14, LGS) and gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) exhibit piezoelectrically excited bulk acoustic waves at temperatures of up to at least 1450 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Consequently, resonant sensors based on those materials enable new sensing approaches. Thereby, resonant high-temperature microbalances are of particular interest. They correlate very small mass changes during film deposition onto resonators or gas composition-dependent stoichiometry changes of thin films already deposited onto the resonators with the resonance frequency shift of such devices. Consequently, the objective of the work is to review the high-temperature properties, the operation limits and the measurement principles of such resonators. The electromechanical properties of high-temperature bulk acoustic wave resonators such as mechanical stiffness, piezoelectric and dielectric constant, effective viscosity and electrical conductivity are described using a one-dimensional physical model and determined accurately up to temperatures as close as possible to their ultimate limit. Insights from defect chemical models are correlated with the electromechanical properties of the resonators. Thereby, crucial properties for stable operation as a sensor under harsh conditions are identified to be the formation of oxygen vacancies and the bulk conductivity. Operation limits concerning temperature, oxygen partial pressure and water vapor pressure are given. Further, application-relevant aspects such as temperature coefficients, temperature compensation and mass sensitivity are evaluated. In addition, approximations are introduced which make the exact model handy for routine data evaluation. An equivalent electrical circuit for high-temperature resonator devices is derived based on the one-dimensional physical model. Low- and high-temperature approximations are introduced. Thereby, the structure of the equivalent circuit corresponds to the Butterworth

  7. High-temperature metallography setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, M.; Shmarjahu, D.; Elfassy, S.

    1979-06-01

    A high-temperature metallography setup is presented. In this setup the observation of processes such as that of copper recrystallization was made possible, and the structure of metals such as uranium could be revealed. A brief historical review of part of the research works that have been done with the help of high temperature metallographical observation technique since the beginning of this century is included. Detailed description of metallographical specimen preparation technique and theoretical criteria based on the rate of evaporation of materials present on the polished surface of the specimens are given

  8. High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Alison; Zhang, Gengsheng

    2006-01-01

    NAVSYS High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver (HAGR) uses a digital beam-steering antenna array to enable up to eight GPS satellites to be tracked, each with up to 10 dBi of additional antenna gain over a conventional receiver solution...

  9. High-pressure-high-temperature treatment of natural diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Royen, J V

    2002-01-01

    The results are reported of high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) treatment experiments on natural diamonds of different origins and with different impurity contents. The diamonds are annealed in a temperature range up to 2000 sup o C at stabilizing pressures up to 7 GPa. The evolution is studied of different defects in the diamond crystal lattice. The influence of substitutional nitrogen atoms, plastic deformation and the combination of these is discussed. Diamonds are characterized at room and liquid nitrogen temperature using UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectrometry. The economic implications of diamond HPHT treatments are discussed.

  10. High Temperature Polymers for use in Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, Katherine M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently working on polymers for fuel cell and lithium battery applications. The desire for more efficient, higher power density, and a lower environmental impact power sources has led to interest in proton exchanges membrane fuels cells (PEMFC) and lithium batteries. A PEMFC has many advantages as a power source. The fuel cell uses oxygen and hydrogen as reactants. The resulting products are electricity, heat, and water. The PEMFC consists of electrodes with a catalyst, and an electrolyte. The electrolyte is an ion-conducting polymer that transports protons from the anode to the cathode. Typically, a PEMFC is operated at a temperature of about 80 C. There is intense interest in developing a fuel cell membrane that can operate at higher temperatures in the range of 80 C- 120 C. Operating the he1 cell at higher temperatures increases the kinetics of the fuel cell reaction as well as decreasing the susceptibility of the catalyst to be poisoned by impurities. Currently, Nafion made by Dupont is the most widely used polymer membrane in PEMFC. Nafion does not function well above 80 C due to a significant decrease in the conductivity of the membrane from a loss of hydration. In addition to the loss of conductivity at high temperatures, the long term stability and relatively high cost of Nafion have stimulated many researches to find a substitute for Nafion. Lithium ion batteries are popular for use in portable electronic devices, such as laptop computers and mobile phones. The high power density of lithium batteries makes them ideal for the high power demand of today s advanced electronics. NASA is developing a solid polymer electrolyte that can be used for lithium batteries. Solid polymer electrolytes have many advantages over the current gel or liquid based systems that are used currently. Among these advantages are the potential for increased power density and design flexibility. Automobiles, computers, and cell phones require

  11. Development of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Path Toward 2700 F Temperature Capability and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Good, Brian; Costa, Gustavo; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Fox, Dennis S.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant coating development challenges is to achieve prime-reliant environmental barrier coating systems to meet the future 2700F EBC-CMC temperature stability and environmental durability requirements. This presentation will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating system testing and down-selects, particularly the development path and properties towards 2700-3000F durability goals by using NASA hafnium-hafnia-rare earth-silicon-silicate composition EBC systems for the SiC-SiC CMC turbine component applications. Advanced hafnium-based compositions for enabling next generation EBC and CMCs capabilities towards ultra-high temperature ceramic coating systems will also be briefly mentioned.

  12. High-temperature process heat applications with an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quade, R.N.; Vrable, D.L.

    1980-04-01

    An 842-MW(t) HTGR-process heat (HTGR-PH) design and several synfuels and energy transport processes to which it could be coupled are described. As in other HTGR designs, the HTGR-PH has its entire primary coolant system contained in a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) which provides the necessary biological shielding and pressure containment. The high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. With a capability to produce hot helium in the secondary loop at 800 0 C (1472 0 F) with current designs and 900 0 C (1652 0 F) with advanced designs, a large number of process heat applications are potentially available. Studies have been performed for coal liquefaction and gasification using nuclear heat

  13. High Temperature Superconductor Machine Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech; Træholt, Chresten

    2011-01-01

    A versatile testing platform for a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) machine has been constructed. The stationary HTS field winding can carry up to 10 coils and it is operated at a temperature of 77K. The rotating armature is at room temperature. Test results and performance for the HTS field...

  14. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  15. Advanced Rankine and Brayton cycle power systems: Materials needs and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Guentert, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual advanced potassium Rankine and closed Brayton power conversion cycles offer the potential for improved efficiency over steam systems through higher operating temperatures. However, for utility service of at least 100,000 hours, materials technology advances will be needed for such high temperature systems. Improved alloys and surface protection must be developed and demonstrated to resist coal combustion gases as well as potassium corrosion or helium surface degradation at high temperatures. Extensions in fabrication technology are necessary to produce large components of high temperature alloys. Long time property data must be obtained under environments of interest to assure high component reliability.

  16. Advanced Rankine and Brayton cycle power systems - Materials needs and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, S. J.; Guentert, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual advanced potassium Rankine and closed Brayton power conversion cycles offer the potential for improved efficiency over steam systems through higher operating temperatures. However, for utility service of at least 100,000 hours, materials technology advances will be needed for such high temperature systems. Improved alloys and surface protection must be developed and demonstrated to resist coal combustion gases as well as potassium corrosion or helium surface degradation at high temperatures. Extensions in fabrication technology are necessary to produce large components of high temperature alloys. Long-time property data must be obtained under environments of interest to assure high component reliability.

  17. Stability of High Temperature Standard Platinum Resistance Thermometers at High Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Y. A. ABDELAZIZ; F. M. MEGAHED

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of the stability of high temperature standard platinum resistance thermometers HTSPRTs has been carried out for two different designs thermometers (with nominal resistance 0.25 Ω and 2.5 Ω) from two different suppliers. The thermometers were heated for more than 160 hours at temperatures above 960 0C using a vertical furnace with a ceramic block. A study was made of the influence of the heat treatment on the stability of the resistance at the triple point of water, and on the...

  18. Selection of high temperature thermal energy storage materials for advanced solar dynamic space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Dovie E.; Coles-Hamilton, Carolyn; Juhasz, Albert

    1987-01-01

    Under the direction of NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Technology (OAST), the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated an in-house thermal energy storage program to identify combinations of phase change thermal energy storage media for use with a Brayton and Stirling Advanced Solar Dynamic (ASD) space power system operating between 1070 and 1400 K. A study has been initiated to determine suitable combinations of thermal energy storage (TES) phase change materials (PCM) that result in the smallest and lightest weight ASD power system possible. To date the heats of fusion of several fluoride salt mixtures with melting points greater than 1025 K have been verified experimentally. The study has indicated that these salt systems produce large ASD systems because of their inherent low thermal conductivity and low density. It is desirable to have PCMs with high densities and high thermal conductivities. Therefore, alternate phase change materials based on metallic alloy systems are also being considered as possible TES candidates for future ASD space power systems.

  19. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  20. High Temperature Chemistry at NASA: Hot Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature issues in aircraft engines Hot section: Ni and Co based Superalloys Oxidation and Corrosion (Durability) at high temperatures. Thermal protection system (TPS) and RCC (Reinforced Carbon-Carbon) on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. High temperatures in other worlds: Planets close to their stars.

  1. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  2. Lifetime evaluation of superheater tubes exposed to steam oxidation, high temperature corrosion and creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriksen, N [Elsamprojekt A/S, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark); Hede Larsen, O; Blum, R [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    Advanced fossil fired plants operating at high steam temperatures require careful design of the superheaters. The German TRD design code normally used in Denmark is not precise enough for the design of superheaters with long lifetimes. The authors have developed a computer program to be used in the evaluation of superheater tube lifetime based on input related to tube dimensions, material, pressure, steam temperature, mass flux, heat flux and estimated corrosion rates. The program is described in the paper. As far as practically feasible, the model seems to give a true picture of the reality. For superheaters exposed to high heat fluxes or low internal heat transfer coefficients as is the case for superheaters located in fluidized bed environments or radiant environments, the program has been extremely useful for evaluation of surface temperature, oxide formation and lifetime. The total uncertainty of the method is mainly influenced by the uncertainty of the determination of the corrosion rate. More precise models describing the corrosion rate as a function of tube surface temperature, fuel parameters and boiler parameters need to be developed. (au) 21 refs.

  3. Silicon coating treatment to improve high temperature corrosion resistance of 9%Cr steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    A silicon coating process is described which confers good protection on 9%Cr steels and alloys in CO 2 based atmospheres at high temperatures and pressures. The coatings are formed by decomposition of silane at temperatures above 720 K. Protective layers are typically up to 1 μm thick. The optimum coating conditions are discussed. The chemical state of the coatings has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and has demonstrated the importance of avoiding silicon oxide formation during processing. Corrosion testing has been carried out for extended periods, up to 20 000 h, at temperatures between 753 and 853 K, in a simulated advanced gas cooled reactor gas at 4 MPa pressure. Benefit factors of up to 60 times have been measured for 9%Cr steels. Even higher values have been measured for 9Cr-Fe binary alloy on which a 1 μm coating was sufficient to eliminate significant oxidation over 19 000 h except at the specimen edges. The mechanism of protection is discussed. It is suggested that a silicon surface coating for protecting steels from high temperature corrosion has some advantages over adding silicon to the bulk metal. (author)

  4. Proceedings of Prof. Brahm Prakash birth centenary workshop on high temperature materials and hot structures: souvenir and book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, monolithic ceramics and refractory metals were identified for use at high temperatures. Considerations such as higher operating temperatures, increased thermostructural loads, lower density, etc. brought exotic materials such as ceramic matrix composites, carbon based composites, ODS alloy, intermetallics and thermal barrier coatings to the horizon. Advent of ultra high temperature ceramics and functionally graded materials further pushed the threshold of applicability of high temperature materials and hot structures. Impressive progress in this area has been possible because of the fact that characterization tools along with design and simulation techniques have constantly kept pace with advancement occurring in the processing methods of these materials. The workshop scope includes: Thermal Protection Systems and Materials, Hot Structures, Ceramic and Carbon Matrix Composites, Ultra High Temperature Ceramics, Coating Technology, Simulation and Characterization. Articles relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. HIgh Temperature Photocatalysis over Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Thomas A.

    Due in large part to in prevalence of solar energy, increasing demand of energy production (from all sources), and the uncertain future of petroleum energy feedstocks, solar energy harvesting and other photochemical systems will play a major role in the developing energy market. This dissertation focuses on a novel photochemical reaction process: high temperature photocatalysis (i.e., photocatalysis conducted above ambient temperatures, T ≥ 100°C). The overarching hypothesis of this process is that photo-generated charge carriers are able to constructively participate in thermo-catalytic chemical reactions, thereby increasing catalytic rates at one temperature, or maintaining catalytic rates at lower temperatures. The photocatalytic oxidation of carbon deposits in an operational hydrocarbon reformer is one envisioned application of high temperature photocatalysis. Carbon build-up during hydrocarbon reforming results in catalyst deactivation, in the worst cases, this was shown to happen in a period of minutes with a liquid hydrocarbon. In the presence of steam, oxygen, and above-ambient temperatures, carbonaceous deposits were photocatalytically oxidized over very long periods (t ≥ 24 hours). This initial experiment exemplified the necessity of a fundamental assessment of high temperature photocatalytic activity. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that affect photocatalytic activity as a function of temperatures was achieved using an ethylene photocatalytic oxidation probe reaction. Maximum ethylene photocatalytic oxidation rates were observed between 100 °C and 200 °C; the maximum photocatalytic rates were approximately a factor of 2 larger than photocatalytic rates at ambient temperatures. The loss of photocatalytic activity at temperatures above 200 °C is due to a non-radiative multi-phonon recombination mechanism. Further, it was shown that the fundamental rate of recombination (as a function of temperature) can be effectively modeled as a

  6. High temperature reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Beno, M.F.; Mulac, W.A.; Bartels, D.

    1985-01-01

    During the last year the dependence of the apparent rate of OD + CO on water pressure was measured at 305, 570, 865 and 1223 K. An explanation was found and tested for the H 2 O dependence of the apparent rate of OH(OD) + CO at high temperatures. The isotope effect for OH(D) with CO was determined over the temperature range 330 K to 1225 K. The reason for the water dependence of the rate of OH(OD) + CO near room temperatures has been investigated but no clear explanation has been found. 1 figure

  7. Use of TRIGA-pulsed irradiations for high-temperature Doppler measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foell, W K; Cashwell, R J; Bhattacharyya, S K [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Russell, G J [Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, University of California, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1974-07-01

    experimentally measured values. Explicit correlations for the Doppler Ratio were derived from the results of the present work. Since the Doppler Ratios were measured over a range of temperatures in the PAD experiment, effective static temperatures were defined for use in the correlations. The PAD technique has provided a significant advance in the field of high-temperature Doppler Measurements, extending the temperature range of the measurements by about 1000 deg. K. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first study of the Doppler Ratio under partially molten conditions of UO{sub 2}. (author)

  8. Fuel temperature prediction during high burnup HTGR fuel irradiation test. US-JAERI irradiation test for HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku; Acharya, R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the preirradiation thermal analysis of the HRB-22 capsule designed for an irradiation test in a removable beryllium position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor(HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This test is being carried out under Annex 2 of the Arrangement between the U.S. Department of Energy and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute on Cooperation in Research and Development regarding High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. The fuel used in the test is an advanced type. The advanced fuel was designed aiming at burnup of about 10%FIMA(% fissions per initial metallic atom) which was higher than that of the first charge fuel for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor(HTTR) and was produced in Japan. CACA-2, a heavy isotope and fission product concentration calculational code for experimental irradiation capsules, was used to determine time-dependent fission power for the fuel compacts. The Heat Engineering and Transfer in Nine Geometries(HEATING) code was used to solve the steady-state heat conduction problem. The diameters of the graphite fuel body, which contains the fuel compacts, and of the primary pressure vessel were determined such that the requirements of running the fuel compacts at an average temperature less than 1250degC and of not exceeding a maximum fuel temperature of 1350degC were met throughout the four cycles of irradiation. The detail design of the capsule was carried out based on this analysis. (author)

  9. Petascale supercomputing to accelerate the design of high-temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongwon; Lee, Sangkeun; Shyam, Amit; Haynes, J. Allen

    2017-12-01

    Recent progress in high-performance computing and data informatics has opened up numerous opportunities to aid the design of advanced materials. Herein, we demonstrate a computational workflow that includes rapid population of high-fidelity materials datasets via petascale computing and subsequent analyses with modern data science techniques. We use a first-principles approach based on density functional theory to derive the segregation energies of 34 microalloying elements at the coherent and semi-coherent interfaces between the aluminium matrix and the θ‧-Al2Cu precipitate, which requires several hundred supercell calculations. We also perform extensive correlation analyses to identify materials descriptors that affect the segregation behaviour of solutes at the interfaces. Finally, we show an example of leveraging machine learning techniques to predict segregation energies without performing computationally expensive physics-based simulations. The approach demonstrated in the present work can be applied to any high-temperature alloy system for which key materials data can be obtained using high-performance computing.

  10. Review on fatigue behavior of high-strength concrete after high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongfu; Jia, Penghe; Gao, Haijing

    2017-06-01

    The fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature has begun to attract attention. But so far the researches work about the fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature have not been reported. This article based on a large number of literature. The research work about the fatigue of high-strength concrete after high temperature are reviewed, analysed and expected, which can provide some reference for the experimental study of fatigue damage analysis.

  11. Materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbaud, F.; Desgranges, Clara; Martinelli, Laure; Rouillard, Fabien; Duhamel, Cecile; Marchetti, Loic; Perrin, Stephane; Molins, Regine; Chevalier, S.; Heintz, O.; David, N.; Fiorani, J.M.; Vilasi, M.; Wouters, Y.; Galerie, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Viguier, B.; Monceau, D.; Soustelle, M.; Pijolat, M.; Favergeon, J.; Brancherie, D.; Moulin, G.; Dawi, K.; Wolski, K.; Barnier, V.; Rebillat, F.; Lavigne, O.; Brossard, J.M.; Ropital, F.; Mougin, J.

    2011-01-01

    This book was made from the lectures given in 2010 at the thematic school on 'materials corrosion and protection at high temperatures'. It gathers the contributions from scientists and engineers coming from various communities and presents a state-of-the-art of the scientific and technological developments concerning the behaviour of materials at high temperature, in aggressive environments and in various domains (aerospace, nuclear, energy valorization, and chemical industries). It supplies pedagogical tools to grasp high temperature corrosion thanks to the understanding of oxidation mechanisms. It proposes some protection solutions for materials and structures. Content: 1 - corrosion costs; macro-economical and metallurgical approach; 2 - basic concepts of thermo-chemistry; 3 - introduction to the Calphad (calculation of phase diagrams) method; 4 - use of the thermodynamic tool: application to pack-cementation; 5 - elements of crystallography and of real solids description; 6 - diffusion in solids; 7 - notions of mechanics inside crystals; 8 - high temperature corrosion: phenomena, models, simulations; 9 - pseudo-stationary regime in heterogeneous kinetics; 10 - nucleation, growth and kinetic models; 11 - test experiments in heterogeneous kinetics; 12 - mechanical aspects of metal/oxide systems; 13 - coupling phenomena in high temperature oxidation; 14 - other corrosion types; 15 - methods of oxidized surfaces analysis at micro- and nano-scales; 16 - use of SIMS in the study of high temperature corrosion of metals and alloys; 17 - oxidation of ceramics and of ceramic matrix composite materials; 18 - protective coatings against corrosion and oxidation; 19 - high temperature corrosion in the 4. generation of nuclear reactor systems; 20 - heat exchangers corrosion in municipal waste energy valorization facilities; 21 - high temperature corrosion in oil refining and petrochemistry; 22 - high temperature corrosion in new energies industry. (J.S.)

  12. High-temperature uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timusk, T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments reveal that the mechanism responsible for the superconducting properties of cuprate materials is even more mysterious than we thought. Two decades ago, Georg Bednorz and Alex Mueller of IBM's research laboratory in Zurich rocked the world of physics when they discovered a material that lost all resistance to electrical current at the record temperature of 36 K. Until then, superconductivity was thought to be a strictly low-temperature phenomenon that required costly refrigeration. Moreover, the IBM discovery - for which Bednorz and Mueller were awarded the 1987 Nobel Prize for Physics - was made in a ceramic copper-oxide material that nobody expected to be particularly special. Proposed applications for these 'cuprates' abounded. High-temperature superconductivity, particularly if it could be extended to room temperature, offered the promise of levitating trains, ultra-efficient power cables, and even supercomputers based on superconducting quantum interference devices. But these applications have been slow to materialize. Moreover, almost 20 years on, the physics behind this strange state of matter remains a mystery. (U.K.)

  13. RPC operation at high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Aielli, G; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, A; Di Stante, L; Liberti, B; Paoloni, A; Pastori, E; Santonico, R

    2003-01-01

    The resistive electrodes of RPCs utilised in several current experiments (ATLAS, CMS, ALICE, BABAR and ARGO) are made of phenolic /melaminic polymers, with room temperature resistivities ranging from 10**1**0 Omega cm, for high rate operation in avalanche mode, to 5 multiplied by 10**1**1 Omega cm, for streamer mode operation at low rate. The resistivity has however a strong temperature dependence, decreasing exponentially with increasing temperature. We have tested several RPCs with different electrode resistivities in avalanche as well as in streamer mode operation. The behaviours of the operating current and of the counting rate have been studied at different temperatures. Long-term operation has also been studied at T = 45 degree C and 35 degree C, respectively, for high and low resistivity electrodes RPCs.

  14. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  15. HYFIRE: a tokamak/high-temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.P.; Benenati, R.; Varljen, T.C.; Chi, J.W.H.; Karbowski, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    The HYFIRE studies to date have investigated a number of technical approaches for using the thermal energy produced in a high-temperature Tokamak blanket to provide the electrical and thermal energy required to drive a high-temperature (> 1000 0 C) water electrolysis process. Current emphasis is on two design points, one consistent with electrolyzer peak inlet temperatures of 1400 0 C, which is an extrapolation of present experience, and one consistent with a peak electrolyzer temperature of 1100 0 C. This latter condition is based on current laboratory experience with high-temperature solid electrolyte fuel cells. Our major conclusion to date is that the technical integration of fusion and high-temperature electrolysis appears to be feasible and that overall hydrogen production efficiencies of 50 to 55% seem possible

  16. High temperature phase equilibria and phase diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Kuo, Chu-Kun; Yan, Dong-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    High temperature phase equilibria studies play an increasingly important role in materials science and engineering. It is especially significant in the research into the properties of the material and the ways in which they can be improved. This is achieved by observing equilibrium and by examining the phase relationships at high temperature. The study of high temperature phase diagrams of nonmetallic systems began in the early 1900s when silica and mineral systems containing silica were focussed upon. Since then technical ceramics emerged and more emphasis has been placed on high temperature

  17. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  18. Ion filter for high temperature cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutomi, Yasuhiro; Nakamori, Masaharu.

    1994-01-01

    A porous ceramic pipe mainly comprising alumina is used as a base pipe, and then crud and radioactive ion adsorbing materials in high temperature and high pressure water mainly comprising a FeTiO 3 compound are flame-coated on the outer surface thereof to a film thickness of about 100 to 300μ m as an aimed value by an acetylene flame-coating method. The flame-coated FeTiO 3 layer is also porous, so that high temperature and high pressure water to be cleaned can pass through from the inside to the outside of the pipe. Cruds can be removed and radioactive ions can be adsorbed during passage. Since all the operations can be conducted at high temperature and high pressure state, cooling is no more necessary for the high temperature and high pressure water to be cleaned, heat efficiency of the plant can be improved and a cooling facility can be saved. Further, since the flame-coating of FeTiO 3 to the porous ceramic pipe can be conducted extremely easily compared with production of a sintering product, cost for the production of filter elements can be saved remarkably. (T.M.)

  19. High temperature fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.; dePaz, J.F.; Gohar, M.Y.; Stevens, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Fusion energy may have unique advantages over other systems as a source for high temperature process heat. A conceptual design of a blanket for a 7 m tokamak reactor has been developed that is capable of producing 1100 0 C process heat at a pressure of approximately 10 atmospheres. The design is based on the use of a falling bed of MgO spheres as the high temperature heat transfer system. By preheating the spheres with energy taken from the low temperature tritium breeding part of the blanket, 1086 MW of energy can be generated at 1100 0 C from a system that produces 3000 MW of total energy while sustaining a tritium breeding ratio of 1.07. The tritium breeding is accomplished using Li 2 O modules both in front of (6 cm thick) and behind (50 cm thick) the high temperature ducts. Steam is used as the first wall and front tritium breeding module coolant while helium is used in the rear tritium breeding region. The system produces 600 MW of net electricity for use on the grid

  20. IGSCC growth behaviors of Alloy 690 in hydrogenated high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioka, K.; Yamada, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Terachi, T. [INSS, (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The rate of growth of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was measured for cold worked and thermally treated and solution treated Alloy 690 (UNS N06690, CW TT690, CW ST690) in hydrogenated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water under static load condition. Three important patterns were observed: First, Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was observed on both TT and ST690 even in static load condition if materials were heavily cold worked although the rate of SCC growth was much slower than that of CW mill annealed Alloy 600. Furthermore much rapid SCC growth was recognized in 20% CW TT690 than that of 20% CW ST690. This is quite different result in the literature in high temperature caustic solution. Second, in order to assess the role of creep, rates of creep crack growth were measured in air, argon, and hydrogen gas environments using 20% CW TT690, and 20% CW MA600 in the range of temperatures between 360 and 460 C; intergranular creep cracking (IG creep cracking) was observed on the test materials even in air. Similar slope of 1/T-type temperature dependencies on IGSCC and IG creep crack growth were observed on 20% CW TT690. Similar fracture morphologies and similar 1/T-type temperature dependencies suggest that creep is important in the growth of IGSCC of CW TT690 in high temperature water. Third, cavities and pores were observed at grain boundaries near tips of SCC and creep although the size of the cavities and pores of SCC were much smaller than that of creep cracks. Also the population and size of cavities seem to decrease with decreasing test temperature. These results suggest that the difference in the size and population of cavities might be related with the difference in crack growth rate. And the cavities seem to be formed result from collapse of vacancies at grain boundaries as the crack embryo. This result suggests that diffusion of condensation of vacancies in high stressed fields occurs in high temperature water and gas environments

  1. High temperature divertor plasma operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi.

    1991-02-01

    High temperature divertor plasma operation has been proposed, which is expected to enhance the core energy confinement and eliminates the heat removal problem. In this approach, the heat flux is guided through divertor channel to a remote area with a large target surface, resulting in low heat load on the target plate. This allows pumping of the particles escaping from the core and hence maintaining of the high divertor temperature, which is comparable to the core temperature. The energy confinement is then determined by the diffusion coefficient of the core plasma, which has been observed to be much lower than the thermal diffusivity. (author)

  2. High-Temperature Shape Memory Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Weiss, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    physical conformation changes when exposed to an external stimulus, such as a change in temperature. Such materials have a permanent shape, but can be reshaped above a critical temperature and fixed into a temporary shape when cooled under stress to below the critical temperature. When reheated above the critical temperature (Tc, also sometimes called the triggering or switching temperature), the materials revert to the permanent shape. The current innovation involves a chemically treated (sulfonated, carboxylated, phosphonated, or other polar function group), high-temperature, semicrystalline thermoplastic poly(ether ether ketone) (Tg .140 C, Tm = 340 C) mix containing organometallic complexes (Zn++, Li+, or other metal, ammonium, or phosphonium salts), or high-temperature ionic liquids (e.g. hexafluorosilicate salt with 1-propyl-3- methyl imidazolium, Tm = 210 C) to form a network where dipolar or ionic interactions between the polymer and the low-molecular-weight or inorganic compound forms a complex that provides a physical crosslink. Hereafter, these compounds will be referred to as "additives". The polymer is semicrystalline, and the high-melt-point crystals provide a temporary crosslink that acts as a permanent crosslink just so long as the melting temperature is not exceeded. In this example case, the melting point is .340 C, and the shape memory critical temperature is between 150 and 250 C. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic with a high Young fs modulus, nominally 3.6 GPa. An important aspect of the invention is the control of the PEEK functionalization (in this example, the sulfonation degree), and the thermal properties (i.e. melting point) of the additive, which determines the switching temperature. Because the compound is thermoplastic, it can be formed into the "permanent" shape by conventional plastics processing operations. In addition, the compound may be covalently cross - linked after forming the permanent shape by S-PEEK by applying ionizing

  3. High Temperature Operational Experiences of Helium Experimental Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Soo; Hong, Sung-Deok; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The development of high temperature components of VHTR is very important because of its higher operation temperature than that of a common light water reactor and high pressure industrial process. The development of high temperature components requires the large helium loop. Many countries have high temperature helium loops or a plan for its construction. Table 1 shows various international state-of-the-art of high temperature and high pressure gas loops. HELP performance test results show that there is no problem in operation of HELP at the very high temperature experimental condition. These experimental results also provide the basic information for very high temperature operation with bench-scale intermediate heat exchanger prototype in HELP. In the future, various heat exchanger tests will give us the experimental data for GAMMA+ validation about transient T/H behavior of the IHX prototype and the optimization of the working fluid in the intermediate loop

  4. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of organic crystal paracetamol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Spencer J.; Montgomery, Jeffrey M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) Raman spectroscopy studies have been performed on the organic crystal paracetamol in a diamond anvil cell utilizing boron-doped heating diamond anvil. Isobaric measurements were conducted at pressures up to 8.5 GPa and temperature up to 520 K in five different experiments. Solid state phase transitions from monoclinic Form I  →  orthorhombic Form II were observed at various pressures and temperatures as well as transitions from Form II  →  unknown Form IV. The melting temperature for paracetamol was observed to increase with increasing pressures to 8.5 GPa. This new data is combined with previous ambient temperature high-pressure Raman and x-ray diffraction data to create the first HPHT phase diagram of paracetamol.

  5. High-pressure high-temperature phase diagram of organic crystal paracetamol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Spencer J; Montgomery, Jeffrey M; Vohra, Yogesh K

    2016-01-01

    High-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) Raman spectroscopy studies have been performed on the organic crystal paracetamol in a diamond anvil cell utilizing boron-doped heating diamond anvil. Isobaric measurements were conducted at pressures up to 8.5 GPa and temperature up to 520 K in five different experiments. Solid state phase transitions from monoclinic Form I  →  orthorhombic Form II were observed at various pressures and temperatures as well as transitions from Form II  →  unknown Form IV. The melting temperature for paracetamol was observed to increase with increasing pressures to 8.5 GPa. This new data is combined with previous ambient temperature high-pressure Raman and x-ray diffraction data to create the first HPHT phase diagram of paracetamol. (paper)

  6. "Green" High-Temperature Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    PMR-15 is a processable, high-temperature polymer developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center in the 1970's principally for aeropropulsion applications. Use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in these applications can lead to substantial weight savings, thereby leading to improved fuel economy, increased passenger and payload capacity, and better maneuverability. PMR-15 is used fairly extensively in military and commercial aircraft engines components seeing service temperatures as high as 500 F (260 C), such as the outer bypass duct for the F-404 engine. The current world-wide market for PMR-15 materials (resins, adhesives, and composites) is on the order of $6 to 10 million annually.

  7. High temperature alloys and ceramic heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Masaharu

    1984-04-01

    From the standpoint of energy saving, the future operating temperatures of process heat and gas turbine plants will become higher. For this purpose, ceramics is the most promissing candidate material in strength for application to high-temperature heat exchangers. This report deals with a servey of characteristics of several high-temperature metallic materials and ceramics as temperature-resistant materials; including a servey of the state-of-the-art of ceramic heat exchanger technologies developed outside of Japan, and a study of their application to the intermediate heat exchanger of VHTR (a very-high-temperature gas-cooled reactor). (author)

  8. Photon CT scanning of advanced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems. Small size flaws (10 - 200 μm) and small nonuniformities in density distributions (0.1 -2%) present as long-range density gradients, are critical in most ceramics and their detection is of crucial importance. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging provides a means of obtaining a precise two-dimensional density map of a cross section through an object from which accurate information about small flaws and small density gradients can be obtained. With the use of high energy photon sources high contrast CT images can be obtained for both low and high density ceramics. In the present paper we illustrate the applicability of the photon CT technique to the examination of advanced ceramics. CT images of sintered alumina tiles are presented from which data on high-density inclusions, cracks and density gradients have been extracted

  9. Behaviors of SiC fibers at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, C.; Falanga, V.; Gelebart, L.

    2010-01-01

    On the one hand, considering the improvements of mechanical and thermal behaviours of the last generation of SiC fibers (Hi-Nicalon S, Tyranno SA3); on the other hand, regarding physical and chemical properties and stability under irradiation, SiC/SiC composites are potential candidates for nuclear applications in advanced fission and fusion reactors. CEA must characterize and optimize these composites before their uses in reactors. In order to study this material, CEA is developing a multi-scale approach by modelling from fibers to bulk composite specimen: fibres behaviours must be well known in first. Thus, CEA developed a specific tensile test device on single fibers at high temperature, named MecaSiC. Using this device, we have already characterized the thermoelastic and thermoelectric behaviours of SiC fibers. Additional results about the plastic properties at high temperatures were also obtained. Indeed, we performed tensile tests between 1200 degrees C up to 1700 degrees C to characterize this plastic behaviour. Some thermal annealing, up to 3 hours at 1700 degrees C, had been also performed. Furthermore, we compare the mechanical behaviours with the thermal evolution of the electric resistivity of these SiC fibers. Soon, MecaSiC will be coupled to a new charged particle accelerator. Thus, in this configuration, we will be able to study in-situ irradiation effects on fibre behaviours, as swelling or creep for example

  10. Status of the INL high-temperature electrolysis research program –experimental and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley; J. S. Herring; J. J. Hartvigsen

    2009-04-01

    This paper provides a status update on the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), with an overview of recent large-scale system modeling results and the status of the experimental program. System analysis results have been obtained using the commercial code UniSim, augmented with a custom high-temperature electrolyzer module. The process flow diagrams for the system simulations include an advanced nuclear reactor as a source of high-temperature process heat, a power cycle and a coupled steam electrolysis loop. Several reactor types and power cycles have been considered, over a range of reactor coolant outlet temperatures. In terms of experimental research, the INL has recently completed an Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) HTE test at the 15 kW level. The initial hydrogen production rate for the ILS test was in excess of 5000 liters per hour. Details of the ILS design and operation will be presented. Current small-scale experimental research is focused on improving the degradation characteristics of the electrolysis cells and stacks. Small-scale testing ranges from single cells to multiple-cell stacks. The INL is currently in the process of testing several state-of-the-art anode-supported cells and is working to broaden its relationship with industry in order to improve the long-term performance of the cells.

  11. Investigations on an advanced power system based on a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell and an organic Rankine cycle for heating and power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, Alessandra; Minutillo, Mariagiovanna; Jannelli, Elio

    2015-01-01

    Energy systems based on fuel cells technology can have a strategic role in the range of small-size power generation for the sustainable energy development. In order to enhance their performance, it is possible to recover the “waste heat” from the fuel cells, for producing or thermal power (cogeneration systems) or further electric power by means of a bottoming power cycle (combined systems). In this work an advanced system based on the integration between a HT-PEMFC (high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell) power unit and an ORC (organic Rankine cycle) plant, has been proposed and analysed as suitable energy power plant for supplying electric and thermal energies to a stand-alone residential utility. The system can operate both as cogeneration system, in which the electric and thermal loads are satisfied by the HT-PEMFC power unit and as electric generation system, in which the low temperature heat recovered from the fuel cells is used as energy source in the ORC plant for increasing the electric power production. A numerical model, able to characterize the behavior and to predict the performance of the HT-PEMFC/ORC system under different working conditions, has been developed by using the AspenPlus™ code. - Highlights: • The advanced plant can operate both as CHP system and as electric generation system. • The performance prediction of the integrated system is carried out by numerical modeling. • ORC thermodynamic optimization is carried out by a sensitivity analysis. • Thermal coupling between the HT-PEMC system and the ORC plant is analyzed. • Results are very promising in the field of the distributed generation

  12. High temperature superconductor accelerator magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nugteren, J.

    2016-01-01

    For future particle accelerators bending dipoles are considered with magnetic fields exceeding 20T. This can only be achieved using high temperature superconductors (HTS). These exhibit different properties from classical low temperature superconductors and still require significant research and

  13. Development of VHTR high temperature piping in KHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Takano, Shiro

    1981-01-01

    The high temperature pipings used for multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors are the internally insulated pipings for transporting high temperature, high pressure helium at 1000 deg C and 40 kgf/cm 2 , and the influences exerted by their performance as well as safety to the plants are very large. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., has engaged in the development of the high temperature pipings for VHTRs for years. In this report, the progress of the development, the test carried out recently and the problems for future are described. KHI manufactured and is constructing a heater and internally insulated helium pipings for the large, high temperature structure testing loop constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The design concept for the high temperature pipings is to separate the temperature boundary and the pressure boundary, therefore, the double walled construction with internal heat insulation was adopted. The requirements for the high temperature pipings are to prevent natural convection, to prevent bypass flow, to minimize radiation heat transfer and to reduce heat leak through insulator supporters. The heat insulator is composed of two layers, metal laminate insulator and fiber insulator of alumina-silica. The present state of development of the high temperature pipings for VHTRs is reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Mechanism of high-temperature resistant water-base mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, P

    1981-01-01

    Based on experiments, the causes and laws governing the changes in the performance of water-base mud under high temperature are analyzed, and the requisites and mechanism of treating agents resisting high temperature are discussed. Ways and means are sought for inhibiting, delaying and making use of the effect of high temperature on the performance of mud, while new ideas and systematic views have been expressed on the preparation of treating agents and set-up of a high temperature resistant water-base mud system. High temperature dispersion and high temperature surface inactivation of clay in the mud, as well as their effect and method of utilization are reviewed. Subjects also touched upon include degradation and cross-linking of the high-temperature resistant treating agents, their use and effect. Based on the above, the preparation of a water-base and system capable of resisting 180 to 250/sup 0/C is recommended.

  15. Hydrogen production by high-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam. Test results obtained with an electrolysis tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Ryutaro; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1995-01-01

    High-temperature electrolysis of water vapor steam is an advanced hydrogen production process decomposing high temperature steam up to 1,000degC, which applies an electro-chemical reaction reverse to the solid oxide fuel cell. At Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, laboratory-scale experiments have been conducted using a practical electrolysis tube with 12 electrolysis cells in order to develop heat utilization systems for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The electrolysis cells of which electrolyte was yttria-stabilized zirconia were formed on a porous ceramic tube in series by plasma spraying. In the experiments, water steam mixed with argon carrier gas was supplied into the electrolysis tube heated at a constant temperature regulated in the range from 850degC to 950degC, and electrolysis power was supplied by a DC power source. Hydrogen production rate increased with applied voltage and electrolysis temperature; the maximum production rate was 6.9Nl/h at 950degC. Hydrogen production rate was correlated with applied current densities on the basis of experimental data. High energy efficiency was achieved under the applied current density ranging from 80 to 100 mA/cm 2 . (author)

  16. CDSD-4000: High-resolution, high-temperature carbon dioxide spectroscopic databank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashkun, S.A.; Perevalov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    We present a high-resolution, high-temperature version of the Carbon Dioxide Spectroscopic Databank called CDSD-4000. The databank contains the line parameters (positions, intensities, air- and self-broadened half-widths, coefficients of temperature dependence of air- and self-broadened half-widths, and air-broadened pressure shifts) of the four most abundant isotopologues of CO 2 . A reference temperature is 296 K and an intensity cutoff is 10 -27 cm -1 /molecule cm -2 at 4000 K. The databank has 628,324,454 entries, covers the 226-8310 cm -1 spectral range and designed for the temperature range 2500-5000 K. Format of CDSD-4000 is similar to that of HITRAN-2008. The databank has been generated within the framework of the method of effective operators and based on the global fittings of spectroscopic parameters (parameters of the effective Hamiltonians and effective dipole moment operators) to observed data collected from the literature. The databank is useful for studying high-temperature radiative properties of CO 2 , including exoplanets atmospheres, aerothemal modeling for Mars entry missions, high-temperature laboratory spectra, and industrial applications. CDSD-4000 is freely accessible via the Internet site (ftp://ftp.iao.ru/pub/CDSD-4000).

  17. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  18. High-temperature superconducting conductors and cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.E.; Maley, M.P.; Boulaevskii, L.; Willis, J.O.; Coulter, J.Y.; Ullmann, J.L.; Cho, Jin; Fleshler, S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a 3-year LDRD project at LANL. High-temperature superconductivity (HTS) promises more efficient and powerful electrical devices such as motors, generators, and power transmission cables; however this depends on developing HTS conductors that sustain high current densities J c in high magnetic fields at temperatures near liq. N2's bp. Our early work concentrated on Cu oxides but at present, long wire and tape conductors can be best made from BSCCO compounds with high J c at low temperatures, but which are degraded severely at temperatures of interest. This problem is associated with thermally activated motion of magnetic flux lines in BSCCO. Reducing these dc losses at higher temperatures will require a high density of microscopic defects that will pin flux lines and inhibit their motion. Recently it was shown that optimum defects can be produced by small tracks formed by passage of energetic heavy ions. Such defects result when Bi is bombarded with high energy protons. The longer range of protons in matter suggests the possibility of application to tape conductors. AC losses are a major limitation in many applications of superconductivity such as power transmission. The improved pinning of flux lines reduces ac losses, but optimization also involves other factors. Measuring and characterizing these losses with respect to material parameters and conductor design is essential to successful development of ac devices

  19. Technology development for high temperature logging tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Coquat, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A set of prototype, high temperature logging tools (temperature, pressure and flow) were tested successfully to temperatures up to 275/sup 0/C in a Union geothermal well during November 1978 as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program. This program is being conducted by Sandia Laboratories for the Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy. The progress and plans of this industry based program to develop and apply the high temperature instrumentation technology needed to make reliable geothermal borehole measurements are described. Specifically, this program is upgrading existing sondes for improved high temperature performance, as well as applying new materials (elastomers, polymers, metals and ceramics) and developing component technology such as high temperature cables, cableheads and electronics to make borehole measurements such as formation temperature, flow rate, high resolution pressure and fracture mapping. In order to satisfy critical existing needs, the near term goal is for operation up to 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi by the end of FY80. The long term goal is for operation up to 350/sup 0/C and 20,000 psi by the end of FY84.

  20. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  1. Flux Pinning and AC Loss in Second Generation High Temperature Superconductor Wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York

    2007-01-01

    Major advances have been made in the last 18 years in high-temperature superconductor (HTS) reserach and development, resulting in increased use of HTS materials in commerical and pre-commercial electric-power applications. This new and important book addresses the issues related to flux pinning, AC losses and thick YBCO film growth. Written by top most scientists in the world, it presents the current status and issues related to YBCO coated conductors and the need for further fundamental materials science work in YBCO coated conductor. It will be a useful handbook for years to come.

  2. Dynamic High-Temperature Characterization of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High Strain Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Environment Simulation Dept.; Nelson, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials Dept.; Lipinski, Ronald J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Dept.; Bignell, John L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Structural and Thermal Analysis Dept.; Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program; George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 – 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750°C and 1030°C). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  3. High Temperature Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elder, Rachael; Cumming, Denis; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    High temperature electrolysis of carbon dioxide, or co-electrolysis of carbon dioxide and steam, has a great potential for carbon dioxide utilisation. A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC), operating between 500 and 900. °C, is used to reduce carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. If steam is also i...

  4. Metallurgical considerations in the design of creep exposed, high temperature components for advanced power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, F.

    1990-08-01

    Metallic components in advanced power generating plants are subjected to temperatures at which the material properties are significantly time-dependent, so that the creep properties become dominant for the design. In this investigation, methods by which such components are to be designed are given, taking into account metallurgical principles. Experimental structure mechanics testing of component related specimens carried out for representative loading conditions has confirmed the proposed methods. The determination of time-dependent design values is based on a scatterband evaluation of long-term testing data obtained for a number of different heats of a given alloy. The application of computer-based databank systems is recommendable. The description of the technically important secondary creep rate based on physical metallurgy principles can be obtained using the exponential relationship originally formulated by Norton, ε min = k.σ n . The deformation of tubes observed under internal pressure with a superimposed static or cyclic tensile stress and a torsion loading can be adequately described with the derived, three-dimensional creep equation (Norton). This is also true for the description of creep ratcheting and creep buckling phenomena. By superimposing a cyclic stress, the average creep rate is increased in one of the principal deformation axes. This is also true for the creep crack growth rate. The Norton equation can be used to derive this type of deformation behaviour. (orig.) [de

  5. High temperature and dynamic testing of AHSS for an analytical description of the adiabatic cutting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S.; Schmitz, F.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2017-03-01

    In the automotive industry, advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are widely used as sheet part components to reduce weight, even though this leads to several challenges. The demand for high-quality shear cutting surfaces that do not require reworking can be fulfilled by adiabatic shear cutting: High strain rates and local temperatures lead to the formation of adiabatic shear bands (ASB). While this process is well suited to produce AHSS parts with excellent cutting surface quality, a fundamental understanding of the process is still missing today. In this study, compression tests in a Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar with an initial strain rate of 1000 s-1 were performed in a temperature range between 200 °C and 1000 °C. The experimental results show that high strength steels with nearly the same mechanical properties at RT may possess a considerably different behavior at higher temperatures. The resulting microstructures after testing at different temperatures were analyzed by optical microscopy. The thermo-mechanical material behavior was then considered in an analytical model. To predict the local temperature increase that occurs during the adiabatic blanking process, experimentally determined flow curves were used. Furthermore, the influence of temperature evolution with respect to phase transformation is discussed. This study contributes to a more complete understanding of the relevant microstructural and thermo-mechanical mechanisms leading to the evolution of ASB during cutting of AHSS.

  6. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc [SBT, UMR-E CEA / UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, Grenoble, F-38054 (France); Daniel, Christophe [CNES, 18, avenue Edouard Belin, Toulouse, F-31401 (France)

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  7. High temperature mechanical properties of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D. G.; Munoz-Morris, M. A.

    2001-01-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the iron aluminide family of intermetallics over the past years since they offer considerable potential as engineering materials for intermediate to high temperature applications, particularly in cases where extreme oxidation or corrosion resistance is required. Despite efforts at alloy development, however, high temperature strength remains low and creep resistance poor. Reasons for the poor high-temperature strength of iron aluminides will be discussed, based on the ordered crystal structure, the dislocation structure found in the materials, and the mechanisms of dislocation pinning operating. Alternative ways of improving high temperature strength by microstructural modification and the inclusion of second phase particles will also be considered. (Author)

  8. Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Baliga, B Jayant

    2012-01-01

    Advanced High Voltage Power Device Concepts describes devices utilized in power transmission and distribution equipment, and for very high power motor control in electric trains and steel-mills. Since these devices must be capable of supporting more than 5000-volts in the blocking mode, this books covers operation of devices rated at 5,000-V, 10,000-V and 20,000-V. Advanced concepts (the MCT, the BRT, and the EST) that enable MOS-gated control of power thyristor structures are described and analyzed in detail. In addition, detailed analyses of the silicon IGBT, as well as the silicon carbide MOSFET and IGBT, are provided for comparison purposes. Throughout the book, analytical models are generated to give a better understanding of the physics of operation for all the structures. This book provides readers with: The first comprehensive treatment of high voltage (over 5000-volts) power devices suitable for the power distribution, traction, and motor-control markets;  Analytical formulations for all the device ...

  9. Contribution to high-temperature chromatography and high-temperature-gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aichholz, R.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes the use of high temperature gas chromatography for the investigation of unusual triacylglycerols, cyanolipids and bees waxes. The used glass capillary columns were pretreated and coated with tailor made synthesized high temperature stable polysiloxane phases. The selective separation properties of the individual columns were tested with a synthetic lipid mixture. Suitable derivatization procedures for the gaschromatographic analyses of neutral lipids, containing multiple bonds as well as hydroxy-, epoxy-, and carboxyl groups, were developed and optimized. Therefore conjugated olefinic-, conjugated olefinic-acetylenic-, hydroxy-, epoxy-, and conjugated olefinic keto triacylglycerols in miscellaneous plant seed oils as well as hydroxy monoesters, diesters and hydroxy diesters in bees waxes could be analysed directly with high temperature gas chromatography for the first time. In order to elucidate the structures of separated lipid compounds, high temperature gas chromatography was coupled to mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Comparable analytical systems are hitherto not commercial available. Therefore instrumental prerequisites for a comprehensive and detailed analysis of seed oils and bees waxes were established. In GC/MS commonly two ionization methods are used, electron impact ionization and chemical ionization. For the analysis of lipids the first is of limited use only. Due to intensive fragmentation only weak molecular ions are observed. In contrast, the chemical ionization yields in better results. Dominant quasi molecular ions enable an unambiguous determination of the molecular weight. Moreover, characteristic fragment ions provide important indications of certain structural features of the examined compounds. Nevertheless, in some cases the chromatographic resolution was insufficient in order to separate all compounds present in natural lipid mixtures. Owing to the selected detection with mass spectrometry

  10. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  11. Deformation of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.; Miller, D.J.; Chen, N.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; Jimenez-Melendo, M.; De Arellano-Lopez, A.R.

    1994-08-01

    Of the many families of high-temperature superconductors, only the properties of those discovered prior to 1989 - Y-Ba-Cu-O, Tl-Ba(Sr)-Ca-Cu-O, and Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O - have been studied extensively. Deformation tests have been performed on YBa 2 Cu 3 O x (Y-123), YBa 2 Cu 4 O x (Y-124), TlBa 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O x (Bi-2223). The tests have revealed that plasticity is generally limited in these compounds and that the rate-controlling diffusional kinetics for creep are very slow. Nevertheless, hot forming has proved to be quite successful for fabrication of bulk high-temperature superconductors, so long as deformation rates are low or large hydrostatic stresses are applied. Steady-state creep data have proved to be useful in designing optimal heat treatments for superconductors and in support of more-fundamental diffusion experiments. The high-temperature superconductors are highly complex oxides, and it is a challenge to understand their deformation responses. In this paper, results of interest and operant creep mechanisms will be reviewed

  12. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, B.; Kugel, H.W.; Goranson, P.; Kaita, R.

    1999-01-01

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed

  13. Screening of High Temperature Organic Materials for Future Stirling Convertors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Euy-sik E.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Along with major advancement of Stirling-based convertors, high temperature organics are needed to develop future higher temperature convertors for much improved efficiencies as well as to improve the margin of reliability for the current SOA (State-of-the-Art) convertors. The higher temperature capabilities would improve robustness of the convertors and also allow them to be used in additional missions, particularly ones that require a Venus flyby for a gravity assist. Various organic materials have been employed as essential components in the convertor for their unique properties and functions such as bonding, potting, sealing, thread locking, insulation, and lubrication. The Stirling convertor radioisotope generators have been developed for potential future space applications including Lunar/Mars surface power or a variety of spacecraft and vehicles, especially with a long mission cycle, sometimes up to 17 years, such as deep space exploration. Thus, performance, durability, and reliability of the organics should be critically evaluated in terms of every possible material structure-process-service environment relations based on the potential mission specifications. The initial efforts in screening the high temperature candidates focused on the most susceptible organics, such as adhesive, potting compound, O-ring, shrink tubing, and thread locker materials in conjunction with commercially available materials. More systematic and practical test methodologies that were developed and optimized based on the extensive organic evaluations and validations performed for various Stirling convertor types were employed to determine thermal stability, outgassing, and material compatibility of the selected organic candidates against their functional requirements. Processing and fabrication conditions and procedures were also optimized. This report presents results of the three-step candidate evaluation processes, their application limitations, and the final selection

  14. Physiological responses of growing pigs to high ambient temperature and/or inflammatory challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Reis Furtado Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Global warming is one of the major environmental threats facing the world in the 21st century. This fact will have a significant impact on pig production due to its direct effects on welfare, health, and performance of pigs. Besides, the effects of high temperatures will presumably become more important over the next decades due to the development of pig production in developing countries mainly located in tropical and subtropical areas, where animals are often exposed to ambient temperatures above their thermal comfort zone. Furthermore, pigs reared in tropical areas are often confronted to sanitary challenges including poor hygiene conditions, lack of respect for sanitary rules, and pathogens. This results in the stimulation of the immune system and, as a consequence, in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neuroendocrine adjustments that, in turn, usually have a negative impact on growth and feed efficiency. Although the effects of high ambient temperature and disease on pig physiology and performance have been well documented in literature, little is known about the associated effects of both factors. This understanding may contribute to a better quantification and comprehension of the physiological and metabolic disturbances occurring in practical conditions of pig production in tropical areas and, more generally, in many other geographic areas that will be influenced by the perspective of global warming. Therefore, the objective of this work is to provide an overview of recent research advances on the physiological responses of growing pigs during acclimation to high ambient temperature and on the potential effects of high ambient temperature on the ability of growing pigs to resist, cope with, or recover from an inflammatory challenge.

  15. On high temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Manabu; Kanero, Takahiro; Ihara, Yoshihito

    1977-01-01

    In the steels for high temperature use, the oxidation resistance is regarded as important, but carbon steels show enough oxidation resistance to be used continuously at the temperature up to 500 deg. C if the strength is left out of consideration, and up to 450 deg. C even when the strength is taken into account. Moreover, the production is easy, the workability and weldability are good, and the price is cheap in carbon steels as compared with alloy steels. In the boilers for large thermal power stations, 0.15-0.30% C steels are used for reheater tubes, main feed water tubes, steam headers, wall water tubes, economizer tubes, bypass pipings and others, and they account for 70% of all steel materials used for the boilers of 350 MW class and 30% in 1000 MW class. The JIS standard for the carbon steels for high temperature use and the related standards in foreign countries are shown. The high temperature strength of carbon steels changes according to the trace elements, melting and heat treatment as well as the main compositions of C, Si and Mn. Al and N affect the high temperature strength largely. The characteristics of carbon steels after the heating for hours, the factors controlling the microstructure and high temperature strength, and the measures to improve the high temperature strength of carbon steels are explained. (Kako, I.)

  16. IRPhE-DRAGON-DPR, OECD High Temperature Reactor Dragon Project, Primary Documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Description: The DRAGON Reactor Experiment (DRE): The first demonstration High temperature gas reactor (HTGR) was built in the 1960's. Thirteen OECD countries began a project in 1959 to build an experimental reactor known as Dragon at Winfrith in the UK. The reactor - which operated successfully between 1966 and 1975 - had a thermal output of 20 MW and achieved a gas outlet temperature of 750 deg. C. The High Temperature Reactor concept, if it justified its expectations, was seen as having its place as an advanced thermal reactor between the current thermal reactor types such as the PWR, BWR, and AGR and the sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. It was expected that the HTR would offer better thermal efficiency, better uranium utilisation, either with low enriched uranium fuel or high enriched uranium thorium fuel, better inherent safety and lower unit power costs. In the event all these potential advantages were demonstrated to be in principle achievable. This view is still shared today. In fact Very High Temperature Reactors is one of the concepts retained for Generation IV. Projects on constructing Modular Pebble Bed Reactors are under way. Here all available Dragon Project Reports (DPR) - approximately 1000 - are collected in electronic form. An index points to the reports (PDF format); each table in the report is accessible in EXCEL format with the aim of facilitating access to the data. These reports describe the design, experiments and modelling carried out over a period of 17 years. 2 - Related or auxiliary information: IRPHE-HTR-ARCH-01, Archive of HTR Primary Documents NEA-1728/01. 3 - Software requirements: Acrobat Reader, Microsoft Word, HTML Browser required

  17. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO 2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  18. Close-Spaced High Temperature Knudsen Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-15

    radiant heat source assembly was substituted for the brazed molybdenum one in order to achieve higher radiant heater temperatures . 2.1.4 Experimental...at very high temperature , and ground flat. The molybdenum is then chemically etched to the desired depth using an etchant which does not affect...RiB6 295 -CLSE PCED HIGH TEMPERATURE KNUDSEN FLOU(U) RASOR I AiASSOCIATES INC SUNNYVALE CA J 8 MCVEY 15 JUL 86 NSR-224 AFOSR-TR-87-1258 F49628-83-C

  19. Development of High Temperature/High Sensitivity Novel Chemical Resistive Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chunrui [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Enriquez, Erik [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Wang, Haibing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Xu, Xing [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Bao, Shangyong [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-08-13

    The research has been focused to design, fabricate, and develop high temperature/high sensitivity novel multifunctional chemical sensors for the selective detection of fossil energy gases used in power and fuel systems. By systematically studying the physical properties of the LnBaCo2O5+d (LBCO) [Ln=Pr or La] thin-films, a new concept chemical sensor based high temperature chemical resistant change has been developed for the application for the next generation highly efficient and near zero emission power generation technologies. We also discovered that the superfast chemical dynamic behavior and an ultrafast surface exchange kinetics in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films. Furthermore, our research indicates that hydrogen can superfast diffuse in the ordered oxygen vacancy structures in the highly epitaxial LBCO thin films, which suggest that the LBCO thin film not only can be an excellent candidate for the fabrication of high temperature ultra sensitive chemical sensors and control systems for power and fuel monitoring systems, but also can be an excellent candidate for the low temperature solid oxide fuel cell anode and cathode materials.

  20. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

  1. A review of basic phenomena and techniques for sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auciello, O. (Microelectronics Center of North Carolina, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA) North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ameen, M.S.; Kingon, A.I.; Lichtenwalner, D.J. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Krauss, A.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The processes involved in plasma and ion beam sputter-deposition of high temperature superconducting thin films are critically reviewed. Recent advances in the development of these techniques are discussed in relation to basic physical phenomena, specific to each technique, which must be understood before high quality films can be produced. Control of film composition is a major issue in sputter-deposition of multicomponent materials. Low temperature processing of films is a common goal for each technique, particularly in relation to integrating high temperature superconducting films with the current microelectronics technology. It has been understood for some time that for Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} deposition, the most intensely studied high-{Tc} compound, incorporation of sufficient oxygen into the film during deposition is necessary to produce as-deposited superconducting films at relatively substrate temperatures. Recent results have shown that with the use of suitable buffer layers, high quality Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} sputtered films can be obtained on Si substrates without the need for post-deposition anneal processing. This review is mainly focussed on issues related to sputter-deposition of Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin films, although representative results concerning the bismuth and thallium based compounds are included. 143 refs., 11 figs.

  2. High temperature and high pressure equation of state of gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Masanori

    2010-01-01

    High-temperature and high-pressure equation of state (EOS) of Au has been developed using measured data from shock compression up to 240 GPa, volume thermal expansion between 100 and 1300 K and 0 GPa, and temperature dependence of bulk modulus at 0 GPa from ultrasonic measurements. The lattice thermal pressures at high temperatures have been estimated based on the Mie-Grueneisen-Debye type treatment with the Vinet isothermal EOS. The contribution of electronic thermal pressure at high temperatures, which is relatively insignificant for Au, has also been included here. The optimized EOS parameters are K' 0T = 6.0 and q = 1.6 with fixed K 0T = 167 GPa, γ 0 = 2.97, and Θ 0 = 170 K from previous investigations. We propose the present EOS to be used as a reliable pressure standard for static experiments up to 3000K and 300 GPa.

  3. 1981 Annual status report. High-temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The high temperature materials programme is executed at the JRC, Petten Establishment and has for the 1980/83 programme period the objective to promote within the European Community the development of high temperature materials required for future energy technologies. A range of engineering studies is being carried out. A data bank storing factual data on alloys for high temperature applications is being developed and has reached the operational phase

  4. 1982 Annual status report: high-temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Voorde, M.

    1983-01-01

    The High Temperature Materials Programme is executed at the JRC, Petten Establishment and has for the 1980/83 programme period the objective to promote within the European Community the development of high temperature materials required for future energy technologies. Materials and engineering studies include: corrosion with or without load, mechanical properties under static or dynamic loads, surface protection creep of tubular components in corrosive environments and high temperature materials data bank

  5. High pressure study of high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souliou, Sofia-Michaela

    2014-09-29

    The current thesis studies experimentally the effect of high external pressure on high-T{sub c} superconductors. The structure and lattice dynamics of several members of the high-T{sub c} cuprate and Fe-based superconductors families were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction under well-controlled, hydrostatic high pressure and low temperature conditions. The lattice dynamics of the high-T{sub c} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} have been investigated systematically by Raman spectroscopy as a function of doping (x = 0.95, 0.75, 0.60, 0.55, and 0.45) and external pressure. Under ambient pressure conditions, in addition to the Raman modes expected from group theory, we observe new Raman active phonons upon cooling the underdoped samples, at temperatures well above the superconducting transition temperature. The doping dependence and the onset temperatures of the new Raman features suggest that they are associated with the incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) state recently discovered in underdoped cuprates using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques. Under high pressure conditions (from 2 to 12 GPa), our Raman measurements on highly ordered underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.55} samples do not show any of the new Raman phonons seen at ambient pressure. High pressure and low temperature Raman measurements have been performed on the underdoped superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}. A clear renormalization of some of the Raman phonons is seen below T{sub c} as a result of the changes in the phonon self-energy upon the opening of the superconducting gap, with the most prominent one being that of the B{sub 1g}-like buckling phonon mode. The amplitude of this renormalization strongly increases with pressure, resembling the effect of hole doping in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. At ∝ 10 GPa, the system undergoes a reversible pressure-induced structural phase transition to a non-centrosymmmetric structure (space group

  6. High pressure study of high-temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souliou, Sofia-Michaela

    2014-01-01

    The current thesis studies experimentally the effect of high external pressure on high-T c superconductors. The structure and lattice dynamics of several members of the high-T c cuprate and Fe-based superconductors families were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction under well-controlled, hydrostatic high pressure and low temperature conditions. The lattice dynamics of the high-T c superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x have been investigated systematically by Raman spectroscopy as a function of doping (x = 0.95, 0.75, 0.60, 0.55, and 0.45) and external pressure. Under ambient pressure conditions, in addition to the Raman modes expected from group theory, we observe new Raman active phonons upon cooling the underdoped samples, at temperatures well above the superconducting transition temperature. The doping dependence and the onset temperatures of the new Raman features suggest that they are associated with the incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) state recently discovered in underdoped cuprates using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques. Under high pressure conditions (from 2 to 12 GPa), our Raman measurements on highly ordered underdoped YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.55 samples do not show any of the new Raman phonons seen at ambient pressure. High pressure and low temperature Raman measurements have been performed on the underdoped superconductor YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 . A clear renormalization of some of the Raman phonons is seen below T c as a result of the changes in the phonon self-energy upon the opening of the superconducting gap, with the most prominent one being that of the B 1g -like buckling phonon mode. The amplitude of this renormalization strongly increases with pressure, resembling the effect of hole doping in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x . At ∝ 10 GPa, the system undergoes a reversible pressure-induced structural phase transition to a non-centrosymmmetric structure (space group Imm2). The structural transition is clearly reflected in the high pressure

  7. High Temperature Test Possibility at the HANARO Out-core Region through a Thermal Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young-Hwan; Choi, Myung-Hwan; Cho, Man-Soon; Choo, Kee-Nam; Kim, Bong-Goo

    2007-01-01

    The development of an advanced reactor system such as a next generation nuclear plant and other generation IV systems require new fuels, claddings, and structural materials. To characterize the performance of these new materials, it is necessary for us to have a leading-edge technology to satisfy the specific test requirements such as the conditions of high neutron exposures and high operating temperatures. Thus, nuclear data on HANARO's vertical test holes have been gathered and reviewed to evaluate the usability of the test holes located at the out-core zone of HANARO. In 2007, neutron flux levels of the concerned test holes and the gamma heat of the specimens and two different specimen holder materials of Al and Mo at the concerned test hole were obtained to enhance the utilization of the HANARO reactor and to develop new design concepts for high temperature irradiation tests. Based on the data, a series of thermal analyses was implemented to provide a reasonable demonstration and guidance on limitations or application

  8. Application of High Temperature Superconductors to Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2000-01-01

    Since the discovery of high temperature superconductivity, a large effort has been made by the scientific community to investigate this field towards a possible application of the new oxide superconductors to different devices like SMES, magnetic bearings, flywheels energy storage, magnetic shielding, transmission cables, fault current limiters, etc. However, all present day large scale applications using superconductivity in accelerator technology are based on conventional materials operating at liquid helium temperatures. Poor mechanical properties, low critical current density and sensitivity to the magnetic field at high temperature are the key parameters whose improvement is essential for a large scale application of high temperature superconductors to such devices. Current leads, used for transferring currents from the power converters, working at room temperature, into the liquid helium environment, where the magnets are operating, represent an immediate application of the emerging technology of high t...

  9. Advanced ceramic material for high temperature turbine tip seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, N. G.; Vogan, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic material systems are being considered for potential use as turbine blade tip gas path seals at temperatures up to 1370 1/4 C. Silicon carbide and silicon nitride structures were selected for study since an initial analysis of the problem gave these materials the greatest potential for development into a successful materials system. Segments of silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials over a range of densities, processed by various methods, a honeycomb structure of silicon nitride and ceramic blade tip inserts fabricated from both materials by hot pressing were tested singly and in combination. The evaluations included wear under simulated engine blade tip rub conditions, thermal stability, impact resistance, machinability, hot gas erosion and feasibility of fabrication into engine components. The silicon nitride honeycomb and low-density silicon carbide using a selected grain size distribution gave the most promising results as rub-tolerant shroud liners. Ceramic blade tip inserts made from hot-pressed silicon nitride gave excellent test results. Their behavior closely simulated metal tips. Wear was similar to that of metals but reduced by a factor of six.

  10. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.; Ainsworth, R.A.

    1989-08-01

    The current program represents a joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the USA, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan, and the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) in the UK. The goal is to develop an interim high-temperature flaw assessment procedure for high-temperature reactor components. This is to be accomplished through exploratory experimental and analytical studies of high-temperature crack growth. The state-of-the-art assessment and the fracture mechanics database for both types 304 and 316 stainless steels, completed in 1988, serve as a foundation for the present work. Work in the three participating organizations is progressing roughly on schedule. Results to-date are presented in this document. Fundamental tests results are discussed in Section 2. Section 3 focuses on results of exploratory subcritical crack growth tests. Progress in subcritical crack growth modeling is reported in Section 4. Exploratory failure tests are outlined in Section 5. 21 refs., 70 figs., 7 tabs

  11. The MWCNTs-Rh Nanocomposite Obtained By The New High-Temperature Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz A.D.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A nanocomposite was fabricated during the research undertaken, consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with rhodium nanoparticles by the new high-temperature method being the subject of the patent claim. High quality multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with the length of 100÷500 nm and the diameter of 8÷20 nm obtained in advance with Catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD were employed in the investigations. The nanotubes manufactured under the own research contain small amounts of metallic impurities and amorphous carbon deposits. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalisation in acids was applied to deposit rhodium nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, and then the material was placed in a solution being a precursor of rhodium nanoparticles. The material prepared was next placed in a quartz vessel and subjected to high-temperature reduction in the atmosphere of argon to deposit rhodium nanoparticles onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The following examinations were performed, respectively: MWCNTs fabrication, fabrication of a CNT-NPs (Carbon NanoTube-NanoParticles nanocomposite material; the characterisation of the materials produced including examination of the structure and morphology, and the assessment of rhodium nanoparticles distribution on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Micro- and spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterise the structure of the nanocomposites obtained.

  12. Numerical method for analysis of temperature rises and thermal stresses around high level radioactive waste repository in granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    The disposal of high-level radioactive waste should result in temperature rises and thermal stresses which change the hydraulic conductivity of the rock around the repository. For safety analysis on disposal of high-level radioactive waste into hard rock, it is necessary to find the temperature rises and thermal stresses distributions around the repository. In this paper, these distribution changes are analyzed by the use of the finite difference method. In advance of numerical analysis, it is required to simplify the shapes and properties of the repository and the rock. Several kinds of numerical models are prepared, and the results of this analysis are examined. And, the waste disposal methods are discussed from the stand-points of the temperature rise and thermal stress analysis. (author)

  13. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  14. High temperature materials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    A lab facility for measuring elastic moduli up to 1700 C was constructed and delivered. It was shown that the ultrasonic method can be used to determine elastic constants of materials from room temperature to their melting points. The ease in coupling high frequency acoustic energy is still a difficult task. Even now, new coupling materials and higher power ultrasonic pulsers are being suggested. The surface was only scratched in terms of showing the full capabilities of either technique used, especially since there is such a large learning curve in developing proper methodologies to take measurements into the high temperature region. The laser acoustic system does not seem to have sufficient precision at this time to replace the normal buffer rod methodology.

  15. High transition temperature superconducting integrated circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiIorio, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and fabrication of the first superconducting integrated circuit capable of operating at over 10K. The primary component of the circuit is a dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) which is extremely sensitive to magnetic fields. The dc SQUID consists of two superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson microbridges that are fabricated using a novel step-edge process which permits the use of high transition temperature superconductors. By utilizing electron-beam lithography in conjunction with ion-beam etching, very small microbridges can be produced. Such microbridges lead to high performance dc SQUIDs with products of the critical current and normal resistance reaching 1 mV at 4.2 K. These SQUIDs have been extensively characterized, and exhibit excellent electrical characteristics over a wide temperature range. In order to couple electrical signals into the SQUID in a practical fashion, a planar input coil was integrated for efficient coupling. A process was developed to incorporate the technologically important high transition temperature superconducting materials, Nb-Sn and Nb-Ge, using integrated circuit techniques. The primary obstacles were presented by the metallurgical idiosyncrasies of the various materials, such as the need to deposit the superconductors at elevated temperatures, 800-900 0 C, in order to achieve a high transition temperature

  16. MOTHER MK II: An advanced direct cycle high temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.; Kendall, J.M.; Marsden, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    The MOTHER (MOdular Thermal HElium Reactor) power plant concepts employ high temperature gas reactors utilizing TRISO fuel, graphite moderator, and helium coolant, in combination with a direct Brayton cycle for electricity generation. The helium coolant from the reactor vessel passes through a Power Conversion Unit (PCU), which includes a turbine-generator, recuperator, precooler, intercooler and turbine-compressors, before being returned to the reactor vessel. The PCU substitutes for the reactor coolant system pumps and steam generators and most of the Balance Of Plant (BOP), including the steam turbines and condensers, employed by conventional nuclear power plants utilizing water cooled reactors. This provides a compact, efficient, and relatively simple plant configuration. The MOTHER MK I conceptual design, completed in the 1987 - 1989 time frame, was developed to economically meet the energy demands for extracting and processing heavy oil from the tar sands of western Canada. However, considerable effort was made to maximize the market potential beyond this application. Consistent with the remote and very high labour rate environment in the tar sands region, simplification of maintenance procedures and facilitation of 'change-out' in lieu of in situ repair was a design focus. MOTHER MK I had a thermal output of 288 MW and produced 120 MW electrical when operated in the electricity only production mode. An annular Prismatic reactor core was utilized, largely to minimize day-to-day operations activities. Key features of the power conversion system included two Power Conversion Units (144 MW th each), the horizontal orientation of all rotating machinery and major heat exchangers axes, high speed rotating machinery (17,030 rpm for the turbine-compressors and 10,200 rpm for the power turbine-generator), gas (helium) bearings for all rotating machinery, and solid state frequency conversion from 170 cps (at full power) to the grid frequency. Recognizing that the on

  17. High temperature corrosion in gasifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakker Wate

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several commercial scale coal gasification combined cycle power plants have been built and successfully operated during the last 5-10 years. Supporting research on materials of construction has been carried out for the last 20 years by EPRI and others. Emphasis was on metallic alloys for heat exchangers and other components in contact with hot corrosive gases at high temperatures. In this paper major high temperature corrosion mechanisms, materials performance in presently operating gasifiers and future research needs will be discussed.

  18. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis; Mangal, Rahul; Agrawal, Akanksha; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-01-01

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  19. A highly reversible room-temperature lithium metal battery based on crosslinked hairy nanoparticles.

    KAUST Repository

    Choudhury, Snehashis

    2015-12-04

    Rough electrodeposition, uncontrolled parasitic side-reactions with electrolytes and dendrite-induced short-circuits have hindered development of advanced energy storage technologies based on metallic lithium, sodium and aluminium electrodes. Solid polymer electrolytes and nanoparticle-polymer composites have shown promise as candidates to suppress lithium dendrite growth, but the challenge of simultaneously maintaining high mechanical strength and high ionic conductivity at room temperature has so far been unmet in these materials. Here we report a facile and scalable method of fabricating tough, freestanding membranes that combine the best attributes of solid polymers, nanocomposites and gel-polymer electrolytes. Hairy nanoparticles are employed as multifunctional nodes for polymer crosslinking, which produces mechanically robust membranes that are exceptionally effective in inhibiting dendrite growth in a lithium metal battery. The membranes are also reported to enable stable cycling of lithium batteries paired with conventional intercalating cathodes. Our findings appear to provide an important step towards room-temperature dendrite-free batteries.

  20. HYFIRE: fusion-high temperature electrolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.D.; Horn, F.; Isaacs, H.; Lazareth, O.; Makowitz, H.; Usher, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is carrying out a comprehensive conceptual design study called HYFIRE of a commercial fusion Tokamak reactor, high-temperature electrolysis system. The study is placing particular emphasis on the adaptability of the STARFIRE power reactor to a synfuel application. The HYFIRE blanket must perform three functions: (a) provide high-temperature (approx. 1400 0 C) process steam at moderate pressures (in the range of 10 to 30 atm) to the high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) units; (b) provide high-temperature (approx. 700 to 800 0 C) heat to a thermal power cycle for generation of electricity to the HTE units; and (c) breed enough tritium to sustain the D-T fuel cycle. In addition to thermal energy for the decomposition of steam into its constitutents, H 2 and O 2 , electrical input is required. Power cycle efficiencies of approx. 40% require He cooling for steam superheat. Fourteen hundred degree steam coupled with 40% power cycle efficiency results in a process efficiency (conversion of fusion energy to hydrogen chemical energy) of 50%

  1. High temperature structural sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Christos G.

    High strength composites are being used for making lightweight structural panels that are being employed in aerospace, naval and automotive structures. Recently, there is renewed interest in use of these panels. The major problem of most commercial available sandwich panels is the fire resistance. A recently developed inorganic matrix is investigated for use in cases where fire and high temperature resistance are necessary. The focus of this dissertation is the development of a fireproof composite structural system. Sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices have an excellent potential for use in applications where exposure to high temperatures or fire is a concern. Commercial available sandwich panels will soften and lose nearly all of their compressive strength temperatures lower than 400°C. This dissertation consists of the state of the art, the experimental investigation and the analytical modeling. The state of the art covers the performance of existing high temperature composites, sandwich panels and reinforced concrete beams strengthened with Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP). The experimental part consists of four major components: (i) Development of a fireproof syntactic foam with maximum specific strength, (ii) Development of a lightweight syntactic foam based on polystyrene spheres, (iii) Development of the composite system for the skins. The variables are the skin thickness, modulus of elasticity of skin and high temperature resistance, and (iv) Experimental evaluation of the flexural behavior of sandwich panels. Analytical modeling consists of a model for the flexural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels, and a model for deflection calculations of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP subjected to fatigue loading. The experimental and analytical results show that sandwich panels made with polysialate matrices and ceramic spheres do not lose their load bearing capability during severe fire exposure, where temperatures reach several

  2. A novel SOI pressure sensor for high temperature application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Sainan; Liang Ting; Wang Wei; Hong Yingping; Zheng Tingli; Xiong Jijun

    2015-01-01

    The silicon on insulator (SOI) high temperature pressure sensor is a novel pressure sensor with high-performance and high-quality. A structure of a SOI high-temperature pressure sensor is presented in this paper. The key factors including doping concentration and power are analyzed. The process of the sensor is designed with the critical process parameters set appropriately. The test result at room temperature and high temperature shows that nonlinear error below is 0.1%, and hysteresis is less than 0.5%. High temperature measuring results show that the sensor can be used for from room temperature to 350 °C in harsh environments. It offers a reference for the development of high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. (semiconductor devices)

  3. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE POLYMER FUEL CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Oluf; Qingfeng, Li; He, Ronghuan

    2003-01-01

    This paper will report recent results from our group on polymer fuel cells (PEMFC) based on the temperature resistant polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI), which allow working temperatures up to 200°C. The membrane has a water drag number near zero and need no water management at all. The high working...

  5. Issues of high-burnup fuel for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belac, J.; Milisdoerfer, L.

    2004-12-01

    A brief description is given of nuclear fuels for Generation III+ and IV reactors, and the major steps needed for a successful implementation of new fuels in prospective types of newly designed power reactors are outlined. The following reactor types are discussed: gas cooled fast reactors, heavy metal (lead) cooled fast reactors, molten salt cooled reactors, sodium cooled fast reactors, supercritical water cooled reactors, and very high temperature reactors. The following are regarded as priority areas for future investigations: (i) spent fuel radiotoxicity; (ii) proliferation volatility; (iii) neutron physics characteristics and inherent safety element assessment; technical and economic analysis of the manufacture of advanced fuels; technical and economic analysis of the fuel cycle back end, possibilities of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, storage and disposal. In parallel, work should be done on the validation and verification of analytical tools using existing and/or newly acquired experimental data. (P.A.)

  6. Potentialities of high temperature reactors (HTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hittner, D.

    2001-01-01

    This articles reviews the assets of high temperature reactors concerning the amount of radioactive wastes produced. 2 factors favors HTR-type reactors: high thermal efficiency and high burn-ups. The high thermal efficiency is due to the high temperature of the coolant, in the case of the GT-MHR project (a cooperation between General Atomic, Minatom, Framatome, and Fuji Electric) designed to burn Russian military plutonium, the expected yield will be 47% with an outlet helium temperature of 850 Celsius degrees. The high temperature of the coolant favors a lot of uses of the heat generated by the reactor: urban heating, chemical processes, or desalination of sea water.The use of a HTR-type reactor in a co-generating way can value up to 90% of the energy produced. The high burn-up is due to the technology of HTR-type fuel that is based on encapsulation of fuel balls with heat-resisting materials. The nuclear fuel of Fort-Saint-Vrain unit (Usa) has reached values of burn-ups from 100.000 to 120.000 MWj/t. It is shown that the quantity of unloaded spent fuel can be divided by 4 for the same amount of electricity produced, in the case of the GT-MHR project in comparison with a light water reactor. (A.C.)

  7. ASD-1000: High-resolution, high-temperature acetylene spectroscopic databank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyulin, O. M.; Perevalov, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    We present a high-resolution, high-temperature version of the Acetylene Spectroscopic Databank called ASD-1000. The databank contains the line parameters (position, intensity, Einstein coefficient for spontaneous emission, term value of the lower states, self- and air-broadening coefficients, temperature dependence exponents of the self- and air-broadening coefficients) of the principal isotopologue of C2H2. The reference temperature for line intensity is 296 K and the intensity cutoff is 10-27 cm-1/(molecule cm-2) at 1000 K. The databank has 33,890,981 entries and covers the 3-10,000 cm-1 spectral range. The databank is based on the global modeling of the line positions and intensities performed within the framework of the method of effective operators. The parameters of the effective Hamiltonian and the effective dipole moment operator have been fitted to the observed values of the line positions and intensities collected from the literature. The broadening coefficients as well as their temperature dependence exponents were calculated using the empirical equations. The databank is useful for studying high-temperature radiative properties of C2H2. ASD-1000 is freely accessible via the Internet site of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS ftp://ftp.iao.ru/pub/ASD1000/.

  8. Programmes and projects for high-temperature reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, Edgar; Hittner, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    An increasing attention has to be recognised worldwide on the development of High-Temperature Reactors (HTR) which has started in Germany and other countries in the 1970ies. While pebble bed reactors with spherical fuel elements have been developed and constructed in Germany, countries such as France, the US and Russia investigated HTR concepts with prismatic block-type fuel elements. The concept of a modular HTR formerly developed by Areva NP was an essential basis for the HTR-10 in China. A pebble bed HTR for electricity production is developed in South Africa. The construction is planned after the completion of the licensing procedure. Also the US is planning an HTR under the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) Project. Due to the high temperature level of the helium coolant, the HTR can be used not only for electricity production but also for supply of process heat. Including its inherent safety features the HTR is an attractive candidate for heat supply to various types of plants e.g. for hydrogen production or coal liquefactions. The conceptual design of an HTR with prismatic fuel elements for the cogeneration of electricity and process heat has been developed by Areva NP. On the European scale the HTR development is promoted by the RAPHAEL (ReActor for Process heat, Hydrogen And ELectricity generation) project. RAPHAEL is an Integrated Project of the Euratom 6th Framework Programme for the development of technologies towards a Very High-Temperature Reactor (VHTR) for the production of electricity and heat. It is financed jointly by the European Commission and the partners of the HTR Technology Network (HTR-TN) and coordinated by Areva NP. The RAPHAEL project not only promotes HTR development but also the cooperation with other European projects such as the material programme EXTREMAT. Furthermore HTR technology is investigated in the frame of Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The development of a VHTR with helium temperatures above 900 C for the

  9. High-Temperature Lead-Free Solder Alternatives: Possibilities and Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    High-temperature solders have been widely used as joining materials to provide stable interconnections that resist a severe thermal environment and also to facilitate the drive for miniaturization. High-lead containing solders have been commonly used as high-temperature solders. The development...... of high-temperature lead-free solders has become an important issue for both the electronics and automobile industries because of the health and environmental concerns associated with lead usage. Unfortunately, limited choices are available as high-temperature lead-free solders. This work outlines...... the criteria for the evaluation of a new high-temperature lead-free solder material. A list of potential ternary high-temperature lead-free solder alternatives based on the Au-Sn and Au-Ge systems is proposed. Furthermore, a comprehensive comparison of the high-temperature stability of microstructures...

  10. Advances in highly doped upconversion nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shihui; Zhou, Jiajia; Zheng, Kezhi; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Liu, Xiaogang; Jin, Dayong

    2018-06-20

    Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are capable of converting near-infra-red excitation into visible and ultraviolet emission. Their unique optical properties have advanced a broad range of applications, such as fluorescent microscopy, deep-tissue bioimaging, nanomedicine, optogenetics, security labelling and volumetric display. However, the constraint of concentration quenching on upconversion luminescence has hampered the nanoscience community to develop bright UCNPs with a large number of dopants. This review surveys recent advances in developing highly doped UCNPs, highlights the strategies that bypass the concentration quenching effect, and discusses new optical properties as well as emerging applications enabled by these nanoparticles.

  11. Survey of high-temperature nuclear heat application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, N.; Schaefer, M.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear heat application at high temperatures can be divided into two areas - use of high-temperature steam up to 550 deg. C and use of high-temperature helium up to about 950 deg. C. Techniques of high-temperature steam and heat production and application are being developed in several IAEA Member States. In all these countries the use of steam for other than electricity production is still in a project definition phase. Plans are being discussed about using steam in chemical industries, oil refineries and for new synfuel producing plants. The use of nuclear generated steam for oil recovery from sands and shale is also being considered. High-temperature nuclear process heat production gives new possibilities for the application of nuclear energy - hard coals, lignites, heavy oils, fuels with problems concerning transport, handling and pollution can be converted into gaseous or liquid energy carriers with no loss of their energy contents. The main methods for this conversion are hydrogasification with hydrogen generated by nuclear heated steam reformers and steam gasification. These techniques will allow countries with large coal resources to replace an important part of their natural gas and oil consumption. Even countries with no fossil fuels can benefit from high-temperature nuclear heat - hydrogen production by thermochemical water splitting, nuclear steel making, ammonia production and the chemical heat-pipe system are examples in this direction. (author)

  12. Hardness of high-pressure high-temperature treated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Nojima, Y.; Yokomae, T.; Okino, F.; Touhara, H.

    2007-01-01

    We have performed high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) treatments of high quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) over a wide pressure-temperature range up to 13 GPa-873 K and have investigated the hardness of the HPHT-treated SWCNTs using a nanoindentation technique. It was found that the hardness of the SWCNTs treated at pressures greater than 11 GPa and at temperatures higher than 773 K is about 10 times greater than that of the SWCNTs treated at low temperature. It was also found that the hardness change of the SWCNTs is related to the structural change by the HPHT treatments which was based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements

  13. High temperature resistant cermet and ceramic compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Cermet compositions having high temperature oxidation resistance, high hardness and high abrasion and wear resistance, and particularly adapted for production of high temperature resistant cermet insulator bodies are presented. The compositions are comprised of a sintered body of particles of a high temperature resistant metal or metal alloy, preferably molybdenum or tungsten particles, dispersed in and bonded to a solid solution formed of aluminum oxide and silicon nitride, and particularly a ternary solid solution formed of a mixture of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride. Also disclosed are novel ceramic compositions comprising a sintered solid solution of aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and aluminum nitride.

  14. Laser-Machined Microcavities for Simultaneous Measurement of High-Temperature and High-Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengling Ran

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ~0.0779 nm/°C and ~1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ~32.3 nm/°C and ~24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions.

  15. Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Zengling; Liu, Shan; Liu, Qin; Huang, Ya; Bao, Haihong; Wang, Yanjun; Luo, Shucheng; Yang, Huiqin; Rao, Yunjiang

    2014-08-07

    Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ~0.0779 nm/°C and ~1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ~32.3 nm/°C and ~24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions.

  16. Development of high temperature turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kitao; Nouse, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Toyoaki; Minoda, Mitsuhiro; Matsusue, Katsutoshi; Yanagi, Ryoji

    1988-07-01

    For the contribution to the development of FJR710, high by-pass ratio turbofan engine, with the study for many years of the development of high efficiency turbine for the jet engine, the first technical prize from the Energy Resource Research Committee was awarded in April, 1988. This report introduced its technical contents. In order to improve the thermal efficiency and enlarge the output, it is very effective to raise the gas temperature at the inlet of gas turbine. For its purpose, by cooling the nozzle and moving blades and having those blades operate at lower temperature than that of the working limitation, they realized, for the first time in Japan, the technique of cooling turbine to heighten the operational gas temperature. By that technique, it was enabled to raise the gas temperature at the inlet of turbine, to 1,350/sup 0/C from 850/sup 0/C. This report explain many important points of study covering the basic test, visualizing flow experiment, material discussion and structural design in the process of development. (9 figs)

  17. Thermally Stable and Electrically Conductive, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Infiltrated Composite Structures for High-Temperature Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qi Ming; Deng, Lei Min; Li, Da Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Fan, Li Sha; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2017-10-25

    Traditional ceramic-based, high-temperature electrode materials (e.g., lanthanum chromate) are severely limited due to their conditional electrical conductivity and poor stability under harsh circumstances. Advanced composite structures based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) and high-temperature ceramics are expected to address this grand challenge, in which ceramic serves as a shielding layer protecting the VACNTs from the oxidation and erosive environment, while the VACNTs work as a conductor. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate VACNT/ceramic composite structures due to the limited diffusion of ceramics inside the VACNT arrays. In this work, we report on the controllable fabrication of infiltrated (and noninfiltrated) VACNT/silicon composite structures via thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [and laser-assisted CVD]. In laser-assisted CVD, low-crystalline silicon (Si) was quickly deposited at the VACNT subsurfaces/surfaces followed by the formation of high-crystalline Si layers, thus resulting in noninfiltrated composite structures. Unlike laser-assisted CVD, thermal CVD activated the precursors inside and outside the VACNTs simultaneously, which realized uniform infiltrated VACNT/Si composite structures. The growth mechanisms for infiltrated and noninfiltrated VACNT/ceramic composites, which we attributed to the different temperature distributions and gas diffusion mechanism in VACNTs, were investigated. More importantly, the as-farbicated composite structures exhibited excellent multifunctional properties, such as excellent antioxidative ability (up to 1100 °C), high thermal stability (up to 1400 °C), good high velocity hot gas erosion resistance, and good electrical conductivity (∼8.95 Sm -1 at 823 K). The work presented here brings a simple, new approach to the fabrication of advanced composite structures for hot electrode applications.

  18. High temperature battery. Hochtemperaturbatterie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, M.

    1992-06-04

    To prevent heat losses of a high temperature battery, it is proposed to make the incoming current leads in the area of their penetration through the double-walled insulating housing as thermal throttle, particularly spiral ones.

  19. Large-break LOCA assessment for the highly advanced core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, F.J.; Nath, V.I.; Hau, K.F.; Dam, R.F.; Vecchiarelli, J.

    1997-01-01

    Over the course of the years, a conceptual highly advanced core (HAC) reactor has been designed for Japan Electric Power Development Company Limited (EPDC). The HAC reactor, which is capable of generating 1326 MW of electrical power, consists of 640 CANDU-type fuel channels with each fuel channel containing twelve 61-element fuel bundles. As part of the conceptual design study, the performance of the HAC reactor during a large loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) was assessed with the use of several computer codes. The SOPHT, CATHENA, ELOCA and ELESTRES computer codes were used to predict the thermalhydraulic behaviour of the circuit, thermalhydraulic behaviour of a single high-power channel, thermal-mechanical behaviour of the outer fuel elements contained in the high-powered channel and the steady-state fuel-element conditions respectively. The LOCAs that were analyzed include 100% reactor outlet header (ROH) break, and a survey of reactor inlet header (RIH) breaks ranging from 5% to 25%. The conceptual feasibility of the HAC design was evaluated against two criteria; namely, maximum sheath temperature less than 1200 deg C and AECL's 5% sheath straining criterion to assess failure by excessive straining. For the cases analyzed, the analysis predicted a maximum sheath temperature of 820 deg C and a maximum sheath strain of 1.5% (the maximum pressure-tube temperature was 515 deg C). Although the maximum element-burnup of the HAC design is extended beyond the CANDU 6 burnup, the maximum linear power of HAC (40 kW/m) is significantly lower than the maximum linear power of a CANDU 6 reactor (60 kW/m). The reduced element-power level in conjunction with internal design modification for the HAC design has resulted m significantly lower internal gas pressures under steady-state conditions, as compared with the CANDU 6 design. During a LOCA, the low linear powers and zero-void reactivity associated with the HAC design has increased the safety margin. In addition, the cases

  20. New temperature monitoring devices for high-temperature irradiation experiments in the high flux reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, M.; Futterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M. [European Commission Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fourrez, S. [THERMOCOAX SAS, BP 26, Planquivon, 61438 Flers Cedex (France); Morice, R. [Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75724 Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Within the European High Temperature Reactor Technology Network (HTR-TN) and related projects a number of HTR fuel irradiations are planned in the High Flux Reactor Petten (HFR), The Netherlands, with the objective to explore the potential of recently produced fuel for even higher temperature and burn-up. Irradiating fuel under defined conditions to extremely high burn-ups will provide a better understanding of fission product release and failure mechanisms if particle failure occurs. After an overview of the irradiation rigs used in the HFR, this paper sums up data collected from previous irradiation tests in terms of thermocouple data. Some research and development work for further improvement of thermocouples and other on-line instrumentation will be outlined. (authors)

  1. Primary and Secondary Lithium Batteries Capable of Operating at Low Temperatures for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Brandon, E. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Approach: (1) Develop advanced Li ]ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -60 to +60 C). Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (2) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (3) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  2. Development of advanced metallic coatings resistant to corrosion in high temperature industrial atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T.; Bender, R.; Rosado, C.; Schuetze, M. [DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Following the experimental results that {gamma}-TiAl is highly resistant in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres the development of Ti-Al-co-diffusion coatings produced in a single step pack cementation process was started. The appropriate diffusion powder compositions were selected using thermodynamical calculations. Different Al-Ti-, Al-Si- and Al-Ti-Si-diffusion coatings were successfully applied on austenitic steels as well as Ni-base materials and showed excellent behaviour in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres with high carbon contents (CH{sub 4} - 1% CO - 1% CO{sub 2} - 10% H{sub 2} - 7% H{sub 2}S) up to 700 deg. C, under metal dusting conditions (H{sub 2} - 25 CO - 2% H{sub 2}O and CO - 2.4% CO{sub 2} - 1% CH{sub 4} - 9.4% N{sub 2} - 23.4% H{sub 2} - 0.2% H{sub 2}O - 1 ppm H{sub 2}S-0.3 ppm HCl) at temperatures of 620 deg. C and 700 deg. C. The application of diffusion coatings on ferritic materials has to be modified due to the specific requirements on the mechanical properties which are affected by the heat treatment during the diffusion process. TiAl was also applied by the HVOF thermal spray method on ferritic steels. Due to similarity of the thermal expansion coefficients this substrate-coating system proved to be mechanically very stable also under thermal cycling conditions. (authors)

  3. Development of Safety Analysis Codes and Experimental Validation for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. Oh, PhD; Cliff Davis; Richard Moore

    2004-11-01

    The very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTGRs) are those concepts that have average coolant temperatures above 900 degrees C or operational fuel temperatures above 1250 degrees C. These concepts provide the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation and nuclear hydrogen generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperatures to support process heat applications, such as desalination and cogeneration, the VHTGR's higher temperatures are suitable for particular applications such as thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the high temperature operation can be detrimental to safety following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) initiated by pipe breaks caused by seismic or other events. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air from the containment will enter the core by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structures and fuel. The oxidation will release heat and accelerate the heatup of the reactor core. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has investigated this event for the past three years for the HTGR. However, the computer codes used, and in fact none of the world's computer codes, have been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably predict this event. New code development, improvement of the existing codes, and experimental validation are imperative to narrow the uncertaninty in the predictions of this type of accident. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration are to develop advanced computational methods for VHTGR safety analysis codes and to validate these computer codes.

  4. Spin Hall magnetoresistance at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Ken-ichi; Qiu, Zhiyong; Kikkawa, Takashi; Iguchi, Ryo; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in Pt/Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 (YIG) bilayer films has been investigated in a high temperature range from room temperature to near the Curie temperature of YIG. The experimental results show that the magnitude of the magnetoresistance ratio induced by the SMR monotonically decreases with increasing the temperature and almost disappears near the Curie temperature. We found that, near the Curie temperature, the temperature dependence of the SMR in the Pt/YIG film is steeper than that of a magnetization curve of the YIG; the critical exponent of the magnetoresistance ratio is estimated to be 0.9. This critical behavior of the SMR is attributed mainly to the temperature dependence of the spin-mixing conductance at the Pt/YIG interface

  5. High-pressure high-temperature experiments: Windows to the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santaria-Perez, D.

    2011-01-01

    From Earth compositional arguments suggested by indirect methods, such as the propagation of seismic waves, is possible to generate in the laboratory pressure and temperature conditions similar to those of the Earth or other planet interiors and to study how these conditions affect to a certain metal or mineral. These experiments are, therefore, windows to the Universe. The aim of this chapter is to illustrate the huge power of the experimental high-pressure high-temperature techniques and give a global overview of their application to different geophysical fields. Finally, we will introduce the MALTA Consolider Team, which gather most of the Spanish high-pressure community, and present their available high-pressure facilities. (Author) 28 refs.

  6. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  7. In Situ Observation of Gypsum-Anhydrite Transition at High Pressure and High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chuan-Jiang; ZHENG Hai-Fei

    2012-01-01

    An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC).The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 MPa.With increasing temperature,the anhydrite (CaSO4) phase precipitates at 250 320℃ in the pressure range of 1.0 1.5 GPa,indicating that under a saturated water condition,both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite.A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(GPa) =0.0068T - 0.7126 (250℃≤T≤320℃).Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber,showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is irreversible at high pressure and high temperature.%An in-situ Raman spectroscopic study of gypsum-anhydrite transition under a saturated water condition at high pressure and high temperature is performed using a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC). The experimental results show that gypsum dissolvs in water at ambient temperature and above 496 Mpa. With increasing temperature, the anhydrite (CaSO4) phase precipitates at 250-320℃ in the pressure range of 1.0-1.5 Gpa, indicating that under a saturated water condition, both stable conditions of pressure and temperature and high levels of Ca and SO4 ion concentrations in aqueous solution are essential for the formation of anhydrite. A linear relationship between the pressure and temperature for the precipitation of anhydrite is established as P(Gpa) = 0.0068T - 0.7126 (250℃≤T≤320℃). Anhydrite remained stable during rapid cooling of the sample chamber, showing that the gypsum-anhydrite transition involving both dissolution and precipitation processes is

  8. HIGH-TEMPERATURE SAFETY TESTING OF IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Reber, Edward L.; Chrisensen, Cad L.

    2016-11-01

    High-Temperature Safety Testing of Irradiated AGR-1 TRISO Fuel John D. Stempien, Paul A. Demkowicz, Edward L. Reber, and Cad L. Christensen Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA Corresponding Author: john.stempien@inl.gov, +1-208-526-8410 Two new safety tests of irradiated tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel have been completed in the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). In the first test, three fuel compacts from the first Advanced Gas Reactor irradiation experiment (AGR-1) were simultaneously heated in the FACS furnace. Prior to safety testing, each compact was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to a burnup of approximately 15 % fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), a fast fluence of 3×1025 n/m2 (E > 0.18 MeV), and a time-average volume-average (TAVA) irradiation temperature of about 1020 °C. In order to simulate a core-conduction cool-down event, a temperature-versus-time profile having a peak temperature of 1700 °C was programmed into the FACS furnace controllers. Gaseous fission products (i.e., Kr-85) were carried to the Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) by a helium sweep gas and captured in cold traps featuring online gamma counting. By the end of the test, a total of 3.9% of an average particle’s inventory of Kr-85 was detected in the FGMS traps. Such a low Kr-85 activity indicates that no TRISO failures (failure of all three TRISO layers) occurred during the test. If released from the compacts, condensable fission products (e.g., Ag-110m, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-154, Eu-155, and Sr-90) were collected on condensation plates fitted to the end of the cold finger in the FACS furnace. These condensation plates were then analyzed for fission products. In the second test, five loose UCO fuel kernels, obtained from deconsolidated particles from an irradiated AGR-1 compact, were heated in the FACS furnace to a peak temperature of 1600 °C. This test had two

  9. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions

  10. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  11. Microstructure and Mechanical Property of ODS Ferritic Steels Using Commercial Alloy Powders for High Temperature Service Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Choi, Byoung-Kwon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) is one of the promising ways to improve the mechanical property at high temperatures. This is mainly attributed to uniformly distributed nano-oxide particle with a high density, which is extremely stable at the high temperature and acts as effective obstacles when the dislocations are moving. In this study, as a preliminary examination to develop the advanced structural materials for high temperature service applications, ODS ferritic steels were fabricated using commercial alloy powders and their microstructural and mechanical properties were investigated. In this study, ODS ferritic steels were fabricated using commercial stainless steel 430L powder and their microstructures and mechanical properties were investigated. Morphology of micro-grains and oxide particles were significantly changed by the addition of minor alloying elements such as Ti, Zr, and Hf. The ODS ferritic steel with Zr and Hf additions showed ultra-fine grains with fine complex oxide particles. The oxide particles were uniformly located in grains and on the grain boundaries. This led to higher hardness than ODS ferritic steel with Ti addition.

  12. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)-A Brightness Temperature, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) for Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) brightness temperature in "window channels". The data cover a time period from...

  13. Effects of long-term high temperature exposure on the microstructure of Haynes alloy 230

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veverkova, J.; Strang, A.; Atkinson, H.V. [Leicester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering; Marchant, G.R. [Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Haynes Alloy 230 was specifically designed to have excellent long-term thermal stability and resistance to the precipitation of damaging phases. This paper describes in detail studies on the effects of long-term high temperature exposure on the hardness, microstructural changes and tensile properties of thermally exposed samples of Haynes Alloy 230. The samples from the 2mm thick sheet material have been investigated using X-Ray diffraction and advanced electron microscopy techniques (FEGSEM, TEM etc.). The evolution of the precipitating phases was monitored across a wide range of temperatures (from 500 C to 1170 C) and durations (from 24 hours up to 30000 hours) and several key phases have been identified. In addition to the primary W-rich carbide and the precipitation of Cr-rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, a new brittle phase/carbide was observed within the microstructure at the highest exposure temperatures (above 930 C). (orig.)

  14. IMPULSE---an advanced, high performance nuclear thermal propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrosky, L.J.; Disney, R.K.; Mangus, J.D.; Gunn, S.A.; Zweig, H.R.

    1993-01-01

    IMPULSE is an advanced nuclear propulsion engine for future space missions based on a novel conical fuel. Fuel assemblies are formed by stacking a series of truncated (U, Zr)C cones with non-fueled lips. Hydrogen flows radially inward between the cones to a central plenum connected to a high performance bell nozzle. The reference IMPULSE engine rated at 75,000 lb thrust and 1800 MWt weighs 1360 kg and is 3.65 meters in height and 81 cm in diameter. Specific impulse is estimated to be 1000 for a 15 minute life at full power. If longer life times are required, the operating temperature can be reduced with a concomitant decrease in specific impulse. Advantages of this concept include: well defined coolant paths without outlet flow restrictions; redundant orificing; very low thermal gradients and hence, thermal stresses, across the fuel elements; and reduced thermal stresses because of the truncated conical shape of the fuel elements

  15. High Temperature Strength of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clauer, A.H.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    constant (except for the material with the lowest oxide content). The high temperature values of the modulus-corrected yield stresses are approximately two-thirds of the low temperature value. During high temperature creep, there is a definite indication of a threshold stress. This threshold stress......The tensile flow stress of coarse-grained dispersion strengthened Al-Al2O3 materials were measured as a function of temperature (77–873 K) and volume fraction (0.19-0.92 vol.%) of aluminium oxide. For the same material, the creep strength was determined as a function of temperature in the range 573......–873 K. The modulus-corrected yield stress (0.01 offset) is found to be temperature independent at low temperature (195–472 K). Between 473 and 573 K, the yield stress starts to decrease with increasing temperature. At high temperatures (573–873 K), the modulus-corrected yield stress is approximately...

  16. High Temperature, Wireless Seismometer Sensor for Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Taylor, Brandt; Beard, Steve; Meredith, Roger D.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter Gary W.; Kiefer, Walter S.

    2012-01-01

    Space agency mission plans state the need to measure the seismic activity on Venus. Because of the high temperature on Venus (462? C average surface temperature) and the difficulty in placing and wiring multiple sensors using robots, a high temperature, wireless sensor using a wide bandgap semiconductor is an attractive option. This paper presents the description and proof of concept measurements of a high temperature, wireless seismometer sensor for Venus. A variation in inductance of a coil caused by the movement of an aluminum probe held in the coil and attached to a balanced leaf-spring seismometer causes a variation of 700 Hz in the transmitted signal from the oscillator/sensor system at 426? C. This result indicates that the concept may be used on Venus.

  17. High temperature superconductors and other superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, A S

    2017-01-01

    Written by eminent researchers in the field, this text describes the theory of superconductivity and superfluidity starting from liquid helium and a charged Bose-gas. It also discusses the modern bipolaron theory of strongly coupled superconductors, which explains the basic physical properties of high-temperature superconductors. This book will be of interest to fourth year graduate and postgraduate students, specialist libraries, information centres and chemists working in high-temperature superconductivity.

  18. ASTER-Derived High-Resolution Ice Surface Temperature for the Arctic Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sun Son

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ice surface temperature (IST controls the rate of sea ice growth and the heat exchange between the atmosphere and ocean. In this study, high-resolution IST using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER thermal infrared region (TIR images was retrieved to observe the thermal change of coastal sea ice. The regression coefficients of the multi-channel equation using ASTER brightness temperatures ( B T and MODIS ISTs were derived. MODIS IST products (MOD29 were used as an in situ temperature substitute. The ASTER IST using five channels from band 10 ( B T 10 to band 14 ( B T 14 showed an RMSE of 0.746 K for the validation images on the Alaskan coast. The uncertainty of the two-channel ( B T 13 and B T 14 ASTER IST was 0.497 K, which was better than that of the five-channel. We thus concluded that the two-channel equation using ASTER B T 13 and B T 14 was an optimal model for the surface temperature retrieval of coastal sea ice. The two-channel ASTER IST showed similar accuracy at higher latitudes than in Alaska. Therefore, ASTER-derived IST with 90 m spatial resolution can be used to observe small-scale thermal variations on the sea ice surface along the Arctic coast.

  19. Research on reactor physics using the Very High Temperature Reactor Critical Assembly (VHTRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1988-01-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), of which the research and development are advanced by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, is planned to apply for the permission of installation in fiscal year 1988, and to start the construction in the latter half of fisical year 1989. As the duty of reactor physics research, the accuracy of the nuclear data is to be confirmed, the validity of the nuclear design techniques is to be inspected, and the nuclear safety of the HTTR core design is to be verified. Therefore, by using the VHTRC, the experimental data of the reactor physics quantities are acquired, such as critical mass, the reactivity worth of simulated control rods and burnable poison rods, the temperature factor of reactivity, power distribution and so on, and the experiment and analysis are advanced. The cores built up in the VHTRC so far were three kinds having different lattice forms and degrees of uranium enrichment. The calculated critical mass was smaller by 1-5 % than the measured values. As to the power distribution and the reactivity worth of burnable poison rods, the prospect of satisfying the required accuracy for the design of the HTTR core was obtained. The experiment using a new core having axially different enrichment degree is planned. (K.I.)

  20. Effect of In-situ Cure on Measurement of Glass Transition Temperatures in High-temperature Thermosetting Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    TEMPERATURES IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMOSETTING POLYMERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...illustrated the difficulties inherent in measurement of the glass transition temperature of this high-temperature thermosetting polymer via dynamic...copyright protection in the United States. EFFECT OF IN-SITU CURE ON MEASUREMENT OF GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURES IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMOSETTING

  1. Timing of glacier advances and climate in the High Tatra Mountains (Western Carpathians) during the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makos, Michał; Dzierżek, Jan; Nitychoruk, Jerzy; Zreda, Marek

    2014-07-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), long valley glaciers developed on the northern and southern sides of the High Tatra Mountains, Poland and Slovakia. Chlorine-36 exposure dating of moraine boulders suggests two major phases of moraine stabilization, at 26-21 ka (LGM I - maximum) and at 18 ka (LGM II). The dates suggest a significantly earlier maximum advance on the southern side of the range. Reconstructing the geometry of four glaciers in the Sucha Woda, Pańszczyca, Mlynicka and Velicka valleys allowed determining their equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) at 1460, 1460, 1650 and 1700 m asl, respectively. Based on a positive degree-day model, the mass balance and climatic parameter anomaly (temperature and precipitation) has been constrained for LGM I advance. Modeling results indicate slightly different conditions between northern and southern slopes. The N-S ELA gradient finds confirmation in slightly higher temperature (at least 1 °C) or lower precipitation (15%) on the south-facing glaciers during LGM I. The precipitation distribution over the High Tatra Mountains indicates potentially different LGM atmospheric circulation than at the present day, with reduced northwesterly inflow and increased southerly and westerly inflows of moist air masses.

  2. High-Operating Temperature HgCdTe: A Vision for the Near Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.; Carmody, M.; Piquette, E.; Dreiske, P.; Chen, A.; Yulius, A.; Edwall, D.; Bhargava, S.; Zandian, M.; Tennant, W. E.

    2016-09-01

    We review recent advances in the HgCdTe material quality and detector performance achieved at Teledyne using molecular beam epitaxy growth and the double-layer planar hetero-junction (DLPH) detector architecture. By using an un-doped, fully depleted absorber, Teledyne's DLPH architecture can be extended for use in high operating temperatures and other applications. We assess the potential achievable performance for long wavelength infrared (LWIR) hetero-junction p-lightly-doped n or p-intrinsic- n (p-i-n) detectors based on recently reported results for 10.7 μm cutoff 1 K × 1 K focal plane arrays (FPAs) tested at temperatures down to 30 K. Variable temperature dark current measurements s