WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced heat recovery

  1. IEA Annex 26: Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, VAN

    2003-05-19

    With increased concern about the impact of refrigerant leakage on global warming, a number of new supermarket refrigeration system configurations requiring significantly less refrigerant charge are being considered. In order to help promote the development of advanced systems and expand the knowledge base for energy-efficient supermarket technology, the International Energy Agency (IEA) established IEA Annex 26 (Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems) under the ''IEA Implementing Agreement on Heat Pumping Technologies''. Annex 26 focuses on demonstrating and documenting the energy saving and environmental benefits of advanced systems design for food refrigeration and space heating and cooling for supermarkets. Advanced in this context means systems that use less energy, require less refrigerant and produce lower refrigerant emissions. Stated another way, the goal is to identify supermarket refrigeration and HVAC technology options that reduce the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of supermarkets by reducing both system energy use (increasing efficiency) and reducing total refrigerant charge. The Annex has five participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The working program of the Annex has involved analytical and experimental investigation of several candidate system design approaches to determine their potential to reduce refrigerant usage and energy consumption. Advanced refrigeration system types investigated include the following: distributed compressor systems--small parallel compressor racks are located in close proximity to the food display cases they serve thus significantly shortening the connecting refrigerant line lengths; secondary loop systems--one or more central chillers are used to refrigerate a secondary coolant (e.g. brine, ice slurry, or CO2) that is pumped to the food display cases on the sales floor; self-contained display cases--each food display case

  2. Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems. Country Report, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans-Jørgen Høgaard; Christensen, K. G.

    Annex 26 is the first international project under the IEA Heat Pump Programme that links refrigeration and heat pump technology. Recovering heat from advanced supermarket refrigeration systems for space and water heating seems obvious and is beneficial for owners and operators. Because the great...... number of supermarkets that offer frozen and chilled food and further growth of this sector may be expected, the amount of energy used for refrigeration is enormous and will likely increase in the near future. Annex 26 analysed several advanced supermarket refrigeration systems and came to remarkable...... provide valuable information for practitioners (designers, installers) and manufactures of supermarket refrigeration systems....

  3. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

    2009-01-06

    The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

  4. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the research is to provide databases and design criteria to assist in the selection of optimum alloys for construction of components needed to contain process streams in advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems. Typical components include: steam line piping and superheater tubing for low emission boilers (600 to 700{degrees}C), heat exchanger tubing for advanced steam cycles and topping cycle systems (650 to 800{degrees}C), foil materials for recuperators, on advanced turbine systems (700 to 750{degrees}C), and tubesheets for barrier filters, liners for piping, cyclones, and blowback system tubing for hot-gas cleanup systems (850 to 1000{degrees}C). The materials being examined fall into several classes, depending on which of the advanced heat recovery concepts is of concern. These classes include martensitic steels for service to 650{degrees}C, lean stainless steels and modified 25Cr-30Ni steels for service to 700{degrees}C, modified 25Cr-20Ni steels for service to 900{degrees}C, and high Ni-Cr-Fe or Ni-Cr-Co-Fe alloys for service to 1000{degrees}C.

  5. Advanced Energy and Water Recovery Technology from Low Grade Waste Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexin Wang

    2011-12-19

    The project has developed a nanoporous membrane based water vapor separation technology that can be used for recovering energy and water from low-temperature industrial waste gas streams with high moisture contents. This kind of exhaust stream is widely present in many industrial processes including the forest products and paper industry, food industry, chemical industry, cement industry, metal industry, and petroleum industry. The technology can recover not only the sensible heat but also high-purity water along with its considerable latent heat. Waste heats from such streams are considered very difficult to recover by conventional technology because of poor heat transfer performance of heat-exchanger type equipment at low temperature and moisture-related corrosion issues. During the one-year Concept Definition stage of the project, the goal was to prove the concept and technology in the laboratory and identify any issues that need to be addressed in future development of this technology. In this project, computational modeling and simulation have been conducted to investigate the performance of a nanoporous material based technology, transport membrane condenser (TMC), for waste heat and water recovery from low grade industrial flue gases. A series of theoretical and computational analyses have provided insight and support in advanced TMC design and experiments. Experimental study revealed condensation and convection through the porous membrane bundle was greatly improved over an impermeable tube bundle, because of the membrane capillary condensation mechanism and the continuous evacuation of the condensate film or droplets through the membrane pores. Convection Nusselt number in flue gas side for the porous membrane tube bundle is 50% to 80% higher than those for the impermeable stainless steel tube bundle. The condensation rates for the porous membrane tube bundle also increase 60% to 80%. Parametric study for the porous membrane tube bundle heat transfer

  6. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  7. Study on an advanced adsorption desalination cycle with evaporator–condenser heat recovery circuit

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on the efficacy of a silica gel-water based advanced adsorption desalination (AD) cycle with internal heat recovery between the condenser and the evaporator. A mathematical model of the AD cycle was developed and the performance data were compared with the experimental results. The advanced AD cycle is able to produce the specific daily water production (SDWP) of 9.24 m3/tonne of silica gel per day at 70 °C hot water inlet temperature while the corresponding performance ratio (PR) is comparatively high at 0.77. It is found that the cycle can be operational at 50 °C hot water temperature with SDWP 4.3. The SDWP of the advanced cycle is almost twice that of the conventional AD cycle. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Alloys for design and construction of structural components needed to contain process streams and provide internal structures in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems were examined. Emphasis was placed on high-strength, corrosion-resistant alloys for service at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}F (540{degrees}C). Data were collected that related to fabrication, joining, corrosion protection, and failure criteria. Alloys systems include modified type 310 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb steels and sulfidation-resistance alloys HR120 and HR160. Types of testing include creep, stress-rupture, creep crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for high temperature service, a modified type 310 stainless steel was developed with a target strength of twice that for standard type 310 stainless steel.

  9. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Ren, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, modified alloy 800, and two sulfidation resistant alloys: HR160 and HR120. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700{degrees}C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925{degrees}C with good weldability and ductility.

  10. Investigation of austenitic alloys for advanced heat recovery and hot-gas cleanup systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Materials properties were collected for the design and construction of structural components for use in advanced heat recovery and hot gas cleanup systems. Alloys systems included 9Cr-1Mo-V steel, modified 316 stainless steel, modified type 310 stainless steel, modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel, and modified alloy 800. Experimental work was undertaken to expand the databases for potentially useful alloys. Types of testing included creep, stress-rupture, creep-crack growth, fatigue, and post-exposure short-time tensile tests. Because of the interest in relatively inexpensive alloys for service at 700 C and higher, research emphasis was placed on a modified type 310 stainless steel and a modified 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steel. Both steels were found to have useful strength to 925 C with good weldability and ductility.

  11. Heat recovery apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transfer is a living science and technical advances are constantly being made. However, in many cases, progress is limited by the equipment that is available on the market, rather than by knowledge of the heat transfer process. A case in point is the design of economizers: in such equipment a small quantity of water (with a relatively good heat transfer coefficient) is heated by a large quantity of low-pressure gas (with an inherently low heat transfer coefficient). As a first step in design finned tubing is used to lessen the discrepancy in coefficients. From this point, it becomes apparent that the equipment consists of a small number of tubes (to maintain good velocity on the water side) of considerable length (to provide sufficient area). In the process industries the base pressure, though low, may be in the region of 0.5 bar, and there is no convenient flue in which to place the heat recovery coil. It is therefore contained in a flat-sided enclosure, which is ill-fitted to pressure containment and is therefore reinforced with a plethora of structural sections. Such inelegant construction is quite common in North America; in Europe, cylindrical containments of vast size have been supplied for the same purposes. The real shortcoming is a successful marriage of different disciplines to produce reliable and efficient heat transfer equipment suitably contained

  12. Performance investigation of advanced adsorption desalination cycle with condenser-evaporator heat recovery scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Thu, Kyaw

    2013-01-01

    Energy or heat recovery schemes are keys for the performance improvement of any heat-activated cycles such as the absorption and adsorption cycles. We present two innovative heat recovery schemes between the condensing and evaporating units of an adsorption desalination (AD) cycle. By recovering the latent heat of condenser and dumping it into the evaporative process of the evaporator, it elevates the evaporating temperature and hence the adsorption pressure seen by the adsorbent. From isotherms, this has an effect of increasing the vapour uptake. In the proposed configurations, one approach is simply to have a run-about water circuit between the condenser and the evaporator and a pump is used to achieve the water circulation. This run-around circuit is a practical method for retrofitting purposes. The second method is targeted towards a new AD cycle where an encapsulated condenser-evaporator unit is employed. The heat transfer between the condensing and evaporative vapour is almost immediate and the processes occur in a fully integrated vessel, thereby minimizing the heat transfer resistances of heat exchangers. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  13. A comparison of advanced heat recovery power cycles in a combined cycle for large ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Sigthorsson, Oskar; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    working fluids possess high global warming potentials and hazard levels. It is concluded that the ORC has the greatest potential for increasing the fuel efficiency, and the combined cycle offers very high thermal efficiency. While being less efficient, the steam cycle has the advantages of being well......Strong motivation exists within the marine sector to reduce fuel expenses and to comply with ever stricter emission regulations. Heat recovery can address both of these issues. The ORC (organic Rankine cycle), the Kalina cycle and the steam Rankine cycle have received the majority of the focus in...... the literature. In the present work we compare these cycles in a combined cycle application with a large marine two-stroke diesel engine. We present an evaluation of the efficiency and the environmental impact, safety concerns and practical aspects of each of the cycles. A previously validated...

  14. A comparison of advanced heat recovery power cycles in a combined cycle for large ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong motivation exists within the marine sector to reduce fuel expenses and to comply with ever stricter emission regulations. Heat recovery can address both of these issues. The ORC (organic Rankine cycle), the Kalina cycle and the steam Rankine cycle have received the majority of the focus in the literature. In the present work we compare these cycles in a combined cycle application with a large marine two-stroke diesel engine. We present an evaluation of the efficiency and the environmental impact, safety concerns and practical aspects of each of the cycles. A previously validated numerical engine model is combined with a turbocharger model and bottoming cycle models written in Matlab. Genetic algorithm optimisation results suggest that the Kalina cycle possess no significant advantages compared to the ORC or the steam cycle. While contributing to very high efficiencies, the organic working fluids possess high global warming potentials and hazard levels. It is concluded that the ORC has the greatest potential for increasing the fuel efficiency, and the combined cycle offers very high thermal efficiency. While being less efficient, the steam cycle has the advantages of being well proven, harmless to the environment as well as being less hazardous in comparison. - Highlights: • We compare steam, ORC (organic Rankine cycle) and Kalina cycles for waste heat recovery in marine engines. • We evaluate the efficiency and important qualitative differences. • The Kalina cycle presents no apparent advantages. • The steam cycle is well known, harmless and has a high efficiency. • The ORC has the highest efficiency but also important drawbacks

  15. Design and modeling of an advanced marine machinery system including waste heat recovery and removal of sulphur oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An advanced propulsion system for marine applications was designed and modeled. • SOx can be removed as highly concentrated sulphuric acid from the machinery system. • The removal of SOx increased the power production from waste heat recovery with 32.9%. - Abstract: Stricter legislation on sulphur oxide emissions from ships will apply as of 2015 in emission control areas. Consequently, prices on low sulphur fuels are expected to increase drastically, providing a strong incentive to find alternative ways of complying with the legislation and improving the efficiency of machinery systems. The wet sulphuric acid process is an effective way of removing flue gas sulphur oxides from land-based coal-fired power plants. Moreover, organic Rankine cycles (ORC) are suitable for heat to power conversion for low temperature heat sources. This paper describes the design and modeling of a highly efficient machinery system which includes the removal of exhaust gas sulphur oxides. The system consists of a two-stroke diesel engine, the wet sulphuric process for sulphur removal, a conventional steam Rankine cycle and an ORC. Results of numerical modeling efforts suggest that an ORC placed after the conventional waste heat recovery system is able to extract the sulphuric acid from the exhaust gas, while at the same time increase the combined cycle thermal efficiency by 2.6%. The findings indicate that the technology has potential in marine applications regarding both energy and the environment; however, further research and development efforts are needed

  16. Waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Konzen in-house designed anaerobic digester system for the POME (Palm Oil Mill Effluent) treatment process is one of the registered Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects in Malaysia. It is an organic wastewater treatment process which achieves excellent co-benefits objectives through the prevention of water pollution and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, which is estimated to be 40,000 to 50,000 t-CO2 per year. The anaerobic digester was designed in mesophile mode with temperature ranging from 37 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius. A microorganisms growth is optimum under moderately warm temperature conditions. The operating temperature of the anaerobic digester needs to be maintained constantly. There are two waste heat recovery systems designed to make the treatment process self-sustaining. The heat recovered will be utilised as a clean energy source to heat up the anaerobic digester indirectly. The first design for the waste heat recovery system utilises heat generated from the flue gas of the biogas flaring system. A stainless steel water tank with an internal water layer is installed at the top level of the flare stack. The circulating water is heated by the methane enriched biogas combustion process. The second design utilizes heat generated during the compression process for the biogas compressor operation. The compressed biogas needs to be cooled before being recycled back into the digester tank for mixing purposes. Both the waste heat recovery systems use a design which applies a common water circulation loop and hot water tank to effectively become a closed loop. The hot water tank will perform both storage and temperature buffer functions. The hot water is then used to heat up recycled sludge from 30 degree Celsius to 45 degree Celsius with the maximum temperature setting at 50 degree Celsius. The recycled sludge line temperature will be measured and monitored by a temperature sensor and transmitter, which will activate the

  17. Ventilation with heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences from the use of ventilation with heat recovery in several experimental single-family houses developed and built within the last four years to meet the new Danish energy requirements of 2005. Included are descriptions of the ventilation system components...... and the main functional demands as well as measurements of the thermal efficiency, electricity consumptions and building air tightness. The paper addresses the aspects of minimizing the heat loss from the duct system and the heat recovery unit (when placed in an unheated attic space) in order to obtain...... an acceptable efficiency. Furthermore, solutions to secure the air tightness of the building envelope are suggested. The paper does not address problems with condensate of water in the exchanger that may freeze in cold climate conditions. This complex of problem is dealt with in a separate paper....

  18. Design and modeling of an advanced marine machinery system including waste heat recovery and removal of sulphur oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann Nielsen, Rasmus; Haglind, Fredrik; Larsen, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    In order to reduce the formation of acid rain and its harmful effects, stricter legislations on emissions of sulphur oxides from ships applies as of 2015 in emission control areas and globally in 2020 by the international maritime organization (IMO). Consequently, prices on low sulphur fuels...... of the machinery system. The wet sulphuric acid process has shown to be an effective way of removing sulphur oxides from flue gas of land-based coal fired power plants. Moreover, organic Rankine cycles are suitable for heat to power conversion for low temperature heat sources. This paper is aimed at designing......-stroke diesel engine and a conventional waste heat recovery system. The results suggest that an organic Rankine cycle placed after the conventional waste heat recovery system is able to extract the sulphuric acid from the exhaust gas, while at the same time increase power generation from waste heat by 32...

  19. Advanced space recovery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailes, William K.

    1989-01-01

    The design evolution of a space recovery system designed by a NASA-contracted study is described, with particular attention given to the design of a recovery system for a propulsion/avionics module (P/AM), which weighs 60,000 lb at the recovery initiation and achieves subsonic terminal descent at or above 50,000 ft msl. The components of the recovery system concept are described together with the operational sequences of the recovery. The recovery system concept offers low cost, low weight, good performance, a potential for pinpoint landing, and an operational flexibility.

  20. Design and modeling of an advanced marine machinery system including waste heat recovery and removal of sulphur oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimann Nielsen, Rasmus; Haglind, Fredrik; Larsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    and modeling of a highly efficient machinery system which includes the removal of exhaust gas sulphur oxides. The system consists of a two-stroke diesel engine, the wet sulphuric process for sulphur removal, a conventional steam Rankine cycle and an ORC. Results of numerical modeling efforts suggest...... that an ORC placed after the conventional waste heat recovery system is able to extract the sulphuric acid from the exhaust gas, while at the same time increase the combined cycle thermal efficiency by 2.6%. The findings indicate that the technology has potential in marine applications regarding both energy...

  1. Heat recovery equipment for engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segaser, C.L.

    1977-04-01

    The recovery and use of waste heat from prime movers is an important consideration for evaluating an on-site power system, since it is the basic factor that makes possible a substantial increase in fuel-use efficiency. The equipment usually employed to recover waste heat can be categorized as: (a) shell-and-tube type heat exchangers, (b) radiator-type heat exchangers, (c) exhaust gas boilers for the generation of pressurized hot water and/or steam, (d) steam separators, and (e) combined packaged units for ebulliently cooled internal combustion piston engines. The functional requirements and cost considerations involved in applying these devices for the recovery of waste heat from various types of prime-movers considered for application in the ICES Systems Engineering Program are examined.

  2. Waste heat recovery retrofit project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report provides the results of the experience gained and the guidance for the replication of a waste heat recovery system in Lac La Martre, Northwest Territories. In the summer of 1981, a new school of 1800 m {sup 2} was built, which incorporated many energy conservation features. The project demonstrates the technical and ecomomic viability of recovering the waste heat produced by the community's generator motors and using it to almost totally heat the school. Of the three diesel-electric generators which handle the total power supply for Lac La Martre, two (281 kVa and 187 kVa capacity) have been connected to the heat recovery system. The school is provided with two 159 kW capacity boilers which are sized to handle the complete heating load. The system is described, including the heat exchangers, the heat pipe between the power plant and the school, the circulating pumps and the heat metering system. Preliminary load calculations revealed the need to use both the waste heat from the generator's coolant water and the flue gas. Now that the school has operated through a whole winter season, the project can be considered a success up to this point. From an intial capital outlay of Canadian $250,000, savings for fuel of Canadian 26,000/y are now being realized, with a total payback period of 9 years. However, it must be recognized that this system requires a higher level of skill to maintain than a simple on-off system. The difficulties encountered with a similar heat recovery system which was built in Igloolik during the 1970's are briefly discussed. 45 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Toward a Heat Recovery Chimney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Pan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide population increase and subsequent surge in energy demand leads electricity producers to increase supply in an attempt to generate larger profit margins. However, with Global Climate Change becoming a greater focus in engineering, it is critical for energy to be converted in as environmentally benign a way as possible. There are different sustainable methods to meet the energy demand. However, the focus of this research is in the area of Waste Heat Recovery. The waste heat stored in the exiting condenser cooling water is delivered to the air flow through a water-air cross flow heat exchanger. A converging thermal chimney structure is then applied to increase the velocity of the airflow. The accelerated air can be used to turn on the turbine-generator installed on the top the thermal chimney so that electricity can be generated. This system is effective in generating electricity from otherwise wasted heat.

  4. Advanced simulations of energy demand and indoor climate of passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    In building design the requirements for energy consumption for ventilation, heating and cooling and the requirements for increasingly better indoor climate are two opposing factors. This paper presents the schematic layout and simulation results of an innovative multifunctional ventilation concep...

  5. Novel heat recovery systems for building applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Mardiana Idayu

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis will explore the development of novel heat recovery systems coupled with low carbon technologies, and its integration to become one device with multifunction (building integrated heat recovery/cooling/air dehumidifier. In the first part of this thesis, an experimental performance of an individual heat recovery unit using Micro Heat and Mass Cycle Core (MHM3C) made of fibre papers with cross flow arrangement has been carried out. The unit was tested in an env...

  6. Ceramic heat recuperators for industrial heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, J. J.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Kohnken, K. H.; Rebello, W. J.

    1980-08-01

    A cordierite (magnesium aluminum silicate) recuperator was designed for relatively small furnaces with firing rates of 0.3 MM to 0.6 MM Btu/h and with exhaust gas temperatures of 1500 F to 2600 F. Five demonstration programs were performed to determine the heat transfer performance of the device, establish the energy savings by recovery, demonstrate the durability of the ceramic core, determine the operating requirements of the burners and controls with recuperation, and establish the overall system costs and payback period. The recuperator is described and results of tests and measurements, system economics, and cost performance analyses are presented. The methodology is developed and techniques for impact analysis are described. Industrial applications are implied and a process flow diagram for smelting and refining primary copper is shown.

  7. Waste Heat Recovery. Technology and Opportunities in U.S. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Ilona [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States); Choate, William T. [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States); Davidson, Amber [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)

    2008-03-01

    This study was initiated in order to evaluate RD&D needs for improving waste heat recovery technologies. A bottomup approach is used to evaluate waste heat quantity, quality, recovery practices, and technology barriers in some of the largest energyconsuming units in U.S. manufacturing. The results from this investigation serve as a basis for understanding the state of waste heat recovery and providing recommendations for RD&D to advance waste heat recovery technologies.

  8. Minimum heat transfer area for Total Site heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Methodology development for Total Site heat recovery with of intermediate utility. • Selection of temperature for intermediate utilities of Total Site. • Capital cost reduction for heat exchangers network design on Total Site level. • Recommendation for selection of heat exchangers design of Total Site. - Abstract: In this paper a further development of methodology for decreasing the capital cost for Total Site heat recovery by use of different utility levels is proposed. The capital cost of heat recovery system is estimated for certain temperature level of intermediate utility applying Total Site Profiles. Heat transfer area is reduced by selection of appropriate temperature of intermediate utility. Minimum of heat transfer area depends on slopes of Total Site Profiles in each enthalpy interval. This approach allows estimating the minimum of heat transfer area for heat recovery on Total Site level. Case study is performed for fixed film heat transfer coefficients of process streams and intermediate utilities. It indicates that the total heat transfer area of heat recovery can be different up to 49.15% for different utility temperatures

  9. Real heat recovery with air handling units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roulet, C.-A. [Laboratoire d' Energie Solaire et de Physique du Batiment, Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland); Heidt, F.D. [University of Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Pibiri, M.-C.; Foradini, F. [E4Tech, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    More and more air handling units are equipped with heat recovery systems, with the aim of decreasing the energy use in buildings for heating and cooling. The efficiency of the heat recovery system is often used to calculate the energy saving. However, air-handling units do not always function as planned. In particular, parasitic shortcuts and leakage may decrease dramatically the efficiency of ventilation and heat recovery. In addition, these units need electrical energy for fans, which may be more precious than saved heat. Measurements, using tracer gas dilution technique have detected various malfunctions in several units.This paper addresses real energy recovery with air handling units from a theoretical point of view and presents results of measurements on 13 units. In the best three cases, the real, global heat recovery efficiency was between 60 and 70% for units having a 80% nominal efficiency. In the three worst cases, the global efficiency was less than 10%. For these cases, the heat recovery system uses more energy than it saves. (author)

  10. Rational use of energy via heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groscurth, H.M. (Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER), Stuttgart Univ. (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    The linear, stochastic optimization model ECCO has been developed as a computerized planning tool for case studies on integrated energy management involving heat recovery by heat exchanger networks, heat pumps and cogeneration. The procedure of stochastic optimization is described in detail. For a model city, which consists of three districts with together nearly 20,000 inhabitants and 4 industrial companies, we obtain the following results: Via heat recovery and cogeneration, the primary energy input into the energy system of the model city may be reduced by 25% compared to a status quo scenario. At the same time, the CO[sub 2]-emissions are reduced by 31% with some fuel switching from coal to natural gas being involved. Introducing waste heat recovery and cogeneration into the model city at the current low energy price level would increase the cost of the energy system by at least 41% with respect to the status quo. (orig./BWI)

  11. Geothermal Energy Production With Innovative Methods Of Geothermal Heat Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, Allen [GeoTek Energy, LLC, Frisco, TX (United States); Darlow, Rick [GeoTek Energy, LLC, Frisco, TX (United States); Sanchez, Angel [GeoTek Energy, LLC, Frisco, TX (United States); Pierce, Michael [GeoTek Energy, LLC, Frisco, TX (United States); Sellers, Blake [GeoTek Energy, LLC, Frisco, TX (United States)

    2014-12-19

    The ThermalDrive™ Power System (“TDPS”) offers one of the most exciting technological advances in the geothermal power generation industry in the last 30 years. Using innovations in subsurface heat recovery methods, revolutionary advances in downhole pumping technology and a distributed approach to surface power production, GeoTek Energy, LLC’s TDPS offers an opportunity to change the geothermal power industry dynamics.

  12. Advanced heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Joseph L.; Matthews, John D.

    1989-09-01

    This patent application discloses a heat pump which includes a first packed bed of liquid desiccant for removing moisture from outside air in the heating mode of operation, and a pump for transferring the moisture laden desiccant to a second packed bed which humidifies condenser heated inside air by adding water vapor to the air. The first packed bed, by removing moisture from the outside air before it passes through the heat pump's evaporator coils, prevents frost from forming on the coils. In the cooling mode of operation the second packed bed of liquid desiccant removes water vapor from the air inside of the building. The moisture laden desiccant is then transferred to the first packed bed by a second pump where condenser heat transfers the moisture from the desiccant to outside air.

  13. Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.

    1980-01-01

    The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)

  14. Heat Recovery Steam Generator by Using Cogeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.Vivek, P. Vijaya kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A heat recovery steam generator or HRSG is an energy recovery heat exchanger that recovers heat from a hot gas stream. It produces steam that can be used in a process (cogeneration or used to drive a steam turbine (combined cycle. It has been working with open and closed cycle. Both of cycles are used to increase the performance and also power on the cogeneration plant. If we are using closed cycle technology, we can recycle the waste heat from the turbine. in cogeneration plant, mostly they are using open cycle technology. additional, by using closed cycle technology, we can use the waste heat that converts into useful amount of work. In this paper, the exhaust gas will be sent by using proper outlet from cogen unit, we are using only waste heat that produce from turbine.

  15. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2015-09-22

    A waste heat recovery (WHR) system connects a working fluid to fluid passages formed in an engine block and/or a cylinder head of an internal combustion engine, forming an engine heat exchanger. The fluid passages are formed near high temperature areas of the engine, subjecting the working fluid to sufficient heat energy to vaporize the working fluid while the working fluid advantageously cools the engine block and/or cylinder head, improving fuel efficiency. The location of the engine heat exchanger downstream from an EGR boiler and upstream from an exhaust heat exchanger provides an optimal position of the engine heat exchanger with respect to the thermodynamic cycle of the WHR system, giving priority to cooling of EGR gas. The configuration of valves in the WHR system provides the ability to select a plurality of parallel flow paths for optimal operation.

  16. Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

  17. Waste heat recovery for offshore applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Kandepu, Rambabu; Haglind, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    vary in the range 20-30%. There are several technologies available for onshore gas turbines (and low/medium heat sources) to convert the waste heat into electricity. For offshore applications it is not economical and practical to have a steam bottoming cycle to increase the efficiency of electricity...... present paper, a review of the technologies available for waste heat recovery offshore is made. Further, the challenges of implementing these technologies on offshore platforms are discussed from a practical point of view. Performance estimations are made for a number of combined cycles consisting of a...

  18. Solid waste utilization: incineration with heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.

    1978-04-01

    As a part of the Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES) Program, Technology Evaluations, this evaluation considers the potential utilization of municipal solid wastes as an energy source by use of incineration with heat recovery. Subjects covered include costs, design data, inputs and outputs, and operational problems. Two generic types of heat recovery incinerators are evaluated. The first type, called a waterwall incinerator, is one in which heat is recovered directly from the furnace using water circulated through tubes imbedded in the furnace walls. This design normally is used for larger installations (>200 tons/day). The second type, a starved-air incinerator is used mainly in smaller sizes (<100 tons/day). Burning is performed in the incinerator, and heat recovery is obtained by the use of heat exchangers on the flue gases from the incinerator. Currently there are not many installations of either type in the United States; however, interest in this form of solid-waste handling appears to be increasing.

  19. Sustainable Development through Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Bundela

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Waste Heat Recovery (WHR steam Technology is a proven Technology pioneered by Japanese for cement plant and it is economically viable. Electrical Power can be generated by adopting the latest technology in this field. It used a medium to low temperature (120-350°C Turbine technology (standard thermal power plants run on steam temp-500°C. Approach: It requires treat exchangers (Hx designed for high dust load, no additional fuel is required Kymore Cement Works has proposed to install a power plant of 9 MW which will be operated with the recovered waste heat from the clinker coolers and kilns from its both clinker units. The hot air from cooler and kiln passes through the ESP is taken to the waste heat recovery exchangers. Adequate size of heat-exchangers will be located at proper locations in order to achieve optimum temperature of Thermic Oil from waste gases. Conclusion/Recommendations: This is required for optimal power yield. The hot flue gases will pass through a Heat Exchanger by which the temperature (heat of the waste gas is transferred to the internal elements of the heat exchangers which is used for heating of the thermo oil. In turn this thermal oil vaporizes the organic fluid in close loop cycle. Multi level pressure turbine system will be installed which increases usable heat content resulting in higher power output. The turbine will be run by the organic vapors to generate the electrical energy. The system of oil collection, oil transfer to the vaporizer and its recycling process will be made for the complete recycling of the thermal oil.

  20. Short review on heat recovery from exhaust gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Hassan; Khaled, Mahmoud; Lemenand, Thierry; Ramadan, Mohamad

    2016-07-01

    The increasing growth of energy demand leads to issues associated with energy demand reduction and propose new energy efficient solutions. Heat recovery consists the most promising solution especially in regions where renewable energy resources are not available. That is why the domain of heat recovery has shown a tremendous improvement during the recent years. On the other hand, few works have been dedicated to heat recovery from exhaust gas. This paper presents a review on heat recovery from exhaust gas. The authors propose to classify exhaust gas heat recovery systems within three different classifications that are exhaust gas temperature, utilized equipment and recovery purposes.

  1. Condensing Heat Recovery of Centrifugal Chiller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Guang-cai; JIAO Jun-jun; WANG Li-ping; ZENG Wei

    2009-01-01

    To a kind of centrifugal water chiUer with R22 and about 1745 kW of cooling capacity.a heat exchanger was added between the outlet of compressor and original condenser to get part of or all the condensing heat.Condensing heat can be recovered by compound condensing method,which adopts air-cooling model+wa-ter-cooling model or water-cooling model+water-cooling model at the condensing side of the system.By exergy analysis and experiment research on compound condensing heat recovery of centrifugal chiller,the results are ob-tained that the capability of the whole system increases,the energy efficiency ratio (EER) becomes 3.2~5.0 from 2.2~3.4, which implies the EER increases about 1.0~1.5,the exergy efficiency increases about 10%,and the chiller runs more stably after reformation.

  2. Thermoelectric waste heat recovery from an M1 Abrams tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, C. David; Thomas, Peter M.; Baldasaro, Nicholas G.; Mantini, Michael J.; Venkatasubramanian, Rama; Barton, Michael D.; Cardine, Christopher V.; Walker, Grayson W.

    2012-06-01

    The addition of advanced sensors, targeting systems and electronic countermeasures to military vehicles has created a strategic need for additional electric power. By incorporating a thermoelectric (TE) waste heat recovery system to convert available exhaust heat to electricity, increased electric power needs can be met without reducing the energy efficiency of the vehicle. This approach allows existing vehicles to be upgraded without requiring a complete re-design of the engine and powertrain to support the integration of advanced electronic sensors and systems that keep the performance at the state of the art level. RTI has partnered with General Dynamics Land Systems and Creare, Inc. under an Army Research Lab program to develop a thermoelectric exhaust waste heat recovery system for the M1 Abrams tank. We have designed a reduced-scale system that was retrofitted to the tank and generated 80W of electric power on the vehicle operating on a test track by capturing a portion of the exhaust heat from the Honeywell/Lycoming AGT-1500 gas turbine engine.

  3. CFD Simulation of Infiltration Heat Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, C.R.; Sherman, M.H.

    1998-07-01

    Infiltration has traditionally been assumed to affect the energy load of a building by an amount equal to the product of the infiltration flow rate and the sensible enthalpy difference between inside and outside. Results from detailed computational fluid dynamics simulations of five wall geometries over a range of infiltration rates show that heat transfer between the infiltrating air and walls can be substantial, reducing the impact of infiltration. Factors affecting the heat recovery are leakage path length, infiltration flow rate, and wall construction. The classical method for determination of the infiltration energy load was found to over-predict the amount by as much as 95 percent and by at least 10 percent. However, the air flow paths typical of building envelopes give over-predictions at the low end of this range.

  4. Is heat recovery in air-handling units efficient?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roulet, C.-A.; Pibiri, M.-C. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), LESO-PB, Lausanne (Switzerland); Heidt, F.D. [University of Siegen, Siegen (Germany); Foradini, F. [E4Tech, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-09-01

    More and more air handling units are equipped with heat recovery systems, with the aim of decreasing the energy use in buildings for heating and cooling. The design efficiency of the heat recovery system is often used to calculate the energy saving. However, parasitic shortcuts in air-handling units and leakage in the building envelope dramatically decrease the efficiency of heat recovery. In addition, the electrical energy used for fans may be more precious than saved heat. Real energy recovery was measured in 13 air-handling units. In the best three cases, the real, global heat recovery efficiency was between 60 and 70% for units having a 80% nominal efficiency. In the three worst cases, the global efficiency was less than 10%. For these cases, the heat recovery system uses more primary energy than it saves. (author)

  5. Advanced high temperature heat flux sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, W.; Hobart, H. F.; Strange, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    To fully characterize advanced high temperature heat flux sensors, calibration and testing is required at full engine temperature. This required the development of unique high temperature heat flux test facilities. These facilities were developed, are in place, and are being used for advanced heat flux sensor development.

  6. Advances in heat transfer volume 21

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett †, James P; Cho, Young I

    1991-01-01

    This volume in a series on heat transfer covers the modelling of the dynamics of turbulent transport processes, supercritical pressures, hydrodynamics, mass transfer near rotating surfaces, lost heat in entropy and the mechanics of heat transfer in a multifluid bubbling pool. Other related titles are "Advances in Heat Transfer", volumes 18, 19 and 20.

  7. Some performance characteristics of a fluidized bed heat recovery unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of using fluidized bed heat recovery units with diesel engines are well documented. Two of those are: significantly less tube fouling and heat transfer coefficient four to five time higher than that of conventional shell and tube heat exchangers. The high concentration of soot in the exhaust gases of diesel engines make fouling a major concern in design of any kind of heat recovery unit. In the experiment a conventional fluidized bed heat exchanger was connected to the exhaust of a diesel engine mounted on a dynamometer. With this arrangement it was possible to test the heat recovery unit under a wide range of operating conditions. The main objective of this experiment was the determination of the performance characteristics of the heat recovery unit, especially with reference to its heat transfer and fouling characteristics. (author)

  8. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS: SOLUTION TO REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Baradey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy conversion technologies, where waste heat recovery systems are included, have received significant attention in recent years due to reasons that include depletion of fossil fuel, increasing oil prices, changes in climatic conditions, and global warming. For low temperature applications, there are many sources of thermal waste heat, and several recovery systems and potential useful applications have been proposed by researchers [1-4]. In addition, many types of equipment are used to recover waste thermal energy from different systems at low, medium, and high temperature applications, such as heat exchangers, waste heat recovery boiler, thermo-electric generators, and recuperators. In this paper, the focus is on waste heat recovery from air conditioners, and an efficient application of these energy resources. Integration of solar energy with heat pump technologies and major factors that affect the feasibility of heat recovery systems have been studied and reviewed as well. KEYWORDS: waste heat recovery; heat pump.

  9. Study of fuel cell powerplant with heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. M.; Grasso, A. P.; Clausi, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    It was shown that heat can be recovered from fuel cell power plants by replacing the air-cooled heat exchangers in present designs with units which transfer the heat to the integrated utility system. Energy availability for a 40-kW power plant was studied and showed that the total usable energy at rated power represents 84 percent of the fuel lower heating value. The effects of design variables on heat availability proved to be small. Design requirements were established for the heat recovery heat exchangers, including measurement of the characteristics of two candidate fuel cell coolants after exposure to fuel cell operating conditions. A heat exchanger test program was defined to assess fouling and other characteristics of fuel cell heat exchangers needed to confirm heat exchanger designs for heat recovery.

  10. Optimal waste heat recovery and reuse in industrial zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant energy efficiency gains in zones with concentrated activity from energy intensive industries can often be achieved by recovering and reusing waste heat between processing plants. We present a systematic approach to target waste heat recovery potentials and design optimal reuse options across plants in industrial zones. The approach first establishes available waste heat qualities and reuse feasibilities considering distances between individual plants. A targeting optimization problem is solved to establish the maximum possible waste heat recovery for the industrial zone. Then, a design optimization problem is solved to identify concrete waste heat recovery options considering economic objectives. The paper describes the approach and illustrates its application with a case study. -- Highlights: → Developed a systematic approach to target waste heat recovery potentials and to design optimal recovery and reuse options across plants in industrial zones. → Five stage approach involving data acquisition, analysis, assessment, targeting and design. → Targeting optimization problem establishes the maximum possible waste heat recovery and reuse limit for the industrial zone. → Design optimization problem provides concrete waste heat recovery and reuse network design options considering economic objectives.

  11. Heat Recovery From Tail Gas Incineration To Generate Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, Tarek

    2010-09-15

    Many industrial processes result in tail gas wastes that must be flared or incinerated to abide with environmental guidelines. Tail gas incineration occurs in several chemical processes resulting in high-temperature exhaust gas that simply go to the stack, thus wasting all that valuable heat! This paper discusses useful heat recovery and electric power generation utilizing available heat in exhaust gas from tail gas incinerators. This heat will be recovered in a waste-heat recovery boiler that will produce superheated steam to expand in a steam turbine to generate power. A detailed cost estimate is presented.

  12. Modification of deposit formation in glass furnance heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, H.-U.; Novothy, R.; Staller, S.; Kraemer, J.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes methods for removing deposits formed in the heat exchange tube of waste heat recovery boilers for glass furnaces in which sodium aluminum silicate fine particles are introduced into the waste gases before they enter the heat exchange tubes.

  13. High Performance Cascading Adsorption Refrigeration Cycle with Internal Heat Recovery Driven by a Low Grade Heat Source Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Yuki Ueda; Atsushi Akisawa; Aep Saepul Uyun; Takahiko Miyazaki

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the performance of an advanced cascading adsorption cycle that utilizes a driven heat source temperature between 90–130 ºC. The cycle consists of four beds that contain silica gel as an adsorber fill. Two of the beds work in a single stage cycle that is driven by an external heat source, while the other two beds work in a mass recovery cycle that is driven by waste heat of sensible and adsorption heat of the high temperature cycle. The performances, in terms of the coef...

  14. Experimental analysis of an adsorption refrigerator with mass and heat-pipe heat recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We develop one heat pipe type adsorption refrigerator. ► New compound adsorbent of CaCl2/activated carbon–ammonia can work more effectively. ► Combined mass recovery-heat pipe heat recovery can improve adsorption performance. ► Combined mass recovery-heat pipe heat recovery can reduce cycle time. - Abstract: A heat pipe type adsorption refrigerator system is proposed and investigated, which can be powered by solar energy or waste heat of engine. The study assesses the performance of compound adsorbent (CaCl2 and activated carbon)–ammonia adsorption refrigeration cycle with different orifice sets and different mass and heat recovery processes by experimental prototype machine. Specific cooling power (SCP) and coefficient of performance (COP) were calculated with experimental data to analyze the influences of operating condition. The results show that the jaw opening of the hand needle nozzle can influence the adsorption performance obviously and the thermostatic expansion valve (TEV) is effective in the intermediate cycle time in the adsorption refrigeration system. The SCP of the cycle with the mass-heat recovery together (combined recovery process) is superior to that of the conventional cycles with mass recovery or heat recovery independently.

  15. Advances in heat transfer enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Sujoy Kumar; Sundén, Bengt; Wu, Zan

    2016-01-01

    This Brief addresses the phenomena of heat transfer enhancement. A companion edition in the SpringerBrief Subseries on Thermal Engineering and Applied Science to three other monographs including “Critical Heat Flux in Flow Boiling in Microchannels,” this volume is idea for professionals, researchers, and graduate students concerned with electronic cooling.

  16. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  17. Integrated heat recovery. Kilns - spray dryer - spray dryer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, A.; Goncalves, V.; Vaz Serra, A.

    1992-08-01

    This work is about the operating conditions of a system for the preparation of atomized powder aiming at the improvement of its energetic efficiency in relation to the traditional processes. Alternative solutions were studied for the recovery of energy of the different gaseous effluents existing in the plant so as to improve the energetic efficiency of the drying process. The implantation of a system with pre-heating of heat-generator secondary air worth double recovery was choosen, by using high efficiency glass tubes heat-exchangers. Through such system it is intended to get a 9.5% reduction of LPG consumed in the heat-generator. (orig.).

  18. Minewater heat recovery project. Final Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-04-01

    This report consists of three sections: (1) Design, experimental testing and performance analysis of the 20-ft long DBHE (Downhole Bundle Heat Exchanger); (2) Modified design of mine water heat exchanger; and (3) Performance tests on mine water heat exchanger. Appendices summarize design calculations, discuss the scope of the work tasks, and present a diary of the progress throughout the research and development project.

  19. Simulation of exhaust gas heat recovery from a spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study explored various alternatives in improving the energy utilization of spray drying process through the exhaust gas heat recovery. Extensible and user-friendly simulation code was written in Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel for this purpose. The effects of process parameters were analyzed on the energy efficiency and energy saving in the industrial-scale spray drying system with exhaust gas heat recovery in an air-to-air heat exchanger and in the system with partial recirculation of exhaust air. The spray dryer is equipped with an indirect heater for heating the drying air. The maximum gains of 16% in energy efficiency and 50% in energy saving were obtained for spray drying system equipped with heat exchanger for exhaust air heat recovery. In addition, 34% in energy efficiency and 61% in energy saving for system with recirculation of exhaust air in the present range of process parameters. The high energy efficiency was obtained during drying of large amount of dilute slurry. The energy saving was increased using the large amount of hot drying air. - Highlights: • We model industrial-scale spray drying process with the exhaust gas heat recovery. • We develop an Excel VBA computer program to simulate spray dryer with heat recovery. • We examine effects of process parameters on energy efficiency and energy saving. • High energy efficiency is obtained during drying of large amount of dilute slurry. • Energy saving is increased using the large amount of hot drying air

  20. Identification of existing waste heat recovery and process improvement technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Dodge, R.E.; Smith, S.A.; Ames, K.R.

    1984-03-01

    General information is provided on waste heat recovery opportunities. The currently available equipment for high- and low-temperature applications are described. Other equipment related to wasteheat recovery equipment such as components, instruments and controls, and cleaning equipment is discussed briefly. A description of the microcomputer data base is included. Suppliers of waste heat equipment are mentioned throughout the report, with specific contacts, addresses, and telephone numbers provided in an Appendix.

  1. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery - Advanced Reservoir Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sidsel Marie

    to formation of biofilm. The construction of a one-dimensional simulator enables us to investigate how the different mechanisms and the combination of these influence the displacement processes, the saturation profiles and thus the oil recovery curves. The reactive transport model describes...... of the relative permeabilities. Overall, these methods produce similar results. Separate investigations of the surfactant effect have been performed through exemplifying simulation cases, where no biofilm is formed. The water phase saturation profiles are found to contain a waterfront initially...... investigated. A super efficient surfactant produces an incremental recovery recovery around 40 % OOIP over that of waterflooding. Application of the less efficient -- and probably more realistic -- surfactant results in an incremental oil recovery of 9 % OOIP, but it is still considered a significant...

  2. Study and Test of Cold Storage Heat Recovery Heat Pump Coupled Solar Drying Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we design the recovery of a heat pump combined solar drying device. Then, with this device, drying experiments of aquatic product, tilapia, were conducted, indicating that the newly designed device functions are well in temperature adjusting and controlling performance and showing that drying time is closely related to energy consumption and drying conditions. Heat recovery heat pump combined solar energy drier can improve the drying quality of aquatic products, but also can greatly reduce the drying energy consumption, which provides theoretical support to the design and processing of heat recovery heat pump of refrigeration system coupled solar drying device.

  3. Recent advances in coronal heating

    CERN Document Server

    De Moortel, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    The solar corona, the tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, is orders of magnitude hotter than the solar surface. This 'coronal heating problem' requires the identification of a heat source to balance losses due to thermal conduction, radiation and (in some locations) convection. The review papers in this Theo Murphy meeting issue present an overview of recent observational findings, large- and small-scale numerical modelling of physical processes occurring in the solar atmosphere and other aspects which may affect our understanding of the proposed heating mechanisms. At the same time, they also set out the directions and challenges which must be tackled by future research. In this brief introduction, we summarize some of the issues and themes which reoccur throughout this issue.

  4. Advanced electric residential heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyo, S. E.

    The heat pump concept developed uses the vapor compression refrigeration cycle with R22 as the working fluid. In order to achieve the target efficiency an improved reciprocating compressor with modulatable capacity was developed along with higher efficiency air movers, a breadboard microprocessor based control system and higher effectiveness heat exchangers. The relative proportions of the compressor, blower, fan, and heat exchangers are specified through system optimization to minimize annual ownership cost while constrained to provide comfort. The efficiency of this compressor is comparable to the best available while the ratio of minimum to maximum capacity can be selected as a parameter of optimization. The incremental cost of this compressor is estimated to be one third that of the compressor with two speed drive motor.

  5. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in cold climates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Rose, Jørgen; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    Building ventilation is necessary to achieve a healthy and comfortable indoor environment, but as energy prices continue to rise it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption. Using mechanical ventilation with heat recovery reduces the ventilation heat loss significantly, but in cold climates...... like the Northern Europe or in arctic climate like in Greenland or Alaska these ventilation systems will typically face problems with ice formation in the heat exchanger. When the warm humid room air comes in contact with the cold surfaces inside the exchanger (cooled by the outside air), the moisture...... freezes to ice. The analysis of measurements from existing ventilation systems with heat recovery used in single-family houses in Denmark and a test of a standard heat recovery unit in the laboratory have clearly shown that this problem occurs when the outdoor temperature gets below approximately –5º...

  6. Experimental study on an innovative multifunction heat pipe type heat recovery two-stage sorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative multifunction heat pipe type sorption refrigeration system is designed, in which a two-stage sorption thermodynamic cycle based on two heat recovery processes was employed to reduce the driving heat source temperature, and the composite sorbent of CaCl2 and activated carbon was used to improve the mass and heat transfer performances. For this test unit, the heating, cooling and heat recovery processes between two reactive beds are performed by multifunction heat pipes. The aim of this paper is to investigate the cycled characteristics of two-stage sorption refrigeration system with heat recovery processes. The two sub-cycles of a two-stage cycle have different sorption platforms though the adsorption and desorption temperatures are equivalent. The experimental results showed that the pressure evolutions of two beds are nearly equivalent during the first stage, and desorption pressure during the second stage is large higher than that in the first stage while the desorption temperatures are same during the two operation stages. In comparison with conventional two-stage cycle, the two-stage cycle with heat recovery processes can reduce the heating load for desorber and cooling load for adsorber, the coefficient of performance (COP) has been improved more than 23% when both cycles have the same regeneration temperature of 103 deg. C and the cooling water temperature of 30 deg. C. The advanced two-stage cycle provides an effective method for application of sorption refrigeration technology under the condition of low-grade temperature heat source or utilization of renewable energy

  7. Ventilation effectiveness : health benefits of heat recovery ventilators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-08-15

    Studies have shown that the installation of a heat recovery ventilator (HRV) in homes in northern Canada could improve indoor air quality and the respiratory health of inhabitants. Low ventilation rates are common in many homes in the North because the climate is severe, homes are smaller and lack basements, and occupancies are higher, leading to unhealthy indoor air quality. Northern communities also have a high rate of respiratory infections. HRVs recover much of the energy used to ventilate, which is desirable in cold regions with high heating costs. For the study, the test sample was divided into two types of houses, notably houses with active HRVs and those with control HRVs that were installed and operated but that did not function. The study results showed that HRVs provided increased ventilation. Complaints by residents about HRV noise, discomfort, or low humidity were common but equally spread between those with active and placebo HRVs. The study showed that the system design needs to be improved to better suit the needs of Inuit families. The nature of northern housing presents installation and maintenance challenges. It is hard to retrofit HRV ducting inside small, existing houses, and building supplies arrive infrequently, so detailed planning and careful take-offs of all supplies and materials must be done well in advance of construction. In addition, contractors are hard to locate and have variable expertise, and there is little technical follow-up. Robust technical support by local contractors and housing authorities is therefore important. 2 refs.

  8. Coabsorbent and thermal recovery compression heat pumping technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Staicovici, Mihail-Dan

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces two of the most exciting heat pumping technologies, the coabsorbent and the thermal recovery (mechanical vapor) compression, characterized by a high potential in primary energy savings and environmental protection. New cycles with potential applications of nontruncated, truncated, hybrid truncated, and multi-effect coabsorbent types are introduced in this work.   Thermal-to-work recovery compression (TWRC) is the first of two particular methods explored here, including how superheat is converted into work, which diminishes the compressor work input. In the second method, thermal-to-thermal recovery compression (TTRC), the superheat is converted into useful cooling and/or heating, and added to the cycle output effect via the coabsorbent technology. These and other methods of discharge gas superheat recovery are analyzed for single-, two-, three-, and multi-stage compression cooling and heating, ammonia and ammonia-water cycles, and the effectiveness results are given.  The author presen...

  9. Heat recovery from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic efficiency of a standard Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is around 33%. Therefore, about two third of the heat generated by the nuclear fuel is literally wasted in the environment. Given the fact that the steam coming out from the high pressure turbine is superheated, it could be advantageously used for non electrical applications, particularly for district heating. Considering the technological improvements achieved these last years in heat piping insulation, it is now perfectly feasible to envisage heat transport over quite long distances, exceeding 200 km, with affordable losses. Therefore, it could be energetically wise to revise the modifications required on present reactors to perform heat extraction without impeding the NPP operation. In this paper, the case of a French reactor is studied showing that a large fraction of the wasted nuclear heat can be actually recovered and transported to be injected in the heat distribution network of a large city. Some technical and economical aspects of nuclear district heating application are also discussed. (author)

  10. Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery in arctic climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical ventilations systems with highly effective heat recovery units in arctic climate have problems with condensing water from the extracted humid indoor air. If the condensing water freezes to ice in the heat recovery unit, the airflow rate will quickly diminish due to the increasing press...... defrosting itself. Nevertheless, extra heating is still necessary in very cold periods to avoid draft for occupants.......Mechanical ventilations systems with highly effective heat recovery units in arctic climate have problems with condensing water from the extracted humid indoor air. If the condensing water freezes to ice in the heat recovery unit, the airflow rate will quickly diminish due to the increasing...... pressure drop. Preheating the inlet air (outdoor air) to a temperature just above 0ºC is typically used to solve the problem. To minimize the energy cost, a more efficient solution to the problem is therefore desirable. In this project a new design of a heat recovery unit has been developed to the low...

  11. A safety review of the NRU effluent heat recovery project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRU effluent heat recovery project diverts heated effluent water from the NRU process effluent weir and distributes the water for various heating applications in both the inner and active area at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). The dominant hazard of the system operation is from leakage of tritiated heavy water from the reactor heavy water system into the light water system and the subsequent contamination of the steam system. Protective features include continuous leakage monitoring and automatic isolation of the recovery system. Modelling of the worst case accident, predicts a dose equivalent from tritium in steam humidification of about 26 mrem (260 μSv). The operation of the heat recovery project does not present an unacceptable risk to CRNL personnel

  12. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  13. ASHRAE's new Chiller Heat Recovery Application Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgan, C.B.; Dorgan, C.E.

    2000-07-01

    The new Chiller Heat Recovery Application Guide, published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), provides a comprehensive reference manual on the options available for chiller heat recovery. The information in the guide will assist engineers, owners, and system operators in evaluating the potential of integrating chiller heat recovery into their cooling and heating systems. The primary focus is on new construction and applications where a chiller is being replaced due to inefficiency, high operating and maintenance (O and M) costs, or elimination of refrigerants containing ozone-depleting chemicals known as CFC/HCFCs. While chiller systems for commercial buildings are the primary focus of the guide, the information and procedures also apply to industrial heat pumps. The function of this paper is to highlight key information contained in the guide, including the major benefits of chiller heat recovery, primary candidates, and application procedures. A description of the guide's general format and contents is also provided.

  14. Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery - Advanced Reservoir Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Sidsel Marie; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2010-01-01

    In this project, a generic model has been set up to include the two main mechanisms in the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process; reduction of the interfacial tension (IFT) due to surfactant production, and microscopic fluid diversion as a part of the overall fluid diversion mechanism due to formation of biofilm. The construction of a one-dimensional simulator enables us to investigate how the different mechanisms and the combination of these influence the displacement processes, the...

  15. Study and Test of Cold Storage Heat Recovery Heat Pump Coupled Solar Drying Device

    OpenAIRE

    Min Li; Xiao-Qiang Jiang; Bao-Chuan Wu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we design the recovery of a heat pump combined solar drying device. Then, with this device, drying experiments of aquatic product, tilapia, were conducted, indicating that the newly designed device functions are well in temperature adjusting and controlling performance and showing that drying time is closely related to energy consumption and drying conditions. Heat recovery heat pump combined solar energy drier can improve the drying quality of aquatic products, but also can gr...

  16. Use of photovoltaics for waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcyn, Adam D

    2013-04-16

    A device for recovering waste heat in the form of radiated light, e.g. red visible light and/or infrared light includes a housing having a viewing window, and a photovoltaic cell mounted in the housing in a relationship to the viewing window, wherein rays of radiated light pass through the viewing window and impinge on surface of the photovoltaic cell. The housing and/or the cell are cooled so that the device can be used with a furnace for an industrial process, e.g. mounting the device with a view of the interior of the heating chamber of a glass making furnace. In this manner, the rays of the radiated light generated during the melting of glass batch materials in the heating chamber pass through the viewing window and impinge on the surface of the photovoltaic cells to generate electric current which is passed onto an electric load.

  17. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  18. Natural Ventilation with Heat Recovery: A Biomimetic Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In temperate countries, heat recovery is often desirable through mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR. Drawbacks of MVHR include use of electric power and complex ducting, while alternative passive heat recovery systems in the form of roof or chimney-based solutions are limited to low rise buildings. This paper describes a biomimetic concept for natural ventilation with heat recovery (NVHR. The NVHR system mimics the process of water/mineral extraction from urine in the Loop of Henle (part of human kidney. Simulations on a facade-integrated Chamber successfully imitated the geometry and behaviour of the Loop of Henle (LoH. Using a space measuring 12 m2 in area and assuming two heat densities of 18.75 W/m2 (single occupancy or 30 W/m2 (double occupancy, the maximum indoor temperatures achievable are up to 19.3 °C and 22.3 °C respectively. These come with mean relative ventilation rates of 0.92 air changes per hour (ACH or 10.7 L·s−1 and 0.92 ACH (11.55 L·s−1, respectively, for the month of January. With active heating and single occupant, the LoH Chamber consumes between 65.7% and 72.1% of the annual heating energy required by a similar naturally ventilated space without heat recovery. The LoH Chamber could operate as stand-alone indoor cabinet, benefitting refurbishment of buildings and evading constraints of complicated ducting, external aesthetic or building age.

  19. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between research'' and field applications.'' In addition, several modeling and state-of-the-art'' presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Advances in the heat treatment of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of important recent advances in the processing of steels have resulted from the sophisticated uses of heat treatment to tailor the microstructure of the steels so that desirable properties are established. These new heat treatments often involve the tempering or annealing of the steel to accompish a partial or complete reversion from martensite to austenite. The influence of these reversion heat treatments on the product microstructure and its properties may be systematically discussed in terms of the heat treating temperature in relation to the phase diagram. From this perspective, four characteristic heat treatments are defined: (1) normal tempering, (2) inter-critical tempering, (3) intercritical annealing, and (4) austenite reversion. The reactions occurring during each of these treatments are described and the nature and properties of typical product microstructures discussed, with specific reference to new commercial or laboratory steels having useful and exceptional properties

  1. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Calcined Petroleum Coke in Waste Heat Recovery Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of heat transfer characteristics of calcined petroleum coke in waste heat recovery process. The model of heat exchanger was set up. The model has been used to investigate the effects of porosity (0.58 to 0.79, equivalent heat conductivity coefficient (0.9 to 1.1, and equivalent specific heat (0.9 to 1.1. The calculated values of calcined petroleum coke temperature showed good agreement with the corresponding available experimental data. The temperature distribution of calcined petroleum coke, the calcined petroleum coke temperature at heat exchanger outlet, the average heat transfer coefficient, and the heat recovery efficiency were studied. It can also be used in deriving much needed data for heat exchanger designs when employed in industry.

  2. Nuclear-enhanced geothermal heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes the testing of an abandoned drill well for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel rods. The well need not be in a geothermal field, since the downhole assembly takes advantage of only the natural thermal gradient. The water in the immediate vicinity of the fuel will be chemically treated for corrosion resistance. Above this will be a long column of viscous fluid insoluble in water, to act as a fluid barrier. The remainder of the well bore, up to the surface, will be the working fluid for the power turbine at the surface. There will be a low-pressure region in the immediate vicinity of the fuel, encouraging the flashing of steam. Due to the low level of heat emitted by the fuel rods, the radioactive material will be surrounded by a secondary casing that will reduce the water it contacts directly, thus causing it to heat up quickly and to maximize the steam-generating process, and the formation of air nuclides. These will percolate upward through the viscous column where steadily decreasing pressure causes expansion. The nuclear fuel's thermal energy will have been transferred through the high radioactive zone as pressure, then it will flash to steam and heat the water in the top of the wellbore. The drill well, a minimum of 10,000 ft. in depth, will naturally heat any circulating fluid. The fuel is not used as a thermal source, but only to produce a few spontaneous bubbles, sufficient to increase the fluid pressure by expansion as it rises in the wellbore. The additional thermal energy from the nuclear source will superheat the water for use in the power-generation apparatus at the surface. This equipment, operating on very-low radioactive fluid, will be protected by a secondary containment. The typical drill well is ideally suited for the insertion of spent fuel rods, which are smaller than downhole tools and instrumentation regularly installed in production wells

  3. Nuclear-enhanced geothermal heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper proposes the testing of an abandoned drill well for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel rods. The well will have no hydrocarbons subject to contamination at any open hole depth. There is incentive for companies to find some productive use of plugged and abandoned prospects, to recover a part of their investment in the drilling, testing and completion of the wells. Further controls will be in effect to minimize the escape of radiation at the source downhole. The fuel rods will be encased in an epoxy compound that will also improve structural stability while it is being lowered downhole. The water in the immediate vicinity of the fuel will be chemically treated for corrosion resistance. Above this will be a long column of viscous fluid insoluble in water, to act as a fluid and radiation barrier. The remainder of the well bore, up to the surface, will be the working fluid for the power turbine at the surface. There will be a low-pressure region in the immediate vicinity of the fuel, encouraging the flashing of steam. Due to the low level of heat emitted by the fuel rods, the radioactive material will be surrounded by a secondary casing that will reduce the water it contacts directly, thus causing it to heat up quickly and to maximize the steam-generating process, and the formation of air nuclides. These will percolate upward through the viscous column where steadily decreasing pressure causes expansion of the air particles. The nuclear fuel's thermal energy will have been transferred through the high radioactive zone as pressure, then it will flash to steam and heat the water in the top of the wellbore. The drill well, a least 10,000 ft. in depth, will naturally heat any circulating fluid. The thermal energy from the nuclear source will superheat the water for use in the power-generation apparatus at the surface. This equipment, operating on very-low radioactive fluid, will be protected by a secondary containment

  4. A Small Power Recovery Expander for Heat Pump COP Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrara, G.; Ferrari, L.; D. Fiaschi; Galoppi, G.; Karellas, S.; Secchi, R; Tempesti, D.

    2015-01-01

    Heat pumps are becoming more and more applied for heating, due to their possibility of working as cooling systems in the summer period. However, up to now, recovery of expansion work in small system has not been considered as a viable solution, because of the limited amount of recoverable energy and of difficulties in designing and operating a two-phase flow expander. The idea here presented is to investigate the application of a radial piston machine, adapted from oleodynamic motor design...

  5. Waste heat recovery technologies for offshore platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Benato, Alberto; Scolari, E.; Haglind, Fredrik; Stoppato, Anna

    2014-01-01

    to attain optimal designs for each bottoming unit by selecting specific functions tailored to the oil and gas sector, i.e. yearly CO2 emissions, weight and economic revenue. The test case is the gas turbine-based power system serving an offshore platform in the North Sea. Results indicate that the...... expander and of the primary heat exchanger, organic Rankine cycle turbogenerators appear thus to be the preferred solution to abate CO2 emissions and pollutants on oil and gas facilities. As a practical consequence, this paper provides guidelines for the design of high-efficiency, cost-competitive and low...... organic Rankine cycle technology presents larger performances compared to steam Rankine cycle units, whereas the implementation of air bottoming cycle modules is not attractive from an economic and environmental perspective compared to the other two technologies. Despite the relatively high cost of the...

  6. Performance analysis of air——water dual source heat pump water heater with heat recovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ZeShao; TAO WenQuan; ZHU YanWen; HU Peng

    2012-01-01

    A new air-water dual source heat pump water heater with heat recovery is proposed.The heat pump system can heat water by using a single air source,a single water source,or air-water dual sources.The water is first pre-heated by waste hot water,then heated by the heat pump.Waste heat is recovered by first preheating the cold water and as water source of the heat pump.According to the correlated formulas of the coefficient of performance of air-source heat pump and water-source heat pump,and the gain coefficient of heat recovery-preheater,the formulas for the coefficient of performance of heat pump in six operating modes are obtained by using the dimensionless correspondence analysis method.The system characteristics of heat absorption and release associated with the heat recovery-preheater are analyzed at different working conditions.The developed approaches can provide reference for the optimization of the operating modes and parameters.The results of analysis and experiments show that the coefficient of performance of the device can reach 4-5.5 in winter,twice as much as air source heat pump water heater.The utilization of waste heat in the proposed system is higher than that in the system which only uses waste water to preheating or as heat source.Thus,the effect of energy saving of the new system is obvious.On the other hand,the dimensionless correspondence analysis method is introduced to performance analysis of the heat pump,which also has theoretical significance and practical value.

  7. Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

    1981-06-01

    The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

  8. Waste heat recovery in a coffee roasting plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, M. De; Padoano, E.; Pozzetto, D. [Via A Valerio, Trieste (Italy). Dept. of Energetics

    2003-06-01

    The paper presents the possibility of introducing, in the event of substitution of an old plant, the recovery of heat produced during the roasting process of coffee. During the analysis, thermo and fluid dynamic operating parameters of the present plant were defined also with the support of an experimental measuring campaign. Energy recovery possibilities were then evaluated, and a possible plant solution was examined taking into consideration its economic feasibility. The case study is also interesting because the methodology used for the analysis can be generally applied to production plants, which have hot air exhaust emissions. Waste heat recovery is an important topic, not only for its economic benefits, but also for its environmental outcomes and resource saving. (author)

  9. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS: SOLUTION TO REDUCE GLOBAL WARMING

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Baradey; M. N. A. Hawlader; Ahmad Faris Ismail; Meftah Hrairi

    2015-01-01

    Energy conversion technologies, where waste heat recovery systems are included, have received significant attention in recent years due to reasons that include depletion of fossil fuel, increasing oil prices, changes in climatic conditions, and global warming. For low temperature applications, there are many sources of thermal waste heat, and several recovery systems and potential useful applications have been proposed by researchers [1-4]. In addition, many types of equipment are used to rec...

  10. Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

    2007-12-31

    The DOE-funded project on materials for industrial heat recovery systems included four research tasks: materials for aluminum melting furnace recuperator tubes, materials and operational changes to prevent cracking and corrosion of the co-extruded tubes that form primary air ports in black liquor recovery boilers, the cause of and means to prevent corrosion of carbon steel tubes in the mid-furnace area of recovery boilers, and materials and operational changes to prevent corrosion and cracking of recovery boiler superheater tubes. Results from studies on the latter two topics are given in this report while separate reports on results for the first two tasks have already been published. Accelerated, localized corrosion has been observed in the mid-furnace area of kraft recovery boilers. This corrosion of the carbon steel waterwall tubes is typically observed in the vicinity of the upper level of air ports where the stainless clad co-extruded wall tubes used in the lower portion of the boiler are welded to the carbon steel tubes that extend from this transition point or “cut line” to the top of the boiler. Corrosion patterns generally vary from one boiler to another depending on boiler design and operating parameters, but the corrosion is almost always found within a few meters of the cut line and often much closer than that. This localized corrosion results in tube wall thinning that can reach the level where the integrity of the tube is at risk. Collection and analysis of gas samples from various areas near the waterwall surface showed reducing and sulfidizing gases were present in the areas where corrosion was accelerated. However, collection of samples from the same areas at intervals over a two year period showed the gaseous environment in the mid-furnace section can cycle between oxidizing and reducing conditions. These fluctuations are thought to be due to gas flow instabilities and they result in an unstable or a less protective scale on the carbon steel

  11. Waste Heat Recovery: A Special Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lafarge Cement Factory at Al-Fuhais (Jordan was marked of having some energy issues which required performing site visits for defining, locating and gathering any required information related to the energy issue. Considerable amounts of waste energy were detected in exhaust gases. Moving a light spot into the exhaust gases led to quantify their available heat content and then to look for an implementation for the recovered expelled energy. Among many alternatives, electricity generation was chosen by introducing an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC as an intermediary system between the hot exhaust gases and ambient. The operating conditions for the ORC were optimized to capture the expelled energy. For the selected working fluid (refrigerant R-123, the efficiency of ORC was found to be 14.45%. The recovered energy was found monthly varying in range of [239.9, 271.6] MW.hr, this represents only 2.66 – 3% of factory's electricity consumption. Cost saving of 500,000 $ (2.82% from the annually total amount spent on electricity was attained.

  12. Heat recovery versus solar collection in a ventilated double window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ventilated double window, as a passive heating system, acts as a heat reclaiming device. Part of the heat loss from inside through the window is returned back to the room by the air flow, acting as a heat recoverer. Incident solar radiation upon the window warms its components being part of that heat removed by the air flow delivering it into the room, acting as a solar collector. The effect of these two functions were analysed in this study, through numerical simulation based on outdoor tests under real weather conditions. It was found that solar collector function plays a small role in the pre-heating of the air. First of all this is due to the system’s transparency, which allows most of the solar radiation to enter directly to the indoor space. Secondly, in a 24 h period there are only some hours of sunshine. Instead, heat recovery works all the time, the conclusion being that this passive heating device can be used on any facade orientation. - Highlights: ► A ventilated double window provides pre-warmed air for winter ventilation. ► It recovers part of the lost heat delivering it again to the inside. ► A ventilated double window acts as a vertical solar air collector. ► The heat transfer conditions make it suitable on any facade orientation.

  13. Passive ventilation systems with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    University of Denmark. Through building integration in high performance offices the system is optimized to incorporate multiple functions like heating, cooling and ventilation, thus saving the expenses of separate cooling and heating systems. The simulation results are derived using the state......In building design the requirements for energy consumption for ventilation, heating and cooling and the requirements for increasingly better indoor climate are two opposing factors. This paper presents the schematic layout and simulation results of an innovative multifunc-tional ventilation concept...... with little energy consumption and with satisfying indoor climate. The concept is based on using passive measures like stack and wind driven ventilation, effective night cooling and low pressure loss heat recovery using two fluid coupled water-to-air heat exchangers developed at the Technical...

  14. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  15. High Performance Cascading Adsorption Refrigeration Cycle with Internal Heat Recovery Driven by a Low Grade Heat Source Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ueda

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the performance of an advanced cascading adsorption cycle that utilizes a driven heat source temperature between 90–130 ºC. The cycle consists of four beds that contain silica gel as an adsorber fill. Two of the beds work in a single stage cycle that is driven by an external heat source, while the other two beds work in a mass recovery cycle that is driven by waste heat of sensible and adsorption heat of the high temperature cycle. The performances, in terms of the coefficient of performance (COP and the specific cooling power (SCP, are compared with conventional cascading-without-mass-recovery and single-stage cycles. The paper also presents the effect of the adsorbent mass on performance. The results show that the proposed cycle with mass recovery produces as high of a COP as the COP that is produced by the conventional cascading cycle. However, it produces a lower SCP than that of the single-stage cycle.

  16. Thermal energy storage for industrial waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, H. W.; Kedl, R. J.; Duscha, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The potential is examined for waste heat recovery and reuse through thermal energy storage in five specific industrial categories: (1) primary aluminum, (2) cement, (3) food processing, (4) paper and pulp, and (5) iron and steel. Preliminary results from Phase 1 feasibility studies suggest energy savings through fossil fuel displacement approaching 0.1 quad/yr in the 1985 period. Early implementation of recovery technologies with minimal development appears likely in the food processing and paper and pulp industries; development of the other three categories, though equally desirable, will probably require a greater investment in time and dollars.

  17. Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

  18. Heat recovery from a cement plant with a Marnoch Heat Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat from within a typical cement plant. Two MHE units with compressed air as the working fluid are installed to recover the waste heat. The first unit on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. This unit operates with three pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers. The recovered heat is converted to electricity through the MHE system and used internally within the cement plant. A predictive model and results are presented and discussed. The results show the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant. The new heat recovery system increases the efficiency of the cement plant and lowers the CO2 emissions from the clinker production process. Moreover, it reduces the amount of waste heat to the environment and lowers the temperature of the exhaust gases. - Highlights: → This paper examines the thermodynamic performance of a new Marnoch Heat Engine (MHE) that recovers waste heat to produce electricity and improve the operating efficiency of a typical cement plant. → The first unit of the MHE on the main stack has four pairs of shell and tube heat exchangers and the second heat recovery unit is installed on a clinker quenching system. → Both predicted and experimental results demonstrate the promising performance of the MHE's capabilities for efficient generation of electricity from waste heat sources in a cement plant.

  19. Savings flow from waste heat recovery at Syncrude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matte, C.; Velden, J. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2005-10-01

    Syncrude Canada Ltd. is the world's largest producer of crude oil from oil sands. Its Athabasca oil deposit produces approximately 247,000 barrels per day of high-quality, sweet crude oil called Syncrude Sweet Blend. The recycle water system at the oil sand operations has been upgraded to optimize the waste heat recovery at the preheaters. The recycle water system provides hot process water for extracting bitumen from oil sands, and also the cooling water required by the upgrader that turns bitumen into crude oil. The upgrade has nearly doubled the amount of waste heat recovered at preheaters, resulting in energy savings of almost $2.5 million and a reduction of 24,900 tonnes in greenhouse gas emissions in the winter of 2003-2004. The preheaters are key to the bitumen extraction process. Ten massive heat exchangers recover heat from the upgrading cooling tower, to be used to heat water to extract bitumen from the oil sands. The effort to upgrade the system was initiated in 1997 with the replacement of the diluent recovery plants with more efficient twisted tube exchangers, in order to recover waste heat without compromising production. This paper described the delicate balance of making the system run as efficiently as possible. Since the optimal outlet temperature for the pre-heaters is about 20 degrees C, their use is not required in the late spring and summer when the temperature of the recycle pond is above 20 degrees C. The greatest gain in heat recovery occurred during the winter of 1998 when pumping capacity was increased by changing the pump impeller size. This measure supplied more water for the extracting process and made it possible to use the pre-heaters all winter long. Motorized valves were also installed to better clean the heat exchangers and minimize fouling of the exchanger tubes. It was concluded that the waste heat recovery can be attributed to well trained staff at the processing plant who monitor the performance of the system and make

  20. Ammonia and Carbon Dioxide Heat Pumps for Heat Recovery in Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Brix, Wiebke; Christensen, Stefan W.; Markussen, Michael M.; Reinholdt, Lars; Elmegaard, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a generic, numerical study of high temperature heat pumps for waste heat recovery in industry using ammonia and carbon dioxide as refrigerants. A study of compressors available on the market today, gives a possible application range of the heat pumps in terms of temperatures. Calculations of cycle performances are performed using a reference cycle for both ammonia and carbon dioxide as refrigerant. For each cycle a thorough sensitivity analysis reveals that the forward and...

  1. Heat Recovery in Combination with Different Heat Pump Solutions for Energy Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Atle

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this Master's thesis has been to investigate the performance of different methods of heat recovery from ventilation air. Comparisons have been made with regard to delivered energy for heating of domestic hot water, space heating and ventilation heating. A single-unit dwelling was used as a basis for the simulations. The house, built in accordance with the Norwegian passive house standard, had a gross internal area of 172.6 m². Seven different combinations of a heat wheel, ...

  2. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Calcined Petroleum Coke in Waste Heat Recovery Process

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Zheng; Yongqi Liu; Lichen Zou; Ruiyang Li

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the results of heat transfer characteristics of calcined petroleum coke in waste heat recovery process. The model of heat exchanger was set up. The model has been used to investigate the effects of porosity (0.58 to 0.79), equivalent heat conductivity coefficient (0.9 to 1.1), and equivalent specific heat (0.9 to 1.1). The calculated values of calcined petroleum coke temperature showed good agreement with the corresponding available experimental data. The temperature distri...

  3. Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. [Geothermally heated]. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogleman, S.F.; Fisher, L.A.; Black, A.R.; Singh, D.P.

    1977-05-01

    An engineering and economic study was made to determine a practical balance of selected agribusiness subsystems resulting in realistic estimated produce yields for a geothermally heated system known as the Total Energy Recovery System for Agribusiness. The subsystem cycles for an average application at an unspecified hydrothermal resources site in the western United States utilize waste and by-products from their companion cycles insofar as practicable. Based on conservative estimates of current controlled environment yields, produce wholesale market prices, production costs, and capital investment required, it appears that the family-operation-sized TERSA module presents the potential for marginal recovery of all capital investment costs. In addition to family- or small-cooperative-farming groups, TERSA has potential users in food-oriented corporations and large-cooperative-agribusiness operations. The following topics are considered in detail: greenhouse tomatoes and cucumbers; fish farming; mushroom culture; biogas generation; integration methodology; hydrothermal fluids and heat exchanger selection; and the system. 133 references. (MHR)

  4. Optimal waste heat recovery Rankine based for heavy duty applications

    OpenAIRE

    Grelet, Vincent; Reiche, Thomas; Guillaume, Ludovic; Lemort, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Even in nowadays engines which can reach 45% of efficiency a high amount of energy is released as heat to the ambient. The increase in oil prices compels manufacturers to focus on new solutions to improve fuel efficiency of truck powertrain such as Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS). Over last few years a lot of studies have proven that there are a lot of hurdles (cooling margin, expansion machines, …) for a perfect match of such a system on a vehicle. The objective of this study is to define...

  5. Cogeneration and Heat Recovery in the Industrial Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujasinović, E.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Related to energy requirements for non-cellulose i. e. polyester production as an energy-intensive process, potential saving options are proposed. From the process data, it is evident that unit operations need electric and thermal energy in significant amounts. At the same time, improved energy management could be realized by applying a combined heat and power system (CHP instead of the usually used process with separate heat and power production. In addition, the boiler flue gases with a sufficiently high outlet temperature could be used for combustion air preheating.Considering industrial process data, a calculation and comparison between the primary energy demand for conventional, CHP system and flue-gas heat recovery is presented. Comparison between separate heat and electricity production i.e. the conventional system with an overall efficiency of 55.6 % and CHP with efficiency of 85 %, shows an absolute efficiency increase of 29.4 %. Using an air preheater for combustion air temperature increasing saves 5.6 % of the fuel and at the same time diminishes thermal pollution because the exhaust flue-gas temperature becomes 77.3 °C instead of 204 °C. Conclusively, cogeneration and flue-gas heat recovery presentsfuel savings, which also implies economic and environmental benefits.

  6. Applications of thermal energy storage to waste heat recovery in the food processing industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnar, F.; Lunberg, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A study to assess the potential for waste heat recovery in the food industry and to evaluate prospective waste heat recovery system concepts employing thermal energy storage was conducted. The study found that the recovery of waste heat in canning facilities can be performed in significant quantities using systems involving thermal energy storage that are both practical and economical. A demonstration project is proposed to determine actual waste heat recovery costs and benefits and to encourage system implementation by the food industry.

  7. Solar Thermoelectricity via Advanced Latent Heat Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Michele L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, Azure D.; Bobela, David; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, Philip A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, Eric S.; Ginley, David S.

    2016-05-31

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a 'thermal valve,' which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  8. Solar thermoelectricity via advanced latent heat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M. L.; Rea, J.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Hardin, C.; Oshman, C.; Vaughn, J.; Roark, T.; Raade, J. W.; Bradshaw, R. W.; Sharp, J.; Avery, A. D.; Bobela, D.; Bonner, R.; Weigand, R.; Campo, D.; Parilla, P. A.; Siegel, N. P.; Toberer, E. S.; Ginley, D. S.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a new modular, dispatchable, and cost-effective solar electricity-generating technology. Solar ThermoElectricity via Advanced Latent heat Storage (STEALS) integrates several state-of-the-art technologies to provide electricity on demand. In the envisioned STEALS system, concentrated sunlight is converted to heat at a solar absorber. The heat is then delivered to either a thermoelectric (TE) module for direct electricity generation, or to charge a phase change material for thermal energy storage, enabling subsequent generation during off-sun hours, or both for simultaneous electricity production and energy storage. The key to making STEALS a dispatchable technology lies in the development of a "thermal valve," which controls when heat is allowed to flow through the TE module, thus controlling when electricity is generated. The current project addresses each of the three major subcomponents, (i) the TE module, (ii) the thermal energy storage system, and (iii) the thermal valve. The project also includes system-level and techno- economic modeling of the envisioned integrated system and will culminate in the demonstration of a laboratory-scale STEALS prototype capable of generating 3kWe.

  9. Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2012-07-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

  10. Parametric Optimization of Thermoelectric Generators for Waste Heat Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shouyuan; Xu, Xianfan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a methodology for design optimization of thermoelectric-based waste heat recovery systems called thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The aim is to maximize the power output from thermoelectrics which are used as add-on modules to an existing gas-phase heat exchanger, without negative impacts, e.g., maintaining a minimum heat dissipation rate from the hot side. A numerical model is proposed for TEG coupled heat transfer and electrical power output. This finite-volume-based model simulates different types of heat exchangers, i.e., counter-flow and cross-flow, for TEGs. Multiple-filled skutterudites and bismuth-telluride-based thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are applied, respectively, in higher and lower temperature regions. The response surface methodology is implemented to determine the optimized TEG size along and across the flow direction and the height of thermoelectric couple legs, and to analyze their covariance and relative sensitivity. A genetic algorithm is employed to verify the globality of the optimum. The presented method will be generally useful for optimizing heat-exchanger-based TEG performance.

  11. Exergetic Optimization of the Heat Recovery Steam Generators by Imposing the Total Heat Transfer Area

    OpenAIRE

    Cenuşă, Victor-Eduard; Feidt, Michel; Badea, Adrian; Benelmir, Riad

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an original and fast method for the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) exergetic optimization. The objective is maximizing the exergy transfer to the water / steam circuit. The proposed approach, different from the classical method that fixes the pinch point, is essentially thermodynamic but it considers also the economics by imposing the total heat transfer area of HRSG. The HRSG may have one or two steam pressures, without reheat. The input data from the gas turbine are...

  12. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  13. Technologies for waste heat recovery in off-shore applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Haglind, Fredrik; Kandepu, Rambabu;

    2013-01-01

    pressure level steam Rankine cycle employing the once-through heat recovery steam generator without bypass stack. We compare the three technologies considering the combined cycle thermal efficiency, the weight, the net present value, the profitability index and payback time. Both incomes related to CO2...... technological and economic challenges that need to be overcome. However, onshore established technologies such as the steam Rankine cycle, the air bottoming cycle and the organic Rankine cycle can be tailored to recover the exhaust heat off-shore. In the present paper, benefits and challenges of these three...... the once-trough single pressure steam cycle has a combined cycle thermal efficiency of 40.8% and net present value of 13.5 M$. The total weight of the steam Rankine cycle is estimated to be around 170 ton....

  14. Technologies for utilization of industrial excess heat: Potentials for energy recovery and CO2 emission reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Technologies for recovery and use of industrial excess heat were investigated. • Heat harvesting, heat storage, heat utilization, and heat conversion technologies. • Heat recovery potential for Gävleborg County in Sweden was calculated. • Effects on global CO2 emissions were calculated for future energy market scenarios. - Abstract: Industrial excess heat is a large untapped resource, for which there is potential for external use, which would create benefits for industry and society. Use of excess heat can provide a way to reduce the use of primary energy and to contribute to global CO2 mitigation. The aim of this paper is to present different measures for the recovery and utilization of industrial excess heat and to investigate how the development of the future energy market can affect which heat utilization measure would contribute the most to global CO2 emissions mitigation. Excess heat recovery is put into a context by applying some of the excess heat recovery measures to the untapped excess heat potential in Gävleborg County in Sweden. Two different cases for excess heat recovery are studied: heat delivery to a district heating system and heat-driven electricity generation. To investigate the impact of excess heat recovery on global CO2 emissions, six consistent future energy market scenarios were used. Approximately 0.8 TWh/year of industrial excess heat in Gävleborg County is not used today. The results show that with the proposed recovery measures approximately 91 GWh/year of district heating, or 25 GWh/year of electricity, could be supplied from this heat. Electricity generation would result in reduced global CO2 emissions in all of the analyzed scenarios, while heat delivery to a DH system based on combined heat and power production from biomass would result in increased global CO2 emissions when the CO2 emission charge is low

  15. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  16. Low-temperature waste-heat recovery in the food and paper industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foell, W.K.; Lund, D.; Mitchell, J.W.; Ray, D.; Stevenson, R.; TenWolde, A.

    1980-11-01

    The potential of low-temperature waste-heat recovery technology is examined. An examination of barriers to impede waste-heat recovery is made and research programs are identified. Extensive information and data are presented in the following chapters: Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Food Industry; Waste Heat Recovery in the Wisconsin Pulp and Paper Industry; Industries' Economic Analysis of Energy Conservation Projects; Industrial Waste Heat Recovery (selection of heat-recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, simplified procedure for selection of heat recovery heat exchangers for industrial applications, selection of heat pumps for industrial applications); Institutional Aspects of Industrial Energy Conservation (economic motivation for energy conservation and the industrial response, intrafirm idea channels and their sources, evaluation and approval of plant improvement projects, reported barriers to adopting waste heat recovery projects and recommendations for government involvement, and the final chapter is a summary with major conclusions given. Additional information is given in two appendices on the potential waste heat recovery in a cheese plant (calculation) and conditions for optimum exchanger size and break-even fuel cost. (MCW)

  17. Hybrid heat recovery - flat plate Stirling engine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the possibility of process condensate heat recovery for boiler water preheating as well as for combined heat and power production for chosen process in textile industry has been investigated. The garment industry requires low pressure process steam or hot water for which production expensive fossil fuel should be used. Fuel usage can be reduced by various energy conservation methods. During the process a great quantity of hot condensate or waste hot water is rejected in the sewage system. To reduce heat wastes and improve technological process this condensate could be returned to the boiler for feed water preheating. When 60% condensate is returned to the steam generator about 8 % natural gas is saved. The rest of the condensate should be used for driving low temperature flat plate Stirling motor the advantage of the flat plate Stirling engine is ability to work at low temperatures. This engine produces electrical energy which can put in motion an electrogenerator in the same plant. While Stirling engine can be used electrical power and economical effect could be much greater using such a hybrid system the process waste heat is not only converted into useful work but at the same time thermal pollution is greatly diminished. (Author)

  18. Experimental Investigation of a Three-Bed Adsorption Refrigeration Chiller Employing an Advanced Mass Recovery Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Akisawa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an advanced three-bed adsorption chiller with a mass recovery cycle has been experimentally investigated in the present study. The temperature and pressure of various components of the chiller were monitored to observe the dynamic behaviour of the chiller. The performances in terms of the coefficient of performance (COP and specific cooling power (SCP were compared with a conventional single stage. The results show that the proposed cycle produces COP and SCP values superior to those of the conventional single stage cycle for heat source temperature below 75 °C.

  19. Weldability and Strength Recovery of NUCu-140 Advanced Naval Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Jason T.

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper-precipitation strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermomechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld (GTAW) samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom-probe tomography (APT) analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT. The experimental naval steel known as NUCu-140 and an established naval steel HSLA-100 were subjected to stress-relief cracking (SRC) and hot-ductility testing to assess their relative cracking susceptibilities during the welding process and post weld heat treatment. NUCu-140 exhibited a longer time-to-failure (TTF) and a lower temperature of minimum TTF during SRC testing when compared to HSLA-100, indicating better resistance to SRC for the NUCu-140 steel. The

  20. Simulation of a heat pump system for total heat recovery from flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces an approach of using an open-cycle absorption heat pump (OAHP) for recovering waste heat from the flue gas of a gas boiler with a system model. And equivalent energy efficiency is used to evaluate two other heat recovery systems that integrate an electric compression heat pump (EHP) or an absorption heat pump (AHP) with a boiler. The key factors influencing the systems are evaluated. The OAHP system efficiency is improved by 11% compared to the base case. And the OAHP system is more efficient than the AHP or the EHP systems, especially when the solution mass flow rate is only a little less than the cold water mass flow rate. The energy efficiency comparison is supplemented with a simplified economic analysis. The results indicate that the OAHP system is the best choice for the current prices of electricity and natural gas in Beijing. - Highlights: • An OAHP system is analyzed to improve heat recovery from natural gas flue gas. • OAHP system models are presented and analyzed. • The key factors influencing the OAHP systems are analyzed. • The OAHP system is most efficient for most cases compared with other systems. • The OAHP system is more economic than other systems

  1. Review of organic Rankine cycles for internal combustion engine exhaust waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalating fuel prices and future carbon dioxide emission limits are creating a renewed interest in methods to increase the thermal efficiency of engines beyond the limit of in-cylinder techniques. One promising mechanism that accomplishes both objectives is the conversion of engine waste heat to a more useful form of energy, either mechanical or electrical. This paper reviews the history of internal combustion engine exhaust waste heat recovery focusing on Organic Rankine Cycles since this thermodynamic cycle works well with the medium-grade energy of the exhaust. Selection of the cycle expander and working fluid are the primary focus of the review, since they are regarded as having the largest impact on system performance. Results demonstrate a potential fuel economy improvement around 10% with modern refrigerants and advancements in expander technology. -- Highlights: ► This review article focuses on engine exhaust waste heat recovery works. ► The organic Rankine cycle is superior for low to medium exergy heat sources. ► Working fluid and expander selection strongly influence efficiency. ► Several authors demonstrate viable systems for vehicle installation

  2. Biogas recovery from microwave heated sludge by anaerobic digestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Biogas generated from sewage sludge,livestock waste,and food waste by anaerobic digestion is a valuable renewable energy resource.However,conventional anaerobic digestion is not an efficient process.A long hydraulic retention time and low biogas recovery rate hinder the applications of those resources.An effective pretreatment method to destroy sludge microbial cells has been one of the major concerns regarding improvement of the biogas production.This article focuses on the effects of microwave heating on sludge anaerobic digestion.Volatile suspended solid(VSS) and chemical organic demand solubilization of heated sludge were investigated.Microwave heating was found to be a rapid and efficient process for releasing organic substrates from sludge.The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min with microwave heating.The effect of the VSS solubilization was primarily dependent on heating temperature.The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio,36.4%,was obtained at 170°C for 30 min.The COD dissolving ratio was about 25% at 170°C.Total organic carbon of treated sludge liquor was 1.98 and 2.73 g/L at 150°C and 170°C for 5 min,respectively.A biochemical methane potential(BMP) test of excess sludge and a mixture of primary and excess sludge demonstrated an increase in biogas production.The total biogas from microwave treated mixture sludge increased by 12.9% to 20.2% over control after 30 days of digestion.Biogas production was 11.1% to 25.9% higher for excess sludge than for untreated sludge.The VS removal ratios of mixture sludge and excess sludge were 12% and 11% higher,respectively,compared to the untreated sludge.

  3. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FROM BOILER OF LARGE-SCALE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Prateep Pattanapunt; Kanokorn Hussaro; Tika Bunnakand; Sombat Teekasap

    2013-01-01

    Many industrial heating processes generate waste energy in textile industry; especially exhaust gas from the boiler at the same time reducing global warming. Therefore, this article will present a study the way to recovery heat waste from boiler exhaust gas by mean of shell and tube heat exchanger. Exhaust gas from boiler dyeing process, which carries a large amount of heat, energy consumptions could be decrease by using of waste-heat recovery systems. In this study, using ANASYS simulation p...

  4. Transient characteristics and performance analysis of a vapor compression air conditioning system with condensing heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ming Liu; Wu, Jing Yi; Xu, Yu.Xiong; Wang, Ru Zhu [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Dongchuan Road 800, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2010-11-15

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of condensing heat recovery on the dynamic behavior and performance of air conditioners. The article includes a test procedure utilized to evaluate the condensing heat recovery system, relevant experimental results, a detail analysis of the mechanisms, and improvement measure on such a system. The experimental results indicate that although the condensing heat recovery has a negative effect on the cooling capacity at the start of the heat recovery process, the average cooling coefficient of performance (COP) of the system can be improved. The study also incorporates a control scheme of the electronic expansion valve (EEV) of the condensing heat recovery system. The experimental comparison between the EEV and the thermostatic expansion valve (TEV) demonstrates that the EEV has better performance in both stability and efficiency in the condensing heat recovery system. (author)

  5. Application of fluidized-bed technology to the recovery of waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, G.J.; Grogan, P.J.; Evans, A.R.

    1979-08-01

    The fluidized-bed, waste-heat boiler (FBWHB) may represent a significant opportunity for industrial energy conservation. The applications of FBWHBs to the recovery of heat from waste streams are examined. Compared to other waste-heat recovery units, FBWHBs can transfer more heat per unit volume and are physically smaller - an important consideration for retrofit and construction costs. A detailed discussion of fluidized beds, including their application in waste-heat recovery and the factors affecting FBWHB design is presented. Design methodology is discussed along with a preliminary engineering design for recovering heat from a waste-gas stream, a typical FBWHB application.

  6. Simultaneous power generation and heat recovery using a heat pipe assisted thermoelectric generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new passive power cogeneration system using industrial waste heat was introduced. • Heat pipes and thermoelectrics were used for recovering waste heat and electricity. • Theoretical model predicted the 2 kW test rig could recover 1.345 kW thermal power. • 10.39 W electrical power was produced equivalent to 0.77% conversion efficiency. - Abstract: This research explores a new method of recovering waste heat and electricity using a combination of heat pipes and thermoelectric generators (HP-TEG). The HP-TEG system consists of Bismuth Telluride (Bi2Te3) based thermoelectric generators (TEGs), which are sandwiched between two finned heat pipes to achieve a temperature gradient across the TEG for thermoelectricity generation. A theoretical model was developed to predict the waste heat recovery and electricity conversion performances of the HP-TEG system under different parametric conditions. The modelling results show that the HP-TEG system has the capability of recovering 1.345 kW of waste heat and generating 10.39 W of electrical power using 8 installed TEGs. An experimental test bench for the HP-TEG system is under development and will be discussed in this paper

  7. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  8. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States. Appendix, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This volume contains appendices for the following: Overview of improved oil recovery methods (enhanced oil recovery methods and advanced secondary recovery methods); Benefits of improved oil recovery, selected data for the analyzed states; and List of TORIS fields and reservoirs.

  9. Testing heated flint palaeodose protocols using dose recovery procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating of materials from archaeological contexts has been shown to be an accurate method when comparisons are made with other chronometric dating methods; however, little has been published on the verification of the measurement protocols used to determine the equivalent dose (palaeodose). Instead of testing TL dating protocols for heated flint using archaeological material with unknown thermal and radiation history, dose recovery tests for three samples of different geological origin are presented. These samples exhibit TL emission in the UV, blue and orange-red wavelengths. In addition to the two multiple aliquot protocols (standard additive-regeneration and normalization) generally used to determine the palaeodose, the single-aliquot-regenerative-dose (SAR) TL and OSL procedure, a 'short' SAR-TL and isothermal luminescence (IT) decay procedures are applied using detection windows limited to these emissions. Accurate dose recovery is obtained for the standard and normalization protocols in the commonly employed detection window (UV-blue), the 'short' SAR in the orange-red window and some IT measurements. While the standard techniques give the most accurate and precise results, detection of the TL and IT orange-red emission in connection with a 'short' SAR protocol also gave accurate and precise results. Such procedures are especially suitable for samples too small for standard multiple aliquot techniques, which require large samples

  10. A new open absorption heat pump for latent heat recovery from moist gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new open absorption heat pump system was proposed. • The new system aims at recovering latent heat from low-temperature moist gas. • The new system can utilize a lower temperature range of heat source. • COPh and heat recovery efficiency is high with the production of high-temperature steam. • Increasing generation temperature and humidity of gas is beneficial for the new system. - Abstract: Conventional drying processes discharge high humidity gas to the atmosphere. The exhaust gas contains large amount of energy. The direct discharging would result in relatively large energy waste. In order to improve the thermal efficiency of drying process, in this paper, a new open absorption heat pump system was proposed, which aims at recovering the latent heat from exhausted moist gas and producing steam for reutilization. The working principle was discussed in detail and thermodynamic models were established to analyze the performance of the new system. The new system can work under both single-stage and double-stage modes. Simulation results showed that the new system could utilize a heat source with lower generation temperature compared with that utilized by a traditional open absorption system. The temperature range of heat source for the double-stage mode is 130–160 °C, and that for the single-stage mode is 160–175 °C. The new system also eliminates the limitation of traditional close absorption system, whose evaporation temperature has to be lower than the dew point temperature of discharged moist gas to recover the latent heat of water steam. Simulation results also indicated an improved COPh of the new system compared with that of double-stage close absorption heat pump system. The COPh of the new system varied from 1.52 to 1.97 and the efficiency of heat recovery varied from 15.1% to 54.8% when the temperature of heat source varied from 135 °C to 175 °C and saturated steam of 100 °C was produced

  11. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hastelloy N and 242, shows corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures. • Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in at 650, 700, and 850 °C for 200, 500, and 1000 h. • Thermal gradients and galvanic couples in the molten salts enhance corrosion rates. • Corrosion rates found were typically <10 mils per year. - Abstract: This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non-nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, that show good corrosion resistance in molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700 °C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in 58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850 °C for 200, 500, and 1000 h. Corrosion rates were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <100 μm per year after 1000 h of corrosion tests. No catastrophic corrosion was observed in the diffusion welded regions. For materials of construction, nickel-based alloys and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of the type of salt impurity and alloy composition, with respect to chromium and carbon, to better define the best conditions for corrosion resistance. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high-temperature components per American Society of Mechanical Engineers

  12. Disposal of High-Temperature Slags: A Review of Integration of Heat Recovery and Material Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays with the continuous urbanization in China, the carbon emission and resource shortage have been serious issues, for which the disposal of blast furnace slags (BFS) and steel slags (SS) discharged from the metallurgical industry make up a significant strategy. The output of crude steel reached 823 Mt in China in 2014 and the thermal heat in these slags was equivalent to ~18 Mt of standard coal. Herein, the recent advances were systemically reviewed and analyzed, mainly from two respects, i.e., integration of heat recovery and material recycling and crystallization control of the slags. It was first found that for the heat recovery from BFS, the most intensively investigated physical method and chemical method were centrifugal granulation and gasification reaction, respectively. Furthermore, a two-step approach could contribute to a promising strategy for the treatment of slags, i.e., the liquid slags were first granulated into small particles, and then other further treatment was performed such as gasification reaction. With regard to SS, the effective disposal could be achieved using a selective crystallization and phase separation (SCPS) method, and moreover, the solid solution of 2CaO·SiO2 and the target phases could act as a promising enriched phase to extract the valuable elements.

  13. Control optimizations for heat recovery from CO2 refrigeration systems in supermarket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Application of supermarket energy control system model. • Heat recovery from CO2 refrigeration system in supermarket space conditioning. • Effect of pressure controls of CO2 refrigeration system on heat recovery potentials. • Control optimization of CO2 refrigeration system for heat recovery in supermarket. - Abstract: A modern supermarket energy control system has a concurrent need for electricity, food refrigeration and space heating or cooling. Approximately 10% of this energy is for conventional gas-powered heating. In recent years, the use of CO2 as a refrigerant in supermarket systems has received considerable attention due to its negligible contribution to direct greenhouse gas emissions and excellent thermophysical and heat transfer properties. CO2 refrigeration systems also offer more compact component designs over a conventional HFC system and heat recovery potential from compressor discharge. In this paper, the heat recovery potential of an all-CO2 cascade refrigeration system in a supermarket has been investigated using the supermarket simulation model “SuperSim” developed by the authors. It has been shown that at UK weather conditions, the heat recovery potential of CO2 refrigeration systems can be increased by increasing the condenser/gas cooler pressure to the point where all the heat requirements are satisfied. However, the optimum level of heat recovery will vary during the year and the control system should be able to continuously optimize this level based on the relative cost of energy, i.e., gas and electricity

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L. leaves during and after recovery from heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guo-Tian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L. leaves was quantified using the Affymetrix Grape Genome oligonucleotide microarray (15,700 transcripts, followed by quantitative Real-Time PCR validation for some transcript profiles. Results We found that about 8% of the total probe sets were responsive to heat stress and/or to subsequent recovery in grape leaves. The heat stress and recovery responses were characterized by different transcriptional changes. The number of heat stress-regulated genes was almost twice the number of recovery-regulated genes. The responsive genes identified in this study belong to a large number of important traits and biological pathways, including cell rescue (i.e., antioxidant enzymes, protein fate (i.e., HSPs, primary and secondary metabolism, transcription factors, signal transduction, and development. We have identified some common genes and heat shock factors (HSFs that were modulated differentially by heat stress and recovery. Most HSP genes were upregulated by heat stress but were downregulated by the recovery. On the other hand, some specific HSP genes or HSFs were uniquely responsive to heat stress or recovery. Conclusion The effect of heat stress and recovery on grape appears to be associated with multiple processes and mechanisms including stress-related genes, transcription factors, and metabolism. Heat stress and recovery elicited common up- or downregulated genes as well as unique sets of responsive genes. Moreover, some genes were regulated in opposite directions by heat stress and recovery

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves during and after recovery from heat stress

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Guo-Tian; Wang Jun-Fang; Cramer Grant; Dai Zhan-Wu; Duan Wei; Xu Hong-Guo; Wu Ben-Hong; Fan Pei-Ge; Wang Li-Jun; Li Shao-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Grapes are a major fruit crop around the world. Heat stress can significantly reduce grape yield and quality. Changes at the molecular level in response to heat stress and subsequent recovery are poorly understood. To elucidate the effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery on expression of genes by grape leaves representing the classic heat stress response and thermotolerance mechanisms, transcript abundance of grape (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves was quantified using the ...

  16. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary and Crystalline Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Mike S. [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada); Detwiler, Russell L. [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada); Lao, Kang [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada); Serajian, Vahid [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada); Elkhoury, Jean [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada); Diessl, Julia [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada); White, Nicky [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Calgary (Canada)

    2012-12-13

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. The primary objectives of this DOE research effort are to develop and document optimum design configurations and operating practices to produce geothermal power from hot permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations using advanced horizontal well recirculation systems. During Phase I of this research project Terralog Technologies USA and The University of California, Irvine (UCI), have completed preliminary investigations and documentation of advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. We have also identified significant geologic resources appropriate for application of such technology. The main challenge for such recirculation systems is to optimize both the design configuration and the operating practices for cost-effective geothermal energy recovery. These will be strongly influenced by sedimentary formation properties, including thickness and dip, temperature, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, permeability, and porosity; and by working fluid properties.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of a Total Heat Recovery Unit with Polymer Membrane Foils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Lei; Yuan, Shu; Nie, Jinzhe

    2014-01-01

    condition indoors. The airflows taken from the two chambers were connected into the total heat recovery unit and exchange heat in a polymer membrane foil heat exchanger installed inside the unit. The temperature and humidity of the air upstream and downstream of the heat exchanger were measured. Based on...... climate. The test was also conducted in isothermal conditions to observe the moisture transfer performance of the polymer membrane heat exchanger. The results of the experiment shows that total heat recovery equipment tested can recover up to 60 % of the total heat from the ventilation air. Around 87 % of...

  18. Optimal operation of integrated processes. Studies on heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glemmestad, Bjoern

    1997-12-31

    Separators, reactors and a heat exchanger network (HEN) for heat recovery are important parts of an integrated plant. This thesis deals with the operation of HENs, in particular, optimal operation. The purpose of heat integration is to save energy, but the HEN also introduces new interactions and feedback into the overall plant. A prerequisite for optimisation is that there are extra degrees of freedom left after regulatory control is implemented. It is shown that extra degrees of freedom may not always be utilized for energy optimisation, and a quantitative expression for the degrees of freedom that can be so utilized are presented. A simplified expression that is often valid is also deduced. The thesis presents some improvements and generalisations of a structure based method that has been proposed earlier. Structural information is used to divide possible manipulations into three categories depending on how each manipulation affects the utility consumption. By means of these categories and two heuristic rules for operability, the possible manipulations are ordered in a priority table. This table is used to determine which manipulation should be preferred and which manipulation should be selected if an active manipulation is saturated. It is shown that the method may correspond to split-range control. A method that uses parametric information in addition to structural information is proposed. In this method, the optimal control structure is found through solving an integer programming problem. The thesis also proposes a method that combines the use of steady state optimisation and optimal selection of measurements. 86 refs., 46 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Current and future prospects for heat recovery from waste in European district heating systems: A literature and data review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Urban; Münster, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Municipal solid waste has seen increasing annual volumes for many decades in contemporary Europe and constitutes, if not properly managed, an environmental problem due to local pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. From an energy perspective, waste is also an alternative fuel for power and heat...... heat distribution infrastructures, without which no large-scale recovery and utilisation of excess heat is possible. In this paper, which aims to estimate municipal solid waste volumes available for heat recovery in European district heating systems in 2030, a literature and data review is performed to...... generation; energy recovery from waste represents an effective measure to reduce landfilling and avoid disposal emissions while simultaneously reducing the equivalent demand for primary energy supply. A key factor for obtaining the full synergetic benefits of this energy recovery is the presence of local...

  20. Model predictive control of a waste heat recovery system for automotive diesel engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Willems, F.; De Jager, B.; Steinbuch, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a switching Model Predictive Control strategy is designed for an automotive Waste Heat Recovery system with two parallel evaporators. The objective is to maximize Waste Heat Recovery system output power, while satisfying safe operation under highly dynamic disturbances from the engine

  1. Study on a heat recovery system for the thermal power plant utilizing air cooling island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new heat recovery system for CHP (combined heat and power) systems named HRU (heat recovery unit) is presented, which could recover the low grade heat of exhausted steam from the turbine at the thermal power plant directly. Heat recovery of exhausted steam is often accomplished by recovering the heat of cooling water in current systems. Therefore, two processes of heat transfer is needed at least. However, exhausted steam could be condensed in the evaporator of HRU directly, which reduce one process of heat transfer. A special evaporator is designed condense the exhausted steam directly. Simulated results are compared to experiments, which could include the calculation of heat transfer coefficients of different parts of HRU. It is found that about 25Mw of exhausted steam is recovered by this system. HRU could be promising for conventional CHP systems, which could increase the total energy efficiency obviously and enlarge the heating capacity of a built CHP system. - Highlights: • A new heat recovery system for thermal power plant is presented. • A mathematical model including heat transfer coefficients calculation is given. • This heat recovery system is experimented at a thermal power plant. • Performances of this system under different working conditions are simulated

  2. Design and simulation of advanced charge recovery piezoactuator drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German Artificial Sphincter System project aims at the development of an implantable sphincter prosthesis driven by a piezoelectrically actuated micropump. The system has been designed to be fully implantable, i.e. the power supply is provided by a rechargeable lithium polymer battery. In order to provide sufficient battery duration and to limit battery dimensions, special effort has to be made to minimize power consumption of the whole system and, in particular, of the piezoactuator driver circuitry. Inductive charge recovery can be used to recover part of the charge stored within the actuator. We are going to present a simplified inductor-based circuit capable of voltage inversion across the actuator without the need of an additional negative voltage source. The dimension of the inductors required for such a concept is nevertheless significant. We therefore present a novel alternative concept, called direct switching, where the equivalent capacitance of the actuator is charged directly by a step-up converter and discharged by a step-down converter. We achieved superior performance compared to a simple inductor-based driver with the advantage of using small-size chip inductors. As a term of comparison, the performance of the aforementioned drivers is compared to a conventional driver that does not implement any charge recovery technique. With our design we have been able to achieve more than 50% reduction in power consumption compared to the simplest conventional driver. The new direct switching driver performs 15% better than an inductor-based driver. A novel, whole-system SPICE simulation is presented, where both the driving circuit and the piezoactuator are modeled making use of advanced nonlinear models. Such a simulation is a precious tool to design and optimize piezoactuator drivers

  3. Experimental Study of the Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump with Engine Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas engine driven heat pumps (GEHPs represent one of practical solutions to effectively utilize fossil fuel energy and reduce environmental pollution. In this paper, the performance characteristics of the GEHP were investigated experimentally with engine heat recovery. A GEHP test facility was set up for this purpose. The effects of several important factors including engine speed, ambient temperature, condenser water flow rate, and condenser water inlet temperature on the system performance were studied over a wide range of operating conditions. The results showed that the engine waste heat accounted for about 40–50% of the total heat capacity over the studied operating conditions. It also showed that engine speed and ambient temperature had significant effects on the GEHP performance. The coefficient of performance (COP and the primary energy ratio (PER decreased by 14% and 12%, respectively, as engine speed increased from 1400 rpm to 2000 rpm. On the other hand, the COP and PER of the system increased by 22% and 16%, respectively, with the ambient temperature increasing from 3 to 12°C. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the condenser water flow rate and condenser water inlet temperature had little influence on the COP of the heat pump and the PER of the GEHP system.

  4. Advanced radioisotope heat source for Stirling Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobry, T. J.; Walberg, G.

    2001-02-01

    The heat exchanger on a Stirling Engine requires a thermal energy transfer from a heat source to the engine through a very limited area on the heater head circumference. Designing an effective means to assure maximum transfer efficiency is challenging. A single General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), which has been qualified for space operations, would satisfy thermal requirements for a single Stirling Engine that would produce 55 electrical watts. However, it is not efficient to transfer its thermal energy to the engine heat exchanger from its rectangular geometry. This paper describes a conceptual design of a heat source to improve energy transfer for Stirling Engines that may be deployed to power instrumentation on space missions. .

  5. Advanced radioisotope heat source for Stirling Engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heat exchanger on a Stirling Engine requires a thermal energy transfer from a heat source to the engine through a very limited area on the heater head circumference. Designing an effective means to assure maximum transfer efficiency is challenging. A single General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), which has been qualified for space operations, would satisfy thermal requirements for a single Stirling Engine that would produce 55 electrical watts. However, it is not efficient to transfer its thermal energy to the engine heat exchanger from its rectangular geometry. This paper describes a conceptual design of a heat source to improve energy transfer for Stirling Engines that may be deployed to power instrumentation on space missions

  6. A waste heat recovery steam power generation system for ACE Power Embilipitiya (Pvt) Ltd, Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Weerasiri, Udayani Priyadarshana

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the heat recovery from exhaust gas at the ACE Power Embilipitiya (Pvt) Ltd (APE) in Sri Lanka was conceptually proposed and evaluated. APE has an installed capacity of 100 MW comprising 14 units of 7.5MW medium speed diesel engines fired with heavy fuel oil. There is only a minimum recovery of waste heat in the plant at the moment, only for fuel preheating, whereas waste heat recovery (WHR) boilers of 750kWth are equipped on eight engines. The larger portion of the waste heat i...

  7. Waste heat and water recovery opportunities in California tomato paste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water and energy efficiency are important for the vitality of the food processing industry as demand for these limited resources continues to increase. Tomato processing, which is dominated by paste production, is a major industry in California – where the majority of tomatoes are processed in the United States. Paste processing generates large amounts of condensate as moisture is removed from the fruit. Recovery of the waste heat in this condensate and reuse of the water may provide avenues to decrease net energy and water use at processing facilities. However, new processing methods are needed to create demand for the condensate waste heat. In this study, the potential to recover condensate waste heat and apply it to the tomato enzyme thermal inactivation processing step (the hot break) is assessed as a novel application. A modeling framework is established to predict heat transfer to tomatoes during the hot break. Heat recovery and reuse of the condensate water are related to energy and monetary savings gained through decreased use of steam, groundwater pumping, cooling towers, and wastewater processing. This analysis is informed by water and energy usage data from relevant unit operations at a commercial paste production facility. The case study indicates potential facility seasonal energy and monetary savings of 7.3 GWh and $166,000, respectively, with most savings gained through reduced natural gas use. The sensitivity of heat recovery to various process variables associated with heat exchanger design and processing conditions is presented to identify factors that affect waste heat recovery. - Highlights: • The potential to recovery waste heat in tomato paste processing is examined. • Heat transfer from evaporator condensate to tomatoes in the hot break is modeled. • Processing facility data is used in model to predict heat recovery energy savings. • The primary benefit of heat recovery is reduced use of natural gas in boilers. • Reusing

  8. Radiographic examination of pressured parts for heat recovery steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A larger Nuclear Power Generation and Non Nuclear Power Generation are shipped to the job sites in various stages of fabrication and subassembly. Welding and welding related processes are central to Power Generation component fabrication and assembly in the site. This papers presents some results of the investigation that was carried out to examine the welding results of the site construction of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Piping of Tanjung Priok Gas Fired Power Plant Extension Project (740 MW) using the Radiography Test Method based on the ASME Standard. From this investigation it could be concluded that there was no crack founded in the selected specimens of the piping. The rejectable Incomplete Penetration was found in the Hot Reheat Steam Piping HRSG1. Some Porosities and Slag Inclusion are rejected because their size and length are longer than acceptable value limits, therefore should be repaired. However some of the results are accepted and no need to be repaired. The rejected Worm Holes is found on IP Super Heater Inlet Piping of HRSG1 whereas the undercut occurred on HP Steam Drum of HRSG. (author)

  9. Boiling heat transfer modern developments and advances

    CERN Document Server

    Lahey, Jr, RT

    2013-01-01

    This volume covers the modern developments in boiling heat transfer and two-phase flow, and is intended to provide industrial, government and academic researchers with state-of-the-art research findings in the area of multiphase flow and heat transfer technology. Special attention is given to technology transfer, indicating how recent significant results may be used for practical applications. The chapters give detailed technical material that will be useful to engineers and scientists who work in the field of multiphase flow and heat transfer. The authors of all chapters are members of the

  10. Exergetic Optimization of the Heat Recovery Steam Generators by Imposing the Total Heat Transfer Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Feidt

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original and fast method for the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG exergetic optimization. The objective is maximizing the exergy transfer to the water / steam circuit. The proposed approach, different from the classical method that fixes the pinch point, is essentially thermodynamic but it considers also the economics by imposing the total heat transfer area of HRSG. The HRSG may have one or two steam pressures, without reheat. The input data from the gas turbine are: the mass flow rate, the temperature and the molar composition of flue gases. The results are the optimum pressures of the superheated steam. The numerical computations were realized in Delphi programming utility. The obtained results are in agreement with the recent literature.

  11. Advanced Water Recovery Technologies for Long Duration Space Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Scan X.

    2005-01-01

    Extended-duration space travel and habitation require recovering water from wastewater generated in spacecrafts and extraterrestrial outposts since the largest consumable for human life support is water. Many wastewater treatment technologies used for terrestrial applications are adoptable to extraterrestrial situations but challenges remain as constraints of space flights and habitation impose severe limitations of these technologies. Membrane-based technologies, particularly membrane filtration, have been widely studied by NASA and NASA-funded research groups for possible applications in space wastewater treatment. The advantages of membrane filtration are apparent: it is energy-efficient and compact, needs little consumable other than replacement membranes and cleaning agents, and doesn't involve multiphase flow, which is big plus for operations under microgravity environment. However, membrane lifespan and performance are affected by the phenomena of concentration polarization and membrane fouling. This article attempts to survey current status of membrane technologies related to wastewater treatment and desalination in the context of space exploration and quantify them in terms of readiness level for space exploration. This paper also makes specific recommendations and predictions on how scientist and engineers involving designing, testing, and developing space-certified membrane-based advanced water recovery technologies can improve the likelihood of successful development of an effective regenerative human life support system for long-duration space missions.

  12. Advances in Nuclear Power Process Heat Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an IAEA coordinated research project, this publication compiles the findings of research and development activities related to practical nuclear process heat applications. An overview of current progress on high temperature gas cooled reactors coupling schemes for different process heat applications, such as hydrogen production and desalination is included. The associated safety aspects are also highlighted. The summary report documents the results and conclusions of the project.

  13. Energy efficiency improvement of dryer section heat recovery systems in paper machines – A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Sivill, Leena; Ahtila, Pekka

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Modern paper machines are equipped with heat recovery systems that transfer heat from the humid exhaust air of the paper machine?s dryer section to different process streams. As a result of process changes, the heat recovery systems may operate in conditions far from the original design point, creating a significant potential for energy efficiency improvement. In this paper we demonstrate this potential with a case study of three operating paper machines. Both operational ...

  14. Experimental Efficiency investigation on heat recovery system used in a solar-powered desalination process

    OpenAIRE

    Rachdi, Aouatef; Qoaider, Louy; Ben-Amara, Mahmoud; Guizani, Amenallah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to experimentally study, the effect of the heat recovery on water production in a solar desalination process that is working with multiple stage humidification technique. The water production, the temperature and the humidity were tested for such a pilot plant, which operates without and with a heat recovery system. The humidifier efficiency increases with the number of the operating heat exchangers and cannot normally exceed 45% when the system operates wi...

  15. Experimental Study of Thermoelectric Heat Pump Water Heater with Exhaust Heat Recovery from Kitchens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhong-bing; ZHANG Ling; YANG Zhang; XU Ming; HAN Tian-he

    2009-01-01

    A new kind of thermoelectric heat pump water heater for kitchens exhaust heat recovery was pre-sented,and its performances were investigated under different operating voltages.The experiment results show that the coefficient of performance decreases and the temperature difference between the hot and cold sides be-comes larger with the increase of the operating voltage,but the heating time becomes short.The higher the temperature of water,the greater the temperature difference between the hot and cold sides,leading to a smaller eoeffieient of performance.Under an exhaust temperature of 36℃,the coefficient of performance decreases from 1.66 tO 1.22 when the temperature of water increases from 28℃to 46℃with operating voltage 16 V.Performance tests illustrate that,compared with the conventional electrical water heaters,the new kind of ther-moelectric heat pump water heater is more coefficient.

  16. Techno-economic study of a heat pump enhanced flue gas heat recovery for biomass boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An active condensation system for the heat recovery of biomass boilers is evaluated. The active condensation system utilizes the flue gas enthalpy exiting the boiler by combining a quench and a compression heat pump. The system is modelled by mass and energy balances. This study evaluates the operating costs, primary energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions on an Austrian data basis for four test cases. Two pellet boilers (10 kW and 100 kW) and two wood chip boilers (100 kW and 10 MW) are considered. The economic analysis shows a decrease in operating costs between 2% and 13%. Meanwhile the primary energy efficiency is increased by 3–21%. The greenhouse gas emissions in CO2 equivalents are calculated to 15.3–27.9 kg MWh−1 based on an Austrian electricity mix. The payback time is evaluated on a net present value (NPV) method, showing a payback time of 2–12 years for the 10 MW wood chip test case. - Highlights: • A heat pump was studied to recover both sensible and latent heat of the flue gas. • The economic analysis shows a decrease in operating costs between 2% and 13%. • For a 10 MW wood chip boiler a payback time of 2–12 years was estimated

  17. Performance improvement of a 330MWe power plant by flue gas heat recovery system

    OpenAIRE

    Xu Changchun; Xu Min; Zhao Ming; Liang Junyu; Sai Juncong; Qiu Yalin; Xiang Wenguo

    2016-01-01

    In a utility boiler, the most heat loss is from the exhaust flue gas. In order to reduce the exhaust flue gas temperature and further boost the plant efficiency, an improved indirect flue gas heat recovery system and an additional economizer system are proposed. The waste heat of flue gas is used for high-pressure condensate regeneration heating. This reduces high pressure steam extraction from steam turbine and more power is generated. The waste heat recov...

  18. Advanced Heat Map and Clustering Analysis Using Heatmap3

    OpenAIRE

    Shilin Zhao; Yan Guo; Quanhu Sheng; Yu Shyr

    2014-01-01

    Heat maps and clustering are used frequently in expression analysis studies for data visualization and quality control. Simple clustering and heat maps can be produced from the “heatmap” function in R. However, the “heatmap” function lacks certain functionalities and customizability, preventing it from generating advanced heat maps and dendrograms. To tackle the limitations of the “heatmap” function, we have developed an R package “heatmap3” which significantly improves the original “heatmap”...

  19. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullock, Daniel [USDOE Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center, Woodlands, TX (United States)

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  20. Model Predictive Control of Offshore Power Stations With Waste Heat Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Chan, Richard; Li, Xiangan; Lyengar, Krishna; Haglind, Fredrik; Ydstie, Erik

    2016-01-01

    control (MPC) coupled with a steady-state performance optimizer has been developed in the SIMULINK language and is documented in the paper. The test case is the regulation of a power system serving an oil and gas platform in the Norwegian Sea. One of the three gas turbines is combined with an organic......The implementation of waste heat recovery units on oil and gas offshore platforms demands advances in both design methods and control systems. Model-based control algorithms can play an important role in the operation of offshore power stations. A novel regulator based on a linear model predictive...... Rankine cycle (ORC) turbogenerator to increase the energy conversion efficiency. Results show a potential reduction of frequency drop up to 40%for a step in the load set-point of 4 MW, compared to proportional–integral control systems. Fuel savings in the range of 2–3% are also expected by optimizing on...

  1. Volatile organic compound recovery by Brayton cycle Heat Pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic solvent emissions from industrial processes are a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs contribute to the formation of photochemical ozone, a major component of smog. Over 90 percent of the organic solvents used in industry are emitted. Not only does this represent a significant source of air pollution, but it also represents a waste of energy resources. A pound of solvent requires an average of 23,000 Btu of energy to produce, in the form of the feedstock and processing energy expenditures. In 1988, the total amount of solvents emitted in the United States was over 4 billion pounds and represent 100 trillion Btu in energy loss. In the mid-1970's, the 3M Company began developing the Brayton Cycle Heat Pump for solvent recovery (BCSRHP). In 1979, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a project to fabricate and install a BCSRHP in a 3M plant in Hutchinson, Minnesota. DOE has continued sponsoring the development of a large BCSRHP system with 3M, and NUCON International (NUCON). In 1989 DOE and NUCON, with cosponsorship from the Electric Power Research Institute and Southern California Edison Company began development of a small-scale system for use by small emitters. To obtain data for design of the small-scale system, a small, mobile pilot plant was built by NUCON. Between 1990 and 1991, the pilot plant was demonstrated at four industrial sites in Southern California. The operation of the pilot plant was continuously monitored during the demonstrations, and its ability to remove VOCS, utility consumption and other operating characteristics were recorded and its performance quantified

  2. Compacting of coal for heat recovery ovens, Illawarra Coke Company Pty Ltd., Coalcliffe, NSW, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, R.; Schuecker, F.; Kim, R. [Illawara Coke Company, NSW (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    This paper described a simple method of compacting coal for heat-recovery coke making. Coal carbonization tests in commercial non-recovery coke ovens have shown that coal densities greater than 1100 kg/m{sup 3} were obtained in a simple manner by means of hydraulically actuated compression plates. The tests and the results have significantly increased the level of knowledge regarding compacting technology. The coke produced from the compacted cakes is comparable to well-known qualities from non-recovery coke ovens using top charging technology. The quality of stamp charged heat recovery coke will provide a positive impact on blast furnace performance. 2 refs., 5 figs., 11 photos.

  3. Selection of Heat Recovery Ventilators in Different Climate Zones of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Ke; ZHAO Jing-de; LIU Jia-ping

    2007-01-01

    Considering four different climate zones in China, an investigation on the choice of heat recovery ventilator for the buildings with little moisture emissions is carried out. The annual composition of energy consumption of air intake for per unitary air ventilation flow rate is evaluated by employing the testing data of climatic parameters in eight selected cities. The analysis shows that the total heat recovery is suitable in a controlled ventilation system with air humidity controlled during heating period of all the climates. For the building without air humidity controlled in winter, the sensible heat recovery ventilators can be used in severe cold and cold regions, and total heat recovery systems are more suitable for energy saving in hot summer and cold winter and hot summer and warm winter regions.

  4. Waste heat recovery in data centres in Finland: a choice between new technology adoption and process change

    OpenAIRE

    Gerova, Elitza

    2014-01-01

    In this Master's thesis was studied the feasibility of waste heat recovery in data centres. The aim was to address the problem with the continuously increasing electricity consumption in data centres, to explore the waste heat recovery opportunities in them and to find out which is the preferred alternative for waste heat recovery in the Finnish data centres. Also, to observe the role of management in influencing the waste heat recovery policies. The study was conducted through a mixe...

  5. Comparative assessment of alternative cycles for waste heat recovery and upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermally activated systems based on sorption cycles, as well as mechanical systems based on vapor compression/expansion are assessed in this study for waste heat recovery applications. In particular, ammonia-water sorption cycles for cooling and mechanical work recovery, a heat transformer using lithium bromide-water as the working fluid pair to yield high temperature heat, and organic Rankine cycles using refrigerant R245fa for work recovery as well as versions directly coupled to a vapor compression cycle to yield cooling are analyzed with overall heat transfer conductances for heat exchangers that use similar approach temperature differences for each cycle. Two representative cases are considered, one for smaller-scale and lower temperature applications using waste heat at 60 oC, and the other for larger-scale and higher temperature waste heat at 120 oC. Comparative assessments of these cycles on the basis of efficiencies and system footprints guide the selection of waste heat recovery and upgrade systems for different applications and waste heat availabilities. Furthermore, these considerations are used to investigate four case studies for waste heat recovery for data centers, vehicles, and process plants, illustrating the utility and limitations of such solutions. The increased implementation of such waste heat recovery systems in a variety of applications will lead to decreased primary source inputs and sustainable energy utilization. -- Highlights: → Sorption and mechanical pathways for the conversion of waste heat streams to work, cooling, and temperature boosting were investigated. → Waste heat sources including 300 W of energy at 60oC and 1 kW of energy at 120 oC were analyzed. → Up to about seventy percent of the input waste heat can be converted to cooling. → Up to about ten percent can be converted to work. → Up to about 47 percent can be upgraded to a higher temperature.

  6. Techno-economic analysis and optimization of the heat recovery of utility boiler flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Four typical flue gas heat recovery schemes are quantitatively analyzed. • The analysis considers thermodynamic, heat transfer and hydrodynamics factors. • Techno-economic analysis and optimization design are carried out. • High-stage steam substitute scheme obtains better energy-saving effect. • Large heat transfer area and high flue gas resistances weaken overall performance. - Abstract: Coal-fired power plants in China consume nearly half of available coals, and the resulting CO2 emissions cover over 40% of total national emissions. Therefore, reducing the energy expenditure of coal-fired power plants is of great significance to China’s energy security and greenhouse gas reduction programs. For coal-fired power plants, the temperature of a boiler’s exhaust gas reaches 120–150 °C or even higher. The thermal energy of boiler’s exhaust accounts for approximately 3–8% of the total energy of fuel input. Given these factors, we conducted a techno-economic analysis and optimization design of the heat recovery system using boiler exhaust gas. This research is conformed to the principles of thermodynamic, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. Based on the data from an existing 1000 MW typical power generation unit in China, four typical flue gas heat recovery schemes are quantitatively analyzed from the thermodynamics perspective. The impacts of flue gas heat recovery on net work output and standard coal consumption rate of various schemes are performed. Furthermore, the transfer area of heat recovery exchanger and the draft fan work increment due to the flue gas pressure drop are analyzed. Finally, a techno-economic analysis of the heat recovery schemes is conducted, and some recommendations on optimization design parameters are proposed, with full consideration of various factors such as the decrease on fuel cost due to energy conservation as well as the investment cost of heat recovery retrofitting. The results revealed that, high

  7. Influence of Compressor Station Waste-Heat Recovery Section on Operational Efficiency of Gas Turbine Drive with Isobaric Heat Supply and Regenerative Heat Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nesenchuk; V. Romaniuk; A. Аbrazovsky; A. Begliak; T. Ryzhova; V. Begliak; Kuzmin, R.

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to utilize existing secondary energy resources for heat supply of an industrial enterprise has been proposed on the basis of the analysis on operation of compressor stations of a cross-country gas pipe-line. The paper considers an influence of waste heat recovery section on operational efficiency of gas turbine drive with regenerative heat utilization.

  8. Influence of Compressor Station Waste-Heat Recovery Section on Operational Efficiency of Gas Turbine Drive with Isobaric Heat Supply and Regenerative Heat Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nesenchuk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to utilize existing secondary energy resources for heat supply of an industrial enterprise has been proposed on the basis of the analysis on operation of compressor stations of a cross-country gas pipe-line. The paper considers an influence of waste heat recovery section on operational efficiency of gas turbine drive with regenerative heat utilization.

  9. High temperature heat recovery systems; Les recuperateurs de chaleur a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, L.

    2003-07-15

    A state-of-the-art of high temperature heat recovery systems has been made to highlight the advantages of recovery in different energy cycles, and to compare the different geometries, materials and fabrication processes used by the different manufacturers. This leads to define the criteria that a heat recovery system must satisfy in gas turbine cogeneration applications. The pre-dimensioning of a recovery system has been performed in order to compare different geometries and to evaluate them with respect to the criteria defined in the bibliographic study. Finally, the new configuration of the 'Claire' loop has permitted to experimentally characterize a recovery system with an innovative technology based on an helical geometry. These tests have permitted to obtain the global data of the recovery system (efficiency, pressure drop, global exchange coefficient, friction coefficient, velocity and temperature profiles) and to position it with respect to the criteria defined in the bibliographic study. (J.S.)

  10. Removal heat extraction systems in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two main problems generally attributed to the electricity generation by nuclear power are the security of the facility and the radioactivity of the nuclear wastes, in a way that the only tasks of the European Commission on this matter are to make sure a high level of security in the facilities, as well as an adequate fuel and waste management. In this paper we discuss about the main lines in which the CIEMAT and the Polytechnic University of Valencia are working relative to the study of the passive working systems of the advanced designs reactors. (Author) 24 refs

  11. Industrial applications study. Volume IV. Industrial plant surveys. Final report. [Waste heat recovery and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Harry L.; Hamel, Bernard B.; Karamchetty, Som; Steigelmann, William H.; Gajanana, Birur C.; Agarwal, Anil P.; Klock, Lawrence M.; Henderson, James M.; Calobrisi, Gary; Hedman, Bruce A.; Koluch, Michael; Biancardi, Frank; Bass, Robert; Landerman, Abraham; Peters, George; Limaye, Dilip; Price, Jeffrey; Farr, Janet

    1977-01-01

    An initial evaluation of the waste heat recovery and utilization potential in the manufacturing portion of the industrial sector is presented. The scope of this initial phase addressed the feasibility of obtaining in-depth energy information in the industrial sector. Within this phase, the methodology and approaches for data gathering and assessment were established. Using these approaches, energy use and waste heat profiles were developed at the 2-digit level; with this data, waste heat utilization technologies were evaluated. This study represents an important first step in the evaluation of waste heat recovery potential.

  12. Energetic and exergetic analysis of waste heat recovery systems in the cement industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a typical cement producing procedure, 25% of the total energy used is electricity and 75% is thermal energy. However, the process is characterized by significant heat losses mainly by the flue gases and the ambient air stream used for cooling down the clinker (about 35%–40% of the process heat loss). Approximately 26% of the heat input to the system is lost due to dust, clinker discharge, radiation and convection losses from the kiln and the preheaters. A heat recovery system could be used to increase the efficiency of the cement plant and thus contribute to emissions decrease. The aim of this paper is to examine and compare energetically and exergetically, two different WHR (waste heat recovery) methods: a water-steam Rankine cycle, and an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). A parametric study proved that the water steam technology is more efficient than ORC in exhaust gases temperature higher than 310 °C. Finally a brief economic assessment of the most efficient solution was implemented. WHR installations in cement industry can contribute significantly in the reduction of the electrical consumptions operating cost thus being a very attractive investment with a payback period up to 5 years. - Highlights: • This paper presents waste heat recovery as a way to gain energy from the exhaust gases in a cement plant. • Water steam cycle and ORC has been analyzed for waste heat recovery. • The energetic and exergetic evaluation of the two waste heat recovery processes is presented and compared

  13. Performance improvement of a 330MWe power plant by flue gas heat recovery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Changchun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a utility boiler, the most heat loss is from the exhaust flue gas. In order to reduce the exhaust flue gas temperature and further boost the plant efficiency, an improved indirect flue gas heat recovery system and an additional economizer system are proposed. The waste heat of flue gas is used for high-pressure condensate regeneration heating. This reduces high pressure steam extraction from steam turbine and more power is generated. The waste heat recovery of flue gas decreases coal consumption. Other approaches for heat recovery of flue gas, direct utilization of flue gas energy and indirect flue gas heat recovery system, are also considered in this work. The proposed systems coupled with a reference 330MWe power plant are simulated using equivalent enthalpy drop method. The results show that the additional economizer scheme has the best performance. When the exhaust flue gas temperature decreases from 153℃ to 123℃, power output increases by 6.37MWe and increment in plant efficiency is about 1.89%. For the improved indirect flue gas heat recovery system, power output increases by 5.68MWe and the increment in plant efficiency is 1.69%.

  14. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  15. Heat Recovery from High Temperature Slags: A Review of Chemical Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Yongqi Sun; Zuotai Zhang; Lili Liu; Xidong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Waste heat recovery from high temperature slags represents the latest potential way to remarkably reduce the energy consumption and CO2 emissions of the steel industry. The molten slags, in the temperature range of 1723–1923 K, carry large amounts of high quality energy. However, the heat recovery from slags faces several fundamental challenges, including their low thermal conductivity, inside crystallization, and discontinuous availability. During past decades, various chemical methods have ...

  16. Heat recovery from Diesel engines: a thermodynamic comparison between Kalina and ORC cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Bombarda, Paola; Invernizzi, Costante; Pietra, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the context of heat recovery for electric power generation, Kalina cycle (a thermodynamic cycle using as working fluid a mixture of water and ammonia) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) represent two different eligible technologies. In this work a comparison between the thermodynamic performances of Kalina cycle and an ORC cycle, using hexamethyldisiloxane as working fluid, was conducted for the case of heat recovery from two Diesel engines, each one with an electrical pow...

  17. Parameter optimization of heat recovery steam generation for hyndai engine h25/33

    OpenAIRE

    MARCHENKO ANDRII PETROVYCH; ALI ADEL HAMZAH; OMAR ADEL HAMZAH

    2016-01-01

    Conducted experimental studies of thermodynamic parameters changes in working environments in Hyundai engine H25/33 when the engine is operating at different times of the year. Obtained regressional dependence to calculate the parameters of working environment in the range of ambient temperature changes from 0 to 40 °C. Based the possibility of use of ICE cooling water in the heat recovery steam generator in its appropriate treatment. Formed mathematical model of the heat recovery steam gener...

  18. Themoeconomic optimization of triple pressure heat recovery steam generator operating parameters for combined cycle plants

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammd Mohammed S.; Petrović Milan V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a method for optimization of operating parameters of a triple pressure heat recovery steam generator. Two types of optimization: (a) thermodynamic and (b) thermoeconomic were preformed. The purpose of the thermodynamic optimization is to maximize the efficiency of the plant. The selected objective for this purpose is minimization of the exergy destruction in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The purpose of the ther...

  19. Wind- and stack-assisted mechanical ventilation with heat recovery and night cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    2012-01-01

    The dual-sided issue of indoor environment and energy consumption have become increasingly important in building design. One possible solution is to ventilate by passive means, such as bystack eect and wind pressure, but this requires the development of new concepts and components. Here we have presented the outline of a heat recovery concept suitable for stack and wind-assistedmechanical ventilation systems with total system pressure losses of 74Pa. The heat recovery concept is based on two ...

  20. Are ORCs a Good Option for Waste Heat Recovery in a Petroleum Refinery?

    OpenAIRE

    Mazetto, Bruno Mitsuo; Silva, Julio Augusto Mendes da; Junior, Silvio De Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    The studies regarding Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs) have been intensified due to the capacity of these systems to convert low-grade energy sources such as geothermal, solar and industrial waste heat into electricity. In this work optimized configurations of ORCs are compared with conventional options of industrial waste heat recovery such as preheating of boiler feed water and cooling of the gas turbine inlet air using an absorption chiller. The study was focused on the recovery of thermal ex...

  1. Analysis of heat recovery from a spray dryer by recirculation of exhaust air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study a spray dryer with heat recovery by partial recirculation of exhaust air. • We examine effects of process parameters on energy efficiency and energy savings. • Decreasing drying air temperature and flow rate will increase energy efficiency. • Increasing recirculation ratio and slurry feed rate will increase energy efficiency. - Abstract: Model simulations were employed to investigate the influences of process parameters on the energy recovery in spray drying process that partially recycle the exhaust drying gas. The energy efficiency and energy saving were studied for various values of recirculation ratios with respect to the temperature and flow rate of the drying air, slurry feed rate and concentration of slurry in spray drying of advanced ceramic materials. As a result, significant gains in energy efficiency and energy saving were obtained for a spray drying system with high recirculation ratio of exhaust air. The high slurry feed rate and the low slurry concentration, inlet drying air temperature and drying air flow rate enhanced the energy efficiency of spray drying system. However, the high energy saving was obtained in spray dryers operating at low slurry feed rate and high slurry concentration

  2. Thermodynamic performance analysis and algorithm model of multi-pressure heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) based on heat exchangers layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A general model of multi-pressure HRSG based on heat exchangers layout is built. • The minimum temperature difference is introduced to replace pinch point analysis. • Effects of layout on dual pressure HRSG thermodynamic performances are analyzed. - Abstract: Changes of heat exchangers layout in heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) will modify the amount of waste heat recovered from flue gas; this brings forward a desire for the optimization of the design of HRSG. In this paper the model of multi-pressure HRSG is built, and an instance of a dual pressure HRSG under three different layouts of Taihu Boiler Co., Ltd. is discussed, with specified values of inlet temperature, mass flow rate, composition of flue gas and water/steam parameters as temperature, pressure etc., steam mass flow rate and heat efficiency of different heat exchangers layout of HRSG are analyzed. This analysis is based on the laws of thermodynamics and incorporated into the energy balance equations for the heat exchangers. In the conclusion, the results of the steam mass flow rate, heat efficiency obtained for three heat exchangers layout of HRSGs are compared. The results show that the optimization of heat exchangers layout of HRSGs has a great significance for waste heat recovery and energy conservation

  3. Waste Heat Recovery by Heat Pipe Air-Preheater to Energy Thrift from the Furnace in a Hot Forging Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerchai Yodrak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Currently, the heat pipe air-preheater has become importance equipment for energy recovery from industrial waste heat because of its low investment cost and high thermal conductivity. Approach: This purpose of the study was to design, construct and test the waste heat recovery by heat pipe air-preheater from the furnace in a hot brass forging process. The mathematical model was developed to predict heat transfer rate and applied to compute the heat pipe air-preheater in a hot brass forging process. The heat pipe air-preheater was designed, constructed and tested under medium temperature operating conditions with inlet hot gas ranging between 370-420°C using water as the working fluid with 50% filling by volume of evaporator length. Results: The experiment findings indicated that when the hot gas temperature increased, the heat transfer rate also increased. If the internal diameter increased, the heat transfer rate increased and when the tube arrangement changed from inline to staggered arrangement, the heat transfer rate increased. Conclusion/Recommendations: The heat pipe air-preheater can reduced the quantity of using gas in the furnace and achieve energy thrift effectively.

  4. Metabolomic profiling of heat stress: hardening and recovery of homeostasis in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Bundy, Jacob G.;

    2006-01-01

    Frequent exposure of terrestrial insects to temperature variation has led to the evolution of protective biochemical and physiological mechanisms, such as the heat shock response, which markedly increases the tolerance to heat stress. Insight into such mechanisms has, so far, mainly relied on...... selective studies of specific compounds or characteristics or studies at the genomic or proteomic levels. In the present study, we have used untargeted NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the biological response to heat stress in Drosophila melanogaster. The metabolite profile was analyzed during recovery...... homeostasis after subsequent heat stress. Several metabolites were identified as responsive to heat stress and could be related to known physiological and biochemical responses. The time course of the recovery of metabolite homeostasis mirrored general changes in gene expression, showing that recovery follows...

  5. Metabolomic profiling of heat stress: hardening and recovery of homeostasis in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmendal, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes; Bundy, Jacob G;

    2006-01-01

    Frequent exposure of terrestrial insects to temperature variation has led to the evolution of protective biochemical and physiological mechanisms, such as the heat shock response, which markedly increases the tolerance to heat stress. Insight into such mechanisms has, so far, mainly relied on...... selective studies of specific compounds or characteristics or studies at the genomic or proteomic levels. In the present study, we have used untargeted NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the biological response to heat stress in Drosophila melanogaster. The metabolite profile was analyzed during recovery...... homeostasis after subsequent heat stress. Several metabolites were identified as responsive to heat stress and could be related to known physiological and biochemical responses. The time course of the recovery of metabolite homeostasis mirrored general changes in gene expression, showing that recovery follows...

  6. Experimental analysis of energy performance of a ventilated window for heat recovery under controlled conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelfeld, David; Svendsen, Svend

    2011-01-01

    A ventilated window in cold climates can be considered as a passive heat recovery system. This study carried out tests to determine the thermal transmittance of ventilated windows by using the Guarded Hot Box. By testing under defined boundary conditions, the investigation described the heat...... balance of the ventilated window and clarified the methodology for thermal performance evaluation. Comparison between windows with and without ventilation using the window-room-ventilation heat balance revealed that a ventilated window can potentially contribute to energy savings. In addition......, it was found that a significant part of preheating occurred through the window frames, which positively influenced the heat recovery of the window but increased the heat loss. Results also showed that increasing air flow decreased the recovery efficiency until the point when the additional thermal...

  7. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-06-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  8. Performance of Helical Coil Heat Recovery Exchanger using Nanofluid as Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Bozorgan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant condidate in chemical processes for heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on reducing the number of turns in a helical coil heat recovery exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity in a biomass heating plant using γ-Al2O3/n-decane nanofluid as coolant. The nanofluid flows through the tubes and the hot n-hexane flows through the shell. The numerical results show that using nanofluid as coolant in a helical coil heat exchanger can reduce the manufacturing cost of the heat exchanger and pumping power by reducing the number of turns of the coil.

  9. Polymers Advance Heat Management Materials for Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For 6 years prior to the retirement of the Space Shuttle Program, the shuttles carried an onboard repair kit with a tool for emergency use: two tubes of NOAX, or "good goo," as some people called it. NOAX flew on all 22 flights following the Columbia accident, and was designed to repair damage that occurred on the exterior of the shuttle. Bill McMahon, a structural materials engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center says NASA needed a solution for the widest range of possible damage to the shuttle s exterior thermal protection system. "NASA looked at several options in early 2004 and decided on a sealant. Ultimately, NOAX performed the best and was selected," he says. To prove NOAX would work effectively required hundreds of samples manufactured at Marshall and Johnson, and a concerted effort from various NASA field centers. Johnson Space Center provided programmatic leadership, testing, tools, and crew training; Glenn Research Center provided materials analysis; Langley Research Center provided test support and led an effort to perform large patch repairs; Ames Research Center provided additional testing; and Marshall provided further testing and the site of NOAX manufacturing. Although the sealant never had to be used in an emergency situation, it was tested by astronauts on samples of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) during two shuttle missions. (RCC is the thermal material on areas of the shuttle that experience the most heat, such as the nose cone and wing leading edges.) The material handled well on orbit, and tests showed the NOAX patch held up well on RCC.

  10. A combined thermodynamic cycle used for waste heat recovery of internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we present a steady-state experiment, energy balance and exergy analysis of exhaust gas in order to improve the recovery of the waste heat of an internal combustion engine (ICE). Considering the different characteristics of the waste heat of exhaust gas, cooling water, and lubricant, a combined thermodynamic cycle for waste heat recovery of ICE is proposed. This combined thermodynamic cycle consists of two cycles: the organic Rankine cycle (ORC), for recovering the waste heat of lubricant and high-temperature exhaust gas, and the Kalina cycle, for recovering the waste heat of low-temperature cooling water. Based on Peng–Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS), the thermodynamic parameters in the high-temperature ORC were calculated and determined via an in-house computer program. Suitable working fluids used in high-temperature ORC are proposed and the performance of this combined thermodynamic cycle is analyzed. Compared with the traditional cycle configuration, more waste heat can be recovered by the combined cycle introduced in this paper. -- Highlights: ► We study the energy balance of fuel in internal combustion engine. ► Heat recovery effect of exhaust gas is good when ICE is at a high-load condition. ► We propose a new combined thermodynamic cycle for waste heat of ICE. ► The combined cycle has a higher recovery efficiency than previous configurations.

  11. Heat recovery from wastewater systems; Waermerueckgewinnung aus Abwassersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanner, O.

    2004-07-01

    Wastewater contains large amounts of heat energy which can be recovered by means of a heat pump and a heat exchanger installed in the sewer system. Practical problems, which may arise and have been investigated in this research project, are the reduction of the heat transfer efficiency due to heat exchanger fouling and the reduction of the nitrification capacity of downstream wastewater treatment plants due to lower wastewater temperatures. A mathematical model was developed by which the decrease of the wastewater temperature in the treatment plant influent can be determined as a function of the amount of heat energy gathered from the wastewater in the sewer system. By this model the variation in time and space of the wastewater temperature in a sewer pipe is calculated for given hydraulics, geometry and environmental conditions. By analysis of data from a large wastewater treatment plant and simulations with a calibrated model, the effect of lowered influent temperatures on nitrification safety, total nitrogen removal efficiency and ammonium effluent concentrations could be quantified. A procedure is suggested by which the reserve nitrification capacity of an existing treatment plant and the increase of the ammonium effluent concentration resulting from a permanent decrease of the wastewater influent temperature can be estimated. By experiments with a pilot scale heat exchanger in a small wastewater channel, the significance of parameters known to have an effect on fouling was investigated and measures to reduce fouling were tested. The measures tested included controlled variation of the wastewater flow velocity (flushing), coatings and finish of the heat exchanger surface and obstacles mounted on the surface. The best results were obtained by regular short term increases of the flow velocity. By this measure, the efficiency of the fouled heat exchanger, which on the average was 60% of the efficiency of the clean heat exchanger, could repeatedly be raised to an

  12. Advanced Print Reading. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This is a workbook for students learning advanced blueprint reading for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning applications. The workbook contains eight units covering the following material: architectural working drawings; architectural symbols and dimensions; basic architectural electrical symbols; wiring symbols; basic piping symbols;…

  13. Avoidable and unavoidable exergy destructions of a fluidized bed coal combustor and a heat recovery steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Performing advanced exergy analysis of a fluidized-bed combustion for the first time. • Comparing conventional and modified exergy efficiencies of the subsystems. • Deducting inefficiencies of the system components for possible improvements. - Abstract: Advanced exergy analysis was performed using the actual operational data taken from a fluidized bed coal combustor (FBCC) and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) in a textile plant located at Torbalı, Izmir. First, the conventional exergy analysis of the units was carried out. The exergetic efficiencies of the units were found to be 44.2% and 46.2%, respectively. Advanced exergy analysis was then performed by splitting the exergy destructions of the units into avoidable and unavoidable parts. The avoidable exergy destruction rates of the FBCC and the HRSG were determined to be 2999 kW and 760 kW according to the measurements. Correspondingly, the exergy efficiencies were modified to 53.1% and 48.1%, respectively

  14. Design and rating of an evaporator for waste heat recovery organic rankine cycles using SES36

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Alihan; Lazova, Marija; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a design and rating study of a 4MW evaporator having plain horizontal carbon steel tubes having diameters of 25,4 mm, 31,8 mm and 38 mm, to be used in waste heat recovery via Organic Rankine cycle (ORC). SES36 is chosen as working fluid due to its low boiling point, which makes it suitable for low-grade waste heat recovery with subcritical ORCs. Waste heat carrier industrial air arrives at the evaporator bundle at 280°C. Inlet temperature of the working fluid is 40°C and th...

  15. Industrial Waste Heat Recovery - Potential Applications, Available Technologies and Crosscutting R&D Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc, North Potomac, MD (United States); Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to explore key areas and characteristics of industrial waste heat and its generation, barriers to waste heat recovery and use, and potential research and development (R&D) opportunities. The report also provides an overview of technologies and systems currently available for waste heat recovery and discusses the issues or barriers for each. Also included is information on emerging technologies under development or at various stages of demonstrations, and R&D opportunities cross-walked by various temperature ranges, technology areas, and energy-intensive process industries.

  16. Thermal design analysis of triple-pressure heat recovery steam generator and stream turbine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computation routine, capable of performing thermal design analysis of the triple-pressure bottoming System (heat recovery steam generator and steam turbine) of combined cycle power plants, is developed. It is based on thermal analysis of the heat recovery steam generator and estimation of its size and steam turbine power. It can be applied to various parametric analyses including optimized design calculation. This paper presents analysis results for the effects on the design performance of heat exchanger arrangements at intermediate and high temperature parts as well as steam pressures. Also examined is the effect of steam sources for de-aeration on design performance

  17. Increasing oil productivity through electromagnetic induction heating for heavy oil recovery using seawater and ferrofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prama, Agus [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia)

    2011-07-01

    One of the methods to recover heavy oil consists of heating the reservoir electrically to reduce oil viscosity and increase its mobility. The aim of this paper is to present the latest developments in electrical heating technologies. The author proposes electromagnetic induction heating as the best technique if coupled with seawater and ferrofluid. Seawater has the potential to improve oil recovery through increasing water wetness, this capacity also increases with increase in temperature. Oil recovery can also be increased through increasing the salinity of the seawater. On the other hand, ferrofluid generates more heat than seawater when heated by electromagnetic induction and it can be directed to the desired location through the use of multilateral well and crosswell EM monitoring. This paper highlighted the fact that electromagnetic induction heating coupled with seawater and ferrofluid can increase oil productivity.

  18. Investigation of the potential of thermophotovoltaic heat recovery for the Turkish industrial sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This study was to determine the potential of thermophotovoltaic heat recovery for Turkish industrial sector. • It was performed by using actual data for TIS. • Total technical–potential energy heat recovery in the high-temperature industry was estimated as 447.8 PJ/year. • Electricity can be achieved from 22.40 PJ/year to 67.45 PJ/year according to the TPV efficiencies. • This study will be very beneficial in energy policies of countries in terms of the usage of waste heat energy. - Abstract: Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) are the use of the photovoltaic effect to generate electricity from a high-temperature thermal (infrared) source. This study deals with to provide an overview of heat recovery by TPV from industrial high-temperature processes in Turkish industrial sector. The paper reviews the relevant facts about TPV technology and the high-temperature industry and identifies three principle locations for TPV heat recovery. For each location, one example process is assessed in terms of applicability of TPV impact on the existing process and power scale. Knowledge of these factors should contribute to the design of an optimum TPV system. In the TIS, the total technical–potential energy recovery in the high-temperature industry using deployed and demonstrated heat recovery devices for product, flue gas, and wall heat recovery was estimated as 447.8 PJ/year. However, an estimation from 22.40 PJ/year to 67.45 PJ/year can be achieved according to the TPV efficiencies. Also, the paper estimates the range of possible energy savings and the reduction in CO emission using TPV in the high-temperature industry. It is expected that this study will be very beneficial in developing energy policies of countries in terms of the usage of waste energy efficiency

  19. Optimal design of advanced distillation configuration for enhanced energy efficiency of waste solvent recovery process in semiconductor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermally coupled distillation process is proposed for waste solvent recovery. • A systematic optimization procedure is used to optimize distillation columns. • Response surface methodology is applied to optimal design of distillation column. • Proposed advanced distillation allows energy efficient waste solvent recovery. - Abstract: The semiconductor industry is one of the largest industries in the world. On the other hand, the huge amount of solvent used in the industry results in high production cost and potential environmental damage because most of the valuable chemicals discharged from the process are incinerated at high temperatures. A distillation process is used to recover waste solvent, reduce the production-related costs and protect the environment from the semiconductor industrial waste. Therefore, in this study, a distillation process was used to recover the valuable chemicals from semiconductor industry discharge, which otherwise would have been lost to the environment. The conventional sequence of distillation columns, which was optimized using the Box and sequential quadratic programming method for minimum energy objectives, was used. The energy demands of a distillation problem may have a substantial influence on the profitability of a process. A thermally coupled distillation and heat pump-assisted distillation sequence was implemented to further improve the distillation performance. Finally, a comparison was made between the conventional and advanced distillation sequences, and the optimal conditions for enhancing recovery were determined. The proposed advanced distillation configuration achieved a significant energy saving of 40.5% compared to the conventional column sequence

  20. Application of an Integrated Heat Recovery Technology for Domestic Hot Water Supply System and Air Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Yan; Zhang Yufeng

    2013-01-01

    This study is to design an integrated heat recovery and air conditioner system and to investigate the feasibility and the potential performance of this system in changing conditions. Different season conditions and operating modes are studied based on the items of one hotel. In winter, heat recovered from wastewater is used on water heating and air condition and the surplus energy of air conditioner system is used on hot water system in summer. Dynamic energy ...

  1. HT-PEM Fuel Cell System with Integrated Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents two case studies on improving the efficiency and the loadfollowing capability of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HTPEM) fuel cell system by the application of thermoelectric (TE) devices.TE generators (TEGs) are harnessed to recover the system exhaust gas for electricity. For this aim, a heat exchanger based TEG heat recovery subsystem is designed. Instead of optimizing an ordinary rectangular heat exchanger, high efficient and commercialized compact plat...

  2. The Misselhorn Cycle: Batch-Evaporation Process for Efficient Low-Temperature Waste Heat Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Moritz Gleinser; Christoph Wieland

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the Misselhorn cycle is introduced as a power cycle that aims for efficient waste heat recovery of temperature sources below 100 °C. The basic idea shows advantages over a standard Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) in overall efficiency and utilization of the heat source. The main characteristic of this cycle is the use of at least three parallel batch evaporators instead of continuous heat exchangers. The operational phases of the evaporators are shifted so that there is always one ...

  3. Study and Design of Waste Heat Recovery using Organic Rankine Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Saied Homami; Ahmad Khoshgard; Maryam Momenifar; Hamed Nemati Sayad; Hamidreza Heidarimoghadam

    2016-01-01

    Existing energy crisis in the world has diverted human perspective to the optimum usage of the available energy resources. One of these solutions is waste heat recovery systems[1]. Simultaneous production of fresh water, power and cooling from waste heat improves energy efficiency in industrial applications which could be operated by organic Rankine cycles. In this article, cogeneration of electricity and heat (CHP) in the petrochemical industry, textile and paper production has been reviewed...

  4. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury; Bao Kha Nguyen; David Thornhill

    2015-01-01

    The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in ...

  5. Relationship between core temperature change during recovery and prognosis in classic heat stroke rat models

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ya-Nan; Geng, Yan; Fu, Wei; Na PENG; Zheng-tao GU; Su, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To construct classic heat stroke rat models, and observe the changes of body temperature in the recovery period after heat stress to explore its relationship with prognosis. Methods Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into heat stroke group (HS group, n=50) and control group (C group, n=10). Rats in HS group were exposed to 39℃ heat stress. Core temperature and systolic blood pressure (SBP) of rats were monitored until it reached diagnostic criteria of heat stroke. The core bod...

  6. Ventilation Heat Recovery from Wood-Burning Domestic Flues. A Theoretical Analysis Based on a Triple Concentric Tube Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lionel Druette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new air-heating system concept for energy-efficient dwellings. It is a system designed to heat a low-energy building by coupling a heat-recovery ventilation system with a three-fluid heat exchanger located on the chimney of a wood-pellet stove. The proposed work focuses on the heat transfer that occurs between flue gases, the ventilation air and the combustion air within a triple concentric tube heat exchanger with no insulation at its outer surface. The main objective is to predict outlet temperature for the specific geometry of the heat exchanger studied here. Thus, the governing differential equations are derived for a counter-co-current flow arrangement of the three fluids. Then analytical solutions for the steady-state temperature distribution are obtained as well as the amount of heat transferred to the outside. An expression for the effectiveness of the heat exchanger is also proposed. Based on these results, calculations are performed on a case study to predict the fluid temperature distribution along the heat exchanger. Finally, a parametric study is carried out on this case study to assess the influence of the relevant parameters on the effectiveness of the heat exchanger. In addition, computation of heat losses to the outside justifies whether insulation is needed.

  7. Recovery of low temperature heat in oil mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carré Patrick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in oil mills is a major item of costs and a sensitive point in the production of biofuels. To improve their performance, industrials can recover lowtemperature heat thanks to a new technology of heat exchangers suitable for treating granular solid materials. Information about the energy requirements of the rapeseed crushing being not readily available, the article gives a detailed assessment of consumption items (per ton of seed: 263 MJ for preparation operations and 284 MJ for solvent extraction. These exchangers used as pre-conditioners saves about 55 MJ.t−1 of heat by use of steam condensates. We could go further in use of these devices on the one hand to recover heat from press cake and meal, and secondly to use recovered energy to dry and warm up the seeds before pre-pressing. In this configuration, the energy savings could reach 38% of current needs.

  8. Recovery of low temperature heat in oil mills

    OpenAIRE

    Carré Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption in oil mills is a major item of costs and a sensitive point in the production of biofuels. To improve their performance, industrials can recover lowtemperature heat thanks to a new technology of heat exchangers suitable for treating granular solid materials. Information about the energy requirements of the rapeseed crushing being not readily available, the article gives a detailed assessment of consumption items (per ton of seed: 263 MJ for preparation operations and 284 MJ...

  9. Waste heat recovery system with new thermoelectric materials

    OpenAIRE

    Borgström, Fredrik; Coyet, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Increasing fuel prices, higher demands on "greener" transports and tougher international emission regulations puts requirements on companies in the automotive industry in improving their vehicle fuel efficiency. On a typical heavy duty Scania truck around 30% of the total fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust system in terms of heat dissipated to the environment. Hence, several investigations and experiments are conducted trying to find ways to utilize this wasted heat in what is called a...

  10. Assessment of the Performance of a Ventilated Window Coupled with a Heat Recovery Unit through the Co-Heating Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Danza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to describe the results of an experimental campaign based on the assessment of a heat recovery unit coupled with a dynamic window. Two fully monitored and calibrated outdoor test cells are used, in order to evaluate the energy performance and the related thermal comfort. The former presents a traditional window with double-glazing, aluminum frame and indoor blind and a centrifugal extractor for the air circulation. The latter is equipped with a dynamic window with ventilated and blinded double-glazing provided with a heat exchanger. The connection of the dynamic window and heat recovery unit provides different actions: heat recovery; heat transfer reduction; pre-heating before the exchanger. Different operating configurations allowed the trends of the dynamic system to be assessed in different seasons in terms of energy saving, thermal comfort behavior and energy efficiency. The results showed an overall lower consumption of the innovative system, both in winter and summer, with 20% and 15% energy saving, respectively. In general, the dynamic system provided the best comfort conditions, even if it involves a worse behavior than expected, in the summer season.

  11. Recovery of heat from the refrigeration plant at the Bjoerkaeng stadium in Huddinge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glas, L.O.

    1984-01-01

    The report describes an investigation of heat recovery from the refrigeration plant at the ice hockey rinks outdoors and in the stadium building at the Bjoerkaeng athletics centre. Heat emitted by the refrigeration plant is utilized for heating of the stadium building and for heating water. The heat recovery was measured and analysed over the period 1.12.78-30.11.79, a net energy saving of approximately 380,000 kWh being achieved. The heat recovery analysis comprises a complete heat balance for the ice hockey rinks, the ice stadium, the water heating and the refrigeration plant. On average, test results are very near the figures produced by calculations. The calculation method described should therfore reproduce with good accuracy the possible energy savings in refrigeration plants for ice rinks both indoors and outdoors, of widely differing sizes and geographical location. For instance, the calculation takes into account the effect of the ice stadium temperature selected on the net energy saving and the recoverable quantity of heat.

  12. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  13. Microbial enhancement of oil recovery: Recent advances. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Woodhead, A.D.; Vivirito, K.J. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    During recent years, systematic, scientific, and engineering effort by researchers in the United States and abroad, has established the scientific basis for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) technology. The successful application of MEOR technology as an oil recovery process is a goal of the Department of Energy (DOE). Research efforts involving aspects of MEOR in the microbiological, biochemical, and engineering fields led DOE to sponsor an International Conference at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1992, to facilitate the exchange of information and a discussion of ideas for the future research emphasis. At this, the Fourth International MEOR Conference, where international attendees from 12 countries presented a total of 35 papers, participants saw an equal distribution between ``research`` and ``field applications.`` In addition, several modeling and ``state-of-the-art`` presentations summed up the present status of MEOR science and engineering. Individual papers in this proceedings have been process separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Development of More Effective Biosurfactants for Enhanced Oil Recovery/Advanced Recovery Concepts Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, M.J.; Marsh, T.L.; Zhang, X.; Knapp, R.M.; Nagle, Jr., D.P.; Sharma, P.K.; Jackson, B.E.

    2002-05-28

    The objectives of this were two fold. First, core displacement studies were done to determine whether microbial processes could recover residual oil at elevated pressures. Second, the importance of biosurfactant production for the recovery of residual oil was studies. In these studies, a biosurfactant-producing, microorganisms called Bacillus licheniformis strain JF-2 was used. This bacterium produces a cyclic peptide biosurfactant that significantly reduces the interfacial tension between oil and brine (7). The use of a mutant deficient in surfactant production and a mathematical MEOR simulator were used to determine the major mechanisms of oil recovery by these two strains.

  15. NDE (nondestructive examination) development for ceramics for advanced heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClung, R.W. (McClung (R.W.), Powell, TN (USA)); Johnson, D.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) project was initiated in 1983 to meet the ceramic technology needs of DOE's advanced heat engines programs (i.e., advanced gas turbines and low heat rejection diesels). The objective is to establish an industrial ceramic technology base for reliable and cost-effective high-temperature components. Reliability of ceramics was recognized as the major technology need. To increase the material reliability of current and new ceramics, advances were needed in component design methodology, materials processing technology, and data base/life prediction. Nondestructive examination (NDE) was identified as one of the key elements in the approach to high-reliability components. An assessment was made of the current status of NDE for structural ceramics, and a report was prepared containing the results and recommendations for needed development. Based on these recommendations, a long-range NDE development program has been established in the CTAHE project to address these needs.

  16. Latent x-ray damage in the rat sciatic nerve results in delay in functional recovery after a heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of X-irradiation on the sensitivity of the rat sciatic nerve to local hyperthermia was investigated. Irradiation (35 Gy) of a nerve segment, which included the heated part, resulted in a delayed recovery from heat treatment compared to controls (heat only). The time interval and sequence between irradiation and hyperthermia hardly influenced recovery delay. The size of the irradiated nerve segment did influence recovery delay. Irradiation of a 20 mm nerve segment led to longer recovery delays then irradiation of a 10 mm segment (5-10 days and 1-5 days respectively). A dose-response relation for irradiation-induced delay in recovery was observed when a large segment (20mm) of nerve was irradiated immediately after heat with a dose ranging from 5 to 40 Gy. The delay in heat recovery was dose-dependent below 20 Gy, but after radiation doses above 20 Gy recovery delay remained almost constant. (author)

  17. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  18. Control of Single-room Ventilation with Regenerative Heat Recovery for Indoor Climate and Energy Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Kevin Michael; Svendsen, Svend

    2016-01-01

    constructions and will soon require 85%. The development of single-room ventilation units may aim for these requirements as a result. The exhaust temperatures in highly efficient heat exchangers may approach outdoor levels. The cold exhaust cannot contain ample moisture, so vapour will condense on the heat......The Danish government will seek energy-efficiency improvements to meet their targeted aims. Single-room ventilation with heat recovery allows simple installation through the façade and may be broadly deployed in apartments. Danish building regulations require greater than 80% heat recovery in new...... exchanger. Available literature suggests that uncoated rotary heat exchangers transfer this condensate to the supply air, so the drying capacity of the ventilation system may be severely limited. This could raise indoor relative humidities to unsafe levels, which could promote the growth of dust...

  19. Process integration in bioprocess indystry: waste heat recovery in yeast and ethyl alcohol plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process integration of the bioprocess plant for production of yeast and alcohol was studied. Preliminary energy audit of the plant identified the huge amount of thermal losses, caused by waste heat in exhausted process streams, and reviled the great potential for energy efficiency improvement by heat recovery system. Research roadmap, based on process integration approach, is divided on six phases, and the primary tool used for the design of heat recovery network was Pinch Analysis. Performance of preliminary design are obtained by targeting procedure, for three process stream sets, and evaluated by the economic criteria. The results of process integration study are presented in the form of heat exchanger networks which fulfilled the utilization of waste heat and enable considerable savings of energy in short payback period.

  20. Effect of foam on temperature prediction and heat recovery potential from biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbala-Robles, L; Volcke, E I P; Samijn, A; Ronsse, F; Pieters, J G

    2016-05-15

    Heat is an important resource in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) which can be recovered. A prerequisite to determine the theoretical heat recovery potential is an accurate heat balance model for temperature prediction. The insulating effect of foam present on the basin surface and its influence on temperature prediction were assessed in this study. Experiments were carried out to characterize the foam layer and its insulating properties. A refined dynamic temperature prediction model, taking into account the effect of foam, was set up. Simulation studies for a WWTP treating highly concentrated (manure) wastewater revealed that the foam layer had a significant effect on temperature prediction (3.8 ± 0.7 K over the year) and thus on the theoretical heat recovery potential (30% reduction when foam is not considered). Seasonal effects on the individual heat losses and heat gains were assessed. Additionally, the effects of the critical basin temperature above which heat is recovered, foam thickness, surface evaporation rate reduction and the non-absorbed solar radiation on the theoretical heat recovery potential were evaluated. PMID:27017195

  1. Effect of pH on Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571 growth, spore heat resistance and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtimet, Narjes; Guégan, Stéphanie; Durand, Lucile; Mathot, Anne-Gabrielle; Venaille, Laurent; Leguérinel, Ivan; Coroller, Louis; Couvert, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are potential contaminants in several industrial sectors involving high temperatures (40-65 °C) in the manufacturing process. Among those thermophilic spore-forming bacteria, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum, called "the swelling canned food spoiler", has generated interest over the last decade in the food sector. The aim of this study was to investigate and to model pH effect on growth, heat resistance and recovery abilities after a heat-treatment of T. thermosaccharolyticum DSM 571. Growth and sporulation were conducted on reinforced clostridium media and liver broth respectively. The highest spore heat resistances and the greatest recovery ability after a heat-treatment were obtained at pH condition allowing maximal growth rate. Growth and sporulation boundaries were estimated, then models using growth limits as main parameters were extended to describe and quantify the effect of pH on recovery of injured spores after a heat-treatment. So, cardinal values were used as a single set of parameters to describe growth, sporulation and recovery abilities. Besides, this work suggests that T. thermosaccharolyticum preserve its ability for germination and outgrowth after a heat-treatment at a low pH where other high resistant spore-forming bacteria like Geobacillus stearothermophilus are unable to grow. PMID:26742617

  2. Solar and heat recovery window element. Solar- und Waermerueckgewinnungs-Fensterscheibenelement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuber, P.

    1979-10-18

    The solar and heat recovery window element consists of 2 insulating glass windows, which are separated by a square sealing frame, and so form a chamber for the solar liquid to flow through. There is a collecting pipe with return connection in the top part of the sealed frame, and there is a distributor pipe with incoming connection with the appropriate seals in the top part. The incoming or return pipe is laid in the window frame. The inner and outer insulating glass windows are used to insulate the room and to insulate or produce a solar and heat recovery chamber. The inner insulating glass window prevents condensation of humidity from the room at lower temperatures of the solar and heat recovery liquid. This window has liquid flowing through it, pumped by a circulating pump. This liquid is not transparent and clear, and is protected against frost. The solar energy absorbed when flowing through the liquid chamber is taken to a heat pump system, and part of the energy is extracted from the liquid there. This is done continuously. If there is no solar energy available, then the system works as a heat recovery system, where energy from the room is absorbed by the liquid and is transported to the heat pump.

  3. Deep Eutectic Salt Formulations Suitable as Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raade, Justin; Roark, Thomas; Vaughn, John; Bradshaw, Robert

    2013-07-22

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities are comprised of many miles of fluid-filled pipes arranged in large grids with reflective mirrors used to capture radiation from the sun. Solar radiation heats the fluid which is used to produce steam necessary to power large electricity generation turbines. Currently, organic, oil-based fluid in the pipes has a maximum temperature threshold of 400 °C, allowing for the production of electricity at approximately 15 cents per kilowatt hour. The DOE hopes to foster the development of an advanced heat transfer fluid that can operate within higher temperature ranges. The new heat transfer fluid, when used with other advanced technologies, could significantly decrease solar electricity cost. Lower costs would make solar thermal electricity competitive with gas and coal and would offer a clean, renewable source of energy. Molten salts exhibit many desirable heat transfer qualities within the range of the project objectives. Halotechnics developed advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) for application in solar thermal power generation. This project focused on complex mixtures of inorganic salts that exhibited a high thermal stability, a low melting point, and other favorable characteristics. A high-throughput combinatorial research and development program was conducted in order to achieve the project objective. Over 19,000 candidate formulations were screened. The workflow developed to screen various chemical systems to discover salt formulations led to mixtures suitable for use as HTFs in both parabolic trough and heliostat CSP plants. Furthermore, salt mixtures which will not interfere with fertilizer based nitrates were discovered. In addition for use in CSP, the discovered salt mixtures can be applied to electricity storage, heat treatment of alloys and other industrial processes.

  4. Relationship between core temperature change during recovery and prognosis in classic heat stroke rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-nan LIU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct classic heat stroke rat models, and observe the changes of body temperature in the recovery period after heat stress to explore its relationship with prognosis. Methods Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into heat stroke group (HS group, n=50 and control group (C group, n=10. Rats in HS group were exposed to 39℃ heat stress. Core temperature and systolic blood pressure (SBP of rats were monitored until it reached diagnostic criteria of heat stroke. The core body temperature and survival were continuously monitored until 72h. The risk factors of survival were analyzed by univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results During the recovery, compared with the control group, the body temperature of the HS rats represented a biphasic change that consisted of an initial hypothermia and a delayed hyperthermia. Univariable analysis showed that both the highest and lowest core body temperatures were correlated with prognosis in the heat stroke rats (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis revealed that both the highest core body temperature (P=0.000, HR=102.386 and lowest core body temperature in the recovery period (P=0.001, HR=0.134 were the independent risk factors for heat stroke. Conclusion In heat stroke rats, the higher the core body temperature and the deeper the depth of hypothermia, the poorer the prognosis. Core body temperature in heat stress and recovery period could serve as prognostic indexes in heat stroke. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.10.007

  5. Technologies for waste heat recovery in off-shore applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Haglind, Fredrik; Kandepu, Rambabu; Fermi, Alessandro; Rossetti, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    In off-shore oil and gas platforms the selection of the gas turbine to support the electrical and mechanical demand on site is often a compromise between reliability, efficiency, compactness, low weight and fuel flexibility. Therefore, recovering the waste heat in off-shore platforms presents both...

  6. Novel hot gas cleaning/heat recovery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasa, G.; Wellman, R.G.; Kilgallon, P.; Simms, N.J.; Oakey, J.E. [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Power Generation Technology Center

    2004-11-01

    This project was targeted at developing a novel integrated raw gas cooler and sulphur and halide removal process for gasification plant. The desulphurisation process is based on a twin fluidized bed system employing direct solids transfer between adjacent vessels. Halide removal is achieved by means of sorbent injection. The first stage of the project developed a series of mathematical models for the twin-bed desulphurisation concept. Then a 2-D cold model was designed and manufactured to demonstrate the concepts and the validity of the mathematical models produced. After a series of modifications were carried out and their effects assessed, a twin bed unit was designed and manufactured that was capable of being used initially as a 3-D cold model and then being retrofitted to an existing atmospheric pressure gaisifer. The twin bed system seems to be a promising technology for a heat exchanger system, due to the good particle flows between the two fluidized beds, and for the reduction in contaminant emissions. However, further work is required to improve the understanding of the twin-bed hydrodynamics, as well as to develop sorbents with operating temperatures that are compatible with the twin-bed concept. Two options for the twin bed system have been suggested as wroth pursuing as viable use of this technology in gasification plant design. The first involve a twin-bed gasification-heat exchange system where gas from a gasifier is fed to one vessel and heat is transferred to a second by means of re-circulating solids. The second option is a triple-bed adsorption-regeneration-heat exchange system where the gas from the gasifier is fed to a vessel and the H{sub 2}S is removed. Catalyst/sorbent is transferred to a second bed for regeneration and solids are transferred to a third vessel where heat is removed. 21 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Independent air dehumidification with membrane-based total heat recovery: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, C.H.; Zhang, L.Z.; Pei, L.X. [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Fresh air ventilation is helpful for the control of epidemic respiratory disease like Swine flu (H1N1). Fresh air dehumidification systems with energy recovery measures are the key equipments to realize this goal. As a solution, an independent air dehumidification system with membrane-based total heat recovery is proposed. A prototype is built in laboratory. A detailed model is proposed and a cell-by-cell simulation technique is used in simulation to evaluate performances. The results indicate that the model can predict the system accurately. The effects of varying operating conditions like air-flow rates, temperature, and air relative humidity on the air dehumidification rates, cooling powers, electric power consumption, and thermal coefficient of performance are evaluated. The prototype has a COP of 6.8 under nominal operating conditions with total heat recovery. The performance is rather robust to outside weather conditions with a membrane-based total heat exchanger. (author)

  8. Cost Scaling of a Real-World Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator: A Deeper Dive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Yee, Shannon; LeBlanc, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Cost is equally important to power density or efficiency for the adoption of waste heat recovery thermoelectric generators (TEG) in many transportation and industrial energy recovery applications. In many cases, the system design that minimizes cost (e.g., the /W value) can be very different than the design that maximizes the system's efficiency or power density, and it is important to understand the relationship between those designs to optimize TEG performance-cost compromises. Expanding on recent cost analysis work and using more detailed system modeling, an enhanced cost scaling analysis of a waste heat recovery TEG with more detailed, coupled treatment of the heat exchangers has been performed. In this analysis, the effect of the heat lost to the environment and updated relationships between the hot-side and cold-side conductances that maximize power output are considered. This coupled thermal and thermoelectric (TE) treatment of the exhaust waste heat recovery TEG yields modified cost scaling and design optimization equations, which are now strongly dependent on the heat leakage fraction, exhaust mass flow rate, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This work shows that heat exchanger costs most often dominate the overall TE system costs, that it is extremely difficult to escape this regime, and in order to achieve TE system costs of 1/W it is necessary to achieve heat exchanger costs of 1/(W/K). Minimum TE system costs per watt generally coincide with maximum power points, but preferred TE design regimes are identified where there is little cost penalty for moving into regions of higher efficiency and slightly lower power outputs. These regimes are closely tied to previously identified low cost design regimes. This work shows that the optimum fill factor F opt minimizing system costs decreases as heat losses increase, and increases as exhaust mass flow rate and heat exchanger effectiveness increase. These findings have profound implications on the design and

  9. Air Evaporation closed cycle water recovery technology - Advanced energy saving designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasko, Gwyndolyn; Putnam, David F.; Bagdigian, Robert

    1986-01-01

    The Air Evaporation water recovery system is a visible candidate for Space Station application. A four-man Air Evaporation open cycle system has been successfully demonstrated for waste water recovery in manned chamber tests. The design improvements described in this paper greatly enhance the system operation and energy efficiency of the air evaporation process. A state-of-the-art wick feed design which results in reduced logistics requirements is presented. In addition, several design concepts that incorporate regenerative features to minimize the energy input to the system are discussed. These include a recuperative heat exchanger, a heat pump for energy transfer to the air heater, and solar collectors for evaporative heat. The addition of the energy recovery devices will result in an energy reduction of more than 80 percent over the systems used in earlier manned chamber tests.

  10. Hsp27 enhances recovery of splicing as well as rephosphorylation of SRp38 after heat shock

    OpenAIRE

    Marin Vinader, L.; Shin, C.; Onnekink, C; Manley, J L; Lubsen, N H

    2005-01-01

    A heat stress causes a rapid inhibition of splicing. Exogenous expression of Hsp27 did not prevent that inhibition but enhanced the recovery of splicing afterward. Another small heat shock protein, αB-crystallin, had no effect. Hsp27, but not αB-crystallin, also hastened rephosphorylation of SRp38—dephosphorylated a potent inhibitor of splicing—after a heat shock, although it did not prevent dephosphorylation by a heat shock. The effect of Hsp27 on rephosphorylation of SRp38 required phosphor...

  11. Cost Efficient Optimization Based Supervisory Controller for Supermarket Subsystems with Heat Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minko, Tomasz; Wisniewski, Rafal; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon;

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple modelling approach for a thermal system, which consists of heating, ventilation, air conditioning system (HVAC) and a vapor compression cycle (VCC) system, with one loop heat recovery. In addition a simple model for water tank is presented, in which the reclaimed...... heat is stored and/or which can be used for heating purposes of the building. We present a dynamic optimization algorithm that according to the received price signal, occupancy information and ambient temperature minimizes the operation cost of the whole system and distributes set points to local...

  12. Performance of Helical Coil Heat Recovery Exchanger using Nanofluid as Coolant

    OpenAIRE

    Navid Bozorgan

    2015-01-01

    Nanofluids are expected to be a promising coolant condidate in chemical processes for heat transfer system size reduction. This paper focuses on reducing the number of turns in a helical coil heat recovery exchanger with a given heat exchange capacity in a biomass heating plant using γ-Al2O3/n-decane nanofluid as coolant. The nanofluid flows through the tubes and the hot n-hexane flows through the shell. The numerical results show that using nanofluid as coolant in a helical...

  13. Protection of icing for heat recovery units; Vereisungsschutz fuer Waermerueckgewinner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammann, Josef [TechEffekt Anstalt, Schaan (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    During the evaluation of ventilation systems according to the energetic efficiency the additional expenditure for the anti-icing is of great importance. Thereby, it has to be differentiated between measures with respect to the ventilation equipment and measures with respect to the ventilation system. As a function of the execution/combination, an additional energy expenditure results due to the heat demand and the expenditure of electricity. The variants result in losses in the comfort and are qualitatively not comparable. It must be considered that the building owner mainly needs the ventilation in the heating season. The investigation described in the contribution supplies a ranking of the measures to the anti-icing from energetic and qualitative view.

  14. Low grade waste heat recovery using heat pumps and power cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal energy represents a large part of the global energy usage and about 43% of this energy is used for industrial applications. Large amounts are lost via exhaust gases, liquid streams and cooling water while the share of low temperature waste heat is the largest. Heat pumps upgrading waste heat to process heat and cooling and power cycles converting waste heat to electricity can make a strong impact in the related industries. The potential of several alternative technologies, either for the upgrading of low temperature waste heat such as compression-resorption, vapor compression and trans-critical heat pumps, or for the conversion of this waste heat by using organic Rankine, Kalina and trilateral cycle engines, are investigated with regards to energetic and economic performance by making use of thermodynamic models. This study focuses on temperature levels of 45–60 °C as at this temperature range large amounts of heat are rejected to the environment but also investigates the temperature levels for which power cycles become competitive. The heat pumps deliver 2.5–11 times more energy value than the power cycles in this low temperature range at equal waste heat input. Heat engines become competitive with heat pumps at waste heat temperatures at 100 °C and above. - Highlights: • Application of heat pump technology for heating and cooling. • Compression resorption heat pumps operating with large glides approaching 100 K. • Compression-resorption heat pumps with wet compression. • Potential to convert Industrial waste heat to power or high grade heat. • Comparison between low temperature power cycles and heat pumps

  15. Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Luong, David

    2013-01-01

    Energy consumption and efficiency continue to be an area of high interest with the diminishing supply and rising costs of fossil fuels. In the United States, the industrial and transportation sectors consume a significant portion of the resources and total energy, accounting for significant fossil-fuel-related environmental impacts such as greenhouse gas pollution and global warming. It has been estimated that between 20 to 50\\% of the energy consumed is lost as waste heat in the form of ho...

  16. Nano-EngineeredThermoelectric Materials for Waste Heat Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Saleemi, Mohsin

    2014-01-01

    Energy crisis and thermal management related issues have been highlighted in the modern century due to escalating demands for energy consumption and global warming from fossil fuels. Sustainable and alternative energy sources are an ever growing global concern. Thermoelectric (TE) materials have gained significant interest, due to effective solid-state energy conversion from waste heat to useful electrical energy and vice versa.   Clean, noise-free, and environment-friendly operation of TE de...

  17. Energy efficiency improvement of a Kraft process through practical stack gases heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process scheme for the optimal recovery of heat from stack gases considering energy and technical constraints has been developed and applied to an existing Kraft pulping mill. A system based on a closed loop recirculation of hot oil is used to recover the heat from stack gases and distribute it to the appropriate cold streams. The recovery of heat from stack gases is part of an overall optimization of the Kraft mill. Tools such as Pinch Analysis and exergy analysis are used to evaluate the process streams. The results indicate that 10.8 MW of heat from stack gases can be reused to heat process streams such as the deaerator water, hot water, drying filtrates, and black liquor. A simulation model of the recirculation loop has been developed to determine the specifications of the recovery system. The total heat exchanger surface area required by the system is 3460 m2, with a hot oil recirculation temperature of 137 oC. The anticipated total investment is $10.3 M, with a payback time of 1.8 years. - Highlights: → We developed a process design for recovering heat from stack gases in a Kraft mill. → The recovered heat is optimally distributed to the process cold streams. → Heat recovery system has a total surface area of 3500 m2 without gases condensation. → A reduction of 7 percent in total process steam demand is anticipated. → A total investment of 10.3 M$ is needed with a payback time of less than two years

  18. Georgia Pacific: Crossett Mill Identifies Heat Recovery Projects and Operational Improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-10-01

    An assessment team conducted a mill-wide energy survey at Georgia-Pacific's Crossett, Arkansas mill to update a previous pinch analysis. Three heat recovery projects were identified that could reduce annual costs by $4.8 million and reduce natural gas use by 1,845,000 x 106 Btu. The overall payback period for the heat recovery projects would be less than 1 year. Furthermore, by implementing operational improvements, the mill could save $4.8 million more annually and 1,500,000 x 106 Btu in natural gas.

  19. Prediction of heat recovery characteristics of oxyfuel combustion boiler using CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takafuji, Makoto; Suda, Toshiyuki; Ito, Takamasa [IHI Corporation, Yokohama (Japan). Heat and Fluid Dynamics Dept.; Yamada, Toshihiko [IHI Corporation, Tokyo (Japan). Power Plant Div.

    2013-07-01

    Oxyfuel combustion is one of the promising technologies to reduce CO{sub 2} emission from pulverized coal fired power plant. In order to apply this technology to the commercial boiler, it is important to predict the boiler performance (especially heat recovery characteristics) in Oxyfuel combustion condition. In this study, prediction of heat recovery characteristics of Oxyfuel combustion boiler using CFD was conducted. As a result, it was shown that the same boiler performance can be achieved in Oxyfuel combustion mode as that in Air combustion mode.

  20. Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

    2008-06-20

    An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

  1. Advances in heat pump assisted distillation column: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This article reviews the heat pump assisted distillation (HPAD) technologies. • It covers the use of vapor recompression in both batch and continuous columns. • It identifies future challenges involved in HPAD schemes. - Abstract: Progressive depletion of conventional fossil fuels with increasing energy demand and federal laws on environmental emissions have stimulated intensive research in improving energy efficiency of the existing fractionation units. In this light, the heat pump assisted distillation (HPAD) scheme has emerged as an attractive separation technology with great potential for energy saving. This paper aims at providing a state-of-the-art assessment of the research work carried out so far on heat pumping systems and identifies future challenges in this respect. At first, the HPAD technology is introduced with its past progresses that have centered upon column configuration, modeling, design and optimization, economic feasibility and experimental verification for steady state operation. Then the focus is turned to review the progress of a few emerging heat integration approaches that leads to motivate the researchers for further advancement of the HPAD scheme. Presenting the recently developed hybrid HPAD based heat integrated distillation configurations, the feasibility of heat pumping in batch processing is discussed. Finally the work highlights the opportunities and future challenges of the potential methodology

  2. Performance evaluation and experiment system for waste heat recovery of diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a waste heat recovery system is proposed where a high speed turbocharged diesel engine acts as the topper of a combined cycle with exhaust gases used for a bottoming Rankine cycle. The paper describes a mathematical model to evaluate the performance of Rankine cycle system with a reciprocating piston expander. The paper focuses on the performance evaluation and parameter selection of the heat exchanger and reciprocating piston expander that are suitable to waste heat recovery of ICE (internal combustion engine). The paper also describes the experimental setup and the preliminary results. The simulation results show that a proper intake pressure should be 4–5 MPa at its given mass flow rate of 0.015–0.021 kg/s depending on the waste heat recovery of a turbocharged diesel engine (80 kW/2590 rpm). The net power and net power rise rate at various ICE rotation speeds are calculated. The result shows that introducing heat recovery system can increase the engine power output by 12%, when diesel engine operates at 80 kW/2590 rpm. The preliminary experimental results indirectly prove the simulation model by two negative work loops in the P–V curve, under a low intake pressure and steam flow rate condition. - Highlights: • We investigate waste heat recovery through secondary fluid power cycle. • We establish a thermodynamic model of reciprocating steam engine. • We conduct the performance evaluation and experimental system development. • Primary parameters of the heat exchangers and expander are determined

  3. A Thermoelectric Waste-Heat-Recovery System for Portland Cement Rotary Kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qi; Li, Peng; Cai, Lanlan; Zhou, Pingwang; Tang, Di; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie

    2015-06-01

    Portland cement is produced by one of the most energy-intensive industrial processes. Energy consumption in the manufacture of Portland cement is approximately 110-120 kWh ton-1. The cement rotary kiln is the crucial equipment used for cement production. Approximately 10-15% of the energy consumed in production of the cement clinker is directly dissipated into the atmosphere through the external surface of the rotary kiln. Innovative technology for energy conservation is urgently needed by the cement industry. In this paper we propose a novel thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system to reduce heat losses from cement rotary kilns. This system is configured as an array of thermoelectric generation units arranged longitudinally on a secondary shell coaxial with the rotary kiln. A mathematical model was developed for estimation of the performance of waste heat recovery. Discussions mainly focus on electricity generation and energy saving, taking a Φ4.8 × 72 m cement rotary kiln as an example. Results show that the Bi2Te3-PbTe hybrid thermoelectric waste-heat-recovery system can generate approximately 211 kW electrical power while saving 3283 kW energy. Compared with the kiln without the thermoelectric recovery system, the kiln with the system can recover more than 32.85% of the energy that used to be lost as waste heat through the kiln surface.

  4. Thermochemical recovery of heat contained in flue gases by means of bioethanol conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashchenko, D. I.

    2013-06-01

    In the present paper consideration is being given to the use of bioethanol in the schemes of thermochemical recovery of heat contained in exit flue gases. Schematic diagrams illustrate the realization of thermochemical heat recovery by implementing ethanol steam conversion and conversion of ethanol by means of products of its complete combustion. The feasibility of attaining a high degree of recovery of heat contained in flue gases at the moderate temperature (up to 450°C) of combustion components is demonstrated in the example of the energy balance of the system for thermochemical heat recovery. The simplified thermodynamic analysis of the process of ethanol steam conversion was carried out in order to determine possible ranges of variation of process variables (temperature, pressure, composition) of a reaction mixture providing the efficient heat utilization. It was found that at the temperature above 600 K the degree of ethanol conversion is near unity. The equilibrium composition of products of reaction of ethanol steam conversion has been identified for different temperatures at which the process occurs at the ratio H2O/EtOH = 1 and at the pressure of 0.1 MPa. The obtained results of calculation agree well with the experimental data.

  5. Opportunities for low-grade heat recovery in the UK food processing industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy efficiency in the process industry is becoming an increasingly important issue due to the rising costs of both electricity and fossil fuel resources, as well as the tough targets for the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions outlined in the Climate Change Act 2008. Utilisation of waste heat sources is key to improving industrial energy efficiency, with an estimated 11.4 TWh of recoverable heat being wasted each year, a quarter of which is from the food and drinks processing sector. This paper examines the low-grade waste heat sources common to the food and drinks processing sector and the various opportunities for the use of this heat. A review of the best available technologies for recovery of waste heat is provided, ranging from heat transfer between source and sink, to novel technologies for the generation of electricity and refrigeration. Generally, the most economic option for waste heat recovery is heat exchange between nearby/same process source and sink, with a number of well-developed heat exchangers widely available for purchase. More novel options, such as the use of organic Rankine cycles for electricity generation prove to be less economical due to high capital outlays. However, with additional funding provision for demonstration of such projects and development of modular units, such technologies would become more common

  6. Control aspects of latent heat storage and recovery in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.; Hawes, D.W.; Banu, D.; Feldman, D. [Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Centre for Building Studies, 1455 de Maisonmeuve Blud. w., Concordia University, Montreal (Canada)

    2000-05-15

    This paper presents the results of macro scale tests that compare the thermal storage performance of ordinary concrete blocks with those that have been impregnated with two phase change materials (PCM). One is a commercial Butyl Stearate (Emerest 2326), and the other is a commercial Paraffin (Unicere 55). The comparative characteristics of these PCM - concrete combinations were examined. Also, the effect of air velocity was studied in respect to the control of the rates of heat storage and discharge. This research is an extension of the laboratory scale work in this area, which were carried out in recent years.

  7. Energy efficiency analysis of condensed waste heat recovery ways in cogeneration plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The heating equivalent electricity method is used to analyze energy efficiencies. • Analysis is made combining with the characteristics of the steam turbines. • Main factors affecting energy efficiencies of the common heating ways are analyzed. • Applicability evaluations of the heating ways are made under design conditions. - Abstract: Making full use of condensed waste heat is an effective approach to increase heating capacity and reduce air pollutant emissions of the cogeneration plant. In this article, the heating equivalent electricity method is adopted to evaluate energy efficiencies and applicability of different condensed waste heat recovery ways, such as the condenser, the single-effect lithium bromide absorption heat pump and the bleeding-steam-driven compression heat pump. The following discussion is based on a 300 MW water-cooling steam turbine heating system and a 300 MW air-cooling steam turbine heating system. Combining with the characteristics of the water-cooling steam turbine and the air-cooling steam turbine, main factors affecting energy efficiencies are analyzed. Applicability evaluations of these condensed waste heat recovery ways are made by comparing energy efficiencies with each other under design conditions. Analysis shows that direct heat exchange by the condenser should be given the first priority. The condenser is most suitable to provide basic heating load. For the heat source composed of several steam turbines, the corresponding condensers should be connected in series. The proportion of steam turbines with high backpressures should be controlled due to high energy consumptions and inflexibility of adjustment. When supply water temperature is low, a surplus of bleeding steam pressure causes large irreversible loss in the generator of the single-effect absorption heat pump. A waste of energy grade of the bleeding steam makes the energy efficiency of the single-effect absorption heat pump lower than that of the

  8. Modeling of Waste Heat Recovery System and Effects at Different Engine Operating Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Ming; Li, Gangyan; Hu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The model of waste heat recovery (WHR) system is considered by using the thermodynamics cycle, organic Rankine cycle (ORC), to reutilize the waste heat from engine exhaust gas. The model was validated and then applied to different operating conditions. From the results, it could be seen that the working fluid mass flow rate, engine speed, and system pressure would determine the output power and thermal efficiency; the working fluid mass flow rate need not be fixed at a certain point, but a wi...

  9. Retrofit of heat exchanger networks with pressure recovery of process streams at sub-ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • New mathematical model for heat exchanger networks retrofit with pressure recovery. • Optimal heat and work integration applied to the retrofit of sub-ambient processes. • Streams pressure manipulation is used to enhance heat integration of the system. • Compressors and turbines can act on a coupling shaft and/or as stand-alone equipment. • Use of smaller amount of cold utilities, reducing significantly the operational costs. - Abstract: This paper presents a new mathematical programming model for the retrofit of heat exchanger networks (HENs), wherein the pressure recovery of process streams is conducted to enhance heat integration. Particularly applied to cryogenic processes, HENs retrofit with combined heat and work integration is mainly aimed at reducing the use of expensive cold services. The proposed multi-stage superstructure allows the increment of the existing heat transfer area, as well as the use of new equipment for both heat exchange and pressure manipulation. The pressure recovery of streams is carried out simultaneously with the HEN design, such that the process conditions (streams pressure and temperature) are variables of optimization. The mathematical model is formulated using generalized disjunctive programming (GDP) and is optimized via mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP), through the minimization of the retrofit total annualized cost, considering the turbine and compressor coupling with a helper motor. Three case studies are performed to assess the accuracy of the developed approach, including a real industrial example related to liquefied natural gas (LNG) production. The results show that the pressure recovery of streams is efficient for energy savings and, consequently, for decreasing the HEN retrofit total cost especially in sub-ambient processes

  10. Analysis of a Rotating Spool Expander for Organic Rankine Cycles in Heat Recovery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, Abhinav; Bradshaw, Craig R.; Eckhard A. Groll

    2014-01-01

    The increasing cost of energy, coupled with the recent drive for energy security and climate change mitigation have provided the impetus for harnessing renewable energy sources as viable alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Furthermore, recovering heat that is discharged from power plants, automobiles and various other industrial processes is of growing interest. Nevertheless, technologies attempting to provide small-scale heat recovery solutions have seen very limited commercialization...

  11. Optimization of Thermoelectric Components for Automobile Waste Heat Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.

    2015-10-01

    For a typical spark ignition engine approximately 40% of available thermal energy is lost as hot exhaust gas. To improve fuel economy, researchers are currently evaluating technology which exploits exhaust stream thermal power by use of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) that operate on the basis of the Seebeck effect. A 5% improvement in fuel economy, achieved by use of TEG output power, is a stated objective for light-duty trucks and personal automobiles. System modeling of thermoelectric (TE) components requires solution of coupled thermal and electric fluxes through the n and p-type semiconductor legs, given appropriate thermal boundary conditions at the junctions. Such applications have large thermal gradients along the semiconductor legs, and material properties are highly dependent on spatially varying temperature profiles. In this work, one-dimensional heat flux and temperature variations across thermoelectric legs were solved by using an iterative numerical approach to optimize both TE module and TEG designs. Design traits were investigated by assuming use of skutterudite as a thermoelectric material with potential for automotive applications in which exhaust gas and heat exchanger temperatures typically vary from 100°C to over 600°C. Dependence of leg efficiency, thermal fluxes and electric power generation on leg geometry, fill fractions, electric current, thermal boundary conditions, etc., were studied in detail. Optimum leg geometries were computed for a variety of automotive exhaust conditions.

  12. Energy saving in ceramic tile kilns: Cooling gas heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A great quantity of thermal energy is consumed in ceramic tile manufacture, mainly in the firing stage. The most widely used facilities are roller kilns, fuelled by natural gas, in which more than 50% of the energy input is lost through the flue gas and cooling gas exhaust stacks. This paper presents a calculation methodology, based on certain kiln operating parameters, for quantifying the energy saving obtained in the kiln when part of the cooling gases are recovered in the firing chamber and are not exhausted into the atmosphere. Energy savings up to 17% have been estimated in the studied case. Comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental data confirmed the validity of the proposed methodology. The study also evidenced the need to improve combustion process control, owing to the importance of the combustion process in kiln safety and energy efficiency. - Highlights: •Some energy input (30–35%) in ceramic roller kilns is lost through the cooling gas stack. •Cooling air is directly recovered in the combustion chamber, providing oxygen. •This energy recovery from the cooling gas stack has been quantified. •It has been proven that the proposed methodology to estimate energy savings is valid

  13. Heat Recovery from High Temperature Slags: A Review of Chemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqi Sun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste heat recovery from high temperature slags represents the latest potential way to remarkably reduce the energy consumption and CO2 emissions of the steel industry. The molten slags, in the temperature range of 1723–1923 K, carry large amounts of high quality energy. However, the heat recovery from slags faces several fundamental challenges, including their low thermal conductivity, inside crystallization, and discontinuous availability. During past decades, various chemical methods have been exploited and performed including methane reforming, coal and biomass gasification, and direct compositional modification and utilization of slags. These methods effectively meet the challenges mentioned before and help integrate the steel industry with other industrial sectors. During the heat recovery using chemical methods, slags can act as not only heat carriers but also as catalysts and reactants, which expands the field of utilization of slags. Fuel gas production using the waste heat accounts for the main R&D trend, through which the thermal heat in the slag could be transformed into high quality chemical energy in the fuel gas. Moreover, these chemical methods should be extended to an industrial scale to realize their commercial application, which is the only way by which the substantial energy in the slags could be extracted, i.e., amounting to 16 million tons of standard coal in China.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 ≤ ReDh ≤ 1000 have been carried out for channels of square cross-section. Channel wall lengths of 1.0 mm are investigated for elbow spacings of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm. High temperature air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  15. Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-06-17

    The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

  16. Polymer spiral film gas-liquid heat exchanger for waste heat recovery in exhaust gases

    OpenAIRE

    Breton, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    In this master thesis report the development of an innovative spiral heat exchanger based on polymer materials is described. Building prototypes, erection of a test bench and firsts tests of the heat exchanger are presented. The heat exchanger prototype survived all tests especially several days in contact with aggressive gases. A facility integrating a Diesel exhaust gases production has been developed to test this heat exchanger design. Performance results obtained during the tes...

  17. APPLICATIONS OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE TO WASTE HEAT RECOVERY IN THE FOOD PROCESSING INDUSTRY, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, W. L.; Christenson, James A.

    1979-07-31

    A project is discussed in which the possibilities for economical waste heat recovery and utilization in the food industry were examined. Waste heat availability and applications surveys were performed at two manufacturing plants engaged in low temperature (freezing) and high temperature (cooking, sterilizing, etc.) food processing. The surveys indicate usable waste heat is available in significant quantities which could be applied to existing, on-site energy demands resulting in sizable reductions in factory fuel and energy usage. At the high temperature plant, the energy demands involve the heating of fresh water for boiler make-up, for the food processes and for the daily clean-up operation. Clean-up poses an opportunity for thermal energy storage since waste heat is produced during the one or two production shifts of each working day while the major clean-up effort does not occur until food production ends. At the frozen food facility, the clean-up water application again exists and, in addition, refrigeration waste heat could also be applied to warm the soil beneath the ground floor freezer space. Systems to recover and apply waste heat in these situations were developed conceptually and thermal/economic performance predictions were obtained. The results of those studies indicate the economics of waste heat recovery can be attractive for facilities with high energy demand levels. Small factories, however, with relatively low energy demands may find the economics marginal although, percentagewise, the fuel and energy savings are appreciable.

  18. Optimal waste heat recovery in micro gas turbine cycles through liquid water injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water injection in the compressor exhaust, to recuperate waste heat, is considered a possible route to improve the electric efficiency and overall performance of the micro Gas Turbine turbine (mGT). Many research exists on water injection in mGTs, however a generic study to determine the optimal route for waste heat recovery is still missing. To determine the optimal cycle settings for waste heat recovery through water injection, we have performed simulations using a two-step method. In a first step, the thermodynamic limit for water injection is sought using a black box method. In a second step, the cycle layout is designed by means of composite curve theory. This paper summarizes the results of two scenarios. In the first scenario, the black box is considered as adiabatic and no fixed stack temperature is imposed (thus allowing condensation of the exhaust gasses). One of the major concerns when injecting water is the water consumption, which can be compensated in some cases through condensation and recycling the condensate. Therefore, in the second scenario, the cycle is made self-sufficient with water. In this case, the black box is no longer considered adiabatic and heat exchange with the environment is allowed for condensation of the flue gasses. Black box simulations showed that lowering the stack temperature to 53 °C results in an injection of 17 %wt of water and an increase in electric efficiency of 9% absolute. To keep the mGT cycle layout simple, low cost and not too complex, a maximum of two heat exchangers was imposed for the heat exchanger network design. Although black box analysis indicated a large potential for water introduction, this potential could not be achieved with the considered networks in this paper. Finally, injection of preheated water was identified as the optimal water injection scheme for waste heat recovery resulting in 4.6% absolute electric efficiency increase and a final stack temperature of 62 °C. Results of simulations of

  19. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  20. Performance of Counter Flow Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems in Dwellings Considering the Influence of Uncertainties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Cauberg, J.J.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Both critical and optimistic claims have been made regarding the performance of heat recovery ventilation systems (HRVS) in dwellings. Such arguments are raised partly because two key aspects are not fully clarified, i.e. the performance criteria and the influence of uncertainties. In the current pa

  1. ORC waste heat recovery in European energy intensive industries: Energy and GHG savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A methodology to estimate ORC industrial heat recovery potential is defined. • Heat recovery applications for different industrial processes are shown. • Cement, steel, glass and oil and gas applications are considered in EU27. • Savings in electricity costs and greenhouse gases are quantified. - Abstract: Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a technology with important opportunities in heat recovery from energy intensive industrial processes. This paper represents the first comprehensive estimate of ORC units that can be installed in cement, steel, glass and oil and gas industries in the 27 countries of the European Union based on an accurate methodology related to real plants in operation or under construction. An evaluation of energy savings, depending on the number of operating hours per year and of the consequent decrease in CO2 emission and electricity expenditure, is also provided. The study, carried out in the framework of an European research project on heat recovery in energy intensive industries, found that, in the most convenient considered scenario, up to about 20,000 GW h of thermal energy per year can be recovered and 7.6 M ton of CO2 can be saved by the application of ORC technology to the investigated and most promising industrial sectors

  2. Integrated energy and emission management for heavy-duty diesel engines with waste heat recovery system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, F.P.T.; Kupper, F.; Rascanu, G.; Feru, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rankine-cycleWasteHeatRecovery (WHR)systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine andWHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel en

  3. Optimization of paper machine heat recovery system; Paperikoneen laemmoentalteenottosysteemin optimointi - PMSY 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, H. [Valmet Oyj Pansio, Turku (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    Conventionally the energy content of paper and board machine dryer section exhaust air is recovered in the heat recovery tower. This has had a major contribution to the overall energy economy of a paper machine. Modern paper machines have already reached momentary record speeds above 1700 m/min, and speeds above 2000 m/min will be strived to. This is possible by developing new efficient drying technologies. These will require new solutions for the heat recovery systems. At the same time requirements for new heat recovery solutions come from the gradually closing of paper mill water circulation systems. In this project a discrete tool based on optimization is developed, a tool for analyzing, optimizing and dimensioning of paper machine heat recovery systems for different process conditions. Delivery of a paper machine process requires more and more transferring of process knowledge into calculation model parameters. The overall target of the tool is to decrease the energy consumption considering new drying technologies and the gradually closing of water circulation systems. (orig.)

  4. Waste Heat Recovery for the Cement Sector : Market and Supplier Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation; Institute for Industrial Productivity

    2014-01-01

    This report analyzes the current status of Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) technology deployment in developing countries and investigates the success factors in countries where WHR has become widely spread. The report then focuses on the in-depth analysis of WHR potential and enabling factors in eleven country markets in Africa (Nigeria, South Africa), South Asia (India, Pakistan), Middle East (...

  5. Waste heat recovery using a thermoelectric power generation system in a biomass gasifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the use of waste heat that is recovered from a biomass gasifier. In the gasification process, the low heating value of biomass can be transferred to a high heating value for combustible gaseous fuel, a form that is widely used in industry and power plants. Conventionally, some of cleaning processes need to be conducted under higher operating temperatures that the low temperatures typically used to burn biomass. Therefore, the catalytic reactor was designed before installation the scrubber in the downdraft gasifier system to make effective use of the waste heat. The experimental result shows that the temperature of the gasifier outlet is about 623–773 K; dolomite is used for tar removal in the catalytic reactor. To further improve the use of waste heat, a thermoelectric generator is added to provide for the recovery of waste heat. The thermoelectric generator system is manufactured using a Bi2Te3 based material and is composed of eight thermoelectric modules on the surface of catalytic reactor. The measured surface temperature of the catalytic reactor is 473–633 K that is the correct temperature for Bi2Te3 as thermoelectric generator. The result shows that the maximum power output of the thermoelectric generator system is 6.1 W and thermoelectric generator power density is approximately 193.1 W/m2. - Highlights: • Set up the thermoelectric power generation system to recover waste heat from biomass gasifier. • Bi2Te3 based material is suitable for choosing as a thermoelectric generator in the waste heat recovery temperature range of 473–633 K form gasifier. • The maximum power density can reach 193.1 W/m2 for waste heat recovery

  6. Experimental investigation of a reticulated porous alumina heat exchanger for high temperature gas heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study presents an experimental study of a prototype counter-flow heat exchanger designed to recover sensible heat from inert and reactive gases flowing through a high temperature solar reactor for splitting CO2. The tube-in-tube heat exchanger is comprised of two concentric alumina tubes, each filled with reticulated porous alumina with a nominal porosity of 80% and pore density of 5 pores per inch (ppi). The RPC provides high heat transfer surface area per unit volume (917 m−1) with low pressure drop. Measurements include the permeability, inertial coefficient, overall heat transfer coefficient, effectiveness and pressure drop. For laminar flow and an inlet gas temperature of 1240 K, the overall heat transfer coefficients are 36–41 W m−2 K−1. The measured performance is in good agreement with a prior CFD model of the heat exchanger. - Highlights: • A ceramic heat exchanger provides gas-phase heat recuperation for a solar thermochemical reactor. • Alumina reticulated porous ceramic (RPC) provides high surface area and low pressure drop. • Heat transfer and pressure drop are measured at temperatures up to 1240 K. • RPC provides a 9-fold increase in heat transfer compared to bare tubes

  7. Waste heat recovery options in a large gas-turbine combined power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upathumchard, Ularee

    This study focuses on power plant heat loss and how to utilize the waste heat in energy recovery systems in order to increase the overall power plant efficiency. The case study of this research is a 700-MW natural gas combined cycle power plant, located in a suburban area of Thailand. An analysis of the heat loss of the combustion process, power generation process, lubrication system, and cooling system has been conducted to evaluate waste heat recovery options. The design of the waste heat recovery options depends to the amount of heat loss from each system and its temperature. Feasible waste heat sources are combustion turbine (CT) room ventilation air and lubrication oil return from the power plant. The following options are being considered in this research: absorption chillers for cooling with working fluids Ammonia-Water and Water-Lithium Bromide (in comparison) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) with working fluids R134a and R245fa. The absorption cycles are modeled in three different stages; single-effect, double-effect and half-effect. ORC models used are simple ORC as a baseline, ORC with internal regenerator, ORC two-phase flash expansion ORC and ORC with multiple heat sources. Thermodynamic models are generated and each system is simulated using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) to define the most suitable waste heat recovery options for the power plant. The result will be synthesized and evaluated with respect to exergy utilization efficiency referred as the Second Law effectiveness and net output capacity. Results of the models give recommendation to install a baseline ORC of R134a and a double-effect water-lithium bromide absorption chiller, driven by ventilation air from combustion turbine compartment. The two technologies yield reasonable economic payback periods of 4.6 years and 0.7 years, respectively. The fact that this selected power plant is in its early stage of operation allows both models to economically and effectively perform waste heat

  8. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu; Sørensen, Kim;

    2014-01-01

    Concerned to push ships to have a lower impact on the environment, the International Maritime Organization are implementing stricter regulation of NOx and SOx emissions, called Tier III, within emission control areas (ECAs). Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS) on container ships consist of...... recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculating a part of the exhaust gas through the engine combustion chamber to reduce emissions. WHRS combined...

  9. Water Recovery with the Heat Melt Compactor in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Goo, Jonathan; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    The Heat Melt Compactor is a proposed utility that will compact astronaut trash, extract the water for eventual re-use, and form dry square tiles that can be used as additional ionizing radiation shields for future human deep space missions. The Heat Melt Compactor has been under development by a consortium of NASA centers. The downstream portion of the device is planned to recover a small amount of water while in a microgravity environment. Drop tower low gravity testing was performed to assess the effect of small particles on a capillary-based water/air separation device proposed for the water recovery portion of the Heat Melt Compactor.

  10. Heat stress and recovery of photosystem II efficiency in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars acclimated to different growth temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haque, Sabibul; Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Rosenqvist, Eva; Sharma, Dew Kumari; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2014-01-01

    The effect of heat stress on photosystem II (PS II) efficiency and post-stress recovery was studied in four wheat cultivars using chlorophyll fluorescence. The main aim was to examine the cultivar differences in relation to inhibition and recovery of PSII functionality after heat stress at differ...

  11. Cooling energy efficiency and classroom air environment of a school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recently-built school buildings have adopted novel heat recovery ventilator and air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification and indoor air quality indicated by the CO2 concentration have been numerically modeled concerning the effects of delivering ventilation flow rate and supplying air temperature. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of mechanical ventilation rate can simultaneously boost the dilution of indoor air pollutants and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal and pollutant distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of supplying air. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented. - Highlights: • Low energy school buildings and classroom environment. • Heat recovery facility operating with an air conditioning unit. • Displacement ventilation influenced by the heat recovery efficiency. • Energy conservation of cooling and ventilation through heat recovery. • Enhancement of classroom environment with reduction of school building energy

  12. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal and heat transfer models of absorption heat pumps driven by exhaust gas, hot water, or natural gas. • Natural gas boiler combustion model. • Heat exchanger for condensing. • Experimental data of a hot water absorption heat pump. • Economic assessment of heat recovery absorption heat pump for improving natural gas boilers. - Abstract: Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150–200 °C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50–60 °C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural

  13. Design and analysis of a cogeneration plant using heat recovery of a cement factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Pradeep Varma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a more potential in a cement factory for electric power generation using waste heat recovery compared to the other industries. A case study has been done at a cement factory having two units, 1600 TPD and 5500 TPD, identified three waste heat rejections at 176 °C, 330 °C and 420 °C and designed a suitable power plant configuration. In this work, an attempt has been made to quantify the power generation capacity with plant analysis. It has been resulted that 12.5 MW of power can be produced with the available heat recovery against a cement factory demand of 15 MW. The available process heat for cement production and power generation has been estimated at a capacity range from 5000 to 9000 TPD. The analysis recommended a low steam pressure for power generation at above said heat recovery gas temperature.

  14. Direct waste heat recovery via thermoelectric materials - chosen issues of the thermodynamic description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, Piotr; Kolasińska, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    The effective waste heat recovery is one of the present-day challenges in the industry and power engineering. The energy systems dedicated for waste heat conversion into electricity are usually characterized by low efficiency and are complicated in the design. The possibility of waste heat recovery via thermoelectric materials may be an interesting alternative to the currently used technologies. In particular, due to their material characteristics, conducting polymers may be competitive when compared with the power machinery and equipment. These materials can be used in a wide range of the geometries e.g. the bulk products, thin films, pristine form or composites and the others. In this article, the authors present selected issues related to the mathematical and thermodynamic description of the heat transfer processes in the thermoelectric materials dedicated for the waste heat recovery. The link of these models with electrical properties of the material and a material solution based on a conducting polymer have also been presented in this paper.

  15. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  16. A methodology for the geometric design of heat recovery steam generators applying genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper shows how the geometric design of heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) can be achieved. The method calculates the product of the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) by the area of the heat exchange surface (A) as a function of certain thermodynamic design parameters of the HRSG. A genetic algorithm is then applied to determine the best set of geometric parameters which comply with the desired UA product and, at the same time, result in a small heat exchange area and low pressure losses in the HRSG. In order to test this method, the design was applied to the HRSG of an existing plant and the results obtained were compared with the real exchange area of the steam generator. The findings show that the methodology is sound and offers reliable results even for complex HRSG designs. -- Highlights: ► The paper shows a methodology for the geometric design of heat recovery steam generators. ► Calculates product of the overall heat transfer coefficient by heat exchange area as a function of certain HRSG thermodynamic design parameters. ► It is a complement for the thermoeconomic optimization method. ► Genetic algorithms are used for solving the optimization problem

  17. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to study a cogeneration plant for combined heat & power (CHP production that utilises the low-temperature waste energy in the power plant of a Suezmax-size oil tanker for all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency and a CHP Plant with R245fa fluid using a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC is selected. All the ship heat requirements can be covered by energy of organic fluid after expansion in the turbine, except feeder-booster heating. Hence, an additional quantity of working fluid may be heated using an after Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG directed to the feeder-booster module. An analysis of the obtained results shows that the steam turbine plant does not yield significant fuel savings. However, a CHP plant with R245fa fluid using supercritical ORC meets all of the demands for electrical energy and heat while burning only a small amount of additional fuel in HRSG at the main engine off-design operation.

  18. Wind- and stack-assisted mechanical ventilation with heat recovery and night cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Svendsen, Svend

    , a prototype of a heat exchanger, was developed based on design criteria about pressure drop, eciency and production concerns. The exchanger is based on banks of plastic tubing cris-crossing the air flow, thus creating approximate counter flow between air and water. Round PE plastic tubing is used. The tubing......The dual-sided issue of indoor environment and energy consumption have become increasingly important in building design. One possible solution is to ventilate by passive means, such as by stack eect and wind pressure, but this requires the development of new concepts and components. Here we have...... presented the outline of a heat recovery concept suitable for stack and wind-assisted mechanical ventilation systems with total system pressure losses of 74Pa. The heat recovery concept is based on two air-to-water exchangers connected by a liquid loop powered by a pump. The core element of the concept...

  19. Meetings to share advancements in heat pump technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswick, F. A.; Devault, R. C.; Fairchild, P. D.

    1990-04-01

    The Conference brought together researchers, engineers, managers, and government policy makers from the various participating countries and provided a forum to share information on heat pump technological advancements and related environmental issues. From interactions with the Japanese participants in various working meetings and site visits, it is clear that heat pumps represent a major technology emphasis in Japan for industry and utility supported R and D, as well as government sponsored programs. The Super Heat Pump (SHP) project sponsored by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) and aimed at leveling electric power demand in addition to higher heat pump performance, is a notable example of this emphasis and of the way in which industry, research institutes, and government are working together in Japan. A joint industry R and D association established for the SHP effort, for example, includes sixteen (16) major corporate members (Mitsubishi, Toshiba, etc.). Also, gas fired heat pumps have moved beyond laboratory prototypes and field tests and have emerged in Japan in production quantities. These first market entry products use near conventional small I.C. engines and are sized for residential and small commercial building applications. Sales are already in the ten thousands annually, and are increasing. Four major companies are already manufacturing and marketing such units (Yamaha, Yanmar, Aisin Seiki, and Sanyo). The Japanese companies and research organizations were much more open and frank about their research activities and progress than anticipated. The new Heat Pump Technology Center of Japan (HPTCJ) was an excellent host and established a positive atmosphere for international dialogue and cooperation.

  20. Recuperator with microjet technology as a proposal for heat recovery from low-temperature sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajs, Jan; Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Fornalik-Wajs, Elżbieta; Bajor, Michał

    2015-12-01

    A tendency to increase the importance of so-called dispersed generation, based on the local energy sources and the working systems utilizing both the fossil fuels and the renewable energy resources is observed nowadays. Generation of electricity on industrial or domestic scale together with production of heat can be obtained for example through employment of the ORC systems. It is mentioned in the EU directive 2012/27/EU for cogenerative production of heat and electricity. For such systems the crucial points are connected with the heat exchangers, which should be small in size but be able to transfer high heat fluxes. In presented paper the prototype microjet heat exchanger dedicated for heat recovery systems is introduced. Its novel construction is described together with the systematical experimental analysis of heat transfer and flow characteristics. Reported results showed high values of the overall heat transfer coefficient and slight increase in the pressure drop. The results of microjet heat exchanger were compared with the results of commercially available compact plate heat exchanger.

  1. Heat Recovery in a Pasta Factory. Pinch Analysis Leads to Optimal Heat Pump Usage.

    OpenAIRE

    Staine, Frédéric; Favrat, Daniel; Krummenacher, Pierre

    1994-01-01

    In the previous issue of the IEA Heat Pump Centre Newsletter (Vol, 12, No.3, pp. 29-31), an article by these authors described the use of pinch analysis (also known as pinch technology) in a buildings application. This article describes a similar procedure for integrating a heat pump into a pasta production process. Many industrial processes, and particularly those dealing with drying, are characterized by an overabundance of low- grade heat which often cannot be effi...

  2. Advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, J.W.; Stringer, J. (eds.)

    1979-12-01

    The first conference on advanced materials for alternative fuel capable directly fired heat engines was held at the Maine Maritime Academy, Castine, Maine. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and the Electric Power Research Institute, (Division of Fossil Fuel and Advanced Systems). Forty-four papers from the proceedings have been entered into EDB and ERA and one also into EAPA; three had been entered previously from other sources. The papers are concerned with US DOE research programs in this area, coal gasification, coal liquefaction, gas turbines, fluidized-bed combustion and the materials used in these processes or equipments. The materials papers involve alloys, ceramics, coatings, cladding, etc., and the fabrication and materials listing of such materials and studies involving corrosion, erosion, deposition, etc. (LTN)

  3. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry

  4. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry

  5. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wail Aladayleh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively. The indication work, real shaft power and specific fuel consumption for Stirling engine, and the exhaust power losses for IC engine are calculated. The study shows the availability and possibility of recovery of the waste heat from internal combustion engine using Stirling engine.

  6. Recovery Act. Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yi [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States); Casey, Patrick [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States); Du, Liang [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States); He, Dawei [Eaton Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI (United States)

    2014-02-12

    , in particular, advanced power strips (APSs) was studied. The project evaluated the market potential for Smart Power Strips (SPSs) with load identification and the likely impact of a load identification feature on APS adoption and effectiveness. The project also identified other success factors required for widespread APS adoption and market acceptance. Even though the developed technology is applicable for both residential and commercial buildings, this project is focused on effective plug-in load control and management for commercial buildings, accomplished through effective load identification. The project has completed Smart Receptacle (SR) prototype development with integration of Load ID, Control/Management, WiFi communication, and Web Service. Twenty SR units were built, tested, and demonstrated in the Eaton lab; eight SR units were tested in the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for one-month of field testing. Load ID algorithm testing for extended load sets was conducted within the Eaton facility and at local university campuses. This report is to summarize the major achievements, activities, and outcomes under the execution of the project.

  7. Ammonia and Carbon Dioxide Heat Pumps for Heat Recovery in Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Wiebke; Christensen, Stefan W.; Markussen, Michael M.;

    2012-01-01

    . Calculations of cycle performances are performed using a reference cycle for both ammonia and carbon dioxide as refrigerant. For each cycle a thorough sensitivity analysis reveals that the forward and return temperatures of the heat sink (condenser or gas cooler) of the heat pump are most important for the...... coefficient of performance, COP. By comparing the cycles it is found that for each set of operating conditions the two refrigerants perform equally well at one given inlet temperature of the heat sink. Above this temperature ammonia cycles have the best COP and below CO2 cycles perform best. A general...... conclusion is that ammonia heat pumps are best at heat sink inlet temperatures above 28°C and CO2 is best below 24°C, independent of other parameters....

  8. Evaluation of trigeneration system using microturbine, ammonia-water absorption chiller, and a heat recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preter, Felipe C.; Rocha, Marcelo S.; Simoes-Moreira, Jose Roberto [SISEA - Alternative Energy Systems Lab. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering. University of Sao Paulo (EP/USP), SP (Brazil)], e-mails: felipe.preter@poli.usp.br, msrocha@poli.usp.br, jrsimoes@usp.br; Andreos, Ronaldo [COMGAS - Companhia de Gas de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: randreos@comgas.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a CCHP or tri generation system has been projected, mounted, and tested in laboratory, combining a microturbine for power generation, a heat recovery boiler for hot water production, and an ammonia water absorption chiller for chilled water production. The project was motivated by the large practical applications of this kind of energy recovery system in commerce, and industry, and, in general, more than 85% of the energy source is used as power, hot water, and cold water. In the first part, the trigeneration system theoretical model is detailed, and in the second part, experimental results are presented for different operation conditions. (author)

  9. ASPEN Plus simulation of coal integrated gasification combined blast furnace slag waste heat recovery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An integrated system of coal gasification with slag waste heat recovery was proposed. • The goal of BF slag heat saving and emission reduction was achieved by this system. • The optimal parameters were obtained and the waste heat recovery rate reached 83.08%. • About 6.64 kmol/min syngas was produced when using one ton BF slag to provide energy. - Abstract: This article presented a model for the system of coal gasification with steam and blast furnace slag waste heat recovery by using the ASPEN Plus as the simulating and modeling tool. Constrained by mass and energy balance for the entire system, the model included the gasifier used to product syngas at the chemical equilibrium based on the Gibbs free energy minimization approach and the boiler used to recover the heat of the blast furnace slag (BF slag) and syngas. Two parameters of temperature and steam to coal ratio (S/C) were considered to account for their impacts on the Datong coal (DT coal) gasification process. The carbon gasification efficiency (CE), cold gasification efficiency (CGE), syngas product efficiency (PE) and the heating value of syngas produced by 1 kg pulverized coal (HV) were adopted as the indicators to examine the gasification performance. The optimal operating temperature and S/C were 800 °C and 1.5, respectively. At this condition, CE reached above 90% and the maximum values of the CGE, PE and HV were all obtained. Under the optimal operating conditions, 1000 kg/min BF slag, about 40.41 kg/min DT pulverized coal and 77.94 kg/min steam were fed into the gasifier and approximate 6.64 kmol/min syngas could be generated. Overall, the coal was converted to clean syngas by gasification reaction and the BF slag waste heat was also recovered effectively (reached up to 83.08%) in this system, achieving the objective of energy saving and emission reduction

  10. Conjugate heat transfer simulations of advanced research reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Temperature predictions are enhanced by coupling heat transfer in solid and fluid zones. • Seven different cases are considered to observe trends in predicted temperature and pressure. • The seven cases consider high/medium/low power, flow, burnup, fuel material and geometry. • Simulations provide temperature predictions for performance/safety. Boiling is unlikely. • Simulations demonstrate that a candidate geometry can enhance performance/safety. - Abstract: The current work presents numerical simulations of coupled fluid flow and heat transfer of advanced U–Mo/Al and U–Mo/Mg research reactor fuels in support of performance and safety analyses. The objective of this study is to enhance predictions of the flow regime and fuel temperatures through high fidelity simulations that better capture various heat transfer pathways and with a more realistic geometric representation of the fuel assembly in comparison to previous efforts. Specifically, thermal conduction, convection and radiation mechanisms are conjugated between the solid and fluid regions. Also, a complete fuel element assembly is represented in three dimensional space, permitting fluid flow and heat transfer to be simulated across the entire domain. Seven case studies are examined that vary the coolant inlet conditions, specific power, and burnup to investigate the predicted changes in the pressure drop in the coolant and the fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. In addition, an alternate fuel geometry is considered with helical fins (replacing straight fins in the existing design) to investigate the relative changes in predicted fluid and solid temperatures. Numerical simulations predict that the clad temperature is sensitive to changes in the thermal boundary layer in the coolant, particularly in simultaneously developing flow regions, while the temperature in the fuel is anticipated to be unaffected. Finally, heat transfer between fluid and solid regions is enhanced with

  11. Performance investigation of a cogeneration plant with the efficient and compact heat recovery system

    KAUST Repository

    Myat, Aung

    2011-10-03

    This paper presents the performance investigation of a cogeneration plant equipped with an efficient waste heat recovery system. The proposed cogeneration system produces four types of useful energy namely: (i) electricity, (ii) steam, (iii) cooling and (iv) dehumidification. The proposed plant comprises a Capstone C30 micro-turbine which generates 24 kW of electricity, a compact and efficient waste heat recovery system and a host of waste heat activated devices namely (i) a steam generator, (ii) an absorption chiller, (iii) an adsorption chiller and (iv) a multi-bed desiccant dehumidifier. The numerical analysis for the host of waste heat recovery system and thermally activated devices using FORTRAN power station linked to powerful IMSL library is performed to investigate the performance of the overall system. A set of experiments, both part load and full load, of micro-turbine is conducted to examine the electricity generation and the exhaust gas temperature. It is observed that energy utilization factor (EUF) could achieve as high as 70% while Fuel Energy Saving Ratio (FESR) is found to be 28%.

  12. Waste Heat Recovery of a PEMFC System by Using Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianqi He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two systems are brought forward to recover the waste heat of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC, which are named the organic Rankine cycle (ORC, and heat pump (HP combined organic Rankine cycle (HPORC. The performances of both systems are simulated on the platform of MATLAB with R123, R245fa, R134a, water, and ethanol being selected as the working fluid, respectively. The results show that, for PEMFC where operating temperature is constantly kept at 60 °C, there exists an optimum working temperature for each fluid in ORC and HPORC. In ORC, the maximal net power can be achieved with R245fa being selected as the working fluid. The corresponding thermal efficiency of the recovery system is 4.03%. In HPORC, the maximal net power can be achieved with water being selected in HP and R123 in ORC. The thermal efficiency of the recovery system increases to 4.73%. Moreover, the possibility of using ORC as the cooling system of PEMFC is also studied. The heat released from PEMFC stack is assumed to be wholly recovered by the ORC or HPORC system. The results indicate that the HPORC system is much more feasible for the cooling system of a PEMFC stack, since the heat recovery ability can be promoted due to the presence of HP.

  13. A study of trilateral flash cycles for low-grade waste heat recovery-to-power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Ajimotokan, Habeeb A.

    2014-01-01

    There has been renewed significance for innovative energy conversion technologies, particularly the heat recovery-to-power technologies for sustainable power generation from renewable energies and waste heat. This is due to the increasing concern over high demand for electricity, energy shortage, global warming and thermal pollution. Among the innovative heat recovery-to- power technologies, the proposed trilateral flash cycle (TFC) is a promising option, which presents a gr...

  14. Heating of domestic water by waste heat recovery from household refrigerating equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reil, J.; Kaster, B.; Wegner, M.

    1982-09-01

    Heat from a 370 l deep freeze was used to heat water in a 250 l boiler. Both units were made from mass produced components. Tests show that the functions of cooling and deep freezing units can be effectively combined with one warm water boiler. The necessary expenditure for the appliance is, however, only economical with deep freezing units because with normal domestic refrigerators the amount of waste heat is too small. The economy of the unit could be considerably increased by the development of a mass produced motor compressor with a sufficiently large oil cooler to accomplish an optimum thermal insulation of the motor compressor surface area.

  15. Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2012-09-01

    Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the

  16. Reduction of repository heat load using advanced fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain already nearing capacity full before opening, advanced fuel cycles that introduce reprocessing, fast reactors, and temporary storage sites have the potential to allow the repository to support the current reactor fleet and future expansion. An uncertainty analysis methodology that combines Monte Carlo distribution sampling, reactor physics data simulation, and neural network interpolation methods enable investigation into the factor reduction of heat capacity by using the hybrid fuel cycle. Using a Super PRISM fast reactor with a conversion ratio of 0.75, burn ups reach up to 200 MWd/t that decrease the plutonium inventory by about 5 metric tons every 12 years. Using the long burn up allows the footprint of 1 single core loading of FR fuel to have an integral decay heat of about 2.5x105 MW*yr over a 1500 year period that replaces the footprint of about 6 full core loadings of LWR fuel for the number of years required to fuel the FR, which have an integral decay heat of about.3 MW*yr for the same time integral. This results in an increase of a factor of 4 in repository support capacity from implementing a single fast reactor in an equilibrium cycle. (authors)

  17. Thermodynamic optimization opportunities for the recovery and utilization of residual energy and heat in China's iron and steel industry: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses and optimizations of material flows and energy flows in iron and steel industry in the world are introduced in this paper. It is found that the recovery and utilization of residual energy and heat (RUREH) plays an important role for energy saving and CO2 emission reduction no matter what method is used. Although the energy cascade utilization principle is carried out, the efficiency of RUREH in China's iron and steel industry (CISI) is only about 30%–50%, while the international advanced level is higher than 90%, such as USA, Japan, Sweden, etc. An important reason for the low efficiency of RUREH in CISI is that someone ignores the thermodynamic optimization opportunities for the energy recovery or utilization equipment, such as electricity production via waste heat boiler, sintering ore sensible heat recovery, heat transfer through heat exchangers, etc. A case study of hot blast stove flue gas sensible heat recovery and utilization is presented to illustrate the viewpoint above. The results show that before the heat conductance distribution optimization, the system can realize energy saving 76.2 kgce/h, profit 68.9 yuan/h, and CO2 emission reduction 187.2 kg/h. While after the heat conductance distribution optimization, the system can realize energy saving 88.8 kgce/h, profit 92.5 yuan/h, and CO2 emission reduction 218.2 kg/h, which are, respectively, improved by 16.5%, 34.2% and 16.5% than those before optimization. Thermodynamic optimization from the single equipment to the whole system of RUREH is a vital part in the future energy conservation work in CISI. - Highlights: • Material flows and energy flows in iron and steel industry are introduced. • Recovery and utilization of residual energy and heat plays an important role. • A case study of hot blast stove flue gas sensible heat recovery is presented. • Thermodynamic optimization for the system is performed. • Energy saving, profit, and CO2 emission reduction improvements are

  18. WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FROM BOILER OF LARGE-SCALE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prateep Pattanapunt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many industrial heating processes generate waste energy in textile industry; especially exhaust gas from the boiler at the same time reducing global warming. Therefore, this article will present a study the way to recovery heat waste from boiler exhaust gas by mean of shell and tube heat exchanger. Exhaust gas from boiler dyeing process, which carries a large amount of heat, energy consumptions could be decrease by using of waste-heat recovery systems. In this study, using ANASYS simulation performs a thermodynamics analysis. An energy-based approach is performed for optimizing the effective working condition for waste-heat recovery with exhaust gas to air shell and tube heat exchanger. The variations of parameters, which affect the system performance such as, exhaust gas and air temperature, velocity and mass flow rate and moisture content is examined respectively. From this study, it was found that heat exchanger could be reduced temperature of exhaust gases and emission to atmosphere and the time payback is the fastest. The payback period was determined about 6 months for investigated ANSYS. The air is circulated in four passes from the top to the bottom of the test section, in overall counter-flow with exhaust gas. The front area is 1720×1720 mm, the flow length 7500 mm, the inner and outer diameter of exhaust gas is 800 mm, the tube assembly consist of 196 tubes, the tube diameter is 76.2 mm, the tube thickness is 2.6 mm, the tube length is 4500 mm, the tube length of air inner and outer is 500 mm. The result show that, the boiler for superheated type there are exhaust gas temperature is 190°C, 24% the moisture content of fuel and there are palm kernel shell 70 tons day-1 which there are the high temperature after the heat exchanger, 150°C. It was occurred acid rain. The hot air from heat exchanger process can be reduced the moisture of palm kernel shell fuel to 15%.The fuel consumption is reduced by about 2.05% (322.72 kJ kg-1

  19. A novel NGL (natural gas liquid) recovery process based on self-heat recuperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined an innovative self-heat-recuperation technology that circulates latent and sensible heat in the thermal process and applied it to the NGL (natural gas liquid) recovery process. A CGCC (column grand composite curve) was used to assess the thermodynamic feasibility of implementing the heat pump system and self-heat-recuperation technology into a conventional distillation column. The proposed distillation based on self-heat recuperation reduced the energy consumption dramatically by compressing the effluent stream, whose temperature was increased to provide the minimum temperature difference for the heat exchanger, and circulating the stream heat in the process. According to a simulation of the proposed sequence, up to 73.43 and 83.48% of the condenser and reboiler energy, respectively, were saved compared to a conventional column. This study also proposes heat integration to improve the performance of self-heat recuperation. The results showed that the modified sequence saves up 64.35, 100.00 and 31.60% of the condenser energy requirements, reboiler energy requirements and OP (operating cost), respectively, compared to a classical heat pump system, and 90.24, 100.00, and 67.19%, respectively, compared to a conventional column. The use of these sequences to retrofit a distillation column to save energy was also considered. - Highlights: • Innovative self-heat-recuperation technology that circulates latent and sensible heat. • A CGCC (column grand composite curve) is used to assess the thermodynamic feasibility. • The proposed sequence saves up 67.19% of the OP (operating cost). • The proposed sequences can be used to retrofit a distillation column to save energy

  20. Simulation analysis of a repowered double fuel CHP plant including a non-evaporative heat recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcin Liszka; Jan Szargut [Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland). Inst. of Thermal Technology

    2004-06-25

    Repowering analysis of a conventional, coal-fired industrial combined heat and power (CHP) plant by means of a gas turbine (GT) and heat recovery boiler (HRB) has been considered. The existing system, operating in one of the Polish chemical factories consists of coal-fired boilers, back-pressure extraction turbines, condensing turbines and steam-fed district heat exchangers. Two variants of modernization have been proposed and examined from the thermodynamic, environmental protection and economical points of view. The first one includes HRB for preheating the boiler feed water, condensate, and district water, while the steam turbine (ST) system and coal boilers work without any structural changes. The other advanced variant introduces live steam superheaters to HRB. The coal-fired boilers, in this light, supply only saturated steam (which is introduced into HRB), so they have to be readjusted by replacing the existing superheaters with convective vaporizers for proper flue gas cooling. Such a scheme ensures a considerable reduction of exergy losses in HRB and therefore leads to deeper flue gas cooling and a decrease of coal consumption for the assumed process steam and district heat demands. Heat and process steam demand duration curves for a typical year of operation of the plant have been adapted as input data. The mathematical model of the whole CHP plant has been built on GateCycle and Visual Basic software. The results obtained lead to the conclusion that repowering of a coal-fired plant by means of a GT and HRB is a very effective way to improve the thermodynamic and environmental protection aspects of power and heat generation. The introduction of the live steam superheater into HRB provides additional advantages in these fields. The economic results indicate discounted pay back periods from 3 to 11 years, depending on the situation at the electricity and fuel markets. 7 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Application of waste heat powered absorption refrigeration system to the LNG recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinowski, Paul; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard [Center for Environmental Energy Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Al Hashimi, Saleh; Rodgers, Peter [The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2009-06-15

    The recovery process of the liquefied natural gas requires low temperature cooling, which is typically provided by the vapor compression refrigeration systems. The usage of an absorption refrigeration system powered by waste heat from the electric power generating gas turbine could provide the necessary cooling at reduced overall energy consumption. In this study, a potential replacement of propane chillers with absorption refrigeration systems was theoretically analyzed. From the analysis, it was found that recovering waste heat from a 9 megawatts (MW) electricity generation process could provide 5.2 MW waste heat produced additional cooling to the LNG plant and save 1.9 MW of electricity consumption. Application of the integrated cooling, heating, and power is an excellent energy saving option for the oil and gas industry. (author)

  2. Selection criteria for plain and segmented finned tubes for heat recovery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, D. R.; Taborek, J.

    1994-04-01

    Heat recovery heat exchangers with gas as one of the streams depend on the use of finned tubes to compensate for the inherently low gas heat transfer coefficient. Standard frequency welded 'plain' fins were generally used in the past, until the high-frequency resistance welding technology permitted a cost-effective manufacture of 'segmented' fins. The main advantage of this fin design is that it permits higher heat flux and hence smaller, lighter weight units for most operating conditions. While the criteria that dictate optimum design, such as compactness, weight, and cost per unit area favor the segmented fin design, a few other considerations such as fouling, ease of cleaning, and availability of dependable design methods have to be considered. This paper analyzes the performance parameters that affect the selection of either fin type.

  3. Recovery of exhaust waste heat for a hybrid car using steam turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababatin, Yasser

    A number of car engines operate with an efficiency rate of approximately 22% to 25% [1]. The remainder of the energy these engines generate is wasted through heat escape out of the exhaust pipe. There is now an increasing desire to reuse this heat energy, which would improve the overall efficiency of car engines by reducing their consumption of fuel. Another benefit is that such reuse would minimize harmful greenhouse gases that are emitted into the environment. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to examine how the wasted heat energy can be reused and/or recovered by use of a heat recovery system that would store this energy in a hybrid car battery. Green turbines will be analyzed as a possible solution to recycle the lost energy in a way that will also improve the overall automotive energy efficiency.

  4. Oxidative stress impairs the heat stress response and delays unfolded protein recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Adachi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental changes, air pollution and ozone depletion are increasing oxidative stress, and global warming threatens health by heat stress. We now face a high risk of simultaneous exposure to heat and oxidative stress. However, there have been few studies investigating their combined adverse effects on cell viability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pretreatment of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 specifically and highly sensitized cells to heat stress, and enhanced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. H(2O(2 exposure impaired the HSP40/HSP70 induction as heat shock response (HSR and the unfolded protein recovery, and enhanced eIF2alpha phosphorylation and/or XBP1 splicing, land marks of ER stress. These H(2O(2-mediated effects mimicked enhanced heat sensitivity in HSF1 knockdown or knockout cells. Importantly, thermal preconditioning blocked H(2O(2-mediated inhibitory effects on refolding activity and rescued HSF1 +/+ MEFs, but neither blocked the effects nor rescued HSF1 -/- MEFs. These data strongly suggest that inhibition of HSR and refolding activity is crucial for H(2O(2-mediated enhanced heat sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: H(2O(2 blocks HSR and refolding activity under heat stress, thereby leading to insufficient quality control and enhancing ER stress. These uncontrolled stress responses may enhance cell death. Our data thus highlight oxidative stress as a crucial factor affecting heat tolerance.

  5. Draft report: application of organic Rankine cycle heat recovery systems to diesel powered marine vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-15

    The analysis and results of an investigation of the application of organic Rankine cycle heat recovery systems to diesel-powered marine vessels are described. The program under which this study was conducted was sponsored jointly by the US Energy Research and Development Administration, the US Navy, and the US Maritime Administration. The overall objective of this study was to investigate diesel bottoming energy recovery systems, currently under development by three US concerns, to determine the potential for application to marine diesel propulsion and auxiliary systems. The study primarily focused on identifying the most promising vessel applications (considering vessel type, size, population density, operational duty cycle, etc.) so the relative economic and fuel conservation merits of energy recovery systems could be determined and assessed. Vessels in the current fleet and the projected 1985 fleet rated at 1000 BHP class and above were investigated.

  6. Engineering Scoping Study of Thermoelectric Generator Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, Terry [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choate, William T. [BCS, Inc., Laurel, MD (United States)

    2006-11-01

    This report evaluates thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems with the intent to: 1) examine industrial processes in order to identify and quantify industrial waste heat sources that could potentially use TEGs; 2) describe the operating environment that a TEG would encounter in selected industrial processes and quantify the anticipated TEG system performance; 3) identify cost, design and/or engineering performance requirements that will be needed for TEGs to operate in the selected industrial processes; and 4) identify the research, development and deployment needed to overcome the limitations that discourage the development and use of TEGs for recovery of industrial waste heat.

  7. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation and Topological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive numerical model has been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details of the model and results from the analysis of General Motors' prototype TEG were described in part I of the study. In part II of this study, parametric evaluations are considered to assess the influence of heat exchanger, geometry, and thermoelectric module configurations to achieve optimization of the baseline model. The computational tool is also adapted to model other topologies such as transverse and circular configurations (hexagonal and cylindrical) maintaining the same volume as the baseline TEG. Performance analysis of these different topologies and parameters is presented and compared with the baseline design.

  8. Fuel cell heat recovery, electrical load management, and the economics of solar-hydrogen systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabani, B.; Andrews, J. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Badwal, S.P.S. [Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organization CSIRO Energy Transformed Flagship and Energy Technology, Clayton South (Australia)

    2009-03-11

    A solar-hydrogen system located in a remote household in southeast Australia was modelled in order to investigate electrical load management and fuel cell heat recovery processes. An electrical demand profile was used to determine factors related to power supply system size. Results of the study showed that the operating cost of the solar-hydrogen system can be reduced by managing peak demands while ensuring that the average daily electrical energy supply remains constant. Increases in fuel cell size lowered the average unit cost of energy due to the fact that larger fuel cells operate at lower current densities. Although recoverable heat supplies are lowered when optimal load management practices are applied, a net economic benefit for both heat and power is observed. The economic gains of recovering heat for domestic hot water were estimated at approximately US$4300 over an assessment period of 30 years. The economic gains of combining the load management technique with the heat recovery process were estimated at US$8164 over the same time period. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. Exergy efficiency enhancement of MSF desalination by heat recovery from hot distillate water stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This detailed exergy analysis of a 3800 m3/h Multi-Stage Flash (MSF) desalination plant is based on the latest published thermodynamics properties of water and seawater. The parameters of the study were extracted from a validated model of MSF desalination using IPSEpro software. The results confirmed that the overall exergy efficiency of the unit is lower than would be desirable at only 5.8%. Exergy inputs were destroyed by 55%, 17%, 10%, 4.3%, and 14% respectively, in the heat recovery stages, brine heater, heat rejection stages, pumps and brine streams disposal. Moreover, the detail of the study showed that the lowest exergy destruction occurs in the first stage, increasing gradually in heat recovery stages and sharply in heat rejection stages. The study concludes that recovering the heat from the hot distillate water stages can improve unit exergy efficiency from its low 5.8% to a more economical 14%, with the hot water parameters suitable for powering other thermal systems such as absorption chiller and multi-effect desalination

  10. Calculation of Efficiencies of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Grljušić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of a combined heat & power (CHP plant, using the waste heat from a Suezmax-size oil tanker’s main engine, to meet all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency, combined with a supercritical Organic Rankine cycle (ORC system, was selected to supply the auxiliary power, using R245fa or R123 as the working fluid. The system analysis showed that such a plant can meet all heat and electrical power requirements at full load, with the need to burn only a small amount of supplementary fuel in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG when the main engine operates at part load. Therefore, it is possible to increase the overall thermal efficiency of the ship’s power plant by more than 5% when the main engine operates at 65% or more of its specified maximum continuous rating (SMCR.

  11. Performance of Counter Flow Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems in Dwellings Considering the Influence of Uncertainties

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Z.; Cauberg, J.J.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Both critical and optimistic claims have been made regarding the performance of heat recovery ventilation systems (HRVS) in dwellings. Such arguments are raised partly because two key aspects are not fully clarified, i.e. the performance criteria and the influence of uncertainties. In the current paper, an assessment method for HRVS considering the influence of uncertainties is described. This includes adequate assessment criteria, the method of identifying the uncertainties, and the method o...

  12. Inverse Estimation of Temperature Profiles in Landfills Using Heat Recovery Fluids Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    V. G. Dovi'; Reverberi, A.P.; A. Del Borghi; C. Solisio

    2012-01-01

    In addition to leachate and gas emission analysis, temperature variations in municipal solid waste landfills are routinely monitored for safety and health reasons, such as the increased production of biogas or the danger of spontaneous combustion phenomena if the temperature exceeds 70–75°C. The increasing constraints on greenhouse gas emissions and the convenience of fuel and heat recovery have helped develop a global approach to landfills' operation and maintenance, generally referred to as...

  13. Integrated energy and emission management for diesel engines with waste heat recovery using dynamic models

    OpenAIRE

    Willems Frank; Kupper Frank; Rascanu George; Feru Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    Rankine-cycle Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine and WHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel engine with WHR system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC) strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing online the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue consumption. ...

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of an in-cylinder waste heat recovery system for internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, an in-cylinder waste heat recovery system especially for turbocharged engines is proposed to improve the thermal efficiencies of internal combustion engines. Simplified recovery processes can be described as follows: superheated steam generated by engine waste heat is injected into the pipe before the turbine to increase the boost pressure of the fresh air; intake valve close timing is adjusted to control the amount of fresh air as the original level, and thus the higher pressure charged air expands in the intake stroke and transfers the pressure energy directly to the crankshaft. In this way, the increased turbine output by the pre-turbine steam injection is finally recovered in the cylinder, which is different from the traditional Rankine cycle. The whole energy transfer processes are studied with thermodynamic analyses and numerical simulations. The results show that the mass flow rate of the injected steam has the biggest influence on the energy transfer processes followed by the temperature of the injected steam. With this in-cylinder waste heat recovery system, the fuel economy of a selected turbocharged diesel engine can be improved by 3.2% at the rated operating point when the injected mass flow ratio is set to be 0.1. - Highlights: • An in-cylinder waste heat recovery system is proposed. • Effects of injected parameters are studied with energy and exergy balance theories. • Variations of operating points on the compressor map are studied in detail. • The fuel economy is improved by 3.2% at the rated operating point

  15. A combined thermodynamic cycle based on methanol dissociation for IC (internal combustion) engine exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel approach for exhaust heat recovery was proposed to improve IC (internal combustion) engine fuel efficiency and also to achieve the goal for direct usage of methanol as IC engine fuel. An open organic Rankine cycle system using methanol as working medium is coupled to IC engine exhaust pipe for exhaust heat recovery. In the bottom cycle, the working medium first undergoes dissociation and expansion processes, and is then directed back to IC engine as fuel. As the external bottom cycle and the IC engine main cycle are combined together, this scheme forms a combined thermodynamic cycle. Then, this concept was applied to a turbocharged engine, and the corresponding simulation models were built for both of the external bottom cycle and the IC engine main cycle. On this basis, the energy saving potential of this combined cycle was estimated by parametric analyses. Compared to the methanol vapor engine, IC engine in-cylinder efficiency has an increase of 1.4–2.1 percentage points under full load conditions, while the external bottom cycle can increase the fuel efficiency by 3.9–5.2 percentage points at the working pressure of 30 bar. The maximum improvement to the IC engine global fuel efficiency reaches 6.8 percentage points. - Highlights: • A combined thermodynamic cycle using methanol as working medium for IC engine exhaust heat recovery is proposed. • The external bottom cycle of exhaust heat recovery and IC engine working cycle are combined together. • IC engine fuel efficiency could be improved from both in-cylinder working cycle and external bottom cycle. • The maximum improvement to the IC engine global fuel efficiency reaches 6.8 percentage points at full load

  16. Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery with Heat Pipe-Based Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, F. P.; Martins, Jorge; Hançer, Esra; Antunes, Nuno; Gonçalves, L. M.

    2015-06-01

    Heat pipe (HP)-based heat exchangers can be used for very low resistance heat transfer between a hot and a cold source. Their operating temperature depends solely on the boiling point of their working fluid, so it is possible to control the heat transfer temperature if the pressure of the HP can be adjusted. This is the case of the variable conductance HPs (VCHP). This solution makes VCHPs ideal for the passive control of thermoelectric generator (TEG) temperature levels. The present work assesses, both theoretically and experimentally, the merit of the aforementioned approach. A thermal and electrical model of a TEG with VCHP assist is proposed. Experimental results obtained with a proof of concept prototype attached to a small single-cylinder engine are presented and used to validate the model. It was found that the HP heat exchanger indeed enables the TEG to operate at a constant, optimal temperature in a passive and safe way, and with a minimal overall thermal resistance, under part load, it effectively reduces the active module area without deprecating the temperature level of the active modules.

  17. Numerical study of finned type heat exchangers for ICEs exhaust waste heat recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hatami

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two cases of heat exchangers (HEXs which previously were used in exhaust of internal combustion engines (ICEs are modeled numerically to recover the exhaust waste heat. It is tried to find the best viscous model to obtain the results with more accordance by experimental results. One of the HEXs is used in a compression ignition (CI engine with water as cold fluid and other is used in a spark ignition (SI engine with a mixture of 50% water and 50% ethylene glycol as cold fluid. As a main outcome, SST k–ω and RNG k–ε are suitable viscous models for these kinds of problems. Also, effect sizes and numbers of fins on recovered heat amount are investigated in various engine loads and speeds.

  18. Experimental study of a burner with high temperature heat recovery system for TPV applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental investigation to develop and test a burner and a heat recovery system for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications is presented. Experimental data have been compared with theoretical calculations and considerations in the pre-design and design phases of the project to find the weakest point of the concept and to validate the expected performance. The TPV generator has been designed as a compact module in order to be used as a range extender in an electric car. The heat recovery system is the key element to increase the efficiency of the system. The heat recovery system presented in this paper is a rotary type regenerator that is very compact and has higher effectiveness in comparison with other types of regenerators with the same number of transfer units (NTU). The experimental data have been used to verify the numerical models used in the calculations for design of the regenerator matrix. A new version of the numerical model has been developed to take into account the variation of the thermal properties of the system with the temperature. Dimensions, weight, efficiency, emissions and high working temperatures have been the most important competitive constraints to observe for design of the system

  19. Minimum variance control of organic Rankine cycle based waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The self-tuning generalized minimum variance control is applied for a waste heat recovery process with organic Rankine cycle. • The design procedure of generalized minimum variance controller is presented. • Simulation tests show the tracking ability and the disturbance rejecting performance of this controller. - Abstract: In this paper, an online self-tuning generalized minimum variance (GMV) controller is proposed for a 100 KW waste heat recovery system with organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC process model is formulated by the controlled autoregressive moving average (CARMA) model whose parameters are identified using the recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm with forgetting factor. The generalized minimum variance algorithm is applied to regulate ORC based waste heat recovery system. The contributions of this work are twofold: (1) the proposed control strategy is formulated under the data-driven framework, which does not need the precise mathematic model; (2) this proposed method is applied to handle tracking set-point variations and process disturbances by improved minimum objective GMV function. The performance of GMV controller is compared with the PID controller. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy can achieve satisfactory set-point tracking and disturbance rejection performance

  20. A combined air cycle used for IC engine supercharging based on waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A combined air cycle is proposed for IC engine supercharging based on WHR. • Cycle efficiency and energy recovery efficiency depend largely on working pressure. • Exhaust gas pressure of IC engine with combined air cycle is reduced largely. • IC engine fuel efficiency can be increased by 4.1% points at most. - Abstract: A combined air cycle is designed for internal combustion (IC) engine supercharging, which consists of IC engine working cycle and bottom cycle of waste heat recovery (WHR). The bottom cycle uses IC engine exhaust gas as cycle heat source, and its output power is used to drive the gas compressor. Both the heat transfer and thermodynamic processes of combined air cycle were investigated by numerical calculation under various cycle parameters and IC engine operating conditions. On this basis, the performances of combined air cycle and the improvement to IC engine performances were analyzed. Results show that, the cycle efficiency and exhaust gas energy recovery efficiency depend largely on the working pressure, and their maximum values appear at the working pressure of 0.35 MPa and 0.2 MPa, respectively. Compared with the naturally aspirated (NA) engine and turbocharging engine, this approach can make the fuel utilization efficiency of IC engine increase by 8.9% points and 4.1% points at most, respectively, due to the reduction of exhaust gas pressure. All these demonstrate that the proposed concept is a potentially useful approach for IC engine energy saving

  1. Energy and exergy analyses of a bottoming Rankine cycle for engine exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a theoretical study on the thermodynamic processes of a bottoming Rankine cycle for engine waste heat recovery is conducted from the viewpoints of energy balance and exergy balance. A theoretical formula and an exergy distribution map for qualitative analyses of the main operating parameters are presented under simplified conditions when exhaust gas is selected as the only heat source. Five typical working fluids, which are always selected by manufacturers for different types of engines, are compared under various operating conditions in Matlab software. The results show that working fluid properties, evaporating pressure and superheating temperature are the main factors influencing the system design and performances. The global recovery efficiency does not exceed 0.14 under typical operating conditions. Ethanol and R113 show better thermodynamic performances in the whole exhaust gas temperature range. In addition, the optimal evaporating pressure usually does not exist in engine exhaust heat recovery, and the distributions of exergy destruction are varied with working fluid categories and system design constraints. - Highlights: • A theoretical formula for qualitative analyses of the Rankine cycle is proposed. • System exergy destruction is investigated with an exergy distribution map. • Design constraints of the bottoming Rankine cycle for ICEs are summarized. • The optimal evaporating pressure does not occur under typical exhaust conditions. • The exergy destruction depends on working fluid categories and system constraints

  2. Kinetics of recovery and recystallization of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbi, A N; Rowcliffe, A F; Eatherly, W S; Gibson, L T

    1996-04-01

    A series of slow cycle and rapid cycle anneals was carried out in the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy (heat 832665). Also, a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) study was initiated on the samples of the same alloy. The recovery and recrystallization phenomena of V-4Cr-4Ti in slow cycle annealing were quite different from that observed in rapid cycle annealing. The large driving force for recrystallization due to rapid heating resulted in the first nuclei appearing after only 1 minute of 1000{degrees}C. There was a two-stage hardness reduction; the first stage involved recovery due to cell formation and annihilation of dislocation, and second stage was associated with the growth of recrystallization nuclei. This is consistent with results obtained from the DSC in which there was a broad exothermic peak from {approx}200 to 800{degrees}C due to recovery followed by a sharp exotherm associated with recrystallization. The activation energy for recrystallization for V-4Cr-4Ti, which was determined at 576 {+-} 75, kJ/mole is significantly higher than that for pure V, and is thought to be related to Ti and Cr in solid solution.

  3. Advancements in Afterbody Radiative Heating Simulations for Earth Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher O.; Panesi, Marco; Brandis, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Four advancements to the simulation of backshell radiative heating for Earth entry are presented. The first of these is the development of a flow field model that treats electronic levels of the dominant backshell radiator, N, as individual species. This is shown to allow improvements in the modeling of electron-ion recombination and two-temperature modeling, which are shown to increase backshell radiative heating by 10 to 40%. By computing the electronic state populations of N within the flow field solver, instead of through the quasi-steady state approximation in the radiation code, the coupling of radiative transition rates to the species continuity equations for the levels of N, including the impact of non-local absorption, becomes feasible. Implementation of this additional level of coupling between the flow field and radiation codes represents the second advancement presented in this work, which is shown to increase the backshell radiation by another 10 to 50%. The impact of radiative transition rates due to non-local absorption indicates the importance of accurate radiation transport in the relatively complex flow geometry of the backshell. This motivates the third advancement, which is the development of a ray-tracing radiation transport approach to compute the radiative transition rates and divergence of the radiative flux at every point for coupling to the flow field, therefore allowing the accuracy of the commonly applied tangent-slab approximation to be assessed for radiative source terms. For the sphere considered at lunar-return conditions, the tangent-slab approximation is shown to provide a sufficient level of accuracy for the radiative source terms, even for backshell cases. This is in contrast to the agreement between the two approaches for computing the radiative flux to the surface, which differ by up to 40%. The final advancement presented is the development of a nonequilibrium model for NO radiation, which provides significant backshell

  4. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Compact heat exchanger designs evaluated for advanced nuclear reactor applications. • Wavy channel PCHE compared with offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). • 15° pitch angle wavy channel PCHE offers optimum performance characteristics. • OSFHE exhibits higher pressure drop and lower compactness than other options. • Comparison technique applicable for evaluating candidate heat exchangers designs. - Abstract: A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well

  5. Experimental Investigation of a Three-Bed Adsorption Refrigeration Chiller Employing an Advanced Mass Recovery Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi Akisawa; Yuki Ueda; Aep Saepul Uyun; Takahiko Miyazaki

    2009-01-01

    The performance of an advanced three-bed adsorption chiller with a mass recovery cycle has been experimentally investigated in the present study. The temperature and pressure of various components of the chiller were monitored to observe the dynamic behaviour of the chiller. The performances in terms of the coefficient of performance (COP) and specific cooling power (SCP) were compared with a conventional single stage. The results show that the proposed cycle produces COP and SCP values super...

  6. Modelling of waste heat recovery for combined heat and power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current environmental context dictates to reduce the pollutant emissions by improving thermal efficiency of the energy production units. The authors present some studies of cogeneration applications using gas turbines and thermal engines. The on-going research concerns a detailed study of thermodynamic modelling cycles with energy recovery. These combined cycles with gas turbine and ICE can generate a potential increase of about 10% of the energy efficiency. They will generate a technological complexity and the over-charge must be estimated. At last, the authors insist on the necessary synergy between gas turbines and thermal engines.

  7. Heat recovery from Diesel engines: A thermodynamic comparison between Kalina and ORC cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of heat recovery for electric power generation, Kalina cycle (a thermodynamic cycle using as working fluid a mixture of water and ammonia) and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) represent two different eligible technologies. In this work a comparison between the thermodynamic performances of Kalina cycle and an ORC cycle, using hexamethyldisiloxane as working fluid, was conducted for the case of heat recovery from two Diesel engines, each one with an electrical power of 8900 kWe. The maximum net electric power that can be produced exploiting the heat source constituted by the exhaust gases mass flow (35 kg/s for both engines, at 346 deg. C) was calculated for the two thermodynamic cycles. Owing to the relatively low useful power, for the Kalina cycle a relatively simple plant layout was assumed. Supposing reasonable design parameters and a logarithmic mean temperature difference in the heat recovery exchanger of 50 deg. C, a net electric power of 1615 kW and of 1603 kW respectively for the Kalina and for the ORC cycle was calculated. Although the obtained useful powers are actually equal in value, the Kalina cycle requires a very high maximum pressure in order to obtain high thermodynamic performances (in our case, 100 bar against about 10 bar for the ORC cycle). So, the adoption of Kalina cycle, at least for low power level and medium-high temperature thermal sources, seems not to be justified because the gain in performance with respect to a properly optimized ORC is very small and must be obtained with a complicated plant scheme, large surface heat exchangers and particular high pressure resistant and no-corrosion materials.

  8. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling and Baseline Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-04-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate coupled thermal and electrical energy transfer processes in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing the overall heat transferred, the electrical power output, and the associated pressure drop for given inlet conditions of the exhaust gas and the available TEG volume. Multiple-filled skutterudites and conventional bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from exhaust into usable electrical power. Heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and the hot side of the TEMs is enhanced with the use of a plate-fin heat exchanger integrated within the TEG and using liquid coolant on the cold side. The TEG is discretized along the exhaust flow direction using a finite-volume method. Each control volume is modeled as a thermal resistance network which consists of integrated submodels including a heat exchanger and a thermoelectric device. The pressure drop along the TEG is calculated using standard pressure loss correlations and viscous drag models. The model is validated to preserve global energy balances and is applied to analyze a prototype TEG with data provided by General Motors. Detailed results are provided for local and global heat transfer and electric power generation. In the companion paper, the model is then applied to consider various TEG topologies using skutterudite and bismuth telluride TEMs.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Fin and Tube Heat Exchanger for Waste Heat Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shobhana; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, multiphysics numerical modeling is carried out to predict the performance of a liquid-gas fin and tube heat exchanger design. Three-dimensional (3D) steady-state numerical model using commercial software COMSOL based on finite element method (FEM) is developed. The study...

  10. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW POWER CYCLES AND ADVANCED FALLING FILM HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsalan Razani; Kwang J. Kim

    2000-10-28

    The annual progress report for the period of October 1, 1999 to September 30, 2000 on DOE/UNM grant number DE-FG26-98FT40148 discusses the progress on both the theoretical analysis of advanced power cycles and the experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers. The previously developed computer program for the triple cycle, based on the air standard cycle assumption, was modified to include actual air composition (%77.48 N{sub 2}, %20.59 O{sub 2}, %1.9 H{sub 2}O, and %0.03 CO{sub 2}). The actual combustion products were used in exergy analysis of the triple cycle. The effect of steam injection into the combustion chamber on its irreversibility, and the irreversibility of the entire cycle, was evaluated. A more practical fuel inlet condition and a better position of the feedwater heater in the steam cycle were used in the modified cycle. The effect of pinch point and the temperature difference between the combustion products, as well as the steam in the heat recovery steam generator on irreversibility of the cycle were evaluated. Design, construction, and testing of the multitube horizontal falling film condenser facility were completed. Two effective heat transfer additives (2-ethyl-1-hexanol and alkyl amine) were identified and tested for steam condensation. The test results are included. The condenser was designed with twelve tubes in an array of three horizontals and four verticals, with a 2-inch horizontal and 1.5-inch vertical in-line pitch. By using effective additives, the condensation heat transfer rate can be augmented as much as 30%, as compared to a heat transfer that operated without additives under the same operating condition. When heat transfer additives function effectively, the condensate-droplets become more dispersed and have a smaller shape than those produced without additives. These droplets, unlike traditional turbulence, start at the top portion of the condenser tubes and cover most of the tubes. Such a flow behavior can

  11. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An

  12. Advanced neutron source design: burnout heat flux correlation development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the advanced neutron source reactor (ANSR) fuel element region, heat fluxes will be elevated. Early designs corresponded to average and estimated hot-spot fluxes of 11 to 12 and 21 to 22 MW/m2, respectively. Design changes under consideration may lower these values to ∼ 9 and 17 MW/m1. In either event, the development of a satisfactory burnout heat flux correlation is an important element among the many thermal-hydraulic design issues, since the critical power ratio will depend in part on its validity. Relatively little work in the area of subcooled-flow burnout has been published over the past 12 yr. The authors have compared seven burnout correlations and modifications therefore with several sets of experimental data, of which the most relevant to the ANS core are those referenced. The best overall agreement between the correlations tested and these data is currently provided by a modification of Thorgerson et al. correlation. The variable ranges of the experimental data are outlined and the results of the correlation comparisons are summarized

  13. Parkhotel Bellevue, Adelboden - Measurement campaign on heat recovery; Parkhotel Bellevue Adelboden. Schlussbericht der Messkampagne der WRG Wellness-Anlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grob, D. [Grob und Schoepfer AG, Wil (Switzerland); Baumann, E. [Baumann Akustik und Bauphysik AG, Bazenheid (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a measurement campaign carried out on the heat-recovery system of a spa and wellness complex installed at the Park Hotel Bellevue in Adelboden, Switzerland, in 2001. The report takes a look at how heat is recovered from wastewater from the baths, showers and the filter-backwash water of the hotels' salt-water pool. The heat recovered is used to pre-heat the hot-water supply and the brine supply for the salt-water pool. Schematics, photos and tables present details of the installations. The results of the measurements made are presented and discussed. The percentage of energy needs met by the heat-recovery system is quoted and discussed. The economic feasibility of the project is also examined. Suggestions for further heat-recovery action to be taken are made.

  14. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  15. New configurations of a heat recovery absorption heat pump integrated with a natural gas boiler for boiler efficiency improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Ming [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Yin, Hongxi [Southeast University, Nanjing, China

    2014-11-01

    Conventional natural gas-fired boilers exhaust flue gas direct to the atmosphere at 150 200 C, which, at such temperatures, contains large amount of energy and results in relatively low thermal efficiency ranging from 70% to 80%. Although condensing boilers for recovering the heat in the flue gas have been developed over the past 40 years, their present market share is still less than 25%. The major reason for this relatively slow acceptance is the limited improvement in the thermal efficiency of condensing boilers. In the condensing boiler, the temperature of the hot water return at the range of 50 60 C, which is used to cool the flue gas, is very close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas. Therefore, the latent heat, the majority of the waste heat in the flue gas, which is contained in the water vapor, cannot be recovered. This paper presents a new approach to improve boiler thermal efficiency by integrating absorption heat pumps with natural gas boilers for waste heat recovery (HRAHP). Three configurations of HRAHPs are introduced and discussed. The three configurations are modeled in detail to illustrate the significant thermal efficiency improvement they attain. Further, for conceptual proof and validation, an existing hot water-driven absorption chiller is operated as a heat pump at operating conditions similar to one of the devised configurations. An overall system performance and economic analysis are provided for decision-making and as evidence of the potential benefits. These three configurations of HRAHP provide a pathway to achieving realistic high-efficiency natural gas boilers for applications with process fluid return temperatures higher than or close to the dew point of the water vapor in the flue gas.

  16. Thermo-economic analysis of steady state waste heat recovery in data centers using absorption refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Absorption refrigeration is powered by data center waste heat. • Waste heat from 3 to 5 server racks produces cooling for an additional rack. • An economic analysis shows the payback period can be as short as 4–5 months. - Abstract: This paper addresses the technical and economic issues associated with waste heat recovery in data centers through the use of absorption cooling machines. The theoretical possibility of utilizing the heat dissipated by a server, or a number of servers, to power an absorption system, which in turn produces cooling for other servers in the data center, is investigated. For this purpose, a steady-state thermodynamic model is developed to perform energy balance and exergy analyses for a novel configuration of an on-chip two-phase cooling system and an absorption refrigeration system. This combination is created by replacing the condenser in the on-chip cooling circuit with the generator of an absorption refrigeration cycle. The performance of the developed model in simulating both LiBr–water and water–ammonia absorption cooling systems is examined through verification of the model results against the reference data available in the literature. The verification indicates the superiority of LiBr–water absorption system for data center/server operating conditions. Therefore, a LiBr–water absorption refrigeration system is modeled in the novel combined heat recovery system. For these systems it is shown that the traditional definition for the coefficient of performance (COP) is not appropriate to evaluate the performance and, in its place, introduce a new figure of merit. Through a sensitivity analysis, the effects of server waste heat quality, server coolant type, solution peak concentration, solution heat exchanger effectiveness, evaporator temperature, and operating pressures on the performance of the novel system are investigated. Finally, using the thermodynamic model and cost information provided by the

  17. Use of a turboexpander in steam power units for heat energy recovery in heat supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadykov, R. A.; Daminov, A. Z.; Solomin, I. N.; Futin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for raising the efficiency of a boiler plant by installing a unit operating by the organic Rankine cycle is presented. Such units allow one to generate electricity to cover the auxiliaries of a heat source at a heat-transfer fluid temperature of no more than 130°C. The results of commissioning tests of boilers revealed that their efficiency is maximized under a load that is close or corresponds to the nominal one. If this load is maintained constantly, excess heat energy is produced. This excess may be used to generate electric energy in a steam power unit with a turboexpander. A way to insert this unit into the flow diagram of a boiler plant is proposed. The results of analysis of turbine types (turboexpanders included) with various capacities are presented, and the optimum type for the proposed flow diagram is chosen. The methodology for the design of turboexpanders and compressors used in the oil and gas industry and their operational data were applied in the analysis of a turboexpander. The results of the thermogasdynamic analysis of a turboexpander and the engineered shape of an axial-radial impeller are presented. Halocarbon R245fa is chosen as the working medium based on its calorimetric properties.

  18. Thermodynamic evaluation of the Kalina split-cycle concepts for waste heat recovery applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Knudsen, Thomas; Larsen, Ulrik;

    2014-01-01

    The Kalina split-cycle is a thermodynamic process for converting thermal energy into electrical power. It uses an ammonia–water mixture as a working fluid (like a conventional Kalina cycle) and has a varying ammonia concentration during the pre-heating and evaporation steps. This second feature...... results in an improved match between the heat source and working fluid temperature profiles, decreasing the entropy generation in the heat recovery system. The present work compares the thermodynamic performance of this power cycle with the conventional Kalina process, and investigates the impact...... cycle with reheat, and by 4.3% points without reheat. The cycle efficiency varies by 14% points for a variation of the exhaust gas temperature of 100 °C, and by 1% point for a cold water temperature variation of 30 °C. This analysis also pinpoints the large irreversibilities in the low-pressure turbine...

  19. Optimization of a thermoelectric generator subsystem for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Xin; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    2014-01-01

    In previous work, a thermoelectric (TE) exhaust heat recovery subsystem for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack was developed and modeled. Numerical simulations were conducted and have identified an optimized subsystem configuration and 4 types of compact heat...... exchangers with superior performance for further analysis. In this work, the on-design performances of the 4 heat exchangers are more thoroughly assessed on their corresponding optimized subsystem configurations. Afterward, their off-design performances are compared on the whole working range of the fuel...... cell stack. All through this study, different electrical connection styles of all the thermoelectric generator (TEG) modules in the subsystem and their influences are also discussed. In the end, the subsystem configuration is further optimized and a higher subsystem power output is achieved. All TEG...

  20. Optimization of Boiler Blowdown and Blowdown Heat Recovery in Textile Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunudas T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Boilers are widely used in most of the processing industries like textile, for the heating applications. Surat is the one of the largest textile processing area in India. In textile industries coal is mainly used for the steam generation. In a textile industry normally a 4% of heat energy is wasted through blowdown. In the study conducted in steam boilers in textile industries in surat location, 1.5% of coal of total coal consumption is wasted in an industry by improper blowdwon. This thesis work aims to prevent the wastage in the coal use by optimizing the blowdown in the boiler and maximizing the recovery of heat wasting through blowdown.

  1. Study and Design of Waste Heat Recovery using Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saied Homami

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing energy crisis in the world has diverted human perspective to the optimum usage of the available energy resources. One of these solutions is waste heat recovery systems[1]. Simultaneous production of fresh water, power and cooling from waste heat improves energy efficiency in industrial applications which could be operated by organic Rankine cycles. In this article, cogeneration of electricity and heat (CHP in the petrochemical industry, textile and paper production has been reviewed and the usage of aforesaid cycle in these industries is determined. Designing organic Rankine cycle (with operating fluid organic trans-butene and taking advantage of the excess low pressure steam, a strategy for producing three valuable products of fresh water, power and refrigeration in the petrochemical industries has been offered. Simultaneous production of 10,000 kg/hr fresh water, 1533 kw power and access to the lower temperatures of about 226 K and 260 K were resulted.

  2. Advanced energy saving in the reaction section of the hydro-desulfurization process with self-heat recuperation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction section of the naphtha hydro-desulfurization (HDS) process is a heating and cooling thermal process consisting of a feed/effluent heat exchanger and a fired heater. Energy savings are fundamentally made as a result of the maximized heat recovery in the heat exchanger and the reduced heat duty of the fired heater. To achieve further energy saving in the process, 'self-heat recuperation technology' (SHRT) was adopted. In this technology, a compressor was introduced. The suction side of the compressor needed a lower pressure and the feed stream evaporated much easily. The discharged side of the compressor satisfied the operating conditions of both pressure and temperature at the inlet of the reactor. And the reactor effluent stream was able to be used completely to preheat and vaporize the feed stream. All the heat in the process stream was re-circulated without using a fired heater. SHRT was applied to the naphtha HDS process of 18,000 barrel per stream day (BPSD) in the refinery and the mass and energy balance of the process was calculated using commercially available simulation software, Invensys PROII version 8.1. This process-simulation case study confirmed that despite there being no more energy saving potential in the conventional process that makes use of a fired heater, the advanced process with SHRT can reduce the energy consumption significantly by using the recuperated heat of the feed stream.

  3. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warda, Alicja K; Tempelaars, Marcel H; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments. PMID:27486443

  4. Case study : Syncrude Canada Ltd. optimizing waste heat recovery at an oil sands operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Syncrude Canada Ltd., the world's largest producer of crude oil from oil sands, has made upgrades over a seven-year period to its water recycling process, resulting in more heat recovered at the preheaters in its oil sands operations. The preheaters are the key to the recycling process water system. The incentive to optimize heat recovery at the preheaters was to reduce the amount of natural gas required to heat the water used to extract bitumen from the oil sands. The second objective was to lower costs spent on new equipment to heat the water. Syncrude operators attended workshops offered by the Office of Energy Efficiency at Natural Resources Canada to learn the value of monitoring and cleaning the process-water system to recover as much lost heat as possible. This paper presented a project profile and the approach used to optimize the system, beginning with the installation of twisted-tube heat exchangers in 1997, followed by the installation of a larger pump impeller in 1998 which increased the pumping capacity. In 2003, the target outlet temperature for the preheaters was set at 20 degrees C. This paper also described the challenges regarding water temperature, water pressure and maintenance issues. The innovative solutions used to overcome them have lead to energy costs savings of about $60,000 per month. Syncrude is currently exploring whether water can be preheated higher than 20 degrees C. 2 figs.

  5. Exergy analysis of the Szewalski cycle with a waste heat recovery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of a waste heat energy to electricity is now becoming one of the key points to improve the energy efficiency in a process engineering. However, large losses of a low-temperature thermal energy are also present in power engineering. One of such sources of waste heat in power plants are exhaust gases at the outlet of boilers. Through usage of a waste heat regeneration system it is possible to attain a heat rate of approximately 200 MWth, under about 90 °C, for a supercritical power block of 900 MWel fuelled by a lignite. In the article, we propose to use the waste heat to improve thermal efficiency of the Szewalski binary vapour cycle. The Szewalski binary vapour cycle provides steam as the working fluid in a high temperature part of the cycle, while another fluid – organic working fluid – as the working substance substituting conventional steam over the temperature range represented by the low pressure steam expansion. In order to define in detail the efficiency of energy conversion at various stages of the proposed cycle the exergy analysis was performed. The steam cycle for reference conditions, the Szewalski binary vapour cycle as well as the Szewalski hierarchic vapour cycle cooperating with a system of waste heat recovery have been comprised.

  6. Exergy analysis of the Szewalski cycle with a waste heat recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Ziółkowski, Paweł; Badur, Janusz

    2015-09-01

    The conversion of a waste heat energy to electricity is now becoming one of the key points to improve the energy efficiency in a process engineering. However, large losses of a low-temperature thermal energy are also present in power engineering. One of such sources of waste heat in power plants are exhaust gases at the outlet of boilers. Through usage of a waste heat regeneration system it is possible to attain a heat rate of approximately 200 MWth, under about 90 °C, for a supercritical power block of 900 MWel fuelled by a lignite. In the article, we propose to use the waste heat to improve thermal efficiency of the Szewalski binary vapour cycle. The Szewalski binary vapour cycle provides steam as the working fluid in a high temperature part of the cycle, while another fluid - organic working fluid - as the working substance substituting conventional steam over the temperature range represented by the low pressure steam expansion. In order to define in detail the efficiency of energy conversion at various stages of the proposed cycle the exergy analysis was performed. The steam cycle for reference conditions, the Szewalski binary vapour cycle as well as the Szewalski hierarchic vapour cycle cooperating with a system of waste heat recovery have been comprised.

  7. Studies on the effect of ohmic heating on oil recovery and quality of sesame seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Kirti; Mudgal, V D; Viswasrao, Gajanan; Srivastava, Himani

    2016-04-01

    This research describes a new technological process for sesame oil extraction. The process deals with the effect of ohmic heating on enhancement of oil recovery and quality of cleaned and graded sesame seed. The effect of ohmic heating parameters namely electric field strength (EFS), end point temperature (EPT) and holding time (HT) on oil extraction process were investigated. Three levels of electric field strength (600, 750 and 900 V/m), end point temperature (65, 75 and 85 °C) and holding time (5, 10 and 15 min.) were taken as independent variables using full factorial design. Percentage oil recovered from sesame seed through mechanical extracted oil by application of ohmic heating varies from 39.98 to 43.15 %. The maximum oil recovery 43.15 % was obtained when the sample was heated and maintained at 85 °C using EFS of 900 V/m for a holding time of 10 min as against 34.14 % in control sample. The free fatty acid (FFA) of the extracted oil was within the acceptable limit (1.52 to 2.26 % oleic acid) of 0.5 to 3 % as prescribed respectively by Prevention of Food Adulteration (PFA) and Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS). The peroxide value of extracted oil was also found within the acceptable limit (0.78 to 1.01 meq/kg). The optimum value for maximum oil recovery, minimum residual oil content, free fatty acid (FFA) and peroxide value were 41.24 %, 8.61 %, 1.74 % oleic acid and 0.86 meq/kg, respectively at 722.52 V/m EFS at EPT 65 °C for 5 min. holding time which was obtained by response surface methodology. PMID:27413228

  8. Analysis of vehicle exhaust waste heat recovery potential using a Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluates the vehicle exhaust WHR (waste heat recovery) potential using a RC (Rankine cycle ). To this end, both a RC thermodynamic model and a heat exchanger model have been developed. Both models use as input, experimental data obtained from a vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer. The thermodynamic analysis was performed for water, R123 and R245fa and revealed the advantage of using water as the working fluid in applications of thermal recovery from exhaust gases of vehicles equipped with a spark-ignition engine. Moreover, the heat exchanger effectiveness for the organic working fluids R123 and R245fa is higher than that for the water and, consequently, they can also be considered appropriate for use in vehicle WHR applications through RCs when the exhaust gas temperatures are relatively low. For an ideal heat exchanger, the simulations revealed increases in the internal combustion engine thermal and vehicle mechanical efficiencies of 1.4%–3.52% and 10.16%–15.95%, respectively, while for a shell and tube heat exchanger, the simulations showed an increase of 0.85%–1.2% in the thermal efficiency and an increase of 2.64%–6.96% in the mechanical efficiency for an evaporating pressure of 2 MPa. The results confirm the advantages of using the thermal energy contained in the vehicle exhaust gases through RCs. Furthermore, the present analysis demonstrates that improved evaporator designs and appropriate expander devices allowing for higher evaporating pressures are required to obtain the maximum WHR potential from vehicle RC systems. -- Highlights: ► This study evaluates the vehicle exhaust waste heat recovery potential using Rankine cycle systems. ► A thermodynamic model and a heat exchanger model were developed. ► Experimental data obtained in a vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer was used as models input. ► Thermodynamic analysis was performed for water, R123 and R245fa. ► Results confirm advantages of using the thermal energy

  9. Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc., Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

  10. Trends in heat recovery in modern Dutch supermarkets; Trends in WTW bij moderne Nederlandse supermarkten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jans, R. [Coolsultancy, Breda (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    The signing of the energy efficiency covenant by a large number of supermarkets has made the deployment of heat recovery in refrigeration quite common. Previous reports have mentioned the importance of aligning the various disciplines. Generally, the heat installer is unaware of the influence he has on the energy use of refrigeration. This article addresses several types of heat recovery that may be suitable for deployment, depending on the situation (new buildings, renovation, et cetera) [Dutch] Doordat een groot aantal supermarkten het convenant energiebesparing bij supermarkten hebben ondertekend is het toepassen van WTW op de koel- en vriesinstallatie nagenoeg gemeen goed geworden. In eerdere rapportages is reeds melding gemaakt van het belang van de afstemming tussen de verschillende disciplines. Over het algemeen kan gezegd worden dat de warmte-installateur zich niet bewust is welke invloed hij uitoefent op het energiegebruik van de koel- en vriesinstallatie. In dit artikel komen een aantal uitvoeringsvormen van WTW aan de orde die op dit moment afhankelijk van de situatie (nieuwbouw/renovatie, enz.) overwogen kunnen worden.

  11. Waste burning and heat recovery characteristics of a mass burn incineration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin

    2003-02-01

    An experimental investigation on waste combustion characteristics of a mass burn incinerator is conducted in this study. Three different charging modes, including operator manipulation, periodic feeding, and temperature control, are taken into consideration. The results indicate that the burning characteristics in the combustion chambers are closely related to the operating modes. For the operator manipulation where the wastes are sent into the incinerator in two short periods, the entire temperature distribution of the primary combustion chamber can be partitioned into two parts, thereby yielding waste group combustion. Temperature oscillations in both the primary and secondary combustion chambers are characterized for the periodic feeding. However, because of the shorter charging period and smaller amount of waste, the burning interaction between the two chambers is initially weak and becomes notable in the final stage. When temperature control is performed, the burning oscillation of the primary combustion chamber is further amplified so the combustion interaction is drastic. These exhibitions are mainly caused by the competition between endothermic and exothermic reactions. The instantaneous heat exchange efficiency of the cyclone heat recovery system (CHRS) installed in the incineration system is also evaluated to obtain details of energy recovery behaviors. As a result, the efficiency tends to decrease linearly with increasing temperature of hot flue gas. This arises from the fact that heat loss from the gas to the environment is increased when the temperature of the former is higher, even though the temperature gradient across the cyclone is enlarged. PMID:12617288

  12. Second law analysis of a diesel engine waste heat recovery with a combined sensible and latent heat storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine carries away about 30% of the heat of combustion. The energy available in the exit stream of many energy conversion devices goes as waste. The major technical constraint that prevents successful implementation of waste heat recovery is due to intermittent and time mismatched demand for and availability of energy. The present work deals with the use of exergy as an efficient tool to measure the quantity and quality of energy extracted from a diesel engine and stored in a combined sensible and latent heat storage system. This analysis is utilized to identify the sources of losses in useful energy within the components of the system considered, and provides a more realistic and meaningful assessment than the conventional energy analysis. The energy and exergy balance for the overall system is quantified and illustrated using energy and exergy flow diagrams. In order to study the discharge process in a thermal storage system, an illustrative example with two different cases is considered and analyzed, to quantify the destruction of exergy associated with the discharging process. The need for promoting exergy analysis through policy decision in the context of energy and environment crisis is also emphasized. - Highlights: → WHR with TES system eliminates the mismatch between the supply of energy and demand. → A saving of 15.2% of energy and 1.6% of exergy is achieved with PCM storage. → Use of multiple PCMs with cascaded system increases energy and exergy efficiency.

  13. Second law analysis of a diesel engine waste heat recovery with a combined sensible and latent heat storage system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandiyarajan, V., E-mail: pandiyarajan_v@yahoo.com [Institute for Energy Studies, Anna University, Chennai-600 025 (India); Chinnappandian, M., E-mail: muthuchinnapandian@yahoo.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, St. Peter' s Engineering College, Avadi, Chennai-600054 (India); Raghavan, V., E-mail: raghavan.energy@gmail.com [Institute for Energy Studies, Anna University, Chennai-600 025 (India); Velraj, R., E-mail: velrajr@gmail.com [Institute for Energy Studies, Anna University, Chennai-600 025 (India)

    2011-10-15

    The exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine carries away about 30% of the heat of combustion. The energy available in the exit stream of many energy conversion devices goes as waste. The major technical constraint that prevents successful implementation of waste heat recovery is due to intermittent and time mismatched demand for and availability of energy. The present work deals with the use of exergy as an efficient tool to measure the quantity and quality of energy extracted from a diesel engine and stored in a combined sensible and latent heat storage system. This analysis is utilized to identify the sources of losses in useful energy within the components of the system considered, and provides a more realistic and meaningful assessment than the conventional energy analysis. The energy and exergy balance for the overall system is quantified and illustrated using energy and exergy flow diagrams. In order to study the discharge process in a thermal storage system, an illustrative example with two different cases is considered and analyzed, to quantify the destruction of exergy associated with the discharging process. The need for promoting exergy analysis through policy decision in the context of energy and environment crisis is also emphasized. - Highlights: > WHR with TES system eliminates the mismatch between the supply of energy and demand. > A saving of 15.2% of energy and 1.6% of exergy is achieved with PCM storage. > Use of multiple PCMs with cascaded system increases energy and exergy efficiency.

  14. Simulation of CO2 Brayton Cycle for Engine Exhaust Heat Recovery under Various Operating Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒歌群; 张承宇; 田华; 高媛媛; 李团兵; 仇荣赓

    2015-01-01

    A bottoming cycle system based on CO2 Brayton cycle is proposed to recover the engine exhaust heat. Its performance is compared with the conventional air Brayton cycle under five typical engine conditions. The results show that CO2 Brayton cycle proves to be superior to the air Brayton cycle in terms of the system net output power, thermal efficiency and recovery efficiency. In most cases, the recovery efficiency of CO2 Brayton cycle can be higher than 9%and the system has a better performance at the engine’s high operating load. The thermal efficiency can be as large as 24.83%under 100%operating load, accordingly, the net output power of 14.86 kW is obtained.

  15. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  16. A thermodynamic analysis of waste heat recovery from reciprocating engine power plants by means of Organic Rankine Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a Rankine cycle using organic fluid as the working fluid instead of water and steam. The ORC process is a feasible choice in waste heat recovery applications producing electricity from relatively low-temperature waste heat sources or in applications having a rather low power output. Utilizing waste heat from a large high-efficiency reciprocating engine power plant with ORC processes is studied by means of computations. In addition to exhaust gas heat recovery, this study represents and discusses an idea of directly replacing the charge air cooler (CAC) of a large turbocharged engine with an ORC evaporator to utilize the charge air heat in additional power production. A thermodynamic analysis for ORCs was carried out with working fluids toluene, n-pentane, R245fa and cyclohexane. The effect of different ORC process parameters on the process performance are presented and analyzed in order to investigate the heat recovery potential from the exhaust gas and charge air. A simplified feasibility consideration is included by comparing the ratio of the theoretical heat transfer areas needed and the obtained power output from ORC processes. The greatest potential is related to the exhaust gas heat recovery, but in addition also the lower temperature waste heat streams could be utilized to boost the electrical power of the engine power plant. A case study for a large-scale gas-fired engine was carried out showing that the maximum power increase of 11.4% was obtained from the exhaust gas and 2.4% from the charge air heat. - Highlights: • Waste heat recovery potential of reciprocating engines was studied. • Thermodynamic optimization for ORCs was carried out with different fluids. • The utilization of exhaust gas and charge air heat is presented and discussed. • Simplified economic feasibility study was included in the analysis. • Power increase of 11.4% was obtained from exhaust gas and 2.4% from charge air

  17. Heat recovery investigation from dryer–thermal oxidizer system in corn-ethanol plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, annual corn ethanol production in the U.S. has exceeded 13,298,000,000 gallons. However, net energy balance for this sector became a subject of controversy in many discussions. The aim of the presented research is an investigation of thermal improvement opportunities in a corn ethanol plant. For this purpose, a complex mathematical model was developed for a dryer–thermal oxidizer system. Three variants were subjected thermodynamic analyses: one state of the art system and two proposed system modifications. The properties of humid gas, a mixture of combustion products and moisture evaporated from distiller's grain, were updated based on the steam properties according to the formulation proposed by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam. All calculations were performed by uniquely-developed C++ code. The results indicate major potential for improvement in the following areas: (i) water recovery from humid gas; (ii) heat recovery from moisture condensation – max. 44% of total primary energy usage (TPEU); and (iii) fuel savings by reduction of humid gas flow through a thermal oxidizer – max. 1.4% of TPEU. Also the presented analysis can be a starting point for further modifications in real corn ethanol manufacturing applications, leading towards pilot system implementation. - Highlights: • Mathematical model for dryer–oxidizer system in a corn ethanol plant was proposed. • Three configurations were discussed: with intercooler, regenerator, and recuperator. • Recovery rate of water condensed at various conditions and locations was quantified. • Heat recovery possibilities at various temperatures and locations have been assessed. • Energy savings in thermal oxidizer due to preliminary condensation were calculated

  18. Effect of Internal Heat Recovery in Ammonia-Water Absorption Cooling Cycles: Exergy and Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Nogués

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available First and second law analysis have been conducted for three low temperature driven ammonia-water absorption cooling cycles with increasing internal heat recovery. Based on the results of exergy analysis the structural analysis has been achieved. The obtained Coefficients of Structural Bonds (CSB consider how the irreversibility of the whole cycle is affected by a change in the irreversibility related to an efficiency improvement of a single component. Trends for the different configurations are similar, while quantitative differences among the main heat exchangers are considerable. The highest values of the CSB are found for the refrigerant heat exchanger. Also the evaporator, the condenser, the generator and the absorber show values higher than unity. The lowest CSB’s are obtained in the solution heat exchanger. In general, CSB’s decrease with increasing efficiency. That means that for very efficient heat exchangers, a further improvement looks less attractive. The dephlegmator is an exception as it shows a singularity of the CSB value due to its complex interactions with the other components. Once the CSB’s are obtained for the main components, they can be used in the structural method of the thermoeconomic optimisation. This method enables us to find the optimum design of a component in a straightforward calculation.

  19. Recent advances in nutrient removal and recovery in biological and bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Venkata Mohan, S; Lens, P N L

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous are key pollutants in wastewater to be removed and recovered for sustainable development. Traditionally, nitrogen removal is practiced through energy intensive biological nitrification and denitrification entailing a major cost in wastewater treatment. Recent innovations in nitrogen removal aim at reducing energy requirements and recovering ammonium nitrogen. Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) are promising for recovering ammonium nitrogen from nitrogen rich waste streams (urine, digester liquor, swine liquor, and landfill leachate) profitably. Phosphorus is removed from the wastewater in the form of polyphosphate granules by polyphosphate accumulating organisms. Alternatively, phosphorous is removed/recovered as Fe-P or struvite through chemical precipitation (iron or magnesium dosing). In this article, recent advances in nutrients removal from wastewater coupled to recovery are presented by applying a waste biorefinery concept. Potential capabilities of BES in recovering nitrogen and phosphorous are reviewed to spur future investigations towards development of nutrient recovery biotechnologies. PMID:27053446

  20. Energy Conversion Advanced Heat Transport Loop and Power Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, C. H.

    2006-08-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with 3 turbines and 4 compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with 3 stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and an 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various

  1. Heat recovery steam generators design considerations addressing utility combined cycle needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of large gas turbines to combined cycles for power production has increased significantly in the past ten years. Heat Recovery Steam Generators for large power plant applications have been developed to meet utility customer needs for compressed delivery and installation schedules, compliance with present and future emissions requirements, dispatchability, ruggedness and maintainability. This paper discusses design features of the current generation of HRSGs that promote modular shop assembly, minimum field erection, and characteristics that provide the ability to perform in quick start-up and daily cycle service

  2. The development of heat exchangers with advanced thermomechanical materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current metallurgical limitations necessarily impose a number of restrictions on the efficiency of power plant and combustion systems. These limitations include both temperature and corrosion resistance. If significant improvements can be made in these areas, then not only will it be possible to obtain higher system efficiencies, but it will also be possible to further exploit new technologies. Consequently, there is appreciable interest in the development of ceramic tubes for heat exchangers. Such tubes would offer the potential of operation at much higher temperatures combined with a much improved resistance to chemical attack. They are unlikely to be suitable for high pressure operation, at least in the foreseeable future, and hence their use would be limited generally to gas to gas exchangers. In spite of the limitations on details and specific technological solutions imposed by industrial property conditions, this report provides an overview on the development of these components, which is in charge of all the major international industrial companies of the field, in consideration of the relevant benefits coming from their large industrialization. After an analysis of the industrial situation of the product, in terms both of possible applications and economical impacts on the market, an overview of major on-going R and D programmes is carried out. At present, these programmes are mostly within the general frame of the study of advanced thermomechanical components and the related manufacturing technologies development

  3. Energy savings in industrial NH/sub 3/ plant by heat recovery in the waste heat system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, H.; Graeve, H.W.; Herbort, H.J.; Marsch, H.D.

    1984-05-01

    Minimization of energy consumption is nowadays a primary goal in the design of NH/sub 3/ plant. In this context two aspects are particularly important: first, the process steps and their combination must be selected in such a way that the level of energy that has to be supplied to the plant is kept low from the very beginning; second, heat recovery must be optimized by the choice of process conditions and use of appropriate equipment. An industrial NH/sub 3/ plant built according to these principles can operate at a consumption of as low as 29.5 GJ/t NH/sub 3/, using proven processes and equipment. The first plant of this new generation with a capacity of 1120 t/d is currently under construction for Canadian Industries Ltd. (CIL) in Canada.

  4. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  5. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  6. The Misselhorn Cycle: Batch-Evaporation Process for Efficient Low-Temperature Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Gleinser

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the Misselhorn cycle is introduced as a power cycle that aims for efficient waste heat recovery of temperature sources below 100 °C. The basic idea shows advantages over a standard Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC in overall efficiency and utilization of the heat source. The main characteristic of this cycle is the use of at least three parallel batch evaporators instead of continuous heat exchangers. The operational phases of the evaporators are shifted so that there is always one vaporizer in discharge mode. A transient MATLAB® model (The MathWorks: Natick, MA, USA is used to simulate the achievable performance of the Misselhorn cycle. The calculations of the thermodynamic states of the system are based on the heat flux, the equations for energy conservation and the equations of state found in the NIST Standard Reference Database 23 (Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties - REFPROP, National Institute of Standards and Technology: Gaithersburg, MD, USA. In the isochoric batch evaporation, the pressure and the corresponding boiling temperature rise over time. With a gradually increasing boiling temperature, no pinch point limitation occurs. Furthermore, the heat source medium is passed through the evaporators in serial order to obtain a quasi-counter flow setup. It could be shown that these features offer the possibility to gain both high thermal efficiencies and an enhanced utilization of the heat source at the same time. A basic model with a fixed estimated heat transfer coefficient promises a possible system exergy efficiency of 44.4%, which is an increase of over 60% compared to a basic ORC with a system exergy efficiency of only 26.8%.

  7. Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

  8. Thermodynamic evaluation of the Kalina split-cycle concepts for waste heat recovery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kalina split-cycle is a thermodynamic process for converting thermal energy into electrical power. It uses an ammonia–water mixture as a working fluid (like a conventional Kalina cycle) and has a varying ammonia concentration during the pre-heating and evaporation steps. This second feature results in an improved match between the heat source and working fluid temperature profiles, decreasing the entropy generation in the heat recovery system. The present work compares the thermodynamic performance of this power cycle with the conventional Kalina process, and investigates the impact of varying boundary conditions by conducting an exergy analysis. The design parameters of each configuration were determined by performing a multi-variable optimisation. The results indicate that the Kalina split-cycle with reheat presents an exergetic efficiency by 2.8% points higher than a reference Kalina cycle with reheat, and by 4.3% points without reheat. The cycle efficiency varies by 14% points for a variation of the exhaust gas temperature of 100 °C, and by 1% point for a cold water temperature variation of 30 °C. This analysis also pinpoints the large irreversibilities in the low-pressure turbine and condenser, and indicates a reduction of the exergy destruction by about 23% in the heat recovery system compared to the baseline cycle. - Highlights: • The thermodynamic performance of the Kalina split-cycle is assessed. • The Kalina split-cycle is compared to the Kalina cycle, with and without reheat. • An exergy analysis is performed to evaluate its thermodynamic performance. • The impact of varying boundary conditions is investigated. • The Kalina split-cycle displays high exergetic efficiency for low- and medium-temperature applications

  9. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) using an advanced heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced Stirling engine/alternator developed by Stirling Technology Company has potential for a wide range of space applications, at an efficiency comparable to solar cells and triple that of thermoelectric elements. However, the unique design of the Stirling engine requires a concentrated heat input in an annular band which would be optimized with an advanced heat source design. The concentrated heat rejection area of the Stirling engine would also be optimized with the use of a Capillary Pumped Loop to transport the waste heat from the engine. This advanced concept will explore using a Capillary Pumped Loop to transport the waste heat to the mission spacecraft for operational heating. Use of these advanced techniques will allow a specific power approaching 8 We/kg, compared to 5 We for a conventional RTG

  10. Thermodynamic analysis for heat recovery steam generation of cogeneration gas turbine cycle with reheat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosafa, A.H. [Islamic Azad Univ., Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, S.M.S.; Farshi, L.G. [Tabriz Univ., Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Much attention has been given to reheat gas turbine cycles in recent years due to their high exhaust gas temperature and the possibility of using that waste heat in a steam generation system. In this study, a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) was analyzed as an appliance for transferring heat between exhaust gases and water. Design parameters were optimized. The results showed that a decrease in the pinch point temperature difference resulted in an increase in both energetic and exergetic efficiency. As process steam pressure increased, exergetic efficiency increased significantly but energetic efficiency decreased. These efficiencies were less affected by variation in final temperature difference. However decreasing the final temperature difference resulted in an increase in the steam's mass flow rate. Therefore, in order to design an optimal HRSG in a combined system such as cogeneration gas turbine cycle with reheat, a proper value of parameters must be chosen depending on the demand for heat or power. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  11. The Optimal Evaporation Temperature of Subcritical ORC Based on Second Law Efficiency for Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Xu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The subcritical Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC with 28 working fluids for waste heat recovery is discussed in this paper. The effects of the temperature of the waste heat, the critical temperature of working fluids and the pinch temperature difference in the evaporator on the optimal evaporation temperature (OET of the ORC have been investigated. The second law efficiency of the system is regarded as the objective function and the evaporation temperature is optimized by using the quadratic approximations method. The results show that the OET will appear for the temperature ranges investigated when the critical temperatures of working fluids are lower than the waste heat temperatures by 18 ± 5 K under the pinch temperature difference of 5 K in the evaporator. Additionally, the ORC always exhibits the OET when the pinch temperature difference in the evaporator is raised under the fixed waste heat temperature. The maximum second law efficiency will decrease with the increase of pinch temperature difference in the evaporator.

  12. Thermodynamic Optimization of the Operative Parameters for the Heat Recovery in Combined Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Franco

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available

    For the combined power plants, the optimization of the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG is of particular interest in order to improve the efficiency of the heat recovery from turbine exhaust gas and to maximize the power production in the steam cycle. The thermodynamic optimization is the first step of a power plant design optimization process. The aim of this paper is to provide thermodynamic tools for the optimal selection of the operative parameters of the HRSG, starting from which a detailed optimization of its design variables can be carried out. For the thermodynamic analysis, the selected objective is the minimization of thermal exergy losses, taking into account only the irreversibility due to the temperature difference between the hot and cold streams. Various HRSG configurations have been analyzed, from the simpler, a single evaporator to the common configuration of two-pressure steam generator with five different sections.

    •  This paper was presented at the ECOS'00 Conference in Enschede, July 5-7, 2000

  13. Themoeconomic optimization of triple pressure heat recovery steam generator operating parameters for combined cycle plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammd Mohammed S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a method for optimization of operating parameters of a triple pressure heat recovery steam generator. Two types of optimization: (a thermodynamic and (b thermoeconomic were preformed. The purpose of the thermodynamic optimization is to maximize the efficiency of the plant. The selected objective for this purpose is minimization of the exergy destruction in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG. The purpose of the thermoeconomic optimization is to decrease the production cost of electricity. Here, the total annual cost of HRSG, defined as a sum of annual values of the capital costs and the cost of the exergy destruction, is selected as the objective function. The optimal values of the most influencing variables are obtained by minimizing the objective function while satisfying a group of constraints. The optimization algorithm is developed and tested on a case of CCGT plant with complex configuration. Six operating parameters were subject of optimization: pressures and pinch point temperatures of every three (high, intermediate and low pressure steam stream in the HRSG. The influence of these variables on the objective function and production cost are investigated in detail. The differences between results of thermodynamic and the thermoeconomic optimization are discussed.

  14. Same Recovery Level of Compressed Chinese Fir Wood Can Be Obtained Through Different Heating Fixation Pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoshu Tang; Zhao Guangjie; Nakao Tetsuya

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of compression set (RS) of wood after dry heating or steam treatment mainly depends on the temperature and time of treatment. For quantitative elucidation, a graph of intermediate RS was built with temperature (T) and time (t) as coordinates. In this graph (abbreviated as T-t planum), a series of curves of RS were created. This leads to a conclusion that same RS can be obtained by numerous different pathways. Further research on pathway equivalency based on T-t planum indicates that a low RS of 10% can be achieved definitely by different combinations of time and temperature. However, the fixation mechanism varies at different temperatures. On the equivalent pathways of higher recovery, the influence of temperature must be taken into consideration. The actual routes must be somewhat modified to achieve an expected result. This makes it possible for us to work out a best fixation pathway among all the possibilities, to eliminate the impact of heat on the mechanical properties of wood.

  15. Experimental and computational investigation of a MEMS-based boiler for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A microboiler with capillary channels for low temperature energy harvesting. • Complete thermodynamic analysis is completed. • The boiler is designed for minimum thermal losses. • Capability of capillary channels to pump at various pressure is investigated. - Abstract: Thermodynamically limited processes make waste heat abundant in availability. An Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) steam powered micro system designed to scavenge waste heat from various sources (transportation, industries or solar) is presented. The key boiler component is fabricated and characterized in this work. The system design has been inspired by the various efforts implemented in development of micro heat recovery devices and engines. The complete system consists of three individual micro components (1) boiler, (2) free piston expander and (3) superheater. Specifically, design, fabrication techniques, test setup and results of the miniaturized boiler are presented in this paper. A key design feature of the boiler is the inclusion of capillary channels for fluid flow from the surrounding reservoirs to the heated area. The pressurized steam is created by the boiler as a result of phase transformation of the working fluid. This pressurized steam can be utilized to drive another MEMS device (PZT membranes, turbines, thermoelectric, etc.) to generate power. In this upgraded boiler design, radial capillary channels and a thin film glass steamdome were considered to improve the operating efficiency. These inclusions enhanced capillary flow, energy absorption via phase change, mass flow rate and operating pressure. The power inputs of 1.8 W and 2.7 W were selected to simulate and characterize the boiler performance based on real-world waste heat source temperatures. For these power inputs, the maximum power absorption efficiency demonstrated by the boiler via phase change of the working fluid was approximately 88%. The peak operating pressure demonstrated by the boiler was 8.5 k

  16. Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery from Industrial Process Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, J. R.; Wang, D. [Gas Technology Institute; Bischoff, B.; Ciora, [Media and Process Technology; Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S. B.

    2013-01-14

    Recovery of energy from relatively low-temperature waste streams is a goal that has not been achieved on any large scale. Heat exchangers do not operate efficiently with low-temperature streams and thus require such large heat exchanger surface areas that they are not practical. Condensing economizers offer one option for heat recovery from such streams, but they have not been widely implemented by industry. A promising alternative to these heat exchangers and economizers is a prototype ceramic membrane system using transport membrane technology for separation of water vapor and recovery of heat. This system was successfully tested by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) on a natural gas fired boiler where the flue gas is relatively clean and free of contaminants. However, since the tubes of the prototype system were constructed of aluminum oxide, the brittle nature of the tubes limited the robustness of the system and even limited the length of tubes that could be used. In order to improve the robustness of the membrane tubes and make the system more suitable for industrial applications, this project was initiated with the objective of developing a system with materials that would permit the system to function successfully on a larger scale and in contaminated and potentially corrosive industrial environments. This required identifying likely industrial environments and the hazards associated with those environments. Based on the hazardous components in these environments, candidate metallic materials were identified that are expected to have sufficient strength, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance to permit production of longer tubes that could function in the industrial environments identified. Tests were conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of these candidate alloys, and the feasibility of forming these materials into porous substrates was assessed. Once the most promising metallic materials were identified, the ability to form an alumina

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of a low-temperature waste heat recovery system based on the concept of solar chimney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A low grade waste heat recovery system based on the concept of solar chimney is proposed. • The effects of three key factors on the system performance are examined. • Thermodynamics analysis is to find a better way to utilize low grade heat source efficiently. - Abstract: The utilization of low-temperature waste heat draws more and more attention due to serious energy crisis nowadays. This paper proposes a low-temperature waste heat recovery system based on the concept of solar chimney. In the system, low-temperature waste heat is used to heat air to produce an air updraft in the chimney tower. The air updraft propels a turbine fixed at the base of the chimney tower to convert waste heat into electricity. The mathematical model of the system is established based on first law and second law of thermodynamics. Hot water is selected as the representative of low-temperature waste heat sources for researching. The heat source temperature, ambient air temperature and area of heat transfer are examined to evaluate their effects on the system performance such as velocity of updraft, mass flow rate of air, power output, conversion efficiency, and exergy efficiency. The velocity of air demonstrates a better stability than the mass flow rate of air and the pressure difference when temperature of heat source, ambient air temperature or area of heat transfer changes

  18. Process Heat Exchanger Options for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  19. Experimental and numerical analyses on a plate heat exchanger with phase change for waste heat recovery at off-design conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollone, Roberto; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Di Battista, Davide; Fatigati, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyzes the performances of an evaporator for small scale waste heat recovery applications based on bottoming Organic Rankine Cycles with net output power in the range 2-5 kW. The heat recovery steam generator is a plate heat exchanger with oil as hot stream and an organic fluid on the cold side. An experimental characterization of the heat exchanger was carried out at different operating points measuring temperatures, pressures and flow rates on both sides. The measurement data further allowed to validate a numerical model of the evaporator whereas heat transfer coefficients were evaluated comparing several literature correlations, especially for the phase-change of the organic fluid. With reference to a waste heat recovery application in industrial compressed air systems, multiple off-design conditions were simulated considering the effects of oil mass flow rate and temperature on the superheating of the organic fluid, a key parameter to ensure a proper operation of the expansion machine, thus of the energy recovery process.

  20. Reactors for heat production with good electrical generating efficiency. Recovery of heat in helium-cooled direct-cycle reactors with one or two compression stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to be realistic, an evaluation of the performance of helium-cooled direct-cycle reactors must be based on a preliminary study of the circuits and the architecture. This was the procedure adopted by the Department of Mechanical and Thermal Studies (Saclay Nuclear Research Centre) which recently developed a plant concept aimed at solving the various problems involved and also defined the sizes of the principal components. The circuits have been designed to obtain a good electrical generating efficiency but without prejudicing this it has also been attempted to obtain the best conditions for recovering heat from the coolants. Results are presented for the following cases: a two-compression-stage cycle with good electrical generating efficiency and non-preferential heat recovery; a two-compression-stage cycle with acceptable electrical generating efficiency and improved heat recovery; a single-compression-stage cycle for the production of electricity with recovery of heat in the form of hot water; a single-compression-stage cycle with large-scale production of heat in the form of steam and hot water. It appears that the characteristics of the hot water in the secondary recovery circuits are well suited to district heating. It should be noted that the overall performances of all the different variants are satisfactory for a helium temperature at the core outlet of 8000C, which is reasonable. (author)

  1. Parametric study of reverse electrodialysis using ammonium bicarbonate solution for low-grade waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We characterized the influence of various parameters on the NH4HCO3-RED system. • We found the best power density at the concentrated solutions of 1.5 mol L−1 and the diluted solution of 0.01 mol L−1. • We obtained the higher power density of 0.77 W m−2 than previous studies. - Abstract: Waste heat recovery has attracted a significant attention because of the world growth in energy demand. In this paper, we report the study on an energy recovery system utilizing low-grade waste heat below 100 °C. This system called a thermal-driven electrochemical generator is composed of reverse electrodialysis (RED) power generation and thermal separation using waste heat. We especially focus on the experimental characterization of the RED process with ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) solution, which is known to be easily decomposed at the temperature around 60 °C. We characterized this NH4HCO3-RED system with various parameters including the concentration difference, the membrane type, the inlet flow rate, and the compartment thickness. We found the best power density at the concentrated solution of 1.5 mol L−1 and the diluted solution of 0.01 mol L−1. The maximum power density increases as the inlet flow rate increases or the compartment thickness decreases owing to the decrease in the internal resistance. We obtained the excellent power density of 0.77 W m−2, compared with the previous studies

  2. Comparative analysis of a bottoming transcritical ORC and a Kalina cycle for engine exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal performance comparison of two eligible bottoming cycles is investigated. • Thermal match between the temperature profiles of working fluid and exhaust is considered. • Influences of the various-temperature heat source on the two WHR cycles are studied. • Bottoming transcritical ORC shows advantages at a certain ICE load. • Suitable working conditions for both of the bottoming cycles are given. - Abstract: A performance comparison of two types of bottoming cycles, including a Kalina cycle and a transcritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC) using working fluids with sliding-temperature boiling characteristics, is conducted in order to analyze energy saving of the sensible exhaust waste heat recovery (WHR) under various internal combustion engine (ICE) working conditions. Through quantitatively analyzing the relation between exhaust waste-heat behaviors and the ICE load of a commercial ICE, two bottoming subsystems models, including a transcritical ORC using some several Alkanes and a Kalina cycle using NH3–H2O as working fluids, are build under the same ICE various-temperature exhaust heat-source and air heat-sink conditions. Compared to Kalina cycle, the transcritical ORC shows prominent advantages on the overall thermal efficiency, low operation pressure and simple components configuration at the ICE load with exhaust temperature over 491 K. The optimal thermal performance of the transcritical ORC appears at the ICE load with the certain exhaust temperature of 569–618 K. However, thermodynamic performance of the bottoming transcritical ORC is worsened considerably at the ICE load with the exhaust temperature over or under the certain value. Moreover, the extremely high turbine expansion ratio requires a complex multi-stage turbine design and big turbine dimensions for the bottoming transcritical ORC using Alkanes-based working fluid

  3. Design sensitivity analysis of using various flow boiling correlations for a direct evaporator in high-temperature waste heat recovery ORCs

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Alihan; Lecompte, Steven; Lazova, Marija; De Kerpel, Kathleen; De Paepe, Michel

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature waste heat (250°C-400°C) sources being created by industrial operations such as metallurgical industry, incinerators, combustion engines, annealing furnaces, drying, baking, cement production etc. are being utilized in Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery systems. Alongside indirect ORC evaporators having intermediate heat carrier loops, ORC waste heat recovery can also be done through a direct evaporator (e.g. tube bundles) applied on a heat source. In an evaporat...

  4. Experimental and numerical analysis of the optimized finned-tube heat exchanger for OM314 diesel exhaust exergy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An optimized finned-tube heat exchanger is modeled. • Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithm are applied. • Exergy recovery from exhaust of a diesel engine is studied. - Abstract: In this research, a multi objective optimization based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) are applied on the obtained results from numerical outcomes for a finned-tube heat exchanger (HEX) in diesel exhaust heat recovery. Thirty heat exchangers with different fin length, thickness and fin numbers are modeled and those results in three engine loads are optimized with weight functions for pressure drop, recovered heat and HEX weight. Finally, two cases of HEXs (an optimized and a non-optimized) are produced experimentally and mounted on the exhaust of an OM314 diesel engine to compare their results in heat and exergy recovery. All experiments are done for five engine loads (0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of full load) and four water mass flow rates (50, 40, 30 and 20 g/s). Results show that maximum exergy recovers occurs in high engine loads and optimized HEX with 10 fins have averagely 8% second law efficiency in exergy recovery

  5. Performance analysis of a waste heat recovery thermoelectric generation system for automotive application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A new automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator and its “four-TEGs” system are constructed, and the performance characteristics of system are discussed through road test and revolving drum test. - Highlights: • The automotive thermoelectric generator system was constructed and studied. • Road test and revolving drum test were used to measure the output power. • A performance of 201.7 V (open circuit voltage)/944 W obtained. - Abstract: Thermoelectric power generators are one of the promising green energy sources. In this case study, an energy-harvesting system which extracts heat from an automotive exhaust pipe and turns the heat into electricity by using thermoelectric power generators (TEGs) has been constructed. The test bench is developed to analysis the performance of TEG system characteristics, which are undertaken to assess the feasibility of automotive applications. Based on the test bench, a new system called “four-TEGs” system is designed and assembled into prototype vehicle called “Warrior”, through the road test and revolving drum test table, characteristics of the system such as hot-side temperature, cold-side temperature, open circuit voltage and power output are studied, and a maximum power of 944 W was obtained, which completely meets the automotive application. The present study shows the promising potential of using this kind of thermoelectric generator for low-temperature waste heat recovery vehicle

  6. Advanced heat removal system with porous media for electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalle, A.M. [Sant Gadge Baba Amravati Univ., Amravati (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Jajoo, B.N. [Sant Gadge Baba Amravati Univ., Amravati (India). College of Engineering and Technology

    2007-07-01

    High porosity metal foams are primarily utilized in aerospace applications, although there use has been widened to include cooling in electronic packaging. They are good for high heat dissipation and other important applications have been found taking advantages of the thermal properties of the metal foam, including compact heat exchangers for airborne equipment; regenerative and dissipative air cooled condenser towers; and compact heat sinks for electronic power. Metal foam heat exchangers are efficient, compact and lightweight because of their low relative density, open porosity and high thermal conductivity of the cell edges, as well as the large accessible surface area per unit volume, and the ability to mix the cooling fluid. This paper presented the results of an investigation whose purpose was to prove the foam metal is a high heat dissipater using different heat inputs. The paper discussed the experimental methodology and described the metal foam sample used in the experiment. The heat transfer coefficient was increased as the velocity increased. The Reynolds number and Nusselt number was increased to increasing velocity. It was concluded that heat transfer from foam was primarily governed by total heat transfer area of the foam rather than the thermal conductivity. 16 refs., 14 figs.

  7. Influence of mass recovery on the performance of a heat pipe type ammonia sorption refrigeration system using CaCl2/activated carbon as compound adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance analyses of a sorption refrigeration system with different mass recovery processes are presented, in which compound adsorbent of CaCl2 and activated carbon is used to improve the mass and heat transfer performances of sorption bed. The heating, cooling and heat recovery processes between two sorption beds were performed by multifunction heat pipes without additional power consumption. The experimental Clapeyron diagrams showed that the cycles with mass recovery (MR), with heat and mass recoveries (HMR), and with mass and heat recoveries (MHR), have better thermodynamic performances when compared with the sorption cycle without mass recovery (MR0). The implementary order of mass recovery and heat recovery has strong influence on the efficacy of mass recovery while it has little influence on the efficacy of heat recovery. In sorption cycles with HMR and with MHR, the hot beds can be pre-cooled and cold beds can be pre-heated effectively during the switching process, and heat consumption from external heat source during desorption phase is thereby reduced. Mass recovery can enlarge cycled refrigerant mass due to the transfer of refrigerant gas between two sorption beds during mass recovery process. In comparison with sorption cycle with MR0, sorption cycles with MR, with HMR, and with MHR can generally improve the coefficient of performance (COP) and specific cooling power (SCP) by more than 20% and 16%, respectively. Especially, sorption cycle with MHR has the highest performance among different mass recovery processes due to the fact that MHR has the advantages of MR and HMR, and it can improve the COP by 46.7% when compared with the cycle with MR0

  8. Design of heat recovery system in an aluminium cast house : Design av varmegjenvinningssystem i et aluminium smelteverk

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In this diploma thesis, the possibilities to enhance the process production and energy efficiencyas well as the energy recovery potential of PFA 2 at Hydro-Sunndalsøra have been determined.To identify the potentials for energy recovery, it has been conducted energy balances. The resultsfrom the balances give an overview of the waste heat sources and their total energy content, togetherwith the temperatures at which they are available. The total energy in the waste heatsources for PFA 2 w...

  9. An empirical study on the human error recovery failure probability when using soft controls in NPP advanced MCRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Many researchers have tried to understand human recovery process or step. • Modeling human recovery process is not sufficient to be applied to HRA. • The operation environment of MCRs in NPPs has changed by adopting new HSIs. • Recovery failure probability in a soft control operation environment is investigated. • Recovery failure probability here would be important evidence for expert judgment. - Abstract: It is well known that probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) today consider not just hardware failures and environmental events that can impact upon risk, but also human error contributions. Consequently, the focus on reliability and performance management has been on the prevention of human errors and failures rather than the recovery of human errors. However, the recovery of human errors is as important as the prevention of human errors and failures for the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). For this reason, many researchers have tried to find a human recovery process or step. However, modeling the human recovery process is not sufficient enough to be applied to human reliability analysis (HRA), which requires human error and recovery probabilities. In this study, therefore, human error recovery failure probabilities based on predefined human error modes were investigated by conducting experiments in the operation mockup of advanced/digital main control rooms (MCRs) in NPPs. To this end, 48 subjects majoring in nuclear engineering participated in the experiments. In the experiments, using the developed accident scenario based on tasks from the standard post trip action (SPTA), the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR), and predominant soft control tasks, which are derived from the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and the excess steam demand event (ESDE), all error detection and recovery data based on human error modes were checked with the performance sheet and the statistical analysis of error recovery/detection was then

  10. Secondary Heat Exchanger Design and Comparison for Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush; Michael McKellar; Michael Patterson; Eung Soo Kim

    2012-06-01

    The goals of next generation nuclear reactors, such as the high temperature gas-cooled reactor and advance high temperature reactor (AHTR), are to increase energy efficiency in the production of electricity and provide high temperature heat for industrial processes. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and the industrial process heat transport system. The need for efficiency, compactness, and safety challenge the boundaries of existing heat exchanger technology, giving rise to the following study. Various studies have been performed in attempts to update the secondary heat exchanger that is downstream of the primary heat exchanger, mostly because its performance is strongly tied to the ability to employ more efficient conversion cycles, such as the Rankine super critical and subcritical cycles. This study considers two different types of heat exchangers—helical coiled heat exchanger and printed circuit heat exchanger—as possible options for the AHTR secondary heat exchangers with the following three different options: (1) A single heat exchanger transfers all the heat (3,400 MW(t)) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants; (2) Two heat exchangers share heat to transfer total heat of 3,400 MW(t) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants, each exchanger transfers 1,700 MW(t) with a parallel configuration; and (3) Three heat exchangers share heat to transfer total heat of 3,400 MW(t) from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the power conversion system or process plants. Each heat exchanger transfers 1,130 MW(t) with a parallel configuration. A preliminary cost comparison will be provided for all different cases along with challenges and recommendations.

  11. Investigation of Strength Recovery in Welds of NUCu-140 Steel Through Multipass Welding and Isothermal Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Jason T.; DuPont, John N.; Jain, Divya; Baik, Sung-Il; Seidman, David N.

    2015-11-01

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper precipitation-strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time-dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom probe tomography analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT.

  12. Heating System of High Temperature Biogas Digester by Solar Energy and Methane Liquid Heat Recovery Heat Pump%太阳能-沼液余热式热泵高温厌氧发酵加温系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴晓梅; 石惠娴; 朱洪光; 龙惟定

    2012-01-01

    A heating system of biogas digester was developed to avoid area limitations of buried wells in the heating system of biogas digester by ground-source heat pump, in which the heat energy was supplied by hot water from waste heat recovery coupled with solar- assisted heat pump. The key parameters such as the heat load of digester, waste heat recovery rate of the methane liquid, medium and high heat pump, the solar energy collector area and so on werecalculated. The results show that this system can guarantee the temperature of 50+2℃ in the digester, the heat recovery rate of the methane liquid can reach upto 70%. The system is characterized by that the solar energy and waste heat recovery of the methane liquid serve as the low-graded heat sources of the heat pump. There a're three kinds of running modes including the sloar energy heating directly, the solar energy low level heat sources heat pump, and the combination of the solar energy and waste heat recovery low - graded heat resources heat pump and so on. The waste heat recovery technique can make full use of energy of the system and prevent thermal pollution.%针对地源热泵式沼气池加温系统需要打地埋井及铺设地埋管受地质水质局限等问题,系统构建了太阳能—沼液余热式热泵高温厌氧发酵加温系统.对系统发酵池热负荷、沼液余热回收率、中高温热泵机组、太阳能集热装置等关键参数进行了理论计算,得出系统能够保证发酵池温度50±2℃,沼液余热回收量可以达到系统总需要热量的70%.系统特点在于采用太阳能和沼液余热联合作为中高温热泵低位热源并确立其三种运行模式,包括太阳能直接加温模式,太阳能低位热源—热泵加热模式和太阳能—沼液余热回收联合式热泵加温模式.

  13. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) plasma heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma heating systems are critical to the operation of a high Q tandem mirror reactor. Two electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) systems, a high energy negative ion-based neutral beam, and an anchor ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system create the proper axial density, pressure and potential profiles in the endcells. The proper profiles electrostatically plug the central cell plasma, and provide an adequate margin with respect to MHD- and micro-stability for the device. An ICRH system in the central cell is also required to heat the plasma to ignition. Each MARS plasma heating system is at a higher power than that has yet been utilized in any fusion experiments; the use of innovative concepts has lead to compact, efficient, and affordable ECRH and negative beam systems. (orig.)

  14. Dynamic test on waste heat recovery system with organic Rankine cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志奇; 刘力文; 夏小霞; 周乃君

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic performance is important to the controlling and monitoring of the organic Rankine cycle(ORC) system so to avoid the occurrence of unwanted conditions. A small scale waste heat recovery system with organic Rankine cycle was constructed and the dynamic behavior was presented. In the dynamic test, the pump was stopped and then started. In addition, there was a step change of the flue gas volume flow rate and the converter frequency of multistage pump, respectively. The results indicate that the working fluid flow rate has the shortest response time, followed by the expander inlet pressure and the expander inlet temperature. The operation frequency of pump is a key parameter for the ORC system. Due to a step change of pump frequency (39.49−35.24 Hz), the expander efficiency and thermal efficiency drop by 16%and 21%within 2 min, respectively. Besides, the saturated mixture can lead to an increase of the expander rotation speed.

  15. Prediction of heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) noise attenuation using scale model testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, M.; Barman, M.; Gambino, V. [Aercoustics Engineering Limited, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-08-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine whether scale modelling was effective for the study of (1) reactive attenuation on the gas flow path of heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), (2) attenuation due to diffusion and scattering of sound, and (3) propagation loss due to flow resistivity of the tube bundles. MIDAS, a state-of-the-art measurement system, suitable for use with small models, and a microphone capable of ultrasonic measurement, were used. The noise source used was supplied by a high voltage spark source. The methodology used in the study, and some of the initial results of the scale model testing were described. A review of the initial results showed that it will be possible to model reactive effects, viscous loss and diffusion and scattering. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Optimization of heat recovery steam generators for combined cycle gas turbine power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica; Rapun, J.L. [IBERDROLA Ingenieria y Consultoria, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-08-01

    The heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is one of the few components of combined cycle gas turbine power plants tailored for each specific application. Any change in its design would directly affect all the variables of the cycle and therefore the availability of tools for its optimization is of the greatest relevance. This paper presents a method for the optimization of the HRSG based on the application of influence coefficients. The influence coefficients are a useful mathematical tool in design optimization problems. They are obtained after solving the equations of the system through the Newton-Raphson method. The main advantage of the proposed method is that it permits a better understanding of the influence of the design parameters on the cycle performance. The study of the optimization of the distribution of the boiler area between its different components is presented as an example of the proposed technique. (author)

  17. Recovery Act: Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James A Menart, Professor

    2013-02-22

    price paid for the three-dimensional detail is the large computational times required with GEO3D. The computational times required for GEO2D are reasonable, a few minutes for a 20 year simulation. For a similar simulation, GEO3D takes days of computational time. Because of the small simulation times with GEO2D, a number of attractive features have been added to it. GEO2D has a user friendly interface where inputs and outputs are all handled with GUI (graphical user interface) screens. These GUI screens make the program exceptionally easy to use. To make the program even easier to use a number of standard input options for the most common GSHP situations are provided to the user. For the expert user, the option still exists to enter their own detailed information. To further help designers and GSHP customers make decisions about a GSHP heating and cooling system, cost estimates are made by the program. These cost estimates include a payback period graph to show the user where their GSHP system pays for itself. These GSHP simulation tools should be a benefit to the advancement of GSHP system

  18. CO2-Dissolved - A Novel Approach to Combining CCS and Geothermal Heat Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the outline of the CO2-Dissolved project whose objective is to assess the technical-economic feasibility of a novel CCS concept integrating geothermal energy recovery, aqueous dissolution of CO2 and injection via a doublet system, and an innovative post-combustion CO2 capture technology. Compared to the use of a supercritical phase, this approach offers substantial benefits in terms of storage safety, due to lower brine displacement risks, lower CO2 escape risks, and the potential for more rapid mineralization. However, the solubility of CO2 in brine will be a limiting factor to the amount of CO2 that can be injected. Consequently, and as another contributing novel factor, this proposal targets low to medium range CO2 emitters (ca. 10-100 kt/yr), that could be compatible with a single doublet installation. Since it is intended to be a local solution, the costs related to CO2 transport would then be dramatically reduced, provided that the local underground geology is favorable. Finally, this project adds the potential for energy and/or revenue generation through geothermal heat recovery. This constitutes an interesting way of valorization of the injection operations, demonstrating that an actual synergy between CO2 storage and geothermal activities may exist. (authors)

  19. The Brayton Cycle heat pump for solvent recovery and pollution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brayton Cycle heat pump technology for the recovery of solvent and prevention of emissions is relatively new. Like most new technologies, it is a combination of older concepts, ideas and types of processes put together in a unique way. As a result, proven equipment enables achievement of extremely low condensing temperatures at relatively low cost. The Brayton Cycle is a thermodynamic principle. It was used first for a turbine engine, but more recently it has been used for a variety of other kinds of processes including refrigeration. A great variety of methods are used for emission control including adsorption, direct condensation, absorption in a fluid, and incineration or destruction. The Brayton Cycle technology actually fits into two of these categories, adsorption and direct condensation. Since it is a refrigeration process, it can be used to condense solvents from a solvent-laden air stream. The advantage of this particular process over other refrigeration methods is that lower temperatures can be achieved more easily. In fact, temperatures as low as -150 degrees F have been used to recover solvents in this manner. That happens to be the freezing point of methylene chloride which is a very volatile compound. High recovery efficiencies can be obtained for a whole variety of organic materials. 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. The recovery boiler advisor. Combination of practical experience and advanced thermodynamic modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, R. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Eriksson, G. [LTH/RWTH (Germany); Sundstroem, K. [Tampella Power Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The Aabo Advisor is a computer based program intended to provide information about the high temperature ash and fluegas chemistry in pulping spent black liquor recovery boilers of kraft pulp mills. The program can be used for predictions of a variety of furnace and flue gas phenomena, such as fireside fouling of the heat exchanger surfaces caused by the flue gas particulate matter, emissions of SO{sub 2}(g), HCl(g) and NO{sub x}(g) with the flue gas etc. The program determines the composition of the fluegas as well as the amount and composition of the two typical fly ash fractions found in recovery boiler fluegases, the condensed fly ash particles and the carry over particles. These data are used for calculating the melting behavior of the fly ash present at different locations in the boiler and this characteristic behavior is used for the fireside fouling predictions. The program may also be used for studying how different mill processes affecting the black liquor composition affects on the fireside chemistry of the recovery boiler. As input data for the calculations only a few boiler operation parameters and the composition of the black liquor is required. The calculations are based on a one-dimensional, multi-stage chemistry model where both thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and stoichiometric material balances are used. The model calculates at first the chemistry in the lower furnace and smelt after which it moves to the upper furnace and the radiative parts of the fluegas channel. As the last block the program calculates the chemistry in the convective part, the electrostatic precipitator cath and stack. The results from each block are presented in tables, key numbers and melt curves representing the fluegas or fly ash fraction present at each location

  1. Natural heat transfer augmentation in passive advanced BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR), the long-term post-accident containment pressure is determined by the combination of non condensable gas pressure and steam pressure in the wet well gas space. Since there are no active systems for heat removal in the wet well, energy transmitted to the wet well gas space, by a variety of means, must be removed by passive heat transfer to the walls and suppression pool (SP). The cold suppression pool located below the hotter gas space provides a stable configuration in which convection currents are suppressed thus limiting heat and mass transfer between the gas space and pool. However, heat transfer to the walls results in natural circulation currents that can augment the heat and mass transfer to the pool surface. Using a simplified model, parametric studies are carried out to show that augmentation of the order of magnitude expected can significantly impact the heat and mass transfer to the pool. Additionally a review of available literature in the area of augmentation and mixed convection of this type is presented and indicates the need for additional experimental work in order to develop adequate models for heat and mass transfer augmentation in the configuration of a BWR suppression pool. (author)

  2. Advanced echocardiography in adult zebrafish reveals delayed recovery of heart function after myocardial cryoinjury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina J Hein

    Full Text Available Translucent zebrafish larvae represent an established model to analyze genetics of cardiac development and human cardiac disease. More recently adult zebrafish are utilized to evaluate mechanisms of cardiac regeneration and by benefiting from recent genome editing technologies, including TALEN and CRISPR, adult zebrafish are emerging as a valuable in vivo model to evaluate novel disease genes and specifically validate disease causing mutations and their underlying pathomechanisms. However, methods to sensitively and non-invasively assess cardiac morphology and performance in adult zebrafish are still limited. We here present a standardized examination protocol to broadly assess cardiac performance in adult zebrafish by advancing conventional echocardiography with modern speckle-tracking analyses. This allows accurate detection of changes in cardiac performance and further enables highly sensitive assessment of regional myocardial motion and deformation in high spatio-temporal resolution. Combining conventional echocardiography measurements with radial and longitudinal velocity, displacement, strain, strain rate and myocardial wall delay rates after myocardial cryoinjury permitted to non-invasively determine injury dimensions and to longitudinally follow functional recovery during cardiac regeneration. We show that functional recovery of cryoinjured hearts occurs in three distinct phases. Importantly, the regeneration process after cryoinjury extends far beyond the proposed 45 days described for ventricular resection with reconstitution of myocardial performance up to 180 days post-injury (dpi. The imaging modalities evaluated here allow sensitive cardiac phenotyping and contribute to further establish adult zebrafish as valuable cardiac disease model beyond the larval developmental stage.

  3. Advanced Echocardiography in Adult Zebrafish Reveals Delayed Recovery of Heart Function after Myocardial Cryoinjury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossack, Mandy; Juergensen, Lonny; Fuchs, Dieter; Katus, Hugo A.; Hassel, David

    2015-01-01

    Translucent zebrafish larvae represent an established model to analyze genetics of cardiac development and human cardiac disease. More recently adult zebrafish are utilized to evaluate mechanisms of cardiac regeneration and by benefiting from recent genome editing technologies, including TALEN and CRISPR, adult zebrafish are emerging as a valuable in vivo model to evaluate novel disease genes and specifically validate disease causing mutations and their underlying pathomechanisms. However, methods to sensitively and non-invasively assess cardiac morphology and performance in adult zebrafish are still limited. We here present a standardized examination protocol to broadly assess cardiac performance in adult zebrafish by advancing conventional echocardiography with modern speckle-tracking analyses. This allows accurate detection of changes in cardiac performance and further enables highly sensitive assessment of regional myocardial motion and deformation in high spatio-temporal resolution. Combining conventional echocardiography measurements with radial and longitudinal velocity, displacement, strain, strain rate and myocardial wall delay rates after myocardial cryoinjury permitted to non-invasively determine injury dimensions and to longitudinally follow functional recovery during cardiac regeneration. We show that functional recovery of cryoinjured hearts occurs in three distinct phases. Importantly, the regeneration process after cryoinjury extends far beyond the proposed 45 days described for ventricular resection with reconstitution of myocardial performance up to 180 days post-injury (dpi). The imaging modalities evaluated here allow sensitive cardiac phenotyping and contribute to further establish adult zebrafish as valuable cardiac disease model beyond the larval developmental stage. PMID:25853735

  4. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  5. Performance Analysis and Working Fluid Selection of a Supercritical Organic Rankine Cycle for Low Grade Waste Heat Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Yourong Li; Shuangying Wu; Xiaoxiao Xu; Chao He; Chao Liu; Hong Gao

    2012-01-01

    The performance analysis of a supercritical organic Rankine cycle system driven by exhaust heat using 18 organic working fluids is presented. Several parameters, such as the net power output, exergy efficiency, expander size parameter (SP), and heat exchanger requirement of evaporator and the condenser, were used to evaluate the performance of this recovery cycle and screen the working fluids. The results reveal that in most cases, raising the expander inlet temperature i...

  6. Analysis of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Recovery and Pollution Processing for Z12V190 Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Hou Xuejun; Gao Deli

    2012-01-01

    With the increasingly prominent problem regarding rapid economy development and the gradually serious environmental pollution, the waste heat recovery and waste gas pollution processing have received significant attention. Z12V190 diesel engine has high fuel consumption and low thermal efficiency and releases large amounts of exhaust gas and waste heat into the atmosphere, causing serious problems of energy waste and environmental pollution. In this work, the diesel engine exhaust gas compone...

  7. Advanced sensible heat solar receiver for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Timothy J.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis, through in-house efforts, has begun a study to generate a conceptual design of a sensible heat solar receiver and to determine the feasibility of such a system for space power applications. The sensible heat solar receiver generated in this study uses pure lithium as the thermal storage medium and was designed for a 7 kWe Brayton (PCS) operating at 1100 K. The receiver consists of two stages interconnected via temperature sensing variable conductance sodium heat pipes. The lithium is contained within a niobium vessel and the outer shell of the receiver is constructed of third generation rigid, fibrous ceramic insulation material. Reradiation losses are controlled with niobium and aluminum shields. By nature of design, the sensible heat receiver generated in this study is comparable in both size and mass to a latent heat system of similar thermal capacitance. The heat receiver design and thermal analysis were conducted through the combined use of PATRAN, SINDA, TRASYS, and NASTRAN software packages.

  8. The use of mechanical ventilation with heat recovery for controlling radon and radon-daughter concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An energy research house in Maryland was found to have radon concentrations far in excess of recommended guidelines. A mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery was installed in this house to test its effectiveness as an energy-efficient control technique for indoor radon. Radon concentration was monitored continuously for two weeks under varying ventilation conditions (0.07 to 0.8 air changes per hour (ach)) and radon daughter concentrations were measured by grab-sample techniques about nine times daily during this period. At ventilation rates of 0.6 ach and higher radon and radon daughter levels dropped below guidelines for indoor concentrations. Comparison with other studies indicates that indoor radon buildup may be a problem in a considerable portion of houses characterized by their low infiltration rates. The use of mechanical ventilation systems with air-to-air heat exchangers may offer a practical, cost-effective, and energy-efficient means of alleviating not only the radon problem specifically but also the general deterioration of indoor air quality in houses designed or retrofitted to achieve low infiltration

  9. Thermodynamic analysis and performance optimization of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system for marine diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalating fuel prices and imposition of carbon dioxide emission limits are creating renewed interest in methods to increase the thermal efficiency of marine diesel engines. One viable means to achieve such improved thermal efficiency is the conversion of engine waste heat to a more useful form of energy, either mechanical or electrical. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) has been demonstrated to be a promising technology to recover waste heat. This paper examines waste heat recovery of a marine diesel engine using ORC technology. Two separated ORC apparatuses for the waste heat from both the jacket cooling water and the engine exhaust gas are designed as the traditional recovery system. The maximum net power output is chosen as the evaluation criterion to select the suitable working fluid and define the optimal system parameters. To simplify the waste heat recovery, an optimized system using the jacket cooling water as the preheating medium and the engine exhaust gas for evaporation is presented. The influence of preheating temperature on the system performance is evaluated to define the optimal operating condition. Economic and off-design analysis of the optimized system is conducted. The simulation results reveal that the optimized system is technically feasible and economically attractive. - Highlights: • ORC is used to recover waste heat from both exhaust gas and jacket cooling water. • Comparative study is conducted for different ORC systems. • Thermal performance, system structure and economic feasibility are considered. • Optimal preheating temperature of the system is selected

  10. 炼油厂废热回收利用%The Recovery and Exploitation of Heat Discarded from Oil Refinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓东

    2012-01-01

    针对江苏某炼油厂废热回收问题为研究方向,将硫回收车间需要降温的净化水进行热量回收,采用HTFS软件作为换热器计算的工具,设计换热器使用净化水加热原工艺设置用1.0 MPa蒸汽加热的原油,降温后的净化水可直接送至减压、加氢等装置回收利用,以实现原油加热、净化水降温且最终达到节能的目的。%Based on the study direction of the hot recovery problems of some oil refinerysf in Jiangsu,reduce the heat the decontamination water that the sulphur recover the car to need to be reduce the heat carries on the calories recovery,adopting HTFS software as the tool of changing hot and calculating,making the the hot change machine use the 1.0 MPa steam heating crude oil that the original craft for decontamination water heating use,and the decontamination water can directly send to the decompression,hydrogenation,etc.to equip the recovery exploitation,to carry out the crude oil heating,decontamination the water reduce the heat and end attain the purpose of economy energy.

  11. Analyzing HEAT of Lesson Plans in Pre-Service and Advanced Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Maxwell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher-order thinking, Engagement, Authenticity, and Technology integration combine to form HEAT to boost the rigor of a lesson plan to impact K-12 student learning. This preliminary study examines both pre-service and advanced teachers’ lesson plans to determine the level in each of the HEAT components. Through this study an instrument has been revised and refined using previous research of HEAT. The researchers assessed the current HEAT level of lesson plans at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The findings show a difference in HEAT performance of the pre-service and advanced teachers’ lesson plans; however, Higher-order thinking was the highest component of performance for both groups’ lesson plans. In this preliminary study, Technology was found to be the strongest predictor of overall HEAT performance.

  12. Final Scientific/Technical Report [Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterton, Mike

    2014-02-12

    The Recovery Act: Districtwide Geothermal Heating Conversion project performed by the Blaine County School District was part of a larger effort by the District to reduce operating costs, address deferred maintenance items, and to improve the learning environment of the students. This project evaluated three options for the ground source which were Open-Loop Extraction/Re-injection wells, Closed-Loop Vertical Boreholes, and Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approaches. In the end the Closed-Loop Horizontal Slinky approach had the lowest total cost of ownership but the majority of the sites associated with this project did not have enough available ground area to install the system so the second lowest option was used (Open-Loop). In addition to the ground source, this project looked at ways to retrofit existing HVAC systems with new high efficiency systems. The end result was the installation of distributed waterto- air heat pumps with water-to-water heat pumps installed to act as boilers/chillers for areas with a high ventilation demand such as they gymnasiums. A number of options were evaluated and the lowest total cost of ownership approach was implemented in the majority of the facilities. The facilities where the lowest total cost of ownership approaches was not selected were done to maintain consistency of the systems from facility to facility. This project had a number of other benefits to the Blaine County public. The project utilizes guaranteed energy savings to justify the levy funds expended. The project also developed an educational dashboard that can be used in the classrooms and to educate the community on the project and its performance. In addition, the majority of the installation work was performed by contractors local to Blaine County which acted as an economic stimulus to the area during a period of recession.

  13. Thermo-economic optimization of Regenerative Organic Rankine Cycle for waste heat recovery applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermo-economic optimization of regenerative ORC is performed. • Optimization is performed using multi objective genetic algorithm. • Objective function is maximum cycle efficiency and minimum specific investment. • Evaporation pressure, pinch point and superheat are decision variables. • Sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate effect of decision variables. - Abstract: Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is low grade and waste heat conversion technology. The current article deal with the thermo-economic optimization of basic ORC and regenerative ORC for waste heat recovery applications under constant heat source condition. Thermal efficiency and specific investment cost of basic ORC, single stage regenerative and double stage regenerative ORC has been optimized by using Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II). Maximum thermal efficiency and minimum specific investment cost were selected as objective functions and relative increase in thermal efficiency and cost has been analyzed taking the basic ORC as base case. The constraint set consist of evaporation pressure, superheat, pinch point temperature difference in evaporator and condenser. The optimization was performed for five different working fluids. The optimization result show that R245fa is best working under considered conditions and basic ORC has low specific investment cost and thermal efficiency compared to regenerative ORC. R245fa is low boiling organic fluid, which has high degree of thermal stability and compatible with common construction materials of ORC. The average increase in thermal efficiency from basic ORC to single stage regenerative ORC was 1.01% with an additional cost of 187 $/kW while from basic ORC to double stage regenerative ORC was 1.45% with an average increase in cost of 297 $/kW. The sensitivity analysis was also performed to investigate the effect of operating conditions which show that evaporation pressure has promising effect on thermal

  14. Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

    2012-09-30

    There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

  15. Thermal Protection System (Heat Shield) Development - Advanced Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, T. John

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) ADP was a 3 1/2 year effort to develop ablative TPS materials for the Orion crew capsule. The ADP was motivated by the lack of available ablative TPS's. The TPS ADP pursued a competitive phased development strategy with succeeding rounds of development, testing and down selections. The Project raised the technology readiness level (TRL) of 8 different TPS materials from 5 different commercial vendors, eventual down selecting to a single material system for the Orion heat shield. In addition to providing a heat shield material and design for Orion on time and on budget, the Project accomplished the following: 1) Re-invigorated TPS industry & re-established a NASA competency to respond to future TPS needs; 2) Identified a potentially catastrophic problem with the planned MSL heat shield, and provided a viable, high TRL alternate heat shield design option; and 3) Transferred mature heat shield material and design options to the commercial space industry, including TPS technology information for the SpaceX Dragon capsule.

  16. Multi-objective optimization of organic Rankine cycles for waste heat recovery: Application in an offshore platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierobon, Leonardo; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Larsen, Ulrik;

    2013-01-01

    than for acetone. Other promising working fluids are cyclohexane, hexane and isohexane. The present methodology can be utilized in waste heat recovery applications where a compromise between performance, compactness and economic revenue is required. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Characteristics on the heat storage and recovery by the underground spiral heat exchange pipe; Chichu maisetsu spiral kan ni yoru chikunetsu shunetsu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, I. [Kure National College of Technology, Hiroshima (Japan); Taga, M. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    The consistency between the experimental value of a soil temperature and the calculation value of a soil temperature given by a non-steady heat conduction equation was confirmed. The experimental value is obtained by laying a spiral heat exchange pipe in the heat-insulated soil box and circulating hot water forcibly in the pipe. The temperature conductivity in soil significantly influences the heat transfer in soil. The storage performance is improved when the temperature conductivity increases because of the contained moisture. As the difference between the initial soil temperature and circulating water temperature becomes greater, the heat storage and recovery values increase. A thermal core heat transfer is done in the spiral pipe. Therefore, the diameter of the pipe little influences the heat storage performance, and the pitch influences largely. About 50 hours after heat is stored, the storage performance is almost the same as for a straight pipe that uses the spiral diameter as a pipe diameter. To obtain the same heat storage value, the spiral pipe is made of fewer materials than the straight pipe and low in price. The spiral pipe is more advantageous than the straight pipe in the necessary motive power and supply heat of a pump. 1 ref., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Steam injection for heavy oil recovery: Modeling of wellbore heat efficiency and analysis of steam injection performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A comprehensive mathematical model was established to estimate wellbore heat efficiency of steam injection wells. • A simplified approach of predicting steam pressure in wellbores was proposed. • High wellhead injection rate and wellhead steam quality can improve wellbore heat efficiency. • High wellbore heat efficiency does not necessarily mean good performance of heavy oil recovery. • Using excellent insulation materials is a good way to save water and fuels. - Abstract: The aims of this work are to present a comprehensive mathematical model for estimating wellbore heat efficiency and to analyze performance of steam injection for heavy oil recovery. In this paper, we firstly introduce steam injection process briefly. Secondly, a simplified approach of predicting steam pressure in wellbores is presented and a complete expression for steam quality is derived. More importantly, both direct and indirect methods are adopted to determine the wellbore heat efficiency. Then, the mathematical model is solved using an iterative technique. After the model is validated with measured field data, we study the effects of wellhead injection rate and wellhead steam quality on steam injection performance reflected in wellbores. Next, taking cyclic steam stimulation as an example, we analyze steam injection performance reflected in reservoirs with numerical reservoir simulation method. Finally, the significant role of improving wellbore heat efficiency in saving water and fuels is discussed in detail. The results indicate that we can improve the wellbore heat efficiency by enhancing wellhead injection rate or steam quality. However, high wellbore heat efficiency does not necessarily mean satisfactory steam injection performance reflected in reservoirs or good performance of heavy oil recovery. Moreover, the paper shows that using excellent insulation materials is a good way to save water and fuels due to enhancement of wellbore heat efficiency

  19. A comparison study on energy savings and fungus growth control using heat recovery devices in a modern tropical operating theatre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The paper can be used as a comprehensive guide for building services engineers. → Energy is wasted in overcooling and reheating processes in the reheat system. → The recovery wheel integrated system is a good choice for heat recovery purpose. → The heat pipe heat exchanger system is the best choice for energy saving purpose. -- Abstract: Fungus growth has always been a problem in hot and humid areas. This particular problem is crucial for operating theatre as it could affect the success rate of operations. Many postoperative fungus infection cases had occurred in the past, and it is generally agreed that air-conditioning system play a very important role in resolving the fungus growth problem. Besides air quality, the energy consumption level of air-conditioning system is also very important. In this study, the operating theatre 3 in Putrajaya Hospital, Malaysia was chosen as the research subject. The air-conditioning system for OT3 was redesigned with the energy recovery wheel, desiccant dehumidifier and heat pipe heat exchanger to achieve the objectives of this study. A computer program called Transient system simulation program (TRNSYS) was utilized for analysis in this research. From the outcome of simulations, it was found that the heat pipe heat exchanger could reduce the most energy consumed by the air-conditioning system. It managed to reduce the energy consumption by 57.85%. Moreover, the payback period of the device is only 0.95 years, which is the shortest among all the systems studied. Therefore, applying heat pipe heat exchanger is a good choice to save energy and resolve fungus growth problem in hot and humid areas.

  20. Numerical model of a thermoelectric generator with compact plate-fin heat exchanger for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Chen, Min;

    2012-01-01

    plate-fin heat exchangers is adopted. Then the model is validated against experimental data and the main variables are identified by means of a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the system configuration is optimized for recovering heat from the exhaust gas. The results exhibit the crucial importance of the......This paper presents a numerical model of an exhaust heat recovery system for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) stack. The system is designed as thermoelectric generators (TEGs) sandwiched in the walls of a compact plate-fin heat exchanger. Its model is based on a...... model accuracy and the optimization on system configuration. Future studies will concentrate on heat exchanger structures....

  1. Modeling and Control of a Parallel Waste Heat Recovery System for Euro-VI Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Feru

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modeling and control of a waste heat recovery systemfor a Euro-VI heavy-duty truck engine. The considered waste heat recovery system consists of two parallel evaporators with expander and pumps mechanically coupled to the engine crankshaft. Compared to previous work, the waste heat recovery system modeling is improved by including evaporator models that combine the finite difference modeling approach with a moving boundary one. Over a specific cycle, the steady-state and dynamic temperature prediction accuracy improved on average by 2% and 7%. From a control design perspective, the objective is to maximize the waste heat recovery system output power.However, for safe system operation, the vapor state needs to be maintained before the expander under highly dynamic engine disturbances. To achieve this, a switching model predictive control strategy is developed. The proposed control strategy performance is demonstrated using the high-fidelity waste heat recovery system model subject to measured disturbances from an Euro-VI heavy-duty diesel engine. Simulations are performed usinga cold-start World Harmonized Transient cycle that covers typical urban, rural and highway driving conditions. The model predictive control strategy provides 15% more time in vaporand recovered thermal energy than a classical proportional-integral (PI control strategy. In the case that the model is accurately known, the proposed control strategy performance can be improved by 10% in terms of time in vapor and recovered thermal energy. This is demonstrated with an offline nonlinear model predictive control strategy.

  2. Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

  3. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat and waste heat recovery in the primary aluminum industry. Final report, September 1977-September 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katter, L.B.; Hoskins, R.L.

    1979-04-01

    The results of a study entitled, Applications of Thermal Energy Storage to Process Heat and Waste Heat Recovery in the Primary Aluminum Industry are presented. In this preliminary study, a system has been identified by which the large amounts of low-grade waste energy in the primary pollution control system gas stream can be utilized for comfort heating in nearby communities. Energy is stored in the form of hot water, contained in conventional, insulated steel tanks, enabling a more efficient utilization of the constant energy source by the cyclical energy demand. Less expensive energy storage means (heated ponds, aquifers), when they become fully characterized, will allow even more cost-competitive systems. Extensive design tradeoff studies have been performed. These tradeoff studies indicate that a heating demand equivalent to 12,000 single-family residences can be supplied by the energy from the Intalco plant. Using a 30-year payback criterion (consistent with utility planning practice), the average cost of energy supplied over the system useful life is predicted at one-third the average cost of fossil fuel. The study clearly shows that the utilization of waste energy from aluminum plants is both technically and economically attractive. The program included a detailed survey of all aluminum plants within the United States, allowing the site specific analyses to be extrapolated to a national basis. Should waste heat recovery systems be implemented by 1985, a national yearly savings of 6.5 million barrels of oil can be realized.

  4. The Advanced Exploration Systems Water Recovery Project: Innovation on 2 Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam M.; Neumeyer, Derek; Shull, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    As NASA looks forward to sending humans farther away from Earth, we will have to develop a transportation architecture that is highly reliable and that can sustain life for long durations without the benefit of Earth s proximity for continuous resupply or even operational guidance. NASA has consistently been challenged with performing great feats of innovation, but particularly in this time of economic stress, we are challenged to go farther with less. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) projects were implemented to address both of these needs by not only developing innovative technologies, but by incorporating innovative management styles and processes that foster the needed technical innovation given a small amount of resources. This presentation explains how the AES Water Recovery Project is exhibiting innovation on both fronts; technical and process. The AES Water Recovery Project (WRP) is actively engineering innovative technologies in order to maximize the efficiency of water recovery. The development of reliable, energy-efficient, and low-mass spacecraft systems to provide environmental control and life support (ECLS) is critical to enable long-duration human missions outside of low-Earth orbit. Recycling of life support consumables is necessary to reduce resupply mass and provide for vehicle autonomy. To address this, the WRP is working on a rotary distiller that has shown enhanced performance over the state-of-the-art (SOA). Additionally, the WRP is looking at innovative ways to address issues present in the state-of-the-art (SOA) systems pertaining to toxicity and calcium scale buildup. As an AES project, the WRP has a more streamlined Skunk Works like approach to technology development intended to reduce overhead but achieve a more refined end product. The project has incorporated key partnerships between NASA centers as well as between NASA and industry. A minimal project management style has been implemented such that risks are managed and

  5. Active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes in EAST towards advanced steady state operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant progress has been made in EAST towards advanced steady state operations by active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes. Many innovative techniques have been developed to mitigate transient ELM and stationary heat fluxes on the divertor target plates. It has been found that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) can lead to edge plasma ergodization, striation of the stationary heat flux and lower ELM transient heat and particle fluxes. With multi-pulse supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) to quantitatively regulate the divertor particle flux, the divertor power footprint pattern can be actively modified. H-modes have been extended over 30 s in EAST with the divertor peak heat flux and the target temperature being controlled well below 2 MW/m2 and 250 °C, respectively, by integrating these new methods, coupled with advanced lithium wall conditioning and internal divertor pumping, along with an edge coherent mode to provide continuous particle and power exhaust

  6. Active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes in EAST towards advanced steady state operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L., E-mail: lwang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Guo, H.Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); General Atomics, P. O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186 (United States); Li, J.; Wan, B.N.; Gong, X.Z.; Zhang, X.D.; Hu, J.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liang, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Xu, G.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zou, X.L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Loarte, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Maingi, R.; Menard, J.E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Luo, G.N.; Gao, X.; Hu, L.Q.; Gan, K.F.; Liu, S.C.; Wang, H.Q.; Chen, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    Significant progress has been made in EAST towards advanced steady state operations by active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes. Many innovative techniques have been developed to mitigate transient ELM and stationary heat fluxes on the divertor target plates. It has been found that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) can lead to edge plasma ergodization, striation of the stationary heat flux and lower ELM transient heat and particle fluxes. With multi-pulse supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) to quantitatively regulate the divertor particle flux, the divertor power footprint pattern can be actively modified. H-modes have been extended over 30 s in EAST with the divertor peak heat flux and the target temperature being controlled well below 2 MW/m{sup 2} and 250 °C, respectively, by integrating these new methods, coupled with advanced lithium wall conditioning and internal divertor pumping, along with an edge coherent mode to provide continuous particle and power exhaust.

  7. Integrated implosion/heating studies for advanced fast ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated experiments to investigate the ultrafast heating of implosions using cone/shell geometries have been performed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experiments used the 1054 nm, nanosecond, 0.9 kJ output of the VULCAN Nd:glass laser to drive 486 μm diameter, 6 μm wall thickness Cu-doped deuterated plastic (CD) shells in 6-beam cubic symmetry. Measurements of the opacity of the compressed plasma using two-dimensional spatially resolved Ti-Kα x-ray radiography suggest that densities of 4 g cm-3 and areal densities of 40 mg cm-2 were achieved at stagnation. Upper limits on the heating with both 1 ps and 10 ps pulses were deduced from the fluorescent yield from the Cu dopant. The data suggest that control of the preformed plasma scale-length inside the cone is necessary for efficient coupling to the compressed plasma

  8. Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

  9. Advanced k-epsilon modeling of heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Okey; Ames, Forrest E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes two approaches to low Reynolds-number k-epsilon turbulence modeling which formulate the eddy viscosity on the wall-normal component of turbulence and a length scale. The wall-normal component of turbulence is computed via integration of the energy spectrum based on the local dissipation rate and is bounded by the isotropic condition. The models account for the anisotropy of the dissipation and the reduced mixing length due to the high strain rates present in the near-wall region. The turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate were computed from the k and epsilon transport equations of Durbin. The models were tested for a wide range of turbulent flows and proved to be superior to other k-epsilon models, especially for nonequilibrium anisotropic flows. For the prediction of airfoil heat transfer, the models included a set of empirical correlations for predicting laminar-turbulent transition and laminar heat transfer augmentation due to the presence of freestream turbulence. The predictions of surface heat transfer were generally satisfactory.

  10. Heat engine requirements for advanced solar thermal power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Pham, H. Q.

    1981-01-01

    Requirements and constraints are established for power conversion subsystems, including heat engine, alternator and auxiliaries, of dish concentrator solar thermal power systems. In order to be competitive with conventional power systems, it is argued that the heat engine should be of less than 40 kW rated output, in a subsystem with an efficiency of at least 40% at rated output and at least 37% at half power. An interval between major overhauls of 50,000 hours is also desirable, along with minor maintenance and lubrication not more than four times a year requiring no more than one man-hour each time, and optimal reliability. Also found to be important are the capability for hybrid operation using heat from a solar receiver, fuel-fired combustor or both simultaneously, operation at any attitude, stability to transients in input power and output loading, operation at ambient temperatures from -30 to 50 C, and compatibility with environmental and safety requirements. Cost targets include a price of $180/kWe, and operation, maintenance and replacement costs averaging $0.001/kWh for 30 years of operation.

  11. Simulation analysis of a repowered double fuel CHP plant including a non-evaporative heat recovery boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszka, M.; Szargut, J. [Silesian Univ. of Technology, Gliwice (Poland). Inst. of Thermal Technology

    2004-07-01

    A repowering analysis of a conventional, coal-fired industrial combined heat and power (CHP) plant by means of a gas turbine (GT) and heat recovery boiler (HRB) has been taken into consideration. The existing system, operating in one of the Polish chemical factories consists of coal-fired boilers, back-pressure extraction turbines, condensing turbines and steam-fed district heat exchangers. Two variants of modernization have been proposed and examined from the thermodynamic, environmental protection and economical points of view. The first one includes HRB for preheating the boiler feed water, condensate, and district water, while the steam turbine (ST) system and coal boilers work without any structural changes. The other advanced variant introduces live steam superheaters to HRB. The coal-fired boilers, in this light, supply only saturated steam (which is introduced into HRB), so they have to be readjusted by replacing the existing superheaters with convective vaporizers for proper flue gas cooling. Such a scheme ensures a considerable reduction of exergy losses in HRB and therefore leads to deeper flue gas cooling and a decrease of coal consumption for the assumed process steam and district heat demands. Heat and process steam demand duration curves for a typical year of operation of the plant have been adapted as input data. The mathematical model of the whole CHP plant has been built on GateCycle and Visual Basic software. The model includes design and off design analyses of boilers, steam and gas turbines and also takes into account shut-down necessities, concerning machines during their operation outside the acceptable area of their key parameters (e.g. the minimum steam flow in the condensing section of the turbines from the point of view of rotor cooling). The computation was run many times for different sets of input data, read from the demand duration curves. Finally, the yearly values of solid and gaseous fuel consumption, as well as electricity

  12. Conventional and advanced exergoenvironmental analysis of an ammonia-water hybridabsorption-compression heat pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Markussen, Wiebke Brix; Reinholdt, Lars; Elmegaard, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The ammonia-water hybrid absorption-compression heat pump (HACHP) is a technology suitable for industrial scale heat pumps in the process industry. A helpful tool in the design of cost effective and low environmental impact energy conversion systems, such as the HACHP, is the application of an...... to allocate the initial and operational environmental impact to the system components, thus revealing the main sources of environmental impact. The application of the advanced exergoenvironmental analysis improves the level of detail attained.This is achieved by accounting for technological and...... advanced exergy-based analysis, comprised of both an advanced exergy, exergoeconomic and exergoenvironmental analysis. Recent studies have presented both the advanced exergy and advanced exergoeconmic analysis of the HACHP. Anexergoenvironmental analysis combines exergy analysis with life cycle assessment...

  13. Application of Reservoir Characterization and Advanced Technology to Improve Recovery and Economics in a Lower Quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Class 2 Project at West Welch was designed to demonstrate the use of advanced technologies to enhance the economics of improved oil recovery (IOR) projects in lower quality Shallow Shelf Carbonate (SSC) reservoirs, resulting in recovery of additional oil that would otherwise be left in the reservoir at project abandonment. Accurate reservoir description is critical to the effective evaluation and efficient design of IOR projects in the heterogeneous SSC reservoirs. Therefore, the majority of Budget Period 1 was devoted to reservoir characterization. Technologies being demonstrated include: (1) Advanced petrophysics; (2) Three dimensional (3-D) seismic; (3) Cross-well bore tomography; (4) Advanced reservoir simulation; (5) Carbon dioxide (CO2) stimulation treatments; (6) Hydraulic fracturing design and monitoring; and (7) Mobility control agents

  14. Advanced Simulation of Electron Heat Transport in Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E x B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  15. Advanced simulation of electron heat transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport in burning plasmas is more important since fusion products first heat electrons. First-principles simulations of electron turbulence are much more challenging due to the multi-scale dynamics of the electron turbulence, and have been made possible by close collaborations between plasma physicists and computational scientists. The GTC simulations of collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM) turbulence show that the electron heat transport exhibits a gradual transition from Bohm to gyroBohm scaling when the device size is increased. The deviation from the gyroBohm scaling can be induced by large turbulence eddies, turbulence spreading, and non-diffusive transport processes. Analysis of radial correlation function shows that CTEM turbulence eddies are predominantly microscopic but with a significant tail in the mesoscale. A comprehensive analysis of kinetic and fluid time scales shows that zonal flow shearing is the dominant decorrelation mechanism. The mesoscale eddies result from a dynamical process of linear streamers breaking by zonal flows and merging of microscopic eddies. The radial profile of the electron heat conductivity only follows the profile of fluctuation intensity on a global scale, whereas the ion transport tracks more sensitively the local fluctuation intensity. This suggests the existence of a nondiffusive component in the electron heat flux, which arises from the ballistic radial E X B drift of trapped electrons due to a combination of the presence of mesoscale eddies and the weak de-tuning of the toroidal precessional resonance that drives the CTEM instability. On the other hand, the ion radial excursion is not affected by the mesoscale eddies due to a parallel decorrelation, which is not operational for the trapped electrons because of a bounce averaging process associated with the electron fast motion along magnetic field lines. The presence of the nondiffusive component raises question on the applicability of the usual

  16. Technical Subtopic 2.1: Modeling Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump and Heat Recovery Equipment in EnergyPlus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raustad, Richard; Nigusse, Bereket; Domitrovic, Ron

    2013-09-30

    The University of Central Florida/Florida Solar Energy Center, in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute and several variable-refrigerant-flow heat pump (VRF HP) manufacturers, provided a detailed computer model for a VRF HP system in the United States Department of Energy's (U.S. DOE) EnergyPlus? building energy simulation tool. Detailed laboratory testing and field demonstrations were performed to measure equipment performance and compare this performance to both the manufacturer's data and that predicted by the use of this new model through computer simulation. The project goal was to investigate the complex interactions of VRF HP systems from an HVAC system perspective, and explore the operational characteristics of this HVAC system type within a laboratory and real world building environment. Detailed laboratory testing of this advanced HVAC system provided invaluable performance information which does not currently exist in the form required for proper analysis and modeling. This information will also be useful for developing and/or supporting test standards for VRF HP systems. Field testing VRF HP systems also provided performance and operational information pertaining to installation, system configuration, and operational controls. Information collected from both laboratory and field tests were then used to create and validate the VRF HP system computer model which, in turn, provides architects, engineers, and building owners the confidence necessary to accurately and reliably perform building energy simulations. This new VRF HP model is available in the current public release version of DOE?s EnergyPlus software and can be used to investigate building energy use in both new and existing building stock. The general laboratory testing did not use the AHRI Standard 1230 test procedure and instead used an approach designed to measure the field installed full-load operating performance. This projects test methodology used the air

  17. Performance analysis of different high-temperature heat pump systems for low-grade waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different heat pump systems were used to recover the heat from waste water with mean temperature of 45 °C and produce hot water with the temperature up to 95 °C. Those systems include single-stage vapor compression heat pump (system 1), two-stage heat pump with external heat exchanger (system 2), two-stage heat pump with refrigerant injection (system 3), two-stage heat pump with refrigerant injection and internal heat exchanger (system 4), two-stage heat pump with flash tank (system 5) and two-stage heat pump with flash tank and intercooler (system 6). Thermodynamic and economic analyses were conducted to compare the performance of each system. Results showed that the COP and exergy efficiency for both system 5 and system 6 are quite close, and much higher than those of other systems. Besides, the payback period of both system 5 and system 6 are also shorter as compared to other systems. Considering both the thermodynamic performance and economic quality of the system, system 5 is finally preferred since less initial investment is required for system 5 as compared to system 6. - Highlights: • Different heat pump systems were introduced to recover the heat of waste water. • Thermodynamic and economic performances of those systems were analyzed and compared. • The two-stage heat pump system with flash tank was preferred

  18. Risk analysis of heat recovery steam generator with semi quantitative risk based inspection API 581

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayogo, Galang Sandy; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a major problem that most often occurs in the power plant. Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is an equipment that has a high risk to the power plant. The impact of corrosion damage causing HRSG power plant stops operating. Furthermore, it could be threaten the safety of employees. The Risk Based Inspection (RBI) guidelines by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 58 has been used to risk analysis in the HRSG 1. By using this methodology, the risk that caused by unexpected failure as a function of the probability and consequence of failure can be estimated. This paper presented a case study relating to the risk analysis in the HRSG, starting with a summary of the basic principles and procedures of risk assessment and applying corrosion RBI for process industries. The risk level of each HRSG equipment were analyzed: HP superheater has a medium high risk (4C), HP evaporator has a medium-high risk (4C), and the HP economizer has a medium risk (3C). The results of the risk assessment using semi-quantitative method of standard API 581 based on the existing equipment at medium risk. In the fact, there is no critical problem in the equipment components. Damage mechanisms were prominent throughout the equipment is thinning mechanism. The evaluation of the risk approach was done with the aim of reducing risk by optimizing the risk assessment activities.

  19. Integrated Energy and Emission Management for Diesel Engines with Waste Heat Recovery Using Dynamic Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Frank

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rankine-cycle Waste Heat Recovery (WHR systems are promising solutions to reduce fuel consumption for trucks. Due to coupling between engine and WHR system, control of these complex systems is challenging. This study presents an integrated energy and emission management strategy for an Euro-VI Diesel engine with WHR system. This Integrated Powertrain Control (IPC strategy optimizes the CO2-NOx trade-off by minimizing online the operational costs associated with fuel and AdBlue consumption. Contrary to other control studies, the proposed control strategy optimizes overall engine-aftertreatment-WHR system performance and deals with emission constraints. From simulations, the potential of this IPC strategy is demonstrated over a World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC using a high-fidelity simulation model. These results are compared with a state-of-the-art baseline engine control strategy. By applying the IPC strategy, an additional 2.6% CO2 reduction is achieved compare to the baseline strategy, while meeting the tailpipe NOx emission limit. In addition, the proposed low-level WHR controller is shown to deal with the cold start challenges.

  20. Cold start-up condition model for heat recovery steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dynamic modeling of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) during cold start-up operation in Combined Cycle Power Plant (CCPP) is introduced. In order to characterize the essential dynamic behavior of the HRSG during cold start-up; Dynamic equations of all HRSG's components are developed based on energy and mass balances. To describe precisely the operation of HRSG; a method based on nonlinear estimated functions for thermodynamic properties is applied to estimate the model parameters. Model parameters are evaluated by a designed algorithm based on Genetic Algorithm (GA). A wide set of experimental data is used to validate HRSG model during cold start-up operation. The simulation results show the reliability and validity of the developed model for cold start-up operation. - Highlights: •Presenting a mathematical model for HRSGs cold start-up based on energy and mass balances. •A designed parameter identification algorithm based on GA is presented. •Application of experimental data in order to model and validate simulation results

  1. Combined heating and chemical treatment for oil recovery from aging crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chunjuan; Jiang, Qingzhe; Song, Zhaozheng; Tan, Guorong; Shi, Zhan

    2016-07-01

    With increasing use of chemical oil displacement agents in tertiary recovery and the application of various demulsifiers for crude oil dehydration, a large amount of aging crude oil containing a high ratio of water is produced, and it is very difficult for processing and utilisation. In this article, we chose aging crude oil samples from a union station in an oilfield in China. Sample composition was analysed to demonstrate that the key of aging crude oil dehydration is the removal of solid impurities. Thus, an efficient method of combining heating and chemical treatments was developed to treat aging crude oil. It includes two steps: The first step is washing of aging crude oil with hot water with sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate; the second step is chemical demulsification of the above mixture with hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride solution. The result showed that 2.9% of solid impurities and 29.2% of water were removed in the first step; 27.2% of oil, 24.3% of water, and 3.47% of solid impurities in the aging crude oil were recycled in the second step. A total 87.07% of aging crude oil could be solved with this method. The present two-step treatment method can ensure that the dehydration process runs normally and efficiently in the union station, making it a promising method in the recycling of aging crude oil. PMID:27236165

  2. A new conceptual cold-end design of boilers for coal-fired power plants with waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new cold-end design of boilers for CFPPs with waste heat recovery is proposed. • Thermodynamic and economic analyses are quantitatively conducted. • Higher energy efficiency improvement and greater economic benefits are achieved. • Lower exergy destruction and better matched energy level are obtained. - Abstract: After conducting an in-depth analysis of the conventional boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery, this work proposed a new conceptual boiler cold-end design integrated with the steam cycle in a 1000 MW CFPP, in which the preheating of air was divided into high-temperature air preheater (HTAP), main air preheater (MAP) and low-temperature air preheater (LTAP). The HTAP and an economizer were installed in separate flue ducts, and the low temperature economizer (LTE) was situated between the MAP and the LTAP in the main flue duct to heat the condensed water. In the proposed boiler cold-end design, the flue gas waste heat was not only used to heat condensed water, but also to further preheat the combustion air. The air temperature at the air-preheater outlet increases and part of the steam bleeds with high exergy can be saved, resulting in greater energy-savings and better economics. Results showed that, for a typical 1000 MW CFPP in China, using the proposed boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery could produce 13.3 MWe additional net power output with a heat rate reduction of approximately 112.0 kJ/kW h and could yield a net benefit of up to $85.8 M per year, which is much greater than those of the conventional cases. Exergy destruction is also reduced from 49.9 MWth in the conventional boiler cold-end design to 39.6 MWth in the proposed design

  3. Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Seltzer

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by natural circulation to the waterwalls and divisional wall panels. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) without over-fire air and (2) with 20% over-fire air. The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from carbon steel to T91. The total heat transfer surface required in the oxygen-fired heat recovery area (HRA) is 25% less than the air-fired HRA due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are practically the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are very similar.

  4. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  5. Effect of process parameters on energy performance of spray drying with exhaust air heat recovery for production of high value particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study heat recovery from spray dryer using air-to-air heat exchanger. • We examine dryer energy performance using advanced mathematical model. • We use the response surface methodology to study the effect of process parameters. • Energy efficiency up to 43.3% is obtained at high flow rate of dilute slurry. • Energy saving up to 52.4% is obtained at high drying air temperature. - Abstract: Spray drying process has been widely used in various industries for many decades for production of numerous materials. This paper explores the energy performance of an industrial scale spray dryer equipped with an exhaust air heat recovery system for production of high value particles. Energy efficiency and energy saving were calculated using a comprehensive mathematical model of spray drying. The response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to study the effect of process parameters on energy performance using a space-filling design. The meta model equations were formulated employing the well-fitted response surface equations with adjusted R2 larger than 0.995. The energy efficiency as high as 43.3% was obtained at high flow rate of dilute slurry, while the highest energy saving of 52.4% was found by combination of positive effect of drying air temperature and negative effect of slurry mass flow rate. The utilization of efficient air-to-air heat exchanger leads to an increase in energy efficiency and energy savings. The detailed temperature and vapor concentration profiles obtained with the model are also valuable in determining final product quality when spray dryer is operated at energy efficient conditions

  6. How can the heat transfer correlations for finned-tubes influence the numerical simulation of the dynamic behavior of a heat recovery steam generator?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical investigation on the influence of different heat transfer correlations for finned-tubes to the dynamic behavior of a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The investigation was done for a vertical type natural circulation HRSG with 3 pressure stages under hot start-up and shutdown conditions. For the calculation of the flue gas-side heat transfer coefficient the well known correlations for segmented finned-tubes according to Schmidt, VDI and ESCOATM (traditional and revised) as well as a new correlation, which was developed at the Institute for Energy Systems and Thermodynamics, are used. The simulation results show a good agreement in the overall behavior of the boiler between the different correlations. But there are still some important differences found in the detail analysis of the boiler behavior. - Research highlights: → Numerical simulation is performed to explore the influence of different heat transfer correlations for finned-tubes to the dynamic behavior of a heat recovery steam generator. → Differences in the steam generator behavior are found. → In the worst case the boiler can lead to unfavorable operation conditions, e.g. reverse flow.

  7. Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

  8. Advanced heat pumps and their economic aspects. The case for super heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the economic evaluation of the Super Heat Pump Energy Accumulation System project in Japan are reviewed. It is reported that although the initial costs of super heat pumps are higher than those of conventional systems, the calculated operating costs of a unit thermal energy produced by a super heat pump is reduced considerably. All the various system concepts with thermal/chemical storage were evaluated economically with the exception of the high temperature thermal storage systems using salt ammonia complexes and solvation. These latter systems were not further developed as pilot plants. It is advocated to accelerate the introduction of super heat pumps by facilitating their market introduction. Actual clathrate chemical storage systems have shown that the annual costs are comparable to those of an ice storage system. Clathrate systems will find their way in the market. It is concluded that most of the super heat pump systems and clathrate storage systems will be economic in the future. A big challenge however still exists in further improving the cost effectiveness of heat storage in tanks by reducing their size dramatically (to 1/10th)

  9. Numerical Study on Crossflow Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various fluids such as water, gases (helium), molten salts (FLiNaK, FLiBe) and liquid metal (sodium) are used as a coolant of advanced small modular reactors (SMRs). The printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) has been adopted as the intermediate and/or secondary heat exchanger of SMR systems because this heat exchanger is compact and effective. The size and cost of PCHE can be changed by the coolant type of each SMR. In this study, the crossflow PCHE analysis code for advanced small modular reactor has been developed for the thermal design and cost estimation of the heat exchanger. The analytical solution of single pass, both unmixed fluids crossflow heat exchanger model was employed to calculate a two dimensional temperature profile of a crossflow PCHE. The analytical solution of crossflow heat exchanger was simply implemented by using built in function of the MATLAB program. The effect of fluid property uncertainty on the calculation results was evaluated. In addition, the effect of heat transfer correlations on the calculated temperature profile was analyzed by taking into account possible combinations of primary and secondary coolants in the SMR systems. Size and cost of heat exchanger were evaluated for the given temperature requirement of each SMR

  10. Korea Superconducting tokamak advanced research project - Development of heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    The heating and current drive systems for KSTAR based on multiple technologies (neutral beam, ion cyclotron, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron) have been designed to provide heating and current drive capabilities as well as flexibility in the control of current density and pressure profiles needed to meet the mission and research objectives of the machine. They are designed to operate for long-pulse lengths of up to 300 s. The NBI system initially delivers 8 MW of neutral beam power to the plasma from one co-directed beam line and shall be upgraded to provide 20 MW of neutral beam power with two co-directed beam lines plus one counter-directed beam line. It will be capable of being reconfigured such that the source arrangement is changed from horizontal to vertical stacking, with 6 MW beam power to the plasmas per beam line, in order to facilitate profile control. The RF system initially delivers 6 MW of rf power to the plasma, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. The system will be upgraded to proved 12 MW of rf power through 2 adjacent ports. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of RF system and the system have the capabilities to be operationable for pulse length up to 300 sec and in the 25-60 MHz frequency range. Lower hybrid system initially provides 1.5 MW LH rf power to the plasma at 3.7 GHz through a horizontal port, which has a capability to be operated for pulse length up to 300 sec, and shall be upgraded to provide 4.5 MW of LH rf power to the plasma. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of LHCD system which incorporate the TPX-type launcher and independently phase-changeable transmission system for the fully phased coupler. The ECH system will deliver up to 0.5 MW of power to the plasma for up to 0.5 sec. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of ECH system which includes an 84 GHz gyrotron system, a transmission system, and a launcher. The basic design of the low loss transmission system

  11. Recent Advances in the long pulse heating and current drive system for KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heating and current-drive systems of KSTAR tokamak have been developed to support long pulse, high β, advanced tokamak physics experiments. Key technologies relevant for high power and long-pulse operation are under development. Substantial progresses have been made in areas such as ion source, RF launchers, tuning components and high power supplies and they will make the advanced tokamak operation of the KSTAR be obtainable and maintained for long-pulse operating condition. (author)

  12. Calculation of Efficiencies of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirko Grljušić; Vladimir Medica; Gojmir Radica

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the possibility of a combined heat & power (CHP) plant, using the waste heat from a Suezmax-size oil tanker’s main engine, to meet all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency, combined with a supercritical Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system, was selected to supply the auxiliary power, using R245fa or R123 as the working fluid. ...

  13. Thermodynamic Analysis of a Ship Power Plant Operating with Waste Heat Recovery through Combined Heat and Power Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirko Grljušić; Vladimir Medica; Nikola Račić

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to study a cogeneration plant for combined heat & power (CHP) production that utilises the low-temperature waste energy in the power plant of a Suezmax-size oil tanker for all heating and electricity requirements during navigation. After considering various configurations, a standard propulsion engine operating at maximum efficiency and a CHP Plant with R245fa fluid using a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is selected. All the ship heat requirements ...

  14. Naturally-Forced Slug Flow Expander for Application in a Waste-Heat Recovery Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben de Witt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a slug-flow expander (SFE for conversion of high-pressure gas/vapor into kinetic energy of liquid slugs. The energy transfer from high-pressure to kinetic energy is quantified using thrust plate measurements. Non-dimensional thrust data is used to quantify performance by normalizing measured thrust by thrust for the same water flow rate at zero air flow rate. A total of 13 expander configurations are investigated and geometries with the shortest cavity length and the smallest exit diameter are found to result in the largest non-dimensional thrust increase. Results show that thrust augmentation increases with the initiation of slug flow in the SFE. The analysis performed on the normalized thrust readings suggested that as the water and air flow were increased to critical conditions, the liquid slugs produced by the SFE augmented the thrust measurements. The final performance evaluation was based on linear regression of the normalized thrust measurements where slug flow was generated for each SFE architecture. Greater magnitudes of the slope from the linear regression indicated the propensity of the SFE to augment thrust. This analysis confirmed that for the SFE configurations over the range of values investigated, the SFE increased thrust up to three times its original value at no air flow. Given the inherent multiphase nature of the slug-flow expander, application to systems involving expansion of wetting fluids (water as part of a waste-heat recovery system or air with water droplet formation (as part of a compressed-air energy storage system could be considered.

  15. The environmental impact of organic Rankine cycle for waste heat recovery through life-cycle assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LCA (life-cycle assessment) was applied to evaluate EI (the environmental impact) of ORCPW (organic Rankine cycle power-plant for waste-heat-recovery) in this paper. The model of LCA on the ORCPW was established. The life-cycle of ORCPW was divided into construction, operation and decommissioning phases. The inventory of environmental emissions was listed for the ORCPW with 7 different working fluids. The GWP (global warming potential), AP (acidification potential), EP (eutrophication potential), HTP (human toxicity potential), SWP (solid waste potential) and SAP (soot and dust potential) were investigated. Some EIs of ORCPW were compared with the EIs of other power generation modes. The results show that the construction phase of ORCPW contributes mostly to the GWP and EP. GWP is the most serious EI followed by HTP among all the environmental impacts. The average pay back times of greenhouse gas discharged from ORCPW is calculated on the basis of five other power generation modes. For 7 different working fluids, it is 3–5 years for CO2, about one year for CH4 and 3–6 years for NOx. But CO cannot be paid back during the life-cycle of ORCPW according to the average pay back time. - Highlights: • LCA was proposed to evaluate the environmental performance of ORC. • The ORC life cycle environmental emissions inventory was established. • GWP is the most serious environmental impact, followed by HTP. • The ORC with R113 exhibits the lowest environment impact load, followed by Pentane. • The total GWP of ORC could be paid back in 5 years

  16. Energy and economic analysis of total energy systems for residential and commercial buildings. [utilizing waste heat recovery techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maag, W. L.; Bollenbacher, G.

    1974-01-01

    Energy and economic analyses were performed for an on-site power-plant with waste heat recovery. The results show that for any specific application there is a characteristic power conversion efficiency that minimizes fuel consumption, and that efficiencies greater than this do not significantly improve fuel consumption. This type of powerplant appears to be a reasonably attractive investment if higher fuel costs continue.

  17. Demonstration of the Performance of an Air-Type Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT System Coupled with a Heat-Recovery Ventilator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A heat-recovery ventilator (HRV effectively conducts ventilation by recovering waste heat from indoors to outdoors during heating periods. However, dew condensation associated with the HRV system may arise due to the difference between the indoor temperature and the very low outdoor temperature in winter, and this can decrease the heat exchange efficiency. These problems can be solved by the pre-heating of the incoming air, but additional energy is required when pursuing such a strategy. On the other hand, an air-type photovoltaic thermal (PVT system produces electricity and thermal energy simultaneously using air as the heat transfer medium. Moreover, the heated air from the air-type PVT system can be connected to the HRV to pre-heat the supply air instead of taking in the cold outdoor air. Thus, the ventilation efficiency can be improved and the problems arising during the heating period can be resolved. Consequentially, the heating energy required in a building can be reduced, with additional electricity acquired as well. In this paper, the performance of an air-type PVT system coupled with an HRV is assessed. To do this, air-type PVT collectors operating at 1 kWp were installed in an experimental house and coupled to an HRV system. Thermal performance and heating energy required during the winter season were analyzed experimentally. Furthermore, the electrical performances of the air-type PVT system with and without ventilation at the back side of the PV during the summer season were analyzed.

  18. A study of natural circulation in the evaporator of a horizontal-tube heat recovery steam generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Pleshanov, K. A.; Sterkhov, K. V.

    2014-07-01

    Results obtained from investigations of stable natural circulation in an intricate circulation circuit with a horizontal layout of the tubes of evaporating surface having a negative useful head are presented. The possibility of making a shift from using multiple forced circulation organized by means of a circulation pump to natural circulation in vertical heat recovery steam generator is estimated. Criteria for characterizing the performance reliability and efficiency of a horizontal evaporator with negative useful head are proposed. The influence of various design solutions on circulation robustness is considered. With due regard of the optimal parameters, the most efficient and least costly methods are proposed for achieving more stable circulation in a vertical heat recovery steam generator when a shift is made from multiple forced to natural circulation. A procedure for calculating the circulation parameters and an algorithm for checking evaporator performance reliability are developed, and recommendations for the design of heat recovery steam generator, nonheated parts of natural circulation circuit, and evaporating surface are suggested.

  19. Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Rosenberry, Harris Companies

    2012-05-04

    A large centralized geothermal heat pump system was installed to provide ice making, space cooling, space heating, process water heating, and domestic hot water heating for an ice arena in Eagan Minnesota. This paper provides information related to the design and construction of the project. Additionally, operating conditions for 12 months after start-up are provided.

  20. Calucaltion of waste heat from hot rolled steel coils at SSAB and its recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Yousaf, Naeem

    2009-01-01

    Hot rolling process is heat input process. The heat energy in hot rolled steel coils can be utilized. At SSAB Strip Product Borlänge when the hot rolled steel coils came out of the hot rolling mill they are at the temperature range of 500°C to 800°C. Heat energy contained by the one hot rolled steel coil is about 1981Kwh whereas the total heat energy for the year 2008 is 230 GWh/year.The potential of heat is too much but the heat dissipation rate is too slow. Different factors on which heat ...

  1. Heat recovery with heat pumps in non-energy intensive industry: A detailed bottom-up model analysis in the French food and drink industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First bottom-up energy model for NEI at 4-digit level of NACE for energy analysis. • Energy end-use modelling due to the unsuitability of end-product/process approach. • Analysis of heat recovery with HP on industrial processes up to 2020 in French F and D. • Energy consumption and emissions drop respectively by 10% compared to 2001 and 9% to 1990. • Results only achieved at heat temperature below 100 °C, concentrated in 1/3 of F and D sectors. - Abstract: Rising energy prices and environmental impacts inevitably encourage industrials to get involved in promoting energy efficiency and emissions reductions. To achieve this goal, we have developed the first detailed bottom-up energy model for Non-Energy Intensive industry (NEI) to study its global energy efficiency and the potential for CO2 emissions reduction at a 4-digit level of NACE classification. The latter, which is generally neglected in energy analyses, is expected to play an important role in reducing industry energy intensity in the long term due to its economic and energy significance and relatively high growth rate. In this paper, the modelling of NEI is done by energy end-use owing to the unsuitability of the end-product/process approach used in the Energy Intensive industry modelling. As an example, we analysed the impact of heat recovery with heat pumps (HP) on industrial processes up to 2020 on energy savings and CO2 emissions reductions in the French food and drink industry (F and D), the biggest NEI sector. The results showed HP could be an excellent and very promising energy recovery technology. For further detailed analysis, the depiction of HP investment cost payments is given per temperature range for each F and D subsector. This model constitutes a useful decision-making tool for assessing potential energy savings from investing in efficient technologies at the highest level of disaggregation, as well as a better subsectoral screening

  2. Comparison of supplements to enhance recovery of heat-injured Salmonella from egg albumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recovery of Salmonella from liquid egg white (LEW) is complicated by thermal and innate LEW antimicrobial-induced injury. Numerous supplements have been reported to promote the recovery of injured bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of twelve media supplements to af...

  3. Suppressing sub-bandgap phonon-polariton heat transfer in near-field thermophotovoltaic devices for waste heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-08-01

    We consider a near-field thermophotovoltaic device with metal as the emitter and semiconductor as the photovoltaic cell. We show that when the cell is a III-V semiconductor, such as GaSb, parasitic phonon-polariton heat transfer reduces efficiency in the near-field regime, especially when the temperature of the emitter is not high enough. We further propose ways to avoid the phonon-polariton heat transfer by replacing the III-V semiconductor with a non-polar semiconductor such as Ge. Our work provides practical guidance on the design of near-field thermophotovoltaic systems for efficient harvesting of low-quality waste heat.

  4. Advanced electric heat pump dual-stroke compressor and system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyo, S. E.; Fagan, T. J.

    1983-12-01

    The development of an advanced electric heat pump is discussed. A two-capacity, residential, advanced electric heat pump utilizing a unique dual-stroke compressor was developed. Two nearly identical preprototype split systems of nominally 3.5 tons maximum cooling capacity were designed, built and laboratory tested. The estimated annual energy efficiency of this advanced system is 20 percent better than a two-speed electric heat pump available at contract inception in 1979. This superior performance is due to the synergism of a high-efficiency, dual-stroke reciprocating compressor, a dual-strength high-efficiency single-speed single-phase hermetic drive motor, a single-width, single-entry high-efficiency indoor blower with backward curved cambered plate blades, a high-efficiency multivane axial flow outdoor fan, high-efficiency two-speed air mover motors and a microprocessor control system. The relative proportions of heat exchangers, air flows and compressor size as well as the ratio between high and low capacity were optimized so as to minimize the annual cost of ownership in a northern climate. Constraints placed upon the optimization and design process to ensure comfort provide heating air with a temperature of at least 90(0)F and provide cooling with a sensible-to-total capacity ratio of not more than 0.7. System performance was measured in the laboratory in accordance with applicable codes and procedures. Performance data plus hardware details are provided.

  5. Heat recovery from a spray dryer using a glass tube heat exchanger. A demonstration at ABM Chemicals, Gloucester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This project at ABM Chemicals demonstrates the use of a glass tube heat exchanger to recover heat directly from a spray dryer exhaust to pre-heat the inlet air. It was originally envisaged that this would reduce the energy consumption of the dryer by around 20%. The background to the project, the results to date, corrosive nature of exhaust and expected savings are discussed. Reduced performance, believed to be due to a higher-than-anticipated level of fines in the exhaust, leading to fouling of the heat transfer surfaces, and eventually to the failure of a number of the glass tubes is described. Measures are currently in hand to reduce the carryover and further monitoring of the replacement exchanger is planned.

  6. Potential for improving the energy efficiency of cryogenic air separation unit (ASU) using binary heat recovery cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the potential of improving the energy efficiency of a conventional cryogenic air separation unit (ASU) was investigated through modelling and simulation using Aspen Plus® v 8.1. It is achieved through converting the heat from the compressor effluent to electricity using organic Ranking cycle (ORC). Two different arrangements of combining compressor and waste heat recovery ORC system were compared with the conventional cryogenic ASU which was used as the benchmark. The benchmark is a conventional cryogenic ASU with 3 stages of compression which uses water for intercooling. In the first arrangement the water used as the cooling fluid of the intercooler/after cooler heat exchanger of a conventional cryogenic ASU process was replaced by R134a which also acts as the working fluid for the ORC system (C3WHR) while in the second arrangement, the 3 stages compressor of the conventional process was replaced with a single stage compressor with the same overall pressure ratio as the conventional process and the hot compressor effluent cooled with R134a which also acts as the working fluid of the ORC system (C1WHR). The simulation results based on a cryogenic ASU capable of processing 100 kg/s of atmospheric air at 30 °C as feedstock show that the specific power consumption for the pure products which was 0.32 kWh/kg, 0.37 kWh/kg and 17.35 kWh/kg for oxygen, nitrogen and argon respectively for the conventional cryogenic ASU process was reduced by the addition of the waste heat recovery ORC system. The C1WHR reduced the specific power consumption by an average of 0.2% across the aforementioned pure products while the C3WHR reduced it by an average of 11%. The net power consumption of the conventional cryogenic ASU which was 21826.19 kW was also found to be reduced by the same percentage. - Highlights: • We model two cryogenic air separation unit with compressor waste heat recovery. • We compare the specific energy consumption of the models. • We

  7. System analysis and optimisation of a Kalina split-cycle for waste heat recovery on large marine diesel engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Nguyen, Tuong-Van; Knudsen, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Waste heat recovery systems can produce power from heat without using fuel or emitting CO2, therefore their implementation is becoming increasingly relevant. The Kalina cycle is proposed as an efficient process for this purpose. The main reason for its high efficiency is the non-isothermal phase...... process in order to improve the match between the heat source and working fluid temperatures. We present a system analysis to identify the governing mechanisms of the process, including a comparison of the efficiency of the Split-cycle and a conventional Kalina cycle and an investigation of the effects...... of using reheat in both cases. Results of a multi-variable optimisation effort using a genetic algorithm suggest that the Split-cycle process can obtain a thermal efficiency of 23.2% when using reheat compared to 20.8% for a conventional reference Kalina cycle. Reheat can increase the thermal efficiency...

  8. Effect of longwall face advance rate on spontaneous heating process in the gob area - CFD modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boleslav Taraba; Zdenek Michalec [University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-08-15

    A commercial CFD software programme, FLUENT, was used to study the oxidation process of coal in the mined-out longwall (gob) area. A three-dimensional, single-phase model with a continuously advancing longwall face has been developed. For the model, the gob longwall area was designed on the basis of the actual longwall panel operating in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Mines (OKD, Czech Republic). The behaviour of the coal to oxygen was modelled using the results arising mainly from the former laboratory-scale experiments with Czech bituminous coals. Basically, the technique of pulse flow calorimetry and measurements at a continuous airflow reactor were applied during the laboratory investigations. In the contribution, the main focus was to understand the effect of the longwall face advancing speed on the oxidation heat production as well as evolution of the gases in the gob area. Simultaneously, the effect of coal crushing in the mined-out area on the spontaneous heating process was examined. Numerical simulations confirmed the existence of a 'favourable' zone for the onset and development of the spontaneous heating process in the gob area. The location and the maximal temperature reached in the 'favourable' zone were found to be significantly affected by the advancing rate of the coalface. The slower the advancing rate is, the higher the maximal temperature and smaller the depth of the 'favourable' zone in the gob area are. When the rate drops to a certain 'critical' value, spontaneous heating turns to flammable combustion of the coal. The value of the 'critical' advancing rate was confirmed to increase if the grain size of the coal left in the gob decreases. Numerical examinations of carbon monoxide concentrations then proved that small incidents of spontaneous heating could occur in the gob area that need not be detected in the airflow of the longwall tail gate. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A novel pyroelectric generator utilising naturally driven temperature fluctuations from oscillating heat pipes for waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, D.; Taylor, J.; Ayel, V.; Bertin, Y.; Romestant, C.; Bowen, C. R.

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature thermal to electrical energy converters have the potential to provide a route for recovering waste energy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of a thermal harvester that uses a naturally driven thermal oscillator free of mechanical motion and operates between a hot heat source and a cold heat sink. The system exploits a heat induced liquid-vapour transition of a working fluid as a primary driver for a pyroelectric generator. The two-phase instability of a fluid in a closed looped capillary channel of an oscillating heat pipe (OHP) creates pressure differences which lead to local high frequency temperature oscillations in the range of 0.1-5 K. Such temperature changes are suitable for pyroelectric thermal to electrical energy conversion, where the pyroelectric generator is attached to the adiabatic wall of the OHP, thereby absorbing thermal energy from the passing fluid. This new pyroelectric-oscillating heat pipe (POHP) assembly of a low temperature generator continuously operates across a spatial heat source temperature of 55 °C and a heat sink temperature of 25 °C, and enables waste heat recovery and thermal energy harvesting from small temperature gradients at low temperatures. Our electrical measurements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) show an open circuit voltage of 0.4 V (AC) and with lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) an open circuit voltage of 0.8 V (AC) at a frequency of 0.45 Hz, with an energy density of 95 pJ cm-3 for PMN-PT. Our novel POHP device therefore has the capability to convert small quantities of thermal energy into more desirable electricity in the nW to mW range and provides an alternative to currently used batteries or centralised energy generation.

  10. Evaluation of Advanced Stirling Convertor Net Heat Input Correlation Methods Using a Thermal Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) have been developing the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) for use as a power system for space science missions. This generator would use two high-efficiency Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), developed by Sunpower Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The ASCs convert thermal energy from a radioisotope heat source into electricity. As part of ground testing of these ASCs, different operating conditions are used to simulate expected mission conditions. These conditions require achieving a particular operating frequency, hot end and cold end temperatures, and specified electrical power output for a given net heat input. In an effort to improve net heat input predictions, numerous tasks have been performed which provided a more accurate value for net heat input into the ASCs, including testing validation hardware, known as the Thermal Standard, to provide a direct comparison to numerical and empirical models used to predict convertor net heat input. This validation hardware provided a comparison for scrutinizing and improving empirical correlations and numerical models of ASC-E2 net heat input. This hardware simulated the characteristics of an ASC-E2 convertor in both an operating and non-operating mode. This paper describes the Thermal Standard testing and the conclusions of the validation effort applied to the empirical correlation methods used by the Radioisotope Power System (RPS) team at NASA Glenn.

  11. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Wail Aladayleh; Ali Alahmer

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively....

  12. Preliminary Design of Compact Condenser in an Organic Rankine Cycle System for the Low Grade Waste Heat Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Capata

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present a thermodynamic cycle for the production of electrical power in the 2–5 kW range, suitable for all types of thermally propelled vehicles. The sensible heat recovered from the exhaust gases feeds the energy recovery system, which is able to produce sufficient power to sustain the air conditioning system or other auxiliaries. The working fluids R134a and R245fa have been used in the ORC system, and the systems are simulated by CAMEL-ProTM software. The cycles are generated starting from the same heat source: the exhaust gas of a typical 2.0 L Diesel engine (or from a small size turbine engine. The design of the condenser has been performed to obtain a very compact component, evaluating the heat exchanger tube and fins type design. Through empirical formulas, the area of heat exchange, the heat required to exchange and the pressure drop in the element have been calculated. A commercial software package is used to build the model of the condenser, then a thermal and mechanical analysis and a CFD analysis are realized to estimate the heat exchange. Finally the evaluations, the possible future studies and possible improvements of the system are shown.

  13. Advances in uranium ore processing and recovery from non-conventional resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main topics covered by the technical sessions were: in situ and heap leaching, improvements in conventional acid and alkaline uranium ore processing, recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid and recovery of uranium from coal and from natural waters. The technical sessions concluded with three panel discussions dealing with pre-concentration and benefication, in situ and heap leaching, and recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid. The present volume includes 18 of the 27 presented papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  14. Review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer for agriculture produce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past three decades there has been nearly exponential growth in drying R and D on a global scale. Improving of the drying operation to save energy, improve product quality as well as reduce environmental effect remained as the main objectives of any development of drying system. A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is a new solar drying system, which have contributed to better cost-effectiveness and better quality dried products as well as saving energy. A solar collector is adapted to provide thermal energy in a reactor so a chemical reaction can take place. This reduces the dependency of the drying technology on fossil energy for heating. In this paper a review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is presented (the system model and the results from experimental studies on the system performance are discussed). The review of heat pump dryers and solar assisted heat pump dryer is presented. Description of chemical heat pump types and the overview of chemical heat pump dryer are discussed. The combination of chemical heat pump and solar technology gives extra efficiency in utilizing energy. (author)

  15. Review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer for agriculture produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadhel, M.I. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Sopian, K.; Daud, W.R.W.; Alghoul, M.A. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    Over the past three decades there has been nearly exponential growth in drying R and D on a global scale. Improving of the drying operation to save energy, improve product quality as well as reduce environmental effect remained as the main objectives of any development of drying system. A solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is a new solar drying system, which have contributed to better cost-effectiveness and better quality dried products as well as saving energy. A solar collector is adapted to provide thermal energy in a reactor so a chemical reaction can take place. This reduces the dependency of the drying technology on fossil energy for heating. In this paper a review on advanced of solar assisted chemical heat pump dryer is presented (the system model and the results from experimental studies on the system performance are discussed). The review of heat pump dryers and solar assisted heat pump dryer is presented. Description of chemical heat pump types and the overview of chemical heat pump dryer are discussed. The combination of chemical heat pump and solar technology gives extra efficiency in utilizing energy. (author)

  16. Heat recovery from a boiler exhaust to pre-heat air to a spray dryer. A demonstration project at BIP Chemicals Ltd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This demonstration project at BIP Chemicals Ltd., is one of a package of projects being funded by the Energy Efficiency Office of the Department of Energy, under the Energy Efficiency Demonstration Scheme. It involves the recovery of waste heat to pre-heat spray dryer inlet air. It is estimated that the adoption of the technology within the UK will lead to energy savings worth Pound 1.5M/year by 1990. The project at BIP demonstrates the use of a heat pipe exchanger to recover the heat from a boiler exhaust in order to pre-heat the inlet air. Details of the performance of the exchanger and the resulting energy and cost savings at the spray dryer are given, and factors affecting the savings are discussed. This project has shown that the use of a separate boiler exhaust, even if located some 60 m from the dryer, is a practical and cost-effective means of improving the efficiency of a spray dryer.

  17. Modelling, sizing and testing a scroll expander for a waste heat recovery application on a gasoline engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Arnaud; Guillaume, Ludovic; Diny, Mouad; Lemort, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Waste heat recovery technologies in a mobile application emerge every time energy becomes a valuable resource. It has been the case in the 70s with oil crisis and it is starting to regain some interests now due to the continuously rising price of oil and due to the restrictive standards imposed by the different governments. This paper deals with the recovery on the exhaust gases of an internal combustion engine by using a Rankine system. The study focuses on the expander, which is one of the most important components of the system. The use of a scroll expander operating with steam is currently investigated through simulation and experimentation. This paper presents the modelling of a scroll expander. The model is a detailed model including various losses such as leakage, friction or under or over expansion. This model has been used to design and size a tailor-made scroll expander. This was necessary due to the small amount of expanders on the market and also to have a machine that fits our application. After designing the machine, a prototype has been built. It has also been tested on our prototype bench of waste heat recovery on a gasoline engine, by means of a Rankine cycle. Measured performance will be presented, analysed and compared to predictions by the model. The first results will be presented here and discussed in order to give recommendations for the design of next prototypes.

  18. Theoretical evaluation on the impact of heat exchanger in Advanced Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A multi-stage AA-CAES system model is established based on thermodynamic theory. • Four Cases about pressure loss and effectiveness of heat exchanger are investigated. • The impact of pressure loss on conversion of heat energy in TES is more sensitive. • The impact of heat exchanger effectiveness in charge process on system is stronger. • Pressure loss in heat exchanger affects the change trends of system efficiency. - Abstract: Advanced Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (AA-CAES) is a large-scale energy storage system based on gas turbine technology and thermal energy storage (TES). Electrical energy can be converted into internal energy of air and heat energy in TES during the charge process, while reverse energy conversion proceeds during discharge process. The performance of AA-CAES system requires further improvement in order to increase efficiency. In this paper, a multi-stage AA-CAES system model is established, and the influence of effectiveness and pressure loss in heat exchanger on energy conversion and utilization efficiency of AA-CAES system is analyzed theoretically based on the theory of thermodynamics. Four Cases about effectiveness and pressure loss of heat exchanger are investigated and compared with each other. It is found that effectiveness and pressure loss of heat exchanger are directly related to energy conversion and utilization in AA-CAES system. System efficiency changes with the variation of heat exchanger effectiveness and the impact of pressure loss on conversion of heat energy in TES is more sensitive than that of internal energy of air. Pressure loss can cause the complexity of system efficiency change. With appropriate selection of the values of heat exchanger effectiveness for both charge and discharge processes, an AA-CAES system with a higher efficiency could be expected

  19. Waste Heat Recovery and Recycling in Thermal Separation Processes: Distillation, Multi-Effect Evaporation (MEE) and Crystallization Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanuel A. Dada; Chandrakant B. Panchal; Luke K. Achenie; Aaron Reichl; Chris C. Thomas

    2012-12-03

    Evaporation and crystallization are key thermal separation processes for concentrating and purifying inorganic and organic products with energy consumption over 1,000 trillion Btu/yr. This project focused on a challenging task of recovering low-temperature latent heat that can have a paradigm shift in the way thermal process units will be designed and operated to achieve high-energy efficiency and significantly reduce the carbon footprint as well as water footprint. Moreover, this project has evaluated the technical merits of waste-heat powered thermal heat pumps for recovery of latent heat from distillation, multi-effect evaporation (MEE), and crystallization processes and recycling into the process. The Project Team has estimated the potential energy, economics and environmental benefits with the focus on reduction in CO2 emissions that can be realized by 2020, assuming successful development and commercialization of the technology being developed. Specifically, with aggressive industry-wide applications of heat recovery and recycling with absorption heat pumps, energy savings of about 26.7 trillion Btu/yr have been estimated for distillation process. The direct environmental benefits of this project are the reduced emissions of combustible products. The estimated major reduction in environmental pollutants in the distillation processes is in CO2 emission equivalent to 3.5 billion lbs/year. Energy consumption associated with water supply and treatments can vary between 1,900 kWh and 23,700 kWh per million-gallon water depending on sources of natural waters [US DOE, 2006]. Successful implementation of this technology would significantly reduce the demand for cooling-tower waters, and thereby the use and discharge of water treatment chemicals. The Project Team has also identified and characterized working fluid pairs for the moderate-temperature heat pump. For an MEE process, the two promising fluids are LiNO3+KNO3+NANO3 (53:28:19 ) and LiNO3+KNO3+NANO2

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of a cross flow air-to-water heat pipe-based heat exchanger used in waste heat recovery

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ramos; Chong, A.; Jouhara, H

    2016-01-01

    This paper applies CFD modelling and numerical calculations to predict the thermal performance of a cross flow heat pipe based heat exchanger. The heat exchanger under study transfers heat from air to water and it is equipped with six water-charged wickless heat pipes, with a single-pass flow pattern on the air side (evaporator) and two flow passes on the water side (condenser). For the purpose of CFD modelling, the heat pipes were considered as solid devices of a known thermal conductivity w...

  1. Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based PC Boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Supercritical Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE, Siemens, and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by forced circulation to the waterwalls at the periphery and divisional wall panels within the furnace. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) with cryogenic air separation unit (ASU) and (2) with oxygen ion transport membrane (OITM). The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H2O and CO2 concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O2. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from T2 to T92. Compared to the air-fired heat recovery area (HRA), the oxygen-fired HRA total heat transfer surface is 35% less for the cryogenic design and 13% less for the OITM design due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are nearly the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are similar

  2. Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Supercritical O2-Based PC Boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Seltzer

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Supercritical Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE, Siemens, and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by forced circulation to the waterwalls at the periphery and divisional wall panels within the furnace. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) with cryogenic air separation unit (ASU) and (2) with oxygen ion transport membrane (OITM). The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from T2 to T92. Compared to the air-fired heat recovery area (HRA), the oxygen-fired HRA total heat transfer surface is 35% less for the cryogenic design and 13% less for the OITM design due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are nearly the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are similar.

  3. Recent advance on the efficiency at maximum power of heat engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review reports several key advances on the theoretical investigations of efficiency at maximum power of heat engines in the past five years. The analytical results of efficiency at maximum power for the Curzon—Ahlborn heat engine, the stochastic heat engine constructed from a Brownian particle, and Feynman's ratchet as a heat engine are presented. It is found that: the efficiency at maximum power exhibits universal behavior at small relative temperature differences; the lower and the upper bounds might exist under quite general conditions; and the problem of efficiency at maximum power comes down to seeking for the minimum irreversible entropy production in each finite-time isothermal process for a given time. (review)

  4. Recovery and recrystallization in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldments after post-weld heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Qiuzhi; Di Xinjie [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Liu Yongchang, E-mail: licmtju@163.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yan Zesheng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Jointing Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2012-05-15

    The Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is indispensable to the as-welded joints in fabricating high-temperature structural components of steam power plants. The microstructural evolution and the relationship between the formed precipitates and the recovery and recrystallization of welded joints after PWHT have been studied in details. It is found that the recovery and recrystallization occurring at above 730 Degree-Sign C/2 h led to fragmentation of martensite laths and thus formation of equiaxed grains. Only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates were observed in the weldments according to the X-ray diffraction results of slag received by electrolytic corrosion. The variation of the recovery and recrystallization behaviors was largely influenced by the distribution of the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates in the microstructure of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldments after PWHT. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-hardness decrease with the increment of PWHT holding temperature and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth rate of intergranular precipitates decreases with extending of holding time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovery and recrystallization occur during PWHT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Location and size of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates affect the nucleation of recrystallization.

  5. Recovery and recrystallization in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weldments after post-weld heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is indispensable to the as-welded joints in fabricating high-temperature structural components of steam power plants. The microstructural evolution and the relationship between the formed precipitates and the recovery and recrystallization of welded joints after PWHT have been studied in details. It is found that the recovery and recrystallization occurring at above 730 °C/2 h led to fragmentation of martensite laths and thus formation of equiaxed grains. Only M23C6 precipitates were observed in the weldments according to the X-ray diffraction results of slag received by electrolytic corrosion. The variation of the recovery and recrystallization behaviors was largely influenced by the distribution of the M23C6 precipitates in the microstructure of the modified 9Cr–1Mo steel weldments after PWHT. - Highlights: ► Micro-hardness decrease with the increment of PWHT holding temperature and time. ► Growth rate of intergranular precipitates decreases with extending of holding time. ► Recovery and recrystallization occur during PWHT. ► Location and size of M23C6 precipitates affect the nucleation of recrystallization.

  6. Energy, exergy, environmental and economic analysis of industrial fired heaters based on heat recovery and preheating techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • 4-E analysis of a typical industrial grade fired heater unit is studied. • This analysis is accomplished for the first time in this study. • Heat recovery and air preheating lead to substantial reduction in the fuel consumption. • The company’s current costs are tremendously reduced by these methods. • The methods lead to mitigation in GHG emission and to reduction in the associated taxes. - Abstract: Fired heaters are ubiquitous in both the petroleum and petrochemical industries, due to it being vital in their day to day operations. They form major components in petroleum refineries, petrochemical facilities, and processing units. This study was commissioned in order to analyze the economic benefits of incorporating both heat recovery and air preheating methods into the existing fired heater units. Four fired heater units were analyzed from the energy and environmental point of views. Moreover, the second law efficiency and the rate of irreversibility were also analyzed via the exergy analysis. Both analyses was indicative of the fact that the heat recovery process enhances both the first and second law efficiencies while simultaneously assisting in the production of high and low pressure water steam. The implementation and usage of the process improves the thermal and exergy efficiencies from 63.4% to 71.7% and 49.4%, to 54.8%, respectively. Additionally, the heat recovery and air preheating methods leads to a substantial reduction in fuel consumption, in the realm of up to 7.4%, while also simultaneously decreasing heat loss and the irreversibility of the unit. Nevertheless, the results of the economic analysis posits that although utilizing an air preheater unit enhances the thermal performance of the system, due to the air preheater’s capital and maintenance costs, incorporating an air preheater unit to an existing fired heater is not economically justifiable. Furthermore, the results of the sensitivity analysis and payback period

  7. The effects of reversion heat treatment on the recovery of thermal aging embrittlement of CF8M cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal aging embrittlement of cast stainless steels (CASSs) is one of the key material property degradation that would limit the long-term operation nuclear power plants. In this study, we investigated the recovery behaviors of thermal aging embrittlement of cast stainless steels (CASSs) by the reversion heat treatment. Two heats of CF8M with different ferrite contents were used and the degree of aging embrittlement was measured by the micro-hardness of ferrite phases. It was found that the micro-hardness values of ferrites in the aged CF8M were significantly reduced after the reversion heat treatment at 550 °C for 30 min. Meanwhile, those of the un-aged CF8M were slightly increased by the reversion heat treatment. Also, the re-aging embrittlement behaviors of the recovered CF8M were similar to the initial aging behaviors. Finally, if the reversion heat treatment was applied to the un-aged CF8M, the degree of the embrittlement was reduced during the thermal aging heat treatment. These changes in the micro-hardness values were explained in view of the dissolution of the Cr-rich region formed during spinodal decomposition and the formation of Mo-rich precipitates in the ferrite phases during the reversion heat treatment. - Highlights: • Reversion heat treatment (R-HT) was used to recover thermal aging of CF8M. • During the R-HT, Cr-rich phases dissolved but Mo-rich phases precipitated in ferrites. • After the R-HT, the rate of re-embrittlement was similar to that of previous aging. • Pre-application of the R-HT reduced the degree of aging embrittlement of CF8M

  8. Study of mixtures based on hydrocarbons used in ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) for engine waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For high temperature ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) used in engine waste heat recovery, it's very critical to select a high temperature working fluid. HCs (Hydrocarbons) usually have excellent cycle performance, but the flammability limits their practical application. Considering that some retardants can be used to suppress flammability, the paper presents an application of mixtures based on hydrocarbons blending with refrigerant retardants to engine waste heat ORC. Three pure hydrocarbons (cyclopentane, cyclohexane, benzene) and two retardants (R11, R123) are selected for combination. Thermal efficiency and exergy loss are selected as the main objective functions. Based on thermodynamic model, the effects of retardants mass fraction, evaporation temperature and IHE (internal heat exchanger) are investigated. Results show that zeotropic mixtures do have higher thermal efficiency and lower exergy loss than pure fluids, at a certain mixture ratio. There exists the OMR (optimal mixture ratio) for different mixtures, and it changes with the evaporation temperature. When adding IHE to system, cycle performance could be obviously improved, and for benzene/R11 (0.7/0.3), the efficiency growth is about 7.12%∼9.72%. Using it, the maximum thermal efficiency of the system can achieve 16.7%, and minimum exergy loss is only 30.76 kW. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of Organic Rankine Cycle for engine exhaust heat recovery is proposed. • Mixtures based on hydrocarbons as working fluids have been suggested. • Effects of the IHE (internal heat exchanger) on ORC system are investigated. • OMR (Optimal mixture ratio) changes with the evaporation temperature. • Using the system, maximum thermal efficiency can achieve 16.7%

  9. Combined particle emission reduction and heat recovery from combustion exhaust-A novel approach for small wood-fired appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replacing fossil fuels by renewable sources of energy is one approach to address the problem of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Wood combustion can help to replace fuel oil or gas. It is advisable, however, to use modern technology for combustion and exhaust gas after-treatment in order to achieve best efficiency and avoid air quality problems due to high emission levels often related to small scale wood combustion. In this study, simultaneous combustion particle deposition and heat recovery from the exhaust of two commercially available wood-fired appliances has been investigated. The experiments were performed with a miniature pipe bundle heat exchanger operating in the exhaust gas lines of a fully automated pellet burner or a closed fireplace. The system has been characterised for a wide range of aerosol inlet temperatures (135-295 deg. C) and flow velocities (0.13-1.0ms-1), and particle deposition efficiencies up to 95% have been achieved. Deposition was dominated by thermophoresis and diffusion and increased with the average temperature difference and retention time in the heat exchanger. The aerosols from the two different appliances exhibited different deposition characteristics, which can be attributed to enhanced deposition of the nucleation mode particles generated in the closed fire place. The measured deposition efficiencies can be described by simple linear parameterisations derived from laboratory studies. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of thermophoretic particle removal from biomass burning flue gas and support the development of modified heat exchanger systems with enhanced capability for simultaneous heat recovery and particle deposition

  10. Heat recovery from UPS units - Analysis of a first unit and technology assessment; Waermerueckgewinnung in USV-Anlagen. Analyse einer Erstanlage und Potentialabschaetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, S.; Schlegel, A.

    2009-11-15

    UPS units (uninterruptible power supply) generate large heat losses, which have to be dissipated with cooling units. awtec has developed a unique UPS system with integrated heat recovery which was installed in 2001 (Building Gretag/SAP in Regensdorf) and which is still running error-free. With this system the waste heat can be recovered and electrical energy for the refrigeration system can be saved likewise. The measured data shows that during the heating season, the unit transfers virtually all heat loss (about 20 MWh/year) to the space heating system. The building's refrigeration system, however, has its own heat recovery system, so the actual annual energy savings can be estimated to be only about 4 MWh of electricity. The prototype shows that awtec built a robust unit which - given an appropriate cooling and heating system - has the potential for high energy savings (without central heat recovery system: 4 MWh electric + 20 MWh thermal) without increased investment. Based on the UPS heat recovery development, previous projects of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy and a market survey, scenarios for the cooling and heat recovery from UPS units were developed. Since the same concepts also apply to the cooling of servers and other IT components, they were also included in the analysis. The scenario analysis shows that a high potential for savings of electric energy and heat exists in this area. In particular, the direct cooling of the IT components with cooling water offers big benefits for heat recovery and free cooling (cooling without the use of the refrigeration system) compared to conventional air cooling. These direct cooling systems are currently mainly used for special applications or as a fallback in case of overheating problems. Passive cooling through geothermal probes, which are now mainly used for buildings with small heat pump systems, provides an interesting approach to the cooling of IT equipment in accordance with the temperature level. It

  11. Thermal-economic multiobjective optimization of heat pipe heat exchanger for energy recovery in HVAC applications using genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaye Sepehr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost and effectiveness are two important factors of heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE design. The total cost includes the investment cost for buying equipment (heat exchanger surface area and operating cost for energy expenditures (related to fan power. The HPHE was thermally modeled using e-NTU method to estimate the overall heat transfer coefficient for the bank of finned tubes as well as estimating pressure drop. Fast and elitist non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II with continuous and discrete variables was applied to obtain the maximum effectiveness and the minimum total cost as two objective functions. Pipe diameter, pipe length, numbers of pipes per row, number of rows, fin pitch and fin length ratio were considered as six design parameters. The results of optimal designs were a set of multiple optimum solutions, called ‘Pareto optimal solutions’. The comparison of the optimum values of total cost and effectiveness, variation of optimum values of design parameters as well as estimating the payback period were also reported for various inlet fresh air volume flow rates.

  12. Evaluation of the recovery of thermal aging embrittlement of CF8M cast stainless steels after reversion heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of mechanical properties caused by the thermal aging embrittlement of cast stainless steels (CASSs) is considered one of the key issues that should be resolved for the continued operation of nuclear power plants. In this study, the effects of reversion heat treatments on the mechanical properties of CF8M were evaluated by tensile and small punch tests. The reversion heat treatments were performed at 550 °C and 600 °C for two heats of CF8M containing 11% and 32% of ferrites. After the reversion heat treatments (R-HT), the ductility and small punch energy of the aged CF8Ms were effectively recovered. The re-aging embrittlement behaviors of the recovered CF8M were less severe than the initial aging behaviors. Furthermore, the application of the R-HT to the as-received CF8M also reduced the degree of thermal aging embrittlement. The fracture surface analyses also confirmed the observed changes in mechanical properties. Finally, the optimum reversion heat treatment condition for the recovery of thermal aging embrittlement of CF8M was proposed

  13. Heat recovery from a thermal energy storage based on the Ca(OH)2/CaO cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal energy storage is very important in many applications related to the use of waste heat from industrial processes, renewable energies or from other sources. Thermochemical storage is very interesting for long-term storage as it can be carried out at room temperature with no energy losses. Dehydration/hydration cycle of Ca(OH)2/CaO has been applied for thermal energy storage in two types of reactors. One of them was a prototype designed by the authors, and in the other type conventional laboratory glassware was used. Parameters such as specific heats, reaction rate and enthalpy, mass losses and heat release were monitored during cycles. Although in the hydration step water is normally added in vapour phase, liquid water, at 0 deg. C has been used in these experiences. Results indicated that the energy storage system performance showed no significant differences, when we compared several hydration/dehydration cycles. The selected chemical reaction did not exhibit a complete reversibility because complete Ca(OH)2 dehydration, was not achieved. However the system could be used satisfactorily along 20 cycles at least. Heat recovery experiments showed general system behaviour during the hydration step in both types of reactors. The designed prototype was more efficient in this step. Main conclusions suggested carrying out one complete cycle at a higher dehydration temperature to recover total system reversibility. A modification of the prototype design trying to enhance heat transfer from the Ca(OH)2 bed could also be proposed

  14. Engineering for high heat loads on ALS [Advanced Light Source] beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discussed general thermal engineering problems and specific categories of thermal design issues for high photon flux beam lines at the LBL Advanced Light Source: thermal distortion of optical surfaces and elevated temperatures of thermal absorbers receiving synchrotron radiation. A generic design for water-cooled heat absorbers is described for use with ALS photon shutters, beam defining apertures, and heat absorbing masks. Also, results of in- situ measurements of thermal distortion of a water-cooled mirror in a synchrotron radiation beam line are compared with calculated performance estimates. 17 refs., 2 figs

  15. Towards energy efficient operation of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning systems via advanced supervisory control design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswiecinska, A.; Hibbs, J.; Zajic, I.; Burnham, K. J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents conceptual control solution for reliable and energy efficient operation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems used in large volume building applications, e.g. warehouse facilities or exhibition centres. Advanced two-level scalable control solution, designed to extend capabilities of the existing low-level control strategies via remote internet connection, is presented. The high-level, supervisory controller is based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) architecture, which is the state-of-the-art for indoor climate control systems. The innovative approach benefits from using passive heating and cooling control strategies for reducing the HVAC system operational costs, while ensuring that required environmental conditions are met.

  16. Optimum design of dual pressure heat recovery steam generator using non-dimensional parameters based on thermodynamic and thermoeconomic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analyses are investigated to achieve the optimum operating parameters of a dual pressure heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), coupled with a heavy duty gas turbine. In this regard, the thermodynamic objective function including the exergy waste and the exergy destruction, is defined in such a way to find the optimum pinch point, and consequently to minimize the objective function by using non-dimensional operating parameters. The results indicated that, the optimum pinch point from thermodynamic viewpoint is 2.5 °C and 2.1 °C for HRSGs with live steam at 75 bar and 90 bar respectively. Since thermodynamic analysis is not able to consider economic factors, another objective function including annualized installation cost and annual cost of irreversibilities is proposed. To find the irreversibility cost, electricity price and also fuel price are considered independently. The optimum pinch point from thermoeconomic viewpoint on basis of electricity price is 20.6 °C (75 bar) and 19.2 °C (90 bar), whereas according to the fuel price it is 25.4 °C and 23.7 °C. Finally, an extensive sensitivity analysis is performed to compare optimum pinch point for different electricity and fuel prices. -- Highlights: ► Presenting thermodynamic and thermoeconomic optimization of a heat recovery steam generator. ► Defining an objective function consists of exergy waste and exergy destruction. ► Defining an objective function including capital cost and cost of irreversibilities. ► Obtaining the optimized operating parameters of a dual pressure heat recovery boiler. ► Computing the optimum pinch point using non-dimensional operating parameters

  17. Secondary heat recovery from low-permeability high-temperature reservoir: A possible project in the Larderello Field, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianelli, G.; Squarci, P. [CNR-Istituto Internazionale per le Ricerche Geotermiche, Pisa (Italy); Capocecera, P. [ENEA-C.R. Casaccia, Roma (Italy)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    A project of fracture stimulation and secondary heat recovery from the metamorphic reservoir of the Larderello geothermal field could be developed in a next future. Geological and geophysical data suggest that the stimulation can enhance permeability and that the water injection can be recovered as steam. In particular, the area of the project is characterized by the presence of an important seismic reflector which has been explained assuming the presence of fractured rocks filled with high pressure fluids. Extensional and hydraulic fractures can present at temperatures of 300-350{degrees}C, and this makes the experiment of extreme interest.

  18. A comprehensive design methodology of organic Rankine cycles for the waste heat recovery of automotive heavy-duty diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most promising approaches to recover the waste heat from internal combustion engines is the Organic Rankine Cycle owing to its efficiency and reliability. The design optimization of ORC, however, is nontrivial because there exist many design variables and practical considerations. The present paper proposes a comprehensive design methodology to optimize the Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) considering a wide range of design variables as well as practical aspects such as component limitations and costs. The design process is comprised of three steps: heat source selection, candidate fluid selection, and thermodynamic cycle optimization. In order to select the best waste heat source, the available energy and other practical considerations of various heat sources have been compared. Among others, the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) cooler is found to be the best heat source, and thus used for the rest of this study. Based on a systematic working fluid analysis, Ethanol, Pentane, and R245fa are selected as three candidate fluids. For the comprehensive ORC optimization, four types of cycle layouts are considered; 1) subcritical cycle without a recuperator, 2) subcritical cycle with a recuperator, 3) supercritical without a recuperator, and 4) supercritical cycle with a recuperator. Four cycle layouts coupled with three candidate fluids give a total of twelve cycle analyses. Results show that the best performance is provided by the regenerative subcritical cycle with Ethanol, while the solution with minimum capital cost is the subcritical cycles with Ethanol but without a recuperator. - Highlights: • Selection of the best waste heat source of a diesel engine for a heat recovery system. • Screening process to identify the most suitable working fluids for the system. • Comprehensive ORC optimization is introduced for four types of cycle layouts. • Pay Back Time investigation to present the economic analysis of the cycles

  19. Optimization of Surfactant Mixtures and Their Interfacial Behavior for Advanced Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaran, Prof. P.

    2001-02-27

    The goal of this report is to develop improved extraction processes to mobilize and produce the oil left untapped using conventional techniques. Current chemical schemes for recovering the residual oil have been in general less than satisfactory. High cost of the processes as well as significant loss of chemicals by adsorption on reservoir materials and precipitation has limited the utility of chemical-flooding operations. There is a need to develop cost-effective, improved reagent schemes to increase recovery from domestic oil reservoirs. The goal of the report was to develop and evaluate novel mixtures of surfactants for improved oil recovery.

  20. Waste heat recovery from the exhaust of a diesel generator using Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Diesel engine exhaust contains 40% energy which can be used to produce extra power. • Extra 11% power gained with optimized heat exchangers using water as working fluid. • As a result brake specific fuel consumption improved by 12%. • Parallel arrangement of heat exchangers showed better performance than series. • Optimum working fluid pressure varies with the engine power. - Abstract: Exhaust heat from diesel engines can be an important heat source to provide additional power using a separate Rankine Cycle (RC). In this research, experiments were conducted to measure the available exhaust heat from a 40 kW diesel generator using two ‘off-the-shelf’ heat exchangers. The effectiveness of the heat exchangers using water as the working fluid was found to be 0.44 which seems to be lower than a standard one. This lower performance of the existing heat exchangers indicates the necessity of optimization of the design of the heat exchangers for this particular application. With the available experimental data, computer simulations were carried out to optimize the design of the heat exchangers. Two heat exchangers were used to generate super-heated steam to expand in the turbine using two orientations: series and parallel. The optimized heat exchangers were then used to estimate additional power considering actual turbine isentropic efficiency. The proposed heat exchanger was able to produce 11% additional power using water as the working fluid at a pressure of 15 bar at rated engine load. This additional power resulted into 12% improvement in brake-specific fuel consumption (bsfc). The effects of the working fluid pressure were also investigated to maximize the additional power production. The pressure was limited to 15 bar which was constrained by the exhaust gas temperature. However, higher pressure is possible for higher exhaust gas temperatures from higher capacity engines. This would yield more additional power with further improvements in