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Sample records for advanced heart failure

  1. Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Planning Ahead: Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Jul 7,2016 ... making your preferences known is called advance care planning. It allows you to speak for yourself, even ...

  2. Heart failure: advances through genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E. Creemers; A.A. Wilde; Y.M. Pinto

    2011-01-01

    Heart failure is an increasingly prevalent and highly lethal disease that is most often caused by underlying pathologies, such as myocardial infarction or hypertension, but it can also be the result of a single gene mutation. Comprehensive genetic and genomic approaches are starting to disentangle t

  3. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements...... in patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  4. Advanced glycation endproducts in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Andries J.; Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schleicher, E; Somoza,; Shieberle, P

    2008-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been proposed as factors involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). Cross-linking by AGEs results in vascular and myocardial stiffening, which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of CHE Additionally, stimulation of receptors b

  5. Advanced Congestive Heart Failure Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcon, Annahita; Liu, Xiaoli; Ton, David; Haywood, James; Hitchcock, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a complication of an underlying disease and not a primary illness. It is most commonly associated with sepsis, trauma, obstetrical complications, and malignancies. There are very few cases in the literature illustrating the association between DIC and congestive heart failure. Findings. In this report, we present a case of severe congestive heart failure, leading to biventricular thrombi and subsequently DIC. Conclusion. We suggest that the association between congestive heart failure and DIC is an underrecognized one. Congestive heart failure continues to remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapies. Thus far, the precise role of coagulation factors in congestive heart failure is unknown. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and coagulation factors.

  6. Advanced Congestive Heart Failure Associated With Disseminated Intravascular Coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcon, Annahita; Liu, Xiaoli; Ton, David; Haywood, James; Hitchcock, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is a complication of an underlying disease and not a primary illness. It is most commonly associated with sepsis, trauma, obstetrical complications, and malignancies. There are very few cases in the literature illustrating the association between DIC and congestive heart failure. Findings. In this report, we present a case of severe congestive heart failure, leading to biventricular thrombi and subsequently DIC. Conclusion. We suggest that the association between congestive heart failure and DIC is an underrecognized one. Congestive heart failure continues to remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical therapies. Thus far, the precise role of coagulation factors in congestive heart failure is unknown. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure and coagulation factors. PMID:26788528

  7. The Genetic Challenges and Opportunities in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah-Shmouni, Fady; Seidelmann, Sara B; Sirrs, Sandra; Mani, Arya; Jacoby, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The causes of heart failure are diverse. Inherited causes represent an important clinical entity and can be divided into 2 major categories: familial and metabolic cardiomyopathies. The distinct features that might be present in early disease states can become broadly overlapping with other diseases, such as in the case of inherited cardiomyopathies (ie, familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or mitochondrial diseases). In this review article, we focus on genetic issues related to advanced heart failure. Because of the emerging importance of this topic and its breadth, we sought to focus our discussion on the known genetic forms of heart failure syndromes, genetic testing, and newer data on pharmacogenetics and therapeutics in the treatment of heart failure, to primarily encourage clinicians to place a priority on the diagnosis and treatment of these potentially treatable conditions.

  8. Exercise And Heart Failure: Advancing Knowledge And Improving Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Paulino; Hannawi, Bashar; Guha, Ashrith

    2016-01-01

    Exercise limitation is the hallmark of heart failure, and an increasing degree of intolerance is associated with poor prognosis. Objective evaluation of functional class (e.g., cardiopulmonary exercise testing) is essential for adequate prognostication in patients with advanced heart failure and for implementing an appropriate exercise training program. A graded exercise program has been shown to be beneficial in patients with heart failure and has become an essential component of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation in these patients. An exercise program tailored to the patient's preferences, possibilities, and physiologic reserve has the greatest chance of being successful. Despite being safe, effective, and a guideline-recommended treatment to improve quality of life, exercise training remains grossly underutilized. Patient, physician, insurance and practice barriers need to be addressed to improve this quality gap. PMID:27486494

  9. Advanced chronic heart failure : A position statement from the Study Group on Advanced Heart Failure of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Dickstein, Kenneth; McMurray, John J. V.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Bergh, Claes-Hakan; Fraser, Alan G.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Pitsis, Antonis; Mohacsi, Paul; Boehm, Michael; Anker, Stefan; Dargie, Henry; Brutsaert, Dirk; Komajda, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Therapy has improved the survival of heart failure (HF) patients. However, many patients progress to advanced chronic HF (ACHF). We propose a practical clinical definition and describe the characteristics of this condition. Patients that are generally recognised as ACHF often exhibit the following c

  10. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood. In other cases, the heart can't pump blood to the rest of the body with enough ... failure affects the right side, the heart cannot pump enough blood to the lungs, where it picks up oxygen. ...

  11. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... together. About Rise Above HF Rise Above Heart Failure seeks to increase the dialogue about HF and improve the lives of people affected by the condition through awareness, education and support. Through the initiative, AHA strives to ...

  12. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008037 Factors associated with efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy for patients with congestive heart failure. SHI Haoying(史浩颖), et al. Dept Cardiol, Zhongshan Hosp Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Cardiol 2007;35(12):1099-1163. Objective The efficacy of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with congestive heart failure and the potential factors associated with responder or nonresponder were investigated. Methods Fifty

  13. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970284 Effects of enalapril on heart rate variabilityin patients with congestive heart failure. ZHANGYouhua(章友华), et a1. Dept Cardiol, Cardiovasc Instit& Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. ChinCir J 1996; 11(2): 729-732.

  14. Advanced cardiac imaging in heart failure : from subclinical myocardial dysfunction to therapy optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auger, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Advanced echocardiographic techniques permit assessment of left ventricular dyssynchrony in overt heart failure patients and provide important prognostic data. These techniques may guide patients’ selection for cardiac resynchronization therapy and device optimization. Global left ventricular longit

  15. Temporary Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jessica L; Estep, Jerry D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiogenic shock is severe, refractory heart failure caused by significant myocardial dysfunction in the setting of adequate preload that is accompanied by systemic hypoperfusion. Progressive end-organ dysfunction is a hallmark of persistent cardiogenic shock and necessitates intervention to overcome altered hemodynamics and restore end-organ perfusion. Temporary percutaneous mechanical circulatory support is an established modality in the treatment of cardiogenic shock and is increasingly used in patients with cardiogenic shock as a bridge to recovery or further definitive therapy. This article reviews the current devices, their effects on left ventricular hemodynamics, and the evidence supporting their continued use. PMID:27371515

  16. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    2009170 Curcumin attenuates left ventricular dysfunction and remodeling in rabbits with chronic heart failure. TANG Yanhong(唐艳红),et al.Dept Cardiol,Renmin Hosp,Wuhan Univ,Wuhan 430060.Chin J Cardiol,2009;37(3):262-267.

  17. Paradox of circulating advanced glycation end product concentrations in patients with congestive heart failure and after heart transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    A. Heidland; Šebeková, K.; Frangiosa, A; De Santo, L S; Cirillo, M.; Rossi, F.; Cotrufo, M.; Perna, A; Klassen, A; Schinzel, R; De Santo, N G

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse circulating concentrations of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and after heart transplantation; to identify the potential contribution of kidney function to plasma AGE concentrations; and to determine whether AGE concentrations and parameters of oxidative stress are interrelated.

  18. LVAD as a Bridge to Heart Transplantation in a Patient with Left Ventricular Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy and Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerar, Andraž; Kšela, Juš; Poglajen, Gregor; Vrtovec, Bojan; Kneževič, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is a rare hereditary cardiomyopathy characterized by the formation of an outer compacted and inner noncompacted layer of the myocardium. The latter is characterized by prominent trabeculations and deep intertrabecular recesses and is functionally inferior to the compacted myocardium. As there is no specific treatment for patients with LVNC who develop heart failure, the management of these patients is limited and many patients progress to advanced stages of the disease. For LVNC patients with advanced heart failure, the data regarding the use of mechanical circulatory support are scarce. We report a case of a 29-year-old patient with LVNC and advanced refractory heart failure, who was successfully bridged to heart transplantation using a long-term continuous-flow left ventricular assist device. PMID:27355148

  19. Living with an unfixable heart: a qualitative study exploring the experience of living with advanced heart failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Marie

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Nurses working with patients with advanced heart failure need knowledge that will help us to help patients cope with their situations of chronic illness. However, our knowledge bank is deficient due to the scarcity of inquiry that takes the affected person\\'s point of view as its central focus. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe patients\\' experiences of living with advanced heart failure. METHODS: The study sample (N=9) consisted of male (N=6) and female (N=3) patients with advanced (NYHA classes III-IV) heart failure. The design was qualitative and open unstructured interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim during 2006. RESULTS: Four main themes emerged: Living in the Shadow of Fear; Running on Empty; Living a Restricted life; and Battling the System. The experience of living with advanced heart failure was described as a fearful and tired sort of living characterised by escalating impotence and dependence. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that there may be an illogical but enduring ethos of \\'cure\\' pervading health care worker\\'s attitudes to advanced heart failure care. This mindset might be working to hinder the application of additional or alternative therapies, which might better palliate the physical and psychosocial distress of patients.

  20. NEW ADVANCES IN BETA-BLOCKER THERAPY IN HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo eBarrese

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of -blockers (BB in heart failure (HF has been considered a contradiction for many years. Considering HF simply as a state of inadequate systolic function, BB were contraindicated because of their negative effects on myocardial contractility. Nevertheless, evidence collected in the past years have suggested that additional mechanisms, such as compensatory neuro-humoral hyperactivation or inflammation, could participate in the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Indeed, chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system, although initially compensating the reduced cardiac output from the failing heart, increases myocardial oxygen demand, ischemia and oxidative stress; moreover, high catecholamine levels induce peripheral vasoconstriction and increase both cardiac pre- and after-load, thus determining additional stress to the cardiac muscle (1. As a consequence of such a different view of the pathogenic mechanisms of HF, the efficacy of BB in the treatment of HF has been investigated in numerous clinical trials. Results from these trials highlighted BB as valid therapeutic tools in HF, providing rational basis for their inclusion in many HF treatment guidelines. However, controversy still exists about their use, in particular with regards to the selection of specific molecules, since BB differ in terms of adrenergic -receptors selectivity, adjunctive effects on -receptors, and effects on reactive oxygen species and inflammatory cytokines production. Further concerns about the heterogeneity in the response to , as well as the use in specific patients, are matter of debate among clinicians. In this review, we will recapitulate the pharmacological properties and the classification of BB, and the alteration of the adrenergic system occurring during HF that provide a rationale for their use; we will also focus on the possible molecular mechanisms, such as genetic polymorphisms, underlying the different efficacy of molecules

  1. Recognizing Advanced Heart Failure and Knowing Your Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different procedures for different types of valve defects. Percutaneous coronary intervention: A blocked heart artery can be opened using ... placed in the artery to keep it open. Percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI, is also known as coronary angioplasty. ...

  2. Estrogen Therapy Rescues Advanced Heart Failure via Estrogen Receptor Beta

    OpenAIRE

    Iorga, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, defined as an enlargement of the ventricles, is often triggered when the heart is subjected to hemodynamic stress from physiological stimuli such as pregnancy, or from pathological stimuli such as pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy or pulmonary hypertension-induced right ventricular hypertrophy. Physiological hypertrophy is beneficial and adaptive, while pathological hypertrophy is maladaptive and detrimental. Estrogen treatment prior to the onset of p...

  3. Advanced strategies for end-stage heart failure: combining regenerative approaches with LVAD, a new horizon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyenne eTseng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improved treatment of cardiovascular diseases the population with end-stage heart failure is progressively growing. The scarcity of the gold standard therapy, heart transplantation, demands novel therapeutic approaches. For patients awaiting transplantation ventricular assist devices have been of great benefit on survival. To allow explantation of the assist device and obviate heart transplantation, sufficient and durable myocardial recovery is necessary. However, explant rates so far are low. Combining mechanical circulatory support with regenerative therapies such as cell(-based therapy and biomaterials might give rise to improved long-term results. Although synergistic effects are suggested with mechanical support and stem cell therapy, evidence in both preclinical and clinical setting is lacking. This review focuses on advanced and innovative strategies for the treatment of end-stage heart failure and furthermore appraises clinical experience with combined strategies.

  4. Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920647 Comparative effects of commonvasodilators on experimental cardiac fai-lure. LI Zhijian (李志坚), et al. Dept Cardiol,2nd Hosp, Tianjin Med Coll. Tianjin Med J1992; 20(8): 456-458. A 9×9 latin square design was employed forcomparing the effects of (1) placebo, (2) nitr-oprusside, (3) phentolamine, (4) isosorbide dini-trate. (5) captopril, (6) captopril-isosorbide

  5. Haemostatic and inflammatory biomarkers in advanced chronic heart failure: role of oral anticoagulants and successful heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugno, Massimo; Mari, Daniela; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Gronda, Edoardo; Vicari, Francesco; Frigerio, Maria; Coppola, Raffaella; Bottasso, Bianca; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Gregorini, Luisa

    2004-07-01

    Advanced chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with abnormal haemostasis and inflammation, but it is not known how these abnormalities are related, whether they are modified by oral anticoagulants (OAT), or if they persist after successful heart transplantation. We studied 25 patients with CHF (New York Heart Association class IV, 10 of whom underwent heart transplantation) and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by measuring their plasma levels of prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 (F1 + 2), thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), D-dimer, factor VII (FVII), fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), soluble TNF receptor II (sTNFRII), interleukin 6 (IL-6), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), endothelial-selectin (E-selectin) and thrombomodulin. CHF patients had higher plasma levels of TAT, D-dimer, t-PA, fibrinogen, VWF, TNF, IL-6, sTNFRII, sVCAM-1 (P = 0.0001), sICAM-1 (P = 0.003) and thrombomodulin (P = 0.007) than controls. There were significant correlations (r = 0.414-0.595) between coagulation, fibrinolysis, endothelial dysfunction and inflammation parameters, which were lower in those patients treated with OATs. Heart transplantation led to reductions in fibrinogen (P = 0.001), VWF (P = 0.05), D-dimer (P = 0.05) and IL-6 levels (P = 0.05), but all the parameters remained significantly higher (P = 0.01-0.0001) than in the controls. Advanced CHF is associated with coagulation activation, endothelial dysfunction and increased proinflammatory cytokine levels. Most of these abnormalities parallel each other, tend to normalize in patients treated with OATs and, although reduced, persist in patients undergoing successful heart transplantation, despite the absence of clinical signs of CHF. PMID:15198737

  6. Cardiomyocytic apoptosis and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanzhou Feng

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure is a major disease seriously threatening human health.Once left ventricular dysfunction develops,cardiac function usually deteriorates and progresses to congestive heart failure in several months or years even if no factors which accelerate the deterioration repeatedly exist.Mechanism through which cardiac function continually deteriorates is still unclear.Cardiomyocytic apoptosis can occur in acute stage of ischemic heart diseases and the compensated stage of cardiac dysfunction.In this review,we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of cardiomyocytic apoptosis in heart failure.

  7. Lungs in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Apostolo; Giuliano Giusti; Paola Gargiulo; Maurizio Bussotti; Piergiuseppe Agostoni

    2012-01-01

    Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance...

  8. End-of-Life Decisions and Palliative Care in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Deborah E; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan. Use of defined triggers for FCP can stimulate important patient-caregiver conversations. Guidelines advocate an annual review of HF status and future care preferences. Advance directives are important for any individual with a chronic, life-limiting illness and should be integrated into FCP. Nevertheless, use of advance directives by HF patients is extremely low. Consideration of illness trajectories and risk-scoring tools might facilitate prognostication and delivery of appropriate HF care. Decisions about heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation should include planning for potential complications associated with these therapies. Such decisions also should include a discussion of palliative management, as an alternative to intervention and also as an option for managing symptoms or adverse events after intervention. Palliative care, including FCP and SDM, should be integrated into the course of all patients with advanced HF. Clinicians who provide HF care should acquire the skills necessary for conducting FCP and SDM discussions.

  9. End-of-Life Decisions and Palliative Care in Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Deborah E; Goodlin, Sarah J

    2016-09-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) therapies are focused on extending life and improving function. In contrast, palliative care is a holistic approach that focuses on symptom alleviation and patients' physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs. HF clinicians can integrate palliative care strategies by incorporating several important components of planning and decision-making for HF patients. Future care planning (FCP) for HF patients should incorporate the basic tenets of shared decision-making (SDM). These include understanding the patient's perspective and care preferences, articulating what is medically feasible, and integrating these considerations into the overall care plan. Use of defined triggers for FCP can stimulate important patient-caregiver conversations. Guidelines advocate an annual review of HF status and future care preferences. Advance directives are important for any individual with a chronic, life-limiting illness and should be integrated into FCP. Nevertheless, use of advance directives by HF patients is extremely low. Consideration of illness trajectories and risk-scoring tools might facilitate prognostication and delivery of appropriate HF care. Decisions about heart transplantation or left ventricular assist device implantation should include planning for potential complications associated with these therapies. Such decisions also should include a discussion of palliative management, as an alternative to intervention and also as an option for managing symptoms or adverse events after intervention. Palliative care, including FCP and SDM, should be integrated into the course of all patients with advanced HF. Clinicians who provide HF care should acquire the skills necessary for conducting FCP and SDM discussions. PMID:27568873

  10. Impact of advance care planning on the care of patients with heart failure: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Chetna; Sim, David Kheng Leng; Jaufeerally, Fazlur; Vikas, Nivedita Nadkarni; Sim, Genevieve Wong Cheng; Tan, Boon Cheng; Ng, Clarice Shu Hwa; Tho, Pei Leng; Lim, Jingfen; Chuang, Claire Ya-Ting; Fong, Florence Hui Mei; Liu, Joy; Finkelstein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the promise and popularity of advance care planning, there is insufficient evidence that advance care planning helps patients to meet their end-of-life care preferences, especially in Asian settings. Thus, the proposed study aims to assess whether patients with advanced heart failure who are receiving advance care planning have a greater likelihood of receiving end-of-life care consistent with their preferences compared to patients receiving usual care. Secondary objectives...

  11. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests, such as coronary angiography. MRI , CT , or PET scans of the heart may be done to check how much heart muscle damage is present. It can also help detect the reason for a patient's heart failure. Stress tests are done to see whether the heart ...

  12. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with which your heart muscle contracts in the short term. Long term beta blockers help keep your heart failure from becoming worse. Over time they may also help strengthen your ... include lightheadedness, depression, fatigue, and memory loss.

  13. Antithrombotics in heart failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Miličić, Davor; Samardžić, Jure; Petričević, Mate

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common clinical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rate despite significant improvements in pharmacotherapy and implementation of medical procedures. Patients with heart failure are at an increased risk of developing arterial and venous thrombosis, which contribute to the high rate of adverse events and fatal outcomes. Many heart failure patients routinely receive antithrombotic therapy due to the presence of a specific indication...

  14. Life disruption, life continuation: contrasting themes in the lives of African-American elders with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Faith Pratt; Thornton, Nancy; Martin, Lindsey; Zalenski, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses the need for more information about how urban African-American elders experience advanced heart failure. Participants included 35 African Americans aged 60 and over with advanced heart failure, identified through records from a community hospital in Detroit, Michigan. Four focus groups (n = 13) and 22 individual interviews were conducted. We used thematic analysis to examine qualitative focus groups and interviews. Themes identified included life disruption, which encompassed the sub-themes of living scared, making sense of heart failure, and limiting activities. Resuming life was a contrasting theme involving culturally relevant coping strategies, and included the sub-themes of resiliency, spirituality, and self-care that helped patients regain and maintain a sense of self amid serious illness. Participants faced numerous challenges and invoked a variety of strategies to cope with their illness, and their stories of struggles, hardship, and resilience can serve as a model for others struggling with advanced illness. PMID:22352363

  15. Recent advances in treatment of heart failure [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kitai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the total cases and economic burden of heart failure continuing to rise, there is an overwhelming need for novel therapies. Several drugs for heart failure have succeeded in preclinical and early-phase clinical trials, but most of them failed to show the real benefit in pivotal clinical trials. Meanwhile, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two promising new drugs to treat heart failure: ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Furthermore, some of the newer agents in testing offer the potential for significant progress in addition to these drugs. Patiromer and zirconium cyclosilicate are attractive agents that are expected to prevent hyperkalemia during renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibition, and serelaxin and urodilatin are promising drugs in the treatment of acute heart failure. Future clinical trials with more appropriate study designs, optimal clinical endpoints, and proper patient selection are mandatory to assess the true efficacy of these attractive compounds in clinical practice.

  16. Application of Transformational Leadership Principles in the Development and Integration of Palliative Care Within an Advanced Heart Failure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Susan; Leasure, A Renee

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major health problem in United States, and it has reached epidemic proportions. Heart failure is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Although the prognosis of HF is worse than many forms of cancer, many patients, families, and clinicians are unaware of the dire prognosis. As the disease progress to advanced HF, patients are faced with many challenges, such as poor quality of life due to worsening symptoms and frequent hospitalizations. Heart failure management adds significant financial burden to the health care system. Palliative care can be integrated into HF care to improve quality of life and symptom management and to address physical, spiritual, and psychosocial needs of patients and families. Palliative care can be used concurrently with or independent of curative or life-prolonging HF therapies. Transformational leadership principles were used to guide the development of a plan to enhance integration of palliative care within traditional advanced HF care. PMID:26836596

  17. Application of Transformational Leadership Principles in the Development and Integration of Palliative Care Within an Advanced Heart Failure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Susan; Leasure, A Renee

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major health problem in United States, and it has reached epidemic proportions. Heart failure is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Although the prognosis of HF is worse than many forms of cancer, many patients, families, and clinicians are unaware of the dire prognosis. As the disease progress to advanced HF, patients are faced with many challenges, such as poor quality of life due to worsening symptoms and frequent hospitalizations. Heart failure management adds significant financial burden to the health care system. Palliative care can be integrated into HF care to improve quality of life and symptom management and to address physical, spiritual, and psychosocial needs of patients and families. Palliative care can be used concurrently with or independent of curative or life-prolonging HF therapies. Transformational leadership principles were used to guide the development of a plan to enhance integration of palliative care within traditional advanced HF care.

  18. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Reci Meseri

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilem...

  19. Patient, carer and professional perspectives on barriers and facilitators to quality care in advanced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Browne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Those with advanced heart failure (HF experience high levels of morbidity and mortality, similar to common cancers. However, there remains evidence of inequity of access to palliative care services compared to people with cancer. This study examines patient, carer, and professional perspectives on current management of advanced HF and barriers and facilitators to improved care. METHODS: Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with advanced HF patients (n = 30, carers (n = 20, and professionals (n = 65. Data analysed using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT as the underpinning conceptual framework. FINDINGS: Uncertainty is ubiquitous in accounts from advanced HF patients and their caregivers. This uncertainty relates to understanding of the implications of their diagnosis, appropriate treatments, and when and how to seek effective help. Health professionals agree this is a major problem but feel they lack knowledge, opportunities, or adequate support to improve the situation. Fragmented care with lack of coordination and poor communication makes life difficult. Poor understanding of the condition extends to the wider circle of carers and means that requests for help may not be perceived as legitimate, and those with advanced HF are not prioritised for social and financial supports. Patient and caregiver accounts of emergency care are uniformly poor. Managing polypharmacy and enduring concomitant side effects is a major burden, and the potential for rationalisation exists. This study has potential limitations because it was undertaken within a single geographical location within the United Kingdom. CONCLUSIONS: Little progress is being made to improve care experiences for those with advanced HF. Even in the terminal stages, patients and caregivers are heavily and unnecessarily burdened by health care services that are poorly coordinated and offer fragmented care. There is evidence that these poor

  20. Qt dispersion has no prognostic information for patients with advanced congestive heart failure and reduced left ventricular systolic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, B; Elming, H; Jun, L;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: QT dispersion is a potential prognostic marker of tachyarrhythmic events and death, but it is unclear whether this applies to patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). METHODS AND RESULTS: Of the 1518 patients with advanced CHF and left ventricular dysfunction enrolled in the Danish...

  1. Advances in Echocardiographic Imaging in Heart Failure With Reduced and Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Alaa Mabrouk Salem; Bansal, Manish; Sengupta, Partho P

    2016-07-01

    Echocardiography, given its safety, easy availability, and the ability to permit a comprehensive assessment of cardiac structure and function, is an indispensable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with heart failure (HF). From initial phenotyping and risk stratification to providing vital data for guiding therapeutic decision-making and monitoring, echocardiography plays a pivotal role in the care of HF patients. The recent advent of multiparametric approaches for myocardial deformation imaging has provided valuable insights in the pathogenesis of HF, elucidating distinct patterns of myocardial dysfunction and events that are associated with progression from subclinical stage to overt HF. At the same time, miniaturization of echocardiography has further expanded clinical application of echocardiography, with the use of pocket cardiac ultrasound as an adjunct to physical examination demonstrated to improve diagnostic accuracy and risk stratification. Furthermore, ongoing advances in the field of big data analytics promise to create an exciting opportunity to operationalize precision medicine as the new approach to healthcare delivery that aims to individualize patient care by integrating data extracted from clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic, and genetic assessments. The present review summarizes the recent advances in the field of echocardiography, with emphasis on their role in HF phenotyping, risk stratification, and optimizing clinical outcomes. PMID:27390337

  2. Advanced research on the microRNA mechanism in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianying; Zhong, Qianjin

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure is the end stage of most cardiac diseases and also an important cardiovascular disease. Ventricular remodeling, a complicated pathophysiological process involving multiple molecular pathways, is a crucial mechanism for the occurrence and development of heart failure. A microRNA (miRNA) is a highly conservative noncoding molecule containing 18-25 nucleotides. miRNA is different from other RNAs. It mainly serves as an endogenous gene-regulating factor, and is a member of the complex regulatory network. It induces gene repression of target transcripts by affecting mRNA at the post-transcriptional level Vasudevan et al. (2007) . This study aimed at determining the mechanism of miRNA action in heart failure. PMID:27372044

  3. Lungs in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Apostolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung function abnormalities both at rest and during exercise are frequently observed in patients with chronic heart failure, also in the absence of respiratory disease. Alterations of respiratory mechanics and of gas exchange capacity are strictly related to heart failure. Severe heart failure patients often show a restrictive respiratory pattern, secondary to heart enlargement and increased lung fluids, and impairment of alveolar-capillary gas diffusion, mainly due to an increased resistance to molecular diffusion across the alveolar capillary membrane. Reduced gas diffusion contributes to exercise intolerance and to a worse prognosis. Cardiopulmonary exercise test is considered the “gold standard” when studying the cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic adaptations to exercise in cardiac patients. During exercise, hyperventilation and consequent reduction of ventilation efficiency are often observed in heart failure patients, resulting in an increased slope of ventilation/carbon dioxide (VE/VCO2 relationship. Ventilatory efficiency is as strong prognostic and an important stratification marker. This paper describes the pulmonary abnormalities at rest and during exercise in the patients with heart failure, highlighting the principal diagnostic tools for evaluation of lungs function, the possible pharmacological interventions, and the parameters that could be useful in prognostic assessment of heart failure patients.

  4. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-10-01

    Disorders of potassium homeostasis can potentiate the already elevated risk of arrhythmia in heart failure. Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used. Acute treatment for hyperkalemia may not be tolerated in the long term. Recent data for patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate, used to treat and prevent high serum potassium levels on a more chronic basis, have sparked interest in the treatment of hyperkalemia, as well as the potential use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors in patients who were previously unable to take these drugs or tolerated only low doses. This review discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and outcomes of hyperkalemia in heart failure; provides an overview of traditional and novel ways to approach management of hyperkalemia; and discusses the need for further research to optimally treat heart failure.

  5. Chronic beta-blocker treatment in patients with advanced heart failure - Effects on neurohormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teisman, ACH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Boomsma, F; de Kam, PJ; Pinto, YM; de Zeeuw, D; van Gilst, WH

    2000-01-01

    Background: To date, the use of beta-blockers in treating patients with chronic heart failure gains support, this since several large clinical trials reported reduced mortality after chronic beta-blockade. Part of these beneficial effects may result from inhibition of deleterious neurohormone activa

  6. Nutrition in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reci Meseri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is defined as decreased ability of heart due to various reasons. It%u2019s seen 2-3% but the prevalence increases sharply after the age of seventy. The objectives of nutrition therapy in heart failure are to prevent from water retention and edema, to avoid from hard digestion and to offer a balanced diet. In order to avoid fluid retention and edema, daily sodium and fluid intake must be monitored carefully. Main dilemma of the heart failure patients is the obesity-cachexia dilemma. Since one of the main reasons of heart failure is cardiovascular diseases, in first phase, the patient may be obese. In the later phases, cachexia may show up. It was shown that cachexia is associated with mortality. Within this period, patients should not be over-fed and the patient should pass from catabolic state to anabolic state slowly. If the gastrointestinal track is functional oral/enteral feeding must be preferred. Multi vitamin and mineral supportsmay be beneficial, which may replace the increased loss, increase anti-inflammatory response and be anti-oxidants. Large, controlled and well-designed studies must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of nutritional practices such as nutritional assessment, enteral feeding and nutrient supports in heart failure patients.

  7. Advances in the management of atrial fibrillation in congestive heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Gopinathannair, Rakesh; Olshansky, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation, a common problem in patients with heart failure, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Pharmacological as well as invasive management and the endpoints of such management are complex. Recent randomized trials indicate that a rate-control strategy, along with anticoagulation treatment with warfarin, when appropriate, has a similar outcome in terms of mortality and morbidity as rhythm control, and could, therefore, be considered as the primary management str...

  8. High sensitivity C-reactive protein and cardfiac resynchronization therapy in patients with advanced heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi CAI; Wei HUA; Li-Gang DING; Jing WANG; Ke-Ping CHEN; Xin-Wei YANG; Zhi-Min LIU; Shu ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Background The data on the prognostic values of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels in patients with advanced symp-tomatic heart failure (HF) receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are scarce. The aim of present study was to investigate the association of serum hsCRP levels with left ventricle reverse remodeling after six months of CRT as well as long-term outcome. Methods A total of 232 CRT patients were included. The assessment of hsCRP values, clinical status and echocardiographic data were performed at baseline and after six months of CRT. Long-term follow-up included all-cause mortality and hospitalizations for HF. Results During the mean follow-up periods of 31.3 ± 31.5 months, elevated hsCRP (>3 mg/L) prior to CRT was associated with a significant 2.39-fold increase (P=0.006) in the risk of death or HF hospitalizations. At 6-month follow-up, patients who responded to CRT showed significant reductions or maintained low in hsCRP levels (–0.5 ± 4.1 mg/L reduction) compared with non-responders (1.7 ± 6.1 mg/L increase, P=0.018). Com-pared with patients in whom 6-month hsCRP levels were reduced or remained low, patients in whom 6-month hsCRP levels were increased or maintained high experienced a significantly higher risk of subsequent death or HF hospitalizations (Log-rank P<0.001). The echocardio-graphic improvement was also better among patients in whom 6-month hsCRP levels were reduced or remained low compared to those in whom 6-month hsCRP levels were raised or maintained high. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that measurement of baseline and follow-up hsCRP levels may be useful as prognostic markers for timely potential risk stratification and subsequent appropriate treatment strategies in patients with advanced HF undergoing CRT.

  9. Relationship between advanced glycation end-products with the severity of chronic heart failure in 85 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Farhang Zand Parsa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs came up with the recent researches regarding new biomarkers for the diagnosis of heart failure. AGEs are the end products of non-enzymatic glycation and oxidation of proteins, lipids and nucleotides during Maillard biochemical reaction. Although it has been known that AGEs have a role in the pathogenesis of chronic heart failure (CHF, information regarding its role and its pathogenetic mechanism is very limited. The aim of this study was to find any relationship between AGEs with the etiology and severity of chronic heart failure.Methods: This study is a prospective cross sectional study that enrolled 85 patients with chronic heart failure. Measurement of left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF was done by echocardiography. Blood samples were collected for measuring AGEs just before or after echocardiography assessment (in the same session. Measurement of AGEs was done by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method. The relationship between AGEs with the severity of CHF and as well as the etiology of CHF were evaluated via SPSS-15.Results: Of 85 patients 48 (56.5% patients were male and 37 (43.5% were female; Mean±SD of their ages was 55.8±13.4 years old (ranges from 27 to 84 years. Correlation coefficient between LVEF and AGEs was 0.269 (P=0.013. Mean of AGEs in patients with and without ischemic etiology of their heart failure were 16.8±9.8µg/ml and 11.6±7.3 µg/ml, respectively. Although trend was in favor of ischemic heart failure, the difference between two groups was not statistically significant (P= 0.141.Conclusion: According to this study the rate of AGES could be helpful in the diagnosis and assessment of severity of CHF. Based on our findings, higher blood levels of AGEs in the ischemic CHF cases, also it could be concluded that in the future this marker may be used for etiologic differentiation of heart failure syndrome.

  10. Heart Failure Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Site Terms and Conditions Copyright © 2016 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2016 Board Review ... Membership Membership Information Membership in the Heart Failure Society is open to all health care professionals with ...

  11. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Mar 25,2016 Patients with heart failure ... good relationships with all the members of this team. Learn to talk to them openly and honestly ...

  12. Acute electromyostimulation decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with advanced chronic heart failure (EMSICA Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Labrunée

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Muscle passive contraction of lower limb by neuromuscular electrostimulation (NMES is frequently used in chronic heart failure (CHF patients but no data are available concerning its action on sympathetic activity. However, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS is able to improve baroreflex in CHF. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of TENS and NMES compared to Sham stimulation on sympathetic overactivity as assessed by Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity (MSNA. METHODS: We performed a serie of two parallel, randomized, double blinded and sham controlled protocols in twenty-two CHF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class III. Half of them performed stimulation by TENS, and the others tested NMES. RESULTS: Compare to Sham stimulation, both TENS and NMES are able to reduce MSNA (63.5 ± 3.5 vs 69.7 ± 3.1 bursts / min, p < 0.01 after TENS and 51.6 ± 3.3 vs 56.7 ± 3.3 bursts / min, p < 0, 01 after NMES. No variation of blood pressure, heart rate or respiratory parameters was observed after stimulation. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that sensory stimulation of lower limbs by electrical device, either TENS or NMES, could inhibit sympathetic outflow directed to legs in CHF patients. These properties could benefits CHF patients and pave the way for a new non-pharmacological approach of CHF.

  13. Copeptin in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasota B

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bartosz Lasota,1 Katarzyna Mizia-Stec212nd Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland; 21st Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, PolandAbstract: Copeptin is a novel indicator of arginine–vasopressin activation in the body. Its value has primarily been documented in acute life-threatening conditions mediated by the stress response system. Recently, some studies have revealed copeptin's promising role as a marker in cardiovascular diseases. In our review, we summarize the current knowledge on copeptin in pathophysiology, as well as in risk assessment in different clinical settings involving the cardiovascular system with a special focus on heart failure.Keywords: copeptin, heart failure, arginine–vasopressin

  14. Mitophagy and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Shires, Sarah E.; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac mitochondria are responsible for generating energy in the form of ATP through oxidative phosphorylation and are crucial for cardiac function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major contributor to loss of myocytes and development of heart failure. Myocytes have quality control mechanisms in place to ensure a network of functional mitochondria. Damaged mitochondria are degraded by a process called mitochondrial autophagy, or mitophagy, where the organelle is engulfed by an autophagosome a...

  15. Reduction of complex ventricular arrhythmias after enalapril treatment in patients with advanced stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomini, G; Gribaldo, R; Rugna, A; Lupia, M; Molfese, G; Carenza, P

    1991-01-01

    We studied, by 48-hour Holter monitoring, 33 patients with chronic stable heart failure (radionuclide ejection fraction less than 35%), complex ventricular arrhythmias and no electrolyte abnormalities, after a period during which they were treated with digoxin and diuretics. Before Holter monitoring blood samples were analyzed for serum concentration of sodium, potassium, magnesium, urea, creatinine, digoxin, aldosterone and for plasmatic renin activity in addition to urinary aldosterone and catecholamines determination. After these investigations in 23 patients, 5-20 mg of enalapril were progressively added to the conventional therapy, while 10 patients continued the previous therapy. After 8 weeks 30 patients were subjected to a second 48-hour Holter monitoring and to the same biochemical and hormonal tests. One patient died and 2 were lost to follow up. Only the enalapril group showed a significant decrease in the number of premature ventricular complexes (PVC) (p less than 0.01), and the frequency of couplets and episodes of ventricular tachycardia (VT) declined significantly (P less than 0.01). In the two groups there were no significant changes in digoxin, sodium, or magnesium, while potassium concentration increased in both groups (p less than 0.01). In the enalapril group heart rate and systolic and diastolic pressure declined significantly (p less than 0.01), and New York Heart Association class (NYHA) improved (p less than 0.001). In the other group there were no significant changes in these parameters. Enalapril caused a significant increase in the plasmatic renin activity (p less than 0.01) and a significant fall of plasma and urinary aldosterone (p less than 0.01; p less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2055378

  16. Focus on renal congestion in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Baris; Ortiz, Alberto; Covic, Adrian; Solak, Yalcin; Goldsmith, David; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalizations due to heart failure are increasing steadily despite advances in medicine. Patients hospitalized for worsening heart failure have high mortality in hospital and within the months following discharge. Kidney dysfunction is associated with adverse outcomes in heart failure patients. Recent evidence suggests that both deterioration in kidney function and renal congestion are important prognostic factors in heart failure. Kidney congestion in heart failure results from low cardiac output (forward failure), tubuloglomerular feedback, increased intra-abdominal pressure or increased venous pressure. Regardless of the cause, renal congestion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in heart failure. The impact on outcomes of renal decongestion strategies that do not compromise renal function should be explored in heart failure. These studies require novel diagnostic markers that identify early renal damage and renal congestion and allow monitoring of treatment responses in order to avoid severe worsening of renal function. In addition, there is an unmet need regarding evidence-based therapeutic management of renal congestion and worsening renal function. In the present review, we summarize the mechanisms, diagnosis, outcomes, prognostic markers and treatment options of renal congestion in heart failure.

  17. Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Torque Capacity and Circulating Ceramides in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunjes, Danielle L.; Dunlop, Mark; Wu, Christina; Jones, Meaghan; Kato, Tomoko S.; Kennel, Peter J.; Armstrong, Hilary F.; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Bartels, Matthew N.; Forman, Daniel E.; Mancini, Donna M.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF)-related exercise intolerance is thought to be perpetuated by peripheral skeletal muscle functional, structural, and metabolic abnormalities. We analyzed specific dynamics of muscle contraction in patients with HF compared with healthy, sedentary controls. Methods Isometric and isokinetic muscle parameters were measured in the dominant upper and lower limbs of 45 HF patients and 15 healthy age-matched controls. Measurements included peak torque normalized to body weight, work normalized to body weight, power, time to peak torque, and acceleration and deceleration to maximum strength times. Body morphometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan) and circulating fatty acids and ceramides (lipodomics) were analyzed in a subset of subjects (18 HF and 9 controls). Results Extension and flexion time-to-peak torque was longer in the lower limbs of HF patients. Furthermore, acceleration and deceleration times in the lower limbs were also prolonged in HF subjects. HF subjects had increased adiposity and decreased lean muscle mass compared with controls. Decreased circulating unsaturated fatty acids and increased ceramides were found in subjects with HF. Conclusions Delayed torque development suggests skeletal muscle impairments that may reflect abnormal neuromuscular functional coupling. These impairments may be further compounded by increased adiposity and inflammation associated with increased ceramides. PMID:26879888

  18. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:May 31,2016 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  19. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R W M; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  20. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  1. Copeptin in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and mortality in the modern Western world and an increasing proportion of the population will be affected by HF in the future. Although HF management has improved quality of life and prognosis, mortality remains very high despite therapeutic options. Medical management consists of a neurohormonal blockade of an overly activated neurohormonal axis. No single marker has been able to predict or monitor HF with respect to disease progression, hospitalization, or mortality. New methods for diagnosis, monitoring therapy, and prognosis are warranted. Copeptin, a precursor of pre-provasopressin, is a new biomarker in HF with promising potential. Copeptin has been found to be elevated in both acute and chronic HF and is associated with prognosis. Copeptin, in combination with other biomarkers, could be a useful marker in the monitoring of disease severity and as a predictor of prognosis and survival in HF. PMID:26975969

  2. Chronic Heart Failure: Contemporary Diagnosis and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ramani, Gautam V.; Uber, Patricia A.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains the only cardiovascular disease with an increasing hospitalization burden and an ongoing drain on health care expenditures. The prevalence of CHF increases with advancing life span, with diastolic heart failure predominating in the elderly population. Primary prevention of coronary artery disease and risk factor management via aggressive blood pressure control are central in preventing new occurrences of left ventricular dysfunction. Optimal therapy for CHF...

  3. Management of advanced heart failure in the elderly: ethics, economics, and resource allocation in the technological era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Keith M; Stulak, John M; Dunlay, Shannon M; Gafford, Ellin F

    2012-01-01

    Significant strides have been made in the durability, portability, and safety of mechanical circulatory support devices (MCS). Although transplant is considered the standard treatment for advanced heart failure, limits in organ availability leave a much larger pool of recipients in need versus donors. MCS is used as bridge to transplantation and as destination therapy (DT) for patients who will have MCS as their final invasive therapy with transplant not being an option. Despite improvements in quality of life (QOL) and survival, defining the optimal candidate for DT may raise questions regarding the economics of this approach as well as ethical concerns regarding just distribution of goods and services. This paper highlights some of the key ethical issues related to justice and the costs of life-prolonging therapies with respect to resource allocations. Available literature, current debates, and future directions are discussed herein. PMID:23259150

  4. Management of Advanced Heart Failure in the Elderly: Ethics, Economics, and Resource Allocation in the Technological Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Swetz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant strides have been made in the durability, portability, and safety of mechanical circulatory support devices (MCS. Although transplant is considered the standard treatment for advanced heart failure, limits in organ availability leave a much larger pool of recipients in need versus donors. MCS is used as bridge to transplantation and as destination therapy (DT for patients who will have MCS as their final invasive therapy with transplant not being an option. Despite improvements in quality of life (QOL and survival, defining the optimal candidate for DT may raise questions regarding the economics of this approach as well as ethical concerns regarding just distribution of goods and services. This paper highlights some of the key ethical issues related to justice and the costs of life-prolonging therapies with respect to resource allocations. Available literature, current debates, and future directions are discussed herein.

  5. After Heart Attack, New Threat: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poorest patients had a 27 percent increased risk. Atrial fibrillation -- a condition characterized by an abnormal heartbeat -- and diabetes also significantly increased the risk of heart failure, by 63 percent and 44 percent, respectively. Other ...

  6. New medications for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordin, Jonathan S; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is common and results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Current guideline-based therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, including beta blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and aldosterone antagonists aim to interrupt deleterious neurohormonal pathways and have shown significant success in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heart failure. Continued efforts to further improve outcomes in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction have led to the first new-in-class medications approved for heart failure since 2005, ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. Ivabradine targets the If channels in the sinoatrial node of the heart, decreasing heart rate. Sacubitril/valsartan combines a neprilysin inhibitor that increases levels of beneficial vasodilatory peptides with an angiotensin receptor antagonist. On a background of previously approved, guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure, these medications have shown improved clinical outcomes ranging from decreased hospitalizations in a select group of patients to a reduction in all-cause mortality across all pre-specified subgroups. In this review, we will discuss the previously established guideline-directed medical therapies for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, the translational research that led to the development of these new therapies, and the results from the major clinical trials of ivabradine and sacubitril/valsartan. PMID:27038558

  7. Sex differences in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examined differences between men and women with heart failure. First, it was shown that biological sex is a strong modulator in the clinical expression of various cardiomyopathies. In the general population it was shown that men are more likely to develop heart failure with reduced eject

  8. Getting Pumped About Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome caused by dysregulated calcium handling and abnormal cardiac pumping capacity. Whalquist et al. (2014) show that upregulation of micro-RNA25 impairs calcium handling leading to pump dysfunction, and that targeting micro-RNA25 using antisense oligonucleotides reverses pump dysfunction and improves survival in mice with heart failure.

  9. Bisoprolol for congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J.; Gustafsson, F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: beta-Blockers are a cornerstone in the treatment of systolic heart failure treatment, but not all beta-blockers are effective or in this setting. Objective: To define the role of bisoprolol, a highly selective beta(1)-antagonist in congestive heart failure due to systolic dysfunction....... Methods: Using the keywords 'bisoprolol' and 'heart failure' PubMed and BIOSIS databases were searched for information regarding pharmacology and relevant randomised clinical trials. Supplementary publications were acquired by scrutinising reference lists of relevant papers. Additional information...... was obtained from the FDA website. Conclusion: Bisoprolol is an effective and well-tolerated first-line beta-blocker for patients with systolic heart failure. The knowledge is primarily based on study patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure from the three CIBIS trials Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  10. [Palliative care in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzi, Antonello; Svanoni, Fausto; De Maria, Renata

    2012-12-01

    The natural history of heart failure (HF) is characterized by a progressive decline in functional capacity, punctuated by acute heart destabilization episodes which contribute to a spiraling worsening course. Advanced HF affects one in four patients who are referred to the hospital for the syndrome and has an estimated yearly incidence of 12 000 new cases in Italy. Life expectancy is very limited, and in general less than 50% of advanced HF patients are alive at 1-2 years. Advanced HF patients show a high, not modifiable mortality, severe symptoms and impaired quality of life. Treatment goals should focus on the improvement of symptoms and quality of life, the aims of palliative care. Palliative consultations during hospital admissions reduce the number of interventions and procedures in the last stages of life, the length of stay in the intensive care unit and general ward. HF patients who receive home palliative care are more likely to die at home, in accordance with their expressed will. The research project RF-MAR-2007-67955 aims to analyze, through a prospective observational registry, the palliative care needs of HF patients in Italy, to answer the gaps in knowledge on symptom changes during the terminal stages of the disease, on the quality of communication between healthcare professionals, patients and their families and caregivers' needs.

  11. Parallel paths to improve heart failure outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    Gaps and disparities in delivery of heart failure education by nurses and performance in accomplishing self-care behaviors by patients with advanced heart failure may be factors in clinical decompensation and unplanned consumption of health care. Is nurse-led education effectively delivered before...... hospital discharge? Nurse leaders must understand the strength of nurses’ knowledge base related to self-care principles and important barriers to best practice. Nurses may not be comfortable teaching patients about dry weight, meal planning, heart failure medications, or progressive steps of activity...... and exercise. Further, clinical nurses may not have time to provide in-depth education to patients before discharge. Equally important, research is needed to learn about factors that enhance patients’ adherence to heart failure self-care behaviors, because adherence to recommendations of national, evidence...

  12. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga Yuniadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4±7.40 yo preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5±4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87±0.41, 0.63±0.66, 99.00±2.60, and 3.22±3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22±5.68 versus 26.8±7.93, p<0.001 during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  13. Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160932.html Smoking Thickens Heart Wall, Leading to Heart Failure: Study ... 13, 2016 TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking leads to heart failure by causing thickened heart ...

  14. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  15. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  16. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  17. Dimensions of religiousness and spirituality as predictors of well-being in advanced chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Crystal L; Lim, Haikel; Newlon, Max; Suresh, D P; Bliss, Deborah E

    2014-04-01

    We examined relationships between seven dimensions of religion/spirituality (RS) (forgiveness, daily spiritual experiences, belief in afterlife, religious identity, religious support, public practices, and positive RS coping) and three dimensions of well-being (physical, mental, and existential) in a sample of 111 patients with advanced chronic heart failure. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline and 3 months later. Results showed that fairly high levels of RS were reported on all seven dimensions. Furthermore, RS dimensions were differentially related to well-being. No aspect of RS was related to physical well-being, and only a few aspects were related to mental well-being. Forgiveness was related to less subsequent depression, while belief in afterlife was related to poorer mental health. All aspects of RS were related to at least one aspect of existential well-being. In particularly, daily spiritual experiences were linked with higher existential well-being and predicted less subsequent spiritual strain. These results are consistent with the view that in advanced disease, RS may not affect physical well-being but may have potent influences on other aspects of well-being, particularly existential aspects.

  18. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42...

  19. [Metabolic therapy for heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiacono, Ferdinando; Alberti, Luca; Lauretta, Ludovica; Puccetti, Patrizia; Silipigni, Carmen; Margonato, Alberto; Fragasso, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure may promote metabolic changes such as insulin resistance, in part through neurohumoral activation, and determining an increased utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates for energy production. In fact, fasting blood ketone bodies as well as fat oxidation have been shown to be increased in patients with heart failure. The result is depletion of myocardial ATP, phosphocreatine and creatine kinase with decreased efficiency of mechanical work. A direct approach to manipulate cardiac energy metabolism consists in modifying substrate utilization by the failing heart. To date, the most effective metabolic treatments include several pharmacological agents that directly inhibit fatty acid oxidation. The results of current research are supporting the concept that shifting the energy substrate preference away from fatty acid metabolism and toward glucose metabolism could be an effective adjunctive treatment in patients with heart failure. Trimetazidine is the most studied drug in this context. Several small studies have evidenced the usefulness of such additional therapeutic tools for heart failure. More specifically, recent meta-analyses and a multicenter retrospective study have shown that additional use of trimetazidine in patients with heart failure, along with symptoms and cardiac function improvement, also provides a significant protective effect on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events and hospitalization due to cardiac causes. Nevertheless, the exact role of metabolic therapy in heart failure is yet to be established, and a large multicenter randomized trial is necessary. PMID:25072544

  20. [Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF). Together against heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Börste, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most urgent medical and socio-economic challenges of the 21(st) century. Up to three million people are affected in Germany; this means one in ten people over the age of 65  live with heart failure. The current demographic changes will accentuate the importance of this grave health problem. The care of patients with heart failure, as well as the associated research mandates a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF) pursues this objective. CNHF is a research alliance with 11 sites in Germany and was funded by the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) from 2003 through 2014. Since January 2015, the network has been an associate cooperating partner of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). During the 12-year funding period by the BMBF, scientists in the field of heart failure from 30 university hospitals, 5 research institutes, 7 heart centers, 17 cardiovascular clinics, over 200 general practitioners, 4 rehabilitation clinics, as well as numerous organizations and associations were involved in cooperative CNHF research. In the context of 22 projects, the CNHF covered basic, clinical, and health care research, and generated numerous groundbreaking insights into disease mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, which are documented in more than 350 publications. With its central study database and bank of biomaterials, the network has set up a Europe-wide unique research resource, which can be used in the future for national and international cooperations with the DZHK and other partners. Furthermore, the CNHF strongly promotes nation- and Europe-wide public relations and heart failure awareness activities. PMID:26979718

  1. Severe Obesity and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161011.html Severe Obesity and Heart Failure Study sees link even without ... 2016 FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for ...

  2. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Lifestyle Changes for Heart Failure Updated:May 4,2016 ... so it becomes a regular part of your lifestyle. Managing stress Take 15 to 20 minutes a ...

  3. Decongestion in acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Kjeldsen, Keld; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Voors, Adriaan A.; Cleland, John G. F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Fiuzat, Mona; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; O'Connor, Christopher; Felker, G. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Congestion is a major reason for hospitalization in acute heart failure (HF). Therapeutic strategies to manage congestion include diuretics, vasodilators, ultrafiltration, vasopressin antagonists, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and potentially also novel therapies such as gut sequesterants

  4. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time. Although people with heart failure commonly experience depression or anxiety, that does not mean you have to accept ... them to get better on their own. Recognizing Depression and Anxiety Everyone feels anxious or blue some of the ...

  5. Tachycardia-Induced Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Jitenbhai J; Whittaker, Charles T

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure associated with tachyarrhythmias can very often be reversed by dealing with the underlying tachyarrhythmia. Typically characterized by left ventricular dilation and subsequent systolic dysfunction, this disorder can be caused by both atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, most commonly chronic atrial fibrillation. Whereas for most cardiomyopathies there is little that can be done to reverse the progression of the disease, in tachycardia-induced heart failure the patient's often deb...

  6. Serum From Advanced Heart Failure Patients Promotes Angiogenic Sprouting and Affects the Notch Pathway in Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannella, Micaela; Caliceti, Cristiana; Fortini, Francesca; Aquila, Giorgio; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Pannuti, Antonio; Fortini, Cinzia; Morelli, Marco Bruno; Fucili, Alessandro; Francolini, Gloria; Voltan, Rebecca; Secchiero, Paola; Dinelli, Giovanni; Leoncini, Emanuela; Ferracin, Manuela; Hrelia, Silvana; Miele, Lucio; Rizzo, Paola

    2016-12-01

    It is unknown whether components present in heart failure (HF) patients' serum provide an angiogenic stimulus. We sought to determine whether serum from HF patients affects angiogenesis and its major modulator, the Notch pathway, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). In cells treated with serum from healthy subjects or from patients at different HF stage we determined: (1) Sprouting angiogenesis, by measuring cells network (closed tubes) in collagen gel. (2) Protein levels of Notch receptors 1, 2, 4, and ligands Jagged1, Delta-like4. We found a higher number of closed tubes in HUVECs treated with advanced HF patients serum in comparison with cells treated with serum from mild HF patients or controls. Furthermore, as indicated by the reduction of the active form of Notch4 (N4IC) and of Jagged1, advanced HF patients serum inhibited Notch signalling in HUVECs in comparison with mild HF patients' serum and controls. The circulating levels of NT-proBNP (N-terminal of the pro-hormone brain natriuretic peptide), a marker for the detection and evalutation of HF, were positively correlated with the number of closed tubes (r = 0.485) and negatively with Notch4IC and Jagged1 levels in sera-treated cells (r = -0.526 and r = -0.604, respectively). In conclusion, we found that sera from advanced HF patients promote sprouting angiogenesis and dysregulate Notch signaling in HUVECs. Our study provides in vitro evidence of an angiogenic stimulus arising during HF progression and suggests a role for the Notch pathway in it. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2700-2710, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26987674

  7. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology heart failure nurse curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jillian P; Astin, Felicity; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa G; Deaton, Christi M; Kienhorst, Jens; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; McDonagh, Theresa A; Rushton, Claire A; Stromberg, Anna; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in care and management of heart failure have improved outcome, largely as a result of the developing evidence basis for medications, implantable devices and the organization of heart failure follow-up. Such developments have also increased the complexity of delivering and coordinating care. This has led to a change to the way in which heart failure services are organized and to the traditional role of the heart failure nurse. Nurses in many countries now provide a range of services that include providing care for patients with acute and with chronic heart failure, working in and across different sectors of care (inpatient, outpatient, community care, the home and remotely), organising care services around the face-to-face and the remote collection of patient data, and liaising with a wide variety of health-care providers and professionals. To support such advances the nurse requires a skill set that goes beyond that of their initial education and training. The range of nurses' roles across Europe is varied. So too is the nature of their educational preparation. This heart failure nurse curriculum aims to provide a framework for use in countries of the European Society of Cardiology. Its modular approach enables the key knowledge, skills, and behaviours for the nurse working in different care settings to be outlined and so facilitate nursing staff to play a fuller role within the heart failure team. PMID:27220672

  8. Modulating fatty acid oxidation in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lionetti, Vincenzo; Stanley, William C.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2011-01-01

    In the advanced stages of heart failure, many key enzymes involved in myocardial energy substrate metabolism display various degrees of down-regulation. The net effect of the altered metabolic phenotype consists of reduced cardiac fatty oxidation, increased glycolysis and glucose oxidation, and rigidity of the metabolic response to changes in workload. Is this metabolic shift an adaptive mechanism that protects the heart or a maladaptive process that accelerates structural and functional dera...

  9. The pathophysiology of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Clinton D; Conte, John V

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results when the heart is unable to provide sufficient blood flow to meet metabolic requirements or accommodate systemic venous return. This common condition affects over 5 million people in the United States at a cost of $10-38 billion per year. Heart failure results from injury to the myocardium from a variety of causes including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Less common etiologies include cardiomyopathies, valvular disease, myocarditis, infections, systemic toxins, and cardiotoxic drugs. As the heart fails, patients develop symptoms which include dyspnea from pulmonary congestion, and peripheral edema and ascites from impaired venous return. Constitutional symptoms such as nausea, lack of appetite, and fatigue are also common. There are several compensatory mechanisms that occur as the failing heart attempts to maintain adequate function. These include increasing cardiac output via the Frank-Starling mechanism, increasing ventricular volume and wall thickness through ventricular remodeling, and maintaining tissue perfusion with augmented mean arterial pressure through activation of neurohormonal systems. Although initially beneficial in the early stages of heart failure, all of these compensatory mechanisms eventually lead to a vicious cycle of worsening heart failure. Treatment strategies have been developed based upon the understanding of these compensatory mechanisms. Medical therapy includes diuresis, suppression of the overactive neurohormonal systems, and augmentation of contractility. Surgical options include ventricular resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular remodeling, ventricular assist device implantation, and heart transplantation. Despite significant understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in heart failure, this disease causes significant morbidity and carries a 50% 5-year mortality. PMID:22227365

  10. Prevalence of AAV1 neutralizing antibodies and consequences for a clinical trial of gene transfer for advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B; Butler, J; Felker, G M; Ponikowski, P; Voors, A A; Pogoda, J M; Provost, R; Guerrero, J; Hajjar, R J; Zsebo, K M

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) has many advantages as a gene therapy vector, but the presence of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is an important limitation. This study was designed to determine: (1) characteristics of AAV NAbs in human subjects, (2) prevalence of AAV1 NAbs in heart failure patients and (3) utility of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy in reducing NAb seroconversion in an animal model. NAb titers were assessed in a cohort of heart failure patients and in patients screened for a clinical trial of gene therapy with AAV1 carrying the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase gene (AAV1/SERCA2a). AAV1 NAbs were found in 59.5% of 1552 heart failure patients. NAb prevalence increased with age (P=0.001) and varied geographically. The pattern of NAb titers suggested that exposure is against AAV2, with AAV1 NAb seropositivity due to crossreactivity. The effects of immunosuppression on NAb formation were tested in mini-pigs treated with immunosuppressant therapy before, during and after a single AAV1/SERCA2a infusion. Aggressive immunosuppression did not prevent formation of AAV1 NAbs. We conclude that immunosuppression is unlikely to be a viable solution for repeat AAV1 dosing. Strategies to reduce NAbs in heart failure patients are needed to increase eligibility for gene transfer using AAV vectors.

  11. Heart failure overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smoke . Stay active. Walk or ride a stationary bicycle. Your provider can provide a safe and effective ... at the same time. A defibrillator sends an electrical pulse to stop life-threatening abnormal heart rhythms. ...

  12. Dynamics and prognostic role of galectin-3 in patients with advanced heart failure, during left ventricular assist device support and following heart transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Coromilas, Ellie; Que-Xu, Em-Claire; Moore, D’Vesharronne; Kato, Tomoko S.; Wu, Christina; Ji, Ruiping; Givens, Raymond; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Takayama, Hiroo; NAKA, YOSHIFUMI; George, Isaac; Mancini, Donna; Schulze, P. Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Galectin-3 is a marker of myocardial inflammation and fibrosis shown to correlate with morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF). We examined the utility of galectin-3 as a marker of the severity of HF, the response of galectin-3 levels to ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation or heart transplantation (HTx), and its use as a prognostic indicator. Methods Plasma galectin-3 was measured using a commercially available ELISA assay in patients with stable HF (n = 55), severe...

  13. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed.

  14. Heart failure: Epidemiology and prevention in India

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Mark D; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2010-01-01

    Reliable estimates of heart failure are lacking in India because of the absence of a surveillance programme to track incidence, prevalence, outcomes and key causes of heart failure. Nevertheless, we propose that the incidence and prevalence rates of heart failure are rising due to population, epidemiological and health transitions. Based on disease-specific estimates of prevalence and incidence rates of heart failure, we conservatively estimate the prevalence of heart failure in India due to ...

  15. Mechanisms of heart failure in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Imo A; Goff, David C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing haemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition to other heart failure risk factors. Direct cardiac lipotoxicity has been described where lipid accumulation in the heart results in cardiac dysfunction inexplicable of other heart failure risk factors. In this overview, we discussed various pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to heart failure in obesity, including the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac lipotoxicity. We defined the obesity paradox and enumerated various premises for the paradoxical associations observed in the relationship between obesity and heart failure.

  16. Translocation and cleavage of myocardial dystrophin as a common pathway to advanced heart failure: A scheme for the progression of cardiac dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Toyo-Oka, Teruhiko; Kawada, Tomie; Nakata, Jumi; Xie, Han; Urabe, Masashi; Masui, Fujiko; Ebisawa, Takashi; Tezuka, Asaki; Iwasawa, Kuniaki; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Uehara, Yoshio; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Kostin, Sawa; Schaper, Jutta; Nakazawa, Mikio

    2004-01-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in developed countries. The mechanism underlying the progression of cardiac dysfunction needs to be clarified to establish approaches to prevention or treatment. Here, using TO-2 hamsters with hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we show age-dependent cleavage and translocation of myocardial dystrophin (Dys) from the sarcolemma (SL) to the myoplasm, increased SL permeability in situ, and a close relationship between the loss of Dys and h...

  17. Heart failure: SGLT2 inhibitors and heart failure -- clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Itamar; Cahn, Avivit

    2016-04-01

    The latest findings from the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial show a 34% reduction in hospitalization for heart failure or cardiovascular death in patients receiving empagliflozin, a sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, compared with placebo. These outstanding results call for discussion of the clinical implications, and in-depth studies of the mechanisms of action of SGLT2 inhibitors. PMID:26961066

  18. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about major side effects of treatment, quality of life, loss of independence, impact of worsening symptoms, and increased commitment by caregivers and families. Considering palliative care , ... a care plan for the end of life that ensures your needs and wishes are met. ...

  19. Advances of metabolic therapy for heart failure%心力衰竭的代谢治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄震华

    2011-01-01

    The hyperadrenergic state of heart failure can cause the increase of plasma free fatty acid,insulin resistance and decrease of glucose oxidation, result in the decrease of energy production, increase of free radical generation and inflammatory markers, and thereby, make heart failure worse.Adrenergic beta receptor antagonists, trimetazidine, ranolazine, perhexiline and metformin were currently paid more attention in the study of metabolic therapy for heart failure.%心力衰竭时交感神经兴奋性增加,使血浆游离脂肪酸浓度增高,引起胰岛素抵抗、葡萄糖氧化减少、游离脂肪酸氧化增加,导致能量产生减少、氧自由基和炎症介质产生增加,均加剧心力衰竭.肾上腺素β受体拮抗药、曲美他嗪、雷诺嗪、哌克昔林、二甲双呱等是目前心力衰竭代谢治疗中研究最多的药物.

  20. 利尿剂在心力衰竭中的治疗进展%Research Advances in Diuretic Therapy for Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋菲(综述); 张冬颖; 刘剑(审校)

    2015-01-01

    心力衰竭(心衰)指心脏结构或功能性疾病导致心室充盈及(或)射血能力受损而引起的一组综合征。利尿剂在心力衰竭治疗中占重要地位,是治疗急性呼吸困难和维持慢性心衰血容量稳定的一线用药。合理使用利尿剂是其他治疗心衰药物取得成功的关键因素之一。利尿剂种类较多,近年有关利尿剂治疗心衰的研究不断涌现,尤其是托拉塞米、醛固酮受体拮抗剂、托伐普坦等在心衰治疗中的应用有较多的文献报道,该文就相关研究进展予以综述。%Heart failure refers to a series of clinical syndromes of impaired ability of the ventricle to fill or eject blood results from abnormality of cardiac structure or functional diseaseshe.Diuretics play an importantrole in heart failure therapy,they are the first-line drugs in treating acute dyspnea and maintaining thestability of blood volume in patients with chronic heart failure.The rational use of diuretics is one of the keyfactors that influence on the successfulness of other medicines in treating heart failure.In recent years,researcheson diuretics in treating heart failure are constantly emerging,especially on torasemide,aldosterone receptorantagonists,tolvaptan,etc.Here is to make a review of the advances in such researches .

  1. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V;

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...

  2. 10.3.Heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920271 The relationship between plasmacatecholamines and cardiac function in pa-tients with congestive heart failure.ZHAOShuyuan (赵树元),et al.Dept Intern Med,HebeiProv Hosp.Chin Cir J 1991;6(6):484-486.

  3. Heart failure association of the European society of cardiology specialist heart failure curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja; Nielsen, Olav W; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module. The second year allows completion of the optional modules of advanced imaging, device therapy for implanters, cardiac transplantation, and mechanical circulatory support. The second year can also be devoted to continuation of specialist heart failure training and/or research for those not wishing to continue with the advanced modules.

  4. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42.......4%), valvular disease (VHD, 9.5%), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, 7.9%), other (11.5%), and unknown etiology (14.8%). Patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were also included. Follow-up was up to 5years. RESULTS: In multivariable analysis, with HTN as the reference, VHD showed the highest...

  5. Anemia in chronic heart failure : etiology and treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure, and is related to increased morbidity and mortality. The etiology of anemia in heart failure is complex and still not fully resolved. The review will describe current advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of an

  6. Optimized cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Hong-xia; HUA Wei; ZHANG Shu; SUN Xin; CHEN Ke-ping; WANG Fang-zheng; CHEN Xin

    2007-01-01

    @@ Heart failure was a major and increasing public health problem, with an almost "epidemic increase in the number of patients.1 Despite recent advances in pharmacotherapy, the prognosis remains poor. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), by pacing right and left ventricles, has been proved to improve symptoms and reduce mortality for heart failure patients with cardiac dyssynchrony.

  7. NEW HORIZONS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneeta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Heart failure (HF is a global problem with an estimated prevalence of 38 million people worldwide; a number that is increasing with the ageing of the population. The heart failure is associated with high health expenditure, mostly because of cost of hospitalisations. The five year survival for individuals with heart failure is about 50%, and in advanced heart failure, the one year survival is as low as 22%, regardless of therapy. The modern history of therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction began with the introduction of vasodilatation with hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate. Research about heart failure is now quite active worldwide and many areas are being explored e.g. gene therapy, modification of function of micro RNAs by antagomirs, stem cell therapy besides development of new pharmacological therapeutic agents.

  8. Heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Erik; Abrahamsen, B; Vestergaard, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates.......The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of heart failure in patients treated with bisphosphonates....

  9. Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_159059.html Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise You'll feel better and maybe even live ... with heart failure should not be scared of exercise damaging them or killing them," said principal investigator ...

  10. Effects of heart failure management programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink-André de la Porte, P.W.F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract of the thesis “Effects of heart failure management programmes” The main purpose of the studies presented in this thesis, was to assess whether an intensive 1-year intervention at a heart failure clinic for patients with heart failure, NYHA classification III or IV, reduces the incidence of

  11. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Stevenson, M.D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality. Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy. It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug therapy. Data from randomized trials demonstrating a survival benefit for patients undergoing an ablation procedure for atrial fibrillation are still lacking. Ablation of the AV junction and permanent pacing remain a treatment alternative in otherwise refractory cases. Placement of a biventricular system may prevent or reduce negative consequences of chronic right ventricular pacing. Current objectives and options for treatment of atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients are reviewed.

  12. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ede Lucia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CAs biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers are presently being investigated for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80% and Norepinephrine (20% in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs: α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and βARs (mainly β2ARs stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and GPCR kinases (GRKs regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal a2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies (antiadrenergic, such as bAR-blockers minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems.The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding pathophysiology of HF and identifying new potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Seiler; Tedrow, Usha B.; Stevenson, William G

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality.  Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy.  It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect.  Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of a...

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    William G. Stevenson, M.D; Usha B. Tedrow, M.D; Jens Seiler, M.D

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality. Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy. It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of anti-arrhythmic dru...

  15. Abdominal contributions to cardiorenal dysfunction in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Frederik H; Dupont, Matthias; Steels, Paul; Grieten, Lars; Malbrain, Manu; Tang, W H Wilson; Mullens, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    Current pathophysiological models of congestive heart failure unsatisfactorily explain the detrimental link between congestion and cardiorenal function. Abdominal congestion (i.e., splanchnic venous and interstitial congestion) manifests in a substantial number of patients with advanced congestive heart failure, yet is poorly defined. Compromised capacitance function of the splanchnic vasculature and deficient abdominal lymph flow resulting in interstitial edema might both be implied in the occurrence of increased cardiac filling pressures and renal dysfunction. Indeed, increased intra-abdominal pressure, as an extreme marker of abdominal congestion, is correlated with renal dysfunction in advanced congestive heart failure. Intriguing findings provide preliminary evidence that alterations in the liver and spleen contribute to systemic congestion in heart failure. Finally, gut-derived hormones might influence sodium homeostasis, whereas entrance of bowel toxins into the circulatory system, as a result of impaired intestinal barrier function secondary to congestion, might further depress cardiac as well as renal function. Those toxins are mainly produced by micro-organisms in the gut lumen, with presumably important alterations in advanced heart failure, especially when renal function is depressed. Therefore, in this state-of-the-art review, we explore the crosstalk between the abdomen, heart, and kidneys in congestive heart failure. This might offer new diagnostic opportunities as well as treatment strategies to achieve decongestion in heart failure, especially when abdominal congestion is present. Among those currently under investigation are paracentesis, ultrafiltration, peritoneal dialysis, oral sodium binders, vasodilator therapy, renal sympathetic denervation and agents targeting the gut microbiota. PMID:23747781

  16. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices.

  17. A Comparison of three diuretic Regimens in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, F.; Eriksen, U.H.; Guul, S.-J.;

    1993-01-01

    Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate......Farmakologi, bendroflumethiazide, diuretics, heart failure, bumethanide, ergometry plasma lactate...

  18. Is Heart Rate a Norepiphenomenon in Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensey, Mark; O'Neill, James

    2016-09-01

    There has been an increased focus on heart rate as a target in the management of cardiovascular disease and more specifically in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in recent years with several studies showing the benefit of a lower resting heart rate on outcomes. This review paper examines the pathophysiology behind the benefits of lowering heart rate in heart failure and also the evidence for and against the pharmacological agents available to achieve this. PMID:27457085

  19. Heart failure in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabete Viana de Freitas; Michel Batlouni; Roberto Gamarsky

    2012-01-01

    The aging of the population is, currently, a major phenomenon, drawing the attention of a number of investigators. The significant increase of life expectancies over the past few decades, in addition to social and economic consequences, has lead to a major change in the morbidity and mortality profile of elders. Heart failure (HF) is a condition in which the heart can not pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. HF is predominantly a disorder of the elderly with rates increasing exponentially. The prevalence of HF approximately doubles with each decade of life. As people live longer, the occurrence of HF rises, as well as other conditions that complicate its treatment. Impaired heart function implies a reduced duration of survival. Fortunately, many factors that can prevent HF and improve outcome are known and can be applied at any stage. This review emphasizes the importance of factors inherent in aging itself, focusing on heart disease, particularly as a disease of aging, can help critically refine management of this acute and chronic disease, as well as foster preventive strategies to reduce the incidence of this common malady.

  20. Primary Graft Failure after Heart Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Iyer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary graft failure (PGF is a devastating complication that occurs in the immediate postoperative period following heart transplantation. It manifests as severe ventricular dysfunction of the donor graft and carries significant mortality and morbidity. In the last decade, advances in pharmacological treatment and mechanical circulatory support have improved the outlook for heart transplant recipients who develop this complication. Despite these advances in treatment, PGF is still the leading cause of death in the first 30 days after transplantation. In today's climate of significant organ shortages and growing waiting lists, transplant units worldwide have increasingly utilised “marginal donors” to try and bridge the gap between “supply and demand.” One of the costs of this strategy has been an increased incidence of PGF. As the threat of PGF increases, the challenges of predicting and preventing its occurrence, as well as the identification of more effective treatment modalities, are vital areas of active research and development.

  1. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  2. Insomnia and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Don; Anstead, Michael I; Ho, Julia; Phillips, Barbara A

    2009-09-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease including chronic heart failure (CHF) and is a significant contributing factor to fatigue and poor quality of life. The pathophysiology of CHF often leads to fatigue, due to nocturnal symptoms causing sleep disruption, including cough, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and nocturia. Inadequate cardiac function may lead to hypoxemia or poor perfusion of the cerebrum, skeletal muscle, or visceral body organs, which result in organ dysfunction or failure and may contribute to fatigue. Sleep disturbances negatively affect all dimensions of quality of life and is related to increased risk of comorbidities, including depression. This article reviews insomnia in CHF, cardiac medication side-effects related to sleep disturbances, and treatment options. PMID:18758945

  3. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-12-01

    In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  4. Co-morbidities in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Damman, Kevin; van der Meer, Peter; Wijkstra, Peter J.; Luijckx, Gert-Jan; van Beek, Andre; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome characterized by poor quality of life and high morbidity and mortality. Co-morbidities frequently accompany heart failure and further decrease in both quality of life and clinical outcome. We describe that the prevalence of co-morbidities in patients with heart f

  5. Brain natriuretic peptide and optimal management of heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nan; WANG Jian-an

    2005-01-01

    Aside from the important role of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in diagnosis, and differential diagnosis of heart failure, this biological peptide has proved to be an independent surrogate marker of rehospitalization and death of the fatal disease.Several randomized clinical trials demonstrated that drugs such as beta blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, spironolactone and amiodarone have beneficial effects in decreasing circulating BNP level during the management of chronic heart failure. The optimization of clinical decision-making appeals for a representative surrogate marker for heart failure prognosis. The serial point-of-care assessments of BNP concentration provide a therapeutic goal of clinical multi-therapy and an objective guidance for optimal treatment of heart failure. Nevertheless new questions and problems in this area remain to be clarified. On the basis of current research advances, this article gives an overview of BNP peptide and its property and role in the management of heart failure.

  6. Heart failure and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Castagna, Francesco; Mattaliano, Paola; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of sleep-related disorders in patients with cardiovascular diseases is growing. In particular, sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep time, and low sleep quality are frequently reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Sleep-disordered breathing, which includes obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and central sleep apnoea (CSA), is common in patients with HF and has been suggested to increase the morbidity and mortality in these patients. Both OSA and CSA are associated with increased sympathetic activation, vagal withdrawal, altered haemodynamic loading conditions, and hypoxaemia. Moreover, OSA is strongly associated with arterial hypertension, the most common risk factor for cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Intrathoracic pressure changes are also associated with OSA, contributing to haemodynamic alterations and potentially affecting overexpression of genes involved in ventricular remodelling. HF treatment can decrease the severity of both OSA and CSA. Indeed, furosemide and spironolactone administration, exercise training, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and eventually heart transplantation have shown a positive effect on OSA and CSA in patients with HF. At present, whether CSA should be treated and, if so, which is the optimal therapy is still debated. By contrast, more evidence is available on the beneficial effects of OSA treatment in patients with HF. PMID:27173772

  7. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Seiler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality.  Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy.  It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect.  Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug therapy.  Data from randomized trials demonstrating a survival benefit for patients undergoing an ablation procedure for atrial fibrillation are still lacking.  Ablation of the AV junction and permanent pacing remain a treatment alternative in otherwise refractory cases.  Placement of a biventricular system may prevent or reduce negative consequences of chronic right ventricular pacing.  Current objectives and options for treatment of atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients are reviewed. 

  8. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Contemporary Medical Management

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. C...

  9. Right heart failure: toward a common language

    OpenAIRE

    Mehra, Mandeep R.; Park, Myung H.; Landzberg, Michael J.; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right ...

  10. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Guglin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Maya GuglinUniversity of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USAAbstract: Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure.Keywords: heart failure, diuretics, congestion, systolic function, diastolic function, ejection fraction

  11. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  12. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  13. NADPH Oxidases in Heart Failure: Poachers or Gamekeepers?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Min; Perino, Alessia; Ghigo, Alessandra; Hirsch, Emilio; Shah, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of heart failure but clinical antioxidant trials have been unsuccessful. This may be because effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) depend upon their source, location, and concentration. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) proteins generate ROS in a highly regulated fashion and modulate several components of the heart failure phenotype. Recent Advances: Two Nox isoforms, Nox2 and Nox4, are expressed in the ...

  14. Heart Failure Update: Inpatient Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabathina, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure (HF) is one of most common reasons for hospitalization among individuals older than 65 years. A thorough evaluation, including history, physical examination, and laboratory assessment, is required to optimize care of these patients. In uncertain cases, serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal proBNP level, stress testing, and/or invasive coronary angiography may be helpful in establishing the diagnosis. The hospital setting provides an opportunity to identify etiologies and stabilize the patient. The primary goal of inpatient HF therapy is systemic and pulmonary decongestion, achieved most effectively using intravenous diuretic therapy. Rate and rhythm control may be needed for patients with concurrent atrial fibrillation and, in American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association stage D HF, intravenous inotropes may become necessary. New pharmacologic or device therapies also are considered as a means of transitioning patients, especially those with severe disease, to the outpatient setting. Patients hospitalized for acute decompensated HF have high postdischarge mortality and rehospitalization rates and, thus, should be monitored carefully. PMID:26974002

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  16. Gastrointestinal and Liver Issues in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Varun; Fang, James C

    2016-04-26

    Heart failure affects ≈23 million people worldwide and continues to have a high mortality despite advancements in modern pharmacotherapy and device therapy. HF is a complex clinical syndrome that can result in the impairment of endocrine, hematologic, musculoskeletal, renal, respiratory, peripheral vascular, hepatic, and gastrointestinal systems. Although gastrointestinal involvement and hepatic involvement are common in HF and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, their bidirectional association with HF progression remains poorly fathomed. The current understanding of multiple mechanisms, including proinflammatory cytokine milieu, hormonal imbalance, and anabolic/catabolic imbalance, has been used to explain the relationship between the gut and HF and has been the basis for many novel therapeutic strategies. However, the failure of these novel therapies such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α has resulted in further complexity. In this review, we describe the involvement of the gastrointestinal and liver systems within the HF syndrome, their pathophysiological mechanisms, and their clinical consequences.

  17. Psychosocial risk factors and heart failure hospitalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Andersen, Ingelise; Prescott, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Prospective studies on the role of psychosocial factors in heart failure development are virtually nonexistent. The authors aimed to address the effect of psychosocial factors on the risk of heart failure hospitalization in men and women free of cardiovascular disease. In 1991-1993, the 8,670 par...

  18. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  19. Efficacy of carvedilol in pediatric heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Fatkin, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Huang M, Zhang X, Chen S et al. The effect of carvedilol treatment on chronic heart failure in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: a prospective, randomized-controlled study. Pediatr. Cardiol. 34, 680-685 (2013). A role for β-blockers in children with heart failure has...

  20. Combination of liver biopsy with MELD-XI scores for post-transplant outcome prediction in patients with advanced heart failure and suspected liver dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Maryjane; Mitchell, James; Lippel, Matthew; Kato, Tomoko S.; Jin, Zhezhen; Ippolito, Paul; Dove, Lorna; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Takayama, Hiroo; Emond, Jean; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna; Lefkowitch, Jay H.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Functional and structural liver abnormalities may be found in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). The Model of End-Stage Liver Disease Excluding INR (MELD-XI) score allows functional risk stratification of HF patients on and off anti-coagulation awaiting heart transplantation (HTx), but these scores may improve or worsen depending on bridging therapies and during time on the waiting list. Liver biopsy is sometimes performed to assess for severity of fibrosis. Uncertainty remains whether biopsy in addition to MELD-XI improves prediction of adverse outcomes in patients evaluated for HTx. METHODS Sixty-eight patients suspected of advanced liver disease underwent liver biopsy as part of their HTx evaluation. A liver risk score (fibrosis-on-biopsy + 1) × MELD-XI was generated for each patient. RESULTS Fifty-two patients were listed, of whom 14 had mechanical circulatory support (MCS). Thirty-six patients underwent transplantation and 27 patients survived ≥1 year post-HTx (74%, as compared with 88% average 1-year survival in HTx patients without suspected liver disease; p ventilation times (55.6% vs 11.1%, p = 0.013) and severe bleeding events (44.4% vs 11.1%, p = 0.049). The liver risk score at evaluation for HTx also predicted 1-year mortality after HTx listing (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Patients with HF and advanced liver dysfunction are high-risk HTx candidates. Liver biopsy in addition to MELD-XI improves risk stratification of patients with advanced HF and suspected irreversible liver dysfunction. PMID:25851466

  1. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provider may suggest other ways to help your body reduce the extra fluid. Depression and Heart Failure If you have chronic heart ... more often, tell your healthcare professional right away. Depression in ... and other chemicals in your body that can be damaging to your heart and ...

  2. Heart Failure in the Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shamiri, Mostafa Q

    2013-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of heart failure is the final pathway for a myriad of diseases that affect the heart, and is a leading and growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence-based guidelines have provided clinicians with valuable data for better applying diagnostic and therapeutic tools, particularly the overwhelming new imaging technology and other, often expensive, therapies and devices, in heart failure patients. In the Middle East, progress has recently been made with the ...

  3. The systemic inflammatory response in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson

    2000-09-01

    The physiologic diagnosis of heart failure has changed very little over the past several decades: heart failure is the inability of the cardiac output to meet the metabolic demands of the organism. The clinical definition of heart failure (also relatively unchanged) describes it as ventricular dysfunction that is accompanied by reduced exercise tolerance. Our understanding of the true pathophysiologic processes involved in heart failure have, however, changed. We have moved from thinking of heart failure as primarily a circulatory phenomenon to seeing it as a pathophysiologic state under the control of multiple complex systems. Over the past several years the dramatic explosion of research in the fields of immunology and immunopathology have added an additional piece to the puzzle that defines heart failure and have lead to an understanding of heart failure, at least in some part, as an 'inflammatory disease'. In this review we will examine several of the key inflammatory mediators as they relate to heart failure while at the same time attempting to define the source(s) of these mediators. We will examine key elements of the inflammatory cascade as they relate to heart failure such as: cytokines, 'proximal mediators' (e.g. NF-kappaB), and distal mediators (e.g. nitric oxide). We will end with a discussion of the potential therapeutic role of anti-inflammatory strategies in the future treatment of heart failure. Also, throughout the review we will examine the potential pitfalls encountered in applying bench discoveries to the bedside as have been learned in the field of septic shock research. PMID:10978715

  4. A study to improve communication between clinicians and patients with advanced heart failure: methods and challenges behind the working to improve discussions about defibrillator management trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Nathan E; Kalman, Jill; Kutner, Jean S; Fromme, Erik K; Hutchinson, Mathew D; Lipman, Hannah I; Matlock, Daniel D; Swetz, Keith M; Lampert, Rachel; Herasme, Omarys; Morrison, R Sean

    2014-12-01

    We report the challenges of the Working to Improve Discussions About Defibrillator Management trial, our novel, multicenter trial aimed at improving communication between cardiology clinicians and their patients with advanced heart failure (HF) who have implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). The study objectives are (1) to increase ICD deactivation conversations, (2) to increase the number of ICDs deactivated, and (3) to improve psychological outcomes in bereaved caregivers. The unit of randomization is the hospital, the intervention is aimed at HF clinicians, and the patient and caregiver are the units of analysis. Three hospitals were randomized to usual care and three to intervention. The intervention consists of an interactive educational session, clinician reminders, and individualized feedback. We enroll patients with advanced HF and their caregivers, and then we regularly survey them to evaluate whether the intervention has improved communication between them and their HF providers. We encountered three implementation barriers. First, there were institutional review board concerns at two sites because of the palliative nature of the study. Second, we had difficulty in creating entry criteria that accurately identified an HF population at high risk of dying. Third, we had to adapt our entry criteria to the changing landscape of ventricular assist devices and cardiac transplant eligibility. Here we present our novel solutions to the difficulties we encountered. Our work has the ability to enhance conduct of future studies focusing on improving care for patients with advanced illness.

  5. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  6. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  7. Heart Failure: Diagnosis, Management and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati A. Inamdar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advancement in medicine, management of heart failure (HF, which usually presents as a disease syndrome, has been a challenge to healthcare providers. This is reflected by the relatively higher rate of readmissions along with increased mortality and morbidity associated with HF. In this review article, we first provide a general overview of types of HF pathogenesis and diagnostic features of HF including the crucial role of exercise in determining the severity of heart failure, the efficacy of therapeutic strategies and the morbidity/mortality of HF. We then discuss the quality control measures to prevent the growing readmission rates for HF. We also attempt to elucidate published and ongoing clinical trials for HF in an effort to evaluate the standard and novel therapeutic approaches, including stem cell and gene therapies, to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Finally, we discuss the appropriate utilization/documentation and medical coding based on the severity of the HF alone and with minor and major co-morbidities. We consider that this review provides an extensive overview of the HF in terms of disease pathophysiology, management and documentation for the general readers, as well as for the clinicians/physicians/hospitalists.

  8. How Is Heart Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your heart doesn’t work as hard to pump blood. Studies have shown that this medicine can reduce ... a left ventricular assist device . This device helps pump blood from the heart to the rest of the ...

  9. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Program Funded States History of PCNASP PCNASP Metrics/Data Elements PCNASP Logic Model 2015 PCNASP FOA DP15- ... Insurance Million Hearts® Clinical Quality Measures (CQM) Dashboard Data Trends & Maps Printed Atlases Heart Disease Hospitalizations Among ...

  10. Self-care in heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula da Conceição; Mariana Alvina dos Santos; Bernardo dos Santos; Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro da Cruz

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to describe self-care behavior and its associated factors in a sample of heart failure Brazilian patients. Method: descriptive cross-sectional study with non-probabilistic sample of 116 ambulatory patients undergoing heart failure treatment. Self-care was evaluated using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index, (scores ≥70 points=appropriate self-care). Association tests were applied, considering a descriptive level of 0.05. Results: the mean age of participants was 57.7 (SD ...

  11. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  12. Heart failure and orthostatic hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Oleg; Feldman, Leonid; Cohen, Natan

    2016-09-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is traditionally defined as a fall of ≥20 mmHg in systolic and/or ≥10 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure within 3 min of active standing. OH is a common comorbidity among patients with heart failure (HF). A comprehensive review regarding the relationship between OH and HF has not been published in the English literature. Here we provide current information about concomitant HF and OH, including: pathophysiology, methods of evaluation, prevalence, risk factors, prognosis and management of OH in HF patients, as well as the incidence of HF among patients with OH. The prevalence of OH in HF ranges from 8 % among community-living individuals to 83 % in elderly hospitalized patients. Dizziness and palpitations are the most frequent OH symptoms. Main predisposing factors for OH are HF severity, non-ischemic HF etiology, prolonged bed rest, hypertension and polypharmacy. OH in HF is generally managed according to recommendations for treatment of OH in the non-HF population. However, since acceptable pharmacotherapy with fludrocortisone and midodrine is problematic in HF due to adverse effects, the management of OH is based mainly on non-pharmacologic interventions. Several prospective epidemiological studies reported that OH is independently associated with an increased risk of developing HF. Since OH is a common and frequently symptomatic condition in HF patients, its clinical implications should be emphasized. Longitudinal studies should be conducted to investigate the prognostic significance and optimal management of OH in the HF population. PMID:26880254

  13. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rajeev; Bakken, Kristian; D'Elia, Emilia; Lewis, Gregory D

    2016-08-01

    Exercise intolerance, indicated by dyspnea and fatigue during exertion, is a cardinal manifestation of heart failure (HF). Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) precisely defines maximum exercise capacity through measurement of peak oxygen uptake (VO2). Peak VO2 values have a critical role in informing patient selection for advanced HF interventions such as heart transplantation and ventricular assist devices. Oxygen uptake and ventilatory patterns obtained during the submaximal portion of CPET are also valuable to recognize because of their ease of ascertainment during low-level exercise, relevance to ability to perform activities of daily living, independence from volitional effort, and strong relationship to prognosis in HF. The ability of peak VO2 and other CPET variables to be measured reproducibly and to accurately reflect HF severity is increasingly recognized and endorsed by scientific statements. Integration of CPET with invasive hemodynamic monitoring and cardiac imaging during exercise provides comprehensive characterization of multisystem reserve capacity that can inform prognosis and the need for cardiac interventions. Here, we review both practical aspects of conducting CPETs in patients with HF for clinical and research purposes as well as interpretation of gas exchange patterns across the spectrum of preclinical HF to advanced HF. PMID:27289406

  14. Remote patient monitoring in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Mishkin, Aaron; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kalra, Ankur; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a significant economic burden on our health-care resources with very high readmission rates. Remote monitoring has a substantial potential to improve the management and outcome of patients with HF. Readmission for decompensated HF is often preceded by a stage of subclinical hemodynamic decompensation, where therapeutic interventions would prevent subsequent clinical decompensation and hospitalization. Various methods of remote patient monitoring include structured telephone support, advanced telemonitoring technologies, remote monitoring of patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators, and implantable hemodynamic monitors. Current data examining the efficacy of remote monitoring technologies in improving outcomes have shown inconsistent results. Various medicolegal and financial issues need to be addressed before widespread implementation of this exciting technology can take place. PMID:23018667

  15. Patient Experiences of Structured Heart Failure Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala E. Tully

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patient experiences of structured heart failure rehabilitation and their views on the important components of heart failure services were examined. Methods. Focus groups were conducted with fifteen participants (men, =12 attending one of two heart failure rehabilitation programmes. Sessions were guided by a semistructured interview schedule covering participants' experiences of the programme, maintenance, and GP role. Focus group transcripts were analysed qualitatively. Results. Participants indicated that rehabilitation programmes substantially met their needs. Supervised exercise sessions increased confidence to resume physical activity, while peer-group interaction and supportive medical staff improved morale. However, once the programme ended, some participants' self-care motivation lapsed, especially maintenance of an exercise routine. Patients doubted their GPs' ability to help them manage their condition. Conclusion. Structured rehabilitation programmes are effective in enabling patients to develop lifestyle skills to live with heart failure. However, postrehabilitation maintenance interventions are necessary to sustain patients' confidence in disease self-management.

  16. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:Mar 25,2016 These are concerns that ... draw up a list of questions for your physician or healthcare team. Download Partnering in Your HF ...

  17. Atrial Fibrillation in Congestive Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lubitz, Steven A.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure are morbid conditions that share common risk factors and frequently coexist. Each condition predisposes to the other, and the concomitant presence of the two identifies individuals at increased risk for mortality. Recent data have emerged which help elucidate the complex genetic and non-genetic pathophysiological mechanisms that contribute to the development of atrial fibrillation in individuals with congestive heart failure. Clinical trial res...

  18. Pediatric heart failure: current state and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Joseph W; Jang, Gi Young

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a complex pathophysiological syndrome that can occur in children from a variety of diseases, including cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, and congenital heart disease. The condition is associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality and places a significant burden on families of affected children and to society as a whole. Current medical therapy is taken largely from the management of heart failure in adults, though clear survival benefit of these medications are lacking. Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have taken an increasingly important role in the management of advanced heart failure in children. The predominant role of these devices has been as a bridge to heart transplantation, and excellent results are currently achieved for most children with cardiomyopathies. There is an ongoing investigation to improve outcomes in high-risk populations, such as small infants and those with complex congenital heart disease, including patients with functionally univentricular hearts. Additionally, there is an active investigation and interest in expansion of VADs beyond the predominant utilization as a bridge to a heart transplant into ventricular recovery, device explant without a heart transplantation (bridge to recovery), and placement of devices without the expectation of recovery or transplantation (destination therapy).

  19. Optimization of cardiac metabolism in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Yoshimura, Michihiro; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2011-12-01

    The derangement of the cardiac energy substrate metabolism plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. The utilization of non-carbohydrate substrates, such as fatty acids, is the predominant metabolic pathway in the normal heart, because this provides the highest energy yield per molecule of substrate metabolized. In contrast, glucose becomes an important preferential substrate for metabolism and ATP generation under specific pathological conditions, because it can provide greater efficiency in producing high energy products per oxygen consumed compared to fatty acids. Manipulations that shift energy substrate utilization away from fatty acids toward glucose can improve the cardiac function and slow the progression of heart failure. However, insulin resistance, which is highly prevalent in the heart failure population, impedes this adaptive metabolic shift. Therefore, the acceleration of the glucose metabolism, along with the restoration of insulin sensitivity, would be the ideal metabolic therapy for heart failure. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of modifying substrate utilization to optimize cardiac metabolism in heart failure. PMID:21933140

  20. Renal neurohormonal regulation in heart failure decompensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Sofia; Agic, Mediha Becirovic; Narfström, Fredrik; Melville, Jacqueline M; Hultström, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Decompensation in heart failure occurs when the heart fails to balance venous return with cardiac output, leading to fluid congestion and contributing to mortality. Decompensated heart failure can cause acute kidney injury (AKI), which further increases mortality. Heart failure activates signaling systems that are deleterious to kidneys such as renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and vasopressin secretion. All three reduce renal blood flow (RBF) and increase tubular sodium reabsorption, which may increase renal oxygen consumption causing AKI through renal tissue hypoxia. Vasopressin contributes to venous congestion through aquaporin-mediated water retention. Additional water retention may be mediated through vasopressin-induced medullary urea transport and hyaluronan but needs further study. In addition, there are several systems that could protect the kidneys and reduce fluid retention such as natriuretic peptides, prostaglandins, and nitric oxide. However, the effect of natriuretic peptides and nitric oxide are blunted in decompensation, partly due to oxidative stress. This review considers how neurohormonal signaling in heart failure drives fluid retention by the kidneys and thus exacerbates decompensation. It further identifies areas where there is limited data, such as signaling systems 20-HETE, purines, endothelin, the role of renal water retention mechanisms for congestion, and renal hypoxia in AKI during heart failure.

  1. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Remember, some foods, such as soups, puddings, gelatin, ice cream, popsicles and others contain fluids. When you eat ... and Metabolism; American Heart Association Interdisciplinary Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. State of the ...

  2. Biventricular Pacing Therapy for Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry; Cheuk - Man Yu

    2001-01-01

    @@eart failure is a disease with high morbidity and mortality. It is also the commonest cause of medical ward admission. The incidence of heart failure has been increasing world-wide in the past decade.Studies observed that about 25 - 50 % of patients with heart failure had evidence of electromechanical delay,commonly in the form of left bundle branch block or intraventricular conduction delay on surface electrocardiogram. This condition results in dyssynchronous contraction, mitral regurgitation and was associated with a worse prognosis. These patients may therefore benefit from cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  3. Anticoagulation in heart failure : current status and future direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Greene, Stephen J.; Greenberg, Barry H.; Liu, Peter P.; Massie, Barry M.; Mehra, Mandeep R.; Metra, Marco; Zannad, Faiez; Cleland, John G. F.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Shah, Ami N.; Butler, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, patients with worsening heart failure (HF) requiring hospitalization have unacceptably high post-discharge mortality and re-admission rates soon after discharge. Evidence suggests a hypercoagulable state is present in patients with HF. Although thromboembolism as a dire

  4. Comparison of whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression for evaluation of the perioperative inflammatory response in patients with advanced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyna Bondar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF prevalence is increasing in the United States. Mechanical Circulatory Support (MCS therapy is an option for Advanced HF (AdHF patients. Perioperatively, multiorgan dysfunction (MOD is linked to the effects of device implantation, augmented by preexisting HF. Early recognition of MOD allows for better diagnosis, treatment, and risk prediction. Gene expression profiling (GEP was used to evaluate clinical phenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC transcriptomes obtained from patients' blood samples. Whole blood (WB samples are clinically more feasible, but their performance in comparison to PBMC samples has not been determined. METHODS: We collected blood samples from 31 HF patients (57±15 years old undergoing cardiothoracic surgery and 7 healthy age-matched controls, between 2010 and 2011, at a single institution. WB and PBMC samples were collected at a single timepoint postoperatively (median day 8 postoperatively (25-75% IQR 7-14 days and subjected to Illumina single color Human BeadChip HT12 v4 whole genome expression array analysis. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score was used to characterize the severity of MOD into low (≤ 4 points, intermediate (5-11, and high (≥ 12 risk categories correlating with GEP. RESULTS: Results indicate that the direction of change in GEP of individuals with MOD as compared to controls is similar when determined from PBMC versus WB. The main enriched terms by Gene Ontology (GO analysis included those involved in the inflammatory response, apoptosis, and other stress response related pathways. The data revealed 35 significant GO categories and 26 pathways overlapping between PBMC and WB. Additionally, class prediction using machine learning tools demonstrated that the subset of significant genes shared by PBMC and WB are sufficient to train as a predictor separating the SOFA groups. CONCLUSION: GEP analysis of WB has the potential to become a clinical

  5. Heart Failure After Heart Attack Tied to Cancer Risk in Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159804.html Heart Failure After Heart Attack Tied to Cancer Risk in Study Preliminary finding ... News) -- People who develop heart failure after a heart attack may also face a higher risk of cancer, ...

  6. 慢性心力衰竭与贫血的相关性及治疗进展%The recent advances in the treatment and the correlation for chronic heart failure and of anemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小玲; 吴新华; 陈章荣

    2016-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is the end-stage performance of the cardiovascular disease, and the main cause of death, serious harm human health.It is common in patients with anemia. The worse of patient age and heart function, the higher the incidence of anemia. Epidemiological survey data show that both at home and abroad about 1/5 to 1/3 of the patients with heart failure anemia maybe merge. Severe heart failure patient anaemia could be as high as 50% above. This paper reviews the advances in the treatment and anemia and the correlation of heart failure.%慢性心力衰竭(简称心衰)是心血管疾病的终末期表现和最主要的死因,严重危害人类健康。心衰患者常合并贫血,且患者年龄越大,心功能越差,贫血发生率越高。国内外流行病学调查资料[1]显示约1/5~1/3的心衰患者可能合并贫血,心衰程度严重者合并贫血率可能高达50%以上;本文旨在综述贫血与心衰的相关性及治疗进展。

  7. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease. PMID:27226153

  8. Heart rate reduction in coronary artery disease and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim

    2016-08-01

    Elevated heart rate is known to induce myocardial ischaemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and heart rate reduction is a recognized strategy to prevent ischaemic episodes. In addition, clinical evidence shows that slowing the heart rate reduces the symptoms of angina by improving microcirculation and coronary flow. Elevated heart rate is an established risk factor for cardiovascular events in patients with CAD and in those with chronic heart failure (HF). Accordingly, reducing heart rate improves prognosis in patients with HF, as demonstrated in SHIFT. By contrast, data from SIGNIFY indicate that heart rate is not a modifiable risk factor in patients with CAD who do not also have HF. Heart rate is also an important determinant of cardiac arrhythmias; low heart rate can be associated with atrial fibrillation, and high heart rate after exercise can be associated with sudden cardiac death. In this Review, we critically assess these clinical findings, and propose hypotheses for the variable effect of heart rate reduction in cardiovascular disease.

  9. Ethnic differences in patient perceptions of heart failure and treatment: the West Birmingham heart failure project

    OpenAIRE

    Lip, G Y H; Khan, H; Bhatnagar, A; Brahmabhatt, N; Crook, P.; Davies, M. K.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate further the hypothesis that ethnic groups would have different levels of knowledge and perceptions of congestive heart failure (CHF) and treatments for this condition, a cross sectional survey was conducted of patients who were attending the heart failure clinics in two teaching hospitals of Birmingham, UK, that serve a multiethnic population.

  10. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja;

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology...... Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...

  11. End-of-life matters in chronic heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Sobanski, Piotr; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krajnik, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Until recently, concepts of care for people with heart failure had rarely included preparation for unavoidable imminent death or caring for the dying. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on current end-of-life issues specific to heart failure patients. Recent findings Mortality in the heart failure population remains high, especially shortly after the first acute heart failure hospitalization. Patients with systolic heart failure die more frequently from progr...

  12. Adults living with heart failure and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Sommer, Irene; Bjerrum, Merete

    Background Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms reported by patients with heart failure (HF). Fatigue negatively impacts on patients’ everyday life, prognosis and quality of life. No specific cure or effective interventions to alleviate fatigue are available. Over the past decade, qualitative...... studies have been performed to develop more coherent and effective interventions to support self-care among heart failure patients experiencing fatigue. The findings of qualitative research should be synthesised to optimise nurses' understanding of fatigue and develop recommendations for practice. Aim...... To synthesise the best available evidence related to the lived experiences and management of fatigue in everyday life in adult patients with stable heart failure to develop effective interventions to support self-care. Specific questions on the patients’ lived experiences included: • How do patients with HF...

  13. Can complexity decrease in congestive heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Banerjee, Santo; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Rondoni, Lamberto; Bhattacharya, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The complexity of a signal can be measured by the Recurrence period density entropy (RPDE) from the reconstructed phase space. We have chosen a window based RPDE method for the classification of signals, as RPDE is an average entropic measure of the whole phase space. We have observed the changes in the complexity in cardiac signals of normal healthy person (NHP) and congestive heart failure patients (CHFP). The results show that the cardiac dynamics of a healthy subject is more complex and random compare to the same for a heart failure patient, whose dynamics is more deterministic. We have constructed a general threshold to distinguish the border line between a healthy and a congestive heart failure dynamics. The results may be useful for wide range for physiological and biomedical analysis.

  14. A case of peripartum heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Vinci

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old woman was admitted in congestive heart failure (CHF 3 days after delivery. She had no history of cardiovascular disease and impaired left ventricular Ejection Fraction (EF 35%. She underwent complete heart catheterisation, selective coronary angiography and right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy (EMB.Coronary arteries were normal and EMB revealed active virus negative myocarditis. Serum was positive for anti-heart autoantibodies (AHA. Thus myocarditis was classified as autoimmune and the patient was treated with immunosuppressive therapy, with clinical and hemodynamic improvement. At 27 months follow-up EMB showed healed myocarditis. Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM is a rare disorder in which left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure occur in the peripartum period in previously healthy women. The etiology is still unknown but a sizable proportion of patients may have an underlying organ-specific autoimmune myocarditis.

  15. Mitochondria in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Tandler, Bernard; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) frequently is the unfavorable outcome of pathological heart hypertrophy. In contrast to physiological cardiac hypertrophy, which occurs in response to exercise and leads to full adaptation of contractility to the increased wall stress, pathological hypertrophy occurs in response to volume or pressure overload, ultimately leading to contractile dysfunction and HF. Because cardiac hypertrophy impairs the relationship between ATP demand and production, mitochondrial bioenerget...

  16. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation.

  17. Congestive Heart Failure and Central Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Scott A; Owens, Robert L

    2016-03-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is among the most common causes of admission to hospitals in the United States, especially in those over age 65. Few data exist regarding the prevalence CHF of Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) owing to congestive heart failure in the intensive care unit (ICU). Nevertheless, CSR is expected to be highly prevalent among those with CHF. Treatment should focus on the underlying mechanisms by which CHF increases loop gain and promotes unstable breathing. Few data are available to determine prevalence of CSR in the ICU, or how CSR might affect clinical management and weaning from mechanical ventilation. PMID:26972039

  18. Intercellular communication lessons in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Claudia; Antoniades, Charalambos; Antonopoulos, Alexios S; Eriksson, Ulf; Franssen, Constantijn; Hamdani, Nazha; Lehmann, Lorenz; Moessinger, Christine; Mongillo, Marco; Muhl, Lars; Speer, Thimoteus; Thum, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Cell-cell or inter-organ communication allows the exchange of information and messages, which is essential for the coordination of cell/organ functions and the maintenance of homeostasis. It has become evident that dynamic interactions of different cell types play a major role in the heart, in particular during the progression of heart failure, a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Heart failure is associated with compensatory structural and functional changes mostly in cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, which finally lead to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Intercellular communication within the heart is mediated mostly via direct cell-cell interaction or the release of paracrine signalling mediators such as cytokines and chemokines. However, recent studies have focused on the exchange of genetic information via the packaging into vesicles as well as the crosstalk of lipids and other paracrine molecules within the heart and distant organs, such as kidney and adipose tissue, which might all contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure. In this review, we discuss emerging communication networks and respective underlying mechanisms which could be involved in cardiovascular disease conditions and further emphasize promising therapeutic targets for drug development.

  19. Use of Inotropic Agents in Treatment of Systolic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-12-04

    The most common use of inotropes is among hospitalized patients with acute decompensated heart failure, with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and with signs of end-organ dysfunction in the setting of a low cardiac output. Inotropes can be used in patients with severe systolic heart failure awaiting heart transplant to maintain hemodynamic stability or as a bridge to decision. In cases where patients are unable to be weaned off inotropes, these agents can be used until a definite or escalated supportive therapy is planned, which can include coronary revascularization or mechanical circulatory support (intra-aortic balloon pump, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, impella, left ventricular assist device, etc.). Use of inotropic drugs is associated with risks and adverse events. This review will discuss the use of the inotropes digoxin, dopamine, dobutamine, norepinephrine, milrinone, levosimendan, and omecamtiv mecarbil. Long-term inotropic therapy should be offered in selected patients. A detailed conversation with the patient and family shall be held, including a discussion on the risks and benefits of use of inotropes. Chronic heart failure patients awaiting heart transplants are candidates for intravenous inotropic support until the donor heart becomes available. This helps to maintain hemodynamic stability and keep the fluid status and pulmonary pressures optimized prior to the surgery. On the other hand, in patients with severe heart failure who are not candidates for advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant and mechanical circulatory support, inotropic agents can be used for palliative therapy. Inotropes can help reduce frequency of hospitalizations and improve symptoms in these patients.

  20. Xamoterol in severe congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangø, M; Lyngborg, K; Mehlsen, J;

    1992-01-01

    Twelve patients in severe congestive heart failure were given placebo, 100 mg xamoterol (Corwin) twice daily and 200 mg xamoterol twice daily, respectively, in 3 two-week periods in a double-blind randomised study. At the end of each treatment period the patients were evaluated. No differences were...... found between placebo and xamoterol in the following parameters: New York Heart Association function group index, heart volume, body weight, exercise duration on bicycle and treadmill, heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest. However, during exercise we found significantly lower...... heart rate and rate-pressure product during xamoterol treatment. This reduction is probably indicating occupation of beta-adrenoreceptors with concomitant reduced oxygen consumption during exercise....

  1. Research advancement in atrial fibrillation associated with heart failure%心房颤动合并心力衰竭研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪莉; 汪海娅

    2009-01-01

    @@ 心房颤动(atrial fibrillation,Af)和心力衰竭(heart failure,Hf)目前已经成为心血管领域日渐突出的两大问题.Af是异常心电活动所致的一种最常见的持续性心律失常疾病,约占心律失常住院患者的三分之一.

  2. Systolic heart failure: a prothrombotic state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Peuter, Olav R; Kok, Wouter E M; Torp-Pedersen, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    Systolic heart failure is a common syndrome whose incidence is expected to increase. Several treatment modalities, such as beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, improve survival. Whether antithrombotic treatment is effective remains to be elucidated, although observations su...

  3. Dopamine in heart failure and critical care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, AJ

    2000-01-01

    Dopamine is widely used in critical care to prevent renal function loss. Nevertheless sufficient evidence is still lacking of reduction in end points like mortality or renal replacement therapy. Dopaminergic treatment in chronic heart failure (CHF) has provided an example of unexpected adverse outco

  4. Erythropoietin in heart failure : pathology and protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, Berend Daan

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is common in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and related to impaired survival. The etiology of anemia in CHF-patients is often unknown. We hypothesized that dysregulation of erythropoietin (EPO) synthesis by the kidney or an altered sensitivity of the bone marrow to EPO might represent c

  5. The management of acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milo-Cotter, O.; Bettari, L.; Kleijn, L.; Bugatti, S.; Lombardi, C.; Rund, M.; Metra, M.; Voors, A. A.; Cotter, G.; Kaluski, E.; Weatherley, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    Hospitalization for acute heart failure (AHF) is one of the burdensome aspects of 21(st) century medicine, leading to significant debilitating symptoms, high morbidity and mortality and consuming significant portion of the health care budget. Management of AHF is thought-provoking given the heteroge

  6. Heart failure management programmes in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Trijntje (Tiny); Stromberg, A; De Geest, S.; Fridlund, B.; Heikkila, J.; Martensson, J.; Moons, P.; Scholte op Reimer, W.; Smith, K; Stewart, S.; Thompson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The ESC guidelines recommend that an organised system of specialist heart failure (HF) care should be established to improve outcomes of HF patients. The aim of this study was therefore to identify the number and the content of HF management programmes in Europe. Method: A two-phase desc

  7. Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Heart Hospital, London, UK and Monaldi Hospital, Naples, Italy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This abstract book contains four reports and all abstracts presented to the Joint Meeting: Update in cardiomyopathies and congestive heart failure, 22-23 September 2011 - Naples, Italy, endorsed by the Working Group on Myocardial and Pericardial Diseases (WG 21 of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC.

  8. Copeptin as a biomarker in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Louise; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Increased neurohormonal activation is a key feature of heart failure (HF). Copeptin is a surrogate marker for proarginine vasopressin and the prognostic value of copeptin has been reported for multiple disease states of both nonvascular and cardiovascular etiology. Elevated plasma copeptin in HF...

  9. Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents and Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsic, Erik; van der Meer, Peter; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF) patients. Its occurrence and severity are associated with worse prognosis. Although the etiology of anemia is multifactorial, inappropriate erythropoietin (EPO) production and/or bone-marrow resistance to EPO appear crucial in majority of anemic H

  10. Body mass index in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Heidi M; Schou, Morten; Goetze, Jens P;

    2013-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) is associated with a poor outcome in chronic heart failure (CHF). An inverse association between BMI and adiponectin and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether novel markers...

  11. Cell therapy in congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) has emerged as a major worldwide epidemic and its main causes seem to be the aging of the population and the survival of patients with post-myocardial infarction. Cardiomyocyte dropout (necrosis and apoptosis) plays a critical role in the progress of CHF; thus treatment of CHF by exogenous cell implantation will be a promising medical approach. In the acute phase of cardiac damage cardiac stem cells (CSCs) within the heart divide symmetrically and/or asymmetrically in response to the change of heart homeostasis, and at the same time homing of bone marrow stem cells (BMCs) to injured area is thought to occur, which not only reconstitutes CSC population to normal levels but also repairs the heart by differentiation into cardiac tissue. So far, basic studies by using potential sources such as BMCs and CSCs to treat animal CHF have shown improved ventricular remodelling and heart function. Recently, however, a few of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials demonstrated mixed results in heart failure with BMC therapy during acute myocardial infarction.

  12. Remote monitoring of heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    "The Teledactyl (Tele, far; Dactyl, finger--from the Greek) is a future instrument by which it will be possible for us to 'feel at a distance.' This idea is not at all impossible, for the instrument can be built today with means available right now. It is simply the well known telautograph, translated into radio terms, with additional refinements. The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance...The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient's room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient's room by means of a television screen." -Hugo Gernsback, Science and Invention Magazine, February 1925 Heart failure continues to be a major burden on our health care system. As the number of patients with heart failure increases, the cost of hospitalization alone is contributing significantly to the overall cost of this disease. Readmission rate and hospital length of stay are emerging as quality markers of heart failure care along with reimbursement policies that force hospitals to optimize these outcomes. Apart from maintaining quality assurance, the disease process of heart failure per-se requires demanding and close attention to vitals, diet, and medication compliance to prevent acute decompensation episodes. Remote patient monitoring is morphing into a key disease management strategy to optimize care for heart failure. Innovative implantable technologies to monitor intracardiac hemodynamics also are evolving, which potentially could offer better and substantial parameters to monitor.

  13. Remote Monitoring of Heart Failure Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    “The Teledactyl (Tele, far; Dactyl, finger — from the Greek) is a future instrument by which it will be possible for us to ‘feel at a distance.’ This idea is not at all impossible, for the instrument can be built today with means available right now. It is simply the well known telautograph, translated into radio terms, with additional refinements. The doctor of the future, by means of this instrument, will be able to feel his patient, as it were, at a distance…The doctor manipulates his controls, which are then manipulated at the patient’s room in exactly the same manner. The doctor sees what is going on in the patient’s room by means of a television screen.” —Hugo Gernsback, Science and Invention Magazine, February 1925 Heart failure continues to be a major burden on our health care system. As the number of patients with heart failure increases, the cost of hospitalization alone is contributing significantly to the overall cost of this disease. Readmission rate and hospital length of stay are emerging as quality markers of heart failure care along with reimbursement policies that force hospitals to optimize these outcomes. Apart from maintaining quality assurance, the disease process of heart failure per-se requires demanding and close attention to vitals, diet, and medication compliance to prevent acute decompensation episodes. Remote patient monitoring is morphing into a key disease management strategy to optimize care for heart failure. Innovative implantable technologies to monitor intracardiac hemodynamics also are evolving, which potentially could offer better and substantial parameters to monitor. PMID:23519115

  14. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stine Andersen; Asger Andersen; Jens Erik Nielsen-Kudsk

    2016-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent a rapidly growing patient group. Dysfunction of the right ventricle is often present, and right heart failure constitutes the main cause of death. Heart failure therapies used in acquired left heart failure are often initiated in adults with right heart failure due to congenital heart disease, but the right ventricle differs substantially from the left ventricle, and the clinical evidence for this treatment strategy is lacking. In this review,...

  15. Stratification of the Risk of Sudden Death in Nonischemic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Pimentel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant therapeutic advancements, heart failure remains a highly prevalent clinical condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In 30%-40% patients, the etiology of heart failure is nonischemic. The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD is capable of preventing sudden death and decreasing total mortality in patients with nonischemic heart failure. However, a significant number of patients receiving ICD do not receive any kind of therapy during follow-up. Moreover, considering the situation in Brazil and several other countries, ICD cannot be implanted in all patients with nonischemic heart failure. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify patients at an increased risk of sudden death because these would benefit more than patients at a lower risk, despite the presence of heart failure in both risk groups. In this study, the authors review the primary available methods for the stratification of the risk of sudden death in patients with nonischemic heart failure.

  16. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S;

    2013-01-01

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia....

  17. Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159604.html Antidepressant No Help to Heart Failure Patients: Study Depression ... 2016 TUESDAY, June 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The antidepressant Lexapro may not help heart failure patients suffering ...

  18. Heart failure and atrial fibrillation: current concepts and controversies

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, van den, T.J.T.P.; Tuinenburg, A. E.; Crijns, H. J. G. M.; Gelder, De; Gosselink, A. T.; Lie, K. I.

    1997-01-01

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are very common, particularly in the elderly. Owing to common risk factors both disorders are often present in the same patient. In addition, there is increasing evidence of a complex, reciprocal relation between heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Thus heart failure may cause atrial fibrillation, with electromechanical feedback and neurohumoral activation playing an important mediating role. In addition, atrial fibrillation may promote heart failure; ...

  19. Sex differences in new-onset heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven; Brouwers, Frank P.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Hillege, Hans L.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Rienstra, Michiel; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in patients with established heart failure have been well described, but much less is known in the development of heart failure. We studied sex-specific incidence and risk of new-onset heart failure in 8592 subjects (mean age 49.2 +/- A 12.7 years; 50.1 % women) of the Prevention of

  20. Prospective memory and chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Habota, Tina; Cameron, Jan; McLennan, Skye N; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Peter G Rendell

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) experience a number of debilitating symptoms, which impact on activities of daily living and result in poor quality of life. Prospective memory, which is defined as memory to carry out future intentions, has not been investigated in this group. However, emerging evidence suggests CHF patients have difficulties with cognitive processes related to prospective memory. Self-care, which partly relies on prospective memory, is essential in sympto...

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Huang, Shu-Chun; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Wang, Chao-Hung; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2014-01-01

    Reduced exercise capacity negatively affects the ability of patients with heart failure (HF) to perform activities required for daily life, further decreasing their independence and quality of life (QoL). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) can effectively improve aerobic fitness and overall health status in patients with HF. Low referral rate is an important limitation that may impede successful CR, whereas the automatic referral and liaison strategies performed by some healthcare providers manifest...

  2. Isometric exercise and chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimia Zerva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The resistance exercise is an important part of all rehabilitation programs in patients with chronic heart failure. Among several kinds of resistance exercises, the one mainly applied is isotonic exercise, whereas, in the contrary, isometric is not heavily used although it affects the daily lives of patients who, trying to look after themselves (moving, walking, lifting objects, twitch in an isometric way their peripheral muscles due to reduced cardiovascular endurance. Purpose: The purpose of the present review was to present the data available so far for isometric exercise in cardiovascular patients and to examine the importance of applying this kind of exercise in rehabilitation programs in the context of, firstly, evaluation, and secondly therapeutic intervention. Material - Methods: The methodology followed included searching inquiries and reviews from international databases (Pubmed, Medline, Scopus on the effects of isometric exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. The progress and development of the studies are of particular importance to this work and, to this end, the literature refers to the entire range of time in the last three decades, from 1985 to 2012 according the key words noted. Results: In rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic heart failure, resistance exercise if applied in an isotonic way helps improve hemodynamic and functional parameters. In contrast, resistance exercise applied in an isometric way requires further investigation because most findings are related to hemodynamic disturbances. The data which is encouraging for isometric exercise programs are few and, therefore, it cannot be directly recommended as a proper way to exercise. Conclusions: Isometric exercise has an important place in the evaluation of patients with chronic heart failure, and limits should be "placed" in its application as a therapeutic tool to prevent complications.

  3. Cell death signalling mechanisms in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mughal, Wajihah; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, cardiovascular disease was the most costly disease in Canada, and it is still on the rise. The loss of properly functioning cardiomyocytes leads to cardiac impairment, which is a consequence of heart failure. Therefore, understanding the pathways of cell death (necrosis and apoptosis) has potential implications for the development of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the role of B-cell lymphoma-2 family members is discussed and the importance of mitochondria in directing cell deat...

  4. An intriguing association between congestive heart failure and An intriguing association between congestive heart failure and diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-feng

    2010-01-01

    @@ The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising at an alarming rate in China due to aging of the population,increased frequency of obesity, and suboptimal nutritional habits.~1 Although many diabetic Patients now survive severe coronary lesions or myocardial infarction as a result of dramatic advances in the management of ischemic heart disease in general and acute myocardial infarction specifically,~(2,3) they are subsequently succumbing to the consequences of myocardial damage, with an increased incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF).~4

  5. Myocardial disease,anemia and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Donald S Silverberg; Dov Wexler; Adrian Iaina; Doron Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Many patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) fail to respond to maximal CHF therapy and progress to end stage CHF with many hospitalizations, very poor quality of life, end stage renal failure, or die of cardiovascular complications within a short time. One factor that has generally been ignored in many of these patients is the fact that they are often anemic.The anemia is due mainly to renal failure but also to the inhibitory effects of cytokines on the bone marrow. Anemia itself may further worsen the cardiac function and make the patients resistant to standard CHF therapies. Indeed anemia has been associated with increased severity of CHF, increased hospitalization, worse cardiac function and functional class, higher doses of diuretics,worsening of renal function and reduced quality of life. In both controlled and uncontrolled studies the correction of the anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) and oral or Ⅳ iron is associated with improvement in all these parameters. EPO itself may also play a direct role in improving the heart unrelated to the improvement of the anemia. Anemia may also play a role in the worsening of coronary heart disease even without CHF.

  6. "ACUTE LIVER FAILURE" : THE HEART MAY BE THE MATTER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, K.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; van der Berg, A. P.; Ligtenberg, J. J. M.; Tulleken, J. E.; Zijlstra, J. G.; Meertens, John H. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis secondary to heart failure is a known and treatable cause of liver failure. The diagnosis may be difficult, especially when symptoms of heart failure are absent. We present two patients who were transferred to our hospital with the diagnosis of acute liver failure to be screened fo

  7. Home monitoring of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O. L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Being a common syndrome chronic heart failure (CHF results in high mortality among cardiosurgical patients and requires very high expenditures for the treatment. All over the world the number of patients with CHF syndrome is about 22 millions. Heart failure is difficult to treat because of high level of hospitalization due to decompensation. Care aimed at constant home observation of patients could have been more efficient and not only symptomatic and as a response to complications induced. There are methods controlling CHF patients at home. These methods vary from increase of self-care and telephone support to telemonitoring and remote monitoring of implantable devices. Self-care includes such components as maintenance of drug intake, keeping to a diet, physical exercises and active control over edemas. Telephone calls are also a source of monitoring and treatment of heart failure at home. Meta-analysis of programs for structured phone support showed that telephone support could reduce the level of readmission of HF patients approximately by 25%. Telemonitoring implies transmission of such physiological data as blood pressure, body weight, electrocardiographic signals or oxygen saturation using phone lines, broadband and satellite or wireless networks. Having cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices that are placed in HF patients, it is possible to use their opportunities for the further evaluation of the patient. Some regularly controlled parameters can show the clinical state of the patient and predict the following heart failure. For example, atrial fibrillation, decrease of cardiac rhythm variability and decrease of the level of the patient`s activity (according to integrated accelerometer can predict clinical decompensation. Also, implantable hemodynamic monitors for immediate pressure measuring in the left atrium, sensor system of pressure measuring in the right atrium are

  8. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaarsma, T.; Larsen, Torben; Stromberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting. Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients, it is advised to consider the following......Introduction: Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis, and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted...... in this population and specialised heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialised home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure. Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients...

  9. Angiotensin II vaccine promising for patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yang-xin; YAO You-jie; NIE Ru-qiong; ZHOU Shu-xian; WANG Jing-feng

    2009-01-01

    @@ Chronic heart failure (CHF), as the end-stage presentation of all kinds of heart diseases, is a major public health problem as well as a pressing public policy issue. There are more than 5 million patients diagnosed with CHF in USA alone and approximately 550 000 new cases appear per year. About 0.4%-2% of the European population is affected by symptomatic heart failure. Hence heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization especially in older people around the world.

  10. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.;

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  11. Mechano-signaling in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyandelger, Byambajav; Mansfield, Catherine; Knöll, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Mechanosensation and mechanotransduction are fundamental aspects of biology, but the link between physical stimuli and biological responses remains not well understood. The perception of mechanical stimuli, their conversion into biochemical signals, and the transmission of these signals are particularly important for dynamic organs such as the heart. Various concepts have been introduced to explain mechanosensation at the molecular level, including effects on signalosomes, tensegrity, or direct activation (or inactivation) of enzymes. Striated muscles, including cardiac myocytes, differ from other cells in that they contain sarcomeres which are essential for the generation of forces and which play additional roles in mechanosensation. The majority of cardiomyopathy causing candidate genes encode structural proteins among which titin probably is the most important one. Due to its elastic elements, titin is a length sensor and also plays a role as a tension sensor (i.e., stress sensation). The recent discovery of titin mutations being a major cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) also underpins the importance of mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here, we focus on sarcomere-related mechanisms, discuss recent findings, and provide a link to cardiomyopathy and associated heart failure. PMID:24531746

  12. Obesity paradox, cachexia, frailty, and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; De Schutter, Alban; Alpert, Martin A; Mehra, Mandeep R; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2014-04-01

    Overweight and obesity adversely affect cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and CV structure and function, and lead to a marked increase in the risk of developing heart failure (HF). Despite this, an obesity paradox exists, wherein those who are overweight and obese with HF have a better prognosis than their leaner counterparts, and the underweight, frail, and cachectic have a particularly poor prognosis. In light of this, the potential benefits of exercise training and efforts to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, as well as the potential for weight reduction, especially in severely obese patients with HF, are discussed.

  13. Diagnosis and management of acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Dilek; Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Eren, Mehmet; Karaüzüm, Kurtuluş; Temizhan, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Zoghi, Mehdi; Ramassubu, Kumudha; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2015-11-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life threatening clinical syndrome with a progressively increasing incidence in general population. Turkey is a country with a high cardiovascular mortality and recent national statistics show that the population structure has turned to an 'aged' population.As a consequence, AHF has become one of the main reasons of admission to cardiology clinics. This consensus report summarizes clinical and prognostic classification of AHF, its worldwide and national epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, principles of approach in emergency department,intensive care unit and ward, treatment in different clinical scenarios and approach in special conditions and how to plan hospital discharge. PMID:26574757

  14. Mechanisms of Cardiotoxicity and the Development of Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher S

    2015-12-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a broad term that refers to the negative effects of toxic substances on the heart. Cancer drugs can cause cardiotoxicity by effects on heart cells, thromboembolic events, and/or hypertension that can lead to heart failure. Rheumatoid arthritis biologics may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and cause/worsen heart failure. Long-term and heavy alcohol use can result in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and decreased contractile protein function. Cocaine use results in sympathetic nervous system stimulation of heart and smooth muscle cells and leads to cardiotoxicity and evolution of heart failure. The definition of cardiotoxicity is likely to evolve along with knowledge about detecting subclinical myocardial injury. PMID:26567492

  15. Stem Cell Therapy for Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunduz E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHeart failure is a major cardiovascular health problem. Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of congestive heart failure (CHF [1]. Cardiac transplantation remains the most effective long-term treatment option, however is limited primarily by donor availability, rejection and infections. Mechanical circulatory support has its own indications and limitations [2]. Therefore, there is a need to develop more effective therapeutic strategies.Recently, regenerative medicine has received considerable scientific attention in the cardiovascular arena. We report here our experience demonstrating the beneficial effects of cardiac stem cell therapy on left ventricular functions in a patient with Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL who developed CHF due to ischemic heart disease during the course of lymphoma treatment. Case reportA 58-year-old male with relapsed HL was referred to our bone marrow transplantation unit in October 2009. He was given 8 courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine (ABVD between June 2008 and February 2009 and achieved complete remission. However, his disease relapsed 3 months after completing the last cycle of ABVD and he was decided to be treated with DHAP (cisplatin, cytarabine, dexamethasone followed autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT. After the completion of first course of DHAP regimen, he developed acute myocardial infarction (AMI and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG was performed. After his cardiac function stabilized, 3 additional courses of DHAP were given and he was referred to our centre for consideration of autologous SCT. Computed tomography scans obtained after chemotherapy confirmed complete remission. Stem cells were collected from peripheral blood after mobilization with 10 µg/kg/day granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF subcutaneously. Collection was started on the fifth day of G-CSF and performed for 3 consecutive days. Flow cytometric

  16. Predicting Heart Failure With Preserved and Reduced Ejection Fraction : The International Collaboration on Heart Failure Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Jennifer E; Enserro, Danielle; Brouwers, Frank P; Kizer, Jorge R; Shah, Sanjiv J; Psaty, Bruce M; Bartz, Traci M; Santhanakrishnan, Rajalakshmi; Lee, Douglas S; Chan, Cheeling; Liu, Kiang; Blaha, Michael J; Hillege, Hans L; van der Harst, Pim; van Gilst, Wiek H; Kop, Willem J; Gansevoort, Ron T; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Gardin, Julius M; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S; de Boer, Rudolf A; Larson, Martin G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent and deadly disease, and preventive strategies focused on at-risk individuals are needed. Current HF prediction models have not examined HF subtypes. We sought to develop and validate risk prediction models for HF with preserved and reduced ejection fract

  17. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This documen

  18. Epidemiology of central sleep apnoea in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Matthew T

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnoea occurs in about a third of patients with reduced systolic heart failure and is a marker of increased mortality. Such patients usually are older males with advanced heart failure (i.e., high pulmonary wedge pressure), often in atrial fibrillation, with evidence of hyperventilation (i.e., low PaCO2) in the absence of hypoxemia. Characteristically, ventilation waxes and wanes in a sinusoidal pattern, with mild hypoxemia, occurring in the lighter levels of sleep usually when supine. Snoring may also occur in central sleep apnoea, often at the peak of hyperventilation, sometimes contributing to the confusion or overlap with obstructive sleep apnoea. Central sleep apnoea is associated with orthopnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea and an oscillatory respiratory pattern with an incremental cardiopulmonary exercise study. Importantly, heart failure therapies (e.g., afterload reduction, diuresis, pacemakers, transplantation) attenuate central sleep apnoea. Night to night variability in severity of central sleep apnoea may occur with changes in patients' posture during sleep (less severe when sleeping on-side or upright). PMID:26948168

  19. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  20. [The best in 2000 on heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillière, Y

    2001-01-01

    The advances in cardiac failure are permanent. In 2000, once again, they concerned all fields of pathology. Complementary information of the epidemiology of the disease in France and Europe has been published. The prevention of sudden death by the implantable defibrillator in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy has been confirmed. The prognostic role of the aetiology of dilated cardiomyopathy has been demonstrated and the distinct clinical entity of acute fulminating viral myocarditis with an excellent long-term prognosis has been identified. New genetic abnormalities have been found in different forms of dilated cardiomyopathy. One of the most important advances concerns the neurohormones and the rise of interest in type B natriuretic peptide, for diagnosis, prognosis, as well as treatment (nesiritide). From the therapeutic point of view, the importance of betablockers has been confirmed, including in severe cardiac failure. The therapeutic value of biventricular stimulation resynchronising the two ventricles seem to be an additional therapeutic opportunity for patients with advanced cardiac failure. The summit of 2000 remains the first cellular transplantation carried out by a Parisian French team. PMID:11260834

  1. Khat Use: History and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Menyar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports suggest that 20 million people worldwide are regularly using khat as a stimulant, even though the habit of chewing khat is known to cause serious health issues. Historical evidence suggests khat use has existed since the 13th century in Ethiopia and the southwestern Arabian regions even before the cultivation and use of coffee. In the past three decades, its availability and use spread all over the world including the United States and Europe. Most of the consumers in the Western world are immigrant groups from Eastern Africa or the Middle East. The global transport and availability of khat has been enhanced by the development of synthetic forms of its active component. The World Health Organization considers khat a drug of abuse since it causes a range of health problems. However, it remains lawful in some countries. Khat use has long been a part of Yemeni culture and is used in virtually every social occasion. The main component of khat is cathinone, which is structurally and functionally similar to amphetamine and cocaine. Several studies have demonstrated that khat chewing has unfavorable cardiovascular effects. The effect on the myocardium could be explained by its effect on the heart rate, blood pressure, its vasomotor effect on the coronary vessels, and its amphetamine–like effects. However, its direct effect on the myocardium needs further elaboration. To date, there are few articles that contribute death among khat chewers to khat-induced heart failure. Further studies are needed to address the risk factors in khat chewers that may explain khat-induced cardiotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure.

  2. Pulse pressure as a haemodynamic variable in systolic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrie, Colin James

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to satisfy the requirements of the body. Explanations for this include heart muscle damage after a heart attack. This could be very recently, or in the past, sometimes dating back many years. In other cases the explanation for

  3. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah R

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ravish Shah, Anil K AgarwalDivision of Nephrology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.Keywords: anemia, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, elderly population

  4. Optimizing therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mulder, Bart Antonius

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and the prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. The same is true for heart failure. Atrial fibrillation may result in heart failure, and vice versa, but they can also exacerbate each other. The combination of atrial fibrillation and heart failure has important therapeutic implications to treat both diseases and create optimal outcomes for these patients. We started with patients with permanent atrial fibrillation. These...

  5. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Strömberg, Anna; Larsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialized heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialized home care and offered this to a...

  6. Family Influences on Heart Failure Self-care and Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Dunbar, Sandra B.; Clark, Patricia C.; Quinn, Christina; Gary, Rebecca A.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2008-01-01

    Many patient education guidelines for teaching heart failure patients recommend inclusion of the family; however, family-focused interventions to promote self-care in heart failure are few. This article reviews the state of the science regarding family influences on heart failure self-care and outcomes. The literature and current studies suggest that family functioning, family support, problem solving, communication, self-efficacy, and caregiver burden are important areas to target for future...

  7. Palliative care in medical outliers with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jammula Prabhakar Patro; Pavani Priyadarsini

    2016-01-01

    Medical outliers are the patients who present to medical practices without health insurance or with serious co-morbidities needing prolonged hospital stay. Palliative care is part of standard guidelines for management of heart failure. But in medical outliers suffering from heart failure, palliative care should begin more early than it is recommended in standard guidelines because of financial reasons. It is suggested that guidelines be framed also for medical outliers with heart failure. It ...

  8. Diagnosis and management of heart failure in the elderly.

    OpenAIRE

    King, D

    1996-01-01

    Heart failure is common in the elderly and is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It accounts for about 5% of adult medical admissions and the expenditure of 1% of the total National Health Service budget. Clinical presentation in old age may be with the classical symptoms of heart failure but often, due to multiple pathology and low functional ability, presentation is atypical. Both nonspecific symptoms and signs of heart failure, are often a delayed presentation in this p...

  9. Challenges Facing Nurse-Led Disease Management for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Paul L; Sisk, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    The positive results of several randomized controlled trials of nurse-led disease management (DM) for heart failure have led to considerable growth in the use of DM programs in such patients. However, many aspects of the protocols used in randomized trials of DM for heart failure have differed, and there are still significant gaps in our knowledge of what makes DM work and for whom. Four important unresolved issues are: (i) what components of multifaceted DM protocols for heart failure are ef...

  10. Arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes in systolic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Ashok Devkota; Ahmed Bakhit; Alix Dufresne; Aung Naing Oo; Premraj Parajuli; Saveena Manhas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is a common condition that that leads to hospitalization. It is associated with various atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Aim: The aim of this study is to find common arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes in hospitalized patients who have systolic heart failure. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of medical records, and electrocardiograms (EKGs) of 157 patients admitted to our hospital who had systolic heart failure with ejection fraction (...

  11. Technology to promote and increase physical activity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Nina C

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is firmly recommended as part of a multifaceted approach to heart failure (HF) self-management. Unfortunately, research indicates that most patients are less likely to engage in and adhere to such activities. The widespread use of information and communication technology tools and resources offers an innovative and potentially beneficial avenue for increasing physical activity levels in HF patients. This article presents specific ways in which advances in information and communication technologies, including Internet- and mobile-based communications, social media platforms, and self-monitoring health devices, can serve as a means to broadly promote increasing levels of physical activity to improve health outcomes in the HF population.

  12. Characteristics and outcome of patients with heart failure due to anabolic-androgenic steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva Bjerre; Thune, Jens Jakob; Gustafsson, Finn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to analyse the outcome of patients with advanced heart failure due to abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids. DESIGN: A retrospective chart review of patients admitted or referred for advanced heart failure, due to anabolic-androgenic steroid abuse...... with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers. The remaining 3 patients required implantation of a LV assist device (LVAD) and were listed for heart transplantation. No recovery of LV function in the patients treated with assist device was seen. CONCLUSION: Anabolic-androgenic steroid...

  13. Non-transplant surgical alternatives for heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robroy H. MacIver; Edwin C. McGee

    2006-01-01

    Although surgical options exist, treatment for heart failure remains dominated by medical therapy. Even with optimal medical therapy, the mortality of heart failure continues to be high. Conventional wisdom in heart failure treatment leads many practitioners to believe that the patient is "too sick" for further operative procedures such as revascularization, valve repair or replacement and ventricular reconstruction. Improvements in intra and peri-operative care over the last 20 years have allowed for more complex procedures to be performed, and have improved the mortality rates of the more traditional surgeries. As the complexity of the operative procedure and morbidity of the patient has elevated so has the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in choosing treatment plans for patients. As the age of the population increases and acute management of ischemic heart disease improves, the prevalence of heart failure will likely increase. Improving access and changing treatment algorithms to include operative procedures can improve the treatment of heart failure patients.

  14. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  15. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laura Leto; Mauro Feola

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, altera-tions of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mecha-nisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers avail-able data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development.

  16. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:26974003

  17. Psoriasis and risk of heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalid, Usman; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease that is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Heart failure (HF) is independently associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality....... The association between psoriasis and HF is unclear and we therefore investigated the risk of new-onset HF in a nationwide cohort of psoriasis patients compared with the background population. METHODS: The study included the entire Danish population aged ≥18 years followed from 1 January 1997 until HF, death...... by multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for age, gender, comorbidity and cardiovascular medications. RESULTS: A total of 5 485 856 subjects were eligible for analysis. In the study period 66 389 patients with new-onset psoriasis, including 11 242 patients with severe psoriasis, were identified. The overall...

  18. [The heart failure patient: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Arozamena-Pérez, Jorge; García-Garrido, Lluïsa

    2014-01-01

    Given its prevalence, high mortality rate, morbidity, chronicity and use of resources, heart failure (HF) is a priority issue from a social and health standpoint, due to the ageing population and to lack of adherence to and the complexity of treatment. For these reasons, an individualized care plan needs to be established to meet the real and potential needs of the patient diagnosed with HF. A clinical case is presented of a patient admitted to the Cardiology Critical Care (CCC) unit of a tertiary hospital. A patient care plan was prepared following the steps of the scientific method and relying on the NANDA taxonomy, and the NOC and NIC to design goals and nursing interventions, respectively.

  19. Metabolic remodeling in chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing WANG; Tao GUO

    2013-01-01

    Although the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) has made enormous progress over the past decades,CHF is still a tremendous medical and societal burden.Metabolic remodeling might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CHF.The characteristics and mechanisms of metabolic remodeling remained unclear,and the main hypothesis might include the changes in the availability of metabolic substrate and the decline of metabolic capability.In the early phases of the disease,metabolism shifts toward carbohydrate utilization from fatty acids (FAs) oxidation.Along with the progress of the disease,the increasing level of the hyperadrenergic state and insulin resistance cause the changes that shift back to a greater FA uptake and oxidation.In addition,a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the improvement in the metabolic capability is likely to be more significant than the selection of the substrate.

  20. Cardiorenal biomarkers in acute heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajiv Choudhary; Dipika Gopal; Ben A. Kipper; Alejandro De La Parra Landa; Hermineh Aramin

    2012-01-01

    Managing patients with heart failure (HF) is a challenging task within itself, but the presence of associated worsening renal function can greatly increase mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key to prevent re-hospitalizations and reduce healthcare costs. Biomarkers have long been established as highly sensitive and specific tools in diagnosing and prognosticating patients with HF. Reflecting distinct pathophysiological events and ongoing cellular insult, biomarkers have been proven superior to conventional laboratory tests. Availability of better assays and rapid analysis has allowed the use of biomarkers as point-of-care tests in the emergency department and at the patient's bed-side. Acute HF patients often go on to develop worsening renal function, termed as acute cardiorenal syndrome. The growing breadth of studies has shown the implications of combining multiple biomarkers to better chart outcomes and produce desirable results in such patients.

  1. [Chronic systolic heart failure - dosing recommendations at beginning and end of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugck, Christian; Remppis, Andrew; Katus, Hugo A; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2008-10-01

    As a multi-system disease, chronic heart failure requires a complex, multimodal therapy. Achieving maximum guideline adherence in (advanced) chronic heart failure can therefore become a challenge. The important decrease in morbidity and mortality seen lately largely depends on consequent and sometime tedious implementation of guideline targets. The present paper provides a comprehensive overview on medical therapeutic strategies with a particular focus of onset and discontinuation of drugs in patients with chronic systolic dysfunction.

  2. Computer assisted optimisation on non-pharmacological treatment of congestive heart failure and supraventricular arrhythmia

    OpenAIRE

    Reumann, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Heart Failure is the most common cardiac disease worldwide; supraventricular arrhythmia the most common cardiac arrhythmia. The understanding of these diseases advances treatment options. Ablation therapy and atrial antitachycardial pacing are non-pharmacological options in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Cardiac resynchronization therapy with biventricular pacing devices has been shown successful in patients with severe heart failure. However, an optimization or even individual therapy...

  3. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure: new directions in diagnosis, risk assessment and risk reduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Dr Richard Till; Prof artin Cowie

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure and atrial fibrillation are common conditions which frequently co-exist. In patients with established systolic and diastolic dysfunction, atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, mortality and reduces quality of life. Recent advances in implantable device technology have improved the detection of atrial fibrillation and reduced the time to intervention. Rate control remains the mainstay of treatment to improve symptoms in patients with heart failure. Currently evidence ...

  4. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno-Pierre Dubé; Piergiuseppe Agostoni; Pierantonio Laveneziana

    2016-01-01

    Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology. Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators o...

  5. Hepatic Dysfunction in Ambulatory Patients With Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Maryjane; Wu, Christina; Givens, Raymond C.; Collado, Ellias; Mancini, Donna M.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and its modified versions, which are established measures of liver dysfunction, as a tool to assess heart transplantation (HTx) urgency in ambulatory patients with heart failure. Background Liver abnormalities have a prognostic impact on the outcome of patients with advanced heart failure. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 343 patients undergoing HTx evaluation between 2005 and 2009. The prognostic effectiveness of MELD and 2 modifications (MELDNa [includes serum sodium levels] and MELD-XI [does not include international normalized ratio]) for endpoint events, defined as death/HTx/ventricular assist device requirement, was evaluated in our cohort and in subgroups of patients on and off oral anticoagulation. Results The MELD and MELDNa scores were excellent predictors for 1-year endpoint events (areas under the curve: 0.71 and 0.73, respectively). High scores (>12) were strongly associated with poor survival at 1 year (MELD 69.3% vs. 90.4% [p < 0.0001]; MELDNa 70.4% vs. 96.9% [p < 0.0001]). Increased scores were associated with increased risk for HTx (hazard ratio: 1.10 [95% confidence interval: 1.06 to 1.14]; p < 0.0001 for both scores), which was independent of other known risk factors (MELD p = 0.0055; MELDNa p = 0.0083). Anticoagulant use was associated with poor survival at 1 year (73.7% vs. 86.4%; p = 0.0118), and the statistical significance of MELD/MELDNa was higher in patients not receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. MELD-XI was a fair but limited predictor of the endpoint events in patients receiving oral anticoagulation therapy. Conclusions Assessment of liver dysfunction according to the MELD scoring system provides additional risk information in ambulatory patients with heart failure. PMID:23563127

  6. Influence of diabetes mellitus on heart failure risk and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Belle Eric

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our aim is to summarize and discuss the recent literature linking diabetes mellitus with heart failure, and to address the issue of the optimal treatment for diabetic patients with heart failure. The studies linking diabetes mellitus (DM with heart failure (HF The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in heart failure populations is close to 20% compared with 4 to 6% in control populations. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an increased risk of heart failure in diabetics; moreover, in diabetic populations, poor glycemic control has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Various mechanisms may link diabetes mellitus to heart failure: firstly, associated comorbidities such as hypertension may play a role; secondly, diabetes accelerates the development of coronary atherosclerosis; thirdly, experimental and clinical studies support the existence of a specific diabetic cardiomyopathy related to microangiopathy, metabolic factors or myocardial fibrosis. Subgroup analyses of randomized trials demonstrate that diabetes is also an important prognostic factor in heart failure. In addition, it has been suggested that the deleterious impact of diabetes may be especially marked in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Treatment of heart failure in diabetic patients The knowledge of the diabetic status may help to define the optimal therapeutic strategy for heart failure patients. Cornerstone treatments such as ACE inhibitors or beta-blockers appear to be uniformly beneficial in diabetic and non diabetic populations. However, in ischemic cardiomyopathy, the choice of the revascularization technique may differ according to diabetic status. Finally, clinical studies are needed to determine whether improved metabolic control might favorably influence the outcome of diabetic heart failure patients.

  7. Accuracy of a heart failure diagnosis in administrative registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Thomas; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Kirk, Vibeke;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of heart failure is frequently reported using hospital discharge diagnoses. The specificity of a diagnosis has been shown to be high but the sensitivity of a reported diagnosis is unknown. PURPOSE: To study the accuracy of a heart failure diagnosis reported to the Danish...

  8. Predicting mortality in patients with heart failure : a pragmatic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouvy, ML; Heerdink, ER; Leufkens, HGM; Hoes, AW

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a comprehensive and easily applicable prognostic model predicting mortality risk in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. Design: Prospective follow up study. Setting: Seven general hospitals in the Netherlands. Patients: 152 outpatients with heart failure or patients

  9. Health care professionals in a heart failure team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, T

    2005-01-01

    A heart failure team that treats heart failure patients often faces the challenge of managing multiple conditions requiring multiple medications and life style changes in an older patient group. A multidisciplinary team approach can optimally diagnose, carefully review and prescribe treatment, and e

  10. Associations of heart failure with sleep quality: The rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Zuurbier (Lisette); A.I. Luik (Annemarie); M.J.G. Leening (Maarten); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Freak-Poli (Rosanne); O.H. Franco (Oscar); B.H. Stricker; H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStudy Objectives: The prevalence of sleep disturbances and heart failure increases with age. We aimed to evaluate the associations of incident heart failure and cardiac dysfunction with changes in sleep quality. Methods: This prospective population-based study was conducted in the Rotter

  11. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    O'CONNOR, MELISSA; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; FELDMAN, PENNY H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteris...

  12. Program Description: Physical Therapy in a Heart Failure Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Knocke, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic exercise and resistance training have been proven to be beneficial for patients with heart failure. Current reimbursement guidelines exclude these patients from our traditional cardiac rehabilitation program, so at Newton Wellesley Hospital a clinic model was developed for the disease management and exercise of heart failure patients.

  13. Defibrillator Implantation in Patients with Nonischemic Systolic Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Thune, Jens J; Nielsen, Jens C;

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) in patients with symptomatic systolic heart failure caused by coronary artery disease has been well documented. However, the evidence for a benefit of prophylactic ICDs in patients with systolic heart failure that is not due...

  14. Practical guide on home health in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiny Jaarsma

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic heart failure is a common condition affecting up to 15 million people in the extended Europe. Heart failure is burdensome and costly for patients in terms of decreased quality of life and poor prognosis and it is also costly for society. Better integrated care is warranted in this population and specialized heart failure care can save costs and improve the quality of care. However, only a few European countries have implemented specialized home care and offered this to a larger number of patients with heart failure.Method: We developed a guide on Home Health in Heart Failure patients from a literature review, a survey of heart failure management programs, the opinion of researchers and practitioners, data from clinical trials and a reflection of an international expert meeting.Results: In integrated home care for heart failure patients it is advised to consider the following components: integrated multi-disciplinary care, patient and partner participation, care plans with clear goals of care, patient education, self-care management, appropriate access to care and optimized treatment.Discussion: We summarized the state of the art of home based care for heart failure patients in Europe, described the typical content of such care to provide a guide for health care providers.

  15. Respiratory sleep disorders in patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Matthew T

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory sleep disorders (RSD) occur in about 40-50% of patients with symptomatic congestive heart failure (CHF). Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered a cause of CHF, whereas central sleep apnea (CSA) is considered a response to heart failure, perhaps even compensatory. In the setting of heart failure, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has a definite role in treating OSA with improvements in cardiac parameters expected. However in CSA, CPAP is an adjunctive therapy to other standard therapies directed towards the heart failure (pharmacological, device and surgical options). Whether adaptive servo controlled ventilatory support, a variant of CPAP, is beneficial is yet to be proven. Supplemental oxygen therapy should be used with caution in heart failure, in particular, by avoiding hyperoxia as indicated by SpO2 values >95%.

  16. Review of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Practice guidelines for management of heart failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colan, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    imaging, and strain and strain rate were either novel or non-existent and have now moved into the main stream. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had very limited availability, and since that time imaging and assessment of myocardial iron content, delayed gadolinium enhancement, and extracellular volume have moved into the mainstream. The only devices discussed in the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines were extracorporeal membrane oxygenators, pacemakers, and defibrillators. Since that time, ventricular assist devices have become mainstream. Despite the relative lack of randomised controlled trials in paediatric heart failure, advances continue to occur. These advances warrant implementation of an update and review process, something that is best done under the auspices of the national and international cardiology societies. A joint activity that includes the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association, the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology (AEPC), European Society of Cardiology, Canadian Cardiovascular Society, and others will have more credibility than independent efforts by any of these organisations.

  17. Health-related quality of life in children with heart failure as perceived by children and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmot, Ivan; Cephus, Constance E; Cassedy, Amy; Kudel, Ian; Marino, Bradley S; Jefferies, John L

    2016-06-01

    Advancements in paediatric heart failure management have resulted in improved survival and a focus on long-term outcomes including health-related quality of life. We compared health-related quality of life in children with heart failure with healthy patients, children with chronic conditions, and children with cardiovascular disease. Families (n=63) and children (n=73) aged 2-20 years with heart failure were enrolled and compared with data previously published for healthy patients (n=5480), those with chronic conditions (n=247), and those with cardiovascular disease (n=347). Patients and parents completed the PedsQL 4.0 and the Cardiac 3.0 Module health-related quality-of-life questionnaires. PedsQL scores including Total, Psychosocial Health Summary, and Physical were compared between groups. In general, patients with heart failure had lower scores than the healthy population (p=0.001), and comparable scores with those with chronic conditions. Parents perceived no difference in physical scores for children with heart failure when compared with healthy children, and perceived higher scores for children with heart failure when compared with those with chronic conditions (p⩽0.003). Furthermore, children with heart failure had decremental health-related quality-of-life scores as the American Heart Association stage of heart failure increased, such that patients with stage C heart failure had scores similar to children with severe cardiovascular disease. Children with heart failure reported significantly impaired health-related quality of life compared with healthy children and similar scores compared with children with chronic conditions. Parental perceptions appear to underestimate these impairments. Children with heart failure appear to have progressive impairment of health-related quality of life with advancing stage of heart failure.

  18. Congestive heart failure in acromegaly: A review of 6 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, P.; Das, S; Bhansali, A; S K Bhadada; B V Rajesh; Reddy, K. S.; Vaiphei, K; K. K. Mukherjee; Pathak, A.; Shah, V N

    2012-01-01

    Background: Though cardiac involvement is common in acromegaly, overt congestive heart failure is uncommon. Materials and Methods: This is retrospective analysis of hospital record between 1996 and 2007. We analyzed records of 150 consecutive patients with acromegaly. We included the patients with acromegaly those who had overt congestive heart failure either at presentation or during the course of illness for the present analysis. The diagnosis of acromegaly and congestive cardiac failure we...

  19. How can we cure a heart "in flame"? A translational view on inflammation in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Ulrich; Frantz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic heart failure is still increasing making it a major health issue in the 21st century. Tremendous evidence has emerged over the past decades that heart failure is associated with a wide array of mechanisms subsumed under the term "inflammation". Based on the great success of immuno-suppressive treatments in auto-immunity and transplantation, clinical trials were launched targeting inflammatory mediators in patients with chronic heart failure. However, they widely lack...

  20. Plasma Concentration of the Novel Peptide Apelin is Regularly Changed in Patients With Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yanju; Li Tianchang; Yan Jun; Bian Hong; Yao Daokuo; Xu Shiying; Zheng Jianyong

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Apelin, the novel endogenous ligand for the G-protein-coupled receptor APJ, has been observed in many animals and humans studies. It is concluded that it has inotropic effects,hypotension and diuretic properties. The change of apelin in relation to heart failure is still controversial.Our goal was to observe the change of apelin-12 in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods From 2005 to 2006, 81 consecutive patients (46 male and 35 female, mean age 68.5±12.1 years) with heart failure resulting from variable etiologies and 15 healthy controls were included in this study. Plasma concentration of apelin-12 was measured through ELISA on admission. All patients received conventional therapy and recorded detailed the clinical conditions. Results (1) Plasma concentration of apelin of the controls is lower than the ones of heart failure patients. (2) Plasma concentration of apelin is increased in the early stage and decreased in the advanced period. (3) Apelin is related with variable indexes in the Pearson's association analysis. Apelin is also changed with the atrium and ventricular's diameter. Conclusions Plasma concentration of apelin is increased in early stage and decreased in advanced period. The apelin-APJ system might be important in the pathophysiological process of heart failure. And it might be valuable in diagnosis and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

  1. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure: From bench to bedside

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Fu Xiao

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cardiac arrhythmia is an abnormal rate and/or rhythm of a heart due to its abnormal electrical impulse origination and/or propagation.Various etiologies can cause arrhythnuas.Heart failure(HF)is a clinical syndrome due to an impaired heart that can not pump sufficient blood to meet the systemic metabolic needs.The common causes of HF include myocardial infarction,hypertension,valvular heart disease,and cardiomyopathy.

  3. Comorbidity of atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Liang-Han; Kistler, Peter M; Kalman, Jonathan M; Schilling, Richard J; Hunter, Ross J

    2016-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) are evolving epidemics, together responsible for substantial human suffering and health-care expenditure. Ageing, improved cardiovascular survival, and epidemiological transition form the basis for their increasing global prevalence. Although we now have a clear picture of how HF promotes AF, gaps remain in our knowledge of how AF exacerbates or even causes HF, and how the development of HF affects the outcome of patients with AF. New data regarding HF with preserved ejection fraction and its unique relationship with AF suggest a possible role for AF in its aetiology, possibly as a trigger for ventricular fibrosis. Deciding on optimal treatment strategies for patients with both AF and HF is increasingly difficult, given that results from trials of pharmacological rhythm control are arguably obsolete in the age of catheter ablation. Restoring sinus rhythm by catheter ablation seems successful in the medium term and improves HF symptoms, functional capacity, and left ventricular function. Long-term studies to examine the effect on rates of stroke and death are ongoing. Guidelines continue to evolve to keep pace with this rapidly changing field. PMID:26658575

  4. MicroRNA and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Lee Wong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure (HF imposes significant economic and public health burdens upon modern society. It is known that disturbances in neurohormonal status play an important role in the pathogenesis of HF. Therapeutics that antagonize selected neurohormonal pathways, specifically the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, have significantly improved patient outcomes in HF. Nevertheless, mortality remains high with about 50% of HF patients dying within five years of diagnosis thus mandating ongoing efforts to improve HF management. The discovery of short noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs and our increasing understanding of their functions, has presented potential therapeutic applications in complex diseases, including HF. Results from several genome-wide miRNA studies have identified miRNAs differentially expressed in HF cohorts suggesting their possible involvement in the pathogenesis of HF and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets. Unravelling the functional relevance of miRNAs within pathogenic pathways is a major challenge in cardiovascular research. In this article, we provide an overview of the role of miRNAs in the cardiovascular system. We highlight several HF-related miRNAs reported from selected cohorts and review their putative roles in neurohormonal signaling.

  5. Neprilysin Inhibition as a PARADIGM Shift in Heart Failure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ruth; Greenberg, Barry

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a growing global public health problem. With the aging population, increased risk factors for heart failure development, and better survival after myocardial infarction, the prevalence is only expected to increase in the coming years. Although existing therapies have improved the clinical course of heart failure patients, new approaches are urgently needed to enhance quality of life and reduce morbidity and mortality. However, there has been little progress in the treatment of chronic heart failure in the past decade with only two new drugs approved by the US FDA over this time. Better understanding of the neurohormonal axis of heart failure has lead to the development of LCZ696, a first-in-class novel agent that acts as an angiotensin receptor blocker and neprilysin inhibitor. In the PARADIGM-HF study, LCZ696 was superior to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in reducing mortality and HF hospitalizations and improving quality of life across a broad spectrum of symptomatic patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. While evaluation of long-term effects is still needed, the completed trials on LCZ696 demonstrate that the drug is generally well-tolerated with a safe side effect profile. LCZ696 should be strongly considered as a favorable alternative to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers in appropriate heart failure patients. PMID:27271564

  6. Heart Failure in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the heart. It's then pumped into the aorta, which distributes it throughout the body to provide ... due to effects of smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes, coronary artery disease and bad heart valves. It ...

  7. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS......), 1.02-1.23, P=0.018]. There was a significant interaction between the importance of AF and the presence of ischaemic heart disease (P=0.034). In patients with AF at the time of discharge and ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.25 (95% CI: 1.09-1.42) and P... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  8. 3D Printing to Guide Ventricular Assist Device Placement in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Kanwal M; Saeed, Omar; Zaidi, Ali; Sanz, Javier; Nielsen, James C; Hsu, Daphne T; Jorde, Ulrich P

    2016-04-01

    As the population of adults with congenital heart disease continues to grow, so does the number of these patients with heart failure. Ventricular assist devices are underutilized in adults with congenital heart disease due to their complex anatomic arrangements and physiology. Advanced imaging techniques that may increase the utilization of mechanical circulatory support in this population must be explored. Three-dimensional printing offers individualized structural models that would enable pre-surgical planning of cannula and device placement in adults with congenital cardiac disease and heart failure who are candidates for such therapies. We present a review of relevant cardiac anomalies, cases in which such models could be utilized, and some background on the cost and procedure associated with this process. PMID:27033018

  9. Adrenal GRK2 upregulation mediates sympathetic overdrive in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Rengo, Giuseppe; Funakoshi, Hajime; Eckhart, Andrea D; Koch, Walter J

    2007-03-01

    Cardiac overstimulation by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is a salient characteristic of heart failure, reflected by elevated circulating levels of catecholamines. The success of beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) antagonists in heart failure argues for SNS hyperactivity being pathogenic; however, sympatholytic agents targeting alpha2AR-mediated catecholamine inhibition have been unsuccessful. By investigating adrenal adrenergic receptor signaling in heart failure models, we found molecular mechanisms to explain the failure of sympatholytic agents and discovered a new strategy to lower SNS activity. During heart failure, there is substantial alpha2AR dysregulation in the adrenal gland, triggered by increased expression and activity of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Adrenal gland-specific GRK2 inhibition reversed alpha2AR dysregulation in heart failure, resulting in lowered plasma catecholamine levels, improved cardiac betaAR signaling and function, and increased sympatholytic efficacy of a alpha2AR agonist. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of a molecular mechanism for SNS hyperactivity in heart failure, and our study identifies adrenal GRK2 activity as a new sympatholytic target.

  10. Influence of levocarnitine on heart function and endocrine among patients with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程磊

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy of levocarnitine in treating elderly patients with chronic heart failure and to explore its impact on cardiac function and endocrine.Methods 120 elderly patients with chronic heart failure were randomly divided into observation and control groups,with 60 cases of each.Patients in the control

  11. Disparities in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases among women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Jean; Pettey, Christina; Lefler, Leanne L; Heo, Seongkum

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews literature pertinent to cardiovascular disparities in women, focusing primarily on heart failure (HF). It provides an in-depth look at causes, biological influences, self-management and lack of adherence to HF-treatment guidelines in women. Disparities in treatment of causative factors of HF, such as myocardial infarction and hypertension, contribute to women having poorer HF outcomes than men. This article discusses major contributing reasons for nonadherence to medication regimes for HF in women, including advanced age at time of diagnosis, likelihood of multiple comorbidities, lack of social support and low socioeconomic status. Limited inclusion of women in clinical trials and the scarcity of gender analyses for HF and other cardiovascular diseases continues to limit the applicability of research findings to women.

  12. Prognostic importance of pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Akkan, Dilek; Iversen, Kasper Karmark;

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a well-known complication in heart failure, but its prognostic importance is less well established. This study assessed the risk associated with pulmonary hypertension in patients with heart failure with preserved or reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fractions....... Patients with known or presumed heart failure (n = 388) underwent the echocardiographic assessment of pulmonary systolic pressure and LV ejection fraction. Patients were followed for up to 5.5 years. Increased pulmonary pressure was associated with increased short- and long-term mortality (p ... obstructive lung disease, heart failure, and impaired renal function. In conclusion, pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality in patients with reduced LV ejection fractions and also in patients with preserved LV ejection fractions....

  13. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (HVBP) – Heart Failure Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospitals participating in the Hospital VBP Program and their performance rates and scores for the Clinical Process of Care Heart Failure measures.

  14. Association of heart failure severity with risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Malene N.; Gislason, Gunnar H.; Køber, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Heart failure has been suggested to increase the risk of developing diabetes. We investigated the relation between heart failure severity, defined by loop-diuretic dosage, and the risk of developing diabetes in a nationwide cohort of patients with heart failure. METHODS: We...... followed all Danish patients discharged from hospitalisation for first-time heart failure in 1997-2010, without prior use of hypoglycaemic agents, until a claimed prescription for hypoglycaemic agents, death or 31 December 2010. The association of loop-diuretic dosage (furosemide equivalents) 90 days after...... discharge (study baseline) with risk of diabetes was estimated by multivariate Cox regression models. RESULTS: In total, 99,362 patients were included and divided into five loop-diuretic dose groups: 30,838 (31%) used no loop diuretics; 24,389 (25%) used >0-40 mg/day; 17,355 (17%) used >40-80 mg/day; 11...

  15. Indicators psychological status in patients with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    KADIROVA SHAHLO; KAMILOVA UMIDA KABIROVNA

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure to study the psychological status of the relationship between indicators of psychological status and progression of the disease: patients with FC III identified more often more severe disorders with revalence of depressive disorders.

  16. Aldosterone blockade in post-acute myocardial infarction heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitt, Bertram; Ferrari, Roberto; Gheorghiade, Mihai; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John; Lopez-Sendon, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Development of heart failure (HF) or left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) significantly increases mortality post acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Aldosterone contributes to the development and progression of HF post AMI, and major guidelines now recommend aldosterone blockade in this setti

  17. High mortality among heart failure patients treated with antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veien, Karsten T; Videbæk, Lars; Schou, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to assess whether pharmacologically treated depression was associated with increased mortality risk in systolic heart failure (SHF) patients. METHODS: Patients (n=3346) with SHF (left ventricular ejection fraction...

  18. Exertional dyspnoea in chronic heart failure: the role of the lung and respiratory mechanical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Bruno-Pierre; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Laveneziana, Pierantonio

    2016-09-01

    Exertional dyspnoea is among the dominant symptoms in patients with chronic heart failure and progresses relentlessly as the disease advances, leading to reduced ability to function and engage in activities of daily living. Effective management of this disabling symptom awaits a better understanding of its underlying physiology.Cardiovascular factors are believed to play a major role in dyspnoea in heart failure patients. However, despite pharmacological interventions, such as vasodilators or inotropes that improve central haemodynamics, patients with heart failure still complain of exertional dyspnoea. Clearly, dyspnoea is not determined by cardiac factors alone, but likely depends on complex, integrated cardio-pulmonary interactions.A growing body of evidence suggests that excessively increased ventilatory demand and abnormal "restrictive" constraints on tidal volume expansion with development of critical mechanical limitation of ventilation, contribute to exertional dyspnoea in heart failure. This article will offer new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in patients with chronic heart failure by exploring the potential role of the various constituents of the physiological response to exercise and particularly the role of abnormal ventilatory and respiratory mechanics responses to exercise in the perception of dyspnoea in patients with heart failure. PMID:27581831

  19. Heart failure among Indigenous Australians: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Woods John A; Katzenellenbogen Judith M; Davidson Patricia M; Thompson Sandra C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases contribute substantially to the poor health and reduced life expectancy of Indigenous Australians. Heart failure is a common, disabling, progressive and costly complication of these disorders. The epidemiology of heart failure and the adequacy of relevant health service provision in Indigenous Australians are not well delineated. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cinahl Plus, Informit and Google ...

  20. Management of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Andrew E. Darby

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and heart failure (HF) are common conditions that frequently coexist. Both conditions share risk factors, are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and may worsen the other. The presence of heart failure and symptoms associated with it may influence both the approach to management (i.e., rate versus rhythm control) and the treatment options available for AF patients. The presence of HF increases the stroke risk with atrial fibrillation, and thromboembo...

  1. Long noncoding RNA dysregulation in ischemic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Simona; Zaccagnini, Germana; Perfetti, Alessandra; Fuschi, Paola; Valaperta, Rea; Voellenkle, Christine; Castelvecchio, Serenella; Gaetano, Carlo; Finato, Nicoletta; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Menicanti, Lorenzo; Martelli, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Background Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcripts regulating a variety of physiological and pathological functions. However, their implication in heart failure is still largely unknown. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize lncRNAs deregulated in patients affected by ischemic heart failure. Methods LncRNAs were profiled and validated in left ventricle biopsies of 18 patients affected by non end-stage dilated ischemic cardiomyopathy and 17 matched cont...

  2. Insulin resistance and exercise tolerance in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan;

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage.......Insulin resistance has been linked to exercise intolerance in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to assess the potential role of coronary flow reserve (CFR), endothelial function and arterial stiffness in explaining this linkage....

  3. Psychobiology of depression/distress in congestive heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    York, Kaki M.; Hassan, Mustafa; Sheps, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure affects millions of Americans and new diagnosis rates are expected to almost triple over the next 30 years as our population ages. Affective disorders including clinical depression and anxiety are common in patients with congestive heart failure. Furthermore, the presence of these disorders significantly impacts quality of life, medical outcomes, and healthcare service utilization. In recent years, the literature has attempted to describe potential pathophysiologic mechanisms re...

  4. Comprehensive Approach to Heart Failure: an Urgent Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanier Coll Muñoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure leads to the activation of a neurohormonal response that interacts with the hemodynamic changes, which are joined by functional and structural myocardial abnormalities, that may exist. This paper addresses the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the pathophysiology of heart failure and the use of non-invasive complementary methods that provide additional information necessary for the assessment and comprehensive management of patients, without losing the essential connection between the doctor and the patient.

  5. Heart rate awareness in patients with chronic stable heart failure. A multi-center observational study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D

    2014-08-23

    We assessed adherence to European Society of Cardiology heart rate guidelines (i.e. heart rates less than 70bpm) in patients with chronic stable heart failure. We also investigated the percent of patients on target doses of rate controlling drugs.

  6. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, Pcoronary artery disease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  7. Liguzinediol improved the heart function and inhibited myocardial cell apoptosis in rats with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu; Song, Ping; ZHU Qing; Yin, Qiu-yi; Ji, Jia-wen; Li, Wei; Bian, Hui-min

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Liguzinediol is a novel derivative of ligustrazine isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Chuanxiong (Ligusticum wallichii Franch), and produces significant positive inotropic effect in isolated rat hearts. In this study we investigated the effects of liguzinediol on a rat model of heart failure. Methods: To induce heart failure, male SD rats were injected with doxorubicin (DOX, 2 mg/kg, ip) once a week for 4 weeks. Then the rats were administered with liguzinediol (5, 10, 20 mg·...

  8. Pharmacology of heart failure: From basic science to novel therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lother, Achim; Hein, Lutz

    2016-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is one of the leading causes for hospitalization in the United States and Europe, and is accompanied by high mortality. Current pharmacological therapy of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is largely based on compounds that inhibit the detrimental action of the adrenergic and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems on the heart. More than one decade after spironolactone, two novel therapeutic principles have been added to the very recently released guidelines on heart failure therapy: the HCN-channel inhibitor ivabradine and the combined angiotensin and neprilysin inhibitor valsartan/sacubitril. New compounds that are in phase II or III clinical evaluation include novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, guanylate cyclase activators or myosine activators. A variety of novel candidate targets have been identified and the availability of gene transfer has just begun to accelerate translation from basic science to clinical application. This review provides an overview of current pharmacology and pharmacotherapy in chronic heart failure at three stages: the updated clinical guidelines of the American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology, new drugs which are in clinical development, and finally innovative drug targets and their mechanisms in heart failure which are emerging from preclinical studies will be discussed.

  9. Case of congestive heart failure induced by therapeutic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushigami, Motohiko; Suruda, Hidetoshi; Mizukoshi, Masato; Umemoto, Masaaki; Fujiwara, Setsuko; Yamamoto, Katsuhiro; Ueno, Yuji; Nishio, Ichiro; Masuyama, Yoshiaki

    1985-02-01

    Valvular insufficiency in radiation-induced heart disease is very rare. We described a patient, 53 years old woman, who developed congestive heart failure 2.5 years later following radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. The findings on examinations including cardiac catheterization revealed pericarditis with effusion, mitral and tricuspid valve insufficiency and pulmonary infarction. (author).

  10. Applied Cardiovascular Physiology in Dogs with Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Álvarez Ramírez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Congestive heart failure is related to abnormal ventricular contraction and relaxation. Recent publications show that the alteration of systolic and diastolic function coexists in most patients with heart diseases. There are currently several ambiguities in the daily use of clinical and physiological terms regarding this topic. This paper aims to review certain physiological concepts of the cardiovascular system.

  11. Psychological distress and mortality in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Schiffer, Angélique A;

    2010-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, and type D ("distressed") personality (tendency to experience negative emotions paired with social inhibition) have been associated with poor prognosis in coronary heart disease, but little is known about their role in chronic heart failure. Therefore, we investigated whether...

  12. Failure and damage analysis of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The papers in this volume present basic concepts and new developments in failure and damage analysis with focus on advanced materials such as composites, laminates, sandwiches and foams, and also new metallic materials. Starting from some mathematical foundations (limit surfaces, symmetry considerations, invariants) new experimental results and their analysis are shown. Finally, new concepts for failure prediction and analysis will be introduced and discussed as well as new methods of failure and damage prediction for advanced metallic and non-metallic materials. Based on experimental results the traditional methods will be revised.

  13. Imaging of Myocardial Oxidative Metabolism in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Naya, Masanao; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic imaging has a potential for better understanding of pathophysiology of heart failure. C-11 acetate is taken up by the heart, rapidly converted to acetylCoA and readily metabolized to C-11 CO2 through TCA cycle with oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the myocardial turnover rate of this tracer is tightly correlated with its clearance of C-11 CO2, reflecting overall oxidative metabolism. The heart relies on aerobic oxidative substrate for the generation of ATP, which is required to main...

  14. 61. The effect of depression on medication adherence in patients with heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zeineddine, M.; Farah, I.; S. Alanzi; A. Alsaud; B. Bdeir

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a major and growing public health problem; approximately 5 million patients in the USA have heart failure. Depression is a serious mental illness that interferes with daily life activities and quality of life of Heart Failure Patients. Aim: To determine the association between depression and the medication adherence in patients with heart failure. Depression will reduce adherence to medication in patients with heart failure Quality project involving 50 patients with heart fai...

  15. Accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices (3 Ds) in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang B. Siswanto

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure becomes main problem in cardiology because of increasing of heart failure patients, rehospitalization rate, morbidity, and mortality rate. The main causes of increasing heart failure problems are: (1) Successful treatment of acute myocardial infarction can be life saving, but its sequelae can cause heart failure. (2) Increasing life expectancy rate grows along with incidences of ageing related heart failure. (3) High prevalence of infection in Indonesia can cause rheumatic heart...

  16. Gene transfer for congestive heart failure: update 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk

    2013-04-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with increasing social and economic costs. There have been no new high impact therapeutic agents for this devastating disease for more than a decade. However, many pivotal regulators of cardiac function have been identified using cardiac-directed transgene expression and gene deletion in preclinical studies. Some of these increase function of the failing heart. Altering the expression of these pivotal regulators using gene transfer is now either being tested in clinical gene transfer trials, or soon will be. In this review, we summarize recent progress in cardiac gene transfer for clinical congestive heart failure.

  17. [Disease management for heart failure patients: role of wireless technologies for telemedicine. The ICAROS project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Alessandra; Malfatto, Gabriella; Della Rosa, Francesco; Branzi, Giovanna; Boarin, Simona; Borghi, Claudio; Cosentino, Eugenio; Gualerzi, Massimo; Coruzzi, Paolo; Molinari, Enrico; Compare, Angelo; Cassi, Maurizio; Collatina, Stefano; Parati, Gianfranco

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare costs for heart failure are increasing. The need for a better care, however, has to be matched with a policy of cost containment. A way to improve the cost-effectiveness of heart failure care is the disease management approach, in which therapy, education and follow-up are tailored for each patient by a multidisciplinary team. Such a complex intervention can be facilitated by the use of telemedicine, which allows the remote control of considerable amounts of clinical data. In Italy, a few studies with telemedicine have been reported. A recent development in this field is represented by the ICAROS project (Integrated Care vs Conventional Intervention in Cardiac Failure Patients: Randomized Open Label Study), whose aim is to improve the clinical and psychological care of heart failure patients employing advanced wireless telecommunication technology. So far, we randomized 60 patients: 30 in usual ambulatory care, 30 in an intensive treatment group. The latter patients were instructed to use a portable computer to get in touch daily with the heart failure clinic and receive feedback instruction for the management of drug therapy and daily problems. At the first year of follow-up, the treatment group showed good compliance to drug prescriptions, and could easily handle the portable computer. The preliminary results of this ongoing study support the feasibility and appropriateness of new technologies for the management of heart failure, even in elderly patients in whom a limited expertise with these appliances could have been anticipated. PMID:17402355

  18. Noncardiac Comorbidities in Heart Failure With Reduced Versus Preserved Ejection Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mentz, Robert J.; Kelly, Jacob P.; von Lueder, Thomas G.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Lam, Carolyn S. P.; Cowie, Martin R.; Kjeldsen, Keld; Jankowska, Ewa A.; Atar, Dan; Butler, Javed; Fiuzat, Mona; Zannad, Faiez; Pitt, Bertram; O'Connor, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure patients are classified by ejection fraction (EF) into distinct groups: heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) or heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Although patients with heart failure commonly have multiple comorbidities that complicate management a

  19. Arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes in systolic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Devkota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heart failure is a common condition that that leads to hospitalization. It is associated with various atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Aim: The aim of this study is to find common arrhythmias and electrocardiographic changes in hospitalized patients who have systolic heart failure. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of medical records, and electrocardiograms (EKGs of 157 patients admitted to our hospital who had systolic heart failure with ejection fraction (EF 35%. Twelve-lead EKG of these patients was studied to identify common arrhythmia and demographic variables; laboratory results were compared to identify the differences. Results: A total of 157 patients with systolic heart failure, 63.7% had an EF ≤ 35%. Hypertension 82.8%, diabetes 49%, coronary artery disease 40.8%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or bronchial asthma 22.3%, and stroke 12.1% were common associated co-morbidities. On analysis of EKG, 28.6% had tachycardia, 21.9% had prolonged PR > 200 ms, 16.3% had wide QRS > 120 ms, 70.7% had prolonged corrected QT (QTc, and 42.2% had left axis deviation. The most common arrhythmias were sinus tachycardia and atrial fibrillation/flutter which were found in 14.6% and 13.4%, respectively. The left ventricular hypertrophy was a common abnormality found in 22.4% followed by ventricular premature contractions 18.4%, atrial premature contractions 9.5%, and left bundle branch block 6.1%. Patients with severe systolic heart failure had prolonged QRS (P = 0.02 and prolonged QTc (P = 0.01 as compared to the other group. Conclusions: Sinus tachycardia and atrial fibrillation/flutter were common arrhythmias in patients with systolic heart failure. Patients with severe systolic heart failure had statistically significant prolongation of the QRS duration and QTc interval.

  20. Adiponectin, diabetes and ischemic heart failure: a challenging relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldasseroni Samuele

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several peptides, named adipokines, are produced by the adipose tissue. Among those, adiponectin (AD is the most abundant. AD promotes peripheral insulin sensitivity, inhibits liver gluconeogenesis and displays anti-atherogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Lower levels of AD are related to a higher risk of myocardial infarction and a worse prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease. However, despite a favorable clinical profile, AD increases in relation to worsening heart failure (HF; in this context, higher adiponectinemia is reliably related to poor prognosis. There is still little knowledge about how certain metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, modulate the relationship between AD and HF. We evaluated the level of adiponectin in patients with ischemic HF, with and without type 2 diabetes, to elucidate whether the metabolic syndrome was able to influence the relationship between AD and HF. Results We demonstrated that AD rises in patients with advanced HF, but to a lesser extent in diabetics than in non-diabetics. Diabetic patients with reduced systolic performance orchestrated a slower rise of AD which began only in face of overt HF. The different behavior of AD in the presence of diabetes was not entirely explained by differences in body mass index. In addition, NT-proBNP, the second strongest predictor of AD, did not differ significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic patients. These data indicate that some other mechanisms are involved in the regulation of AD in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Conclusions AD rises across chronic heart failure stages but this phenomenon is less evident in type 2 diabetic patients. In the presence of diabetes, the progressive increase of AD in relation to the severity of LV dysfunction is hampered and becomes evident only in overt HF.

  1. Drugs That May Cause or Exacerbate Heart Failure: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Robert L; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Cheng, Davy; Dow, Tristan J; Ky, Bonnie; Stein, C Michael; Spencer, Anne P; Trupp, Robin J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a common, costly, and debilitating syndrome that is associated with a highly complex drug regimen, a large number of comorbidities, and a large and often disparate number of healthcare providers. All of these factors conspire to increase the risk of heart failure exacerbation by direct myocardial toxicity, drug-drug interactions, or both. This scientific statement is designed to serve as a comprehensive and accessible source of drugs that may cause or exacerbate heart failure to assist healthcare providers in improving the quality of care for these patients.

  2. Heart failure and cardiorenal syndrome in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In the view of the aging of the general population and particularly the aging of the dialysis population, it is of considerable interest to examine the combined effects of age and uremia on cardiovascular status. The effects of uremia per se interact with the effects of aging in cardiovascular end-organ damage and in the genesis of heart failure (HF) and cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Structural abnormalities with fibrosis and calcification of the heart and central arteries, along with autonomic nervous system dysfunction, underlie reduced cardiac performance leading to cardiac decompensation and HF. HF in the elderly is characterized by the heart's inability to maintain an adequate cardiac output and may be the result of systolic dysfunction or reduced compliance and diastolic dysfunction. In the elderly, HF symptoms are generally light, upon admission to the hospital, while HF is sometimes in an advanced stage. The pathophysiology of CRS involves interrelated hemodynamic and neurohormonal mechanisms that in the elderly are often increased/emphasized because there is no compensatory response. The therapy of HF and CRS in the elderly with chronic kidney disease is almost entirely empirical since there are no large trials of drugs to reduce mortality and morbidity in this setting. This may lead nephrologists and cardiologists managing these patients toward a sort of "therapeutic nihilism." But this is not the attitude we should adopt in the elderly. Instead we should make a rather careful assessment of each patient and use a personalized treatment that takes into consideration the characteristics of the individual patient and his or her cardiac and renal history as well as social context. PMID:23032915

  3. Spirituality and well being among elders: differences between elders with heart failure and those without heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary T Quinn Griffin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mary T Quinn Griffin1, Yi-Hui Lee2, Ali Salman1, Yaewon Seo1, Patricia A Marin3, Randall C Starling3, Joyce J Fitzpatrick11Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, OH; 2College of Nursing and Health Wright State University Dayton, OH; 3Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OhioAbstract: Heart failure is a chronic debilitating disease that affects all aspects of a person’s life, including physical, mental and spiritual dimensions. The associations among these dimensions, and the relationship to overall health status, have not been clearly identified. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to explore differences between spirituality, depressive symptoms, and quality of life among elders with and without heart failure. A total of 44 elders with heart failure and 40 non-heart failure elders completed several questionnaires including: The Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES, Spirituality Index of Well-Being (SIWB, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, and SF-12™ Health Survey. There were significant differences in the groups on gender and ethnicity; thus these variables were controlled in the analyses related to the dependent variables. After controlling for gender and ethnicity, there were significant differences in the physical component of quality of life and spiritual well-being. The heart failure patients had significantly lower physical quality of life but more spiritual well-being than the non-heart failure patients. There were no significant differences in daily spiritual experiences, mental component of quality of life, and depressive symptoms between the two groups.Keywords: spiritual experience, spiritual well-being, heart failure, depressive symptoms, quality of life, elders

  4. The cardiac enigma: current conundrums in heart failure research [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Kapiloff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of heart failure is expected to increase almost 50% in the next 15 years because of aging of the general population, an increased frequency of comorbidities, and an improved survival following cardiac events. Conventional treatments for heart failure have remained largely static over the past 20 years, illustrating the pressing need for the discovery of novel therapeutic agents for this patient population. Given the heterogeneous nature of heart failure, it is important to specifically define the cellular mechanisms in the heart that drive the patient’s symptoms, particularly when considering new treatment strategies. This report highlights the latest research efforts, as well as the possible pitfalls, in cardiac disease translational research and discusses future questions and considerations needed to advance the development of new heart failure therapies. In particular, we discuss cardiac remodeling and the translation of animal work to humans and how advancements in our understanding of these concepts relative to disease are central to new discoveries that can improve cardiovascular health.

  5. Palliative care in heart failure : a position statement from the palliative care workshop of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Beattie, James M.; Ryder, Mary; Rutten, Frans H.; McDonagh, Theresa; Mohacsi, Paul; Murray, Scott A.; Grodzicki, Thomas; Bergh, Ingrid; Metra, Marco; Ekman, Inger; Angermann, Christiane; Leventhal, Marcia; Pitsis, Antonis; Anker, Stefan D.; Gavazzi, Antonello; Ponikowski, Piotr; Dickstein, Kenneth; Delacretaz, Etienne; Blue, Lynda; Strasser, Florian; McMurray, John

    2009-01-01

    Heart failure is a serious condition and equivalent to malignant disease in terms of symptom burden and mortality. At this moment only a comparatively small number of heart failure patients receive specialist palliative care. Heart failure patients may have generic palliative care needs, such as ref

  6. DETECTING CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE USING HEART RATE SEQUENTIAL TREND ANALYSIS PLOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRINIVAS KUNTAMALLA,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability analysis is gaining acceptance as a potential non-invasive means of autonomic nervous system assessment in research as well as clinical domains. In this study, a nonlinear analysis method is developed to detect congestive heart failure. The data obtained from an online and widely used public database (i.e., MIT/BIH physionet database, is used for testing the performance of the method. The method developed is based on the sequential trend analysis plot of heart rate variability and correlates well with the characteristic autonomic nervous system regulations in congestive heart failure. The proposed method can be used for screening as well as diagnosing the heart failure patients. The algorithm is computationally simple and can be implemented in a real time processing hardware. This method classifies 31 out of 32 subjects and has the highest discrimination power in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

  7. Heart failure in the general Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach

    /co-existing IHD. Trends of prevalence and incidence of HF in the population and in IHD patients during 1997-2006 was estimated, applying logistic and Poisson regression analyses, adjusting for gender, age, income and origin (Danish, foreign (western non-western)). Survival time without subsequent or contemporary...... MI. Yet, the treatment of heart failure has also improved. It is unknown to what extent the incidence, prevalence and survival with heart failure in the general population and among patients with ischemic heart disease has changed over time. Aim The aim of this study is to estimate incidence...... and prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the Danish population and among individuals with ischemic heart disease (IHD) during 1996-2006, applying register data from the national patient register (NPR) and the national dispensing register (NDR). Data and methods All Danish inhabitants (aged >15) by January 1996...

  8. Evolution of biomarker guided therapy for heart failure: current concepts and trial evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Amanda E; Lee, Amanda K; Patterson, J Herbert; Schwartz, Todd A; Glotzer, Jana M; Adams, Kirkwood F

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing management of patients with heart failure remains quite challenging despite many significant advances in drug and device therapy for this syndrome. Although a large body of evidence from robust clinical trials supports multiple therapies, utilization of these well-established treatments remains inconsistent and outcomes suboptimal in "real-world" patients with heart failure. Disease management programs may be effective, but are difficult to implement due to cost and logistical issues. Another approach to optimizing therapy is to utilize biomarkers to guide therapeutic choices. Natriuretic peptides provide additional information of significant clinical value in the diagnosis and estimation of risk inpatients with heart failure. Ongoing research suggests a potential important added role for natriuretic peptides in heart failure. Guiding therapy based on serial changes in these biomarkers may be an effective strategy to optimize treatment and achieve better outcomes in this syndrome. Initial, innovative, proof-of-concept studies have provided encouraging results and important insights into key aspects of this strategy, but well designed, large-scale, multicenter, randomized, outcome trials are needed to definitively establish this novel approach to management. Given the immense and growing public health burden of heart failure, identification of cost-effective ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality due to this syndrome is critical. PMID:24251462

  9. Neprilysin and Natriuretic Peptide Regulation in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Morant-Talamante, Nuria; Lupón, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Neprilysin is acknowledged as a key player in neurohormonal regulation, a cornerstone of modern drug therapy in chronic heart failure. In the cardiovascular system, neprilysin cleaves numerous vasoactive peptides, some with mainly vasodilating effects (natriuretic peptides, adrenomedullin, bradykinin) and other with mainly vasoconstrictor effects (angiotensin I and II, endothelin-1). For decades, neprilysin has been an important biotarget. Academia and industry have combined active efforts to search for neprilysin inhibitors (NEPIs) that might be useful in clinical practice. NEPI monotherapy was initially tested with little success due to efficacy issues. Next, combination of NEPI and ACE-inhibiting activity agents were abandoned due to safety concerns. Recently, the combination of NEPI and ARB, also known as ARNI, has shown better than expected results in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and multitude of ongoing studies are set to prove its value across the heart failure spectrum. PMID:27260315

  10. Telerehabilitation in heart failure patients: The evidence and the pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Piepoli, Massimo F; Jaarsma, Tiny; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Coats, Andrew J S; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Corrà, Ugo; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Dickstein, Kenneth; Seferović, Petar M; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Ponikowski, Piotr P

    2016-10-01

    Accessibility to the available traditional forms of cardiac rehabilitation programs in heart failure patients is not adequate and adherence to the programs remains unsatisfactory. The home-based telerehabilitation model has been proposed as a promising new option to improve this situation. This paper's aims are to discuss the tools available for telemonitoring, and describing their characteristics, applicability, and effectiveness in providing optimal long term management for heart failure patients who are unable to attend traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs. The critical issues of psychological support and adherence to the telerehabilitation programs are outlined. The advantages and limitations of this long term management modality are presented and compared with alternatives. Finally, the importance of further research, multicenter studies of telerehabilitation for heart failure patients and the technological development needs are outlined, in particular interactive remotely controlled intelligent telemedicine systems with increased inter-device compatibility.

  11. Telerehabilitation in heart failure patients: The evidence and the pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowicz, Ewa; Piepoli, Massimo F; Jaarsma, Tiny; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Coats, Andrew J S; Schmid, Jean-Paul; Corrà, Ugo; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Dickstein, Kenneth; Seferović, Petar M; Adamopoulos, Stamatis; Ponikowski, Piotr P

    2016-10-01

    Accessibility to the available traditional forms of cardiac rehabilitation programs in heart failure patients is not adequate and adherence to the programs remains unsatisfactory. The home-based telerehabilitation model has been proposed as a promising new option to improve this situation. This paper's aims are to discuss the tools available for telemonitoring, and describing their characteristics, applicability, and effectiveness in providing optimal long term management for heart failure patients who are unable to attend traditional cardiac rehabilitation programs. The critical issues of psychological support and adherence to the telerehabilitation programs are outlined. The advantages and limitations of this long term management modality are presented and compared with alternatives. Finally, the importance of further research, multicenter studies of telerehabilitation for heart failure patients and the technological development needs are outlined, in particular interactive remotely controlled intelligent telemedicine systems with increased inter-device compatibility. PMID:27390963

  12. Ventricular assist devices for heart failure: a focus on patient selection and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriani M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manlio Cipriani, Vincenzo De Simone, Luciana D'Angelo, Enrico Perna, Marzia Lilliu, Virginia Bovolo, Fabrizio Oliva, Maria Frigerio Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department, A De Gasperis Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy Abstract: Heart transplantation represents the “gold standard” for the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure, but remains challenged by inadequate donor supply, finite graft survival, and long-term complications arising from immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, a lot of patients waiting for a heart transplant experience clinical deterioration, and other patients become ineligible to undergo this treatment due to their age or relevant comorbidities. Left ventricular assist devices have emerged as a valid therapeutic option for advanced heart failure. In recent years, we have seen significant advances not only in the technologies available, but also in patient selection, indications for use, and management after implantation. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of implants and an improvement in the survival rate and quality of life for these patients. At the same time, there are new challenges on the horizon. Patient selection is a difficult process, based on clinical and imaging parameters and risk scores, and more data are needed to refine patient selection criteria and the timing of the implant. Left ventricular assist device-related complications are still a serious problem, causing adverse events and hospital readmissions. Continuous progress in the development of these implantable devices, such as a further reduction in size and hopefully the abolition of the external driveline, will probably make ventricular assist devices an option also for less advanced stages of heart failure. Here, we discuss the current indications for left ventricular assist device implantation, patient selection criteria, and the most frequent complications associated with these devices. Keywords

  13. Collaboration and entanglement: An actor-network theory analysis of team-based intraprofessional care for patients with advanced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, A; Goldszmidt, M; Kinsella, E A; Smith, S; Lingard, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite calls for more interprofessional and intraprofessional team-based approaches in healthcare, we lack sufficient understanding of how this happens in the context of patient care teams. This multi-perspective, team-based interview study examined how medical teams negotiated collaborative tensions. From 2011 to 2013, 50 patients across five sites in three Canadian provinces were interviewed about their care experiences and were asked to identify members of their health care teams. Patient-identified team members were subsequently interviewed to form 50 "Team Sampling Units" (TSUs), consisting of 209 interviews with patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Results are gathered from a focused analysis of 13 TSUs where intraprofessional collaborative tensions involved treating fluid overload, or edema, a common HF symptom. Drawing on actor-network theory (ANT), the analysis focused on intraprofessional collaboration between specialty care teams in cardiology and nephrology. The study found that despite a shared narrative of common purpose between cardiology teams and nephrology teams, fluid management tools and techniques formed sites of collaborative tension. In particular, care activities involved asynchronous clinical interpretations, geographically distributed specialist care, fragmented forms of communication, and uncertainty due to clinical complexity. Teams 'disentangled' fluid in order to focus on its physiological function and mobilisation. Teams also used distinct 'framings' of fluid management that created perceived collaborative tensions. This study advances collaborative entanglement as a conceptual framework for understanding, teaching, and potentially ameliorating some of the tensions that manifest during intraprofessional care for patients with complex, chronic disease. PMID:27490299

  14. INSIGHT INTO THE MOLECULAR AND GENETIC CHANGES IN HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Dalla–Volta, MD, PhD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available n the last fifteen years much progress has been made on the knowledge of the mechanisms controlling the genetic and molecular activities of the mammalian (with special emphasis on the human heart in chronic cardiac insufficiency.This increased knowledge has greatly influenced the understanding and treatment of heart failure, helping to prolong duration of life; even if clear evidence of a long lasting improvement of the syndrome is lacking.The causes of heart failure are numerous and different, but the common feature depends on the modest regenerative capacity of the human heart after any important injury damaging the myocardium. Therefore, the more frequent consequence is the appearance of scar tissue, with collagen deposition and tissue remodelling. Even is some proliferation of cardiac myocites has been noted, this process is unable to overcome the destruction of normal cells observed in the several cardiac disorders, so that the only efficient response is usually the cellular hypertrophy.

  15. Ventricular repolarization in a rat model of global heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krandycheva, Valeria; Kharin, Sergey; Strelkova, Marina; Shumikhin, Konstantin; Sobolev, Aleksey; Shmakov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    Isoproterenol in high doses induces infarction-like myocardial damage and structural and functional remodelling of the ventricular myocardium. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ventricular repolarization in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced heart failure. Isoproterenol was administered twice to female Wistar rats (170 mg/kg, s.c., 24 h apart). Four weeks after the injections, cardiac output was measured and unipolar epicardial ventricular electrograms were recorded in situ. Activation-recovery intervals were calculated to assess repolarization. Histological examination of the heart ventricles was also performed. Heart failure in rats treated with isoproterenol was indicated by myocardial histopathological damage and reduced cardiac output. In rats with heart failure, the regional differences in activation-recovery interval prolongation over the ventricular epicardium resulted in increasing heterogeneity in the activation-recovery interval distribution and increasing repolarization heterogeneity of the ventricular subepicardium. Myocardial damage and haemodynamic changes in heart failure induced by isoproterenol were accompanied by significant changes in ventricular repolarization, which were not associated with myocardial hypertrophy.

  16. Parvovirus B19-Induced Constellation of Acute Renal Failure, Elevated Aminotransferases and Congestive Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain W McAuley

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This report details a case of acute renal failure and elevated aminotransferases with subsequent development of congestive heart failure in a patient with history of exposure to parvovirus B19 and serological evidence of acute infection with this agent. This constellation of organ involvement has not been previously reported in the literature.

  17. Exercise Intolerance In Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of Americans with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of HFpEF, but the pathophysiology is not well understood. Diverse etiologies and incomplete mechanistic understanding have resulted in ineffective management strategies to improve the outcomes of HFpEF. Traditional therapies that have been beneficial in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), neurohormonal blockade in particular, have not been effective in treating HFpEF. In this review, we address underlying mechanisms of HFpEF and present the rationale supporting exercise as a component of comprehensive management.

  18. Distribution side of pleural effusion in heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Kyu; Park, Young Ha; Jung, Se Young; Park, Seog Hee; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The interrelationship between the etiology of pleural effusion and the side of its occurrence has been a subject of clinical interest for many years. It has often been stated that pleural effusion caused by congestive heart failure tends to occur on the right side. However, some authors contended that such a side proclivity is not reliable. In the present study, the authors investigated the laterally of effusion caused by various cardiovascular diseases complicated by heart failure. We reviewed the chest X-ray films and clinical records of 68 patients with proven pleural effusion resulted from heart failure. 1. There were 34 men and 34 women with the age ranging from 10 to 84 years with the mean of 59. 2. The diagnoses were rheumatic heart disease (2 patients), coronary heart disease (10 patients), hypertensive heart disease (8 patients), mitral valvular disease (18 patients), aortic valvular disease (3 patients), and miscellaneous (27 patients). 3. 34 patients had unilateral pleural effusion, 25 and 9, right and left, respectively. Of the 34 patients with bilateral effusion, 13 patients had predominantly right-sided effusion, 5 patients had predominantly left-sided effusion and 16 patients had evenly distributed bilateral effusion. Thus, 55.8% of effusion was right-sided.

  19. Heart failure re-admission: measuring the ever shortening gap between repeat heart failure hospitalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Bakal

    Full Text Available Many quality-of-care and risk prediction metrics rely on time to first rehospitalization even though heart failure (HF patients may undergo several repeat hospitalizations. The aim of this study is to compare repeat hospitalization models. Using a population-based cohort of 40,667 patients, we examined both HF and all cause re-hospitalizations using up to five years of follow-up. Two models were examined: the gap-time model which estimates the adjusted time between hospitalizations and a multistate model which considered patients to be in one of four states; community-dwelling, in hospital for HF, in hospital for any reason, or dead. The transition probabilities and times were then modeled using patient characteristics and number of repeat hospitalizations. We found that during the five years of follow-up roughly half of the patients returned for a subsequent hospitalization for each repeat hospitalization. Additionally, we noted that the unadjusted time between hospitalizations was reduced ∼40% between each successive hospitalization. After adjustment each additional hospitalization was associated with a 28 day (95% CI: 22-35 reduction in time spent out of hospital. A similar pattern was seen when considering the four state model. A large proportion of patients had multiple repeat hospitalizations. Extending the gap between hospitalizations should be an important goal of treatment evaluation.

  20. DOCA-salts induce heart failure in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiritilli, A

    2001-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common clinical problem confronting physicians and is often the final manifestation of many cardiovascular disorders. Despite recent advances in the pharmacological management of HF, it remains a highly lethal and disabling disorder. A number of animal models have been developed to study both the pathophysiology of HF and new therapeutic approaches to this complex syndrome. Only through an improved understanding of the basic biology of the early stages of the syndrome can HF be prevented or at least anticipated. With this in view, we have developed an easily realisable and inexpensive model in the guinea pig, which presents numerous structural, metabolic and biochemical similarities compared with the human heart. Thirty guinea pigs, aged 5 weeks and weighing 300 g were used. After anaesthesia, left nephrectomy was performed. After 1 week the guinea pigs were divided into: (a) control group (n=15), which received an injection of vehicle as well as tap water for 10 weeks; (b) DOCA-salts group (n=15), where the animals were treated with an IM injection of 10 mg DOCA 5 days a week for 10 weeks and with drinking water containing 9 g/l(-1) NaCl and 2 g/l(-1) KCl. Our results demonstrate that the administration of DOCA-salts to guinea pigs for 10 weeks caused a significant increase in blood pressure (BP+30%) associated with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), evaluated by LV weight (+37%), LV wall (+36%), by the ratio LV weight/Body weight (+23%) and by an increase in LV volume (+51%). Concerning HF, the latter was clinically evident through an increase in body weight, heart rate and dyspnoea. Indeed, guinea pigs presented pleural and/or pericardial effusion often associated with ascite. This model, which combines pressure and volume overload, results in a slow evolution towards HF. This allows a better understanding of the mechanisms in early LV remodelling which has the potential to develop into HF. Some recent studies have emphasised the value

  1. A novel distributed model of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanshadi, Samin; Jahed, Mehran

    2013-04-01

    Conventional models of cardiovascular system frequently lack required detail and focus primarily on the overall relationship between pressure, flow and volume. This study proposes a localized and regional model of the cardiovascular system. It utilizes noninvasive blood flow and pressure seed data and temporal cardiac muscle regional activity to predict the operation of the heart under normal and congestive heart failure conditions. The analysis considers specific regions of the heart, namely, base, mid and apex of left ventricle. The proposed method of parameter estimation for hydraulic electric analogy model is recursive least squares algorithm. Based on simulation results and comparison to clinical data, effect of congestive heart failure in the heart is quantified. Accumulated results for simulated ejection fraction percentage of the apex, mid and base regions of the left ventricle in congestive heart failure condition were 39 ± 6, 36 ± 9 and 38 ± 8, respectively. These results are shown to satisfactorily match those found through clinical measurements. The proposed analytical method can in effect be utilized as a preclinical and predictive tool for high-risk heart patients and candidates for heart transplant, assistive device and total artificial heart.

  2. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  3. Heart failure in very elderly population- a profile of heart failure in patients over the age of eighty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher V.Chien; Dani Hackner; Ernst R. Schwarz

    2007-01-01

    Objective Heart failure is an epidemic in the elderly, but there is a striking lack of data in this clinically important patient population. We investigated the demographics, cardiac performance, and medication management of a segment of the hospital population in at least their eighth decade of life. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 75 records of heart failure patients who were 80 years of age or older. Records were reviewed for demographic information, presence or absence of diastolic dysfunction, evaluation of ejection fraction, and medication usage including angiotensin-concerting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin receptor antagonists (ARBs),beta-adrenergic blockers, digoxin, and aldosterone antagonists. Assessment for contra-indications to ACE inhibitor or ARBs use was also performed to assess co-morbidities that limit treatment of heart failure. Results The population of very elderly with heart failure is heterogeneous. We found a higher proportion of females as well as higher rates of diastolic dysfunction in patients aged ≥ 90 years compared to patients between the ages of 80-89 years. Usage of ACE inhibitors, ARBs and beta-adrenergic blockers was strikingly low throughout the very elderly population. While co-morbid conditions limited use of agents in many cases, there was a lack of explicit contra-indication in most patients not on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB. Conclusions Heart failure is not a single disease processes, but a continuum of disease processes that vary with age. The elderly with heart failure are an undertreated population, in part due to the multitude of co-morbidities that affect them. Further prospective studies are needed to better understand the physiology and ideal treatment regiment in this growing population.

  4. Optimal medical therapy in chronic heart failure-an audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Systolic heart failure is a chronic condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Evidence based optimal medical therapy (OMT) has been shown to reduce mortality. Underuse of OMT due to multiple reasons has been a consistent problem. The study objective was to audit the use of OMT in patients with heart Failure. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of study: This audit was carried out in AFIC-NIHD from April 2011- February 2012. Material and Methods: Seventy consecutive stage D heart failure patients were included in the study. The patients were assessed clinically by a cardiologist and all previous documentations, referral letters, prescriptions, and purchase receipts were reviewed. To identify any other medication patients might have been taking (which did not appear on the prescriptions) patients were asked to identify common medicine packs. The patients underwent a detailed clinical evaluation including history, physical examination. Relevant investigations were done. ACCF/AHA (American College of Cardiology Foundation / American Heart Association) and ESC (European Society of Cardiology) guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure were taken as standard of care. Results: In our audit we found that a large proportion of patients who were at high risk as per the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) were not on OMT, only 4.3% of the patients were on beta blockers that have been shown to improve mortality in the large randomized clinical trials, 64.3% were not taking any beta blockers where as 55.7% were not on ACE inhibitors and adding the OMT greatly reduced their mortality risk. Conclusions: We concluded that a large proportion of patients were not on OMT despite not having any contraindication to such therapy. This deprives them of significant survival benefit. (author)

  5. Increased walking variability in elderly persons with congestive heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Forman, D. E.; Ladin, Z.; Goldberger, A. L.; Rigney, D. R.; Wei, J. Y.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of congestive heart failure on a person's ability to walk at a steady pace while ambulating at a self-determined rate. SETTING: Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, a primary and tertiary teaching hospital, and a social activity center for elderly adults living in the community. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven elderly subjects (aged 70-93 years) with well compensated congestive heart failure (NY Heart Association class I or II), seven elderly subjects (aged 70-79 years) without congestive heart failure, and 10 healthy young adult subjects (aged 20-30 years). MEASUREMENTS: Subjects walked for 8 minutes on level ground at their own selected walking rate. Footswitches were used to measure the time between steps. Step rate (steps/minute) and step rate variability were calculated for the entire walking period, for 30 seconds during the first minute of the walk, for 30 seconds during the last minute of the walk, and for the 30-second period when each subject's step rate variability was minimal. Group means and 5% and 95% confidence intervals were computed. MAIN RESULTS: All measures of walking variability were significantly increased in the elderly subjects with congestive heart failure, intermediate in the elderly controls, and lowest in the young subjects. There was no overlap between the three groups using the minimal 30-second variability (elderly CHF vs elderly controls: P congestive heart failure when using the overall variability. For all four measures, there was no overlap in any of the confidence intervals, and all group means were significantly different (P < 0.05).

  6. Contemporary strategies in the diagnosis and management of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlay, Shannon M; Pereira, Naveen L; Kushwaha, Sudhir S

    2014-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an important public health problem, and strategies are needed to improve outcomes and decrease health care resource utilization and costs. Its prevalence has increased as the population ages, and HF continues to be associated with a high mortality rate and frequent need for hospitalization. The total cost of care for patients with HF was $30.7 billion in 2012, and it is estimated to more than double to $69.8 billion by 2030. Given this reality, there has been recent investigation into ways of identifying and preventing HF in patients at risk (stage A HF) and those with cardiac structural and functional abnormalities but no clinical HF symptoms (stage B). For patients who have symptoms of HF (stage C), there has been important research into the most effective ways to decongest patients hospitalized with acute decompensated HF and prevent future hospital readmissions. Successful strategies to treat patients with HF and preserved ejection fraction, which has increased in prevalence, continue to be sought. We are in the midst of a rapid evolution in our ability to care for patients with end-stage HF (stage D) because of the introduction of and improvements in mechanical circulatory support. Left ventricular assist devices used as destination therapy offer an important therapeutic option to patients who do not qualify for heart transplant because of advanced age or excessive comorbidity. This review provides a thorough update on contemporary strategies in the diagnosis and management of HF by stage (A to D) that have emerged during the past several years.

  7. AAV-mediated gene therapy for heart failure: enhancing contractility and calcium handling

    OpenAIRE

    Zouein, Fouad A.; Booz, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a progressive, debilitating disease that is characterized by inadequate contractility of the heart. With an aging population, the incidence and economic burden of managing heart failure are anticipated to increase substantially. Drugs for heart failure only slow its progression and offer no cure. However, results of recent clinical trials using recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene delivery offer the promise, for the first time, that heart failure can be reversed. The...

  8. Severe tricuspid regurgitation and isolated right heart failure due to thyrotoxicosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bonou, Maria; Lampropoulos, Konstantinos M; Andriopoulou, Maria; Kotsas, Dimitrios; Lakoumentas, John; Barbetseas, John

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient presented with isolated right heart failure with atrial fibrillation and severe tricuspid regurgitation due to hyperthyroidism. Treatment of the thyroid disease resulted in the disappearance of signs of right heart failure and resolution of the valve incompetence and normalization of the heart rhythm. Although thyrotoxicosis may be associated with congestive heart failure, isolated right heart failure with marked tricuspid regurgitation is rarely seen.

  9. Dronedarone in patients with congestive heart failure: insights from ATHENA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnloser, Stefan H; Crijns, Harry J G M; van Eickels, Martin;

    2010-01-01

    Dronedarone is a new multichannel blocking antiarrhythmic drug for treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). In patients with recently decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF) and depressed LV function, the drug was associated with excess mortality compared with a placebo group. The present study...

  10. Decreased renal clearance of digoxin in chronic congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naafs, M A; van der Hoek, C; van Duin, S; Koorevaar, G; Schopman, W; Silberbusch, J

    1985-01-01

    Renal digoxin clearance was compared in patients suffering from atrial fibrillation with well preserved cardiac function (n = 9; salt intake +/- 170 mmol daily) and patients with chronic congestive heart failure (n = 10; salt intake 50 mmol daily and maintenance treatment with diuretics). There was no difference between the groups concerning digoxin dosage, creatinine clearance, diuresis or sodium excretion in the urine. Digoxin clearance in chronic heart failure proved to be significantly lower than in atrial fibrillation (48 +/- 21 vs 71 +/- 36 ml X min-1, p less than 0.05), and Cdig/Ccreat was similarly reduced at 0.73 +/- 0.15 compared to 1.09 +/- 0.27 (p less than 0.005). Steady state serum digoxin concentration was significantly higher in patients with congestive heart failure (1.44 +/- 0.47 vs 0.87 +/- 0.33 micrograms X 1(-1), p less than 0.01). Chronic congestive heart failure is a state with reduced digoxin clearance by the kidney, which could lead to digoxin intoxication not explicable by overdose, reduced renal function or the effect of interacting drugs. PMID:4007028

  11. Sleep apnoea, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation—quo vadis?

    OpenAIRE

    Chahal, C. Anwar A.; Somers, Virend K.

    2015-01-01

    Strong associations exist between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and both heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF). Burgeoning epidemics of obesity, SDB, HF, and AF make these conditions priorities for health-care policymakers. Two observational studies now suggest outcome benefits from screening and treating for SDB in AF and HF.

  12. Unraveling the mechanisms for heart failure patients' beliefs about compliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Moser, Debra K.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compliance with medication, diet, and monitoring symptoms is a problem in heart failure (HF) patients. Noncompliance can lead to worsening symptoms and is associated with personal beliefs about compliance. To intervene effectively, knowledge of factors related to patients' beliefs about

  13. Return to the Workforce Following First Hospitalization for Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørth, Rasmus; Wong, Chih; Sørensen, Kristian Dahl Kragholm;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Return to work is important financially, as a marker of functional status and for self-esteem in patients developing chronic illness. We examined return to work after first heart failure (HF) hospitalization. METHODS: -By individual-level linkage of nationwide Danish registries, we...

  14. Soluble guanylate cyclase : a potential therapeutic target for heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Marti, Catherine N.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Roessig, Lothar; Greene, Stephen J.; Boehm, Michael; Burnett, John C.; Campia, Umberto; Cleland, John G. F.; Collins, Sean P.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Levy, Phillip D.; Metra, Marco; Pitt, Bertram; Ponikowski, Piotr; Sato, Naoki; Voors, Adriaan A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Butler, Javed

    2013-01-01

    The number of annual hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) and the mortality rates among patients hospitalized for HF remains unacceptably high. The search continues for safe and effective agents that improve outcomes when added to standard therapy. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase

  15. Teaching Congestive Heart Failure to Doctor of Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a lecture given to pharmacy students that emphasizes the pathophysiologic mechanisms causing congestive heart failure and the effects of drugs on these mechanisms. The approach shows the importance of drug therapy in this disorder and how this knowledge can improve patient care. An appendix provides a case study. (GLR)

  16. Bone marrow dysfunction in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Voors, Adriaan A.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schuringa, Jan J.; Klinkenberg, Theo; van der Harst, Pim; Vellenga, Edo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a general dysfunction of the haematopoietic compartment. Bone marrow was obtained during coronary artery bypass graft surgery from 20 patients with CHF (age 67 +/- 6 years, 75% NYHA class >= III, LVEF 32 +/- 6%), and 20 age- and g

  17. Hypochloremia and Diuretic Resistance in Heart Failure : Mechanistic Insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanberg, Jennifer S; Rao, Veena; Ter Maaten, Jozine M; Laur, Olga; Brisco, Meredith A; Perry Wilson, F; Grodin, Justin L; Assefa, Mahlet; Samuel Broughton, J; Planavsky, Noah J; Ahmad, Tariq; Bellumkonda, Lavanya; Tang, W H Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R; Testani, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent epidemiological studies have implicated chloride, rather than sodium, as the driver of poor survival previously attributed to hyponatremia in heart failure. Accumulating basic science evidence has identified chloride as a critical factor in renal salt sensing. Our goal was to prob

  18. Heart failure in the elderly: a U.S. Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael W. Rich

    2006-01-01

    @@ Heart failure (HF) affects 5 million Americans, of whom three-fourths are over age 65 and half are over age 75.1 HF is currently the leading cause of hospitalization among older adults in the U.S., and it is the most costly medical illness by a factor of almost two.

  19. Gender and survival in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez-Sellés, Manuel; Doughty, Robert N; Poppe, Katrina;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gender and survival of patients with heart failure, using data from both randomized trials and observational studies, and the relative contribution of age, left ventricular systolic function, aetiology, and diabetes to differences...

  20. Neurohormonal and clinical sex differences in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, Sven; van der Meer, Peter; van Deursen, Vincent M.; Jaarsma, Tiny; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Wal, Martje H. L.; Hillege, Hans L.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite disparities in pathophysiology and disease manifestation between male and female patients with heart failure, studies focusing on sex differences in biomarkers are scarce. The purpose of this study was to assess sex-specific variation in clinical characteristics and biomarker levels to gain

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study a...

  2. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.;

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs......, IR was an independent predictor of sMAC in the CHF group beta = 0.37 (p complement system and thus...

  3. Overview of emerging pharmacologic agents for acute heart failure syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, Leonardo; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Parissis, John T.; Bohm, Michael; Voors, Adriaan A.; Nieminen, Markku; Zannad, Faiez; Rhodes, Andrew; El-Banayosy, Ali; Dickstein, Kenneth; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2008-01-01

    Background: Several therapies commonly used for the treatment of acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS) present some well-known limitations and have been associated with an early increase in the risk of death. There is, therefore, an unmet need for new pharmacologic agents for the early management of

  4. Management of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuberger, Hans-Ruprecht; Mewis, Christian; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schotten, Ulrich; van Gelder, Isabelle C.; Allessie, Maurits A.; Boehm, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Atrial. fibrillation (AF) and chronic heart failure (CHF) are two major and even growing cardiovascular conditions that often coexist. However, few data are available to guide treatment of AF in patients with CHF. This review summarizes current literature concerning the following topics: (i) prognos

  5. The case for statin therapy in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Boehm, Michael; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Both primary and secondary prevention studies have provided a wealth of evidence that statin therapy effectively reduces cardiovascular events. However, this general statement on the efficacy and safety of statin treatment has not been validated in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Recently

  6. The clinical value of cardiac sympathetic imaging in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Emil; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the pathology of heart failure. The single-photon emission computed tomography tracer iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123) I-MIBG) can be used to investigate the activity of the predominant neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous...

  7. Vitamin B-12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Haye H.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T.; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A.; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B-12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Methods We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause m

  8. Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Congestive Heart Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任海玲; 李海芸; 江时森

    2002-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) belongs to the category of "palpitation", "chest pain", "retention of phlegm and fluid" etc. in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The medical books of past generations recorded a lot of important prescriptions to treat above-mentioned symptoms. This article briefly summarized certain TCM prescriptions on pharmacological actions and therapeutic effects of CHF.

  9. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rujic, Dragana; Sundbøll, Jens; Tofig, Bawer Jalal;

    2016-01-01

    The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) are commonly encountered arrhythmias and include atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia, and focal atrial tachycardia. These tachycardias share several clinical features as well as similar manage...

  10. [Epidemiology and management of heart failure in a Moroccan center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyi, Jamal; Benelmakki, Abdelilah; Bouzelmat, Hicham; Chaib, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This is a prospective observational study of 424 patients hospitalized for heart failure. Data were collected from the intensive care unit and Rhythmology Depatment of the Mohamed V Military Hospital for Instruction in Rabat, between December 2008 and December 2014. The average age was 60.91±12.77. The main cardiovascular risk factors encountered were: hypertension (46%), smoking (45%), and diabetes (43%). Clinically, 63% of patients were admitted for left-sided heart failure. The left ventricle was dilated in 58% of cases, with a mean ejection fraction estimated at 36.33 ± 13.5%. The dominant etiology was ischemic heart disease (254 cases). In addition to optimal medical treatment, 14.4% of our patients underwent cardiac resynchronization with or without defibrillator system. The intra-hospital evolution under medical treatment was marked by 26 deaths. The average length of stay in hospital was 12.1 ± 6.6 days. PMID:27642424

  11. Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Michler, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the publication of a large number of clinical trials primarily using bone marrow-derived stem cells as the injected cell. These “first-generation” clinical trials have advanced our understanding and shown us that (1) cell therapy is safe, (2) cell therapy has been modestly effective, and (3) in humans, bone marrow-derived stem cells do not transdifferentiate into cardiomyocytes or new blood vessels (or at least in sufficient numbers to have any effect).

  12. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  13. Hyperkalemia in heart failure patients: current challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Vilella R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raquel López-Vilella, Herminio Morillas-Climent, Diego Plaza-López, Mónica Cebrián-Pinar, Ignacio Sánchez-Lázaro, Luis Almenar-Bonet Heart Failure and Heart Transplant Unit, Cardiology Department, Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Spain Abstract: In heart failure (HF, hyperkalemia is a frequent problem because of several factors, such as neurohormonal mechanisms involved in the disease, renal failure, comorbidities, and drugs with a prognostic benefit. These drugs can block the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, and therefore, serum potassium levels can increase, mostly when combined with other drugs as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, digitalis, heparin, etc. Hyperkalemia can have severe consequences if not corrected, mostly at the cardiac level (decrease in speed conduction, QRS enlargement, ventricular arrhythmias, and asystole. Therefore, it is important to adequately prescribe these potentially harmful drugs (starting at low doses with close monitoring of renal function and potassium levels, to carefully manage the factors that can interfere with potassium levels, and to early treat hyperkalemia if it develops. There are several investigation lines for the design of new molecules that show a similar efficacy to that of renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system, with a lower risk of hyperkalemia: nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists like finerenone, which is a more cardioselective drug than traditional mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, and angiotensin and neprilysin inhibitors such as LCZ696, which have proven to reduce mortality and heart failure hospitalizations. Besides, new drugs are being studied, which are able to reduce levels of serum potassium in a sustained and faster way, like chelating polymers Patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosilicate. Keywords: hyperkalemia, heart failure, renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors

  14. Accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices (3 Ds in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang B. Siswanto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure becomes main problem in cardiology because of increasing of heart failure patients, rehospitalization rate, morbidity, and mortality rate. The main causes of increasing heart failure problems are: (1 Successful treatment of acute myocardial infarction can be life saving, but its sequelae can cause heart failure. (2 Increasing life expectancy rate grows along with incidences of ageing related heart failure. (3 High prevalence of infection in Indonesia can cause rheumatic heart disease post Streptococcal beta hemolyticus infection, viral myocarditis, infective endocartitis, and tuberculoid pericarditis. (4 Many risk factors for coronary heart disease are often found in heart failure patients, for examples smoking, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and obesity. Indonesia joined international multicentered registry in 2006. Acute Decompensated HEart failure REgistry is a web based international registry to record patient with acute decompensated heart failure treated in emergency room. It was found that heart failure patients in 5 big hospitals in Java and Bali island that joined this registry are younger, sicker and late to seek treatment. The median hospital length of stay was 7 days and in hospital mortality rate was 6.7%. The aim of this article is to give summary about essential things in diagnosing and treating heart failure patients. 3D (accurate diagnoses, evidence based drugs, and new devices are the most important but what to do and what not to do in dealing with heart failure is also useful for your daily practice. (Med J Indones 2012;21:52-8Keywords: Devices, diagnostic, drugs, heart failure

  15. Clinical outcome endpoints in heart failure trials : a European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association consensus document

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannad, Faiez; Garcia, Angeles Alonso; Anker, Stefan D.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Calvo, Gonzalo; Cleland, John G. F.; Cohn, Jay N.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Domanski, Michael J.; Ekman, Inger; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Koglin, Joerg; Konstam, Marvin; Kupfer, Stuart; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Metra, Marco; Nowack, Christina; Pieske, Burkert; Pina, Ileana L.; Pocock, Stuart J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ruilope, Luis M.; Ruschitzka, Frank; Severin, Thomas; Solomon, Scott; Stein, Kenneth; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Swedberg, Karl; Tavazzi, Luigi; Voors, Adriaan A.; Wasserman, ScottM.; Woehrle, Holger; Zalewski, Andrew; McMurray, John J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Endpoint selection is a critically important step in clinical trial design. It poses major challenges for investigators, regulators, and study sponsors, and it also has important clinical and practical implications for physicians and patients. Clinical outcomes of interest in heart failure trials in

  16. Dyspnoea and worsening heart failure in patients with acute heart failure : results from the Pre-RELAX-AHF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Teerlink, John R.; Felker, G. Michael; Greenberg, Barry H.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teichman, Sam L.; Unemori, Elaine; Voors, Adriaan A.; Weatherley, Beth Davison; Cotter, Gad

    2010-01-01

    Although dyspnoea is the most common cause of admission for acute heart failure (AHF), more needs to be known about its clinical course and prognostic significance. The Pre-RELAX-AHF study randomized 232 subjects with AHF to placebo or four doses of relaxin and evaluated early (6-24 h Likert scale)

  17. Co-morbidities in patients with heart failure : an analysis of the European Heart Failure Pilot Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Vincent M.; Urso, Renato; Laroche, Cecile; Damman, Kevin; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Co-morbidities frequently accompany heart failure (HF), contributing to increased morbidity and mortality, and an impairment of quality of life. We assessed the prevalence, determinants, regional variation, and prognostic implications of co-morbidities in patients with chronic HF in Europe. Met

  18. Immunological Aspects of the Statins' Function in Patients with Heart Failure: A Report from the Annual Conference of ESC-Heart Failure 2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Banach; Jaroslaw Dro(z)d(z); Piotr Okonski; Jacek Rysz

    2005-01-01

    The annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of ESC in Lisbon, in June 2005, was exceptionally successful.There were many very interesting presentations and workshops with the unique title: Statins in heart failureCholesterol-lowering is not the only goal Heart failure (HF) is a progressive disease with coronary artery disease (CAD) as the most often underlying etiology. Treatment to prevent progression of heart failure has been targeted to reverse the consequences of HF and to a less extent the cause - the atherosclerotic plaque itself. On the average 50% of patients with heart failure are treated with lipid intervention. Lipid-lowering treatment with statins clearly reduces morbidity and mortality of patients with documented CAD. Since the prevalent etiology of heart failure is CAD, its prevention may reduce heart failure progression. However, recent studies suggest that pleiotropic effects of statins are more important than the influence related to their cholesterol lowering mechanism. Furthermore it is suggested that low levels of circulating lipoproteins and cholesterol may be independent predictors of impaired outcome in patients with heart failure. There are some possible explanations for this finding. High levels of cholesterol can be beneficial to heart failure patients; cholesterol-rich serum lipoproteins are able to modulate inflammatory immune function because they bind and detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide, a very strong stimulator of the release of proinflammatory cytokines that promote heart failure progression and death. So current recommendations strongly emphasize that the aim of treatment of HF is not to lower cholesterol.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation Associated with Heart Failure, Stroke and Mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bordignon MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Atrial Fibrillation (AF is the most common arrhythmia in the western world. Because AF prevalence rises with age and western populations are increasingly aging, AF has been called a “growing epidemic”, especially among older persons, with social and economic consequences. AF may concur to disability and may cluster with other co-existing clinical conditions. AF is an independent risk factor for stroke by increasing the thromboembolic risk profile and is associated with heart failure severity. Among persons with AF, prevalence of stroke, coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, cognitive impairment and physical disability is significantly higher. AF is associated with higher risk of mortality through the association with stroke and heart failure: ischemic strokes are more severe if AF is present and AF may represent a marker of more severe heart failure. Independently of other known predictors of mortality, death rates are almost doubled by AF. AF, therefore, is a considerable source of morbidity and mortality, is associated with disability, and is a major determinant of quality of life.

  20. Cardiac sympathetic nerve terminal function in congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-seng LIANG

    2007-01-01

    Increased cardiac release of norepinephrine (NE) and depleted cardiac stores of NE are two salient features of the human failing heart. Researches from my labo-ratory have shown that these changes are accompanied by a functional defect of NE uptake in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. Our studies have shown that the decrease of NE uptake is caused by reduction of NE transporter density in the sympathetic nerve endings, and this change is responsible, at least in part, for the increased myocardial interstitial NE, decreased myocardial adrenoceptor density, and increased myocyte apoptosis in experimental cardiomyopathies. We have also provided evidence in both intact animals and cultured PC12 cells that the decrease of NE transporter is induced by the actions of oxidative metabolites of exogenous NE, involving endoplasmic reticulum stress and impaired N-glycosylation of the NE transporter. This change in the cardiac sympathetic NE uptake function, as demonstrated by [123I] metaiodobenzylguanidine in human studies, may not only serve as an important prognostic variable in patients with congestive heart failure, but also be used as a surrogate for the efficacies of various therapeutic interventions for heart failure. Finally, increasing evidence suggests and further studies are needed to show that the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminal function may be a direct target for pharmacologic treatment of congestive heart failure.

  1. Application of echocardiography in resynchronization treatment of heart failure patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Hai-long; GUANG Xue-feng; XIAO Zhi-cheng; ZHANG Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the updated research progress about the application of echocardiography in resynchronization treatment of chronic heart failure patients.Data sources The data used in this review were from PubMed,published in English and using the key terms "heart failure","echocardiography" and "cardiac resynchronization therapy".Study selection Relevant articles were reviewed and selected to address the stated purpose.Results Increasing numbers of studies have suggested the importance of echocardiography in resynchronization treatment of chronic heart failure patients.Echocardiography can evaluate atrioventricular,inter- and intra-ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony before cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT),as a guidance to assess the optimal left ventricular (LV) pacing location,optimize the atrioventricular and interventricular delays and predict response to CRT.Conclusions Echocardiography is both non invasive and easily repeatable,and plays a crucial role in appraisal of heart synchronism,instruction of actuator placement,optimization of the device procedure,and prediction of the response to CRT.Chin Med J 2012; 125(19):3548-3555

  2. BAG3: a new player in the heart failure paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Tijana; Myers, Valerie D; Gordon, Jennifer; Tilley, Douglas G; Sharp, Thomas E; Wang, JuFang; Khalili, Kamel; Cheung, Joseph Y; Feldman, Arthur M

    2015-07-01

    BAG3 is a cellular protein that is expressed predominantly in skeletal and cardiac muscle but can also be found in the brain and in the peripheral nervous system. BAG3 functions in the cell include: serving as a co-chaperone with members of the heat-shock protein family of proteins to facilitate the removal of misfolded and degraded proteins, inhibiting apoptosis by interacting with Bcl2 and maintaining the structural integrity of the Z-disk in muscle by binding with CapZ. The importance of BAG3 in the homeostasis of myocytes and its role in the development of heart failure was evidenced by the finding that single allelic mutations in BAG3 were associated with familial dilated cardiomyopathy. Furthermore, significant decreases in the level of BAG3 have been found in end-stage failing human heart and in animal models of heart failure including mice with heart failure secondary to trans-aortic banding and in pigs after myocardial infarction. Thus, it becomes relevant to understand the cellular biology and molecular regulation of BAG3 expression in order to design new therapies for the treatment of patients with both hereditary and non-hereditary forms of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25925243

  3. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  4. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  5. Clinical and economic aspects of the use of nebivolol in the treatment of elderly patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Del Sindaco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Del Sindaco1, Maria Denitza Tinti2, Luca Monzo2, Giovanni Pulignano2,1Heart Failure Unit, Division of Cardiology, INRCA Institute of Care and Research for Elderly, Rome, Italy; 2Heart Failure Clinic, Division of Cardiology/CCU, San Camillo Hospital, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Heart failure is a common and disabling condition with morbidity and mortality that increase dramatically with advancing age. Large observational studies, retrospective subgroup analyses and meta-analyses of clinical trials in systolic heart failure, and recently published randomized studies have provided data supporting the use of beta-blockers as a baseline therapy in heart failure in the elderly. Despite the available evidence about beta-blockers, this therapy is still less frequently used in elderly compared to younger patients. Nebivolol is a third-generation cardioselective beta-blocker with L-arginine/nitric oxide-induced vasodilatory properties, approved in Europe and several other countries for the treatment of essential hypertension, and in Europe for the treatment of stable, mild, or moderate chronic heart failure, in addition to standard therapies in elderly patients aged 70 years old or older. The effects of nebivolol on left ventricular function in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (ENECA and the study of effects of nebivolol intervention on outcomes and rehospitalization in seniors with heart failure (SENIORS have been specifically aimed to assess the efficacy of beta-blockade in elderly heart failure patients. The results of these two trials demonstrate that nebivolol is well tolerated and effective in reducing mortality and morbidity in older patients, and that the beneficial clinical effect is present also in patients with mildly reduced ejection fraction. Moreover, nebivolol appears to be significantly cost-effective when prescribed in these patients. However, further targeted studies are needed to better define the efficacy as well as

  6. Subclinical heart failure in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a consequence of chronic inflammation and subclinical atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada S Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Our findings indicate the presence of subclinical heart failure in these patients. JIA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis, with systemic disease, and with active disease are at greatest risk of developing subclinical heart failure.

  7. ACE inhibitors and calcium antagonists in the treatment of congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J F

    1995-01-01

    The increased mortality after myocardial infarction is related to the risk of reinfarction, sudden death, and the development and progression of heart failure; in congestive heart failure it is due to the progression of heart failure and sudden death. ACE inhibitors have been proven to prevent...... cardiovascular events, especially the progression of heart failure, in postinfarct patients with reduced ejection fraction and heart failure in the SAVE and AIRE trials. In patients with congestive heart failure, ACE inhibitor treatment has prevented cardiovascular death and reduced morbidity due to progressive...... heart failure in the SOLVD trials. In post-myocardial infarction patients, the calcium antagonist nifedipine did not affect mortality or morbidity; diltiazem improved prognosis in patients without congestive heart failure and in patients with non-Q-wave infarction; and verapamil improved prognosis...

  8. Heart Failure With Normal Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction : What is the Evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kindermann, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Pieske, Burkert; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Boehm, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure with a normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a common clinical problem with many unsolved questions regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy. Although the term diastolic heart failure has been abandoned, diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction together with combined systolic

  9. Lack of prevention of heart failure by serial electrical cardioversion in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, AE; Van Gelder, IC; Van Den Berg, MP; Brugemann, J; De Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM

    1999-01-01

    Objective-To investigate the occurrence of heart failure complications, and to identify variables that predict heart failure in patients with (recurrent) persistent atrial fibrillation, treated aggressively with serial electrical cardioversion and antiarrhythmic drugs to maintain sinus rhythm. Desig

  10. THE METHODS OF TOTAL BODY BIOIMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN ANALYSIS THE FUNCTIONAL CLASS OF CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, G.; Dvornicov, V.; Niculina, L.; Kotlarova, L.; Bernshtein, Ju; Pavlovich, A.

    2004-01-01

    The article presented result of studies, which determined signs an studies of total body bioimpedance spectros-copy analysis in evaluate of functional class of chronic heart failure. Key words: biompedance, congestive heart failure.

  11. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in the elderly heart failure patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George E. Taffet

    2005-01-01

    @@ Ms. BP is an 83 year old white female with a long history of congestive heart failure (HF). She is now symptomatic with minimal exertion, has a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of 20%. Her CHF is due to hypertension (HTN) plus coronary artery disease (CAD) and she is on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), furosemide, digoxin,spironolactone, low dose beta blocker and nitrates. Her beta-natriuretic peptide (BNP) in clinic is 3030 pg/ml, heart rate (HR) 100, blood pressure (BP) 89/43.

  12. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management.

  13. Role of the Carotid Body in the Pathophysiology of Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Harold D.; Marcus, Noah J.; Rio, Rodrigo del

    2013-01-01

    Important recent advances implicate a role of the carotid body (CB) chemoreflex in sympathetic and breathing dysregulation in several cardio-respiratory diseases, drawing renewed interest in its potential implications for clinical treatment. Evidence from both chronic heart failure (CHF) patients and animal models indicates that the CB chemoreflex is enhanced in CHF, and contributes to the tonic elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and periodic breathing associated with the disease. ...

  14. Heart Failure in Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction: Questions Concerning Clinical Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Louridas, George E; Katerina G. Lourida

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, important advances have been made in explaining some pathophysiological aspects of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) with repercussions for the successful clinical management of the syndrome. Despite these gains, our knowledge for the natural history of clinical progression from the pre-clinical diastolic dysfunction (PDD) until the final clinical stages is significantly limited. The subclinical progression of PDD to the clinical phenotype of HF...

  15. Impact of Telehealth on Healthcare Utilization by Congestive Heart Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Craig A. Lehmann; Nancy Mintz; Jean Marie Giacini

    2006-01-01

    Background: Advances in telehealth are proving to be extremely conducive to effective management of congestive heart failure (CHF) and other disease states, particularly in ambulatory settings. In order to assess the impact of telehealth on healthcare utilization in CHF patients, telehealth technology was introduced into a demonstration project established by the Secretary of Health and Human Services. Demonstration projects examine health delivery factors that encourage the delivery of impro...

  16. “Nihilism” of chronic heart failure therapy in children and why effective therapy is withheld

    OpenAIRE

    Schranz, Dietmar; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2016-01-01

    Major advances in chronic heart failure (cHF) therapy have been achieved and documented in adult patients, while research regarding the mechanisms and therapy of cHF in children has lagged behind. Based on receptor physiological studies and pharmacological knowledge, treatment with specific ß1-adrenergic receptor blocker (ARB), tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I), and mineralocorticoid antagonists have to be recommended in children despite lack of sufficient data derived fr...

  17. [ANMCO/SIC/SIT Consensus document: The future of telemedicine in heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lenarda, Andrea; Casolo, Giancarlo; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Aspromonte, Nadia; Scalvini, Simonetta; Mortara, Andrea; Alunni, Gianfranco; Ricci, Renato Pietro; Mantovan, Roberto; Russo, Giancarmine; Gensini, Gian Franco; Romeo, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Telemedicine applied to heart failure patients is a tool for recording, remote transmission, storage and interpretation of cardiocirculatory parameters and/or diagnostic images, useful, as emphasized by the latest guidelines, to allow for intensive home monitoring in patients with advanced heart failure or during the vulnerable post-acute phase to improve the prognosis and quality of life for patients.Recently, several meta-analyses have shown that the patterns of care supported by telemedicine are not only effective, but also economically advantageous. The benefit is unquestionable with a 30-35% reduction in mortality and a 15-20% reduction in hospitalizations. Patients implanted with cardiac devices can also benefit from an integrated remote clinical management as all modern devices can transmit technical and diagnostic data. However, telemedicine can bring benefits to the patient with heart failure only if it is part of a shared and integrated, multidisciplinary and multiprofessional "Chronic Care Model". Moreover, the future development of remote telemonitoring programs in our country goes through the primary use of products certified as medical device, field validation of organizational solutions proposed, a legislative and administrative adaptation to new care methods and the widespread growth of competence in clinical care to remotely manage the complexity of chronicity.With this consensus document the Italian Cardiology reaffirms its willingness to contribute to the government of the tumultuous and fragmented technological development, proposing a new phase of qualitative assessment, standardization of processes and testing the application of telemedicine to heart failure. PMID:27311090

  18. Heart failure in chemotherapy-related cardiomyopathy: Can exercise make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nandini; Gongora, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    Medical therapies in oncology have resulted in better survival resulting in a large population who are at risk of early and late cardiac complications of chemotherapy. Cardiotoxicity related to chemotherapy can manifest decades after treatment with a threefold higher mortality rate as compared to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. The leading cause of death in cancer survivors seems to be cardiac. Early detection and intervention could prevent progression of heart failure to end stage disease requiring advanced therapies such as implantation of ventricular assist devices or cardiac transplantation. This review focuses on the role of exercise in cardioprotection in this population. The current practice of depending on ejection fraction for diagnosis of heart failure is suboptimal to detect subclinical disease. It is also important to diagnose and treat early diastolic dysfunction as this tends to lead to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. Hence we suggest an algorithm here that is based on using strain rate and tissue Doppler imaging modalities to detect subclinical systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Further research is warranted in terms of defining exercise prescriptions in this population. Human studies with multicenter participation in randomized controlled trials should be done to elucidate the intricacies of aerobic exercise intervention in cardiotoxicity dependent heart failure. It is also necessary to assess the utility of exercise interventions in the different chemotherapeutic regimens as they impact the outcomes. PMID:27413695

  19. Discrimination power of long-term heart rate variability measures for Chronic Heart Failure detection

    OpenAIRE

    Melillo, Paolo; Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Bracale, Marcello; Pecchia, Leandro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the discrimination power of standard long-term Heart Rate Variability (HRV) measures for the diagnosis of Chronic Heart Failure (CHF). We performed a retrospective analysis on 4 public Holter databases, analyzing the data of 72 normal subjects and 44 patients suffering from CHF. To assess the discrimination power of HRV measures, we adopted an exhaustive search of all possible combinations of HRV measures and we developed classifiers based on Classi...

  20. Spironolactone therapy in infants with congestive heart failure secondary to congenital heart disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbins, S M; Fowler, R. S.; Rowe, R D; Korey, A G

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of treatment with spironolactone for congestive heart failure secondary to congenital heart disease was studied in 21 infants under 1 year of age. All received digoxin and chlorothiazide. In addition, group A (n = 10) was given supplements of potassium and group B (n = 11) received spironolactone. Daily clinical observations of vital signs, weight, hepatomegaly, and vomiting were recorded. Paired t test analysis showed significant reduction in liver size and weight (P less than 0...

  1. Self-Care Behaviors among Patients with Heart Failure in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Zamanzadeh; Leila Valizadeh; Fatemeh Jamshidi; Hossein Namdar; Ahdieh Maleki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Recovery from heart failure and dealing with its effects is significantly influenced by patient’s self-care. In order to maximize the effects of behavioral interventions and for educational planning, it is essential to know how much experience and information do patients with heart failure have about their disease and self-care behaviors. The present study aimed to identify self-care behaviors in patients with heart failure. Methods: Eighty heart failure patients hospitalized in...

  2. REM-HF: REmote Monitoring an evaluation of implantable devices for management of Heart Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, John M

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need to develop new ways of managing the rapidly increasing number of people living with heart failure in the UK. The epidemic of heart failure has arisen because of the rapidly ageing population and dramatic improvements in the survival from acute coronary disease and heart failure. Remote monitoring of heart failure using automated implanted devices and bespoke care pathways/protocols to give early warning of deterioration and facilitate pre-emptive action may be an impo...

  3. Drug Treatment of Heart Failure in Children: Focus on Recent Recommendations from the ISHLT Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Alexander D; Weintraub, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    The International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) recently updated consensus pediatric heart failure guidelines from those published in 2004 with an aim to provide a practical evidence-based resource whilst recognizing the influence of adult heart failure practice. The new guidelines were formed from published evidence for heart failure management and used parallels with adult literature where pediatric evidence was lacking. This is a summary of the pharmacological therapies discussed in the new 2014 guidelines, emphasizing changes from the previous recommendations with regards to treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, chronic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and acute decompensated heart failure. Each recommendation is classified according to strength and level of evidence. We also discuss future perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of heart failure. The 2014 ISHLT guidelines have evolved considerably from those published in 2004 with extensive information surrounding the underlying pathophysiology, investigations and recommended treatment. The new guidelines contain a modest amount of new pediatric data on pharmacological therapies and extrapolate adult data when appropriate. It is likely that most new recommendations for pediatric heart failure will continue to be based on therapies of proven benefit in adult heart failure studies.

  4. Drug Treatment of Heart Failure in Children: Focus on Recent Recommendations from the ISHLT Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Alexander D; Weintraub, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    The International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) recently updated consensus pediatric heart failure guidelines from those published in 2004 with an aim to provide a practical evidence-based resource whilst recognizing the influence of adult heart failure practice. The new guidelines were formed from published evidence for heart failure management and used parallels with adult literature where pediatric evidence was lacking. This is a summary of the pharmacological therapies discussed in the new 2014 guidelines, emphasizing changes from the previous recommendations with regards to treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, chronic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and acute decompensated heart failure. Each recommendation is classified according to strength and level of evidence. We also discuss future perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of heart failure. The 2014 ISHLT guidelines have evolved considerably from those published in 2004 with extensive information surrounding the underlying pathophysiology, investigations and recommended treatment. The new guidelines contain a modest amount of new pediatric data on pharmacological therapies and extrapolate adult data when appropriate. It is likely that most new recommendations for pediatric heart failure will continue to be based on therapies of proven benefit in adult heart failure studies. PMID:26939781

  5. Therapeutic options in chronic heart failure. Findings on chest X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution covers drugless therapeutic options for chronic heart failure: the implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), the interventional catheter treatment of functional mitral insufficiency, and mechanical heart supporting systems and heart transplantation.

  6. Prevalence of heart failure in nursing homes : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daamen, Marielle A. M. J.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hamers, Jan P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Heart failure is an important problem in western countries. In nursing home residents heart failure is expected to be highly prevalent. However, accurate diagnosis of heart failure in these patients is often hampered due to atypical findings and concomitant co-morbidity. In order to de

  7. Low-dose nitroglycerin improves microcirculation in hospitalized patients with acute heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. den Uil; W.K. Lagrand; P.E. Spronk; M. van der Ent; L.S.D. Jewbali; J.J. Brugts; C. Ince; M.L. Simoons

    2009-01-01

    Impaired tissue perfusion is often observed in patients with acute heart failure. We tested whether low-dose nitroglycerin (NTG) improves microcirculatory perfusion in patients admitted for acute heart failure. In 20 acute heart failure patients, NTG was given as intravenous infusion at a fixed dose

  8. Clinical use of novel biomarkers in heart failure : towards personalized medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitter, Daniela; Cotter, Gadi; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers play an important role in heart failure. They provide us information about the mechanisms involved in specific types of heart failure and can identify patients at higher risk. Although the majority of biomarker studies in heart failure focus on their prognostic value, the clinical applica

  9. Non-pharmacological treatment of heart failure: Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gelder, I.C.; Smit, M.D.; Nieuwland, W; Van Veldhuisen, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    The non-pharmacological therapy of heart failure, in particular an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) and cardiac resynchronisation therapy or biventricular stimulation, improves symptoms and survival in patients with heart failure. - An ICD is indicated in many patients with heart failure

  10. Intermittent claudication as a predictor of outcome in patients with ischaemic systolic heart failure : analysis of the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure trial (CORONA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inglis, Sally C.; McMurray, John J. V.; Boehm, Michael; Schaufelberger, Maria; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Lindberg, Magnus; Dunselman, Peter; Hjalmarson, Ake; Kjekshus, John; Waagstein, Finn; Wedel, Hans; Wikstrand, John

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relationship between baseline intermittent claudication and outcomes in patients enrolled in the Controlled Rosuvastatin Multinational Trial in Heart Failure trial (CORONA). Intermittent claudication is an independent predictor of worse outcome in coronary heart disease, but its progn

  11. Congestive heart failure from suspected ductal closure in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcilla, R A; Thilenius, O G; Ranniger, K

    1969-07-01

    This is the 1st case report of a ductal closure occurring during fetal growth. The case was a spontaneous delivery in cephalic presentation from a 31-year-old gravida 3, para 3 Black woman who had been treated with isoniazid and spreptomycin up to 2 months before her delivery. Gestational age was 37 weeks when the fetus was delivered weighing 3.15 kgm. The cord had been wrapped around the fetus's neck, and breathing was delayed 2 minutes. In the nursery, the baby's general condition was poor, and congestive heart failure was diagnosed. The newborn had trieuspid insufficiency, severe heart failure, and acidosis at birth. These disappeared the next day. Hemodynamic studies when the baby was 4 hours old showed a large cone-shaped ductus arteriousus extending from the pulmonary artery but ending blindly at the aortic end.

  12. Quality of life in patients with chronic congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca D. Farcaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Quality of life (QOL is severely decreased in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Our study aims to identify the factors affecting the evaluation of QOL. Material and Methods: Clinical, demographic, social and economic data was collected from patients with CHF in NYHA class III and IV as part of a complex workup. The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to evaluate QOL. Results: QOL decreases as the NYHA class increases. Women evaluate their QOL as more severely affected than men. Age, social and economic factors modulate the perception of QOL. Conclusion: Combining demographic, social and economic data and evaluation of QOL can provide valuable and useful information for the medical management of patients with CHF.

  13. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Acute Heart Failure Patients: Observations from the Oman Acute Heart Failure Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, management and outcomes of patients in Oman with acute heart failure (AHF as part of the Gulf aCute heArt failuRe rEgistry (CARE project. Methods: Data were analyzed from 988 consecutive patients admitted with AHF to 12 hospitals in Oman between 14 February and 14 November 2012. Results: The mean age of our patients was 63±12 years. Over half (57% were male and 95% were Omani citizens. Fifty-seven percent of patients presented with acute decompensated chronic heart failure (ADCHF while 43% had new-onset AHF. The primary comorbid conditions were hypertension (72%, coronary artery disease (55%, and diabetes mellitus (53%. Ischemic heart disease (IHD, hypertensive heart disease, and idiopathic cardiomyopathy were the most common etiologies of AHF in Oman. The median left ventricular ejection fraction of the cohort was 36% (27–45% with 56% of the patients having heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (< 40%. Atrial fibrillation was seen in 15% of patients. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS and non-compliance with medications were the most common precipitating factors. At discharge, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-blockers were prescribed adequately, but aldosterone antagonists were under prescribed. Within 12-months follow-up, one in two patients were rehospitalized for AHF. In-hospital mortality was 7.1%, which doubled to 15.7% at three months and reached 26.4% at one-year post discharge. Conclusions: Oman CARE was the first prospective multicenter registry of AHF in Oman and showed that heart failure (HF patients present at a younger age with recurrent ADCHF and HF with reduced ejection fraction. IHD was the most common etiology of HF with a low prevalence of AHF, but a high prevalence of acute coronary syndrome and non-compliance with medications precipitating HF. A quarter of patients died at one-year follow-up even though at discharge medical

  14. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Human Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez García, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Heart failure (HF) constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. Operationally it is defined as a clinical syndrome characterized by the marked and progressive inability of the ventricles to fill and generate adequate cardiac output to meet the demands of cellular metabolism that may have significant variability in its etiology and it is the final common pathway of various cardiac pathologies. Much attention has been paid to the understanding of the arrhythmogenic mechanisms induc...

  15. Hemodynamic aspects of biventricular pacing in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Ståhlberg, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Biventricular pacing or cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment option for selected heart failure (HF) patients. We aimed at evaluating acute and longer-term hemodynamic effects of different pacemaker programmings in CRT patients. For the latter purpose, 10 CRT patients also received an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM), allowing for long-term hemodynamic monitoring during ambulatory periods. Study I The hemodynamic ...

  16. Metabolomic Fingerprint of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Beshay N Zordoky; Sung, Miranda M.; Justin Ezekowitz; Rupasri Mandal; Beomsoo Han; Trent C Bjorndahl; Souhaila Bouatra; Todd Anderson; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Wishart, David S.; Jason R.B. Dyck

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis. Methods and ...

  17. Daily Physical Activity in Stable Heart Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dontje, Manon L.; van der Wal, Martje H.L; Stolk, Ronald P; Brügemann, Johan; Jaarsma, Tiny; Wijtvliet, Petra E P J; van der Schans, Cees P; Greef, Mathieu H.G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Physical activity is the only nonpharmacological therapy that is proven to be effective in heart failure (HF) patients in reducing morbidity. To date, little is known about the levels of daily physical activity in HF patients and about related factors. OBJECTIVE:: The objectives of this study were to (a) describe performance-based daily physical activity in HF patients, (b) compare it with physical activity guidelines, and (c) identify related factors of daily physical activity. ...

  18. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure in seven nursing homes

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Kjell; Sandli, Marie; Geitung, Jonn Terje; Eide, Geir Egil; Grimsmo, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Previous research suggests that blood-thinning treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation as well as treatment for patients with heart failure is not adequate among the elderly. We tested this among long-term patients in nursing homes. Methods: Information about the patients (n = 513) was collected during the period March-April 2008. Data collection consisted of electrocardiography, particulars of any stroke suffered and copying medication records. A standardized set of blood...

  19. Atrial fibrillation in heart failure: The sword of Damocles revisited.

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Muhammad A.; Ahmed, Fozia; Neyses, Ludwig; Mamas, Mamas A.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) frequently coexist and have emerged as major cardiovascular epidemics. There is growing evidence that AF is an independent prognostic marker in HF and affects patients with both reduced as well as preserved LV systolic function. There has been a general move in clinical practice from a rhythm control to a rate control strategy in HF patients with AF, although recent data suggests that rhythm control strategies may provide better outcomes in sele...

  20. Experiences of air travel in patients with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Ingle, Lee; Hobkirk, James; Damy, Thibaud; Nabb, Samantha; Clark, Andrew L.; Cleland, John G F

    2012-01-01

    Aim To conduct a survey in a representative cohort of ambulatory patients with stable, well managed chronic heart failure (CHF) to discover their experiences of air travel. Methods An expert panel including a cardiologist, an exercise scientist, and a psychologist developed a series of survey questions designed to elicit CHF patients' experiences of air travel (Appendix 1). The survey questions, information sheets and consent forms were posted out in a self-addressed envelope to 1293 CHF pati...

  1. Nitrosative stress and pharmacological modulation of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Pacher, Pal; Schulz, Richard; Liaudet, Lucas; Szabó, Csaba

    2005-01-01

    Dysregulation of nitric oxide (NO) and increased oxidative and nitrosative stress are implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Peroxynitrite is a reactive oxidant that is produced from the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide anion and impairs cardiovascular function through multiple mechanisms, including activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Recent studies suggest that the neutralization of peroxynitrite or pharmacol...

  2. Complement C3c as a Biomarker in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, A.; Ertl, G; Angermann, C. E.; Hofmann, U; Störk, S; Frantz, S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Experimental data indicates an important role of the innate immune system in cardiac remodeling and heart failure (HF). Complement is a central effector pathway of the innate immune system. Animals lacking parts of the complement system are protected from adverse remodeling. Based on these data, we hypothesized that peripheral complement levels could be a good marker for adverse remodeling and prognosis in patients with HF. Methods and Results. Since complement activation conver...

  3. Pulmonary Hypertension and Cardiopulmonary Exercise in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Jae, Sae Young; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    In heart failure (HF), pulmonary hypertension (PH) is initially associated with a rise in the left ventricular filling pressure. PH is defined by pulmonary hemodynamic measurements including pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Eventually, PH in HF may become more of a reactive process. Although the mechanism of the reactive PH development is not clearly understood, vascular dysfunction induced by remodeling, vasoactive substa...

  4. Mammillary bodies and fornix fibers are injured in heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajesh; Woo, Mary A.; Birrer, Bramley V.X.; Macey, Paul M.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Hamilton, Michele A.; Ronald M Harper

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive abnormalities, including memory deficits, are common in heart failure (HF). Brain structures, including the hippocampus, fornix, and thalamus participate in memory processing, and most show structural injury and functional deficits in HF. The mammillary bodies and fornix play essential roles in spatial and working memory processing, interact with other structures, and may also be injured in HF. We assessed mammillary body volumes and cross-sectional fornix areas in 17 HF and 50 cont...

  5. A cornerstone of heart failure treatment is not effective in experimental right ventricular failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgdorff, Marinus A.; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Dickinson, Michael G.; Steendijk, Paul; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Right ventricular (RV) failure due to increased pressure load causes significant morbidity and mortality in patients with congenital heart diseases and pulmonary arterial hypertension. It is unknown whether renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-system (RAAS) inhibition (the cornerstone of left v

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha polymorphism in heart failure/cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlamani, Lou; Iyengar, Srinivas

    2004-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor a (TNF-alpha) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is produced by activated macrophages. It has been shown to stimulate the release of endothelial cytokines and NO, increase vascular permeability, decrease contractility, and induce a prothrombotic state. The most studied TNF-a gene mutation in heart disease is a gamma to alpha substitution, which occurs when 308 nucleotides move upstream from the transcription initiation site in the TNF promoter and has been associated with elevated levels of TNF-alpha. The TNF1 allele (wild type) contains gamma at this site, while the TNF2 allele has an alpha substitution at the site. The TNF2 allele is a more powerful transcriptional activator, therefore leading to higher TNF-alpha levels. Most of the studies to date have failed to conclusively show any link between the polymorphism and heart disease, both coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy/heart failure. PMID:15591843

  7. HEART FAILURE, DIABETES, BETA-BLOCKERS AND RISK OF HYPOGLYCEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Aleksandrov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate an influence of carvedilol on risk of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes type 2 (D2 and chronic heart failure (CHF treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors.Material and methods. 13 patients (10 men, 3 women; aged 59,8±6,7 y.o. with D2 and CHF caused by ischemic heart disease were included in the study. Before inclusion all patients were treated with ACE inhibitors and various beta-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol. These beta-blockers were changed for carvedilol. Heart ultrasonography, blood pressure control, glycemia monitoring, HbA1c level determination were performed before, during and after carvedilol therapy.Results. Carvedilol reduces frequency and duration of hypoglycaemia episodes. There were not episodes of severe hypoglycaemia during carvedilol therapy.Conclusion. Carvedilol reduces risk of hypoglycemia when it is used in combination with ACE inhiditors in diabetic patients with CHF.

  8. Decongestion: Diuretics and other therapies for hospitalized heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazir, Ali; Cowie, Martin R

    2016-04-01

    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a potentially life-threatening clinical syndrome, usually requiring hospital admission. Often the syndrome is characterized by congestion, and is associated with long hospital admissions and high risk of readmission and further healthcare expenditure. Despite a limited evidence-base, diuretics remain the first-line treatment for congestion. Loop diuretics are typically the first-line diuretic strategy with some evidence that initial treatment with continuous infusion or boluses of high-dose loop diuretic is superior to an initial lower dose strategy. In patients who have impaired responsiveness to diuretics, the addition of an oral thiazide or thiazide-like diuretic to induce sequential nephron blockade can be beneficial. The use of intravenous low-dose dopamine is no longer supported in heart failure patients with preserved systolic blood pressure and its use to assist diuresis in patients with low systolic blood pressures requires further study. Mechanical ultrafiltration has been used to treat patients with heart failure and fluid retention, but the evidence-base is not robust, and its place in clinical practice is yet to be established. Several novel pharmacological agents remain under investigation.

  9. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewinter, Christian; Doherty, Patrick; Gale, Christopher P;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS: This was ......BACKGROUND: Guidelines recommend exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (EBCR) for patients with heart failure (HF). However, established research has not investigated the longer-term outcomes including mortality and hospitalisation in light of the contemporary management of HF. METHODS......: This was a systematic review including a meta-analysis of EBCR on all-cause mortality, hospital admission, and standardised exercise capacity using four separate exercise tests in patients with heart failure over a minimum follow-up of six months from January 1999-January 2013. Electronic searches were performed...... in their funnel plots. CONCLUSIONS: EBCR in patients with HF is associated with significant improvements in exercise capacity and hospital admission over a minimum of six months follow-up, but not in all-cause mortality....

  10. Novel biomarkers in acute heart failure: MR-pro-adrenomedullin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, W Frank

    2014-10-01

    First isolated from human pheochromocytoma cells, adrenomedullin (ADM) is a peptide hormone with natriuretic, vasodilatory, and hypotensive effects mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), nitric oxide, and renal prostaglandin systems. ADM expression occurs in many tissues and organ systems, including cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, cerebrovascular, gastrointestinal, and endocrine tissues where it acts as a circulating hormone and a local autocrine and paracrine hormone. ADM plasma concentrations are increased in hypertension, chronic renal disease, and heart failure. As ADM is unstable in vitro, it is necessary to measure its mid-regional pro-hormone fragment, the levels of which correspond to ADM concentration (MR-proADM). The prognostic potential of MR-proADM was recently demonstrated in the Biomarkers in Acute Heart Failure (BACH) trial. In this trial of 568 acute heart failure patients, MR-proADM was superior to both brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and NT-proBNP in predicting mortality within 14 days. MR-proADM also provided significant additive incremental predictive value for 90-day mortality when added to BNP and NT-proBNP.

  11. Feminizing Adrenal Carcinoma Presenting with Heart Failure and Ventricular Tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Harnoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of feminizing adrenal carcinoma with severe elevation in serum estradiol and otherwise unexplained congestive heart failure with ventricular arrhythmia and review the literature on feminizing adrenal tumors and the potential relationship between estrogen and cardiac problems. A 54-year-old man presented with congestive heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia. Imaging revealed a large adrenal mass. Hormonal evaluation revealed a very high serum level of estradiol, elevated DHEA-sulfate and androstenedione, and lack of cortisol suppression on a low-dose overnight dexamethasone suppression test. The patient underwent a left adrenalectomy with subsequent normalization of serum estradiol. Surgical pathology examination established adrenocortical carcinoma MacFarlane stage II. Upon 15-month followup, the patient continued to have a normal serum estradiol level, his cardiac function was significantly improved, and he had no further episodes of ventricular arrhythmia. To the best of our knowledge, the serum estradiol level that was detected in our case is the highest that has been reported. Further, we hypothesize that the very high serum concentration of estradiol in our case may have played a role in his cardiac presentation with congestive heart failure and arrhythmia, particularly as these problems resolved with normalization of his serum estradiol level.

  12. Pattern of heart failure in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur C Onwuchekwa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Arthur C Onwuchekwa, Godspower E AsekomehDepartment of Internal Medicine, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NigeriaBackground: Congestive cardiac failure (CCF has emerged as a major public health problem worldwide and imposes an escalating burden on the health care system. Objective: To determine the causes and mortality rate of CCF in the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH, south Nigeria, over a five-year period from January 2001 to December 2005.Methods: A retrospective study of CCF cases were identified from the admission and discharge register of the medical wards of UPTH and the case notes were retrieved from the medical records department and analyzed.Results: There were 423 patients: 242 males and 181 females. Their ages ranged from 18 to 100 years with a mean of 54.4 ± 17.3. The commonest causes of CCF were hypertension (56.3% and cardiomyopathy (12.3%. Chronic renal failure, rheumatic heart disease, and ischemic heart disease accounted for 7.8%, 4.3%, and 0.2% of CCF, respectively. Peripartum heart disease was rare despite being commonly reported in northern Nigerian females. Eighteen patients died from various complications with a mortality rate of 4.3%.Conclusion: The burden of CCF in the Niger Delta is mainly attributed to hypertension. Efforts should be geared towards hypertension awareness, detection, treatment, and prevention in the region.Keywords: pattern, cardiac failure, Nigeria, etiological factors

  13. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in women : The dutch queen of hearts program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Ruijter, H.; Pasterkamp, G.; Rutten, F. H.; Lam, C. S P; Chi, C.; Tan, K. H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.; Spaanderman, M.; de Kleijn, D. P V

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a heavy burden on patients, their families and society. The syndrome of HF comes in two types: with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The latter is on the increase and predominantly present in women, especially the older ones. There i

  14. Palliative care among heart failure patients in primary care: a comparison to cancer patients using English family practice data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Gadoud

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with heart failure have a significant symptom burden and other palliative care needs often over a longer period than patients with cancer. It is acknowledged that this need may be unmet but by how much has not been quantified in primary care data at the population level. METHODS: This was the first use of Clinical Practice Research Datalink, the world's largest primary care database to explore recognition of the need for palliative care. Heart failure and cancer patients who had died in 2009 aged 18 or over and had at least one year of primary care records were identified. A palliative approach to care among patients with heart failure was compared to that among patients with cancer using entry onto a palliative care register as a marker for a palliative approach to care. RESULTS: Among patients with heart failure, 7% (234/3 122 were entered on the palliative care register compared to 48% (3 669/7 608 of cancer patients. Of heart failure patients on the palliative care register, 29% (69/234 were entered onto the register within a week of their death. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms that the stark inequity in recognition of palliative care needs for people with heart failure in a large primary care dataset. We recommend a move away from prognosis based criteria for palliative care towards a patient centred approach, with assessment of and attention to palliative needs including advance care planning throughout the disease trajectory.

  15. Designing phase 3 sepsis trials: application of learned experiences from critical care trials in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Laterre, Pierre François; Russell, James A; Bergmann, Andreas; Gattinoni, Luciano; Gayat, Etienne; Harhay, Michael O; Hartmann, Oliver; Hein, Frauke; Kjolbye, Anne Louise; Legrand, Matthieu; Lewis, Roger J; Marshall, John C; Marx, Gernot; Radermacher, Peter; Schroedter, Mathias; Scigalla, Paul; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Struck, Joachim; Van den Berghe, Greet; Yilmaz, Mehmet Birhan; Angus, Derek C

    2016-01-01

    Substantial attention and resources have been directed to improving outcomes of patients with critical illnesses, in particular sepsis, but all recent clinical trials testing various interventions or strategies have failed to detect a robust benefit on mortality. Acute heart failure is also a critical illness, and although the underlying etiologies differ, acute heart failure and sepsis are critical care illnesses that have a high mortality in which clinical trials have been difficult to conduct and have not yielded effective treatments. Both conditions represent a syndrome that is often difficult to define with a wide variation in patient characteristics, presentation, and standard management across institutions. Referring to past experiences and lessons learned in acute heart failure may be informative and help frame research in the area of sepsis. Academic heart failure investigators and industry have worked closely with regulators for many years to transition acute heart failure trials away from relying on dyspnea assessments and all-cause mortality as the primary measures of efficacy, and recent trials have been designed to assess novel clinical composite endpoints assessing organ dysfunction and mortality while still assessing all-cause mortality as a separate measure of safety. Applying the lessons learned in acute heart failure trials to severe sepsis and septic shock trials might be useful to advance the field. Novel endpoints beyond all-cause mortality should be considered for future sepsis trials. PMID:27034779

  16. Heart research advances using database search engines, Human Protein Atlas and the Sydney Heart Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Amy; Estigoy, Colleen; Raftery, Mark; Cameron, Darryl; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Lal, Sean; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G

    2013-10-01

    This Methodological Review is intended as a guide for research students who may have just discovered a human "novel" cardiac protein, but it may also help hard-pressed reviewers of journal submissions on a "novel" protein reported in an animal model of human heart failure. Whether you are an expert or not, you may know little or nothing about this particular protein of interest. In this review we provide a strategic guide on how to proceed. We ask: How do you discover what has been published (even in an abstract or research report) about this protein? Everyone knows how to undertake literature searches using PubMed and Medline but these are usually encyclopaedic, often producing long lists of papers, most of which are either irrelevant or only vaguely relevant to your query. Relatively few will be aware of more advanced search engines such as Google Scholar and even fewer will know about Quertle. Next, we provide a strategy for discovering if your "novel" protein is expressed in the normal, healthy human heart, and if it is, we show you how to investigate its subcellular location. This can usually be achieved by visiting the website "Human Protein Atlas" without doing a single experiment. Finally, we provide a pathway to discovering if your protein of interest changes its expression level with heart failure/disease or with ageing.

  17. Decrease of cardiac chaos in congestive heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Merrill, Christopher K.

    1997-10-01

    The electrical properties of the mammalian heart undergo many complex transitions in normal and diseased states. It has been proposed that the normal heartbeat may display complex nonlinear dynamics, including deterministic chaos,, and that such cardiac chaos may be a useful physiological marker for the diagnosis and management, of certain heart trouble. However, it is not clear whether the heartbeat series of healthy and diseased hearts are chaotic or stochastic, or whether cardiac chaos represents normal or abnormal behaviour. Here we have used a highly sensitive technique, which is robust to random noise, to detect chaos. We analysed the electrocardiograms from a group of healthy subjects and those with severe congestive heart failure (CHF), a clinical condition associated with a high risk of sudden death. The short-term variations of beat-to-beat interval exhibited strongly and consistently chaotic behaviour in all healthy subjects, but were frequently interrupted by periods of seemingly non-chaotic fluctuations in patients with CHF. Chaotic dynamics in the CHF data, even when discernible, exhibited a high degree of random variability over time, suggesting a weaker form of chaos. These findings suggest that cardiac chaos is prevalent in healthy heart, and a decrease in such chaos may be indicative of CHF.

  18. So many definitions of heart failure: are they all universally valid? A critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lip-Bun; Williams, Simon G; Tan, David K H; Cohen-Solal, Alain

    2010-02-01

    Defining heart failure (HF) is a matter of finding the most appropriate words to formulate the definiens for HF that will be universally applicable in all specific circumstances pertaining to the nature of HF. Currently available definitions of HF contain ambiguities and notable deficiencies such that non-heart failure medical conditions can become mislabelled as heart failure. Principles of how best to formulate definitions have been employed to provide a guide on how to appraise published definitions of HF. A fundamental requirement of a good definition is that it should be universal, and by this criterion, we need to question the validity of a conventional dogma that a collection of clinical diagnostic features are equivalent to HF definitions. A long-standing deficiency in HF definitions is the inability to take into account the quantifiable extent of functional impairment of the heart. Other traditional misconceptions surrounding HF definitions have also been addressed. In line with Derek Gibson's proposal, we have rephrased William Harvey's description of the cardiac role in maintaining the circulation in terms of Newtonian physics and of the Law of Conservation of Energy to reach a more universal and less ambiguous definition of HF, with the objective of advancing the science of HF and the treatment of this distressing condition. PMID:20136608

  19. Influence of heart failure on nucleolar organization and protein expression in human hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosello-Lleti, Esther; Rivera, Miguel; Cortes, Raquel [Cardiocirculatory Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Azorin, Inmaculada [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Sirera, Rafael [Biotechnology Department, Universidad Politecnica, Valencia (Spain); Martinez-Dolz, Luis [Cardiology Unit, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Hove, Leif; Cinca, Juan [Cardiology Unit, Hospital San Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Lago, Francisca; Gonzalez-Juanatey, Jose R. [Cardiology Unit, Institute of Biomedical Research, Hospital Clinicode Santiagode Compostela (Spain); Salvador, Antonio [Experimental Neurology, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Portoles, Manuel, E-mail: portoles_man@gva.es [Cell Biology and Pathology Unit, Research Center, Hospital Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heart failure alters nucleolar morphology and organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleolin expression is significant increased in ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ventricular function of heart failure patients was related with nucleolin levels. -- Abstract: We investigate for the first time the influence of heart failure (HF) on nucleolar organization and proteins in patients with ischemic (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 71 human hearts from ICM (n = 38) and DCM (n = 27) patients, undergoing heart transplantation and control donors (n = 6), were analysed by western-blotting, RT-PCR and cell biology methods. When we compared protein levels according to HF etiology, nucleolin was increased in both ICM (117%, p < 0.05) and DCM (141%, p < 0.01). Moreover, mRNA expression were also upregulated in ICM (1.46-fold, p < 0.05) and DCM (1.70-fold, p < 0.05. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the highest intensity of nucleolin was into nucleolus (p < 0.0001), and it was increased in pathological hearts (p < 0.0001). Ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy showed an increase in the nucleus and nucleolus size in ICM (17%, p < 0.05 and 131%, p < 0.001) and DCM (56%, p < 0.01 and 69%, p < 0.01). Nucleolar organization was influenced by HF irrespective of etiology, increasing fibrillar centers (p < 0.001), perinucleolar chromatin (p < 0.01) and dense fibrillar components (p < 0.01). Finally, left ventricular function parameters were related with nucleolin levels in ischemic hearts (p < 0.0001). The present study demonstrates that HF influences on morphology and organization of nucleolar components, revealing changes in the expression and in the levels of nucleolin protein.

  20. The causes, consequences, and treatment of left or right heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazos-Lopez P

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Pazos-López, Jesús Peteiro-Vázquez, Ana Carcía-Campos, Lourdes García-Bueno, Juan Pablo Abugattas de Torres, Alfonso Castro-BeirasDepartment of Cardiology, Complejo hospitalario Universitario A Coruña, A Coruña, SpainAbstract: Chronic heart failure (HF is a cardiovascular disease of cardinal importance because of several factors: a an increasing occurrence due to the aging of the population, primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events, and modern advances in therapy, b a bad prognosis: around 65% of patients are dead within 5 years of diagnosis, c a high economic cost: HF accounts for 1% to 2% of total health care expenditure. This review focuses on the main causes, consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality and costs and treatment of HF.Keywords: heart failure, cause, consequence, treatment

  1. Cardiac resynchronization therapy: prospect for long-lasting heart failure remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shinning; Joglar, Jose A

    2011-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) remains an important heath care problem in the United States. With the aging of the US population, this trend is expected to continue. However, patients have also benefited from advances in pharmacologic and device-based therapies such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, aldosterone blockers, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. More recently, cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has become another important therapeutic option for treating heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. In this article, we review the physiologic basis for CRT, the clinical trials that support its efficacy, and the current indications for its use. We also examine key clinical questions regarding CRT still under research, including predictors of response. Finally, we look at the future of CRT and how its indications can be expanded to benefit more patients in the future. PMID:21441824

  2. HeartDrive: A Broader Concept of Interoperability to Implement Care Processes for Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettere, M; Guerri, D; La Manna, S; Groccia, M C; Lofaro, D; Conforti, D

    2016-01-01

    This paper originates from the HeartDrive project, a platform of services for a more effective, efficient and integrated management of heart failure and comorbidities. HeartDrive establishes a cooperative approach based on the concepts of continuity of care and extreme, patient oriented, customization of diagnostic, therapeutic and follow-up procedures. Definition and development of evidence based processes, migration from parceled and episode based healthcare provisioning to a workflow oriented model and increased awareness and responsibility of citizens towards their own health and wellness are key objectives of HeartDrive. In two scenarios for rehabilitation and home monitoring we show how the results are achieved by providing a solution that highlights a broader concept of cooperation that goes beyond technical interoperability towards semantic interoperability explicitly sharing process definitions, decision support strategies and information semantics. PMID:27225572

  3. CYP2J2-Derived Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Suppress Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingxu; Ni, Li; Yang, Lei; Duan, Quanlu; Chen, Chen; Edin, Matthew L.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; WANG, DAO WEN

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress causes apoptosis and is associated with heart failure. Whether CYP2J2 and its arachidonic acid metabolites [epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs)] have a protective influence on ER stress and heart failure has not been studied. Assays of myocardial samples from patients with end-stage heart failure showed evidence of ER stress. Chronic infusion of isoproterenol (ISO) or angiotensin II (AngII) by osmotic mini-pump induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart fai...

  4. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and B-type natriuretic peptide in heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG De-jia

    2009-01-01

    @@ Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves left ventricular function, symptom status, quality of life and reduces hospitalization and mortality in patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class Ⅲ or IV heart failure and intraventricular conduction delay despite optimal medical management.1 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its amino terminal cleavage equivalent (NT-pro BNP) levels correlate with the severity of heart failure and predict prognosis of heart failure patients.2

  5. Resynchronisation therapy in patients with heart failure: Our results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Goran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. Resynchronisation therapy with biventricular permanent pacing stimulation is one method of treating patients with systolic heart failure, with echocardiograph signs of ventricular asynchrony and a prolonged QRS of longer than 120 milliseconds. This method has been accepted in most medical centers around the world and was instigated in our Pacemaker Centre in December 2001, 3 months after FDA approval for human use. OBJECTIVE. The aim of the study was to present this new procedure and the results obtained from our own group of patients. METHOD. A multi-site, biventricular pacemaker, with a special electrode for left-half heart stimulation was implanted in the coronary sinus of 17 patients who had suffered systolic heart failure (12 male and 5 female, average age 59.9 years. For all of them, the duration of the QRS interval was longer than 120 ms, with left bundle branch morphology, and an ejection fraction below 30%. All the patients were NYHA class II or III. Prior to and after the implantation, a 12-channel ECG and ECHO were carried out, a b-minute hall walk test was performed, additionally, the total walked distance on a flat surface was measured, the general condition of the patient was evaluated, the number of medications being taken was noted, as was the number of days of hospitalization. RESULTS. The average time from diagnosis to implantation was 22 months, and the average post-operative follow-up was 14 months. Two of the patients died 10 and 7 months after the implantation, due to a new myocardial infarction and refractory heart failure. In addition, one patient did not show any improvement after the implantation of the multi-site pacemaker (there were three "non-responder" patients. All the other patients felt much better: decreased NYHA class for I - II class, increased left ventricle ejection fraction, reduced use of diuretics, increased b-minute hall walk distance and general walk distance on a flat surface, and

  6. Clinical significance of pain in patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAN Qian; ZHANG Feng-ru; ZHOU Qing-fen; DAI Li-ying; LIU Ye-hong; CHAI Xi-chen; WU Fang; SHEN Wei-feng

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of studies investigating the clinical and biochemical characteristics of pain in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients.This study aimed to determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics and outcomes in Chinese patients with CHF and symptoms of pain.Methods Sociodemographics,serum levels of creatinine,NT-proBNP,high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP),tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α,interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10,and two-dimensional echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were determined in 305 patients with CHF.A questionnaire packet including the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) was used to assess the degree of pain rated on a 0-10 scale and the quality of life (QOL).A six-minute walking test was performed during routine clinic visits.Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded; including all-cause or cardiac mortality and rehospitalization because of myocardial infarction,worsening heart failure or stroke at follow-up.Results Pain occurred in 25.6% of CHF patients,and was more common when the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class was worse.More patients with pain were female in gender,and had more co-morbidities,lower LVEF,and shorter distance during the 6-minute walking test.Despite similar serum levels of creatinine,N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP),IL-6 and IL-10,the TNF-α levels were higher and MLHFQ scores were greater in CHF patients with pain.At follow-up,CHF patients with moderate to severe pain (≥4 scale) had higher rates of all-cause and cardiac mortality and rehospitalization because of myocardial infarction,worsening heart failure or stroke.Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the presence of pain was an independent risk factor for MACE and reduced QOL in CHF patients.Conclusions Pain occurs in all stages of the CHF trajectory,and its incidence increases as clinical

  7. Thrombospondins in the transition from myocardial infarction to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Cingolani, Oscar H

    2016-01-01

    The heart's reaction to ischemic injury from a myocardial infarction involves complex cross-talk between the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) and different cell types within the myocardium. The ECM functions not only as a scaffold where myocytes beat synchronously, but an active signaling environment that regulates the important post-MI responses. The thrombospondins are matricellular proteins that modulate cell--ECM interactions, functioning as "sensors" that mediate outside-in and inside-out signaling. Thrombospondins are highly expressed during embryonic stages, and although their levels decrease during adult life, can be re-expressed in high quantities in response to cardiac stress including myocardial infarction and heart failure. Like a Swiss-army knife, the thrombospondins possess many tools: numerous binding domains that allow them to interact with other elements of the ECM, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules. It is through these that the thrombospondins function. In the present review, we provide basic as well as clinical evidence linking the thrombospondin proteins with the post myocardial infarction response, including inflammation, fibrotic matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, as well as myocyte hypertrophy, apoptosis, and contractile dysfunction in heart failure. We will describe what is known regarding the intracellular signaling pathways that are involved with these responses, paving the road for future studies identifying these proteins as therapeutic targets for cardiac disease.

  8. [Obesity and the prognosis of heart failure: the obesity paradox, myth or reality?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounhoure, Jean-Paul; Galinier, Michel; Roncalli, Jerôme; Massabuau, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has now reached epidemic proportions worldwide. Obesity is associated with numerous comorbidities, including hypertension, lipid disorders and type II diabetes, and is also a major cause of cardiovascular disease, coronary disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and sudden death. Obesity is the main cause of heart failure in respectively 11% and 14% of cases in men and women. The Framingham study showed that, after correction for other risk factors, each point increase in the body mass index raises the risk of heart failure by 5% in men and 7% in women. Obesity increases the heart workload, causes left ventricular hypertrophy, and impairs both diastolic and systolic function. The most common form of heart failure is diastolic dysfunction, and heart failure in obese individuals is associated with preserved systolic function. Despite these comorbidities and the severity of heart failure, numerous studies have revealed an "obesity paradox" in which overweight and obese individuals with heart failure appear to have a better prognosis than non overweight subjects. This review summarizes the adverse cardiac effects of this nutritional disease, the results of some studies supporting the obesity paradox, the better survival rate of obese patients with heart failure. Potential explanations for these surprising data include the possibility that a number of obese patients may simply not have heart failure, as well as methodological bias, and protective effects of adipose tissue. Further studies of large populations are needed to determine how obesity may improve the prognosis of heart failure.

  9. Congestive heart failure in acromegaly: A review of 6 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Though cardiac involvement is common in acromegaly, overt congestive heart failure is uncommon. Materials and Methods: This is retrospective analysis of hospital record between 1996 and 2007. We analyzed records of 150 consecutive patients with acromegaly. We included the patients with acromegaly those who had overt congestive heart failure either at presentation or during the course of illness for the present analysis. The diagnosis of acromegaly and congestive cardiac failure were based on standard criteria. Results:Out of 150 patients with acromegaly, 6 patients had overt CHF (4.0%, of which 4 presented with the features of CHF and 2 developed during the course of illness. Three patients had hypertension and 1 had diabetes. Baseline echocardiography showed severe biventricular dysfunction and global hypokinesia in all. Angiography showed dilated hypokinetic left ventricle with normal coronaries in 3, it was confirmed at autopsy in 1. Three underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery, 1 received somatostatin analogue as primary treatment modality. Normalization of growth hormone and IGF-1 led to improvement in cardiac function in 1, 1 patient lost to follow up, and 4 died during the course of illness. In 1 patient, autopsy was performed and cardiac specimen revealed normal coronaries, concentric ventricular hypertrophy, and dilatation with myofibrolysis and interfascicular fibrosis. Conclusion:Prevalence of overt CHF is 4% in present series. Overt CHF carries poor prognosis and hence, this complication should be recognized at earliest, and medical management to normalized cardiac function should be given utmost priority.

  10. Evolvement of left ventricular assist device: the implications on heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chair, Sek Ying; Yu, Doris Sf; Ng, Michael Timothy; Wang, Qun; Cheng, Ho Yu; Wong, Eliza Ml; Sit, Janet Wh

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a potentially fatal disease that affects increasing number of people worldwide. Although heart transplant is the "gold standard" therapy for HF, due to the limited availability of organs, many patients died when waiting for the transplant. Left ventricular assist device (LVAD), as a mechanical circulatory support, has become a new light for patients with HF. With the technical advancements, LVADs work not only as a bridge to transplant, but also assist heart recovery and even as a destination therapy in long-term treatment. This observation paper reviewed the development of LVAD and its clinical roles. The challenges and possible solutions in nursing care for patients with LVAD at different stage of implantation were discussed. The healthcare professionals could obtain a better understanding about the LVAD treatment for HF patients. PMID:27594870

  11. Bridging the gap in heart failure prevention: rationale and design of the Nurse-led Intervention for Less Chronic Heart Failure (NIL-CHF) Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrington, Melinda J; Stewart, Simon; de Courten, Barbora

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The primary objective of the Nurse-led Intervention for Less Chronic Heart Failure (NIL-CHF) Study is to develop a programme of care that cost-effectively prevents the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods NIL-CHF is a randomized controlled trial of a hybrid, home- and clinic-...

  12. Effect of repeated intracoronary injection of bone marrow cells in patients with ischaemic heart failure the Danish stem cell study - congestive heart failure trial (DanCell-CHF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, A.C.; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Thayssen, P.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that myocardial regeneration may be achieved by a single intracoronary bone marrow derived stem cell infusion in selected patients with ischaemic heart disease. The effect is uncertain in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure and it is not known whether...... repeated infusions would have additional positive effects. AIMS: To assess whether two treatments of intracoronary infusion of bone marrow stem cells, administered 4 months apart, could improve left ventricular (LV) systolic function in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure. METHODS: The study......, NYHA class improved (pstem cell treatment in patients with chronic ischaemic heart failure Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  13. Oxidative Stress and Heart Failure in Altered Thyroid States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Mishra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased or reduced action of thyroid hormone on certain molecular pathways in the heart and vasculature causes relevant cardiovascular derangements. It is well established that hyperthyroidism induces a hyperdynamic cardiovascular state, which is associated with a faster heart rate, enhanced left ventricular systolic and diastolic function whereas hypothyroidism is characterized by the opposite changes. Hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism represent opposite clinical conditions, albeit not mirror images. Recent experimental and clinical studies have suggested the involvement of ROS tissue damage under altered thyroid status. Altered-thyroid state-linked changes in heart modify their susceptibility to oxidants and the extent of the oxidative damage they suffer following oxidative challenge. Chronic increase in the cellular levels of ROS can lead to a catastrophic cycle of DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, further ROS generation and cellular injury. Thus, these cellular events might play an important role in the development and progression of myocardial remodeling and heart failure in altered thyroid states (hypo- and hyper-thyroidism. The present review aims at elucidating the various signaling pathways mediated via ROS and their modulation under altered thyroid state and the possibility of antioxidant therapy.

  14. Massive hepatic cyst presenting as right-sided heart failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2010-01-30

    A 70-year-old woman presented with clinical features of right heart failure. Cardiopulmonary investigations included an echocardiogram, which showed a hepatic cyst compromising venous return and affecting right atrial filling and a CT abdomen showed a 15.5 x 11.5 cm-cystic mass involving the right hepatic lobe and compressing the right atrium. Percutaneous drainage of the cyst was performed. This led to complete resolution of symptoms but these recurred as the fluid re-accumulated. Subsequent definitive treatment with excision of the cyst was undertaken with symptomatic cure. This case is the first report of a hepatic cyst presenting as right heart due to compression of the right atrium.

  15. Update on Obesity and Obesity Paradox in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; Sharma, Abhishek; Alpert, Martin A; De Schutter, Alban; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Milani, Richard V; Ventura, Hector O

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in most of the Westernized world. Overweightness and obesity adversely impact cardiac structure and function, including on both the right and, especially, left sides of the heart, with adverse affects on systolic and, especially, diastolic ventricular function. Therefore, it is not surprising that obesity markedly increases the prevalence of heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, many studies have documented an obesity paradox in large cohorts with HF, where overweight and obese have a better prognosis, at least in the short-term, compared with lean HF patients. Although weight loss clearly improves cardiac structure and function and reduces symptoms in HF, there are no large studies on the impact of weight loss on clinical events in HF, preventing definitive guidelines on optimal body composition in patients with HF.

  16. [Acute heart failure: acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Marteles, Marta; Urrutia, Agustín

    2014-03-01

    Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock are two of the main forms of presentation of acute heart failure. Both entities are serious, with high mortality, and require early diagnosis and prompt and aggressive management. Acute pulmonary edema is due to the passage of fluid through the alveolarcapillary membrane and is usually the result of an acute cardiac episode. Correct evaluation and clinical identification of the process is essential in the management of acute pulmonary edema. The initial aim of treatment is to ensure hemodynamic stability and to correct hypoxemia. Other measures that can be used are vasodilators such as nitroglycerin, loop diuretics and, in specific instances, opioids. Cardiogenic shock is characterized by sustained hypoperfusion, pulmonary wedge pressure > 18 mmHg and a cardiac index 30 mmHg) and absent or reduced diuresis (shock associated with ischaemic heart disease.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Heart Failure: Agreement among Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Amit K; Penny, William F; Bhargava, Valmik; Lai, N Chin; Xu, Ronghui; Hammond, H Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Methods commonly used clinically to assess cardiac function in patients with heart failure include ejection fraction (EF), exercise treadmill testing (ETT), and symptom evaluation. Although these approaches are useful in evaluating patients with heart failure, there are at times substantial mismatches between individual assessments. For example, ETT results are often discordant with EF, and patients with minimal symptoms sometimes have surprisingly low EFs. To better define the relationship of these methods of assessment, we studied 56 patients with heart failure with reduced EF (HFrEF) who underwent measurement of ETT duration, EF by echocardiography, quantitative symptom evaluation, and LV peak dP/dt (rate of left ventricular pressure development and decline, measured invasively). Correlations were determined among these four tests in order to assess the relationship of EF, ETT, and symptoms against LV peak dP/dt. In addition, we sought to determine whether EF, ETT, and symptoms correlated with each other. Overall, correlations were poor. Only 15 of 63 total correlations (24%) were significant (p < 0.05). EF correlated most closely with LV peak -dP/dt. Linear regression analysis indicated that EF, ETT, and symptoms taken together predicted LV peak dP/dt better than any one measure alone. We conclude that clinical tests used to assess LV function in patients with HFrEF may not be as accurate or correlate as well as expected. All three clinical measures considered together may be the best representation of cardiac function in HFrEF patients currently available. PMID:27537778

  18. Cheyne-Stokes respiration in patients with heart failure: prevalence, causes, consequences and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Thomas; Randerath, Winfried; Bloch, Konrad E

    2012-01-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is characterized by a pattern of cyclic oscillations of tidal volume and respiratory rate with periods of hyperpnea alternating with hypopnea or apnea in patients with heart failure. CSR harms the failing heart through intermittent hypoxia brought about by apnea and hypopnea and recurrent sympathetic surges. CSR impairs the quality of life and increases cardiac mortality in patients with heart failure. Thus, CSR should actively be pursued in patients with severe heart failure. When CSR persists despite optimal therapy of heart failure, noninvasive adaptive servoventilation is currently the most promising treatment.

  19. Depressive symptoms are related to decreased low-frequency heart rate variability in older adults with decompensated heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guinjoan, Salvador M.; Castro, Mariana N.; Vigo, Daniel E.; Weidema, Hylke; Berbara, Carlos; Fahrer, Rodolfo D.; Grancelli, Hugo; Nogues, Martin; Leiguarda, Ramon C.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aims: Depression has been associated with increased mortality among individuals with heart failure, but the mechanism for this association is unsettled. Depression is often found to result in autonomic dysfunction which, if present in heart failure, might help explain worsened outcomes. M

  20. Potential applications of pharmacogenomics to heart failure therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Kishan S; Ahmad, Tariq; Fiuzat, Mona

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacogenomics explores one drug's varying effects on different patient genotypes. A better understanding of genomic variation's contribution to drug response can impact 4 arenas in heart failure (HF): (1) identification of patients most likely to receive benefit from therapy, (2) risk stratify patients for risk of adverse events, (3) optimize dosing of drugs, and (4) steer future clinical trial design and drug development. In this review, the authors explore the potential applications of pharmacogenomics in patients with HF in the context of these categories.

  1. The importance of interactions between atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad A; Satchithananda, Duwarakan K; Mamas, Mamas A

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) and atrial fibrillation (AF) are among the commonest cardiovascular conditions encountered in clinical practice and frequently coexist. Over the last decade, they have evolved into global cardiovascular epidemics. This, in turn, has huge clinical and economic implications. There is ample evidence that AF and HF have a mutually deleterious effect on each other. AF is not only a marker of HF severity but also affects HF prognosis independently. This article presents the close pathophysiological relationship between AF and HF and the adverse prognostic consequences of this bidirectional interaction. The scope of various therapeutic modalities and their potential impacts are discussed briefly. PMID:27251919

  2. Team management of congestive heart failure across the continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venner, G H; Seelbinder, J S

    1996-01-01

    Despite an increased incidence of congestive heart failure and frequency of hospital admissions for the Medicare population, there is little information available on improving outcomes for these patients. As changes in health care lead toward capitation, efficient care with limited use of expensive inpatient hospital resources is a necessity. The coordination of three critical components--inpatient, outpatient, and home care--can lead to positive outcomes in terms of functional capacity changes, length of stay, readmission rates, patient self-care knowledge, and patient satisfaction.

  3. Management of chronic heart failure in the older population

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, Nahid; Lemay, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of hospitalization for those over the age of 65 and represents a significant clinical and economic burden. About half of hospital re-admissions are related to co-morbidities, polypharmacy and disabilities associated with CHF. Moreover, CHF also has an enormous cost in terms of poor prognosis with an average one year mortality of 33%–35%. While more than half of patients with CHF are over 75 years, most clinical trials have included younger pati...

  4. [Chronic heart failure and its consequences on the partner relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajzel, Juan

    2015-12-01

    There are presently few data on chronic heart failure (CHF) and its consequences on the partner relationship. The aim of our study was to assess how patients with severe CHF and their female partners were affected in their relationship. First, there was a need to address the issue of sexuality with the doctor because of fear of the occurrence of a cardiac event or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock. Second, there was often a significant decrease in libido and erectile dysfunction associated with general depressive symptoms. Finally, the female partners in several couples developed an overprotective behavior leading to resentment and frustration in patients towards them. PMID:26790235

  5. Increased Circulating Cathepsin K in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guangxian Zhao; Yuzi Li; Lan Cui; Xiang Li; Zhenyi Jin; Xiongyi Han; Ennan Fang; Yihua Gao; Dongmei Zhou; Haiying Jiang; Xueying Jin; Guanghao Piao; Xiangshan Li; Guang Yang; Jiyong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl cathepsin K (CatK) is one of the most potent mammalian collagenases involved in cardiovascular disease. Here, we investigated the clinical predictive value of serum CatK levels in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We examined 134 patients with CHF, measuring their serum CatK, troponin I, high-sensitive C-reactive protein, and pre-operative N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels. The patients were divided into two groups: the 44 patients who showed a left ventricula...

  6. [Diuretics in heart failure and Karl Popper's turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cice, Gennaro

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure and renal failure often coexist in the same patient. This condition is commonly referred to as cardiorenal syndrome. When this occurs, patient survival worsens significantly with increasing degree of renal dysfunction. Management of this complex patient poses treatment challenges because of unstable hemodynamics (the problem is to reduce congestion without affecting organ perfusion) and very high mid-term in-hospital mortality. Congestion is a typical feature of this syndrome, and use of diuretics is mandatory. Loop diuretics should be administered first. However, poor attention to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of loop diuretics may contribute to the development of diuretic resistance leading to iatrogenic hyponatremia. Accordingly, emphasis is given to the importance of sequential nephron blockade to reduce the number of non-responder patients to diuretics and to recognize a possible role for acquaretics.

  7. Prevalence, prognostic significance, and treatment of atrial fibrillation in congestive heart failure with particular reference to the DIAMOND-CHF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Brendorp, Bente; Køber, Lars;

    2003-01-01

    failure and the prevalence increases with the severity of the disease. These two conditions seem to be linked together, and congestive heart failure may either be the cause or the consequence of atrial fibrillation. The prognosis of atrial fibrillation is controversial, but studies indicate that atrial...... fibrillation is a risk factor in congestive heart failure patients. In the last 10-15 years, significant advances in the treatment of heart failure have improved survival, whereas effective management of atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients still awaits similar progress. Empirically, two strategies......Atrial fibrillation is a growing health problem and the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting 5% of persons above the age of 65 years. The number of hospital discharges for atrial fibrillation has more than doubled in the past decade. It occurs very often in patients with congestive heart...

  8. [Renal dysfunction in heart failure and hypervolumenia : Importance of congestion and backward failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, W

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, renal dysfunction in congestive heart failure (cardiorenal syndrome type 1) has been attributed to reduced cardiac output and low mean arterial perfusion pressure, which elicit a series of neurohumoral activations resulting in increased renal vascular resistance and decreased renal function.During the last decade, several studies have shown that the extent of renal dysfunction is not so closely associated with indices of forward failure-such as the cardiac index or mean arterial pressure-but rather with indicators of congestion, such as left ventricular enddiasystolic pressure or central venous pressure (CVP), which are indicators of backward failure. The impact of backward failure on renal function is not confined to an elevation of CVP, the renal drainage pressure, but includes a broad spectrum of mechanisms. Involved are the organ systems right heart, lung, the liver, the proinflammatory signals originating from the intestines, but also renal interstitial edema (renal compartment syndrome) and the intraabdominal pressure.The therapeutic measures must focus on the modulation of the preload adapted to the specific situation of an individual patient. This includes diuretics aiming at different segments of the tubulus system including antagonists of aldosteron and ADH, extracorporeal fluid elimination by ultrafiltration or peritoneal dialysis.

  9. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring of patients with heart failure: a new prognosis marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel F. Canesin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between 24-hour ambulatory arterial blood pressure monitoring and the prognosis of patients with advanced congestive heart failure. METHODS: We studied 38 patients with NYHA functional class IV congestive heart failure, and analyzed left ventricular ejection fraction, diastolic diameter, and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data. RESULTS: Twelve deaths occurred. Left ventricular ejection fraction (35.2±7.3% and diastolic diameter (72.2±7.8mm were not correlated with the survival. The mean 24-hour (SBP24, waking (SBPw, and sleeping (SBPs systolic pressures of the living patients were higher than those of the deceased patients and were significant for predicting survival. Patients with mean SBP24, SBPv, and SBPs > or = 105mmHg had longer survival (p=0.002, p=0.01 and p=0.0007, respectively. Patients with diastolic blood pressure sleep decrements (dip and patients with mean blood pressure dip or = 105 mmHg CONCLUSION: Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring appears to be a useful method for evaluating patients with congestive heart failure.

  10. Some current controversies in heart failure (2004-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, J G F; Loh, H; Windram, J

    2004-12-01

    The disparity between what doctor's believe and the medical facts can be frightening at times. This reflects centuries of training on how to manage patients in the absence of evidence to guide practice. Increasingly disease is becoming susceptible to treatment, requiring a change in the professional approach from the educated, hopeful guess to the application of objective data. Arrogance and certainty, born of ignorance and clutching in desperation at imaginary straws probably still have a place in medicine when conventional treatment has failed, but should play a diminishing role within the medical profession. Epidemiological association is no longer sufficient evidence to conclude that an intervention is effective; with few exceptions, randomised-controlled trials are required. A more successful and objective era of medical practice has arrived. Consequently, a greater degree of scepticism about claims of benefit is also appropriate, which should apply equally to treatments new and old. Of course, no 2 patients are alike, and the evidence-base remains a guide-map on how patients should be treated, rather than a set of rigid rules. Guidelines are guidelines and not infallible, inviolable decrees. In this article, some of the current controversies in the management of heart failure are discussed, ranging from diagnosis, diastolic heart failure, and the role of natriuretic peptides, to the lack of evidence for a clinically-relevant benefit (and therefore possible harm) from aspirin, statins, implantable defibrillators or revascularisation.

  11. [Chronic heart failure and cachexia: role of endocrine system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dei Cas, A; Muoio, A; Zavaroni, I

    2011-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a major health problem that carries a devastating prognosis. The prognosis worsens considerably once cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed. Neurohormonal, metabolic, hemodynamic and immunological alterations are involved in the initiation and progression of cardiac cachexia. Cachexia is characterized by a hypothalamic inappropriate response to the mechanisms controlling energy homeostasis. Levels of the anorexigenic hormone leptin are decreased whereas the orexigenic gherlin hormone levels are normal or elevated. Nevertheless, energy intake is not increased as expected due to a persistent activation of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) system (anorexigenic) paralleled by a decreased activity of the neuropeptide Y (NPY, orexigenic) neurons. Cachexia is also characterized by an imbalance in anabolic (impairment in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I axis, insulin resistance) and catabolic (increased levels of catecholamines, increased cortisol/dehydroepiandrosterone ratio and activation of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleuchin-6, interleuchin-1') at the basis of the wasting process. This review discusses the complex role of the endocrine system in modulating energy balance, appetite and metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure. A joint multidisciplinary effort of the cardiologists, immunologists and endocrinologists might be useful to identify the precise mechanisms involved in the neuroendocrine alteration and to develop therapeutic strategies able to improve the prognosis of CHF patients.

  12. Relationship of literacy and heart failure in adults with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Nancy

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although reading ability may impact educational strategies and management of heart failure (HF, the prevalence of limited literacy in patients with HF is unknown. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Vermont Diabetes Information System Field Survey, a cross-sectional study of adults with diabetes in primary care. Participants' self-reported characteristics were subjected to logistic regression to estimate the association of heart failure and literacy while controlling for social and economic factors. The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy was used to measure literacy. Results Of 172 subjects with HF and diabetes, 27% had limited literacy compared to 15% of 826 subjects without HF (OR 2.05; 95% CI 1.39, 3.02; P P = .05. After adjusting for education, however, HF was no longer independently associated with literacy (OR 1.31; 95% CI 0.82 – 2.08; P = 0.26. Conclusion Over one quarter of diabetic adults with HF have limited literacy. Although this association is no longer statistically significant when adjusted for education, clinicians should be aware that many of their patients have important limitations in dealing with written materials.

  13. Clinical and economic aspects of the use of nebivolol in the treatment of elderly patients with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sindaco, Donatella; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Monzo, Luca; Pulignano, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure is a common and disabling condition with morbidity and mortality that increase dramatically with advancing age. Large observational studies, retrospective subgroup analyses and meta-analyses of clinical trials in systolic heart failure, and recently published randomized studies have provided data supporting the use of beta-blockers as a baseline therapy in heart failure in the elderly. Despite the available evidence about beta-blockers, this therapy is still less frequently used in elderly compared to younger patients. Nebivolol is a third-generation cardioselective beta-blocker with L-arginine/nitric oxide-induced vasodilatory properties, approved in Europe and several other countries for the treatment of essential hypertension, and in Europe for the treatment of stable, mild, or moderate chronic heart failure, in addition to standard therapies in elderly patients aged 70 years old or older. The effects of nebivolol on left ventricular function in elderly patients with chronic heart failure (ENECA) and the study of effects of nebivolol intervention on outcomes and rehospitalization in seniors with heart failure (SENIORS) have been specifically aimed to assess the efficacy of beta-blockade in elderly heart failure patients. The results of these two trials demonstrate that nebivolol is well tolerated and effective in reducing mortality and morbidity in older patients, and that the beneficial clinical effect is present also in patients with mildly reduced ejection fraction. Moreover, nebivolol appears to be significantly cost-effective when prescribed in these patients. However, further targeted studies are needed to better define the efficacy as well as safety profile in frail and older patients with comorbid diseases. PMID:21152240

  14. Paediatric heart failure from the eyes of the cardiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Paolo Bassareo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The causes of heart failure (HF in children differ substantially from those found in the adult population. They comprise cardiac and noncardiac causes. Today, with the near-disappearance of rheumatic fever, the most common cause of pediatric HF are congenital heart diseases, whilst cardiomyopathies are the most common cause of HF in children with a structurally normal heart. Signs and symptoms of pediatric HF are often not specific, most of all in newborns (difficulties in breastfeeding, excessive sweating, growth retardation and poor weight gain. The aim of the therapy is to clinically control HF through general measures as well as drugs administration. In this respect, due to the lack of large interventional trials, the HF in newborns and children is often extrapolated from adult large trials. Cardiac transplantation is currently the treatment option with good outcome and long-term survival in pediatric patients with end-stage or refractory HF.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  15. Treatment of heart failure in Dutch general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bosch Wil JHM

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the relation between the prescription rates of selected cardiovascular drugs (ACE-inhibitors and Angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, diuretics, and combinations, sociodemographic factors (age, gender and socioeconomic class and concomitant diseases (hypertension, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular accident, heart valve disease, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus and asthma/COPD among patients with heart failure cared for in general practice. Methods Data from the second Dutch National Survey in General Practice, conducted mainly in 2001. In this study the data of 96 practices with a registered patient population of 374.000 were used. Data included diagnosis made during one year by general practitioners, derived from the electronic medical records, prescriptions for medication and sociodemographic characteristics collected via a postal questionnary (response 76% Results A diagnosis of HF was found with 2771 patients (7.1 in 1000. Their mean age was 77.7 years, 68% was 75 years or older, 55% of the patients were women. Overall prescription rates for RAAS-I, beta-blockers and diuretics were 50%, 32%, 86%, respectively, whereas a combination of these three drugs was prescribed in 18%. Variations in prescription rates were mainly related to age and concomitant diseases. Conclusion Prescription is not influenced by gender, to a small degree influenced by socioeconomic status and to a large degree by age and concomitant diseases.

  16. Molecular profiling of dilated cardiomyopathy that progresses to heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael A.; Chang, Stephen; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Gorham, Joshua M.; Conner, David A.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Parfenov, Michael G.; DePalma, Steve R.; Eminaga, Seda; Konno, Tetsuo; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by progressive functional and structural changes. We performed RNA-seq at different stages of disease to define molecular signaling in the progression from pre-DCM hearts to DCM and overt heart failure (HF) using a genetic model of DCM (phospholamban missense mutation, PLNR9C/+). Pre-DCM hearts were phenotypically normal yet displayed proliferation of nonmyocytes (59% relative increase vs. WT, P = 8 × 10–4) and activation of proinflammatory signaling with notable cardiomyocyte-specific induction of a subset of profibrotic cytokines including TGFβ2 and TGFβ3. These changes progressed through DCM and HF, resulting in substantial fibrosis (17.6% of left ventricle [LV] vs. WT, P = 6 × 10–33). Cardiomyocytes displayed a marked shift in metabolic gene transcription: downregulation of aerobic respiration and subsequent upregulation of glucose utilization, changes coincident with attenuated expression of PPARα and PPARγ coactivators -1α (PGC1α) and -1β, and increased expression of the metabolic regulator T-box transcription factor 15 (Tbx15). Comparing DCM transcriptional profiles with those in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) revealed similar and distinct molecular mechanisms. Our data suggest that cardiomyocyte-specific cytokine expression, early fibroblast activation, and the shift in metabolic gene expression are hallmarks of cardiomyopathy progression. Notably, key components of these profibrotic and metabolic networks were disease specific and distinguish DCM from HCM. PMID:27239561

  17. Metabolomic Fingerprint of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zordoky, Beshay N.; Sung, Miranda M.; Ezekowitz, Justin; Mandal, Rupasri; Han, Beomsoo; Bjorndahl, Trent C.; Bouatra, Souhaila; Anderson, Todd; Oudit, Gavin Y.; Wishart, David S.; Dyck, Jason R. B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is increasingly recognized as an important clinical entity. Preclinical studies have shown differences in the pathophysiology between HFpEF and HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Therefore, we hypothesized that a systematic metabolomic analysis would reveal a novel metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that will help understand its pathophysiology and assist in establishing new biomarkers for its diagnosis. Methods and Results Ambulatory patients with clinical diagnosis of HFpEF (n = 24), HFrEF (n = 20), and age-matched non-HF controls (n = 38) were selected for metabolomic analysis as part of the Alberta HEART (Heart Failure Etiology and Analysis Research Team) project. 181 serum metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Compared to non-HF control, HFpEF patients demonstrated higher serum concentrations of acylcarnitines, carnitine, creatinine, betaine, and amino acids; and lower levels of phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelins. Medium and long-chain acylcarnitines and ketone bodies were higher in HFpEF than HFrEF patients. Using logistic regression, two panels of metabolites were identified that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.942 and 0.981, respectively. Conclusions The metabolomics approach employed in this study identified a unique metabolomic fingerprint of HFpEF that is distinct from that of HFrEF. This metabolomic fingerprint has been utilized to identify two novel panels of metabolites that can separate HFpEF patients from both non-HF controls and HFrEF patients. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02052804 PMID:26010610

  18. Management of chronic heart failure in the older population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nahid Azad; Genevieve Lemay

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of hospitalization for those over the age of 65 and represents a significant clinical and economic burden. About half of hospital re-admissions are related to co-morbidities, polypharmacy and disabilities associated with CHF. Moreover, CHF also has an enormous cost in terms of poor prognosis with an average one year mortality of 33%–35%. While more than half of patients with CHF are over 75 years, most clinical trials have included younger patients with a mean age of 61 years. Inadequate data makes treatment decisions challenging for the providers. Older CHF patients are more often female, have less cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors, but higher rates of non-cardiovascular conditions and diastolic dysfunction. The prevalence of CHF with reduced ejection fraction, ischemic heart disease, and its risk factors declines with age, whereas the prevalence of non-cardiac co-morbidities, such as chronic renal failure, dementia, anemia and malignancy increases with age. Diabetes and hypertension are among the strongest risk factors as predictors of CHF particularly among women with coronary heart disease. This review paper will focus on the specific consideration for CHF assessment in the older population. Management strategies will be reviewed, including non-pharmacologic, pharmacologic, quality care indicators, quality improvement in care transition and lastly, end-of-life issues. Palliative care should be an integral part of an interdiscipli-nary team approach for a comprehensive care plan over the whole disease trajectory. In addition, frailty contributes valuable prognostic in-sight incremental to existing risk models and assists clinicians in defining optimal care pathways for their patients.

  19. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziebło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. Material/Methods In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I–III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e’) assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR – CSR_ [−] (n=110). Results CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (pCSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, pCSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  20. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (pCSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, pCSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  1. Myocardial energetics and the role of micronutrients in heart failure: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ang-Peng; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra; Rath, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a multifactorial disease with poor prognosis. There are many hypotheses regarding the cause of heart failure. Leading among them are the hemodynamic and the neuro-hormonal hypotheses. Although the energy depletion hypothesis has been fairly recent, there is evidence suggesting that declining bioenergy plays a major role in heart failure. This review explored the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis from the role of micronutrients in correcting and alleviating symptoms of heart failure. Even though focus was on key nutrients such as coenzyme Q10, thiamine, riboflavin, L-carnitine, and taurine, emphasis was on the combined effect of multiple micronutrients as a whole. Search from databases from 2000 to 2015 produced four clinical studies using multiple micronutrients on heart failure. Evidence from the studies show that using high doses of multiple micronutrients may have positive effects on heart failure and simultaneously support the myocardial energy depletion hypothesis. PMID:27679743

  2. Biomarkers for Heart Failure: An Update for Practitioners of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettersten, Nicholas; Maisel, Alan S

    2016-06-01

    Biomarkers have become an integral part of practicing medicine, especially in heart failure. The natriuretic peptides are commonly used in the evaluation of heart failure, but their role extends beyond diagnosis and includes risk stratification and management of heart failure patients. Newer biomarkers have arrived and are becoming part of routine care of heart failure patients. Both ST2 and high-sensitivity troponin have significant prognostic value for mortality, but also may assist in the titration of medical therapy. Procalcitonin can help guide appropriate antibiotic use in patients with heart failure. The ability to appropriately use and interpret these biomarkers is imperative to the care of heart failure patients, especially as these newer biomarkers become widely used. PMID:26844635

  3. Informal Caregivers' Experiences and Needs When Caring for a Relative With Heart Failure: An Interview Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gusdal, A. K.; Josefsson, K.; Adolfsson, E. T.; Martin, L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Informal caregivers play an important role for persons with heart failure in strengthening medication adherence, encouraging self-care, and identifying deterioration in health status. Caring for a relative with heart failure can affect informal caregivers' well-being and cause caregiver burden. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore informal caregivers' experiences and needs when caring for a relative with heart failure living in their own home. Methods: The...

  4. Heart failure in sub-Saharan Africa: A literature review with emphasis on individuals with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Pascal Kengne

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Andre Pascal Kengne1, Anastase Dzudie2, Eugene Sobngwi31The George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Heart failure and transplantation Unit, Louis Pradel’s Cardiovascular Hospital, Lyon, France; 3National Obesity Centre, Yaounde Central Hospital, CameroonPurpose: Heart failure is the ultimate complication of cardiac involvements in diabetes. The purpose of this review was to summarize current literature on heart failure among people with diabetes mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Method: Bibliographic search of published data on heart failure and diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa over the past 26 years.Results: Heart failure remains largely unexplored in general population and among people with diabetes in Africa. Heart failure accounts for over 30% of hospital admission in specialized cardiovascular units and 3%–7% in general internal medicine. Over 11% of adults with heart failure have diabetes. Risk factors for heart failure among those with diabetes include classical cardiovascular risk factors, without evidence of diabetes distinctiveness for other predictors common in Africa. Prevention, management, and outcomes of heart failure are less well known; recent data suggest improvement in the management of risk factors in clinical settings.Conclusions: Diabetes mellitus is growing in SSA. Related cardiovascular diseases are emerging as potential health problem. Heart failure as cardiovascular complication remains largely unexplored. Efforts are needed through research to improve our knowledge of heart failure at large in Africa. Multilevel preventive measures, building on evidences from other parts of the world must go along side.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, heart failure, sub-Saharan Africa

  5. Effect of Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy on Pulmonary Function in Patients With Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Cundrle, Ivan; Johnson, Bruce D.; Somers, Virend K.; Scott, Christopher G; REA, ROBERT F.; Olson, Lyle J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary congestion due to heart failure causes abnormal lung function. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a proven effective treatment for heart failure. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that CRT promotes increased lung volumes, bronchial conductance, and gas diffusion. Forty-four consecutive patients with heart failure were prospectively investigated before and after CRT. Spirometry, gas diffusion (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide), cardiopulmonary exercise te...

  6. Heart failure in sub-Saharan Africa: A literature review with emphasis on individuals with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Pascal Kengne

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Andre Pascal Kengne1, Anastase Dzudie2, Eugene Sobngwi31The George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Heart failure and transplantation Unit, Louis Pradel’s Cardiovascular Hospital, Lyon, France; 3National Obesity Centre, Yaounde Central Hospital, CameroonPurpose: Heart failure is the ultimate complication of cardiac involvements in diabetes. The purpose of this review was to summarize current literature on heart failure among people with diabetes mellitus in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Method: Bibliographic search of published data on heart failure and diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa over the past 26 years.Results: Heart failure remains largely unexplored in general population and among people with diabetes in Africa. Heart failure accounts for over 30% of hospital admission in specialized cardiovascular units and 3%–7% in general internal medicine. Over 11% of adults with heart failure have diabetes. Risk factors for heart failure among those with diabetes include classical cardiovascular risk factors, without evidence of diabetes distinctiveness for other predictors common in Africa. Prevention, management, and outcomes of heart failure are less well known; recent data suggest improvement in the management of risk factors in clinical settings.Conclusions: Diabetes mellitus is growing in SSA. Related cardiovascular diseases are emerging as potential health problem. Heart failure as cardiovascular complication remains largely unexplored. Efforts are needed through research to improve our knowledge of heart failure at large in Africa. Multilevel preventive measures, building on evidences from other parts of the world must go along side.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, heart failure, sub-Saharan Africa

  7. Adherence to self-care in patients with heart failure in the HeartCycle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stut W

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wim Stut,1 Carolyn Deighan,2 John G Cleland,3 Tiny Jaarsma4 1Philips Research Europe, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 2The Heart Manual Department, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh, UK; 3National Heart and Lung Institute, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals Imperial College, London, UK; 4Department of Social and Welfare studies, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel online education and coaching program to promote self-care among patients with heart failure. In this program, education and coaching content is automatically tailored to the knowledge and behavior of the patient. Patients and methods: The evaluation of the program took place within the scope of the HeartCycle study. This multi-center, observational study examined the ability of a third generation telehealth system to enhance the management of patients recently (<60 days admitted to the hospital for worsening heart failure or outpatients with persistent New York Heart Association (NYHA Functional Classification III/IV symptoms. Self-reported self-care behavior was assessed at baseline and study-end by means of the 9-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior scale. Adherence to daily weighing, blood pressure monitoring, and reporting of symptoms was determined by analyzing the system’s database. Results: Of 123 patients enrolled, the mean age was 66±12 years, 66% were in NYHA III and 79% were men. Self-reported self-care behavior scores (n=101 improved during the study for daily weighing, low-salt diet, physical activity (P<0.001, and fluid restriction (P<0.05. Average adherence (n=120 to measuring weight was 90%±16%, to measuring blood pressure was 89%±17% and to symptom reporting was 66%±32%. Conclusion: Self-reported self-care behavior scores improved significantly during the period of observation, and the objective evidence of adherence to daily weight and blood pressure measurements was

  8. Mitochondrial dynamics and cell death in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-García, José; Akhmedov, Alexander T

    2016-03-01

    The highly regulated processes of mitochondrial fusion (joining), fission (division) and trafficking, collectively called mitochondrial dynamics, determine cell-type specific morphology, intracellular distribution and activity of these critical organelles. Mitochondria are critical for cardiac function, while their structural and functional abnormalities contribute to several common cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure (HF). The tightly balanced mitochondrial fusion and fission determine number, morphology and activity of these multifunctional organelles. Although the intracellular architecture of mature cardiomyocytes greatly restricts mitochondrial dynamics, this process occurs in the adult human heart. Fusion and fission modulate multiple mitochondrial functions, ranging from energy and reactive oxygen species production to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cell death, allowing the heart to respond properly to body demands. Tightly controlled balance between fusion and fission is of utmost importance in the high energy-demanding cardiomyocytes. A shift toward fission leads to mitochondrial fragmentation, while a shift toward fusion results in the formation of enlarged mitochondria and in the fusion of damaged mitochondria with healthy organelles. Mfn1, Mfn2 and OPA1 constitute the core machinery promoting mitochondrial fusion, whereas Drp1, Fis1, Mff and MiD49/51 are the core components of fission machinery. Growing evidence suggests that fusion/fission factors in adult cardiomyocytes play essential noncanonical roles in cardiac development, Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial quality control and cell death. Impairment of this complex circuit causes cardiomyocyte dysfunction and death contributing to heart injury culminating in HF. Pharmacological targeting of components of this intricate network may be a novel therapeutic modality for HF treatment. PMID:26872674

  9. Influence of bilevel positive airway pressure on autonomic tone in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Lacerda, Diego; Costa, Dirceu; Reis, Michel; Gomes, Evelim Leal de F. Dantas; Costa, Ivan Peres; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Marsico, Aline; Stirbulov, Roberto; Arena, Ross; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effect of Bilevel Positive Airway (BiPAP) on the autonomic control of heart rate, assessed by heart rate variability (HRV), in patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure. [Subjects and Methods] This prospective cross-sectional study included 20 subjects (age: 69±8 years, 12 male, left ventricular ejection fraction: 36 ±8%) diagnosed with heart failure who were admitted to a semi-intensive care unit with acute decompensation. Date was collected fo...

  10. Atrial fibrillation is associated with a lower exercise capacity in male chronic heart failure patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pardaens, K; Van Cleemput, J.; Vanhaecke, J.; Fagard, R.

    1997-01-01

    Objective—To study the influence of atrial fibrillation on peak oxygen uptake (peak V̇O2) in chronic heart failure. An unfavourable effect of atrial fibrillation has been shown in several patient populations, but the results have not been consistent in chronic heart failure.
Methods—Data were analysed from male heart transplant candidates who were able to perform graded bicycle ergometry until exhaustion with respiratory gas analysis and measurement of heart rate. Patients in atrial fibrillat...

  11. 31P-NMR analysis of congestive heart failure in the SHHF/Mcc-facp rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael O'Donnell, J; Narayan, P; Bailey, M Q; Abduljalil, A M; Altschuld, R A; McCune, S A; Robitaille, P M

    1998-02-01

    31P-NMR was used to monitor myocardial bioenergetics in compensated and failing SHHF/MCC-fa(cp) (SHF) rat hearts. The SHHF/Mcc-fa(cp) (spontaneous hypertension and heart failure) rat is a relatively new genetic model in which all individuals spontaneously develop congestive heart failure, most during the second year of life. Failing SHF rat hearts displayed a pronounced decrease in resting PCr:ATP ratios (Ppressure products (RRP, mmHg X beats/min) from 44.5+/-1.4 to 66.6+/-3. 4 K with dobutamine infusion, whereas hearts in end-stage failure were able to increase their RPP from baseline values of 27+/-4 K to only 37+/-7 K. The data indicate that a pronounced decline in PCr and total creatine signals the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to decompensation and failure in the SHF rat model of hypertensive cardiomyopathy. PMID:9515000

  12. Influence of sex on treatment and outcome in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenstein, Lutz; Clark, Andrew L; Ribeiro, Jorge P

    2012-06-01

    The population is aging, the prevalence of heart failure increases with age, and on average women live longer than men. There is evidence for sex-specific effects of individual, guideline-recommended drugs used for treatment of chronic heart failure. Women are underrepresented in most clinical trials and only a minority of drug applications to regulatory authorities have included sex analyses. The present review focuses on the potential female survival benefit in heart failure, the influence of sex on medical treatment in a broader sense, and the potential benefit to be derived from guideline recommended treatment and common adjunctive heart failure medication.

  13. [Are some antidiabetic drugs also drugs useful for heart failure treatment?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murín, Ján

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus type 2 is rapidly growing. It is the cardiovascular mortality and morbidity why these patients suffer. Also heart failure becomes very frequent in diabetics, as it is a strong risk factor for development of heart failure and for its progression. Recently published data of EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial with empagliflozin hint to the possibility of heart failure treatment with this drug. The author presents data about the influence of antidiabetic drugs on cardiovascular risk factors, specifically on heart failure. This can be a way how to prevent heart failure in diabetic patients. Later he presents data about the influence of antidiabetics on symptoms and signs of heart failure. Some of these drugs are neutral, some are risky for patients and in the case of empagliflozin there is a beneficial influence. As heart failure is a great problem of clinical practice and diabetes is a strong risk factor of heart failure, we are looking also for prevention of heart failure and for its treatment also by using antidiabetic drug. PMID:27250612

  14. Anaemia and long term mortality in heart failure patients: a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlot, Mette; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Valeur, Nana;

    2010-01-01

    Anaemia has been demonstrated as a risk factor in patients with heart failure over periods of a few years, but long term data are not available. We examined the long-term risk of anaemia in heart failure patients during 15 years of follow-up.......Anaemia has been demonstrated as a risk factor in patients with heart failure over periods of a few years, but long term data are not available. We examined the long-term risk of anaemia in heart failure patients during 15 years of follow-up....

  15. Cognitive impairment and self-care in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajduk AM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alexandra M Hajduk,1,2 Stephenie C Lemon,3 David D McManus,1,2,4 Darleen M Lessard,1 Jerry H Gurwitz,1,2,4 Frederick A Spencer,5 Robert J Goldberg,1,2 Jane S Saczynski1,2,4 1Division of Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases and Vulnerable Populations, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Meyers Primary Care Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 3Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 4Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 5Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF is a prevalent chronic disease in older adults that requires extensive self-care to prevent decompensation and hospitalization. Cognitive impairment may impact the ability to perform HF self-care activities. We examined the association between cognitive impairment and adherence to self-care in patients hospitalized for acute HF. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting and participants: A total of 577 patients (mean age = 71 years, 44% female hospitalized for HF at five medical centers in the United States and Canada. Measurements and methods: Participants were interviewed for information on self-reported adherence to self-care using the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale. We assessed cognitive impairment in three domains (memory, processing speed, and executive function using standardized measures. Patients' demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained through medical record review. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the association between cognitive impairment and self-care practices adjusting for demographic and clinical factors. Results: A total of 453 patients (79% were impaired in at least one cognitive

  16. Salt Intake Is Associated with Inflammation in Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Azak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Heart Failure (CHF is highly prevalent and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. It has been well established that excessive intake of sodium chloride (salt induced hypertension in some populations. Although salt seems to induce cardiovascular diseases through elevation of blood pressure, it has also been indicated that salt can induce cardiovascular diseases independently from blood pressure elevation. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the association between salt consumption and inflammation in CHF patients. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted on 86 patients between 18 and 65 years old who were diagnosed with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class I and II heart failure. Salt intake was calculated by using 24 hour urine sodium excretion. Besides, the association between inflammation and daily salt intake was evaluated regarding C - reactive protein (CPR, High sensitive CRP (HsCPR, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR, and ferritin and fibrinogen levels using Pearson correlation analysis. Results: Our results showed a statistically significant difference between the low (n = 41 and high (n = 45 salt intake groups in terms of serum HsCRP levels (5.21 ± 2.62 vs. 6.36 ± 2.64 (P < 0.048. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between the amount of salt consumption and HsCRP levels. In this study, daily salt consumption of the enrolled patients was 8.53 gram/day. The medications and even the blood pressures were similar in the two groups, but daily pill count, prevalence of hypertension, and coronary heart disease were higher in the high salt intake group; however, the differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.065. Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups concerning the inflammation markers, such as CRP, ESR, ferritin, and fibrinogen. Conclusions: Neurohumoral and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to high mortality

  17. Sex Differences in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Insights From the Heart Function Assessment Registry Trial in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFaleh, Hussam F; Thalib, Lukman; Kashour, Tarek; Hersi, Ahmad; Mimish, Layth; Elasfar, Abdelfatah A; Almasood, Ali; Al Ghamdi, Saleh; Ghabashi, Abdullah; Malik, Asif; Hussein, Gamal A; Al-Murayeh, Mushabab; Abuosa, Ahmed; Al Habeeb, Waleed; Al Habib, Khalid F

    2016-08-01

    We assessed sex-specific differences in clinical features and outcomes of patients with acute heart failure (AHF). The Heart function Assessment Registry Trial in Saudi Arabia (HEARTS), a prospective registry, enrolled 2609 patients with AHF (34.2% women) between 2009 and 2010. Women were older and more likely to have risk factors for atherosclerosis, history of heart failure (HF), and rheumatic heart and valve disease. Ischemic heart disease was the prime cause for HF in men and women but more so in men (P Women had higher rates of hypertensive heart disease and primary valve disease (P women and higher ventricular arrhythmias in men, no differences were observed in hospital outcomes. The overall survival did not differ between men and women (hazard ratio: 1.0, 95% confidence interval: 0.8-1.2, P = .981). Men and women with AHF differ significantly in baseline clinical characteristics and management but not in adverse outcomes. PMID:26438635

  18. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaneet Jearath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy.

  19. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy.

  20. Pioglitazone-induced congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema in a patient with preserved ejection fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearath, Vaneet; Vashisht, Rajan; Rustagi, Vipul; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone-induced heart failure is known in patients with underlying heart disease, but is not well documented in patients with normal left ventricular function. Pioglitazone has been very popular as it is an insulin sensitizer and insulin resistance is prevalent among Indians. Fluid retention exacerbates pre-existing heart failure or precipitates heart failure in a patient with underlying left ventricular dysfunction. However, pathogenesis of heart failure in a patient with normal left ventricular function is not known. Probably it is due to dose-related effect on pulmonary endothelial permeability, rather than alterations in left ventricular mass or ejection fraction. We report a patient who developed congestive heart failure and pulmonary edema with normal left ventricular function within 1 year of starting pioglitazone therapy. We have to be careful in monitoring all possible side effects during followup when patients are on pioglitazone therapy. PMID:27127397

  1. Sleep Apnea and Cognitive Function in Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysten M. Knecht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prior research indicates that heart failure (HF patients exhibit significant cognitive deficits on neuropsychological testing. Sleep apnea is associated with both HF and reduced cognitive function, but the combined impact of these conditions on cognitive function is unknown. Methods. In the current study, 172 older adults with a dual diagnosis of HF and sleep apnea or HF alone completed a battery of cognitive tests measuring attention, executive functioning, and memory. Results. Relative to patients with HF alone, persons with both HF and sleep apnea performed worse on measures of attention after adjusting for demographic and medical variables. Conclusions. The current findings suggest that HF patients with comorbid sleep apnea may be at greater risk for cognitive impairment relative to HF patient without such history. Further work is needed to clarify mechanisms for these findings and to determine whether the interactive effects on cognitive function lead to poorer patient outcomes.

  2. Hemostatic biomarkers in dogs with chronic congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Falk, Torkel; Tidholm, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    Background: Chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) in humans is associated with abnormal hemostasis, and abnormalities in hemostatic biomarkers carry a poor prognosis. Alterations in hemostatic pathways can be involved in the pathogenesis of CHF in dogs, and microthrombosis in the myocardium could...... contribute to increased mortality. Hypothesis: That plasma concentration or activity of hemostatic biomarkers is altered in dogs with CHF and that these factors predict mortality. Animals: Thirty-four dogs with CHF caused by either dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, n = 14) or degenerative valvular disease (CDVD......, n = 20) compared with 23 healthy age-matched control dogs were included in this study. Dogs with CHF were recruited from 2 referral cardiology clinics, and control dogs were owned by friends or colleagues of the investigators. Methods: Clinical examination and echocardiography were performed in all...

  3. Aliskiren, Enalapril, or Aliskiren and Enalapril in Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Krum, Henry; Abraham, William T;

    2016-01-01

    (hazard ratio vs. enalapril, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.10); the prespecified test for noninferiority was not met. There was a higher risk of hypotensive symptoms in the combination-therapy group than in the enalapril group (13.8% vs. 11.0%, P=0.005), as well as higher risks of an elevated serum creatinine...... level (4.1% vs. 2.7%, P=0.009) and an elevated potassium level (17.1% vs. 12.5%, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with chronic heart failure, the addition of aliskiren to enalapril led to more adverse events without an increase in benefit. Noninferiority was not shown for aliskiren as compared with...

  4. The management of atrial fibrillation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Rupa; Callans, David J

    2006-08-01

    The development of atrial fibrillation (AF) can greatly complicate the course of heart failure (HF). Although recent trials have indicated the nonsuperiority of a rhythm control strategy in the general population with AF, this may not apply to patients with HF. We feel strongly that AF be treated aggressively in patients with HF, defaulting toward an initial rhythm control strategy, to avoid the hemodynamic detriment of irregular rapid ventricular response and the development of tachycardia-related myopathy. The index episode is treated with cardioversion and antiarrhythmic therapy. If significant benefit is demonstrated, the rhythm control strategy is maintained, to the point of catheter ablation for AF if necessary. If there is no change in cardiac performance or symptoms after cardioversion, strict rate control is enforced, to the point of atrioventricular node ablation and pacing if necessary.

  5. Obesity and the obesity paradox in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pritha P; Fonarow, Gregg C; Horwich, Tamara B

    2015-02-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the general population and is associated with an increased risk for the development of new-onset heart failure (HF). However, in acute and chronic HF, overweight and mild to moderate obesity is associated with substantially improved survival compared with normal weight. This phenomenon has been termed the "obesity paradox" in HF. The majority of data pertaining to the obesity paradox identifies obesity with body mass index; however, the reliability of this method has been questioned. Newer studies have explored the use of other measures of body fat and body composition, including waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, skinfold thickness, and bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition. The relationship between the obesity paradox and cardiorespiratory fitness in HF is also discussed in this review, and we explore the various potential explanations for the obesity paradox and summarize the current evidence and guidelines for intentional weight loss treatments for HF in the obese population.

  6. Obesity and heart failure: epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Martin A; Lavie, Carl J; Agrawal, Harsh; Aggarwal, Kul B; Kumar, Senthil A

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for heart failure (HF) in both men and women. The mortality risk of overweight and class I and II obese adults with HF is lower than that of normal weight or underweight adults with HF of comparable severity, a phenomenon referred to as the obesity paradox. Severe obesity produces hemodynamic alterations that predispose to changes in cardiac morphology and ventricular function, which may lead to the development of HF. The presence of systemic hypertension, sleep apnea, and hypoventilation, comorbidities that occur commonly with severe obesity, may contribute to HF in such patients. The resultant syndrome is known as obesity cardiomyopathy. Substantial weight loss in severely obese persons is capable of reversing most obesity-related abnormalities of cardiac performance and morphology and improving the clinical manifestations of obesity cardiomyopathy.

  7. [Optimization of energy metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, A N

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays particular interest of clinicians is attracted by metabolic therapy of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of complex therapy with addition of Vasonat on the dynamics of remodeling indexes of left ventricle and functional class of CHF on classification of NYHA. It has been shown that application of metabolic modulator Vasonat in addition to conventional therapy of CHF facilitated the clinical improvement and significant decline of functional class. Vasonat use resulted in the meaningful improvement of the contractive function of myocardium and increase of tolerance to the physical exercise. Moreover, high efficiency of Vasonat has been demonstrated in the control of the syndrome of oxidizing stress, by decrease in intensity of free-radical processes and activation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:21265120

  8. Intersections Between Microbiome and Heart Failure: Revisiting the Gut Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Yuji; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    Microbes play an important role in human health and disease. In the setting of heart failure (HF), substantial hemodynamic changes, such as hypoperfusion and congestion in the intestines, can alter gut morphology, permeability, function, and possibly the growth and composition of gut microbiota. These changes can disrupt the barrier function of the intestines and exacerbate systemic inflammation via microbial or endotoxin translocation into systemic circulation. Furthermore, cardiorenal alterations via metabolites derived from gut microbiota can potentially mediate or modulate HF pathophysiology. Recently, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) has emerged as a key mediator that provides a mechanistic link between gut microbiota and multiple cardiovascular diseases, including HF. Potential intervention strategies which may target this microbiota-driven pathology include dietary modification, prebiotics/probiotics, and selective binders of microbial enzymes or molecules, but further investigations into their safety and efficacy are warranted.

  9. Complexity in congestive heart failure: A time-frequency approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Santo; Palit, Sanjay K.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Ariffin, MRK; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2016-03-01

    Reconstruction of phase space is an effective method to quantify the dynamics of a signal or a time series. Various phase space reconstruction techniques have been investigated. However, there are some issues on the optimal reconstructions and the best possible choice of the reconstruction parameters. This research introduces the idea of gradient cross recurrence (GCR) and mean gradient cross recurrence density which shows that reconstructions in time frequency domain preserve more information about the dynamics than the optimal reconstructions in time domain. This analysis is further extended to ECG signals of normal and congestive heart failure patients. By using another newly introduced measure—gradient cross recurrence period density entropy, two classes of aforesaid ECG signals can be classified with a proper threshold. This analysis can be applied to quantifying and distinguishing biomedical and other nonlinear signals.

  10. Conducting Family Nursing in Heart Failure outpatient clinics: Nurses experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voltelen, Barbara; Konradsen, Hanne; Østergaard, Birte

    Aim: This study aimed to explore what was documented during structured Family Nursing (FN) conversations with patients diagnosed with Heart Failure and their families, and to gain knowledge about the nurses’ experiences conducting FN. Background: Patients with HF face many challenges, and so do...... throughout the FN intervention and a Focus group interview with 6 nurses who were conducting the conversations. Content analyses of all text material dealt with both manifest and latent content, and were analyzed through a deductive and inductive process. Results: Enabling bonding emerged as the overall...... theme for the FN conversations, and was made possible through two subthemes; “strengthening family bonds” and “creating an enabling context for FN”. Conducting the FN conversations was challenging due to the use of new communication skills. Optimal setting, experience, retraining and professional...

  11. Obesity and the obesity paradox in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adrienne L; Fonarow, Gregg C; Horwich, Tamara B

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a growing public health problem in the general population, and significantly increases the risk for the development of new-onset heart failure (HF). However, in the setting of chronic HF, overweight and mild to moderate obesity is associated with substantially improved survival compared to normal-weight patients. Evidence exists for an "obesity paradox" in HF, with the majority of data measuring obesity by body mass index, but also across various less-frequently used measures of body fat (BF) and body composition including waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, skinfold estimates of percent BF, and bioelectrical impedance analysis of body composition. Other emerging areas of investigation such as the relationship of the obesity paradox to cardiorespiratory fitness are also discussed. Finally, this review explores various explanations for the obesity paradox, and summarizes the current evidence for intentional weight loss treatments for HF in context.

  12. Dietary Nitrate and Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggan, Andrew R; Peterson, Linda R

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from exercise intolerance that diminishes their ability to perform normal activities of daily living and hence compromises their quality of life. This is due largely to detrimental changes in skeletal muscle mass, structure, metabolism, and function. This includes an impairment of muscle contractile performance, i.e., a decline in the maximal force, speed, and power of muscle shortening. Although numerous mechanisms underlie this reduction in contractility, one contributing factor may be a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Consistent with this, recent data demonstrate that acute ingestion of NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice, a source of NO via the NO synthase-independent enterosalivary pathway, markedly increases maximal muscle speed and power in HF patients. This review discusses the role of muscle contractile dysfunction in the exercise intolerance characteristic of HF, and the evidence that dietary NO3 (-) supplementation may represent a novel and simple therapy for this currently underappreciated problem. PMID:27271563

  13. The role of statins in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Szczurek, Wioletta; Król, Bogumiła; Zembala, Marian

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of statins in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with documented coronary artery disease is unquestionable. However, in chronic heart failure (CHF), evidence regarding the beneficial effects of statin therapy remains contradictory. Although numerous retrospective studies have demonstrated improved prognosis in CHF patients treated with statins, two randomized trials, GISSI-HF and CORONA, have not confirmed the benefit of rosuvastatin in this group of patients. The benefits of using statins in CHF probably result mostly from their pleiotropic action, including the improvement of endothelial function, the inhibition of neurohormonal activation, and the reduction of proinflammatory activation. On the other hand, it has been recognized that low cholesterol is associated with worse morbidity and mortality in patients with CHF. It appears that it is necessary to conduct further randomized clinical trials using different kinds of statins in different populations of patients with CHF. PMID:26336439

  14. Dietary management of heart failure: room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Thomas

    2016-04-14

    There is growing awareness of the role of diet in both health and disease management. Much data are available on the cardioprotective diet in the primary and secondary prevention of CVD. However, there is limited information on the role of diet in the management of heart failure (HF). Animal models of HF have provided interesting insight and potential mechanisms by which dietary manipulation may improve cardiac performance and delay the progression of the disease, and small-scale human studies have highlighted beneficial diet patterns. The aim of this review is to summarise the current data available on the role of diet in the management of human HF and to demonstrate that dietary manipulation needs to progress further than the simple recommendation of salt and fluid restriction.

  15. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  16. Pheochromocytoma Presenting as Acute Heart Failure Leading to Cardiogenic Shock and Multiorgan Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Steppan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma is an endocrine tumor classically presenting with headache, paroxysmal hypertension, and palpitations. We discuss the case of a young male, presenting with acute heart failure and cardiogenic shock requiring stabilization with an intra-aortic balloon pump and a combination of ionotropes and vasopressors. Pheochromocytoma was diagnosed by CT scan, as well as urine and plasma metanephrines. After pretreatment with phenoxy-benzamine, the patient underwent adrenalectomy with subsequent cardiovascular stabilization and full recovery. Unfortunately, pheochromocytoma often remains undiagnosed. Given the ample diagnostic tools and good prognosis when treated suitably, the diagnosis should be entertained early in patients, presenting with unexplained cardiovascular compromise.

  17. Ghrelin与心力衰竭%Ghrelin and heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋娜娜; 丁文惠; 唐朝枢

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid peptide, is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretogogue receptor(GHS-R). It has been shown that the expression and function of ghrelin and its receptor change in heart failure. In addition to promoting growth hormone secretion, ghrelin has direct positive inotropic effect on cardiomyocytes, inhibit the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and ventricular remodeling, protect myocardium directly, improve the disturbed myocardial energy metabolism and cardiac function, and attenuate the development of cardiac cachexia. It is suggested that ghrelin may have potential effects on the treatment of heart failure.%Ghrelin是一种由28个氨基酸组成的多肽,是生长激素促分泌素受体的内源性配体.近年来研究显示心力衰竭时ghrelin及其受体的表达及功能发生变化;Ghrelin除具有促进生长激素分泌的作用外,还具有抑制心肌细胞凋亡、抑制心室重构、增强心肌收缩力、直接保护心肌、改善心肌能量代谢、改善心功能、延缓心源性恶病质的生物学效应.这就提示ghrelin可能从上述多方面发挥抗心力衰竭的作用,具有治疗心力衰竭的潜在功效.

  18. Sildenafil Improves Erectile Function in Men with Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Samiei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with Chronic Heart Failure (CHF have been shown to have enhanced risk of Erectile Dysfunction (ED due to low cardiac output, endothelial dysfunction, medications, co-morbid conditions, and psychogenic factors. Objectives: The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of sildenafil on erectile function of patients with stable CHF using the abridged 5-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5. Patients and Methods: Using convenience sampling, 222 sexually-active adult males with NYHA class I-III stable CHF were included in this cross-sectional study. All the patients filled out the IIEF-5 questionnaire, in which they were required to score the five domains of male sexual function, including erectile function, orgasm function, sexual desire, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction. All the analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software (v. 19 and P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: In our sample, the patients’ mean age was 47.14 ± 11.86 years, their mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 20% (15% - 25%, and the prevalence of ED was 70.3%. In addition, severe, moderate, mild to moderate, and mild ED were seen in 57%, 17%, 7%, and 19% of the patients with ED, respectively. ED was significantly more prevalent in the patients with ischemic heart failure compared to those with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (84.68% vs. 55.85%, P < 0.001. Moreover, the prevalence of ED was significantly lower in the patients taking sildenafil compared to the other group (42.85% vs. 82.89%, P < 0.001. Conclusions: Sildenafil appears to provide satisfactory results toward improving sexual function in patients with CHF.

  19. Assessing patient preferences in heart failure using conjoint methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisa G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Pisa,1 Florian Eichmann,1 Stephan Hupfer21Kantar Health GmbH, Munich, Germany; 2Novartis Pharma GmbH, Nuernberg, GermanyAim: The course of heart failure (HF is characterized by frequent hospitalizations, a high mortality rate, as well as a severely impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL. To optimize disease management, understanding of patient preferences is crucial. We aimed to assess patient preferences using conjoint methodology and HRQoL in patients with HF.Methods: Two modules were applied: an initial qualitative module, consisting of in-depth interviews with 12 HF patients, and the main quantitative module in 300 HF patients from across Germany. Patients were stratified according to the time of their last HF hospitalization. Each patient was presented with ten different scenarios during the conjoint exercise. Additionally, patients completed the generic HRQoL instrument, EuroQol health questionnaire (EQ-5D™.Results: The attribute with the highest relative importance was dyspnea (44%, followed by physical capacity (18%. Of similar importance were exhaustion during mental activities (13%, fear due to HF (13%, and autonomy (12%. The most affected HRQoL dimensions according to the EQ-5D questionnaire were anxiety/depression (23% with severe problems, pain/discomfort (19%, and usual activities (15%. Overall average EQ-5D score was 0.39 with stable, chronic patients (never hospitalized having a significantly better health state vs the rest of the cohort.Conclusion: This paper analyzed patient preference in HF using a conjoint methodology. The preference weights resulting from the conjoint analysis could be used in future to design HRQoL questionnaires which could better assess patient preferences in HF care.Keywords: heart failure, quality of life, conjoint analysis, utility, patient preference

  20. Renal dysfunction prevalence and clinical impact in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palazzuoli A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Palazzuoli, Susanna Benincasa, Stefanie Grothgar, Pasquale Di Sipio, Giovanni Paganini, Marco Pellegrini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Cardiology Section, Le Scotte Hospital, University of Siena, ItalyAbstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with a significant increase in death and cardiovascular mortality. However the exact mechanism by which CKD impairs the cardiovascular outcome is not well established. Some reasons may lie in the association of CKD with several other cardiovascular and noncardiovascular disorders including accelerated systemic atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, increased levels of inflammatory factors, anemic status, bone mineral dysfunction, electrolyte imbalance, and renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS activation. Therefore several risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, lipid disorders, and older age are common in both conditions. In patients affected with heart failure (HF a key role is represented by the neurohormonal activation. This condition causes fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, as well as increased congestion and cardiac workload. Moreover, HF during the decompensated phases is often associated with a worsening renal function that leads to further RAAS activation, microvascular damage, and intrarenal flow redistribution. In order to clarify the interactions between these factors, several questions need to be answered: the universal definition of “worsening renal function,” the identification of the best laboratory parameters to investigate renal function in terms of sensitivity and specificity, and a better definition of the comorbidities’ role in the determination of the outcome, especially in patients with chronic HF. A clarification of these key points could lead to the individualization of new specific therapeutic targets and to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with HF and