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Sample records for advanced hadron facility

  1. Kaon: an advanced hadron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced hadron facility KAON has been proposed to be built in Canada. The report of the Project Definition Study has been presented to both levels of Government (federal and provincial) on May 24, 1990, for action in the near future. A short discussion will be given of the scientific motivation. The physics along the intensity and precision frontier is fully complementary to the physics along the energy frontier. Following, a description will be given of the 100 μA, 30 GeV proton synchrotron proposed. The accelerator will consist of five rings using the present 500 MeV cyclotron as an injector. If the project were funded this year, the accelerators would be completed by 1995 or so, with the experimental program starting a year later

  2. Towards an advanced hadron facility at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Henry A.

    1988-11-01

    In the 1987 AHF Workshop, it was pointed out that activation of the accelerator is a serious problem. At this workshop, it was suggested that a new type of slow extraction system is needed to reduce the activation. We report on the response to this need. The Los Alamos plan is reviewed including as elements the long lead-time R&D in preparation for a 1993 construction start, a menu of accelerator designs, improved losses at injection and extraction time, active participation in the development of PSR, an accelerated hardware R&D program, and close collaboration with TRIUMF. We review progress on magnets and power supplies, on ceramic vacuum chambers, and on ferrite-tuned rf systems. We report on the plan for a joint TRIUMF-Los Alamos main-ring cavity to be tested in PSR in 1989. The problem of beam losses is discussed in detail and a recommendation for a design procedure for the injection system is made. This recommendation includes taking account of single Coulomb scattering, a painting scheme for minimizing foil hits, and a collimator and dump system for containing the expected spills. The slow extraction problem is reviewed and progress on an improved design is discussed. The problem of designing the accelerators for minimum operation and maintenance cost is briefly discussed. The question of the specifications for an advanced hadron facility is raised and it is suggested that the Los Alamos Proposal of a dual energy machine—1.6 GeV and 60 GeV—is a better match to the needs of the science program than the single-energy proposals made elsewhere. It is suggested that design changes need be made in all of the world's hadron facility proposals to prepare for high-intensity operation.

  3. Towards an advanced hadron facility at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1987 workshop, it was pointed out that activation of the accelerator is a serious problem. At this workshop, it was suggested that a new type of slow extraction system is needed to reduce the activation. We report on the response to this need. The Los Alamos plan is reviewed including as elements the long lead-time R and D in preparation for a 1993 construction start, a menu of accelerator designs, improved losses at injection and extraction time, active participation in the development of PSR, and accelerated hardware R and D program, and close collaboration with TRIUMF. We review progress on magnets and power supplies, on ceramic vacuum chambers, and on ferrite-turned rf systems. We report on the plan for a joint TRIUMF-Los Alamos main-ring cavity to be tested in PSR in 1989. The problem of beam losses is discussed in detail and a recommendation for a design procedure for the injection system is made. This recommendation includes taking account of single Coulomb scattering, a painting scheme for minimizing foil hits, and a collimator and dump system for containing the expected spills. The slow extraction problem is reviewed and progress on an improved design is discussed. The problem of designing the accelerators for minimum operation and maintenance cost is briefly discussed. The question of the specifications for an advanced hadron facility is raised and it is suggested that the Los Alamos Proposal of a dual energy machine - 1.6 GeV and 60 GeV - is a better match to the needs of the science program than the single-energy proposals made elsewhere. It is suggested that design changes need be made in all of the world's hadron facility proposals to prepare for high-intensity operation

  4. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  5. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 22-27, 1988, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, and accelerator hardware. The parallel sessions were particularly lively with discussions of all facets of kaon factory design. The workshop provided an opportunity for communication among the staff involved in hadron facility planning from all the study groups presently active. The recommendations of the workshop include: the need to use h=1 RF in the compressor ring; the need to minimize foil hits in painting schemes for all rings; the need to consider single Coulomb scattering in injection beam los calculations; the need to study the effect of field inhomogeneity in the magnets on slow extraction for the 2.2 Tesla main ring of AHF; and agreement in principle with the design proposed for a joint Los Alamos/TRIUMF prototype main ring RF cavity

  6. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (first of two) included papers on architecture, beam diagnostics, compressors, and linacs. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended

  7. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended

  8. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1990-04-01

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended.

  9. Japan hadron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Tokushi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    JHF aims at promoting the variety of research fields using various secondary beams produced by high-intensity proton beams. The accelerator of JHF will be an accelerator complex of a 200 MeV LINAC, a 3 GeV booster proton synchrotron, and a 50 GeV proton synchrotron. The four main experimental facilities of K-Arena, M-Arena, N-Arena, and E-Arena are planed. The outline of the project is presented. (author)

  10. Advances in hadron calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article concentrates on the recent improvements in our understanding of the fundamental aspects of hadron calorimetry: How do these devices work, what are the fundamental limitations to their performance, and how does the calorimeter performance relate to the needs of current and future experiments? The article is restricted to hadron calorimeter applications in accelerator-based experiments. Historically, the first large-scale detectors of this type were used in cosmic-ray experiments. They have found a wide application in underground experiments looking for nucleon decay, cosmic neutrinos, etc. In these experiments, the calorimeter is not only a detector but also a target and (for nucleon decay) a source. Therefore, the total instrumented mass is a very important parameter. Because of the completely different boundary conditions (low event rates, low energies, extremely rare processes), the emphasis in the development of these detectors has been on cheap, reliable technology with high signal-to-background separation capability

  11. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility)

  12. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  13. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  14. Future Hadron Physics Facilities at Fermilab

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, will be described.

  15. Future hadron physics facilities at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    Fermilab's hadron physics research continues in all its accelerator-based programs. These efforts will be identified, and the optimization of the Fermilab schedules for physics will be described. In addition to the immediate plans, the Fermilab Long Range Plan will be cited, and the status and potential role of a new proton source, the Proton Driver, is described.

  16. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  17. Present Status and Future Plans of J-PARC Hadron Experimental Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, K

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of J-PARC Hadron Experimental Facility from the radioactive material leakage incident occurred on May 23, 2013 is reported. Recovery took long time. However its essential part was completed by the beginning of Japanese Fiscal Year 2015. Then we could start the beam operation of Hadron Experimental Facility from April 9, 2015. Experiments with slow extraction beam started on April 24, 2015. The beam intensity delivered to Hadron Experimental Facility reached approximately 32kW by the end of June, 2015. Recent activities on partic le and nuclear physics in the Hadron Experimental Facility are described also.

  18. Future prospects in nuclear physics and the Japanese Hadron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to give an overview of the prospects of nuclear physics in view of various projects and ideas currently discussed within the community, in particular with regard to the the Japanese Hadron Facility. Nuclear structure physics has a bright future. Several planned radioactive beam facilities will provide new possibilities in this field. The synthesis of superheavy elements and of neutron rich exotic nuclei will be taken up at the JHF in the E-arena. Using modern γ-ray spectroscopy techniques, an extension of high resolution spectroscopy to the strangeness degree of freedom, to hypernuclear physics, will be very rewarding, and will be pursued in the K-arena. Another promising area will be nuclear matter at the highest baryon densities. This field is driven by recently obtained evidence for medium modifications of hadrons based on studies of K-production and propagation in the nuclear medium and on possible in-medium changes of vector meson masses as suggested by e+e- - spectra. This research direction could be taken up at the K-arena exploiting primary heavy-ion beams. In hadron physics, the main aims are to establish the existence of glueballs, hybrids and various kinds of hyperons. This physics can again be done at the K-arena with secondary beams but would particularly benefit from the planned future extension with p-bar - beams. Finally, the physics potential of an electron-nucleon collider has been discussed which allows to investigate how complex objects like baryons and mesons are formed from elementary partons and how effective degrees of freedom evolve in QCD. It is not clear at the moment, however, where and when such a project will be realized. In any case, with the many possibilities offered by the JHF, this laboratory will become an excellent home base for nuclear physics in its modern QCD-oriented form. (author)

  19. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  20. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  1. Advances in Cryogenics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    1998-01-01

    After a decade of intensive R&D in the key technologies of high-field superconducting accelerator magnets and superfluid helium cryogenics, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has now fully entered its co nstruction phase, with the adjudication of major procurement contracts to industry. As concerns cryogenic engineering, this R&D program has resulted in significant developments in several fields, amon g which thermo-hydraulics of two-phase saturated superfluid helium, efficient cycles and machinery for large-capacity refrigeration at 1.8 K, insulation techniques for series-produced cryostats and mu lti-kilometre long distribution lines, large-current leads using high-temperature superconductors, industrial precision thermometry below 4 K, and novel control techniques applied to strongly non-line ar processes. We review the most salient advances in these domains.

  2. Proceedings of the international workshop on hadron facility technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1987-12-01

    The conference included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, accelerator hardware, and experimental facilities. Individual abstracts were prepared for 43 papers in the conference proceedings. (LEW)

  3. Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is being developed to enable the latest modern technology, automation, and advanced control methods to be incorporated into nuclear power plants. The facility is proposed as a national multi-user center for advanced control development and testing to be completed in 1991. The facility will support a wide variety of reactor concepts, and will be used by researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), plus scientists and engineers from industry, other national laboratories, universities, and utilities. ACTO will also include telecommunication facilities for remote users

  4. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-06-24

    U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on future hadron facilities in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on future hadron facilities: Workshop on future hadron facilities in the US; 30 {times} 30 TeV-summary report; A high luminosity, 2 {times} 2 TeV collider in the tevatron tunnel; magnets working group; cryogenics discussion; vacuum report; antiproton source production; injector working group; interaction region working group; lattice/beam dynamics working group; LEBT for high-luminosity colliders; some notes on long-range beam-beam effects for the 2TeV collider; synchrotron radiation masks for high energy proton accelerators. Emittance preservation in a proton synchrotron; beam-beam interaction effects on betatron tunes; analytic solutions for phase trombone modules; and chromatic corrections of RHIC when one or two insertions is at {Beta}* = 0.5m.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on future hadron facilities in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on future hadron facilities: Workshop on future hadron facilities in the US; 30 x 30 TeV-summary report; A high luminosity, 2 x 2 TeV collider in the tevatron tunnel; magnets working group; cryogenics discussion; vacuum report; antiproton source production; injector working group; interaction region working group; lattice/beam dynamics working group; LEBT for high-luminosity colliders; some notes on long-range beam-beam effects for the 2TeV collider; synchrotron radiation masks for high energy proton accelerators. Emittance preservation in a proton synchrotron; beam-beam interaction effects on betatron tunes; analytic solutions for phase trombone modules; and chromatic corrections of RHIC when one or two insertions is at Β* = 0.5m

  7. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  8. ANKE, a new facility for medium energy hadron physics at COSY-Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ANKE is a new experimental facility for the spectroscopy of products from proton-induced reactions on internal targets. It has recently been implemented in the accelerator ring of the cooler synchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZ-Juelich), Germany. The device consists of three dipole magnets, various target installations and dedicated detection systems. It will enable a variety of hadron-physics experiments like meson production in elementary proton-nucleon processes and studies of medium modifications in proton-nucleus interactions

  9. Indirectly water-cooled production target at J-PARC hadron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the radioactive material leak accident at the J-PARC hadron experimental facility on May 23, 2013, we designed a new production target, which is capable of a primary proton beam with the energy of 30 GeV and power of 50 kW. It is made of gold and cooled by water through a copper block. For the countermeasures of the recurrence of the accident, the target is enclosed by an airtight chamber and helium gas is circulated to monitor the target soundness. In this paper, technical details of the new target design are presented. (author)

  10. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geesaman, D.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [ed.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  11. Future directions in particle and nuclear physics at multi-GeV hadron beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains papers on the following topics in particle and nuclear physics: hadron dynamics; lepton physics; spin physics; hadron and nuclear spectroscopy; hadronic weak interactions; and Eta physics. These papers have been indexed separately elsewhere

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  13. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data management for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), a stellarator located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is provided by DMG, a locally developed, VAX-based software system. DMG is a data storage and retrieval software system that provides the user interface to ATF raw and analyzed data. Data are described in terms of data models and data types and are organized as signals into files, which are internally documented. The system was designed with user accessibility, software maintainability, and extensibility as primary goals. Extensibility features include compatibility with ATF as it moves from pulsed to steady-state operation and capability for use of the DMG system with experiments other than ATF. DMG is implemented as a run-time library of routines available as a shareable image. General-purpose and specialized data acquisition and analysis applications have been developed using the DMG system. This paper describes the DMG system and the interfaces to it. 4 refs., 2 figs

  14. Advanced toroidal facility vaccuum vessel stress analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex geometry of the Advance Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel required special analysis techniques in investigating the structural behavior of the design. The response of a large-scale finite element model was found for transportation and operational loading. Several computer codes and systems, including the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center Cray machines, were implemented in accomplishing these analyses. The work combined complex methods that taxed the limits of both the codes and the computer systems involved. Using MSC/NASTRAN cyclic-symmetry solutions permitted using only 1/12 of the vessel geometry to mathematically analyze the entire vessel. This allowed the greater detail and accuracy demanded by the complex geometry of the vessel. Critical buckling-pressure analyses were performed with the same model. The development, results, and problems encountered in performing these analyses are described. 5 refs., 3 figs

  15. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  16. Design description of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a large torsatron being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to replace the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. ATF will have a major radius of 2.1 m and an average plasma minor radius of 0.3 m. Major components of the device include the coil sets, structure, and vacuum vessel. The coil sets are designed for broad operating envelopes, including the capability to drive up to 100 kA of plasma current, to produce helical axis configurations, and to operate continuously at one-half the baseline currents. The ATF structure consists of a 40-mm-thick stainless steel toroidal shell encasing the helical coil set. The shell is constructed from 24 identical upper and lower segments, with 12 pairs of intermediate panels to provide access to the helical field (HF) coil joints. The lower portion of the shell also serves as an assembly fixture for the HF coil set. The vacuum vessel is a highly contoured 6-mm-thick stainless steel shell closely fitting the bore and sidewalls of the HF coil winding to provide maximum volume for the plasma. Forty-eight large ports allow good access for diagnostics and neutral beam injection

  17. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  18. Advanced facilities for radiochemistry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaflets in this folder describe the latest addition to Harwell's active handling capability. This is a high level alpha, beta, gamma facility designed specifically for undertaking chemical research and development work. It is based on using high integrity containment boxes which are housed in concrete shielded enclosures. The active boxes can be removed and transferred remotely to a support area where they, and any associated equipment, can be decontaminated and serviced whilst a new fully commissioned box can be readily brought into service. The facility fulfills the principle of ALARA and is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a wide range of active handling requirements. It is supported by a suite of medium active handling cells, radiochemical laboratories and, as necessary, facilities of other scientific and engineering disciplines. The leaflets are: report on conceptual aspects; Techsheet 'Remote handling facility - Salient information'; Techsheet 'Project capabilities'; and 4 sheets of diagrams showing details of the facility. (U.K.)

  19. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  20. Advanced sipping facilities for fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sipping facilities for BWR type plants and PWR type plants of the Russian type WWER-440 are equipped with a bell instead of caps, which is used above the opened reactor, moved by the fuel handling machine, and covers up to eight fuel elements in the core during inspection. In all sipping facilities, the complete inspection sequence is controlled by a desk switchboard near the fuel element storage pool or the reactor well. Siemens' sipping facilities are used in all Siemens-built nuclear power plants and in many others by different manufacturers. Part of them has been in operation already for more than 20 years with a high degree of reliability. Inspection safety is more than 99.5%. (orig./DG)

  1. Structure of hadrons. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were dealt with: Hadronic reactions and resonances, structure of mesons, baryons, glueballs, and hybrids, physics with strange and charmed quarks, future projects and facilities. (HSI)

  2. In Search of the Economic Sustainability of Hadron Therapy: The Real Cost of Setting Up and Operating a Hadron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the treatment cost and required reimbursement for a new hadron therapy facility, considering different technical solutions and financing methods. Methods and Materials: The 3 technical solutions analyzed are a carbon only (COC), proton only (POC), and combined (CC) center, each operating 2 treatment rooms and assumed to function at full capacity. A business model defines the required reimbursement and analyzes the financial implications of setting up a facility over time; activity-based costing (ABC) calculates the treatment costs per type of patient for a center in a steady state of operation. Both models compare a private, full-cost approach with public sponsoring, only taking into account operational costs. Results: Yearly operational costs range between €10.0M (M = million) for a publicly sponsored POC to €24.8M for a CC with private financing. Disregarding inflation, the average treatment cost calculated with ABC (COC: €29,450; POC: €46,342; CC: €46,443 for private financing; respectively €16,059, €28,296, and €23,956 for public sponsoring) is slightly lower than the required reimbursement based on the business model (between €51,200 in a privately funded POC and €18,400 in COC with public sponsoring). Reimbursement for privately financed centers is very sensitive to a delay in commissioning and to the interest rate. Higher throughput and hypofractionation have a positive impact on the treatment costs. Conclusions: Both calculation methods are valid and complementary. The financially most attractive option of a publicly sponsored COC should be balanced to the clinical necessities and the sociopolitical context

  3. An advanced irradiation facilities and its usage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A carrier type gamma irradiator is an advanced device currently installed in Qingdao Irradiation Center (QIC) and has been put into operation for nine years in Qingdao, China. It utilizes Co-60 as the radiation source; the initial Co-60 loading is 1.48×1016Bq (0.4 million Curies). Rubber, natural and synthetic polymers, heat-shrinkable films and tubes, disposable medical supplies, some foods and drugs have been irradiated for test in the past. Especially a great success achieved on the radiation of compound food for young shrimp. The practice demonstrates that the bacteria in the compound food can be destroyed by the irradiation at optimum dosage between 5 000-6 000 Gy.

  4. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  5. Review of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) materials irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the workshop was to document as accurately as possible the present and future needs for neutron irradiation capacity and facilities as related to the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) which will be the next generation steady-state research reactor. The report provides the findings and recommendations of the working group. After introductory and background information is presented, the discussion includes the status of the ANS design, in particular in-core materials irradiation facilities design and important experimental parameters. The summary of workshop discussions describes a survey of irradiation-effects research community and opportunities for ex-core irradiation facilities. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility(ACPF) and hotcell system technologies were developed in this program for demonstrating safely and effectively the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process(ACP) on a lab-scale. With the analysis of work flow and characteristics of the process, ACP was successively demonstrated on a lab-scale experiments and the performance of process was evaluated. The hotcell system was comprehensively evaluated with those results and the design data for the engineering-scale demonstration was derived to propose the direction for the future research and development. The main items performed in this project were as follows. - The reconstruction of ACPF hotcell and demonstration of the ACP - The design and operation technologies for α-γ type nuclear hot cell facility - The overall evaluation of the performance, safety and operation ability of the hotcell system - The acquisition of the government licences for construction and operation and the IAEA licence for using nuclear materials The results of safety analysis and environmental effects assessment and performance data for ACPF had been used for acquiring the government licence for facility operation. The valuable experiences on pyroprocess facility design and operation knowledges would be applied to new Mock-up Facility being scheduled to be a previous stage facility of Integrated Pyroprocess Facility

  7. Construction and initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) torsatron was designed on a physics basis for access to the second stability regime and on an engineering basis for independent fabrication of high-accuracy components. The actual construction, assembly, and initial operation of ATF are compared with the characteristics expected during the design of ATF. 31 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Hadron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -defined range of proton beams offer a solution to these problems through their superior dose distribution properties. In recent years the term 'Hadron Therapy' has been coined to describe cancer treatments involving heavy particles including neutrons, protons and heavy charged particles such as 12C, 20Ne, 28Si, etc. While protons offer a dose distribution advantage, neutrons, which are exponentially attenuated, offer therapeutic advantages derived from differences in cellular response to the different types of radiation depending on cell kinetics and physiology. These differences are attributed to the high stopping power (or 'linear energy transfer') of the secondary particles set in motion in tissue by the primary neutron beam. Heavy charged particle beams (12C, etc) combine the dose distribution advantages of the Bragg peak with the biological advantages of high linear energy transfer (LET). Research in neutron therapy has shown that the biological advantages of this therapy can only be realized for a limited number of disease sites and histologies. The dose distribution advantages of proton therapy, however, are more widely applicable and realizable. It can be argued that, because of the basic physical differences in the dose distribution mechanisms for x ray and proton beams, proton beams can always give a better dose distribution; i.e. more uniform dose in the tumor volume and less dose to the surrounding normal tissues. In spite of the large capital costs of proton facilities, several large facilities, which incorporate a single accelerator and multiple treatment rooms have been built or are planned. It is argued that such large facilities operated over 20-25 years can provide a cost effective and superior cancer treatment in comparison with x ray therapy. The rationales for hadron therapy and the modern accelerator, computing and imaging technologies necessary for it's successful application to cancer therapy will be presented and discussed in detail

  9. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2012-01-01

    The European Commission has launched a study on the applicability of existing chemical industry safety provisions to enhancing security of chemical facilities covering the situation in 18 EU Member States. This paper reports some preliminary analytical findings regarding the extent to which...... Infrastructures (ECI Directive) addresses facility security but does not cover the chemical sector. Chemical facility safety at EU level is addressed by way of the Seveso-II Directive. Preliminary estimates by the chemical industry suggest that perhaps 80% of the existing safety measures under Seveso-II would...... existing provisions that have been put into existence to advance safety objectives due to synergy effects could be expected advance security objectives as well. The paper provides a conceptual definition of safety and security and presents a framework of their essential components. Key differences are...

  10. Nuclear Symmetry Energy for Dense Hadronic Matter in the Era of Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments of gravitational wave detectors like LIGO and Virgo provide us an optimistic opportunity of expecting first few events in near future. One of the exciting possibilities is that we can probe the inner structure of compact objects like neutron star by analyzing the observed pattern of gravitational waves. Among the characteristic features of the equation of state (EoS), the symmetry energy of dense hadronic matter is discussed. A model which implements a new scaling law of physical parameters of hadronic matter is briefly sketched to demonstrate how it affects the equation of state and the outcome for the mass and radius estimation is discussed for an n-p asymmetric configuration.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  13. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004∼2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of α-γ type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β-γ type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process

  14. Advances in Radioisotope Handling Facilities and Automation of Radioisotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Founded in 1959, the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences began to produce radioactive isotopes in 1964. Since then, it has become a major Hungarian centre of research, development and production relating to the application of radioisotopes. Since 1993 a part of the former Institute has been operating as the Institute of Isotopes Co., Ltd. The main advances in radioisotope handling facilities and automation of radioisotope production are presented here. (author)

  15. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  16. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility: advancing nuclear technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a Users Week, internships, faculty student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In addition, the ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  17. Supervision software for string 2 magnet test facility of large hadron collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) software for the String 2 test facility at CERN, Geneva is developed by BARC under the framework of CERN-DAE collaboration for LHC. The supervision application is developed using PCVue32 SCADA/MMI software. The String 2 test facility prototypes one full cell of LHC and is aimed at studying and validating the individual and collective behaviour of the superconducting magnets, before installing in the tunnel. The software integrates monitoring and supervisory control of all the main subsystems of String 2 such as Cryogenics, Vacuum, Power converters, Magnet protection, Energy extraction and interlock systems. It incorporates animated process synoptics, loop and equipment control panels, configurable trend windows for real-time and historical trending of process parameters, user settability for interlock and alarm thresholds, logging of process events, equipment faults and operator activity. The plant equipment are controlled by a variety of field located Programmable Logic Controllers and VME crates which communicate process IO to the central IO server using both vendor specific and custom protocols. The system leverages OPC (OLE for Process Controls) technology for realising a generic IO server. A large number of geographically distributed client stations are arranged to provide the process specific operator interface and these are connected to the Main IO server over CERN wide intranet and internet. (author)

  18. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer’s physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user’s technical needs. The current NSUF partners are

  19. Waste management planned for the advanced fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program has been proposed to develop and employ advanced technologies to increase the proliferation resistance of spent nuclear fuels, recover and reuse nuclear fuel resources, and reduce the amount of wastes requiring permanent geological disposal. In the initial GNEP fuel cycle concept, spent nuclear fuel is to be reprocessed to separate re-usable transuranic elements and uranium from waste fission products, for fabricating new fuel for fast reactors. The separated wastes would be converted to robust waste forms for disposal. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF) is proposed by DOE for developing and demonstrating spent nuclear fuel recycling technologies and systems. The AFCF will include capabilities for receiving and reprocessing spent fuel and fabricating new nuclear fuel from the reprocessed spent fuel. Reprocessing and fuel fabrication activities will generate a variety of radioactive and mixed waste streams. Some of these waste streams are unique and unprecedented. The GNEP vision challenges traditional U.S. radioactive waste policies and regulations. Product and waste streams have been identified during conceptual design. Waste treatment technologies have been proposed based on the characteristics of the waste streams and the expected requirements for the final waste forms. Results of AFCF operations will advance new technologies that will contribute to safe and economical commercial spent fuel reprocessing facilities needed to meet the GNEP vision. As conceptual design work and research and design continues, the waste management strategies for the AFCF are expected to also evolve. (authors)

  20. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  1. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m2, basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc

  2. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. W.; Park, J. S.; Kwon, S.J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, I. J.; Yu, C. H

    2003-09-01

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m{sup 2}, basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc.

  3. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  4. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  5. Hadron hadron collider group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this group was to make a rough assessment of the characteristics of a hadron-hadron collider which could make it possible to study the 1 TeV mass scale. Since there is very little theoretical guidance for the type of experimental measurements which could illuminate this mass scale, we chose to extend the types of experiments which have been done at the ISR, and which are in progress at the SPS collider to these higher energies

  6. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  7. Conceptual design study advanced concepts test (ACT) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.

    1978-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) Project is part of program for developing improved power plant dry cooling systems in which ammonia is used as a heat transfer fluid between the power plant and the heat rejection tower. The test facility will be designed to condense 60,000 lb/hr of exhaust steam from the No. 1 turbine in the Kern Power Plant at Bakersfield, CA, transport the heat of condensation from the condenser to the cooling tower by an ammonia phase-change heat transport system, and dissipate this heat to the environs by a dry/wet deluge tower. The design and construction of the test facility will be the responsibility of the Electric Power Research Institute. The DOE, UCC/Linde, and the Pacific Northwest Laboratories will be involved in other phases of the project. The planned test facilities, its structures, mechanical and electrical equipment, control systems, codes and standards, decommissioning requirements, safety and environmental aspects, and energy impact are described. Six appendices of related information are included. (LCL)

  8. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  9. The Advanced Neutron Source Facility: A new user facility for neutron research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady state source of neutrons and for associated research space and equipment. The ANS will be open for use by scientists from universities, industry, and other federal laboratories. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of unprecedented flux; that is, it will produce the most intense continuous beams of neutrons in the world. The goal is to reach a thermal neutron flux for beam experiments of 5 /times/ 1019 to 10 /times/ 1019 neutrons/(m2/center dot/s/sup /minus/1/). By combining the higher source flux with improved experimental facilities, the ANS will surpass current US high flux reactors---the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL and the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory---by a factor of 10 to 20. The safety analysis of the ANS facility will include a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which will provide a systematic assessment of dependencies among systems at the malfunctions. For the current generation of nuclear power plants that have recently undergone the licensing review process, PRA has been used an an analysis tool after completion of the plant designs. For the ANS Project, the PRA effort has already begun, before the facility conceptual design. This allows safety insights from the PRA to be incorporated into the evolving plant design. 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  11. Radiation Monitoring System in Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process is under development for effective management of spent fuel by converting UO2 into U-metal. For demonstration of this process, α-γ type new hot cell was built in the IMEF basement . To secure against radiation hazard, this facility needs radiation monitoring system which will observe the entire operating area before the hot cell and service area at back of it. This system consists of 7 parts; Area Monitor for γ-ray, Room Air Monitor for particulate and iodine in both area, Hot cell Monitor for hot cell inside high radiation and rear door interlock, Duct Monitor for particulate of outlet ventilation, Iodine Monitor for iodine of outlet duct, CCTV for watching workers and material movement, Server for management of whole monitoring system. After installation and test of this, radiation monitoring system will be expected to assist the successful ACP demonstration

  12. Advanced neutron diagnostics for the Nova laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on recent work addressing advanced neutron diagnostics to be implemented on the Nova laser facility. The goals of these instruments are to measure the following properties of laser fusion targets: compressed fuel areal-density (Rho-R), time-duration, and spatial extent of the neutron emission. The authors will discuss the use of a noval time-of-flight system, radiochemical techniques, and the use of plastic track detectors to measure the compressed Rho-R. The authors will present the design of two proposed instruments to measure the burn time; one uses a sandwich of thin layers of plastic scintillator and uranium coupled to a streak camera while the other design makes use of a neutron sensitive transmission line. Finally, the authors will discuss methods capable of obtaining neutron images of the compressed pellet core

  13. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the X-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft X-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15th ergs/sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  14. Helical coil alignment in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is comprised of several major structural and magnetic coil systems tightly fitted around a thin helically contoured vacuum vessel. A critical parameter for successful operation of this device is the precise alignment of the various coil systems, with particular emphasis on the exact positioning of the helical field (HF) coils. This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion

  15. Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Delivery Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, has notified NASA that it will be unable to deliver the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, FL, on June 1, 1998, as required by contract, because it has experienced delays in assembly and testing of the facility. TRW is NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. NASA and contractor officials met at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, this week to discuss the issue. While no new delivery date was agreed upon, the agency has directed TRW to develop a plan of action that would show how the contractor can minimize impact to the June 1 delivery. Although a delay in delivery could delay the launch, currently scheduled for August 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-93 mission, and could result in additional program costs, the exact impact is not yet known. "The delay in delivery of the observatory is unfortunate," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center observatory projects office manager in Huntsville, AL. "However, our first priority is to launch a world-class observatory which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements. We will work closely with TRW to ensure that happens." The delay is primarily due to TRW's difficulty in configuring and programming its Integrated Spacecraft Automated Test System to test the observatory before it is delivered to NASA. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is expected to play a vital role in answering fundamental questions about the universe, including its age and size, and will probe the nature and amounts of so-called "dark matter," providing unique insight into one of nature's great puzzles. The observatory also will allow scientists to see and measure the details of hot gas clouds in clusters of galaxies; observe X-rays generated when stars are torn apart by the incredibly strong gravity around massive black holes in the centers of galaxies; and provide images that will help understand how exploding stars

  16. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  17. Hadron Physics at COSY

    CERN Document Server

    Gillman, A R; Kleber, V; Krewald, S; Morsch, H P; Rathmann, F; Sibirtsev, A A

    2003-01-01

    The workshop 'Hadron Physics at COSY' held from July 7th to July 10th 2003 in Bad Honnef brought together experimentalists and theoreticians from various fields of hadron physics to identify the key physics questions, which can be addressed with (un-) polarized proton and deuteron induced reactions at COSY. Topics discussed include charge symmetry breaking, elastic and inelastic nucleon-nucleon and nucleon-deuteron interactions, hadrons in the medium, mesonic bound states, meson and baryon resonances, and the hyperon-nucleon system. In addition prospects of the planned GSI facility were discussed. These Miniproceedings contain besides short summaries of the presentations the most relevant references for the field.

  18. Hadron accelerators in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadron-therapy Project is then described in some detail, with reference ro both the National Centre for Oncological Hadron-therapy and the design of different types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large umber of hospitals. (author)

  19. Tagged photon facility at Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore: Possible scenarios

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Pant

    2006-05-01

    Photoproduction of in nuclear medium with the ELSA facility at Bonn is discussed in the context of medium modification of hadronic properties. Utilization of Indus-2 at CAT, Indore for producing tagged bremsstrahlung photons and laser backscattered photons has been explored with a comparison between the two techniques for producing tagged high energy photons for the first time in the country with emphasis on the ADSS programme to have a precise information of (; ) reactions.

  20. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  1. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  2. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  3. Advanced neutron source corrosion test-loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reference core for the advanced neutron source (ANS) will have a configuration similar to the present High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: simply, an array of aluminum-alloy-clad fuel plates immersed in rapidly flowing water. The high thermal conductivity of the aluminum combined with the high heat transfer coefficient governing heat flow from the plate to the water keep the fuel inside the plates at an acceptable temperature. Unfortunately, the exposed of aluminum under these conditions leads to the formation of a thin layer of oxide (boehmite) that separates the fuel plates from the coolant water. The boehmite film has very poor thermal conductivity, and the heat flux that must cross this film can cause excessive heating of the fuel during the lifetime of the core. A test loop has been built to determine experimentally the rate of corrosion product formation on the aluminum cladding at the higher heat fluxes. Preliminary experiments have been completed that illustrate the capabilities of the loop system and the general behavior of an aluminum specimen exposed to large heat fluxes and coolant velocities. This same facility will be used for thermal-hydraulic testing; however, modifications will be necessary because of higher heat fluxes, temperatures, and pressures. Currently, the design is for light water testing; heavy water tests will be conducted in the future, which will require additional modifications

  4. An Advanced Tokamak Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF-AT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.

    2010-11-01

    A Fusion Development Facility (FDF) is a candidate for FNSF-AT. It is a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that uses AT physics to provide the neutron fluence required for fusion nuclear science development. FDF is conceived as a double-null plasma with high elongation and triangularity, predicted to allow good confinement of high plasma pressure. Steady-state is achieved with high bootstrap current and radio frequency current drive. Neutral beam injection and 3D non-resonant magnetic field can provide edge plasma rotation for stabilization of MHD and access to Quiescent H-mode. The estimated power exhaust is somewhat lower than that of ITER because of higher core radiation and stronger tilting of the divertor plates. FDF is capable of further developing all elements of AT physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO. The latest concept has accounted for realistic neutron shielding and divertor implementation. Self-consistent evolution of the transport profiles and equilibrium will quantify the stability and confinement required to meet the FNS mission.

  5. Runaway studies in the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed torsatrons and heliotrons are susceptible to runaway electron formation and confinement resulting from the inherent good containment in the vacuum fields and the high loop voltages during the initiation and termination of the helical and vertical fields (''field ramping''). Because runaway electrons can cause an unacceptable level of hard X rays near the machine, a runaway suppression system was designed and included in the initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The main component of the system is a rotating paddle that is normally left in the vacuum chamber during the field ramps. This device proved to be very effective in reducing the runaway population. Measurements of hard X rays from ATF have shown that the runaways are produced primarily during the field ramping but that usually a small steady-state runaway component is also present during the ''flat-top'' portion of the fields. The paddle is the main source of the hard X rays (thick-target bremsstrahlung), although other objects in the vacuum chamber also serve as targets for the runaways at various times. The maximum X-ray energy found by pulse height analysis is /approximately/12--15 MeV; the mean energy appears to be a few mega-electron-volts. A noticeable forward peaking of the bremsstrahlung from the paddle is evident. The limiters do not appear to be major sources of bremsstrahlung. 17 refs., 14 figs

  6. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  7. Hadron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain invited lectures and papers presente at the symposium. Attention was devoted to hadron interactions a high energy in QCD, to the structure and decay of hadrons, the production of hadrons and supersymmetric particles in e+e- and ep collisions, to perturbation theory in quantum field theory, and new supersymmetric extensions of relativistic algebra. (Z.J

  8. Evaluation of dynamic target options for dual axis radiography hydrotest facility II (DARHT II) and advanced hydrotest facility (AHF) programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial results indicate that electron beams hitting targets used to generate x-rays during multipulse operation in advanced radiography facilities will generate plasma plumes which will disturb the electron beam during subsequent pulses. This, in turn, degrades the x-ray spot quality generated by the subsequent pulses. If this concern is substantiated, new facilities such as the Dual Axia Radiography Hydrotest Facility (DARHT II) and the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) will need a provision for mitigating this effect. one such provision involves moving the target with sufficient velocity that any plasmas formed are carried adequately far from the electron beam that they do not disturb it. They report the various approaches which have been considered and present data showing the maximum target rates which can be achieved with each approach

  9. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  11. Concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The acceleration of beams of unstable nuclei has opened up new research frontiers. Experiments at existing accelerators, and particularly at the first generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, have demonstrated convincingly that unique information becomes accessible. Critical cross sections for astrophysical processes that were impossible to obtain previously, qualitatively new and unexpected nuclear structure effects in nuclei far from stability, completely new approaches to studies of nuclear decays, reactions and structure, all have triggered much excitement for this new dimension in nuclear research. To explore this new dimension, an extension of present technical capabilities and facilities is needed. This need and its scientific basis were discussed in various workshops and symposia and in the Isospin Laboratory (ISL) White Paper. A report by the European community was published recently on prospects of radioactive beam facilities in Europe, and some next-generation projects for such facilities are starting in both Europe and Japan.

  12. The advanced containment experiments (ACE) radioiodine test facility experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) program are reported. This study consisted of four intermediate-scale experiments that investigated the effects of radiation, pH, surfaces and initial iodine speciation on iodine behaviour. The tests revealed that, in high radiation fields, the long-term volatility of iodine is independent of the initial iodine speciation (CsI, I2, CH3I). This is presumably because radiolytic reactions inter-convert aqueous iodine species; I- was the predominant aqueous iodine species after an absorbed dose of about 30-40 kGy. Tests at pH 9 and 5.5 demonstrated that iodine volatility increased significantly with decreasing pH. In addition, this study demonstrated that containment surfaces can play an important role in determining iodine volatility, gas and aqueous phase iodine speciation, and surface adsorption. In summary: The ACE/RTF experiments have demonstrated the importance of several factors on iodine behaviour within containment under reactor accident conditions. One of the most important factors was radiation. Without radiation, the volatility of iodine was dependent on the initial speciation of iodine, presumably because inter-conversion of iodine species by non-radiolytic reactions is relatively slow. In contrast, in the presence of radiation, the long-term volatility of iodine was independent of initial speciation. This is attributed to aqueous phase radiolytic reactions that result in rapid inter-conversion of iodine species. Iodine volatility was shown to increase significantly with decreasing pH. However, changing the pH from acidic to alkaline conditions did not result in rapid decreases in iodine volatility. This may have been due to desorption of volatile iodine species from surfaces, in the case of stainless steel, and the influence of organics in the epoxy tests. Surfaces were shown to influence iodine volatility and speciation. Higher gas phase iodine concentrations were

  13. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    The European Commission has launched a study on the applicability of existing chemical industry safety provisions to enhancing security of chemical facilities covering the situation in 18 EU Member States. This paper reports some preliminary analytical findings regarding the extent to which...... exist at the mitigation level. At the strategic policy level, synergies are obvious. The security of chemical facilities is important. First, facilities with large inventories of toxic materials could be attractive targets for terrorists. The concern is sabotage causing an intentional release that could...

  14. Hadrons-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Proceedings contain the contributions to the Workshop HADRONS-94,held in Uzhgorod between September 7-11,1994. They covers the topics: - elastic and diffractive scattering of hadrons and nuclei; -small-x and spin physics; - meson and baryon spectroscopy; - dual and string models; - collective properties of the strongly interacting matter

  15. Fabrication and installation of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) has been completed and installed in the facility. The vessel fabrication has involved many unique methods to correct unanticipated problems. The primary fabrication concern has been to correct for dimensional inconsistency so that the vessel would fit into the closely nested helical coil set. The vessel has been installed and the remainder of the facility components are being assembled

  16. High intensity hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics

  17. Advanced materials analysis facility at CSIRO HIAF laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R. [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics Div.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.

    1993-12-31

    The HIAF facility at North Ryde, based on a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been operating for several years. Initially three ion sources were in operation:- conventional duoplasmatrons for proton and helium beams and a sputter ion source for heavy ions. An electrostatic focusing system was designed and built in-house for providing microbeams. The research emphasis has been largely on microbeam PIXE with particular reference to the mining industry. An AMS system was added in 1990 which prevented the inclusion of the charge exchange canal required for helium beams. The facility has been operated by CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining. At the beginning of 1992, the lon Beam Technology Group of CSIRO Division of Applied Physics was relocated at Lindfield and became a major user of the HIAF facility. Because the research activities of this group involved Rutherford Backscattering and Channeling, it was necessary to add a helium ion source and a new high vacuum beam line incorporating a precision goniometer. These facilities became operational in the second quarter of 1992. Currently a PIXE system is being added to the chamber containing the goniometer, making the accelerator an extremely versatile one for a wide range of IBA techniques. 3 refs.

  18. Recent utility efforts to develop advanced gasification biomass power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a status report on recent utility efforts to evaluate cost-effective opportunities for developing advanced gasification biomass power generation facilities and, in some cases, to actually begin developing the facilities. An overview is provided of national estimates of the potential for producing electricity from various biomass feedstocks. Major manufacturers of advanced gasification biomass power generation technologies are described. Major biomass power generation projects underway by utilities in the US are described. Significant issues affecting further commercialization of biomass gasification facilities are discussed and strategies for addressing the barriers are suggested

  19. Development of Demonstration Facility Design Technology for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this R and D is to develop the PRIDE (PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration) facility for engineering-scale inactive test using fresh uranium, and to establish the design requirements of the ESPF (Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility) for active demonstration of the pyroprocess. Pyroprocess technology, which is applicable to GEN-IV systems as one of the fuel cycle options, is a solution of the spent fuel accumulation problems. PRIDE Facility, pyroprocess mock-up facility, is the first facility that is operated in inert atmosphere in the country. By using the facility, the functional requirements and validity of pyroprocess technology and facility related to the advanced fuel cycle can be verified with a low cost. Then, PRIDE will contribute to evaluate the technology viability, proliferation resistance and possibility of commercialization of the pyroprocess technology. The PRIDE evaluation data, such as performance evaluation data of equipment and operation experiences, will be directly utilized for the design of ESPF

  20. QCD and Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, Stanley J; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D; Meyer, Curtis A; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G; Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. It highlights progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and presents a vision for the future by identifying key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define our next decade. In defining the priority of outstanding physics opportunities for the future, both prospects for the short (roughly 5 years) and longer term (beyond 10 years) are identified together with the facilities, personnel and other resources needed to maximize the discovery potential in hadronic physics worldwide. In this connection, the potential of an electron ion collider is highlighted.

  1. Hadron interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    In this talk I am reviewing recent calculations of properties of multi-hadron systems in lattice QCD. In particular, I am reviewing results of elastic scattering phase shifts in meson-meson, meson-baryon and baryon-baryon systems, as well as discussing results indicating possible existence of bound states in two baryon systems. Finally, calculations of properties of systems with more than two hadrons are presented.

  2. JAEA key facilities for global advanced fuel cycle R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced fuel cycle will be realized with the mid and long term R and D during the long-term transition period from LWR cycle to advanced reactor fuel cycle. Most of JAEA facilities have been utilized to establish the current LWR and FBR (Fast Breeder Reactor) fuel cycle by implementing evolutionary R and D. An assessment of today's state experimental facilities concerning the following research issues: reprocessing, Mox fuel fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examination, waste management and nuclear data measurement, is made. The revolutionary R and D requests new issues to be studied: the TRU multi-recycling, minor actinide recycling, the assessment of proliferation resistance and the assessment of cost reduction. To implement the revolutionary R and D for advanced fuel cycle, however, these facilities should be refurbished to install new machines and process equipment to provide more flexible testing parameters

  3. J-PARC designated as the 'specific advanced neutron beam facility'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two years ago, the Japanese Government applied in 'Law for the Promotion of Public Utilization of the Specific Advanced Large Research Facilities' to J-PARC for its secure operation regardless of owner's financial conditions. Under this Law, the Comprehensive Research Organization for Science and Society (CROSS) has been awarded the 'Registered Institution for Facilities Use Promotion' to conduct users program for the public beam lines at the Japanese Spallation Neutron Source. (author)

  4. Measurement and Calculation of High-Energy Neutron Spectra behind Shielding at the CERF 120 GeV/c Hadron Beam Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Nakao, N; Roesler, S; Brugger, M; Hagiwara, M; Vincke, H; Khater, H; Prinz, A A; Rokni, S H; Kosako, K

    2008-01-01

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (a mixture of mainly protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameter by 50-cm long). An NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. The measurement locations cover an angular range with respect to the beam axis between 13 and 133 degrees. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 32 MeV and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. Since the source term and experimental geometry in this experiment are well characterized and simple, and results are given in the form of energy spectra, these experimental results are very useful a...

  5. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  6. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shornikov, A.; Wenander, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  7. Advanced filters for nuclear facilities and filter conditioning for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the advantages of the cylinder shape selected for the filter elements for aerosol and iodine removal from the offgas of nuclear facilities, above all in view of remote and manual operation and transport, conditioning and disposal. In order to test the conditioning of polygonal HEPA filter elements, several filter elements not exposed to radioactivity were crushed remotely and embedded in concrete in a 400 l waste drum. The waste drum was subsequently saw cut in order to verify the quality of concrete embedding. The result of concrete embedding is satisfactory. The design is presented of a filter element capable of accommodating gas flows up to 500 m3/h for wet aerosol removal with a high removal efficiency. Also the design of a filter element for gas flows up to 800 m3/h to be used in iodine removal from offgases with low iodine contents is described. In order to be able to use the cylindrical filter elements developed for remote handling in manual operation too, e.g., for cleaning low level offgases, a manually operated filter housing was developed. It is suited for working pressures up to 10 bar and working temperatures up to 160 degree C. The filter elements are replaced by the usual bagging technique

  8. The status of facilities at China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60 MW research reactor, so called China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR,) was built in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), located in the southwest of Beijing and about 37 kilometers away from the central city. CARR is a tank-in-pool inverse neutron trap type reactor using D2O reflector, the designed optimal undisturbed thermal neutron flux is 8×1014 n⋅cm-2⋅s-1. A liquid D2 cold source will be equipped and the installation will be finished at the end of 2015. As a multipurpose research reactor, its main applications include neutron scattering, neutron activation analysis, isotope production, silicon doping, fuel element test, fundamental nuclear physics and so on. On March 13rd, 2012 CARR realized the 72 h stable operation with the full power. And the official operation license is expected to be issued at the beginning of next year. Cooperating with the internal and international users in the first phase ten instruments complete construction and are under commissioning, which are High Resolution Powder Diffractometer, High Intensity Powder Diffractometer, Residual Stress Diffractometer, Texture Diffractometer, Four Circle Diffractometer, Reflectometer, Small Angle Neutron Scattering, two Thermal Triple Axis Spectrometers and Isotope Separator On-Line instrument . In the second phase 7 instruments were approved and are under construction now. Although the operation license was not issued, the reactor was permitted to do the testing run several times and some results were obtained during the instrument commissioning.

  9. High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy

  10. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design

  11. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  12. Gluonic hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard theory of colour forces (Quantum Chromodynamics) suggests that in addition to the familiar hadrons made of quarks, there should exist new states where coloured gluons play an essential dynamical role. The author reviews the theoretical predictions for the properties of these ''glueballs'' and of states containing resonating quarks and gluons. Attempts are made to highlight those features which are common to several models in the literature. Experimental candidates are confronted with the models. No clear cut signal for a gluonic hadron yet exists; consequently what future data are required to determine the constituency of some popular candidates is considered. (author)

  13. Hadron Calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron calorimetry has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades. Perhaps not too far in the future, a realistic calorimeter will be capable of measuring the energies of all the fundamental particles with ∼1% precision. Currently, calorimeters with unprecedented complexity attest to the knowledge and experience that have been accumulated in high energy physics. In this review, we touch on fundamental concepts and explain new developments that we expect to be important in the future. In addition to describing applications in accelerator-based high energy physics, we briefly mention the use of hadron calorimeters in other fields.

  14. Selected publications related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, 1987--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contain papers on work related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source. The general topics of these papers are: insertion devices; front ends; high heat load x-ray optics; novel optics and techniques; and radiation safety, interlocks, and personnel safety

  15. Filling the gaps in SCWR materials research: advanced nuclear corrosion research facilities in Hamilton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research efforts on materials selection and development in support of the design of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) have produced a considerable amount of data on corrosion, creep and other related properties. Summaries of the data on corrosion [1] and stress corrosion cracking [2] have recently been produced. As research on the SCWR advances, gaps and limitations in the published data are being identified. In terms of corrosion properties, these gaps can be seen in several areas, including: 1) the test environment, 2) the physical and chemical severity of the tests conducted as compared with likely reactor service/operating conditions, and 3) the test methods used. While some of these gaps can be filled readily using existing facilities, others require the availability of advanced test facilities for specific tests and assessments. In this paper, highlights of the new materials research facilities jointly established in Hamilton by CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory and McMaster University are presented. (author)

  16. Hadronic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Mahlke, Hanna

    2000-01-01

    I review the novel results and developments presented at the Third Workshop on Physics and Detectors for DA$\\Phi$NE that deal with hadronic physics. Topics discussed include: the scalar quark condensate, kaon decays, the sector of scalar and vector mesons, kaon-nucleon scattering, pion- and kaon-nucleon sigma terms, and strange nuclear physics.

  17. Heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy: An overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P C Vinodkumar

    2014-11-01

    A comprehensive overview and some of the theoretical attempts towards understanding heavy flavour hadron spectroscopy are presented. Apart from the conventional quark structure (quark, antiquarks structure for the mesons and three-quarks structure of baryons) of hadrons, multiquark hadrons the hadron molecular states etc., also will be reviewed. Various issues and challenges in understanding the physics and dynamics of the quarks at the hadronic dimensions are highlighted. Looking into the present and future experimental prospects at different heavy flavour laboratories like BES-III, CLEO-c, BaBar, Belle, LHC etc., the scope for theoretical extensions of the present knowledge of heavy flavour physics would be very demanding. In this context, many relevant contributions from the forthcoming PANDA Facility are expected. Scopes and outlook of the hadron physics at the heavy flavour sector in view of the future experimental facilities are highlighted.

  18. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process

  19. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  20. Hadron physics at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To deepen our understanding of the properties and structure of matter, new large-scale facilities are under construction or in preparation worldwide that provide for novel research capabilities in many areas of science.The GSI-Darmstadt laboratory together with the international user community, has developed the concept for such a facility to broadly address frontiers in strong-interaction physics and in the general research with intense ion beams. The new facility builds, and substantially expands, on the present accelerator system. Primary beams of high-energy ions, and secondary beams including antiprotons and beams of short-lived nuclei, together with an intricate system of beam-storage and experimental rings, are its key features.This report provides a short overview of the science motivation of the hadron community for the facility, as well as of its technical layout and performance characteristics

  1. Hadron Physics at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To deepen our understanding of the properties and structure of matter, new large-scale facilities are under construction or in preparation worldwide that provide for novel research capabilities in many areas of science. The GSI-Darmstadt laboratory together with the international user community, has developed the concept for such a facility to broadly address frontiers in strong-interaction physics and in the general research with intense ion beams. The new facility builds, and substantially expands, on the present accelerator system. Primary beams of high-energy ions, and secondary beams including antiprotons and beams of short-lived nuclei, together with an intricate system of beam-storage and experimental rings, are its key features. This report provides a short overview of the science motivation of the hadron community for the facility, as well as of its technical layout and performance characteristics

  2. Radiation and physical protection challenges at advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges and opportunities for radiation protection in advanced nuclear reactors and fuel facilities proposed under the Generation IV (GEN IV) initiative which is examining and pursuing the exploration and development of advanced nuclear science and technology; and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which seeks to develop worldwide consensus on enabling expanded use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet growing energy demand. The International Energy Agency projects nuclear power to increase at a rate of 1.3 to 1.5 percent a year over the next 20 years, depending on economic growth. Much of this growth will be in Asia, which, as a whole, currently has plans for 40 new nuclear power plants. Given this increase in demand for new nuclear power facilities, ranging from light water reactors to advanced fuel processing and fabrication facilities, it is necessary for radiation protection and physical protection technologies to keep pace to ensure both worker and public health. This paper is based on a review of current initiatives and the proposed reactors and facilities, primarily the nuclear fuel cycle facilities proposed under the GEN IV and GNEP initiatives. Drawing on the Technology Road map developed under GEN IV, this work examines the potential radiation detection and protection challenges and issues at advanced reactors, including thermal neutron spectrum systems, fast neutron spectrum systems and nuclear fuel recycle facilities. The thermal neutron systems look to improve the efficiency of production of hydrogen or electricity, while the fast neutron systems aim to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel. While there are components of these advanced systems that can draw on the current and well-developed radiation protection practices, there will inevitably be opportunities to improve the overall quality of radiation

  3. Project of an advanced ISOL facility for exotic beams at LNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the European program to define a second generation Radioactive Ion Beam facility, LNL are proposing the construction in the next five-seven years of a specialized national facility for RIB originated by fission fragments produced by secondary neutrons. It consists on a two-accelerator ISOL-type facility to provide intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams of highest quality, in the range of masses between 80 and 160. The conceptual design is based on a high intensity 50 MeV (100 kW) proton linac as driver and on the availability of the heavy-ion accelerator ALPI as post accelerator. The estimated neutron yield is 2x1014 n/s at 0 deg., high enough to satisfy the demand for an advanced RIB facility. An intense R and D program on different items is actually in progress in collaboration with other Laboratories and University groups and is moving in a European context

  4. Construction Report of Hot Cell Facility for Demonstration of Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. The hot cell facilities for demonstration of ACP(ACPF) was consisted of α-γ type heavy concrete hot cell, the auxiliary equipment for hot cell operation, and process equipment. A existing β-γ type hot cell, located in IMEF, was refurbished to minimize construction expenditures for utilization as ACPF. The detail design of hot cell facilities and process was completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. And also, the construction of ACPF and installation of process equipment were completed, and government license for hot cell operation was acquired. In this report, the construction outline and the detail information of hot cell facilities and process equipment s are summarized to utilize for operation and maintenance of hot cell facility and process

  5. Design Report of Hot Cell Facilities for Demonstration of Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. The hot test will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For the hot test, the hot cell facilities of α-γ type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β-γ type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. The detail design of hot cell facilities and process were completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. This results were utilized for refurbishment of IMEF future hot cell and installation of process equipments, and manufacturing and procurement of hot cell auxiliary equipments. The safety analysis report were submitted to KINS through MOST for license acquisition, the government issued license for construction and operation. And, the hot test for demonstration of the ACP is performing in this hot cell facilities. In this report, the detail design and safety analysis data are summarized to utilize for operation of hot cell facility and process

  6. Study on process basic requirements of experimental facility of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel management process, which was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. Hot cell facilities of α-γ type and inert atmosphere are required essentially for safe hot test and verification of this process. In this study, design basic data are established, and these data include process flow, process condition and yields, mass and radioactivity balance of radionuclides, process safety considerations, etc. And also, these data will be utilized for basic and detail design of hot cell facility, secured conservative safety and effective operability

  7. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  8. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  9. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

  10. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  11. Design options for the advanced x-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), for which NASA and industry are currently conducting Definition and Preliminary Design studies, will provide a major advance in performance and observing opportunities beyond its predecessor space missions in X-ray astronomy, including Uhuru, Einstein and Rosat. The performance advances come from larger, higher quality mirrors with longer focal length that will extend the useful energy range and provide improved image resolution. Corresponding improvements will be made in observatory aspect determination and pointing stability. Increased observing opportunities come from facility-class operation of the observatory, including on-orbit maintenance and repair to provide potentially unlimited mission lifetime and on-orbit installation of new scientific instruments to take advantage of future advances in sensor technology. A summary of characteristics contrasting AXAF with the Einstein mission will be presented. Developing a design concept for AXAF that takes advantage of recent advances in technology and Shuttle-era capability for operations and servicing in space is a challenging process, requiring evaluation of a number of interesting, diverse design options for the X-ray telescope, science instrument accommodation and the host spacecraft

  12. Advanced reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities: safety and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R N; Nutt, W M; Laidler, J J

    2011-01-01

    The safety and environmental impacts of new technology and fuel cycle approaches being considered in current U.S. nuclear research programs are contrasted to conventional technology options in this paper. Two advanced reactor technologies, the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), are being developed. In general, the new reactor technologies exploit inherent features for enhanced safety performance. A key distinction of advanced fuel cycles is spent fuel recycle facilities and new waste forms. In this paper, the performance of existing fuel cycle facilities and applicable regulatory limits are reviewed. Technology options to improve recycle efficiency, restrict emissions, and/or improve safety are identified. For a closed fuel cycle, potential benefits in waste management are significant, and key waste form technology alternatives are described. PMID:21399407

  13. SAMS: The synchronization and monitoring system for ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAMS performs much of the synchronization of the distributed data acquisition system for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). SAMS is responsible for propagating shot information and managing te data system directories and logical names. This paper describes how SAMS communicates with other processes, both within the VAX cluster that supports most of the ATF data acquisition and on VAXes that are connected to the cluster via DECnet. 3 refs

  14. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  15. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  16. Hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Is all hadronic physics ultimately describable by QCD. Certainly, many disparate phenomena can be understood within the QCD framework. Also certainly, there are important questions which are open, both theoretically (little guidance, as yet) and experimentally, regarding confinement. Are there dibaryons, baryonium, glueballs. In addition, there are experimental results which at present do not have an explanation. This talk, after a short section on QCD successes and difficulties, will emphasize two experimental topics which have recent results - glueball spectroscopy and exclusive reactions at large momentum transfer. Both are experimentally accessible in the AGS/LAMPF II/AGS II/TRIUMF II/SIN II energy domain

  17. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy quark systems and glueball candidates, the particles which are relevant to testing QCD, are discussed. The review begins with the heaviest spectroscopically observed quarks, the b anti-b bound states, including the chi state masses, spins, and hadronic widths and the non-relativistic potential models. Also, P states of c anti-c are mentioned. Other heavy states are also discussed in which heavy quarks combine with lighter ones. The gluonium candidates iota(1460), theta(1700), and g/sub T/(2200) are then covered. The very lightest mesons, pi-neutral and eta, are discussed. 133 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs

  18. Hadron phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subjects here related constitute a summary of some recent collaborations of which details can be found in the references correspondent to each one. One exception is made to the last part (Glueballs) where a new collaboration is going on. These constitute therefore our recent interest in Hadron Phenomenology, looking into models which have been used for explanation o some physical phenomena found in the last years of particle physics. Production processes of heavy flavor bound states, an indirect manifestation of the possible existence a Diquarks, the problems posed by the spin-parity Jp = 1 + mesons and finally evidence for the observation of Glueballs are discussed. (L.C.)

  19. Progress at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility): Progress report, January-December 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (eds.)

    1987-05-01

    Activities at LAMPF during the year of 1986 are summarized, including brief summaries of experiments in nuclear and particle physics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science, radiation-effects studies, biomedical research and instrumentation, nuclear chemistry, radioisotope production, and theory. The status of an advanced hadron facility currently under study is reported, as well as facility development and accelerator operations. (LEW)

  20. Progress at LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility]: Progress report, January-December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities at LAMPF during the year of 1986 are summarized, including brief summaries of experiments in nuclear and particle physics, atomic and molecular physics, materials science, radiation-effects studies, biomedical research and instrumentation, nuclear chemistry, radioisotope production, and theory. The status of an advanced hadron facility currently under study is reported, as well as facility development and accelerator operations

  1. A blueprint for GNEP advanced burner reactor startup fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → This article discusses use of WG-plutonium as the startup fuel for Advanced Burner Reactor. → The presence of gallium in WG fuel may compromise the fuel integrity. → There is no facility exists to remove gallium from plutonium except at laboratory scale. → This article discusses the processes and issues associated with the gallium removal. → The article provides realistic scenario to all stack-holders involved in designing and operating ABR. - Abstract: The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu)-239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the

  2. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Critical need for MFE: the Alcator DX advanced divertor test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Wolf, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-10-01

    Three critical challenges must be met before a steady-state, power-producing fusion reactor can be realized: how to (1) safely handle extreme plasma exhaust power, (2) completely suppress material erosion at divertor targets and (3) do this while maintaining a burning plasma core. Advanced divertors such as ``Super X'' and ``X-point target'' may allow a fully detached, low temperature plasma to be produced in the divertor while maintaining a hot boundary layer around a clean plasma core - a potential game-changer for magnetic fusion. No facility currently exists to test these ideas at the required parallel heat flux densities. Alcator DX will be a national facility, employing the high magnetic field technology of Alcator combined with high-power ICRH and LHCD to test advanced divertor concepts at FNSF/DEMO power exhaust densities and plasma pressures. Its extended vacuum vessel contains divertor cassettes with poloidal field coils for conventional, snowflake, super-X and X-point target geometries. Divertor and core plasma performance will be explored in regimes inaccessible in conventional devices. Reactor relevant ICRF and LH drivers will be developed, utilizing high-field side launch platforms for low PMI. Alcator DX will inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of next-step fusion facilities.

  4. The advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) role in the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), launched in February, 2006, proposes to introduce used nuclear fuel recycling in the United States with improved proliferation-resistance and a more effective waste management approach. This program is evaluating ways to close the fuel cycle in a manner that builds on recent laboratory breakthroughs in U.S. national laboratories and draws on international and industry partnerships. Central to moving this advanced fuel recycling technology from the laboratory to commercial implementation is a flexible research, development and demonstration facility, called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF was introduced as one of three projects under GNEP and will provide the U.S. with the capabilities to evaluate technologies that separate used fuel into reusable material and waste in a proliferation-resistant manner. The separations technology demonstration capability is coupled with a remote transmutation fuel fabrication demonstration capability in an integrated manner that demonstrates advanced safeguard technologies. This presentation will discuss the key technical and programmatic features of AFCF and their support of the GNEP objectives. (authors)

  5. DOE ARM Climate Research Facility - Providing Research Quality Data Products for Climate Model Evaluation and Advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyles, J.; Mather, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    a third Mobile Facility will be deployed at Oliktok Point, Alaska. The new array of ARM instruments and sites are intended to build upon the existing ARM capabilities to better study the interactions among aerosol, clouds, and precipitation. Data from these instruments are now available and the development of advanced data products is underway.

  6. Advanced Non-Destructive Assay Systems and Special Instrumentation Requirements for Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    drawings and documentation (iii) Lack of compatibility with modern computers, software, data transfer networks, digital protocols and electrical code standards, (iv) Non-compliance with current and future mandatory standards and regulations for nuclear facilities (v) Design focused on measurement and control points that may be specific to the facility process (vi) Lack of utilization of recent technological advances where better performing, less complex and more cost-effective options are now available. Key radiometric measurement drivers and control points for future recycling facilities have been determined and a review of the adequacy of existing instrumentation has been performed. Areas where recent technology improvements may be more effectively deployed and future technology development may be appropriate are identified. (author)

  7. Project of an advanced ISOL facility for exotic beams at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tecchio, L.B. E-mail: tecchio@lnl.infn.it; Andrighetto, A.; Cherubini, R.; Colautti, P.; Comunian, M.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Facco, A.; Fioretto, E.; Fortuna, G.; Jiyu, G.; Ming, R.; Montagnoli, G.; Moschini, G.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Porcellato, A.M.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Bak, P.; Kot, N.; Logatchev, P.; Shyankov, S.; Brandolini, F.; Signorini, C.; Clauser, T.; Lamanna, G.; Stagno, V.; Variale, V

    2002-04-22

    In the framework of the European program to define a second generation Radioactive Ion Beam facility, LNL are proposing the construction in the next five-seven years of a specialized national facility for RIB originated by fission fragments produced by secondary neutrons. It consists on a two-accelerator ISOL-type facility to provide intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams of highest quality, in the range of masses between 80 and 160. The conceptual design is based on a high intensity 50 MeV (100 kW) proton linac as driver and on the availability of the heavy-ion accelerator ALPI as post accelerator. The estimated neutron yield is 2x10{sup 14} n/s at 0 deg., high enough to satisfy the demand for an advanced RIB facility. An intense R and D program on different items is actually in progress in collaboration with other Laboratories and University groups and is moving in a European context.

  8. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  9. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830

  10. Hadron physics programs at J-PARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruki M.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The J-PARC Hadron Facility is designed as a multipurpose experimental facility for a wide range of particle and nuclear physics programs, aiming to provide the world highest intensity secondary beams. Currently three secondary beam lines; K1.8, K1.8BR and KL together with the test beam line named K1.1BR come into operation. Various experimental programs are proposed at each beam line and some of them have been performed so far. As the first experiment at the J-PARC Hadron Facility, the Θ+ pentaquark was searched for via the pion-induced hadronic reaction in the autumn of 2010. Also experimental programs to search for new hadronic states such as K−pp have started to perform a physics run. The current status and near future programs are introduced.

  11. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests

  12. Design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a heavily contoured and very complex formed vessel that is specifically designed to allow for maximum plasma volume in a pure stellarator arrangement. The design of the facility incorporates an internal vessel that is closely fitted to the two helical field coils following the winding law theta = 1/6phi. Metallic seals have been incorporated throughout the system to minimize impurities. The vessel has been fabricated utilizing a comprehensive set of tooling fixtures specifically designed for the task of forming 6-mm stainless steel plate to the complex shape. Computer programs were used to develop a series of ribs that essentially form an internal mold of the vessel. Plates were press-formed with multiple compound curves, fitted to the fixture, and joined with full-penetration welds. 7 refs., 8 figs

  13. Advanced exergoenvironmental assessment of a natural gas-fired electricity generating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Advanced exergoenvironmental analysis was conducted for an electricity generating facility. • Exergy destructions and environmental effects were divided into parts. • Environmental relations between the components were determined. • Environmental improvement strategies of the system were determined. - Abstract: This paper presents conventional and advanced exergoenvironmental analyses of an electricity generation facility located in the Eskisehir Industry Estate Zone, Turkey. This facility consists of gas turbine and steam cycles, which generate electrical power of approximately 37 MW and 18 MW, respectively. Exergy efficiency of the system is 0.402 and exergy destruction rate of the system is 78.242 MW. Unit exergy cost of electrical power generated by the system is 25.66 $/GJ and total exergoeconomic factor of the system is 0.279. Conventional exergy analysis method was applied to the system first. Next, exergy environmental impacts of exergy destruction rate within the facility’s components were divided into four parts generally, as endogenous, exogenous, avoidable and unavoidable environmental impact of exergy destruction rate. Through this analysis, improvement potential of the environmental impacts of the components and the overall system and the environmental relations between the components were then determined. Finally, exergoenvironmental factor was determined as 0.277 and environmental impact of the electricity was 8.472 (Pts/h). The system has 33% development potential for environmental impacts while its components have weak relations because of big endogenous parts of environmental impacts (80%). It may be concluded that advanced exergoenvironmental analysis indicated that priority should be given to the GT and CC, while defining the improvement strategies

  14. First Results of an Experiment on Advanced Collimator Materials at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Donze, M; Francon, P; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Calderon Cueva, M; Charitonidis, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment (HRMT-14) has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility on six different materials of interest for Beam Intercepting Devices (collimators, targets, dumps). Both traditional materials (Mo, W and Cu alloys) as well as advanced metal/diamond and metal/graphite composites were tested under extreme conditions as to pressure, density and temperature, leading to the development of highly dynamic phenomena as shock-waves, spallation, explosions. Experimental data were acquired, mostly in real time, relying on extensive integrated instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature and vacuum sensors) and on remote acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The experiment was a success under all points of view in spite of the technological challenges and harsh environment. First measurements are in good agreement with results of complex simulations, confirming the effectiveness of the acquisition system and the reliability of advanced numerical...

  15. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  16. Potential applications of advanced remote handling and maintenance technology to future waste handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two Federal Waste Management System major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment

  17. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  18. Evaluation of the advanced mixed oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced mixed-oxide (UO2-PuO2) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), is undergoing postirradiation examination (PIE). This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) (Leggett and Omberg 1987) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of twelve different types. The test was irradiated for 312 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in FFTF. It had a peak pin power of 13.7 kW/ft and reached a peak burnup of 65.2 MWd/kgM with a peak fast fluence of 9.9 /times/ 1022 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). This document discusses the test and its results. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  20. Summary of the hadronic weak interaction session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors summarize and discuss present and future experiments on decays of light mesons and muons that were presented in the Hadronic Weak Interaction working group session of the open-quotes Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Facilities.close quotes Precise measurements and rare-decay searches, which sense mass scales in the 1-1000 TeV region, are discussed in the context of the standard model and beyond

  1. Summary of the Hadronic Weak Interaction session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarize and discuss present and future experiments on decays of light mesons and muons that were presented in the Hadronic Weak Interaction working group session of the ''Workshop on Future Directions in Particle and Nuclear Physics at Multi-GeV Hadron Facilities.'' Precise measurements and rare-decay searches, which sense mass scales in the 1--1000 TeV region, are discussed in the context of the standard model and beyond

  2. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  3. The Scrounge-atron a phased approach to the Advanced Hydrotest Facility utilizing proton radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, O J; Chargin, A K; Dekin, W D; Hartouni, E P; Hockman, J N; Ladran, A S; Libkind, M A; Moore, T L; Pastrnak, J W; Pico, R E; Souza, R J; Stoner, J M; Wilson, J H; Ruggiero, G; Ohnuma, S; Luccio, A U; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy has initiated its Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSMP) to provide a single, integrated technical program for maintaining the continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing. Consistent with the SSMP, the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) has been conceived to provide improved radiographic imaging with multiple axes and multiple time frames. The AHF would be used to better understand the evolution of nuclear weapon primary implosion shape under normal and accident scenarios. There are three fundamental technologies currently under consideration for use on the AHF. These include linear induction acceleration, inductive-adder pulsed-power technology (both technologies using high current electron beams to produce an intense X-ray beam) and high-energy proton accelerators to produce a proton beam. The Scrounge-atron (a proton synchrotron) was conceived to be a relatively low cost demonstration of the viability of t...

  4. Highlights from the assembly of the helical field coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helical field (HF) coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device consist of a set of 24 identical segments connected to form a continuous pair of helical coils wrapped around a toroidal vacuum vessel. Each segment weighs approximately 1364 kg (3000 lb) and is composed of 14 water-cooled copper plate conductors bolted to a cast stainless steel structural support member with a T-shape cross section (known as the structural tee). The segment components are electrically insulated with Kapton adhesive tape, G-10, Tefzel, and rubber to withstand 2.5 kV. As a final insulator and structural support, the entire segment is vacuum impregnated with epoxy. This paper offers a brief overview of the processes used to assemble the component parts into a completed segment, including identification of items that required special attention. 4 figs

  5. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  6. Regulatory Framework for Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility Using Pyroprocess in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants of 20 units of in Korea are generating about 700 MTU of spent fuels annually. The inventory of spent fuels in Korea were estimated about 10,087.07 MTU at end of 2008, and the storage space of spent fuels won't be available any more at 2016 due to the saturation of the spent fuel pools in the plants. In addition, in order to reduce carbon emission and correspond to the enormous electricity demand in Korea, 8 units of nuclear power plants are under construction and several more plants are under planning. The 100,000 MTU of spent fuel inventory are expected by the year of 2095 in Korea. Therefore, short term and long term of spent fuel management plans are under discussion and implementation in Korea. As a short term of spent fuel management strategy for the target year of 2016, central or local spent fuel dry interim storage options are mostly under discussion. As a long term of management plan, fast reactor and advanced fuel cycle R and D plan were approved by 255th meeting of Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) on Dec. 22, 2008. The approved advanced fuel cycle R and D plan is that the uranium and TRUs(transuranic elements) are recovered from PWR spent fuels using proliferation resistance technology such as pyrochemical processing (pyroprocessing), and formulates metal fuel for utilizing at the next-generation sodium fast reactors (Gen IVSFRs). Heat load elements of spent fuel such as Cs and Sr are removed form the spent fuel. It is known as that it can be reduced the repository burden up to 1/100, compared with the case without removal. The fission products (FP) are also recovered and transferred to a repository. As a result of pyroprocessing, both repository efficiency and U usage are increased. The recycling of recovered resources results in increased uranium usage efficiency and a marked decrease in radiotoxicity and the amount of high-level radioactive waste generated. The spent fuels are classified as a high level radioactive waste in Korea

  7. Modelling activities of experimental facilities related to advanced reactors. Considerations on 1D/3D issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of art of modelling activities related to integral experimental facilities of advanced passive reactors show to date important open items. The main advantage of using 1D plant codes is the capability of simulating the full interaction between components traditionally correctly modelled (condensers, heat exchangers, pipes and vessels) and other components for which codes are not 100% suitable (pools and containments). Polytechnical University of Catalonia (UPC) and Polytechnical University of Valencia (UPV) cooperated with other European research organizations in the 'Technology Enhancement for Passive Safety Systems' (TEPSS) project, within the European Fourth Framework Programme. It was a task of both Universities to supply analytical support of PANDA tests. The paper deals with the 1D/3D discussion in the framework of modelling activities related to integral passive facilities like PANDA. It starts choosing reference tests among those corresponding to our participation in TEPSS project. The discrepancies observed in a 1D simulation of the selected tests will be shown and analyzed. An evaluation of how the 3D version can lead to a better agreement with data will be included. Disadvantages of 3D codes will be shown too. Combining the use of different codes, and considering analyst criteria, will make possible to establish suitable recommendations from both engineering and scientific point of view. (author)

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Ogden

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  9. Authentication system for the JAERI Fast Critical Facility Advanced Containment and Surveillance System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint effort conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), an authentication system has been installed at the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) facility in Tokai-mura, Japan. The purpose of this authentication system is to provide the IAEA with an independent means of authenticating the operator-provided Advanced Containment and Survellance (AC/S) system already in place at the facility. Authentication Controllers were installed at the AC/S Portal Monkor and Penetration Monitor to collect data and to randomly test sensor functions between IAEA inspections. During each inspection the authentication data is collected with an Inspector's portable computer and printed for comparison to the data recorded by the AC/S system. Installation of the authentication equipment took place in November 1991 and a three-month field test began in December 1991. This paper will describe the authentication system, the operator interface, and the preliminary results of the field tests

  10. PREFACE: 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics (Hadron 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti Roy, Bidyut; Chatterjee, A.; Kailas, S.

    2012-07-01

    The 5th DAE-BRNS Workshop on Hadron Physics was held at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai from 31 October to 4 November 2011. This workshop series, supported by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences, Department of Atomic Energy (BRNS, DAE), Govt. of India, began ten years ago with the first one being held at BARC, Mumbai in October 2002. The second one was held at Puri in 2005, organized jointly by Institute of Physics, Bhubneswar and Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata. The 3rd and 4th ones took place, respectively, at Shantineketan in 2006, organized by Visva Bharati University, and at Aligarh in 2008, organized by Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. The aim of the present workshop was to bring together the experts and young researchers in the field of hadron physics (both experiment and theory) and to have in-depth discussions on the current research activities in this field. The format of the workshop was: a series of review lectures by various experts from India and abroad, the presentation of advanced research results by researchers in the field, and a review of major experimental programs being planned and pursued in major laboratories in the field of hadron physics, with the aim of providing a platform for the young participants for interaction with their peers. The upcoming international FAIR facility at GSI is a unique future facility for studies of hadron physics in the charm sector and hyper nuclear physics. The Indian hadron physics community is involved in this mega science project and is working with the PANDA collaboration on the development of detectors, simulation and software tools for the hadron physics programme with antiprotons at FAIR. A one-day discussion session was held at this workshop to discuss India-PANDA activities, the current collaboration status and the work plan. This volume presents the workshop proceedings consisting of lectures and seminars which were delivered during the workshop. We are thankful to

  11. Challenges in Hadron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, U.G.

    2007-01-01

    The status of hadron physics at the end of the HADRON07 Conference is reviewed. The latest results presented at the conference, as well as those important developments in the field which were not represented, are included.

  12. The Design and Construction of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Mixed Treatment Project (AMWTP) privatized contract was awarded to BNFL Inc. in December 1996 and construction of the main facility commenced in August 2000. The purpose of the advanced mixed waste treatment facility is to safely treat plutonium contaminated waste, currently stored in drums and boxes, for final disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The plant is being built at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Construction was completed in 28 months, to satisfy the Settlement Agreement milestone of December 2002. Commissioning of the related retrieval and characterization facilities is currently underway. The first shipment of pre-characterized waste is scheduled for March 2003, with AMWTP characterized and certified waste shipments from June 2003. To accommodate these challenging delivery targets BNFL adopted a systematic and focused construction program that included the use of a temporary structure to allow winter working, proven design and engineering principles and international procurement policies to help achieve quality and schedule. The technology involved in achieving the AMWTP functional requirements is primarily based upon a BNFL established pedigree of plant and equipment; applied in a manner that suits the process and waste. This technology includes the use of remotely controlled floor mounted and overhead power manipulators, a high power shredder and a 2000-ton force supercompactor with the attendant glove box suite, interconnections and automated material handling. The characterization equipment includes real-time radiography (RTR) units, drum and box assay measurement systems, drum head space gas sampling / analysis and drum venting, drum coring and sampling capabilities. The project adopted a particularly stringent and intensive pre-installation testing philosophy to ensure that equipment would work safely and reliably at the required throughput. This testing included the complete off site

  13. The Design and Construction of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrop, G.

    2003-02-27

    The Advanced Mixed Treatment Project (AMWTP) privatized contract was awarded to BNFL Inc. in December 1996 and construction of the main facility commenced in August 2000. The purpose of the advanced mixed waste treatment facility is to safely treat plutonium contaminated waste, currently stored in drums and boxes, for final disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The plant is being built at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Construction was completed in 28 months, to satisfy the Settlement Agreement milestone of December 2002. Commissioning of the related retrieval and characterization facilities is currently underway. The first shipment of pre-characterized waste is scheduled for March 2003, with AMWTP characterized and certified waste shipments from June 2003. To accommodate these challenging delivery targets BNFL adopted a systematic and focused construction program that included the use of a temporary structure to allow winter working, proven design and engineering principles and international procurement policies to help achieve quality and schedule. The technology involved in achieving the AMWTP functional requirements is primarily based upon a BNFL established pedigree of plant and equipment; applied in a manner that suits the process and waste. This technology includes the use of remotely controlled floor mounted and overhead power manipulators, a high power shredder and a 2000-ton force supercompactor with the attendant glove box suite, interconnections and automated material handling. The characterization equipment includes real-time radiography (RTR) units, drum and box assay measurement systems, drum head space gas sampling / analysis and drum venting, drum coring and sampling capabilities. The project adopted a particularly stringent and intensive pre-installation testing philosophy to ensure that equipment would work safely and reliably at the required throughput. This testing included the complete off site

  14. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e+e- annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic bar pp scattering very well from the ISR to S bar ppS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results bar pp in good agreement with the bar pp differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S bar ppS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e+e- annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained

  15. QCD in hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum Chromodynamics provides a good description of many aspects of high energy hadron-hadron collisions, and this will be described, along with some aspects that are not yet understood in QCD. Topics include high ET jet production, direct photon, W, Z and heavy flavor production, rapidity gaps and hard diffraction

  16. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  17. Status of advanced biofuels demonstration facilities in 2012. A report to IEA Bioenergy task 39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacovsky, Dina; Ludwiczek, Nikolaus; Ognissanto, Monica; Woergetter, Manfred

    2013-03-18

    the previous edition of this report (2010), advanced biofuels technologies have developed significantly. Hydrotreatment as pursued by e.g. Neste Oil has been commercialized and currently accounts for app. 2,4% of biofuels production worldwide. Fermentation of lignocellulosic raw material to ethanol has also seen a strong development and several large scale facilities are just coming online in Europe and North America. As for thermochemical processes, the development is recently focusing on the production of mixed alcohols rather than BtL-Diesel. Economic reasons are driving this development, and concepts like the integration into existing industries and the production of several products instead of biofuel only (biorefinery concept) receive more attention lately. But, as expected, some of the projects for advanced biofuel production have failed. As a result, companies are now more careful in making announcements of advanced biofuels projects, and several large-scale projects have been postponed recently, some even though public funding would have been granted. Nevertheless, the production capacity for biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstock has tripled since 2010 and currently accounts for some 140 000 tons per year. Hydrotreating capacity for biofuels has multiplied and stands at about 2 190 000 tons per year.

  18. An Advanced Reverse Osmosis Technology For Application in Nuclear Desalination Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of adequate supplies of clean, safe water is a growing global problem that has reached crisis proportions in many parts of the world. It is estimated that 1.5 billion people do not have access to adequate supplies of safe water, and that as a result nearly 10,000 people die every day and thousands more suffer from a range of debilitating illnesses due to water related diseases. Included in this total is an estimated 2.2 million child deaths annually. As the world's need for additional sources of fresh water continues to grow, seawater and brackish water desalination are providing an increasingly important contribution to the solution of this problem. Because desalination is an energy intensive process, nuclear desalination provides an economically attractive and environmentally sound alternative to the burning of fossil fuels for desalination. Nevertheless, the enormity of the problem dictates that additional steps must be taken to improve the efficiency of energy utilization and reduce the cost of water production in order to reduce the financial and environmental burden to communities in need. An advanced reverse osmosis (RO) desalination technology has been developed that emphasizes a nontraditional approach to system design and operation, and makes use of a sophisticated design optimization process that can lead to highly optimized design configurations and operating regimes. The technology can be coupled with a nuclear generating station (NGS) to provide an integrated facility for the co-generation of both water and electricity. Waste heat from the NGS allows the use of 'preheated' feedwater into the RO system, improving the efficiency of the RO process and reducing the cost of water production. Because waste heat, rather than process heat, is used the desalination system can be readily coupled to any existing or advanced reactor technology with little or no impact on reactor design and operation and without introducing additional reactor safety

  19. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e+e- annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic bar pp scattering from ISR to S bar ppS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The bar pp elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e+e- collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e+e- two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e+e- annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy

  20. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisov D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  1. Hadron Colliders and Hadron Collider Physics Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes main developments of the hadron colliders and physics results obtained since their inception around forty years ago. The increase in the collision energy of over two orders of magnitude and even larger increases in luminosity provided experiments with unique data samples. Developments of full acceptance detectors, particle identification and analysis methods provided fundamental discoveries and ultra-precise measurements which culminated in the completion and in depth verification of the Standard Model. Hadron Collider Physics symposium provided opportunities for those working at hadron colliders to share results of their research since 1979 and helped greatly to develop the field of particle physics.

  2. From magnetized iron bars to amplitude imaging of hadronic reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instruments shape research and determine which discoveries are made. Considering spin observables as carriers of information on nonperturbative QCD dynamics in hadronic reactions, we examine the relevance of amplitude analysis for the design goals of high intensity hadron facilities. New instrumental goals emerge: Hadron facility dedicated to continous measurements of spin observables and to cumulative production of computer images of scattering amplitudes over broad kinematic regions. The facility is viewed as a single instrument and termed spinoscope. We stress its connections to frontier developments in computer industries and to studies of nonperturbative states in condensed matter

  3. Initial high-power testing of the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] ECH [electron cyclotron heating] system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO2 mode absorbers, two 900 miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE02 mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE01, 82.6% TE02, 2.5% TE03, and 1.9% TE04. 4 refs

  4. A mode-transforming polarization-rotatable launcher for the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) fusion energy experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) requires high-power microwaves for startup and plasma heating. Power from a gyrotron oscillator tube at 53.2 GHz will be used to ionize and heat the plasma by the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) process. The confining magnetic field of the device is either 0.95 or 1.9T. The gyrotron tube generates 200 kW in the TE02 mode, which is transported in an overmoded 6.35-cm-diam circular waveguide to the ATF vacuum vessel. The launcher consists of a mode-converting Vlasov section, which converts the nonpolarized TE02 wave into a linearly polarized narrow beam. The beam reflects off a tiled spherical reflector grating and is focused at the center of the plasma. The polarization can be rotated to optimize the absorption efficiency by rotating the grating in the spherical reflector. Overall system efficiency is kept high by making the twist reflector large enough to catch the Vlasov converter sidelobe power, which is partially due to mode conversion in the waveguide system. The launcher design and laboratory measurements are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs

  5. Advanced methods comparisons of reaction rates in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of worldwide results revealed that reaction rates in the blanket region are generally underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration; however, these results vary widely. Experiments in the large uniform Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) blanket yield an accurate quantification of this discrepancy. Using standard production code methods (diffusion theory with 50 group cross sections), a consistent Calculated/Experimental (C/E) drop-off was observed for various reaction rates. A 50% increase in the calculated results at the outer edge of the blanket is necessary for agreement with experiments. The usefulness of refined group constant generation utilizing specialized weighting spectra and transport theory methods in correcting this discrepancy was analyzed. Refined group constants reduce the discrepancy to half that observed using the standard method. The surprising result was that transport methods had no effect on the blanket deviations; thus, transport theory considerations do not constitute or even contribute to an explanation of the blanket discrepancies. The residual blanket C/E drop-off (about half the standard drop-off) using advanced methods must be caused by some approximations which are applied in all current methods. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-07-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  7. Strange Pentaquark Hadrons in Statistical Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Letessier, J.; Torrieri, G.; Steinke, S.; Rafelski, J.

    2003-01-01

    We study, within the statistical hadronization model, the influence of narrow strangeness carrying baryon resonances (pentaquarks) on the understanding of particle production in relativistic heavy ion collisions. There is a great variation of expected yields as function of heavy ion collision energy due to rapidly evolving chemical conditions at particle chemical freeze-out. At relatively low collision energies, these new states lead to improvement of statistical hadronization fits.

  8. Hadron particle theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Radiation therapy with ``hadrons`` (protons, neutrons, pions, ions) has accrued a 55-year track record, with by now over 30,000 patients having received treatments with one of these particles. Very good, and in some cases spectacular results are leading to growth in the field in specific well-defined directions. The most noted contributor to success has been the ability to better define and control the radiation field produced with these particles, to increase the dose delivered to the treatment volume while achieving a high degree of sparing of normal tissue. An additional benefit is the highly-ionizing, character of certain beams, leading to creater cell-killing potential for tumor lines that have historically been very resistant to radiation treatments. Until recently these treatments have been delivered in laboratories and research centers whose primary, or original mission was physics research. With maturity in the field has come both the desire to provide beam facilities more accessible to the clinical setting, of a hospital, as well as achieving, highly-efficient, reliable and economical accelerator and beam-delivery systems that can make maximum advantage of the physical characteristics of these particle beams. Considerable work in technology development is now leading, to the implementation of many of these ideas, and a new generation of clinically-oriented facilities is beginning to appear. We will discuss both the physical, clinical and technological considerations that are driving these designs, as well as highlighting, specific examples of new facilities that are either now treating, patients or that will be doing so in the near future.

  9. Hadron particle theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy with ''hadrons'' (protons, neutrons, pions, ions) has accrued a 55-year track record, with by now over 30,000 patients having received treatments with one of these particles. Very good, and in some cases spectacular results are leading to growth in the field in specific well-defined directions. The most noted contributor to success has been the ability to better define and control the radiation field produced with these particles, to increase the dose delivered to the treatment volume while achieving a high degree of sparing of normal tissue. An additional benefit is the highly-ionizing, character of certain beams, leading to creater cell-killing potential for tumor lines that have historically been very resistant to radiation treatments. Until recently these treatments have been delivered in laboratories and research centers whose primary, or original mission was physics research. With maturity in the field has come both the desire to provide beam facilities more accessible to the clinical setting, of a hospital, as well as achieving, highly-efficient, reliable and economical accelerator and beam-delivery systems that can make maximum advantage of the physical characteristics of these particle beams. Considerable work in technology development is now leading, to the implementation of many of these ideas, and a new generation of clinically-oriented facilities is beginning to appear. We will discuss both the physical, clinical and technological considerations that are driving these designs, as well as highlighting, specific examples of new facilities that are either now treating, patients or that will be doing so in the near future

  10. Hadrons in medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U Mosel

    2006-04-01

    In these lectures I first give the motivation for investigations of in-medium properties of hadrons. I discuss the relevant symmetries of QCD and how they might affect the observed hadron properties. I then discuss at length the observable consequences of in-medium changes of hadronic properties in reactions with elementary probes, and in particular photons, on nuclei. Here I put an emphasis on new experiments on changes of the - and -mesons in medium.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  12. Safeguardability assessment on pilot-scale advanced spent fuel conditioning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In South Korea, approximately 6,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactor operation has been accumulated with the expectation of more than 30,000 metric tons, three times the present storage capacity, by the end of 2040. To resolve these challenges in spent fuel management, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a dry reprocessing technology called Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). This is an electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert oxide-type spent fuel into a metallic form, and the electrolytic reduction (ER) technology developed recently is known as a more efficient concept for spent fuel conditioning. The goal of the ACP study is to recover more than 99% of the actinide elements into a metallic form with minimizing the volume and heat load of spent fuel. The significant reduction of the volume and heat load of spent fuel is expected to lighten the burden of final disposal in terms of disposal size, safety, and economics. In the framework of R and D collaboration for the ACP safeguards, a joint study on the safeguardability of the ACP technology has been performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and KAERI. The purpose of this study is to address the safeguardability of the ACP technology, through analysis of material flow and development of a proper safeguards system that meet IAEA's comprehensive safeguards objective. The sub-processes and material flow of the pilot-scale ACP facility were analyzed, and subsequently the relevant material balance area (MBA) and key measurement point (KMP) were designed for material accounting. The uncertainties in material accounting were also estimated with international target values, and design requirements for the material accounting systems were derived

  13. Instrumentation and beam dynamics study of advanced electron-photon facility in Indiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tianhuan

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips' geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been speci ed. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  14. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  15. Automated alignment of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) target area at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Heebner, John E.; Leach, Richard R.; Orth, Charles D.; Rushford, Michael C.; Lowe-Webb, Roger R.; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a petawatt-class, short-pulse laser system designed to provide x-ray backlighting of NIF targets. ARC uses four NIF beamlines to produce eight beamlets to create a sequence of eight images of an imploding fuel capsule using backlighting targets and diagnostic instrumentation. ARC employs a front end that produces two pulses, chirps the pulses out to 2 ns, and then injects the pulses into the two halves of each of four NIF beamlines. These pulses are amplified by NIF pre- and main amplifiers and transported to compressor vessels located in the NIF target area. The pulses are then compressed and pointed into the NIF target chamber where they impinge upon an array of backlighters. The interaction of the ARC laser pulses and the backlighting material produces bursts of high-energy x-rays that illuminate an imploding fuel capsule. The transmitted x-rays are imaged by diagnostic instrumentation to produce a sequence of radiograph images. A key component of the success of ARC is the automatic alignment system that accomplishes the precise alignment of the beamlets to avoid damaging equipment and to ensure that the beamlets are directed onto the tens-of-microns scale backlighters. In this paper, we describe the ARC automatic alignment system, with emphasis on control loops used to align the beampaths. We also provide a detailed discussion of the alignment image processing, because it plays a critical role in providing beam centering and pointing information for the control loops.

  16. Hadron accelerators in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hadron accelerators (protons and light ions) in cancer therapy is discussed. After a brief introduction on the rationale for the use of heavy charged particles in radiation therapy, a discussion is given on accelerator technology and beam delivery systems. Next, existing and planned facilities are briefly reviewed. The Italian Hadrontherapy Project (the largest project of this type in Europe) is then described, with reference to both the National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy and the design of two types of compact proton accelerators aimed at introducing proton therapy in a large number of hospitals. Finally, the radiation protection requirements are discussed. (author)

  17. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Skuja

    Since the beginning of 2007, HCAL has made significant progress in the installation and commissioning of both hardware and software. A large fraction of the physical Hadron Calorimeter modules have been installed in UX5. In fact, the only missing pieces are HE- and part of HO. The HB+/- were installed in the cryostat in March. HB scintillator layer-17 was installed above ground before the HB were lowered. The HB- scintillator layer-0 was installed immediately after completion of EB- installation. HF/HCAL Commissioning The commissioning and checkout of the HCAL readout electronics is also proceeding at a rapid pace in Bldg. 904 and USC55. All sixteen crates of HCAL VME readout electronics have been commissioned and certified for service. Fifteen are currently operating in the S2 level of USC55. The last crate is being used for firmware development in the Electronics Integration Facility in 904. All installed crates are interfaced to their VME computers and receive synchronous control from the fully-equipp...

  18. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  19. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  20. The State of the Art in Hadron Beam Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Prost, L R

    2008-01-01

    Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the field will also be introduced.

  1. The State of the Art in Hadron Beam Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Prost, L. R.; Derwent, P.

    2008-01-01

    Cooling of hadron beams (including heavy-ions) is a powerful technique by which accelerator facilities around the world achieve the necessary beam brightness for their physics research. In this paper, we will give an overview of the latest developments in hadron beam cooling, for which high energy electron cooling at Fermilab's Recycler ring and bunched beam stochastic cooling at Brookhaven National Laboratory's RHIC facility represent two recent major accomplishments. Novel ideas in the fiel...

  2. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  3. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron

  4. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  5. Statistical Hadronization and Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechi, Jacopo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider some issues about the statistical model of the hadronization in a holographic approach. We introduce a Rindler like horizon in the bulk and we understand the string breaking as a tunneling event under this horizon. We calculate the hadron spectrum and we get a thermal, and...... so statistical, shape for it....

  6. Evaporation/Hadronization Correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Allahbakhshi, Davood

    2016-01-01

    A holographic duality is proposed between black hole evaporation in the bulk and hadronization (confinement) in dual field theory. Information paradox is discussed in this duality. We also propose that the recently introduced semi black brane solution is holographically dual to a mixed plasma of quarks, gluons and hadrons in global equilibrium.

  7. Firetube model and hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new version of the fire tube model is developed to describe hadron-hadron collisions at ultrarelativistic energies. Several improvements are introduced in order to include the longitudinal expansion of intermediate fireballs, which remedies the overestimates of the transverse momenta in the previous version. It is found that, within a wide range of incident energies, the model describes well the experimental data for the single particle rapidity distribution, two-body correlations in the pseudo-rapidity, transverse momentum spectra of pions and kaons, the leading particle spectra and the K/π ratio. (author)

  8. Development of safeguards technology for lab-scale advanced fuel cycle facility at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been developing the DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel in CANDU) fuel cycle and ACP (Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) technology for the purpose of spent fuel management. A safeguards system has been applied to R and D process for fabricating DUPIC fuel directly with PWR spent fuel material. Safeguards issues to be resolved were identified in the areas such as international cooperation on handling foreign origin nuclear material, technology development of operator's measurement system of bulk handling process of spent fuel material, and built-in C/S system for independent verification of material flow. All those safeguards issues have been finally resolved. The lab-scale DUPIC facility (DFDF) safeguards system was successfully established under the international cooperation program. The ACP has been under development at KAERI since 1997 to tackle the problem of the accumulation of the spent fuel. The concept is to convert the spent oxide fuel into a metallic form in a high temperature molten salt in order to reduce the heat power, volume, and radioactivity of the spent fuel. The main objective of the ACP is to treat the PWR spent fuel for a long-term storage and eventual disposal in a proliferation resistant and cost effective way. Moreover, the electrolytic reduction method of the ACP can contribute to the innovative nuclear energy system as a key technology for the preparation of the metallic fuel. Since the inactive tests of the ACP have been successfully implemented to confirm the validity of the electrolytic reduction technology, a lab-scale hot test will be undertaken in the ACP facility (ACPF) to validate the concept. Based on the results of a safeguards implementation at DFDF hot cell, the reference safeguards design conditions are established for the ACPF. Basically, the nuclear material accounting will be performed by ASNC (ACP Safeguards Neutron Counter), which is the same concept as the

  9. Quenching of high pperpendicular hadron spectra by hadronic interactions in heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typically, the materialization of highly energetic transverse partons to hadronic jets is assumed to occur outside the reaction zone in a relativistic heavy ion collision. In contrast, a quantum mechanical estimate yields a time on the order of only a few fm/c for building up the hadronic wave function for jets with typical transverse momenta of pperpendicular≤10 GeV, as accessible at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facilities. The role of possible elastic or inelastic collisions of these high pperpendicular particles with the bulk of hadrons inside the fireball is addressed by means of an opacity expansion in the number of collisions. This analysis shows that the hadronic final state interactions can, in principle, account for the modification of the (moderate) high pperpendicular spectrum observed for central collisions at RHIC

  10. Design of Stopper of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The PGNAA facility consists of the filtered collimated neutron beam, the shielding of the whole facility, the control system, the detecting equipment and the data acquisition and analysis system. The neutron beam is filtered by a mono-crystalline bismuth filter,

  11. Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation

  12. ANURIB – Advanced National facility for Unstable and Rare Ion Beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Bandyopadhyay; V Naik; S Dechoudhury; M Mondal; A Chakrabarti

    2015-09-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India. In this scheme, Rare Ion Beams (RIBs) will be produced using light ion beams (, ) from the = 130 cyclotron, the RIB of interest will be separated from the other reaction products and accelerated up to about 2 MeV/u using a number of linear accelerators. Recently, a few RIBs have been produced and accelerated using this facility. As an extention of this effort, another RIB facility – ANURIB will be developed in a new campus as a green-field project. ANURIB will have two driver accelerators – a superconducting electron LINAC to produce n-rich RIBs using photofission route and a 50 MeV proton cyclotron for producing p-rich RIBs. In this paper, the status of the RIB facility in the present campus and future plans with the ANURIB facility will be discussed.

  13. Secondary Particles Produced by Hadron Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkazem Ansarinejad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Use of hadron therapy as an advanced radiotherapy technique is increasing. In this method, secondary particles are produced through primary beam interactions with the beam-transport system and the patient’s body. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations were employed to determine the dose of produced secondary particles, particularly neutrons during treatment. Materials and Methods In this study, secondary particles, produced by proton and ion beams, were simulated for a cancer treatment plan. In particular, we evaluated the distribution of secondary neutrons, produced by a 400 MeV/u carbon beam on an electronic crate, which was exposed to radiation field under radioactive conditions. The level of major secondary particles, particularly neutrons, irradiating the target, was evaluated, using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. Results The fluences and radiation doses were applied to determine the shielding efficiency of devices and the probability of radiation damage to nearby electronic systems. According to the results, by using maximum-energy carbon ions (400 MeV/u, electronic devices are exposed to a dose rate of 0.05 µSv/s and an integrated dose of about 34 mSv, each year. Conclusion The simulation results could provide significant information about radiation assessment; they could also be a major help for clinical facilities to meet shielding requirements. Moreover, such simulations are essential for determining the radiation level, which is responsible for radiation-induced damages.

  14. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  15. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  16. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    Radiolytic labeling is established as a collaborative program at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Results indicate that white-light bend-magnet beamlines at the ALS produce flux densities high enough to allow microsecond exposures yielding sufficient modification to conduct footprinting experiments, representing a significant advance for the footprinting experiment.

  17. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Briceno, R A; Coito, S; Dudek, J J; Eichten, E; Fischer, C S; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Jackura, A; Kornicer, M; Krein, G; Lebed, R F; Machado, F A; Mitchell, R E; Morningstar, C J; Peardon, M; Pennington, M R; Peters, K; Richard, J -M; Shen, C -P; Shepherd, M R; Skwarnicki, T; Swanson, E S; Szczepaniak, A P; Yuan, C -Z

    2015-01-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.

  18. Renormdynamics and Hadronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhaldiani, Nugzar

    2016-01-01

    Independently radiating valence quarks and corresponding negative binomial distribution presents phenomenologically preferable mechanism of hadronization in multiparticle production processes. Main properties of the renormdynamics, corresponding motion equations and their solutions are considered.

  19. Hadron production within PHSD

    CERN Document Server

    Moreau, Pierre; Palmese, Alessia; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2016-01-01

    We study the production of hadrons in nucleus-nucleus collisions within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics (PHSD) transport approach that is extended to incorporate essentials aspects of chiral symmetry restoration (CSR) in the hadronic sector (via the Schwinger mechanism) on top of the deconfinement phase transition as implemented in PHSD. The essential impact of CSR is found in the Schwinger mechanism (for string decay) which fixes the ratio of strange to light quark production in the hadronic medium. Our studies provide a microscopic explanation for the maximum in the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio at about 30 A GeV which only shows up if in addition to CSR a deconfinement transition to partonic degrees-of-freedom is incorporated in the reaction dynamics.

  20. Melting hadrons, boiling quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafelski, Johann [CERN-PH/TH, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); The University of Arizona, Department of Physics, Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. The material of this review is complemented by two early and unpublished reports containing the prediction of the different forms of hadron matter, and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the discussion of strangeness, and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP. (orig.)

  1. Melting Hadrons, Boiling Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. Finally in two appendices I present previously unpublished reports describing the early prediction of the different forms of hadron matter and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the initial prediction of strangeness and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP.

  2. Hadronic jets an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Banfi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Jet physics is an incredibly rich subject detailing the narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon in a particle physics or heavy ion experiment. This book is a general overview of jet physics for scientists not directly involved in the field. It presents the basic experimental and theoretical problems arising when dealing with jets, and describing the solutions proposed in recent years.

  3. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron colliders provide an important laboratory for testing the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. Because such colliders have the highest available center-of-mass energy (sq. root s), they probe the shortest accessible length scales and hence provide a unique opportunity both to study the fundamental fields of the Standard Model and to search for deviations from the predictions of the Standard Model. This paper presents recent results in the field of experimental hadron collider physics

  4. Aspects of Hadron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, C. D.; Bhagwat, M. S.; Wright, S. V.; Holl, A

    2008-01-01

    Detailed investigations of the structure of hadrons are essential for understanding how matter is constructed from the quarks and gluons of Quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and amongst the questions posed to modern hadron physics, three stand out. What is the rigorous, quantitative mechanism responsible for confinement? What is the connection between confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking? And are these phenomena together sufficient to explain the origin of more than 98% of the mass ...

  5. Production of exotic hadrons at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilloni, A

    2015-01-01

    The observation of many unexpected states decaying into heavy quarkonia has challenged the usual QQbar interpretation. One of the most studied exotic states, the X(3872), happens to be copiously produced in high-energy hadron collisions. We discuss how this large prompt production cross-section disfavors a loosely-bound molecule interpretation for this particle. This is supported by Monte Carlo simulations, and by a comparison with extrapolated light nuclei data by ALICE.

  6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  7. Highlights from COMPASS in hadron spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Krinner, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Since Quantum Choromdynamics allows for gluon self-coupling, quarks and gluons cannot be observed as free particles, but only their bound states, the hadrons. This so-called confinement phenomenon is responsible for $98\\%$ of the mass in the visible universe. The measurement of the hadron excitation spectra therefore gives valuable input for theory and phenomenology to quantitatively understand this phenomenon. One simple model to describe hadrons is the Constituent Quark Model (CQM), which knows two types of hadrons: mesons, consisting of a quark and an antiquark, and baryons, which are made out of three quarks. More advanced models, which are inspired by QCD as well as calculations within Lattice QCD predict the existence of other types of hadrons, which may be e.g. described solely by gluonic excitations (glueballs) or mixed quark and gluon excitations (hybrids). In order to search for such states, the COMPASS experiment at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN has collected large data sets, which allow to ...

  8. Advanced Education Facilities for Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Lungeanu, Marian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the project- and problem-based learning method is achieved at Aalborg University. Two new laboratories called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) and Green Power Laboratory (GPL) have been developed. A common feature is that these facilities are using entirely Simulink...

  9. Design concepts and advanced manipulator development for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division, Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. The application of advanced manipulation is viewed as an essential part of a series of design directions whose sum describes a somewhat unique blend of old and new technology. A design direction based upon the Teletec concept is explained and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems is feasible through advanced technology. 14 refs., 14 figs

  10. The application of advanced remote systems technology to future waste handling facilities: Waste Systems Data and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two FWMS major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment. 5 refs., 7 figs

  11. Golden Hadron awards for the LHC's top suppliers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The following firms have been selected to receive a GOLDEN HADRON AWARD 2003, in recognition of their outstanding achievement: JDL TECHNOLOGIES, Belgium "in producing automatic cable inspection systems", FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY, Japan "in producing high quality superconducting cable", IHI Corporation, Japan, and LINDE KRYOTECHNIK, Switzerland "in producing novel 1.8 K refrigeration units based on advanced cold compressor technology" for the Large Hadron Collider.Photos 01, 02: Recipients of the 2003 Golden Hadron awards at the presentation ceremony on 16 May.Photo 03: LHC project leader Lyn Evans updates the award recipients on work for CERN's new accelerator.Photo 04: René Joannes of JDL Technologies (left) receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Shinichiro Meguro, managing director of Furukawa Electric Company, receives a Golden Hadron award from LHC project leader Lyn Evans.Photo 06: Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of Linde Kryotechnik (left) and Motoki Yoshinaga, associate director of IHI...

  12. Human Engineering Operations and Habitability Assessment: A Process for Advanced Life Support Ground Facility Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Arch, M.; Elfezouaty, Eileen Schultz; Novak, Jennifer Blume; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Design and Human Engineering (HE) processes strive to ensure that the human-machine interface is designed for optimal performance throughout the system life cycle. Each component can be tested and assessed independently to assure optimal performance, but it is not until full integration that the system and the inherent interactions between the system components can be assessed as a whole. HE processes (which are defining/app lying requirements for human interaction with missions/systems) are included in space flight activities, but also need to be included in ground activities and specifically, ground facility testbeds such as Bio-Plex. A unique aspect of the Bio-Plex Facility is the integral issue of Habitability which includes qualities of the environment that allow humans to work and live. HE is a process by which Habitability and system performance can be assessed.

  13. An advanced safeguards approach for a model 200t/a reprocessing facility, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an advanced safeguards approach which has been developed for a model 200 t/a reprocessing plant, using near-real-time materials accountancy in the process MBA, and borrowing advanced ideas from TASTEX, the IWG-RPS, or the authors own invention for the spent fuel storage and plutonium nitrate storage MBAs. In the spent fuel storage MBA primary reliance is placed on 100% inspector observation and verification of all spent fuel receipts, and on surveillance measures to ensure that the inspector is aware of all receipts or other activities in the spent fuel cask receiving bay. The advanced safeguards approach gives more detailed consideration to the mechanical or chop-leach cell than most conventional approaches. Safeguards in the process MBA are based on n.r.t. accountancy. The n.r.t. accountancy model used assumes weekly in-process physical inventories of solution in some five buffer storage tanks. The safeguards approach suggested for the plutonium nitrate storage MBA is not significantly different from conventional approaches. The use of sequential statistical techniques for the analysis of n.r.t. accountancy data requires a significantly different philosophical approach to anomalies and anomaly resolution. This report summarizes anomaly resolution procedures, at least through the earlier stages, and describes a summary estimate of inspection effort likely to be needed to implement the advanced safeguards approach. (author)

  14. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  15. Advances in inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory-temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  16. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  17. Energy deposition and radiological studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    OpenAIRE

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I.S.; Eidelman, Y. I.

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system - all with corresponding radiation shielding - was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Resu...

  18. Power supply design for Hadron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a study investigated the feasibility of building a large 60 GeV, kaon factory accelerator. This paper presents the conceptual design of the magnet power supplies and energy storage system. In this study the following three systems were investigated: (a) power supply using storage generator; (b) power supply using inductive storage device; and (c) resonant power supplies. These systems were analyzed from both technical and economical points of view. It was found that all three systems are feasible and can be built using commercially available components. From a technical point of view, the system using inductive storage is the most advantageous. The resonant power supply is the most economical solution

  19. Holography Inspired Stringy Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in at four dimensional space time. The models are based on a \\map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5xS5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line,a meson,a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the \\string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best ?ts,...

  20. Hadron Dragons strike again

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Dragon Boat team – the Hadron Dragons – achieved a fantastic result at the "Paddle for Cancer" Dragon Boat Festival at Lac de Joux on 6 September. CERN Hadron Dragons heading for the start line.Under blue skies and on a clear lake, the Hadron Dragons won 2nd place in a hard-fought final, following top times in the previous heats. In a close and dramatic race – neck-and-neck until the final 50 metres – the local Lac-de-Joux team managed to inch ahead at the last moment. The Hadron Dragons were delighted to take part in this festival. No one would turn down a day out in such a friendly and fun atmosphere, but the Dragons were also giving their support to cancer awareness and fund-raising in association with ESCA (English-Speaking Cancer Association of Geneva). Riding on their great success in recent competitions, the Hadron Dragons plan to enter the last Dragon Boat festival of 2009 in Annecy on 17-18 October. This will coincide with t...

  1. Evaluation of the advanced mixed-oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced mixed-oxide (UO2-PuO2) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is undergoing postirradiation examination. This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of 12 different types. Two L (annular) fuel pins, GF02L04 (FFTF and transient tested) and GF02L09 (FFTF only), were destructively examined. Evaluation of the FO-2 fuel pins and assembly shows the excellent and predictable performance of the mixed-oxide fuels with HT9 structural material. This, combined with the robust behavior of the pins in transient tests, and the continued excellent performance of the CDE indicate this is a superior fuel system for liquid-metal reactors. It offers greatly reduced deformation during irradiation, while maintaining good operating characteristics

  2. New hadronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes new information on hadronic states which has become available mainly in the last two years. This informations is compared with our previous knowledge regarding these states and is put into perspective in respect to other well-know hadronic states. In particular, this report deals with mesons of spin O (JPC = O-+ and O++), spin 1 (JPC = 1++, 1+- and 1--), and spin 2 (JPC = 2++ and 2-+), with masses below 2 GeV. Emphasis is placed on candidates for exotic hadrons, whether they be real exotics (with quantum numbers which are not allowed by the quark-model or because of their peculiar production, decay and/or spectroscopic properties. (author)

  3. Hadrons at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Samirnath

    2016-01-01

    High energy laboratories are performing experiments in heavy ion collisions to explore the structure of matter at high temperature and density. This elementary book explains the basic ideas involved in the theoretical analysis of these experimental data. It first develops two topics needed for this purpose, namely hadron interactions and thermal field theory. Chiral perturbation theory is developed to describe hadron interactions and thermal field theory is formulated in the real-time method. In particular, spectral form of thermal propagators is derived for fields of arbitrary spin and used to calculate loop integrals. These developments are then applied to find quark condensate and hadron parameters in medium, including dilepton production. Finally, the non-equilibrium method of statistical field theory to calculate transport coefficients is reviewed. With technical details explained in the text and appendices, this book should be accessible to researchers as well as graduate students interested in thermal ...

  4. Pairing in hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A many-body approach to hadron structure is presented, in which we consider two parton species: spin-0 (b-partons), and spin-1/2 (f-partons). We extend a boson and a fermion pairing scheme for the b-, and f-partons respectively, into a Yang-Mills gauge theory. The main feature of this theory is that the gauge field is not identified with the usual gluon field variable in QCD. We study the confinement problem of the hadron constituents, and obtain, for low temperatures, partons that are confined by energy gaps. As the critical temperatures for the corresponding phase transitions are approached, the energy gap gradually disappears, and confinement is lost. The theory goes beyond the non-relativistic harmonic oscillator quark model, in the sense of giving physical reasons why a non-relativistic approximation is adequate in describing the internal dynamics of hadron structure. (author)

  5. Hadron Resonances from QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudek, Jozef [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    I describe how hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes are related to the eigenstates of QCD in a finite cubic volume. The discrete spectrum of such eigenstates can be determined from correlation functions computed using lattice QCD, and the corresponding scattering amplitudes extracted. I review results from the Hadron Spectrum Collaboration who have used these finite volume methods to study ππ elastic scattering, including the ρ resonance, as well as coupled-channel πK, ηK scattering. The very recent extension to the case where an external current acts is also presented, considering the reaction πγ* → ππ, from which the unstable ρ → πγ transition form factor is extracted. Ongoing calculations are advertised and the outlook for finite volume approaches is presented.

  6. The importance of simulation facilities for the development of review criteria for advanced human system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced control room (ACR) concepts are being developed in the commercial nuclear industry as part of future reactor designs. The ACRs will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role (function) in the system, the method of information presentation, the ways in which the operator interacts with the system, and the requirements on the operator to understand and supervise an increasingly complex system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The NRC is developing guidelines to support their review of these advanced designs. As part of this effort, a methodology for guidance development was established, and topics in need of further research were identified. Simulators of various kinds are likely to play important roles in the development of review guidelines and in the evaluation of ACRs. This paper describes a general approach to review criteria development, and discusses the role of simulators in addressing research needs

  7. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  8. High-energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on high energy hadron-hadron collisions in the geometrical model is summarized. Specific items that were studied include the existence and movement of dips in elastic p anti p collisions, the angular distributions for elastic scattering and diffraction dissociation of hadrons on nuclei, and a model calculation of scattering parameters in high energy two-body collisions

  9. Large transverse momenta phenomena in hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of particles with large transverse momentum in high energy hadron-hadron collisions is reviewed. The emphasis is placed on the experimental results. These results are discussed in terms of present theoretical ideas on interactions between hadronic constituents, but no attempt is made to review the theoretical work in a comprehensive manner. (author)

  10. Hadron physics at COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One major focus of the physics studied at the COoler SYnchrotron COSY of the Forschungszentrum Juelich is the production of mesons and hyperons in the hadron-hadron scattering with the aim to investigate relevant production processes, interactions of the participating particles as well as symmetries and symmetry breaking. Due to the excellent experimental conditions at COSY also single- and double-polarization measurements can be performed with high reaction rates. This contribution gives an overview about the physics program which is currently under investigation at the three big COSY installations ANKE, COSY-TOF and WASA-at-COSY. (author)

  11. Development of hot laboratory facility under the project of advanced infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JMTR is preparing for its reoperation, and hot laboratory facilities are also promoting the adjustment of post-irradiation test facilities. The improvement plans from FY2010 to FY2011 are as follows: (1) transmission electron microscope for performing a highly accurate analysis that specializes in the local microscopic area of irradiated materials, (2) focused ion beam processing device, (3) improvement of composite type microstructure analysis device such as X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, (4) improvement of high-performance manipulator of visual function-equipped type, for efficiently, quickly, and safely handling microscopic test samples and large irradiation capsules, and the power manipulator for handling large capsules, and (5) improvement of RI extraction cell for extracting molybdenum-99, as the parent nuclide of technetium-99m used as a radiopharmaceutical. The improvement of these cutting-edge devices enables the development of the next generation light-water reactor as well as the research and development utilizing the state-of-the-art equipment, such as technological development of medical RI production, and gives expectations for contribution to the research and development of future technologies. (A.O.)

  12. Searching for the rules that govern hadron construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Matthew R; Dudek, Jozef J; Mitchell, Ryan E

    2016-06-23

    Just as quantum electrodynamics describes how electrons are bound in atoms by the electromagnetic force, mediated by the exchange of photons, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) describes how quarks are bound inside hadrons by the strong force, mediated by the exchange of gluons. QCD seems to allow hadrons constructed from increasingly many quarks to exist, just as atoms with increasing numbers of electrons exist, yet such complex constructions seemed, until recently, not to be present in nature. Here we describe advances in the spectroscopy of mesons that are refining our understanding of the rules for predicting hadron structure from QCD. PMID:27337337

  13. Bottomonium production in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of bottomonium in hadronic collisions is studied in the framework of the soft colour approach. We report some results for production of Υ in the Tevatron and predictions for the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC). (author)

  14. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry

  15. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Masahiro, E-mail: hino@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki [Center for Experimental Studies, KMI, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 203-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Tasaki, Seiji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS.

  16. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube

  17. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  18. Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

  19. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Stahl, H. Philip; Mountain, Matt; Hyde, Tupper; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Tumlinson, Jason; Soummer, Remi

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  20. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is being planned as a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent x-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 11 long straight sections and up to 48 bend-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams, from less than 10 eV to more than 1 keV, will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in materials and surface science, biology, atomic physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bend magnets will provide high-flux, broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Weibull model of multiplicity distribution in hadron-hadron collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Sadhana; Nandi, Basanta K.; Sett, Priyanka

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the use of the Weibull distribution as a simple parametrization of charged particle multiplicities in hadron-hadron collisions at all available energies, ranging from ISR energies to the most recent LHC energies. In statistics, the Weibull distribution has wide applicability in natural processes that involve fragmentation processes. This provides a natural connection to the available state-of-the-art models for multiparticle production in hadron-hadron collisions, which involve QCD parton fragmentation and hadronization. The Weibull distribution describes the multiplicity data at the most recent LHC energies better than the single negative binomial distribution.

  2. Hadron physics at SATURNE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We will present here some of the results obtained at the Saturne National Laboratory, and a description of the actual programs. Special emphasis will be given to the uniques characteristics of this machine and to the impact of the results in the intermediate energy hadron physics domain on future programs at other accelerators

  3. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  4. The large hadron computer

    CERN Multimedia

    Hirstius, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Plans for dealing with the torrent of data from the Large Hadron Collider's detectors have made the CERN particle-phycis lab, yet again, a pioneer in computing as well as physics. The author describes the challenges of processing and storing data in the age of petabyt science. (4 pages)

  5. Hadron Multiplicities at HERMES

    OpenAIRE

    Hillenbrand, A.; Hartig, M.

    2005-01-01

    Hadron multiplicities of $\\pim$, $\\pip$, $\\km$ and $\\kp$ have been measured in the deep-inelastic scattering of 27.5 GeV positrons off a hydrogen target. The data used in this analysis have been collected during the 2000 HERA running period. The multiplicities were obtained for 0.15$< z

  6. Tau hadronic branching ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    From 64492 selected \\tau-pair events, produced at the Z^0 resonance, the measurement of the tau decays into hadrons from a global analysis using 1991, 1992 and 1993 ALEPH data is presented. Special emphasis is given to the reconstruction of photons and \\pi^0's, and the removal of fake photons. A detailed study of the systematics entering the \\pi^0 reconstruction is also given. A complete and consistent set of tau hadronic branching ratios is presented for 18 exclusive modes. Most measurements are more precise than the present world average. The new level of precision reached allows a stringent test of \\tau-\\mu universality in hadronic decays, g_\\tau/g_\\mu \\ = \\ 1.0013 \\ \\pm \\ 0.0095, and the first measurement of the vector and axial-vector contributions to the non-strange hadronic \\tau decay width: R_{\\tau ,V} \\ = \\ 1.788 \\ \\pm \\ 0.025 and R_{\\tau ,A} \\ = \\ 1.694 \\ \\pm \\ 0.027. The ratio (R_{\\tau ,V} - R_{\\tau ,A}) / (R_{\\tau ,V} + R_{\\tau ,A}), equal to (2.7 \\pm 1.3) \\ \\%, is a measure of the importance of Q...

  7. Electroweak and hadron studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    Some final results are presented on ..mu mu.., /tau//tau/, and hadron production, obtained by the MARK J collaboration at PETRA, over the cm energy band 22 GeV to 46.8 GeV. The MARK J results agree with world averaged data. They constitute powerful tests of the predictions of the Standard Model. 29 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  9. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  10. Development of an Integrated Test Facility (ITF) for the advanced man machine interface evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Integrated Test Facilityu (ITF) is a human factors experimental environment to evaluate an advanced Man Machine Interface(MMI) design. The ITF includes a Human Machine Simulator (HMS) comprised of a nuclear power plant function simulator, man-machine interface, experiment control station for the experiment control and design, human behavioural data measurement system, and Data Analysis and Experiment Evaluation Supporting System(DAEXESS). The most important features of ITF is to secure the flexibility and expandibility of Man Machine Interface(MMI) design to change easily the environment of experiments to accomplish the experiment's objects. In this paper, we describe a development scope and characteristics of the ITF such as, hardware and software development scope and characteristics, system thermohydraulic modelling characteristics, and experiment station characteristics for the experiment variables design and control, to be used as an experiment enviroment for the evaluation of VDU-based control room

  11. The Unmanned Research Airplane Facility at the Cyprus Institute: Advanced Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Manfred A.; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They provide an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. Building on an earlier project (Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project; APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute (APAESO is co-financed by the European Development Fund and the Republic of Cyprus through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation), we have built up an Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The Cyprus Institute (CyI-URAF). The basic components of this facility comprise four CRUISERS airplanes (ET-Air, Slovakia) as UAS platforms, a substantial range of scientific instruments to be flown on these platforms, a mobile Ground Control Station and a well-equipped workshop and calibration laboratory. The APAESO platforms are suitable to carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the (Eastern) Mediterranean (and elsewhere). They enable 3D measurements for determining physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations and atmospheric dynamics as well as 2D investigations into land management practices, vegetation and agricultural mapping, contaminant detection and the monitoring and assessment of hydrological parameters and processes of a given region at high spatial resolution. We will report on some of the essential modifications of the platforms and some of the instrumentation that were instrumental in preparing the research airplanes for a variety of collaborative research projects with. The first scientific mission involved the employment of a DOAS-system (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) in cooperation with

  12. Approach to the open advanced facilities initiative for innovation (strategic use by industry) at the University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC) possesses the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator and the 1 MV Tandetron accelerator for University's inter-department education research. We have actively advanced collaborative researches with other research institutes and industrial users. Since the Open Advanced Facilities Initiative for Innovation by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started in 2007, 12 industrial experiments have been carried out at the UTTAC. This report describes efforts by University's accelerator facility to get industrial users. (author)

  13. The Budapest research reactor as an advanced research facility for the early 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Budapest Research Reactor, Hungary's first nuclear facility was originally put into operation in 1959. The reactor serves for: basic and applied research, technological and commercial applications, education and training. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research. This unique research possibility is used by a broad user community of Europe. Eight instruments for neutron scattering, radiography and activation analyses are already used, others (e.g. time of flight spectrometer, neutron reflectometer) are being installed. The majority of these instruments will get a much improved utilization when the cold neutron source is put into operation. In 1999 the Budapest Research Reactor was operated for 3129 full power hours in 14 periods. The normal operation period took 234 hours (starting Monday noon and finishing Thursday morning). The entire production for the year 1999 was 1302 MW days. This is a slightly reduced value, due to the installation of the cold neutron source. For the year 2000 a somewhat longer operation is foreseen (near to 4000 hours), as the cold neutron source will be operational. The operation of the reactor is foreseen at least up to the end of the first decade of the 21st century. (author)

  14. Recent advances in automatic alignment system for the National Iginition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Kalantar, D; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V

    2010-12-08

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 50 minutes. The system automatically commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics based upon images acquired from high-resolution digital cameras viewing beams at various locations. Forty-five control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze these images of the beams and references, and automaticallys teer the beams toward the target. This paper discusses the upgrades to the NIF automatic alignment system to handle new alignment needs and evolving requirements as related to various types of experiments performed. As NIF becomes a continuously-operated system and more experiments are performed, performance monitoring is increasingly important for maintenance and commissioning work. Data, collected during operations, is analyzed for tuning of the laser and targeting maintenance work. handling evolving alignment and maintenance needs is expected for the planned 30-year operational life of NIF.

  15. Extracting hadron-neutron scattering amplitudes from hadron-proton and hadron-deuteron measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, V.

    1977-01-01

    A method is presented for extracting hadron-neutron scattering amplitudes from hadron-proton and hadron-deuteron measurements within the framework of the Glauber approximation. This method, which involves the solution of a linear integral equation, is applied to pn collisions between 15 and 275 GeV/c. Effects arising from inelastic intermediate states are estimated.

  16. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  17. Facile Synthesis of Lithium Sulfide Nanocrystals for Use in Advanced Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemin; Wolden, Colin A; Ban, Chunmei; Yang, Yongan

    2015-12-30

    This work reports a new method of synthesizing anhydrous lithium sulfide (Li2S) nanocrystals and demonstrates their potential as cathode materials for advanced rechargeable batteries. Li2S is synthesized by reacting hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with lithium naphthalenide (Li-NAP), a thermodynamically spontaneous reaction that proceeds to completion rapidly at ambient temperature and pressure. The process completely removes H2S, a major industrial waste, while cogenerating 1,4-dihydronaphthalene, itself a value-added chemical that can be used as liquid fuel. The phase purity, morphology, and homogeneity of the resulting nanopowders were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized Li2S nanoparticles (100 nm) were assembled into cathodes, and their performance was compared to that of cathodes fabricated using commercial Li2S micropowders (1-5 μm). Electrochemical analyses demonstrated that the synthesized Li2S were superior in terms of (dis)charge capacity, cycling stability, output voltage, and voltage efficiency. PMID:26633238

  18. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Seong Nam; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Sung Hak; Kim, Dong Nam; Hwang, Sang Ho [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals.

  19. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals

  20. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available

  1. In-situ resource utilization in the design of advanced lunar facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    Resource utilization will play an important role in the establishment and support of a permanently manned lunar base. At the University of Houston - College of Architecture and the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture, a study team recently investigated the potential use of lunar in-situ materials in the design of lunar facilities. The team identified seven potential lunar construction materials; concrete, sulfur concrete, cast basalt, sintered basalt, glass, fiberglass, and metals. Analysis and evaluation of these materials with respect to their physical properties, processes, energy requirements, resource efficiency, and overall advantages and disadvantages lead to the selection of basalt materials as the more likely construction material for initial use on a lunar base. Basalt materials can be formed out of in-situ lunar regolith, with minor material beneficiation, by a simple process of heating and controlled cooling. The team then conceptualized a construction system that combines lunar regolith sintering and casting to make pressurized structures out of lunar resources. The design uses a machine that simultaneously excavates and sinters the lunar regolith to create a cylindrical hole, which is then enclosed with cast basalt slabs, allowing the volume to be pressurized for use as a living or work environment. Cylinder depths of up to 4 to 6 m in the lunar mare or 10 to 12 m in the lunar highlands are possible. Advantages of this construction system include maximum resource utilization, relatively large habitable volumes, interior flexibility, and minimal construction equipment needs. Conclusions of this study indicate that there is significant potential for the use of basalt, a lunar resource derived construction material, as a low cost alternative to Earth-based materials. It remains to be determined when in lunar base phasing this construction method should be implemented.

  2. Status of hadron therapy in Europe and the role of ENLIGHT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is a major social problem, and it is the main cause of death between the ages 45-65 years. In the treatment of cancer, radio therapy (RT) plays an essential role. RT with hadrons (protons and light ions), due to their unique physical and radiobiological properties, offers several advantages over photons. In particular, they penetrate the patient with minimal diffusion, they deposit maximum energy at the end of their range, and they can be shaped as narrow focused and scanned pencil beams of variable penetration depth. Hadron beams allow highly conformal treatment (where the beam conforms to the shape of the tumour) of deep-seated tumours with great accuracy, while delivering minimal doses to surrounding tissues. Hadron therapy, thus, has great prospects for being used in early stages of tumour disease not amenable to surgery. It is likely that, besides its more impressive effect on radio-resistant tumours, post-treatment morbidity will be lower in patients treated with hadrons due to the lower dose and toxicity to normal tissues. Visionary physicist and founder of Fermilab, Robert Wilson first proposed the use of hadrons for cancer treatment in 1946. This idea was first put into practise at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) where 30 patients were treated with protons between 1954 and 1957. Since then the total number of patients treated with hadrons in the world now exceeds 50,000, of which 5000 new patients were treated last year. Several dedicated hospital-based centres with significant capacity for treating patients are now taking the place of the first R and D facilities hosted by the Physics Research Laboratories (e.g. LBL, GSI). Europe is playing a key role in the advancement of light ion therapy facilities with five financed centres using actively scanned carbon ions (of which two are already under construction in Heidelberg and Pavia) and several proton therapy centres which will become operational soon. In the US, three proton therapy centres

  3. Status of hadron therapy in Europe and the role of ENLIGHT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Magrin, Giulio

    2007-02-01

    Cancer is a major social problem, and it is the main cause of death between the ages 45-65 years. In the treatment of cancer, radio therapy (RT) plays an essential role. RT with hadrons (protons and light ions), due to their unique physical and radiobiological properties, offers several advantages over photons. In particular, they penetrate the patient with minimal diffusion, they deposit maximum energy at the end of their range, and they can be shaped as narrow focused and scanned pencil beams of variable penetration depth. Hadron beams allow highly conformal treatment (where the beam conforms to the shape of the tumour) of deep-seated tumours with great accuracy, while delivering minimal doses to surrounding tissues. Hadron therapy, thus, has great prospects for being used in early stages of tumour disease not amenable to surgery. It is likely that, besides its more impressive effect on radio-resistant tumours, post-treatment morbidity will be lower in patients treated with hadrons due to the lower dose and toxicity to normal tissues. Visionary physicist and founder of Fermilab, Robert Wilson first proposed the use of hadrons for cancer treatment in 1946. This idea was first put into practise at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) where 30 patients were treated with protons between 1954 and 1957. Since then the total number of patients treated with hadrons in the world now exceeds 50,000, of which 5000 new patients were treated last year. Several dedicated hospital-based centres with significant capacity for treating patients are now taking the place of the first R&D facilities hosted by the Physics Research Laboratories (e.g. LBL, GSI). Europe is playing a key role in the advancement of light ion therapy facilities with five financed centres using actively scanned carbon ions (of which two are already under construction in Heidelberg and Pavia) and several proton therapy centres which will become operational soon. In the US, three proton therapy centres are

  4. Advances in the Electrical , Control Systems, General Analysis of the Coils Design in the Mexican Tokamak Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Fusion Research Group of the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (UANL, Spanish acronyms) presents its advances into the electrical, control systems and its coils design developed toward the Tokamak Experimental Facility [1]. This Research and Development Project (R+D) was approved from the Mexican Education Ministry (UANL-EXB-156). The present electrical and control systems studies are mainly oriented to establish our Magnetic Confinement Facility into our University Campus, with a D-shaped tokamak design with the next main characteristics: major radius R = 41 cm, minor radius a = 18.5 cm, aspect ratio A = 2.2162, safety factor q = 1.9552, plasma current Ip = 277 kA , toroidal field Bt = 1.3 T, electronic plasma density ne = 2 — 3 x 1013 cm-3. The present study at this time is an effective electrical engineering proposal to our University involving studies over the electrical power quality provided by Federal Electricity Commission. We define our parameters in voltage, current, frequency, to implement the correct strategies of electrical supplies in order to protect our facility. The analysis was performed measuring in the five domestic circuits of the University Campus: phase imbalances (current and voltage), harmonic distortion total and individual (voltages and currents of 1 — 50), transient capture, presentation of the power factor, registration of electrical interruptions and reclosing, measuring and recording quality power systems, crest factors (voltage and current), accurate RMS measurements of voltage and current, presentation of phasor diagrams. Our tokamak design contains a proposal coils arrangement capable for generate 1.6 T, with a coil current range (10,000 — 30, 000 A), short circuit times from 0.3 s to 1 s. The entirely systems uses Cu like first analysis material. The coils are designed with 3D CAD modeling and after, we apply finite element analysis through the software COMSOL Multiphysics. Our numerical calculus programs

  5. Search for hadronic axions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of axions, proposed as very light neutral pseudoscalar bosons, would solve the strong CP problem in the QCD. Axions also arise in supersymmetric and superstring theories and are candidates for dark matter in the universe. Cosmological and astrophysical arguments restrict the masses (ma) of invisible axions to rather narrow 10-5 eV → ma → 10-22 eV range, but with large uncertainties on either side. The KSVZ or hadronic axion is one version of invisible axions, which predicts small coupling of axions to electrons. Models of hadronic axions with E/N ≅ 2 allow for a near or complete cancellation of the axion-photon coupling constant. In this case there is no stellar-evolution limits on ma and for hadronic axions there exists a small window 10 eV ≤ ma ≤ 40 eV between supernova cooling and axion burst arguments. So far the best and only discussed candidate for hot dark matter has been the massive neutrino with a mass of a few eV. Because the Super-Kamiokande experiment suggests the tau neutrino mass of only 0.03-0.1 eV, the hadronic axion in the so-called hadronic axion window could be a good candidate for a cosmological hot dark matter within the mixed dark matter scenario. To verify this window one can search for axions by appealing only to their coupling to nucleons. The most promising methods are the observation of an axion burst from a future supernova and the resonant absorption of almost monochromatic solar axions. We have performed the first experiment along this new line of solar axion investigations. Using a small target of 0.03 g of 57Fe we have made a search for 14.4 keV gamma rays induced by resonant absorption of almost monochromatic solar axions. These Doppler broadened axions could be emitted from the Sun, in M1 transition between the first, thermally excited state and the ground state of 57Fe. An upper limit on hadronic axion mass of 745 eV is obtained at the 95 % confidence level. Search for solar axions is beginning to become

  6. Hadrons and broken symmetries with WASA-at-COSY

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Schadmand; Wasa-at-Cosy

    2010-08-01

    The WASA Detector Facility is an internal experiment at the cooler synchrotron (COSY) in Jülich, Germany. The COSY accelerator provides proton and deuteron beams with momenta up to 3.7 GeV/c giving access to hadron physics including the strange quark sector. The physics program with the WASA detector involves hadron dynamics and hadron structure. Key experiments address fundamental symmetries and symmetry violations via the study of rare and not-so-rare meson decays. From the very first production run, results on the Dalitz plot slope parameter in the isospin violating → 30 decay have been obtained. The 30 final state is also used to study meson production mechanisms. Investigations of other decay modes of the -meson address , , and symmetries and combinations. Higher orders in chiral perturbation theory are probed with the → 0 decay. The status and plans for studying hadron structure with Dalitz decays of mesons are presented.

  7. Hadronic molecules with a D ¯ meson in a medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramés, T. F.; Fontoura, C. E.; Krein, G.; Tsushima, K.; Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of a hot and dense medium on the binding energy of hadronic molecules with open-charm mesons. We focus on a recent chiral quark-model-based prediction of a molecular state in the N D ¯ system. We analyze how the two-body thresholds and the hadron-hadron interactions are modified when quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings change in a function of the temperature and baryon density according to predictions of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We find that in some cases the molecular binding is enhanced in medium as compared to their free-space binding. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the search for exotic hadrons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions as well as in the forthcoming facilities FAIR or J-PARC.

  8. Elastic scattering of hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2012-01-01

    When colliding, the high energy hadrons can either produce new particles or scatter elastically without change of their quantum num- bers and other particles produced. Namely elastic scattering of hadrons is considered in this review paper. Even though the inelastic processes dominate at high energies, the elastic scattering constitutes the notice- able part of the total cross section ranging between 18 and 25% with some increase at higher energies. The scattering proceeds mostly at small angles and reveals peculiar dependences at larger angles disclos- ing the geometrical structure of the colliding particles and di?erent dynamical mechanisms. The fast decreasing Gaussian peak at small angles is followed by the exponential (Orear) regime with some shoul- ders and dips and then by the power-like decrease. Results of various theoretical approaches are compared with exper- imental data. Phenomenological models pretending to describe this process are reviewed. The unitarity condition requires the exponen- tial re...

  9. Japanese Hadron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) is aimed at producing various kinds of unstable secondary beams based on high-intensity protons from a new accelerator complex. The 1 GeV protons, first produced from a 1 GeV linac, are transferred to a compressor/stretcher ring, where a sharply-pulsed beam or a stretched continuous beam will be produced. The pulsed beam will be used for a pulsed muon source (M arena) and a spallation neutron source (N arena). A part of the proton beam will be used to produce unstable nuclei, which will be accelerated to several MeV/nucleon (E arena). The purpose and impact of JHP will be described in view of future applications of hadronic beams to nuclear energy and material science. (author)

  10. Hadrons at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the basic concepts and tools to study hadronic properties in the medium. Beginning with a discussion of spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry of QCD in vacuum and its possible restoration at high temperature/density, we introduce current correlation functions and outline methods of constraining them through sum rules. This is followed by a discussion on the evaluation of the vector meson self-energy using effective Lagrangians in the framework of thermal field theory.

  11. Hadrons at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Sourav [Theoretical Physics Division, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata - 700064 (India)

    2011-07-15

    We review the basic concepts and tools to study hadronic properties in the medium. Beginning with a discussion of spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry of QCD in vacuum and its possible restoration at high temperature/density, we introduce current correlation functions and outline methods of constraining them through sum rules. This is followed by a discussion on the evaluation of the vector meson self-energy using effective Lagrangians in the framework of thermal field theory.

  12. Electromagnetic polarizabilities of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electromagnetic polarizabilities of hadrons are reviewed, after a discussion of classical analogues. Differences between relativistic and non-relativistic approaches can lead to conflicts with conventional nuclear physics sum rules and calculational techniques. The nucleon polarizabilities are discussed in the context of the non-relativistic valence quark model, which provides a good qualitative description. The recently measured pion polarizabilities are discussed in the context of chiral symmetry and quark-loop models. 58 refs., 5 figs

  13. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  14. Quadrupole moments of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In chiral bag model an expression is obtained for the quark wave functions with account of color and pion interaction of quarks. The quadrupole moments of nonstrange hadrons are calculated. Quadrupole moment of nucleon isobar is found to be Q(Δ)=-6.3x10-28 esub(Δ)(cm)sup(2). Fredictions of the chiral bag model are in strong disagreement with the non-relativistic quark model

  15. Advanced nutrient root feeding system for conveyer-type cylindrical plant growth facilities developed for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.; Krivobok, Anna; Krivobok, Nikolay

    A new brand of cylindrical conveyer-type space plant growth facilities (PGF) has been created to improve of cosmonauts’ diet in the microgravity conditions. Up to date several ground prototypes of the space PGF have been made and tested: “Phytocycle”, “Vitacycle”, “Phytocycle-LED”, “Phytoconveyer”; now the space PGF “Vitacycle-T” for the Russian segment of the ISS is under developing. In the PGFs the ion-exchange salt-saturated fibrous artificial soil (AS) is used as a root medium. We have proposed the system for enrichment of irrigation water by nutrients to decrease of the AS store required for PGF working during the long space mission. The system includes root modules filled in fibrous ion-exchange AS, the enrichment column with crumble salt-saturation ion-exchange resin and the cassette with slow releasing fertilizer (SRF). Both substrates (ion-exchange resin and SRF) are necessary because of the SRF contains mostly N, P and K but another three essential elements S, Ca, Mg are provided by the ion-exchange resin. In the system water goes throw the enrichment column with ion-exchange resin fertilizing by the nutrients and comes into the mixer cell fertilize equipped with the electrical conductivity sensor. When the signal of the conductivity sensor is coming to the controller it turns on the pump directed the water flow throw the cassette with SRF until the electric conductivity of the solution in the mixer cell will reach the setpoint. The nutrient root feeding system was tested during 88 days when Chinese cabbage grew in PGF “Phytocycle-LED”. The crop has been continuously illuminated by red and blue LEDs in the PPF ratio 7 to 1; an integral PPF level has been (240 ± 10) µmol/(m2×s). There was no renewal of the used fibrous AS during the experiment. The PGF total electric power consumption was of 0,45 kW. The average fresh biomass productivity of the PGF during steady state working mode was equal 135×g/day per m2 of the illuminated

  16. QCD and Hadron Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deshpande, Abhay L.; Gao, Haiyan; McKeown, Robert D.; Meyer, Curtis A.; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Milner, Richard G.; Qiu, Jianwei; Richards, David G.; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-02-26

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  17. QCD and Hadron Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This White Paper presents the recommendations and scientific conclusions from the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadronic Physics that took place in the period 13-15 September 2014 at Temple University as part of the NSAC 2014 Long Range Planning process. The meeting was held in coordination with the Town Meeting on Phases of QCD and included a full day of joint plenary sessions of the two meetings. The goals of the meeting were to report and highlight progress in hadron physics in the seven years since the 2007 Long Range Plan (LRP07), and present a vision for the future by identifying the key questions and plausible paths to solutions which should define the next decade. The introductory summary details the recommendations and their supporting rationales, as determined at the Town Meeting on QCD and Hadron Physics, and the endorsements that were voted upon. The larger document is organized as follows. Section 2 highlights major progress since the 2007 LRP. It is followed, in Section 3, by a brief overview of the physics program planned for the immediate future. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the physics motivations and goals associated with the next QCD frontier: the Electron-Ion-Collider.

  18. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study on high energy collisions using the geometrical model are summarized. A concept of partition temperature is introduced in the geometrical model of multi-particle production processes at high energies. A hadron-hadron collision at a given incoming energy is described as an incoherent superposition of collisions with different partition temperatures. A simple compact formula for single particle momentum spectrum is obtained. The calculated angular distributions are in excellent agreement with experiments at the CERN Collider. Extrapolations to higher and lower energies are made. The same ideas for inelastic hadron-hadron collisions are also applied to e+e- collisions. A number of predictions are made, including the prediction that KNO scaling is not observed in e+e- annihilation. A unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e+e- collisions is obtained

  19. Reflectometer end station for synchrotron calibrations of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility flight optics and for spectrometric research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations have been underway to construct and test a facility for grazing incidence reflectance calibrations of flat mirrors at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The purpose is to conduct calibrations on witness flats to the coating process of the flight mirrors for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The x-ray energy range required is 50 eV--12 keV. Three monochromatic beamlines (X8C, X8A, U3A) will provide energy tunability over this entire range. The goal is to calibrate the AXAF flight mirrors with uncertainties approaching 1%. A portable end station with a precision-positioning reflectometer has been developed for this work. We have resolved the vacuum cleanliness requirements to preserve the coating integrity of the flats with the strict grazing-angle certainty requirements placed on the rotational control system of the reflectometer. A precision positioning table permits alignment of the system to the synchrotron beam to within 10 arcsec; the reflectometer's rotational control system can then produce grazing angle accuracy to within less than 2 arcsec, provided that the electron orbit is stable. At 10--12 keV, this degree of angular accuracy is necessary to achieve the calibration accuracy required for AXAF. However the most important energy regions for the synchrotron calibration are in the 2000--3200 eV range, where the M-edge absorption features of the coating element, iridium, appear, and the 300--700 eV range of the Ir N edges. The detail versus energy exhibited in these features cannot be traced adequately without a tunable energy source, which necessitates a synchrotron for this work. We present the mechanical designs, motion control systems, detection and measurement capabilities, and selected procedures for our measurements, as well as reflectance data

  20. Implementation of advanced control system in 700 MWe fuelling machine test facility using FPGA and Industrial PCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuelling machines are required to perform ON-POWER refuelling in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR). Fuelling machine is an example of high level engineered and precision robotics, which performs more then thousands of complex operations with the help of mechanical actuators using electrical and fluid hydraulic powers. The complete refuelling operation is performed remotely by an automatic control system which is specifically designed to cater the step by step needs of fuelling operation along with built in safety feature to avoid any damage to man, machine and reactor safety. As the design evolution of PHWR from 220 MWe to 700 MWe has resulted in significant changes, Fuelling machines have also experienced substantial advances and design modification from each reactor. These design changes are required to be simulated and verified to ascertain the intended behaviour during actual reactor operation. In view of the above, to validate and verify the design changes of 700 MWe Fuelling machine, a fully automatic Fuelling Machine Test facility (FMTF) is developed at R and D Centre, NPCIL. This facility, with the help of three similar reactor coolant channels, is able to simulate the conditions as in actual reactor environment and performs full refuelling sequence in complete auto mode. The control system philosophy for 700 MWe FMTF was to have fully automatic and safe operating sequence with PC based architecture using minimum hardware to have compact and simplified design. This resulted in the use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) based hardwired logic implementation along with Industrial Computer based control and display system using Data acquisition Cards. This design has drastically reduced the complex wiring implementation of combinational and sequential logic as compared to the earlier control system of FM and resulted in a very compact and sophisticated operator console. This paper brings out the details of FMTF control system which offers numerous

  1. Hadronization processes in neutrino interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katori, Teppei; Mandalia, Shivesh [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Next generation neutrino oscillation experiments utilize details of hadronic final states to improve the precision of neutrino interaction measurements. The hadronic system was often neglected or poorly modelled in the past, but they have significant effects on high precision neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements. Among the physics of hadronic systems in neutrino interactions, the hadronization model controls multiplicities and kinematics of final state hadrons from the primary interaction vertex. For relatively high invariant mass events, many neutrino experiments rely on the PYTHIA program. Here, we show a possible improvement of this process in neutrino event generators, by utilizing expertise from the HERMES experiment. Finally, we estimate the impact on the systematics of hadronization models for neutrino mass hierarchy analysis using atmospheric neutrinos such as the PINGU experiment.

  2. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    U. Baur; Brock, R.; Parsons, J; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; S. Belyaev

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also invest...

  3. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e+-e- collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  4. On charmed particle hadronic production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msub(anti Q)-meson production in hadron-hadron collisions resulting from anti Q quark recombination with valence quark qsub(V) from incident hadron has been considered. The cross section for Msub(anti Q) meson production is obtained. Proceeding from the short-range interaction in the rapidity space a method is proposed to calculate inclusive differential spectra of Λsub(Q) baryons using the known Msub(anti Q) meson spectra

  5. HARP: a hadron production experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Radicioni, Emilio

    2002-01-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of neutrino physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric neutrino fluxes, characterization of accelerator neutrino beams, quantification of pion production and capture for neutrino factory designs, all of these would profit of high-statistics, high-precision hadron production measurements. In addition, such data is needed for the calibration of Monte-Carlo hadron production models. The HARP experiment at CERN is performing extensive measurem...

  6. Quantum chromodynamics and hadron jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures are devoted to the description of the various properties of hard scattering processes with the participation of hadrons in the framework of Quantum Chromodynamics. We discuss in detail the validity and region of applicability of perturbation theory applied to hadron processes. Particular attention is paid to the question of the structure of quark and gluon jets produced in hard processes (as an example, e+ e- annihilation into hadrons). In addition to giving a pedagogical review, we also present new results. (orig.)

  7. Alignment mask design and image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Cohen, Simon; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Roberts, Randy; Salmon, Thad; Smauley, David; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight high-density inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. ARC is designed to produce multiple, sequential X-ray images by using up to eight back lighters. The images will be used to examine the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. As in the NIF system, ARC requires an optical alignment mask that can be inserted and removed as needed for precise positioning of the beam. Due to ARC's split beam design, inserting the nominal NIF main laser alignment mask in ARC produced a partial blockage of the mask pattern. Requirements for a new mask design were needed. In this paper we describe the ARC mask requirements, the resulting mask design pattern, and the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the beam and reference centers required for ARC alignment.

  8. Hadronic probes and nuclear interactions. AIP conference proceedings No. 133

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers in this conference proceedings. Topics include: complementary probes in nuclear physics, microscopic approaches to hadronic interactions, quark/gluon phenomena in nuclear physics, advocacy talks for approaches to quark/gluon phenomena, meson production in nuclei, future facilities for nuclear physics

  9. The Large Hadron electron Collider at CERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polini Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC is a proposed facility which will exploit the new world of energy and intensity offered by the LHC through collisions with a new 60 GeV electron beam. Designed for synchronous operation with the other LHC experiments, the LHeC will be a high luminosity ep and eA collider with a wide ranging physics program on high precision deep inelastic scattering and new physics. Highlights from the physics program will be illustrated along with details from the accelerator, interaction region and detector design.

  10. The Large Hadron electron Collider at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Polini Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) is a proposed facility which will exploit the new world of energy and intensity offered by the LHC through collisions with a new 60 GeV electron beam. Designed for synchronous operation with the other LHC experiments, the LHeC will be a high luminosity ep and eA collider with a wide ranging physics program on high precision deep inelastic scattering and new physics. Highlights from the physics program will be illustrated along with details from the ac...

  11. Quarks and hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the different dynamical stages of a relativistic nuclear collision, from the pre-equilibrium initial stage through a hydrodynamic expansion stage to the particle freeze-out point. Several interesting observables will be discussed and analyzed for their relevance and information content with regard to these various stages. In particular the author touches on antibaryon and φ meson production as a probe for the approach to chemical equilibrium, and on the hadronic transverse momentum spectra as a probe for collective transverse flow in these collisions. Several of these theoretical ideas will be confronted with the recent heavy-ion data from CERN and Brookhaven

  12. High intensity hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we give an introductory discussion of high intensity hadron accelerators with special emphasis on the high intensity feature. The topics selected for this discussion are: Types of acclerator - The principal actions of an accelerator are to confine and to accelerate a particle beam. Focusing - This is a discussion of the confinement of single particles. Intensity limitations - These are related to confinement of intense beams of particles. Power economics - Considerations related to acceleration of intense beams of particles. Heavy ion kinematics - The adaptation of accelerators to accelerate all types of heavy ions

  13. Hadronic Decays of Charm

    OpenAIRE

    Stenson, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    Recent hadronic charm decay results from fixed-target experiments are presented. New measurements of the D0 to K-K+K-pi+ branching ratio are shown as are recent results from Dalitz plot fits to D+ to K-K+pi+, pi+pi-pi+, K-pi+pi+, K+pi-pi+ and D_s+ to pi+pi-pi+, K+pi-pi+. These fits include measurements of the masses and widths of several light resonances as well as strong evidence for the existence of two light scalar particles, the pipi resonance sigma and the Kpi resonance kappa.

  14. Charm from hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the discovery of charmed mesons in electron-positron annihilations at SLAC and DESY, a considerable effort has gone into looking for them in other types of reactions. Both neutrino interactions and photoproduction have provided further data on the production and decay of D mesons, but little has emerged concerning purely hadronic studies.some results from a CERN/Collège de France/Heidelberg/Karlsruhe collaboration using the Split Field Magnet at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) now show definite signs of D meson production in proton-proton collisions

  15. Exotic hadron states

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T G; Kleiv, R T; Bulthuis, B; Harnett, D; Richards, T; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Many charmonium-like and bottomonium-like $XYZ$ resonances have been observed by the Belle, Babar, CLEO and BESIII collaborations in the past decade. They are difficult to fit in the conventional quark model and thus are considered as candidates of exotic hadrons, such as multi-quark states, meson molecules, and hybrids. In this talk, we first briefly introduce the method of QCD sum rules and then provide a short review of the mass spectra of the quarkonium-like tetraquark states and the heavy quarkonium hybrids in the QCD sum rules approach. Possible interpretations of the $XYZ$ resonances are briefly discussed.

  16. Aspects of hadronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the current phenomenological models of hadron structure, whose theoretical basis is the Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), is presented. A short introduction to the QCD permits to focalize the relevant properties which are attached to those models. Following, bag-like models (in particular, MIT bag and chiral extensions) and potential-like models among them the Karl and Isgur non-relativistic model and a semi-relativistic model, free of the Klein paradox, with equal scalar-vetorial mixture of confinement potential are shortly studied. Enphasis is given to the baryons, treated, basically, as three-quarks systems. (L.C.)

  17. High energy hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The more novel and important design considerations and features of high energy hadron colliders (pp or p anti p) are discussed. The paper does not attempt to be sufficient for making a complete design, but contains enough references to other papers necessary for doing so. Formulas are generally given without derivation, and notations are not consistent from section to section. For most formulas the derivation is transparent although the mathematics may be lengthy. Whenever obscure, an explanation of the procedure for derivation will be given in physical terms. Detailed mathematical derivations can be found in the references. 10 references

  18. Hadronic Resonances from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of resonance particle productions (ρ0, ω, K*, ϕ, Σ*, and Λ* measured by the STAR collaboration at RHIC from various colliding systems and energies are presented. Measured mass, width, 〈pT〉, and yield of those resonances are reviewed. No significant mass shifts or width broadening beyond the experiment uncertainties are observed. New measurements of ϕ and ω from leptonic decay channels are presented. The yields from leptonic decay channels are compared with the measurements from hadronic decay channels and the two results are consistent with each other.

  19. High energy hadron/endash/hadron collisions: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: the elastic hadron-hadron collision, the inelastic hadron/endash/hadron collision, and the e+e/sup /minus// annihilation. The geometrical description of high-energy elastic scattering developed earlier is still in very good general agreement with experiments at the CERN/endash/S/bar p/pS energies. This description has also been extended to include processes of fragmentation and diffraction dissociation and other phenomena. More recently a unified physical picture for multiparticle emission in hadron-hadron and e+e/sup /minus// collisions was developed. It focuses on the idea of the wide range of values for the total angular momentum in hadron/endash/hadron collisions. An extension of this consideration yields a theory for the momentum distribution of the outgoing particles which agrees with /bar p/p and e+e/sup /minus// collision experiments. The results and conclusions if this theory have been extrapolated to higher energies and yielded many predictions which can be experimentally tested. 36 refs

  20. Monte Carlo event generators for hadron-hadron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, I.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). High Energy Physics Div.; Protopopescu, S.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-06-01

    A brief review of Monte Carlo event generators for simulating hadron-hadron collisions is presented. Particular emphasis is placed on comparisons of the approaches used to describe physics elements and identifying their relative merits and weaknesses. This review summarizes a more detailed report.

  1. TMD-Factorization in Hadron-Hadron Collision

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Gao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Proof of transverse-momentum-dependent(TMD) factorization for hadron-hadron collision is given in this paper. We focus on processes without detected soft ?nal hadrons or detected ?nal hadrons that are collinear to initial hadrons. This contradicts the widely accepted viewpoint that TMD- factorization does not hold in such processes even in the generalized sense. The key point is that singular points of the type l+ = 0 can be absorbed into Wilson lines of soft gluons, where l is collinear to the plus direction. Thus one should subtract such singular points from the collinear region of l. After such subtraction, one can make use of Ward identity to absorb e?ects of scalar-polarized collinear gluons into Wilson lines.

  2. Gamma-hadron families and scaling violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For three different interaction models we have simulated gamma-hadron families, including the detector (Pamir emulsion chamber) response. Rates of gamma families, hadrons, and hadron-gamma ratios were compared with experiments

  3. A New Hadron Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2014-01-01

    QCD-motivated models for hadrons predict an assortment of "exotic" hadrons that have structures that are more complex than the quark-antiquark mesons and three-quark baryons of the original quark-parton model. These include pentaquark baryons, the six-quark H-dibaryon, and tetraquark, hybrid and glueball mesons. Despite extensive experimental searches, no unambiguous candidates for any of these exotic configurations have been identified. On the other hand, a number of meson states, one that seems to be a proton-antiproton bound state, and others that contain either charmed-anticharmed quark pairs or bottom-antibottom quark pairs, have been recently discovered that neither fit into the quark-antiquark meson picture nor match the expected properties of the QCD-inspired exotics. Here I briefly review results from a recent search for the H-dibaryon, and discuss some properties of the newly discovered states --the proton-antiproton state and the so-called XYZ mesons-- and compare them with expectations for convent...

  4. Results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for bar p + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: σtot = 72.1 ± 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z → bar qq. Precision measurements of MW by UA2 and CDF give an average value MW = 80.13 ± 0.30 GeV/c2. When combined with measurements of MZ from LEP and SLC this number gives sin2θW = 0.227 ± 0.006, or mtop = 130-60+40 GeV/c2 from the EWK radiative correction term Δr. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above MW: mtop > 89 GeV/c2 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing ET signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range mtop 2 look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Hadronic laws from QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of progress in deriving the effective action for hadronic physics, S[π, ρ, ω, .., anti N, N, ..], from the fundamental defining action of QCD, S[anti q, q, Aμa]. This is a problem in quantum field theory and the most success so far has been achieved using functional integral calculus (FIC) techniques. This formulates the problem as an exercise in changing the variables of integration in the functional integrals, from those of the quark and gluon fields to those of the (bare) meson and baryon fields. The appropriate variables are determined by the dynamics of QCD, and the final hadronic variables (essentially the 'normal modes' of QCD) are local fields describing the 'centre-of-mass' motion of extended bound states of quarks. The quarks are extensively dressed by the gluons, and the detailed aspects of the hidden chiral symmetry emerge naturally from the formalism. Particular attention is given to covariant integral equations which determine bare nucleon structure (i.e. in the quenched approximation). These equations, which arise from the closed double-helix diagrams of the FIC analysis, describe the baryons in terms of quark-diquark structure, in the form of Faddeev equations. This hadronisation of QCD also generates the dressing of these baryons by the pions, and the non-local πNN coupling. (orig.)

  6. The key role of critical mock-up facilities for neutronic physics assessment of advanced reactors: an overview of Cea Cadarache tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Physics section of CEA Cadarache operates three critical facilities devoted to neutronic studies of advanced reactors (EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA) covering a large scope of interests. These include 100% MOX core in ABWR qualification, knowledge improvement of basic nuclear data for heavy nuclides for new options of the fuel cycle - especially the multi-recycling of plutonium - and accelerator-driven systems neutronic behaviour for transmutation studies. The paper describes these facilities, the scientific programmes associated and the progressive improvement of experimental techniques, the aim being to significantly reduce the uncertainties regarding the evaluation of the physical parameters. (authors)

  7. Jet-hadron correlations in STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlson, Alice

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the study of dihadron correlations has been one of the primary methods used to investigate the propagation and modification of hard-scattered partons through the QGP. Due to recent advances in jet-finding algorithms, it is now possible to use reconstructed jets in these correlation studies, extending the kinematic reach compared to dihadron analyses. The results of the jet-hadron correlation analysis indicate a broadening and softening of jets that interact with the medium. Jet-hadron correlations can also be used to assess the systematics of other jet-like correlation analyses, such as 2+1 correlations. It is shown that the jets selected in 2+1 correlations are relatively unmodified. Future work will include an analysis of jet-hadron correlations with respect to the event plane to measure the pathlength dependence of parton energy loss. The first steps in this analysis indicate that complications arise when calculating the event plane in the presence of a jet as well as in calculating jet v2...

  8. Exotic hadron and string junction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron structure is investigated adopting string junction model as a realization of confinement. Besides exotic hadrons (M4, B5 etc.), unconventional hadrons appear. A mass formula for these hadrons is proposed. New selection rule is introduced which requires the covalence of constituent line at hadron vertex. New duality appears due to the freedom of junction, especially in anti BB→anti BB reaction. A possible assignment of exotic and unconventional hadrons to recently observed narrow meson states is presented. (auth.)

  9. Review of hadrons in medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the present status in the theoretical and phenomenological understanding of hadron properties in strongly interacting matter. The topics covered are the EMC effect, nucleon structure functions in cold nuclear matter, spectral properties of light vector mesons in hot and cold nuclear matter, and in-medium properties of heavy flavored hadrons

  10. Heavy Hadrons in Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Current studies on heavy hadrons in nuclear medium are reviewed with a summary of the basic theoretical concepts of QCD, namely chiral symmetry, heavy quark spin symmetry, and the effective Lagrangian approach. The nuclear matter is an interesting place to study the properties of heavy hadrons from many different points of view. We emphasize the importance of the following topics: (i) charm/bottom hadron-nucleon interaction, (ii) structure of charm/bottom nuclei, and (iii) QCD vacuum properties and hadron modifications in nuclear medium. We pick up three different groups of heavy hadrons, quarkonia ($J/\\psi$, $\\Upsilon$), heavy-light mesons ($D$/$\\bar{D}$, $\\bar{B}$/$B$) and heavy baryons ($\\Lambda_{c}$, $\\Lambda_{b}$). The modifications of those hadrons in nuclear matter provide us with important information to investigate the essential properties of heavy hadrons. We also give the discussions about the heavy hadrons, not only in nuclear matter with infinite volume, but also in atomic nuclei with finite bary...

  11. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies

  12. Greenhouse gas accounting of the proposed landfill extension and advanced incineration facility for municipal solid waste management in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burgeoning of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal issue and climate change have drawn massive attention from people. On the one hand, Hong Kong is facing a controversial debate over the implementation of proposed landfill extension (LFE) and advanced incineration facility (AIF) to curb the MSW disposal issue. On the other hand, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government is taking concerted efforts to reduce the carbon intensity in this region. This paper discusses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from four proposed waste disposal scenarios, covering the proposed LFE and AIF within a defined system boundary. On the basis of the data collected, assumptions made, and system boundary defined in this study, the results indicate that AIF releases less GHG emissions than LFE. The GHG emissions from LFE are highly contributed by the landfill methane (CH4) emissions but offset by biogenic carbon storage, while the GHG emissions from AIF are mostly due to the stack discharge system but offset by the energy recovery system. Furthermore, parametric sensitivity analyses show that GHG emissions are strongly dependent on the landfill CH4 recovery rate, types of electricity displaced by energy recovery systems, and the heating value of MSW, altering the order of preferred waste disposal scenarios. This evaluation provides valuable insights into the applicability of a policy framework for MSW management practices in reducing GHG emissions. Highlights: • AIF is better than LFE with regard to GHG emissions in Hong Kong. • Major individual sub-processes of LFE and AIF for GHG emissions are investigated. • GHG emissions for LFE and AIF are strongly dependent on studied parametric sensitivity analyses. • Findings are valuable for sustainable MSW management and GHG reductions in waste sector

  13. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.; Mendicino, R.; Benkechkache, M. A.

    2015-02-01

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC.

  14. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  15. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC

  16. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Evaluation of prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) pack for use by the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) Pack which was developed for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). This pack will enable the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) to have ready access to advanced life support supplies and equipment for time critical responses to any situation within the Space Station Freedom. The objectives are: (1) to evaluate the design of the pack; and (2) to collect comments for revision to the design of the pack. The in-flight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic test flight to simulate weightlessness are presented.

  18. Energy deposition and radiological studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    CERN Document Server

    Rakhno, I L; Tropin, I S; Eidelman, Y I

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system - all with corresponding radiation shielding - was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  19. Energy Deposition and Radiological Studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mokhov, N. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Tropin, I. S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Eidelman, Y. I. [Euclid Techlabs LLC., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-25

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system – all with corresponding radiation shielding – was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  20. Cool QCD: Hadronic Physics and QCD in Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    QCD is the only strongly-coupled theory given to us by Nature, and it gives rise to a host of striking phenomena. Two examples in hadronic physics include the dynamic generation of mass and the confinement of quarks. Indeed, the vast majority of the mass of visible matter is due to the kinetic and potential energy of the massless gluons and the essentially massless quarks. QCD also gives rise to the force that binds protons and neutrons into nuclei, including subtle effects that have historically been difficult to understand. Describing these phenomena in terms of QCD has represented a daunting task, but remarkable progress has been achieved in both theory and experiment. Both CEBAF at Jefferson Lab and RHIC at Brookhaven National Lab have provided unprecedented experimental tools for investigating QCD, and upgrades at both facilities promise even greater opportunities in the future. Also important are programs at FermiLab as well as the LHC at CERN. Looking further ahead, an electron ion collider (EIC) has the potential to answer whole new sets of questions regarding the role of gluons in nuclear matter, an issue that lies at the heart of the generation of mass. On the theoretical side, rapid progress in supercomputers is enabling stunning progress in Lattice QCD calculations, and approximate forms of QCD are also providing deep new physical insight. In this talk I will describe both recent advances in Cool QCD as well as the exciting scientific opportunities that exist for the future.

  1. Development of a Code for the Long Term Radiological Safety Assessment of Radioactive Wastes from Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of evaluating annual individual doses from a potential repository disposing of radioactive wastes from the operation of the prospective advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Korea, the new safety assessment code based on the Goldsim has been developed. It was designed to compare the environmental impacts from many fuel cycle options such as direct disposal, wet and dry recycling. The code based on the compartment theory can be applied to assess both normal and what if scenarios

  2. Computer programs for capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes for laser fusion and other advanced technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three FORTRAN programs, CAPITAL, VENTURE, and INDEXER, have been developed to automate computations used in assessing the economic viability of proposed or conceptual laser fusion and other advanced-technology facilities, as well as conventional projects. The types of calculations performed by these programs are, respectively, capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes. The codes permit these three topics to be addressed with considerable sophistication commensurate with user requirements and available data

  3. Hadron therapy takes off in Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    A joint meeting of ULICE, ENLIGHT and PARTNER recently took place in Marburg (Germany). The three initiatives are shaping both the present and the future of hadron therapy in Europe, where new cutting-edge facilities have started to fight cancer with beams of protons and carbon ions.   A pictorial representation of a raster scan on a tumour. (Photo courtesy of HIT/GSI/Siemens.) Thanks to a very active multidisciplinary community consisting of physicists, biologists, radiobiologists, engineers, IT specialists and medical doctors, hadron therapy is taking off in Europe. Indeed, after a few decades during which the innovative technique was mainly used experimentally in Japan, the US and a couple of pioneering laboratory-based facilities in Europe, today an increasing number of hospitals are being equipped with synchrotrons and dedicated treatment rooms. “Asia and Europe are at the forefront of research and use of carbon ions in the treatment of some rare and radio-resistant t...

  4. HIGH ENERGY HADRON POLARIMETRY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE,G.

    2007-09-10

    Proton polarimetry at RHIC uses the interference of electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic scattering amplitudes. The EM spin-flip amplitude for protons is responsible for the proton's anomalous magnetic moment, and is large. This then generates a significant analyzing power for small angle elastic scattering. RHIC polarimetry has reached a 5% uncertainty on the beam polarization, and seem capable of reducing this uncertainty further. Polarized neutron beams ax also interesting for RHIC and for a polarized electron-polarized proton/ion collider in the fume. In this case, deuterons, for example, have a very small anomalous magnetic moment, making the approach used for protons impractical. Although it might be possible to use quasielastic scattering from the protons in the deuteron to monitor the polarization. 3-He beams can provide polarized neutrons, and do have a large anomalous magnetic moment, making a similar approach to proton polarimetry possible.

  5. New hadron states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topics covered in this review are: (1) candidates of new light hadrons including pp¯ threshold enhancement, X(1835), X(1576), f0(1810), recent candidates of the 1-+ exotic mesons, Y(2175), pΛ¯ threshold enhancement etc. (2) charmed mesons including p-wave non-strange charmed mesons, Dsj(2317) and Dsj(2460), recent candidates of higher excited charmed mesons, Dsj(2632) etc. (3) charmonium and charmonium-like states such as X(3872), Y(4260), X(3940), Y(3940), Z(3930) etc. The effect from the nearby S-wave open channels on the quark model spectrum above or near strong decay threshold is emphasized. Dynamical lattice simulations of DK and D0 D¯*0 scattering and the extraction of their phase shifts may help resolve the underlying structure of Dsj(2317), Dsj(2460) and X(3872). (author)

  6. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon

    2012-01-01

    The construction of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been a massive endeavour spanning almost 30 years from conception to commissioning. Building the machine with the highest possible energy (7 TeV) in the existing large electron–positron (LEP) collider tunnel of 27 km circumference and with a tunnel diameter of only 3.8 m has required considerable innovation. The first was the development of a two-in-one magnet, where the two rings are integrated into a single magnetic structure. This compact two-in-one structure was essential for the LHC owing to the limited space available in the existing LEP collider tunnel and the cost. The second was a bold move to the use of superfluid helium cooling on a massive scale, which was imposed by the need to achieve a high (8.3 T) magnetic field using an affordable Nb-Ti superconductor.

  7. Hadronic Imaging Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Alexander; Dubbers, Dirk

    This thesis focuses on a prototype of a highly granular hadronic calorimeter at the planned International Linear Collider optimized for the Particle Flow Approach. The 5.3 nuclear interaction lengths deep sandwich calorimeter was built by the CALICE collaboration and consists of 38 active plastic scintillator layers. Steel is used as absorber material and the active layers are subdivided into small tiles. In total 7608 tiles are read out individually via embedded Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM). The prototype is one of the first large scale applications of these novel and very promising miniature photodetectors. The work described in this thesis comprises the commissioning of the detector and the data acquisition with test beam particles over several months at CERN and Fermilab. The calibration of the calorimeter and the analysis of the recorded data is presented. A method to correct for the temperature dependent response of the SiPM has been developed and implemented. Its successful application shows that it...

  8. Experimental prospects of hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main subject of this report is to take a general view on the experiment with several tens of TeV hadron colliders. Intensive studies have been carried out about the physics and the detectors for such hadron machines. The experimental prospect of hadron colliders based on the studies and the view of the author are presented. To obtain a fundamental knowledge on the experiment with hadron colliders, the general properties of hadron scattering should be investigated. First, the total cross sections and charged particle multiplicity are estimated, and hard scattering process is reviewed. The cross sections for some interesting hard scattering process are summarized. The most serious problem for the experiment with hadron colliders is to pick out useful signals from enormous QCD back-ground processes, and a possibility of finding heavy Higgs bosons is discussed in detail as an example. On the basis of these studies, the requirement which general purpose detectors should satisfy is considered. Also the important machine parameters from experimental viewpoint are discussed. High energy hadron colliders have a potentiality to reveal new physics in TeV region, but the preparation for unexpected physics is necessary. (Kako, I.)

  9. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates

  10. Physics at future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates

  11. Hadronic structure from the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the investigation of hadron structure using lattice techniques has attracted growing attention. The computation of several important quantities has become feasible. Furthermore, theoretical developments as well as progress in algorithms and an increase in computing resources have contributed to a significantly improved control of systematic errors. In this article we give an overview on the work that has been carried out in the framework of the Hadron Physics I3 (I3HP) network ''Computational (lattice) hadron physics''. Here we not restrict ourselves to spin physics but focus on results for nucleon spectrum and structure from the QCDSF collaboration. (orig.)

  12. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  13. B hadron properties at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Heredia De La Cruz, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of B hadron properties are crucial to improve or constrain models based on non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics, which provide predictions of mass, lifetime, cross section, polarization, and branching ratios (among several other properties) of B hadrons. Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_s$ and properties of rare B decays also provide many opportunities to search for new physics. This article presents some B hadron property results obtained by CMS using Run~I (2011-2012) data, and prospects for the Run~II (2015-2017) data taking period.

  14. Nuclei, hadrons, and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a short introduction to the physics of the nuclei, hadrons, and elementary particles for students of physics. Important facts and model imaginations on the structure, the decay, and the scattering of nuclei, the 'zoology' of the hadrons and basic facts of hadronic scattering processes, a short introduction to quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics and the most important processes of lepton and parton physics, as well as the current-current approach of weak interactions and the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam theory are presented. (orig.) With 153 figs., 10 tabs

  15. Hadrons produced in atmospheric interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic analysis is made on cosmic ray induced atmospheric interactions detected to study the hadron multiple production. It is demonstrated that hadrons rich events are not characterized only by super families (halo events). About 5% of the events with visible energy in the range of 100-1000 TeV and transverse momentum sensity over the rapidity scale ≥1 GeV.km, has an anomalously 'hadron excess', already observed in super families (visible energy > 1000 TeV). The analysis did not include events identified as exotic ones (Centauro, Mini Centauro, Geminion and Chiron). (Author)

  16. Physics at future hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U. Baur et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  17. QCD physics at hadron storage rings: From COSY to FAIR

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    James Ritman

    2006-05-01

    As a result of the rapid rise of the coupling constant at low momentum transfers, perturbation theory is not an appropriate method to describe the strong interaction. In this kinematic regime other methods such as lattice QCD or effective field theories are more appropriate to investigate the appearance of a still unsettled phenomena: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking. Furthermore, the confinement of quarks and gluons to hadrons allows crucial tests of fundamental symmetries that are inherent to the QCD Lagrangian but are broken in hadronic systems. Thus, high precision measurements of the production and decay of specific hadronic states provides decisive benchmarks to investigate the properties of QCD in this regime. A new series of experiments are being prepared using nearly full acceptance detectors for neutral and charged particles around internal targets in high intensity, phase-space-cooled hadronic beams. Later this year, it is planned to transfer the WASA detector from the CELSIUS to the COSY ring in order to measure the production and various decay channels of the and ' mesons, thereby investigating the violation of P, C, T, and combinations thereof, as well as isospin violation. The experimental and theoretical techniques employed here will provide an important basis to extend these investigations to the static and dynamical properties of hadrons with charm quark content with the high energy storage ring for antiprotons at the new GSI/FAIR facility. Additional related perspectives will be opened at the new facility ranging from the properties of hadrons in dense nuclear matter to measurements of the nucleon's transverse spin distribution in the valence quark region using polarized antiprotons.

  18. Structure and compositeness of hadron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Hyodo, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The structure of the hadron resonances attracts much attention, in association with the recent observations of various exotic hadrons which do not fit well in the conventional picture. These findings urge us to consider various new configurations such as the multiquark states and the hadronic molecules. However, it is a subtle problem to define a proper classification scheme for the hadron structure, and the nonzero decay width of the hadron resonances makes the analysis complicated. In this article, we summarize the recent developments in the studies of the structure of the hadron resonances, focusing on the notion of the compositeness in terms of the hadronic degrees of freedom.

  19. Advancing automation of power distribution facilities and the cost reduction measures. Activities o technology development for advanced automation systems; Susumu haiden setsubi no jidoka, cost teigen taisaku. Jidoka system no kodoka eno gijutsu kaihatsu no torikumi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayami, M.; Matsui, Y. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Electric power companies in Japan are making efforts to reduce the cost by improving the operation rate of existing facilities through the employment of advanced automation systems in the sector of distribution. This paper introduces the systems of Hitachi. A 22 kV-line automation system using high-speed photo-transmission line is adopted for the maintenance of widely extended distribution facilities. This system includes a 22 kV/240-415 V transformer and a 22 kV/105-210 V transformer. To supervise and control these transformers and switches, and to recover the accidents, this system consists of a computer system, a remote host station, and remote end terminals. Based on the information of distribution facilities of substations, end terminals and a host station, monitor/control of these facilities and recovery of accidents are conducted using computers. A system plan supporting system is also introduced, which aims at improvements of facility utilization factor, operation efficiency, and distribution operation efficiency. 5 figs.

  20. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  1. Lare Hadron Collider faces today

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN could be delayed after three of the magnets used to focus and manipulate the accelerator's proton beams failed premilinary tests at CERN earlier this week." (1 page)

  2. Hadronic property at finite density

    OpenAIRE

    Takaishi, Tetsuya

    2004-01-01

    We report on three topics on finite density simulations: (i) the derivative method for hadronic quantities, (ii) phase fluctuations in the vicinity of the critical temperature and (iii) the density of states method at finite isospin density.

  3. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  4. Physics with colliding hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Wetherell, Alan M

    1972-01-01

    The results on p-p collisions obtained with the CERN ISR will be reviewed and the current experimental programme described. Future possibilities for colliding hadron beams, other than proton-proton, will be briefly discussed. (0 refs).

  5. Hadronic Interactions with Lattice QCD

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    I discuss recent results of the NPLQCD Collaboration regarding the calculation of hadronic interactions with lattice QCD. A particular emphasis will be spent on pi-pi scattering and other meson interactions.

  6. Hadrons with Two Heavy Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Jean-Marc

    1994-01-01

    We review the spectroscopy and some properties of hadrons containing two charmed quarks, or more generally, two heavy quarks. This includes heavy baryons such as $(bcu)$, and possible exotic multiquark states.

  7. Forward physics of hadronic colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures were given at the Baikal Summer School on Physics of Elementary Particles and Astrophysics in July 2012. They can be viewed as a concise introduction to hadronic diffraction, to the physics of the pomeron and related topics

  8. Hadronic {tau} decays and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  9. Masses of hadrons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We emphasize the central role played by the spectral function in the description of hadrons in matter and discuss the applicability of the quasiparticle concept to the propagation of hadrons in dense nuclear matter. Theoretical and experimental results relevant for the in medium properties of vector mesons and kaons are briefly reviewed. We also present novel results for the ρ and ω spectral functions in nuclear matter, deduced from a coupled channel analysis of pion-nucleon scattering data. (orig.)

  10. Hadron physics with KLOE-2

    CERN Document Server

    Czerwinski, Eryk; Babusci, D; Badoni, D; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Bulychjev, S A; Campana, P; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; De Zorzi, G; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Hoistad, B; Iarocci, E; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kulikov, V V; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Loddo, F; Martemianov, M A; Martini, M; Matsyuk, M A; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moricciani, D; Morello, G; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Ranieri, A; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2010-01-01

    In the upcoming month the KLOE-2 data taking campaign will start at the upgraded DAFNE phi-factory of INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati. The main goal is to collect an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb^(-1) in 3-4 years in order to refine and extend the KLOE program on both kaon physics and hadron spectroscopy. Here the expected improvements on the results of hadron spectroscopy are presented and briefly discussed.

  11. Schottky Anomaly and Hadronic Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Aritra; Sinha, Nita

    2015-01-01

    We show that the hadronic "heat capacity" calculated as a function of temperature may be used to infer the possible presence of different scales underlying the dynamical structure of hadronic resonances using the phenomenon of Schottky anomaly. We first demonstrate this possibility with well known meson spectrum in various channels and comment on the possibility of using this method as a diagnostic to distinguish the exotic states.

  12. Progress In Transverse Feedbacks and Related Diagnostics for Hadron Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Hofle, W

    2013-01-01

    Today Hadron Accelerators with high intensity and high brightness beams increasingly rely on transverse feedback systems for the control of instabilities and the preservation of the transverse emittance. With particular emphasis, but not limited to, the CERN Hadron Accelerator Chain, the progress made in recent years, and the performances achieved are reviewed. Hadron colliders such as the LHC represent a particular challenge as they ask for low noise electronic systems in these feedbacks for acceptable emittance growth. Achievements of the LHC transverse feedback system used for damping injection oscillations and to provide stability throughout the cycle are summarized. This includes its use for abort gap and injection cleaning as well as transverse blow-up for diagnostics purposes. Beyond systems already in operation, advances in technology and modern digital signal processing with increasingly higher digitization rates have made systems conceivable to cure intra-bunch motion. With its capabilities to both ...

  13. Thermodynamics of the low density excluded volume hadron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Zalewski, Kacper

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the influence of the excluded volume of hadrons on macroscopic variables and thermal parameters of the hadron gas at finite temperature and chemical potential in the low density approximation. Based solely on elementary thermodynamics we show that when the excluded volume grows at constant temperature, pressure, and number of particles, the overall volume increases just as much as the excluded volume, while the entropy and energy remain unchanged. The growth of the chemical potentials is equal to the work needed to create the respective excluded volumes. Consequently, the bulk density functions of a gas with excluded volume are expressed by the corresponding variables in a system of point particles with the shifted chemical potentials. Our results are fully consistent with the previous findings obtained upon applications of more advanced methods of statistical physics. A validity limit for the low density approximation is derived and discussed in the context of the hadron gas created in heavy ion c...

  14. Concluding remarks on future facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of some of the facilities and projects for the study of hadron spectroscopy are summarized. The work is focalized on e+ e- machines, which are classified according to the quark family they can study: U,D,S quark families, C quark and τ studies and B quark family. The analysis leads to the conclusion that high luminosity e+ e- machines are needed to progress in the hadron spectroscopy exploration

  15. Late effects from hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  16. Hyogo Hadron Therapy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyogo Prefectural Government has decided and started construction of Hyogo Hadron Therapy Center in Harima Science Garden City, where is about 75 km away from Kobe City to the north-west. The center has injector, synchrotron, high energy beam transport system and treatment system. The accelerator complex can accelerate proton, helium, and carbon. The energy ranges are 70-230 MeV/u for proton and helium, and 70-320 MeV/u for the carbon. The beam intensity is required to satisfy the dose rate of 5 Gy/min. for treatment volume of 15cmφ field size and fully extended spread out Bragg peak (SOBP). The beam transport system consists of three horizontal ports, one vertical ports, and one 45deg oblique port for proton, helium and carbon beam, two isocentric gantry ports only for proton beam. A hospital within 50 beds is constructed with the site. Patient treatment will be started in the year 2001. (author)

  17. Theory of hadronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the Euclidean vacuum in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) can be regarded as a four-dimensional ensemble of permanent color magnetic dipoles (instantons and meron pairs), with a positive paramagnetic susceptibility. Standard techniques are used to discuss the interactions of this medium for moderate densities. In the presence of color fields (due to quarks), large scale instantons (and other fluctuations) are suppressed, the density is low, and the system is easily treated. Below a critical field strength, this dilute phase is unstable and a first-order phase transition occurs to a dense phase consisting of closely packed instantons and merons, and possibly other things. In this dense phase, we believe that the permeability is infinite (perfect paramagnetism) and thus the normal QCD vacuum cannot tolerate color fields. This leads to a strikingly simple baglike picture of hadrons, as consisting of quarks confined to a region of space-time which is in a very dilute (abnormal) vacuum phase, in equilibrium with the dense vacuum (normal) phase outside the bag. The quarks are confined to the region of dilute phase where their dynamics are simple; and, as we show, they are shielded from the large-scale fluctuations outside the bag. We present a derivation of the static bag for heavy quarks and an estimate (to within a factor of two) of the bag constant. We further discuss some features of the resulting bag model including chiral-symmetry breaking and surface effects

  18. Deformed shapes of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility is considered that the shape of the ground state configuration of a system of quarks interacting with a real scalar field is nonspherical. This is explored through application of the variational principle to a simple model field theory of quarks coupled linearly to a real scalar field. Trial functions are, by construction, eigenstates of linear and angular momentum and correspond to quarks confined by an ellipsoidal well of major axis, a, and minor axis, b, with zero depth and height g phi0, where g is the quark-scalar particle coupling constant. The parameters a, b, and phi0 are determined such that their values minimize the total energy of the system. These variations are carried out in the limit when the renormalized scalar particle mass, μ, is taken to infinity and the energy takes on a semi-classical form. Furthermore, in the renormalized limit (i.e., when the renormalization cutoff goes to infinity) it is found that the energy depends on two finite arbitrary constants and that there exists a minimum of the energy for which the eccentricity of the confining well is nonzero. In fact, the spherical configuration is unstable and of higher energy. The model is applied to hadron spectroscopy for the low lying (mass < 2 GeV) nonstrange baryons with j less than or equal to 3/2. 15 references

  19. Validation of Advanced Computer Codes for VVER Technology: LB-LOCA Transient in PSB-VVER Facility

    OpenAIRE

    M. Benčík; Zakutaev, M. O.; Zaitsev, S. I.; Schekoldin, V. I.; F. D'Auria; I. V. Elkin; Melikhov, O. I.; Adorni, M.; Del Nevo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OECD/NEA PSB-VVER project provided unique and useful experimental data for code validation from PSB-VVER test facility. This facility represents the scaled-down layout of the Russian-designed pressurized water reactor, namely, VVER-1000. Five experiments were executed, dealing with loss of coolant scenarios (small, intermediate, and large break loss of coolant accidents), a primary-to-secondary leak, and a parametric study (natural circulation test) aimed at characterizing the VVER system...

  20. Hadron nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic and inelastic scattering of intermediate energy (less than or equal to 1 GeV) protons by nuclei is considered first. The discussion focuses on the determination of the proton-nucleus optical potential in terms of the elementary nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitudes and the properties of the target and residual nucleus. The result is a series of terms for the optical potential. Then the interaction of pions with nuclei for energies in the neighborhood of the Δ-resonance is discussed. In this energy domain an incident pion will with high probability be absorbed by a nucleon to produce the Δ-resonance and thus form a Δ-particle hole state in the nucleus. Next, the subject of hypernuclei is taken up. The Λ hypernuclei and a recently observed Σ hypernuclei comprise situations in which the core nucleus can be probed by a baryon of roughly the same mass as a nucleon, with similar albeit not identical interactions with nucleons. But the Λ (or Σ) does not need to satisfy the Pauli exclusion principle with respect to the nucleons, and therefore can be in orbits forbidden to it if it were a nucleon. As the energy of the projectile increases, it becomes correspondingly more important to take relativistic effects into account. The importance of these effects is strikingly revealed by experiments involving the collision of ultrarelativistic hadrons, protons, pions, kaons (up to Fermilab energies) with nuclei. This phenomenon forms part of the final topic, which includes as well as the collision of relativistic heavy ion projectiles with nuclei. A nuclear Weiszaecker-Williams method developed for dealing with peripheral collisions is described. 32 figures, 10 tables

  1. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report for 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on high-energy hadron-hadron collisions in the geometrical model, performed under the DOE Contract No. DE-AS09-76ER00946, is summarized. Specific items studied include the elastic hadron-hadron scattering at ultrahigh energies and the existence of many dips, the computation of meson radii, the hadronic matter current effects on inelastic two-body processes, and the diffraction dissociation processes in hadron-nucleus and hadron-hadron collisions. No data are included with this report; references are given

  2. CALIBRATION AND HOT TESTING OF THE ADVANCED NUCLEAR MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS USED FOR WASTE CHARACTERIZATION IN COGEMA'S NEW ACC COMPACTION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel from commercial power reactors is reprocessed at the COGEMA plant in La Hague. After shearing and dissolution of the fuel assemblies, the hulls and nozzles are sent to COGEMA's new compaction facility (ACC) to reduce the final volume of waste. Technological waste generated in the reprocessing plant is also sent to the ACC facility. Compacted waste is characterized by two measurement stations: a gamma spectrometry station and an active and passive neutron measurement station. The main purpose of these measurement stations is to determine the guaranteed nuclear parameters of the compacted waste and their associated uncertainties: (1) total U and Pu masses, (2) Pu, Cm, and total alpha activities, (3) 137Cs, 90Sr-90Y,241Pu beta activities, (4) decay heat. After giving a description of the measurement stations, this paper will describe the qualification tests performed in the context of the ACC project. The extensive calibration tests performed on site with different sources and different waste matrices will be described (approximately 500 neutron and gamma experiments). Hot tests that were conducted after hot start-up at the end of 2001 and prior to the start of commercial operation will be also presented. A number of drums produced by the upstream facilities were introduced one by one into the ACC facility in order to avoid mixing of different fuel assemblies. This procedure allows comparison between characterization performed in the upstream facilities on the basis of fuel data available before processing and the measurements performed on the new ACC stations. These comparisons showed good agreement between the different methods of characterization and thus validated the innovative technologies and methods used by COGEMA for compacted waste generated by the ACC facility

  3. Threshold Resummation for Di-hadron Production in Hadronic Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Leandro G; Vogelsang, Werner

    2009-01-01

    We study the resummation of large logarithmic perturbative corrections to the partonic cross sections relevant for di-hadron production in hadronic collisions, H1 H2 -> h1 h2 X, at high invariant mass of the produced hadron pair. These corrections arise near the threshold for the partonic reaction and are associated with soft-gluon emission. We perform the resummation to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, and show how to incorporate consistently cuts in rapidity and transverse momentum of the observed particles. We present numerical results for fixed-target and ISR regimes and find enhancements over the next-to-leading order cross section, which significantly improve the agreement between theoretical predictions and data.

  4. Saturation Effects in Hadronic Cross Sections

    OpenAIRE

    Shoshi, Arif I.; Steffen, Frank D.

    2002-01-01

    We compute total and differential elastic cross sections of high-energy hadronic collisions in the loop-loop correlation model that provides a unified description of hadron-hadron, photon-hadron, and photon-photon reactions. The impact parameter profiles of pp and gamma*p collisions are calculated. For ultra-high energies the hadron opacity saturates at the black disc limit which tames the growth of the hadronic cross sections in agreement with the Froissart bound. We compute the impact param...

  5. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on high energy hadron-hadron collisions in the geometrical model is summarized. In the past two years, our investigation centered on the analysis of new experimental results obtained by the UA1, UA4 and UA5 Collaborations at the CERN-SPS Collider. Specific items studied include the analysis of anti p p elastic scattering with the geometrical picture, multiplicity fluctuation and KNO scaling, and forward-backward charge distribution in anti p p collisions at a center of mass energy of 540 GeV. 21 references

  6. Hadron production in e+e- annihilation. QCD and hadronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results on hadron production in e+e- annihilation are summarized. The topics included are: (1) inclusive hadron production, (2) comparison of light (u,d,s) and heavy (c,b) quark jets; (3) p - anti p correlations; (4) gluon vs. quark jets; (5) analysis of 3 jet events; (6) measurement of the strong coupling constant α/sub s/; and (7) forward-backward asymmetries of quarks and leptons. Experimental data are compared with predictions of several models to reveal underlying physics. 62 refs., 22 figs

  7. Towards an optimum principle in hadron-hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the helicity amplitudes are obtained assuming that the hadron-hadron scattering behaves so as to optimize the forward unpolarized cross section when the integrated elastic cross section is fixed. Then, the diffraction behaviour as well as the scalling properties of the angular distributions are well reproduced by the optimal model prediction. The predictions on the logarithmic slope diffraction peak are satisfied experimentally to a surprising accuracy for all pp, anti-p p, k+-p and π+-p scattering at all energies higher than 2 GeV. (author)

  8. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on high energy hadron-hadron collisions in the geometrical model is summarized. Our recent investigation has centered on the analysis of new experimental results obtained at the CERN-SPS Collider. Specific items studied include the analysis of anti pp elastic scattering and particle production processes with the geometrical picture. As a result of the latter study, a model for particle production is proposed and a simple compact formula for single-particle momentum distribution obtained. The calculated angular distribution is in excellent agreement with the SPS Collider experiments. 28 references

  9. Symmetry tests with intense hadron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Government of Canada has pulled the plug on funding of the KAON facility in Canada. But the science opportunities for symmetry tests with the kinds of beams that KAON would have provided remain. For example, the full intensity of kaons, which KAON would have provided, is needed to find the magnitude and phase of Vtd and therefore to describe direct CP violation. The combination of K+ → π+νν- and KLo → πoνν- serve this purpose. A variety of other symmetry tests are possible with the kind of intense beams of kaons, antinucleons, other hadrons and neutrinos which KAON would have provided. A perspective will be given for such experiments and their future prospects, now that KAON will not be built. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  10. The Tevatron Hadron Collider: A short history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this presentation was intended to cover the history of hadron colliders. However this broad topic is probably better left to historians. I will cover a much smaller portion of this subject and specialize my subject to the history of the Tevatron. As we will see, the Tevatron project is tightly entwined with the progress in collider technology. It occupies a unique place among accelerators in that it was the first to make use of superconducting magnets and indeed the basic design now forms a template for all machines using this technology. It was spawned in an incredibly productive era when new ideas were being generated almost monthly and it has matured into our highest energy collider complete with two large detectors that provide the major facility in the US for probing high Pt physics for the coming decade

  11. Dijet imbalance in hadronic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Boer, Daniel; Pisano, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    The imbalance of dijets produced in hadronic collisions has been used to extract the average transverse momentum of partons inside the hadrons. In this paper we discuss new contributions to the dijet imbalance that could complicate or even hamper this extraction. They are due to polarization of initial state partons inside unpolarized hadrons that can arise in the presence of nonzero parton transverse momentum. Transversely polarized quarks and linearly polarized gluons produce specific azimuthal dependences of the two jets that in principle are not suppressed. Their effects cannot be isolated just by looking at the angular deviation from the back-to-back situation, rather they enter jet broadening observables. In this way they directly affect the extraction of the average transverse momentum of unpolarized partons that is thought to be extracted. We discuss appropriately weighted cross sections to isolate the additional contributions.

  12. Quenched hadron spectrum of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate hadron spectrum of quantum chromodynamics without dynamical fermions on a 323 x 64 lattice volume at β = 6.5. Using two different wall sources of staggered fermion whose mass is 0.01, 0.005 and 0.0025 under the background gauge configurations, we extract local light hadron masses and the triangle masses and compare these hadron masses with those from experiments. The numerical simulation is executed on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer. We employ multihit metropolis algorithm with over-relaxation method steps to update gauge field configuration and gauge field configuration are collected at every 1000 sweeps. After the gauge field configuration is fixed to Coulomb gauge, the conjugate gradient method is used for Dirac matrix inversion

  13. The Nonperturbative Structure of Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Hobbs, T J

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we explore a diverse array of issues that strike at the inherently nonperturbative structure of hadrons at momenta below the QCD confinement scale. In so doing, we mainly seek a better control over the partonic substructure of strongly-interacting matter, especially as this relates to the nonperturbative effects that both motivate and complicate experiments --- particularly DIS; among others, such considerations entail sub-leading corrections in $Q^2$, dynamical higher twist effects, and hadron mass corrections. We also present novel calculations of several examples of flavor symmetry violation, which also originates in the long-distance properties of QCD at low energy. Moreover, we outline a recently developed model, framed as a hadronic effective theory amenable to QCD global analysis, which provides new insights into the possibility of nonperturbative heavy quarks in the nucleon. This model can be extended to the scale of the lighter mesons, and we assess the accessibility of the structure f...

  14. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in bar...

  15. Phenomenological studies of hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of hadronic collisions are studied in a phenomenological framework. A Monte Carlo model for initial state parton showers, using a backwards evolution scheme, is presented. Comparisons with experimental data and analytical calculations are made. The consequence of using different fragmentation model on the determination of αs is also investigated. It is found that the different fragmentation models lead to the reconstruction of significantly αs values. Finally the possibility of having several independent parton-parton interactions in a hadron-hadron collision is studied. A model is developed, which takes into account the effects of variable impact parameters. This is implemented in a Monte Carlo computer program and extensive comparisons with experimental data are carried out. There is clear evidence in favour of multiple interactions with variable impact parameters. (author)

  16. The Oxnard advanced water purification facility: combining indirect potable reuse with reverse osmosis concentrate beneficial use to ensure a California community's water sustainability and provide coastal wetlands restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jim; Ortega, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The City of Oxnard in California is implementing a strategic water resources program known as the Groundwater Recovery Enhancement and Treatment (GREAT) program, which includes an Advanced Water Purification Facility (AWPF) that will use a major portion of the secondary effluent from the City's existing Water Pollution Control Facility to produce high-quality treated water to be used for irrigation of edible food crops, landscape irrigation, injection into the groundwater basin to form a barrier to seawater intrusion, and other industrial uses. The AWPF, currently under design by CH2M HILL, will employ a multiple-barrier treatment train consisting of microfiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultravioletlightbased advanced oxidation processes to purify the secondary effluent to conform to California Department of Public Health Title 22 Recycled Water Criteria for groundwater recharge. The AWPF, which will have initial and build-out capacities of ca. 24,000 and ca 95,000 m(3)/day, respectively, was limited to a 1.8-hectare site, with 0.4 hectares dedicated to a Visitor's Center and administration building. Further, the depth below grade and height of the AWPF's structures were constrained because of the high groundwater table at the site, the high cost of excavation and dewatering, and local codes. To accommodate these various restrictions, an innovative design approach has been developed. This paper summarizes the design constraints and innovative solutions for the design of the AWPF. PMID:20220237

  17. Belle II and Hadron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Križan, Peter, E-mail: peter.krizan@ijs.si [J. Stefan Institute and University of Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2015-08-15

    Asymmetric B factories, PEP-II with BaBar and KEKB with Belle, made a decisive contribution to flavour physics. In addition, they also observed a long list of new hadrons, some of which do not fit into the standard meson and baryon schemes. The next generation of B factories, the so called Super B factory will search for departures from the Standard model. For this task, a 50 times larger data sample is needed, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 50 ab{sup −1}. With such a large data sample there are many more topics to explore, including searches for new and exotic hadrons, and investigation of their properties.

  18. Very high multiplicity hadron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper contains a description of a first attempt to understand the extremely inelastic high energy hadron collisions, when the multiplicity of produced hadrons considerably exceeds its mean value. Problems with existing model predictions are discussed. The real-time finite-temperature S-matrix theory is built to have a possibility to find model-free predictions. This allows one to include the statistical effects into consideration and build the phenomenology. The questions to experiment are formulated at the very end of the paper

  19. Proceedings of the second symposium on science of hadrons under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi [ed.

    2000-08-01

    The second symposium on Science of Hadrons under Extreme Conditions, organized by the Research Group for Hadron Science, Advanced Science Research Center, was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI on January 24 to 26, 2000. The symposium was devoted for discussions and presentations of research results in wide variety of fields such as nuclear matter, high-energy nuclear reactions, quantum chromodynamics, supernovae and nucleosynthesis to understand various aspects of hadrons under extreme conditions. The 26 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Proceedings of the second symposium on science of hadrons under extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second symposium on Science of Hadrons under Extreme Conditions, organized by the Research Group for Hadron Science, Advanced Science Research Center, was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI on January 24 to 26, 2000. The symposium was devoted for discussions and presentations of research results in wide variety of fields such as nuclear matter, high-energy nuclear reactions, quantum chromodynamics, supernovae and nucleosynthesis to understand various aspects of hadrons under extreme conditions. The 26 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  2. QCD at high-luminosity hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hautmann, F

    2016-01-01

    This talk gives a brief introduction to open questions in jet physics and QCD which come to the fore in the high-luminosity regime characterizing the upcoming phase of the Large Hadron Collider and future hadron colliders.

  3. SU(2) Skyrme Model for Hadron

    CERN Document Server

    Hadi, Miftachul

    2010-01-01

    The SU(2) Skyrme model is reviewed. The model, which considers hadron as soliton (Skyrmion), is used for investigating the nucleon mass and delta mass. Keywords: Skyrme model, soliton, hadron, nucleon mass, delta mass.

  4. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs.

  5. Is there a hadronic Ramsauer effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that a good part of the hadronic resonances could very well not be resonances at all. We extend the principle of Ramsauer effect of atomic physics to other Physics' areas and especially to hadronic physics

  6. Detectors and luminosity for hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, R.

    1982-01-01

    Three types of very high energy hadron-hadron colliders are discussed in terms of the trade-off between energy and luminosity. The useable luminosity depends both on the physics under study and the rate capabilities of the detector.

  7. HASPECT: HAdron SPEctroscopy CenTer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main motivations for hadron spectroscopy in general and in particular for hybrid meson spectroscopy will be reviewed. The HASPECT (HAdron SPEctroscopy CenTer) project will be presented and discussed.

  8. Beam instrumentation for future high intense hadron accelerators at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, M.; Hu, M.; Tassotto, G.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Scarpine, V.; Shin, S.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    High intensity hadron beams of up to 2 MW beam power are a key element of new proposed experimental facilities at Fermilab. Project X, which includes a SCRF 8 GeV H{sup -} linac, will be the centerpiece of future HEP activities in the neutrino sector. After a short overview of this, and other proposed projects, we present the current status of the beam instrumentation activities at Fermilab with a few examples. With upgrades and improvements they can meet the requirements of the new beam facilities, however design and development of new instruments is needed, as shown by the prototype and conceptual examples in the last section.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider, A Megascience Project

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, P

    2001-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be the next particle accelerator built to serve the world's high-energy physics community at CERN, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research. Reusing the 26.7-km circumference tunnel and infrastructure of the existing LEP collider, the LHC will make use of advanced technology - high-field superconducting magnets operated in superfluid helium - to push the energy frontier up by an order of magnitude, while remaining economically feasible. The LHC demonstrates on a grand scale several typical features of megascience projects, such as the need for international funding, world-wide co-operation and integration in the local environment, which we review in the following.

  10. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  11. Status and prospects for the calculation of hadron structure from lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Dru B. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Lattice QCD calculations of hadron structure are a valuable complement to many experimental programs as well as an indispensable tool to understand the dynamics of QCD. I present a focused review of a few representative topics chosen to illustrate both the challenges and advances of our community: the momentum fraction, axial charge and charge radius of the nucleon. I will discuss the current status of these calculations and speculate on the prospects for accurate calculations of hadron structure from lattice QCD. (orig.)

  12. The masses of elementary particles and hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Ding-Yu

    2000-01-01

    The masses of elementary particles and hadrons can be calculated from the periodic table of elementary particles. The periodic table is derived from dimensional hierarchy for the seven extra spatial dimensions. As a molecule is the composite of atoms with chemical bonds, a hadron is the composite of elementary particles with hadronic bonds. The masses of elementary particles and hadrons can be calculated using the periodic table with only four known constants: the number of the extra spatial ...

  13. Free quarks and antiquarks versus hadronic matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-Ming; PENG Ru

    2009-01-01

    Meson-meson reactions A(q1q1) + B(q2q2) → q1+q1+ q2+q2 in high-temperature hadronic matter are found to produce an appreciable amount of quarks and antiquarks freely moving in hadronic matter and to establish a new mechanism for deconfinement of quarks and antiquarks in hadronic matter.

  14. Unsolved problems in hadronic charm decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes several outstanding problems in the study of hadronic decays of charmed mesons where further experimental work and theoretical understanding is needed. Four topics are stressed: double Cabibbo suppressed decays (DCSD) of D+ mesons, hadronic Ds decays, weak hadronic quasi-two-body decays to pairs of vector mesons, and penguin decays of D mesons. 24 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Assembly of the CMS hadronic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The hadronic calorimeter is assembled on the end-cap of the CMS detector in the assembly hall. Hadronic calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  16. The very large hadron collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This paper reviews the purposes to be served by a very large hadron collider and the organization and coordination of efforts to bring it about. There is some discussion of magnet requirements and R&D and the suitability of the Fermilab site.

  17. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument. It is being constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest particle physics laboratories.

  18. The CMS central hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.; E892 Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The CMS central hadron calorimeter is a copper absorber/ scintillator sampling structure. We describe design choices that led us to this concept, details of the mechanical and optical structure, and test beam results. We discuss calibration techniques, and finally the anticipated construction schedule.

  19. Intermittency patterns in hadron multiproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-range fluctuations in rapidity are observed in high energy multiproduction of hadrons. Using a factorial moment method, we show how to isolate non-statistical fluctuations and discuss some model predictions. Models including a space-time cascade of cluster decays are expected to lead to fluctuation patterns typical of intermittency whereas the dual parton model gives a very different steady behaviour

  20. Shape of hadron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis that, in the leading twist approximation and to all orders of perturbative QCD, there exists a momentum scale Q02 at which hadrons are pure valence quark (or antiquark) bound states gives good results for nucleon, pion, and kaon structure functions. 2 figures

  1. Exotic hadrons: review and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The physics of exotic hadrons is revisited and reviewed, with emphasis on flavour configurations which have not yet been investigated. The constituent quark model of multiquark states is discussed in some detail, as it can serve as a guide for more elaborate approaches.

  2. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W±/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  3. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  4. Hadronic final states at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Bussey, P J

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of hadronic final states by H1 and ZEUS at HERA are presented. The H1 measurements consist of measurements of charged particle spectra in deep -inelastic $ep$ scattering and of forward photons and neutrons. The ZEUS results consist of a series of measurements of prompt photons in photoproduction.

  5. Gluonic excitations in hadronic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical expectations are described for new forms of hadronic matter containing gluons as excitable degrees of freedom. Particular attention is paid to hybrid states containing both quarks and gluons. Recent work on the spectroscopy of hybrid mesons and hybrid baryons is reviewed. Comparisons of bag model, lattice QCD and QCD sum rule predictions are made and some confrontation with data attempted. (author)

  6. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  7. Theoretical predictions for exotic hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational and Theoretical Physics Group]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1996-12-31

    In this contribution the authors discuss current theoretical expectations for the properties of light meson exotica, which are meson resonances outside the q{anti q} quark model. Specifically they discuss expectations for gluonic hadrons (glueballs and hybrids) and multiquark systems (molecules). Experimental candidates for these states are summarized, and the relevance of a TCF to these studies is stressed.

  8. A PARTNERship for hadron therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    PARTNER, the Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy, has recently been awarded 5.6 million euros by the European Commission. The project, which is coordinated by CERN, has been set up to train researchers of the future in hadron therapy and in doing so aid the battle against cancer.

  9. Theoretical predictions for exotic hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution the authors discuss current theoretical expectations for the properties of light meson exotica, which are meson resonances outside the q anti q quark model. Specifically they discuss expectations for gluonic hadrons (glueballs and hybrids) and multiquark systems (molecules). Experimental candidates for these states are summarized, and the relevance of a TCF to these studies is stressed

  10. Introduction to Hadronic B Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Adam F.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the theory of B physics is given, with an emphasis on issues in the strong interactions and hadronic physics. This article is taken from an introductory chapter of The BaBar Physics Book - Physics at an Asymmetric B Factory, SLAC Report SLAC-R-504. It is written at the level of a basic survey aimed at the experimental community.

  11. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  12. Application of life-cycle information for advancement in safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Application of safety information to advanced safety management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk management is major concern to nuclear energy reprocessing plants to improve plant and process reliability and ensure their safety. This is because we are required to predict potential risks before any accident or disaster occurs. The advancement of safety design and safety systems technologies showed large amount of useful safety-related knowledge that can be of great importance to plant operation to reduce operation risks and ensure safety. This research proposes safety knowledge modeling framework on the basis of ontology technologies to systematically construct plant knowledge model, which includes plant structure, operation, and the associated behaviors. In such plant knowledge model safety related information is defined and linked to the different elements of plant knowledge model. Ontology editor is employed to define the basic concepts and their inter-relations, which are used to capture and construct plant safety knowledge. In order to provide detailed safety knowledgebase, HAZOP results are analyzed and structured so that safety-related knowledge are identified and structured within the plant knowledgebase. The target safety knowledgebase includes: failures, deviations, causes, consequences, and fault propagation as mapped to plant knowledge. The proposed ontology-based safety framework is applied on case study nuclear plant to structure failures, causes, consequences, and fault propagation, which are used to support plant operation. (author)

  13. Recent Advances in Antenna Measurement Techniques at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports recent antenna measurement projects and research at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at the Technical University of Denmark. High-accuracy measurement projects for the SMOS, SENTINEL-1, and BIOMASS missions of the European Space Agency were driven by...... uncertainty requirements of a few hundredths of dB for the directivity and correspondingly strong requirements for gain and/or phase. Research and development of 1:3 bandwidth range probes, and the near-field to far-field transformation algorithm accounting for the higher-order azimuthal modes in the...

  14. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near Berlin in September 2013. The aim of this document is to summarize the discussions that took place at the ATHOS 2012 and ATHOS 2013 meetings. We do not attempt a comprehensive review of the field of amplitude analysis, but offer a collection of thoughts that we hope may lay the ground for such a document

  15. Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglieri, M; Celentano, A; Chung, S -U; D'Angelo, A; De Vita, R; Döring, M; Dudek, J; Eidelman, S; Fegan, S; Ferretti, J; Fox, G; Galata, G; Garcia-Tecocoatzi, H; Glazier, D I; Grube, B; Hanhart, C; Hoferichter, M; Hughes, S M; Ireland, D G; Ketzer, B; Klein, F J; Kubis, B; Liu, B; Masjuan, P; Mathieu, V; McKinnon, B; Mitchell, R; Nerling, F; Paul, S; Pelaez, J R; Rademacker, J; Rizzo, A; Salgado, C; Santopinto, E; Sarantsev, A V; Sato, T; Schlüter, T; da Silva, M L L; Stankovic, I; Strakovsky, I; Szczepaniak, A; Vassallo, A; Walford, N K; Watts, D P; Zana, L

    2014-01-01

    The series of workshops on New Partial-Wave Analysis Tools for Next-Generation Hadron Spectroscopy Experiments was initiated with the ATHOS 2012 meeting, which took place in Camogli, Italy, June 20-22, 2012. It was followed by ATHOS 2013 in Kloster Seeon near Munich, Germany, May 21-24, 2013. The third, ATHOS3, meeting is planned for April 13-17, 2015 at The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus, USA. The workshops focus on the development of amplitude analysis tools for meson and baryon spectroscopy, and complement other programs in hadron spectroscopy organized in the recent past including the INT-JLab Workshop on Hadron Spectroscopy in Seattle in 2009, the International Workshop on Amplitude Analysis in Hadron Spectroscopy at the ECT*-Trento in 2011, the School on Amplitude Analysis in Modern Physics in Bad Honnef in 2011, the Jefferson Lab Advanced Study Institute Summer School in 2012, and the School on Concepts of Modern Amplitude Analysis Techniques in Flecken-Zechlin near...

  16. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are the single-cell concept, the low-flow ventilation concept, television viewing, equipment-mounting racks, and force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. 14 refs., 3 figs

  17. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are (1) the single-cell concept, (2) the low-flow ventilation concept, (3) television viewing, (4) equipment-mounting racks, and (5) force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. (author)

  18. Future Advanced Nuclear Systems and the Role of MYRRHA as a Waste Transmutation R&D Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is an experimental accelerator driven system (ADS) currently being developed at SCK•CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. The MYRRHA facility is conceived as a flexible fast spectrum irradiation facility, which is able to run in both subcritical and critical modes. The applications catalogue of MYRRHA includes fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for GEN IV systems and fusion reactors, doped silicon production, radioisotope production and fundamental science applications thanks to the high power proton accelerator. Next to these applications, MYRRHA will demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling a high power proton accelerator, a multi-megawatt spallation target and a subcritical reactor at reasonable power level to allow operational feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow the study of efficient transmutation of high level nuclear waste. Since MYRRHA is based on heavy liquid metal technology, namely lead–bismuth eutectic, it will be able to significantly contribute to the development of lead fast reactor (LFR) technology and will fill the role of the European Technology Pilot Plant in the roadmap for LFR. The current design of the MYRRHA ADS and its ability to contribute to the European Commission strategy for high level waste management through partitioning and transmutation are discussed in this paper. (author)

  19. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Han, H. W.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Orozco, D.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, a D-T neutron source and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The ion accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products through acceleration of D ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. The D-T neutron source generates up to 6 × 108 neutrons/s. The two x-ray generators produce spectra with peak energies of 35 keV and 225 keV and maximum dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 12 Gy/min, respectively. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  20. Restoration of Chiral Symmetry in Excited Hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physics of the low-lying and high-lying hadrons in the light flavor sector is reviewed. While the low-lying hadrons are strongly affected by the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, in the high-lying hadrons the chiral symmetry is restored. A manifestation of the chiral symmetry restoration in excited hadrons is a persistence of the chiral multiplet structure in both baryon and meson spectra. Meson and baryon chiral multiplets are classified. A relation between the chiral symmetry restoration and the string picture of excited hadrons is discussed. (author)

  1. Semiclassical description of hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yield of hadron-nucleus collisions are described in terms of the data on hadron-nucleon collisions and the data on the target-nucleus size and nucleon density distribution in it. A set of hadron-nucleus collision events may be treated as an interaction of hadron beam with a slab of nuclear matter. This way, the data on hadron-nucleus collisions are considered similarly as the data obtained in absorption experiments-when the interaction of a particle beam with a slab of a material is studied. The theory of probability and statistics is the natural mathematical apparatus for such kind

  2. Electric and magnetic polarizabilities of hadrons via elastic Compton scattering at KAON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of dynamic properties of hadrons presents a challenge. Among the most basic of these are the electric and magnetic polarizabilities describing the electromagnetic structure of hadrons. They characterize the induced transient dipole moments of hadrons in an external electromagnetic field. During gamma-hadron Compton scattering the lowest order scattering is determined by the charge and magnetic moment. The next order scattering is determined by the induced dipole moments. The dipole polarizabilities probe the rigidity of the internal structure of baryons and mesons, the dipole moments being induced by the rearrangement of the hadron constituents driven by the presence of the electric and magnetic fields of the photon during scattering. A sophisticated understanding of hadrons within the framework of QCD will be tested, in part, by the prediction of these quantities. For the light charged pion, chiral symmetry leads to a precise prediction for the polarizabilities. For the heavier charged kaon, chiral perturbation theory can be applied to predict the polarizabilities. For these cases, the experimental polarizabilities subject the underlying chiral symmetry and chiral perturbation techniques of QCD to new and serious tests. Here the physics of electromagnetic polarizabilities is first described, followed by a review of previous experimental and theoretical polarizability results for the proton, neutron, pion, and kaon. A brief description is then given of how polarizabilities for these hadrons can be studied at the proposed TRIUMF KAON facility. (36 refs., 4 figs.)

  3. Toward NNLL Resummation for Hadron Production in Hadronic Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Hinderer, Patriz; Sterman, George F; Vogelsang, Werner

    2015-01-01

    We present results relevant for the extension of threshold resummation beyond the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) order for QCD hard-scattering processes. As an example, we consider di-hadron production $H_1 H_2\\to h_1 h_2 X$, where the produced pair has a large invariant mass. Taking into account the non-trivial color structure of the partonic hard-scattering process, we determine the hard and soft matrices in color space. In our numerical studies we find a significant improvement compared to previous results at NLL accuracy. In particular, the scale dependence of the resummed cross section is greatly reduced. In addition, we comment on the extension of the techniques developed in this work to other observables relevant for hadronic collisions.

  4. Double hadron leptoproduction in the nuclear medium

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Grebenyuk, O; Gregor, I M; Griffioen, K; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kobayashi, T; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Michler, T; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Ohsuga, H; Osborne, A; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Streit, J; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Van Haarlem, Y; Veretennikov, D; Vikhrov, V; Vogel, C; Wang, S; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2006-01-01

    First measurement of double-hadron production in deep-inelastic scattering has been measured with the HERMES spectrometer at HERA using a 27.6 GeV positron beam with deuterium, nitrogen, krypton and xenon targets. The influence of the nuclear medium on the ratio of double-hadron to single-hadron yields has been investigated. Nuclear effects are clearly observed but with substantially smaller magnitude and reduced $A$-dependence compared to previously measured single-hadron multiplicity ratios. The data are in fair agreement with models based on partonic or pre-hadronic energy loss, while they seem to rule out a pure absorptive treatment of the final state interactions. Thus, the double-hadron ratio provides an additional tool for studying modifications of hadronization in nuclear matter.

  5. Thermalization of Hadrons via Hagedorn States

    CERN Document Server

    Beitel, M; Greiner, C

    2014-01-01

    Hagedorn states are characterized by being very massive hadron-like resonances and by not being limited to quantum numbers of known hadrons. To generate such a zoo of different Hagedorn states, a covariantly formulated bootstrap equation is solved by ensuring energy conservation and conservation of baryon number $B$, strangeness $S$ and electric charge $Q$. The numerical solution of this equation provides Hagedorn spectra, which enable to obtain the decay width for Hagedorn states needed in cascading decay simulations. A single (heavy) Hagedorn state cascades by various two-body decay channels subsequently into final stable hadrons. All final hadronic observables like masses, spectral functions and decay branching ratios for hadronic feed down are taken from the hadronic transport model UrQMD. Strikingly, the final energy spectra of resulting hadrons are exponential showing a thermal-like distribution with the characteristic Hagedorn temperature.

  6. Inhomogeneous nucleation in quark hadron phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, P K; Sen-Gupta, S K; Gleiser, Marcello; Gleiser, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    The effect of subcritical hadron bubbles on a first-order quark-hadron phase transition is studied. These subcritical hadron bubbles created due to thermal fluctuations introduce a finite amount of phase mixing (quark phase mixed with hadron phase) even at and above the critical temperature. For sufficiently strong transitions, as is expected to be the case for the quark-hadron transition, we show that the amount of phase mixing at the critical temperature remains much below the percolation threshold. Thus, as the system cools below the critical temperature, the transition proceeds through the nucleation of critical-size hadron bubbles from a metastable quark-gluon phase (QGP) within an inhomogeneous background populated by an equilibrium distribution of subcritical hadron bubbles. The inhomogenity of the medium is incorporated consistently by modelling the subcritical bubbles as Gaussian fluctuations, resulting in a large reduction of the nucleation barrier for the critical bubbles. Using the corrected nucle...

  7. Theoretical study of EAS hadronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, L.

    1985-01-01

    The structure of extensive air showers (EAS) is determined mainly by the energetic hadrons. They are strongly collimated in the core of the shower and essential difficulties are encountered for resolution of individual hadrons. The properties for resolution are different from the variety of hadron detectors used in EAS experiments. This is the main difficulty in obtaining a general agreement between actually registered data with different detectors. The most plausible source for disagreement is the uncertainty in determination of the energy of individual hadrons. This research demonstrates that a better agreement can be obtained with the average tendency of hadronic measurements if one assumes a larger coefficient of inelasticity and stronger energy increase of the total inelastic cross section in high energy pion interactions. EAS data above 10 to the 5th power GeV are revealing a faster development of hadronic cascades in the air then can be expected by extrapolating the parameters of hadron interactions obtained in accelerator measurements.

  8. Group theory in particle, nuclear, and hadron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, Syed Afsar

    2016-01-01

    This user-friendly book on group theory introduces topics in as simple a manner as possible and then gradually develops those topics into more advanced ones, eventually building up to the current state-of-the-art. By using simple examples from physics and mathematics, the advanced topics become logical extensions of ideas already introduced. In addition to being used as a textbook, this book would also be useful as a reference guide for graduates and researchers in particle, nuclear and hadron physics.

  9. High Energy Tests of Advanced Materials for Beam Intercepting Devices at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, S; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaeelli, S; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2012-01-01

    Predicting by simulations the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting Collimators and other Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) is a fundamental issue for machine protection: this can be done by resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, these codes require reliable material models that, at the extreme conditions generated by a beam impact, are either imprecise or non-existent. To validate relevant constitutive models or, when unavailable, derive new ones, a comprehensive experimental test foreseeing intense particle beam impacts on six different materials, either already used for present BID or under development for future applications, is being prepared at CERN HiRadMat facility. Tests will be run at medium and high intensity using the SPS proton beam (440 GeV). Material characterization will be carried out mostly in real time relying on embarked instrumentation (strain gauges, microphones, temperature and pressure sensors) and on remote acquisition dev...

  10. Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation

  11. Science drivers and requirements for an Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Implications for technology development and synergies with other future facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Postman, Marc; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R Michael; Stahl, H Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Rémi; Hyde, Tupper; 10.1117/12.857044

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astronphysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 {\\mu}m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 {\\mu}m to 2.4 {\\mu}m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  12. Multipurpose monochromator for the Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center Collaborative Access Team beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source x-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) will construct x-ray beamlines at two sectors of the Advanced Photon Source facility. In most of the beamlines the first optical element will be a monochromator, so that a standard design for this critical component is advantageous. The monochromator is a double-crystal, fixed exit scheme with a constant offset designed for ultrahigh vacuum windowless operation. In this design, the crystals are mounted on a turntable with the first crystal at the center of rotation. Mechanical linkages are used to correctly position the second crystal and maintain a constant offset. The main drive for the rotary motion is provided by a vacuum compatible Huber goniometer isolated from the main vacuum chamber. The design of the monochromator is such that it can accommodate water, gallium, or liquid-nitrogen cooling for the crystal optics

  13. Hadronic molecules with a ${\\bar{D}}$ meson in a medium

    CERN Document Server

    Caramés, T F; Klein, G; Tsushima, K; Vijande, J; Valcarce, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of a hot and dense medium on the binding energy of hadronic molecules with open-charm mesons. We focus on a recent chiral quark-model-based prediction of a molecular state in the $N \\bar D$ system. We analyze how the two-body thresholds and the hadron-hadron interactions are modified when quark and meson masses and quark-meson couplings change in a function of the temperature and baryon density according to predictions of the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model. We find that in some cases the molecular binding is enhanced in medium as compared to their free-space binding. We discuss the consequences of our findings for the search for exotic hadrons in high-energy heavy-ion collisions as well as in the forthcoming facilities FAIR or J-PARC.

  14. Experimental facility with two-phase flow and with high concentration of non-condensable gases for research and development of emergency cooling system of advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of emergency cooling passive systems of advanced nuclear reactors requires the research of some relative processes to natural circulation, in two-phase flow conditions involving condensation processes in the presence of non-condensable gases. This work describes the main characteristics of the experimental facility called Bancada de Circulacao Natural (BCN), designed for natural circulation experiments in a system with a hot source, electric heater, a cold source, heat exchanger, operating with two-phase flow and with high concentration of noncondensable gas, air. The operational tests, the data acquisition system and the first experimental results in natural circulation are presented. The experiments are transitory in natural circulation considering power steps. The distribution of temperatures and the behavior of the flow and of the pressure are analyzed. The experimental facility, the instrumentation and the data acquisition system demonstrated to be adapted for the purposes of research of emergency cooling passive systems, operating with two-phase flow and with high concentration of noncondensable gases. (author)

  15. Hadron therapy information sharing prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Faustin Laurentiu; Kanellopoulos, Vassiliki; Amoros, Gabriel; Davies, Jim; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jena, Raj; Kirkby, Norman; Peach, Ken; Salt, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The European PARTNER project developed a prototypical system for sharing hadron therapy data. This system allows doctors and patients to record and report treatment-related events during and after hadron therapy. It presents doctors and statisticians with an integrated view of adverse events across institutions, using open-source components for data federation, semantics, and analysis. There is a particular emphasis upon semantic consistency, achieved through intelligent, annotated form designs. The system as presented is ready for use in a clinical setting, and amenable to further customization. The essential contribution of the work reported here lies in the novel data integration and reporting methods, as well as the approach to software sustainability achieved through the use of community-supported open-source components.

  16. Hadron therapy physics and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an in-depth overview of the physics of hadron therapy, ranging from the history to the latest contributions to the subject. It covers the mechanisms of protons and carbon ions at the molecular level (DNA breaks and proteins 53BP1 and RPA), the physics and mathematics of accelerators (Cyclotron and Synchrotron), microdosimetry measurements (with new results so far achieved), and Monte Carlo simulations in hadron therapy using FLUKA (CERN) and MCHIT (FIAS) software. The text also includes information about proton therapy centers and carbon ion centers (PTCOG), as well as a comparison and discussion of both techniques in treatment planning and radiation monitoring. This brief is suitable for newcomers to medical physics as well as seasoned specialists in radiation oncology.

  17. Hadronic resonances enhanced by thresholds

    CERN Document Server

    Caramés, T F

    2016-01-01

    We present a neat example of a meson--baryon system where the vicinity of two different thresholds enhances the binding of a hadronic resonance, a pentaquark. As a consequence the pattern of states may change when moving among different flavor sectors, what poses a warning on naive extrapolations to heavy flavor sectors based on systematic expansions. For this purpose we simultaneously analyze the $N\\bar D$ and $NB$ two-hadron systems looking for possible bound states or resonances. When a resonance is controlled by a coupled-channel effect, going to a different flavor sector may enhance or diminish the binding. This effect may, for example, generate significant differences between the charmonium and bottomonium spectra above open-flavor thresholds or pentaquark states in the open-charm and open-bottom sectors.

  18. Quantum groups in hadron phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that application of quantum unitary groups, in place of ordinary flavor SU(nf), to such static aspects of hadron phenomenology as hadron masses and mass formulas is indeed fruitful. So-called q-deformed mass formulas are given for octet baryons 1/2+ and decuplet baryons 3/2+, as well as for the case of vector mesons 1- involving heavy flavors. For deformation parameter q, rigid fixation of values is used. New mass sum rules of remarkable accuracy are presented. As shown in decuplet case, the approach accounts for effects highly nonlinear in SU(3)-breaking. Topological implication (possible connection with knots) for singlet vector mesons and the relation q ↔ Θc (Cabibbo angle) in case of baryons are considered

  19. The PHENIX Hadron Blind Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dielectron measurements by the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC are limited by the combinatorial background from electrons and positrons which are not produced in the same pair. The Hadron Blind Detector will allow a substantial reduction of this background by correctly identifying dielectrons from photon conversions and pion Dalitz decays which dominate the signal in the low mass region of the spectrum. Triple GEM stacks, with a CsI photocathode deposited on the uppermost GEM, detect Cherenkov light produced by electrons in a CF4 radiator. The transparency of CF4, high quantum efficiency of CsI in the UV, and absence of a window between the gas radiator and the GEMs allow a large photoelectron yield, while minimizing the hadron signal. Results from the HBD in RHIC's Run-7 and preparations for upcoming runs are discussed.

  20. Spectrum of hadrons with strangeness

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D; Wan, Shaolong; Wilson, David J

    2012-01-01

    We describe a calculation of the spectrum of strange and nonstrange hadrons that simultaneously correlates the dressed-quark-core masses of meson and baryon ground- and excited-states within a single framework. The foundation for this analysis is a symmetry-preserving Dyson-Schwinger equation treatment of a vector-vector contact interaction. Our results exemplify and highlight the deep impact of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking on the hadron spectrum: an accurate description of the meson spectrum entails a similarly successful prediction of the spectrum of baryons, including those with strangeness. The analysis also provides numerous insights into baryon structure. For example, that baryon structure is largely flavour-blind, the first radial excitation of ground-state baryons is constituted almost entirely from axial-vector diquark correlations, and DCSB is the foundation for the ordering of low-lying baryon levels; viz., (1/2)^+, (1/2)^+, (1/2)^-.

  1. Hadronic interaction models and air shower simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive air showers can only be interpreted by comparison of the measured observables with simulations, using a suitable model for the shower development in the atmosphere. Due to the complexity of the phenomenon, in the past the models were quite simple and results from air showers were to interpret qualitatively, at best. With a new generation of experiments more advanced detectors became operational and the need for detailed simulations grew. In recent years several new air shower programs were developed. Using the rapid increase of the computing power they have now reached a high level of sophistication. Particle transport, electromagnetic interactions and decay of unstable particles are treated in great detail. However the most crucial ingredient to all these programs is the modeling of hadronic interactions since it requires extrapolation in energy, primary mass and kinematics to regions where no accelerator data exist and where theoretical guidelines are only vague. As a consequence of the model uncertainties, experiments using different models occasionally reached very different conclusions on energy spectra and composition of the cosmic rays. CORSIKA is an extensive air shower simulation program that contains five different hadronic interaction models (VENUS, QGSJET, SIBYLL, HDPM, and DPMJET). It is widely used throughout the cosmic ray community and allows the study of model dependencies and the systematic effects of measurement and event reconstruction. Results for different models concerning inelastic cross-sections and particle production and their influence on air shower variables are discussed and the systematic uncertainties for air shower analyses are investigated. The capability of precise multi-parameter measurements to discriminate between the models is emphasised

  2. Hard processes in hadronic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum chromodynamics is today accepted as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, even though most hadronic collisions lead to final states for which quantitative QCD predictions are still lacking. It therefore seems worthwhile to take stock of where we stand today and to what extent the presently available data on hard processes in hadronic collisions can be accounted for in terms of QCD. This is one reason for this work. The second reason--and in fact its original trigger--is the search for the quark-gluon plasma in high energy nuclear collisions. The hard processes to be considered here are the production of prompt photons, Drell-Yan dileptons, open charm, quarkonium states, and hard jets. For each of these, the authors discuss the present theoretical understanding, compare the resulting predictions to available data, and then show what behavior it leads to at RHIC and LHC energies. All of these processes have the structure mentioned above: they contain a hard partonic interaction, calculable perturbatively, but also the non-perturbative parton distribution within a hadron. These parton distributions, however, can be studied theoretically in terms of counting rule arguments, and they can be checked independently by measurements of the parton structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The present volume is the work of Hard Probe Collaboration, a group of theorists who are interested in the problem and were willing to dedicate a considerable amount of their time to work on it. The necessary preparation, planning and coordination of the project were carried out in two workshops of two weeks' duration each, in February 1994 at CERN in Geneva and in July 1994 at LBL in Berkeley. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  3. Electroweak measurements from hadron machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of the W and Z gauge bosons at the Sp bar pS in 1983 marked the beginning of direct electroweak measurements at a hadron machine. These measurements vindicated the tree level predictions of the Standard Model. The new generation of hadron collider machines now have data of such precision that the electroweak measurements are probing the quantum corrections to the Standard Model. The importance of these quantum corrections was recognized in the award of the 1999 Nobel Price. These corrections are being tested by a wide variety of measurements ranging from atomic parity violation in cesium to precision measurements at the Z pole and above in e+e- collisions. In this article, the latest experimental electroweak data from hadron machines is reviewed. The author has taken a broad definition of a hadron machine to include the results from NuTeV (νN collisions) and HERA (ep collisions) as well as the results of the Tevatron (pbar p collisions). This is not an exhaustive survey of all results, but a summary of the new results of the past year and in particular those results which have an influence on the indirect determination of the Higgs mass. This article will cover the direct determinations of the W boson and top quark masses from pbar p collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV from the two Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0. These results are based on s-channel production of single W bosons and top quark pairs. The results presented here from the NuTeV and HERA experiments allow one to make complementary measurements and probe the electroweak interaction in the space-like domain up to large momentum transfers in the t-channel

  4. Hadron Physics from Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    We sketch the basic ideas of the lattice regularization in Quantum Field Theory, the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations, and applications to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This approach enables the numerical measurement of observables at the non-perturbative level. We comment on selected results, with a focus on hadron masses and the link to Chiral Perturbation Theory. At last we address two outstanding issues: topological freezing and the sign problem.

  5. Spectroscopy of heavy quark hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy quarks play special roles in the hadron spectroscopy. Some distinct features of heavy quark dynamics and their significance in the P-wave baryons with a single heavy quark are discussed. We also explore a new color configuration in exotic tetra-quark mesons with two heavy quarks. Finally, possibility of bound states of a charmed baryon with a nucleon and nuclei are examined. (author)

  6. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebach, M; Dax, A; Fuhrmann, H; Gotta, D; Gruber, A; Hirtl, A; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Markushin, V E; Hassani, A J Rusi el; Simons, L M; Trassinelli, M; Zmeskal, J

    2014-01-01

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be $\\epsilon_{1s}=7.086\\,\\pm\\,0.007(stat)\\,\\pm\\,0.006(sys)$\\,eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate resolution bent crystal Bragg spectrometer.

  7. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be ε 1s = 7.086 ± 0.007(stat) ± 0.006(sys) eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground-state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer with bent crystals. (orig.)

  8. Hadron collider physics at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nodulman, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    The hadron collider physics program at Fermilab, Tevatron-I, has recently provided considerable data samples to two high beta experiments as well as one low beta general purpose Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). A brief description of the Tevatron collider and the high beta experiments is followed by a discussion of hard scattering results from CDF. The prospects for growth in this exciting physics program are outlined. 20 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Hadron collider physics at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hadron collider physics program at Fermilab, Tevatron-I, has recently provided considerable data samples to two high beta experiments as well as one low beta general purpose Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). A brief description of the Tevatron collider and the high beta experiments is followed by a discussion of hard scattering results from CDF. The prospects for growth in this exciting physics program are outlined. 20 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab

  10. Correlations in hadron diffraction dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron diffractive dissociation reactions are studied based on three component Deck model. The correlations between the mass in dissociated particle subsystem and the dissociation angle/or partial waves) defined in gottfried-Jackson system, are interpreted. Several reactions with different spin and parity structures in dissociative verticles, are studied. The three component Deck model is extended to dissociation of light nuclei, in particular the deuteron dissociation. (M.C.K.)

  11. Hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebach, M.; Gotta, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Anagnostopoulos, D.F. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ioannina (Greece); Dax, A.; Liu, Y.W.; Markushin, V.E.; Simons, L.M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Particle Physics, Villigen (Switzerland); Fuhrmann, H.; Gruber, A.; Hirtl, A.; Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics, Vienna (Austria); Indelicato, P. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Sorbonne Universites, Paris (France); CNRS, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Departement de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Paris (France); Manil, B. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Sorbonne Universites, Paris (France); Rusi el Hassani, A.J. [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Tanger (Morocco); Trassinelli, M. [Sorbonne Universites, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Paris (France); CNRS, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Paris (France)

    2014-12-01

    The hadronic shift in pionic hydrogen has been redetermined to be ε {sub 1s} = 7.086 ± 0.007(stat) ± 0.006(sys) eV by X-ray spectroscopy of ground-state transitions applying various energy calibration schemes. The experiment was performed at the high-intensity low-energy pion beam of the Paul Scherrer Institut by using the cyclotron trap and an ultimate-resolution Bragg spectrometer with bent crystals. (orig.)

  12. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipari, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the "high energy universe" is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma-rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non-perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ˜ 1020 eV, or a nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  13. Hadron Structure '87. Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of the 21 papers and 41 short communications presented at the conference, the proceedings contain the full texts of 12 papers and 35 short communications. All these contributions have been inputted to INIS. The topics covered include nonperturbative calculations in the field theory, in QCD in particular; particle production in hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions and the quark-gluon plasma; and recent experimental results in the field. (A.K.)

  14. Experiments at future hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes signatures and backgrounds for processes in high-energy hadronic collisions, particularly at the SSC. It includes both signatures for new particles -- t quarks, Higgs bosons, new Ζ' bosons, supersymmetric particles, and technicolor particles -- and other experiments which might be done. It is based on the 1990 Snowmass Workshop and on work contained in the Expressions of Interest submitted to the SSC. 46 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  15. Facile synthesis of ultrathin manganese dioxide nanosheets arrays on nickel foam as advanced binder-free supercapacitor electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ming

    2015-03-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Ultrathin MnO2 nanosheets arrays on Ni foam have been fabricated by a facile hydrothermal approach and further investigated as the binder-free electrode for high-performance supercapacitors. This unique well-designed binder-free electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance (595.2 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1), good rate capability (64.1% retention), and excellent cycling stability (89% capacitance retention after 3000 cycles). Moreover, an asymmetric supercapacitor is constructed using the as-prepared MnO2 nanosheets arrays as the positive electrode and activated microwave exfoliated graphite oxide (MEGO) as the negative electrode. The optimized asymmetric supercapacitor displays excellent electrochemical performance with an energy density of 25.8 Wh kg-1 and a maximum power density of 223.2 kW kg-1. These impressive performances suggest that the MnO2 nanosheet array is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  16. An approach to advanced migration analysis of radioactive nuclides around near and far fields of underground radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposal of radioactive wastes produced from the consumption of nuclear fuel is one of the remaining most important problems. The objective of radioactive waste disposal is to isolate the wastes from the living environment of mankind till the radiation effect to mankind due to the radioactive nuclides contained in the wastes becomes negligible. As for the disposal method to attain the objective, various methods have been proposed corresponding to the kinds of radioactive wastes. One of the fundamental factors of the safety evaluation related to the disposal is the concentration of radioactive nuclides in groundwater. In this paper, the concept of the underground disposal of wastes and its relation to ground water are outlined, and by placing emphasis on the way of thinking of nuclide transfer and heat transfer model, the hydraulic approach to this problem is made by the new theory. In foreign countries, actual underground research facilities were constructed, and the related research activities have been carried out. Further, when the factors of superlong term are added, various new problems arise. (K.I.)

  17. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  18. An Applied Study of Implementation of the Advanced Decommissioning Costing Methodology for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik, Sweden with special emphasis to the application of the Omega code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presented study is focused on an analysis of decommissioning costs for the Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (FA) facility in Studsvik prepared by SVAFO and a proposal of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology application. Therefore, this applied study concentrates particularly in the following areas: 1. Analysis of FA facility cost estimates prepared by SVAFO including description of FA facility in Studsvik, summarised input data, applied cost estimates methodology and summarised results from SVAFO study. 2. Discussion of results of the SVAFO analysis, proposals for enhanced cost estimating methodology and upgraded structure of inputs/outputs for decommissioning study for FA facility. 3. Review of costing methodologies with the special emphasis on the advanced costing methodology and cost calculation code OMEGA. 4. Discussion on implementation of the advanced costing methodology for FA facility in Studsvik together with: - identification of areas of implementation; - analyses of local decommissioning infrastructure; - adaptation of the data for the calculation database; - inventory database; and - implementation of the style of work with the computer code OMEGA

  19. An Applied Study of Implementation of the Advanced Decommissioning Costing Methodology for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik, Sweden with special emphasis to the application of the Omega code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The presented study is focused on an analysis of decommissioning costs for the Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (FA) facility in Studsvik prepared by SVAFO and a proposal of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology application. Therefore, this applied study concentrates particularly in the following areas: 1. Analysis of FA facility cost estimates prepared by SVAFO including description of FA facility in Studsvik, summarised input data, applied cost estimates methodology and summarised results from SVAFO study. 2. Discussion of results of the SVAFO analysis, proposals for enhanced cost estimating methodology and upgraded structure of inputs/outputs for decommissioning study for FA facility. 3. Review of costing methodologies with the special emphasis on the advanced costing methodology and cost calculation code OMEGA. 4. Discussion on implementation of the advanced costing methodology for FA facility in Studsvik together with: - identification of areas of implementation; - analyses of local decommissioning infrastructure; - adaptation of the data for the calculation database; - inventory database; and - implementation of the style of work with the computer code OMEGA.

  20. Proceedings of the third symposium on science of hadrons under extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The third symposium on Science of Hadrons under Extreme Conditions, organized by the Research Group for Hadron Science, Advanced Science Research Center, was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI on January 29 to 31, 2001. The symposium was devoted for discussions and presentations of research results in wide variety of hadron physics such as nuclear matter, high-energy nuclear reactions, quantum chromodynamics, neutron stars, supernovae, nucleosynthesis as well as finite nuclei to understand various aspects of hadrons under extreme conditions. Twenty two papers on these topics presented at the symposium, including a special talk on the present status of JAERI-KEK joint project on high-intensity proton accelerator, aroused lively discussions among approximately 40 participants. The 20 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Proceedings of the third symposium on science of hadrons under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Satoshi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-09-01

    The third symposium on Science of Hadrons under Extreme Conditions, organized by the Research Group for Hadron Science, Advanced Science Research Center, was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI on January 29 to 31, 2001. The symposium was devoted for discussions and presentations of research results in wide variety of hadron physics such as nuclear matter, high-energy nuclear reactions, quantum chromodynamics, neutron stars, supernovae, nucleosynthesis as well as finite nuclei to understand various aspects of hadrons under extreme conditions. Twenty two papers on these topics presented at the symposium, including a special talk on the present status of JAERI-KEK joint project on high-intensity proton accelerator, aroused lively discussions among approximately 40 participants. The 20 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  2. Diagnosing Implosion Performance at the National Ignition Facility by Means of Advanced Neutron-Spectrometry and Neutron-Imaging Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through the evolution of fuel areal density, is essential for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about areal density and areal-density asymmetries, hot-spot ion temperature (Ti) and yield (Yn) are therefore critical for understanding the assembly of the fuel. To obtain this information, a suite of neutron Time-of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been commissioned and extensively used on the NIF for measurements of the neutron spectrum in the energy range from 1.5 to 20 MeV. This range covers all essential details of the neutron spectrum, allowing for the determination of areal density, Yn, and Ti. The spectrometers are fielded at different locations around the implosion for directional measurements of the neutron spectrum, also allowing for determination of areal-density asymmetries and possible kinetic effects. The data obtained from these diagnostics have been essential to the progress of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), indicating that the implosion performance, characterized by the Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx), has improved about two orders of magnitude since the first cryogenic shot taken in September 2010. Areal-density values greater than 1 g/cm2 are now readily achieved. By combining the areal-density data with information about the spatial extent of the high-density region obtained from Neutron Imaging System (NIS), it has been demonstrated that densities above 500 g/cc and pressure-time (Pτ) products in excess of 10 atm s have been achieved, which are according to HYDRA simulations about a factor of three from ignition conditions. (author)

  3. AFRL Advanced Electric Lasers Branch - Construction and Upgrade of a 50-watt Facility-Class Sodium Guidestar Pump Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, T.; Miller, H.; Stohs, J.; Lu, C.; Baker, J.; Lucero, A.

    The development of a reliable and effective laser source for pumping mesospheric sodium to generate an artificial guidestar has been well documented. From the early achievements with 589nm high-power dye lasers at the Keck and Lick observatories to the ground-breaking 50W CW FASOR (Frequency Addition Source of Optical Radiation) Guidestar at the Air Forces Starfire Optical Range (SOR), there has been intense interest in this technology from both the academic and military communities. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the Air Force Research Laboratorys Advanced Electric Lasers Branch began a project to build, test, verify and deliver an upgraded version of the SOR FASOR for use at the AF Maui Optical Station (AMOS) in the summer of 2010. This FASOR will be similar in design to the existing SOR device and produce 50W of diffraction limited, linearly polarized narrow linewidth 589nm light by combining the output of two injection-locked Nd:YAG ring lasers (operating at 1064nm and 1319nm) using resonant sum-frequency generation in a lithium triborate crystal (LBO). The upgraded features will include modularized sub-components, embedded control electronics, and a simplified cooling system. The first portion of this upgrade project is to reconstruct the current SOR FASOR components and include improved methods of regulating the gain modules of the two injection lasers. In parallel with this effort, the technical plans for the modularization and re-packaging of the FASOR will be finalized and coordinated with the staff at Maui. This presentation will summarize the result of these efforts to date and provide updates on the AMOS FASOR status. Additionally, plans for "next-generation" FASOR upgrades for both SOR and AMOS will also be discussed.

  4. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the {\\sc aleph} detector at {\\sc lep} . The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to b e less than $10^{-6}$. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of $\\bd$, $\\bs$ and $\\lb$ weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes , here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be $\\Br(\\btohh) = \\resultBR$. The relative branching fraction $\\rratio$, where $\\rs$ is the ratio of $\\bs$ to $\\bd$ decays in the sample, is measured to be $\\resultR$. %Branching ratio upper limits are also obtained for a variety In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  5. Space-time evolution of hadronization

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A

    2007-01-01

    Beside its intrinsic interest for the insights it can give into color confinement, knowledge of the space-time evolution of hadronization is very important for correctly interpreting jet-quenching data in heavy ion collisions and extracting the properties of the produced medium. On the experimental side, the cleanest environment to study the space-time evolution of hadronization is semi-inclusive Deeply Inelastic Scattering on nuclear targets. On the theoretical side, 2 frameworks are presently competing to explain the observed attenuation of hadron production: quark energy loss (with hadron formation outside the nucleus) and nuclear absorption (with hadronization starting inside the nucleus). I discuss recent observables and ideas which will help to distinguish these 2 mechanisms and to measure the time scales of the hadronization process.

  6. Hadron calorimetry in the L3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the L3 hadron calorimeter as realized in the observation of hadronic jets and other events from e+e- c collisions at LEP are presented and discussed. The pattern-recognition algorithm utilizing the fine granularity of the calorimeter is described, and the observed overall resolution of 10.2% for hadron jets from Z decay is reported. The use of the calorimeter in providing information on muon energy losses is also noted. (orig.)

  7. Identification of hadronic tau decays in CMS

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Raman; CMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The algorithm used for reconstruction and identification of hadronic tau decays by the CMS experiment at the LHC is presented. The tau reconstruction in CMS takes advantage of the particle-flow algorithm which allows to reconstruct individual hadronic decay modes. The performance of the algorithm in terms of tau identification efficiency and rates for jets to be misidentified as hadronic tau decays is measured in $pp$ collision data recorded in 2012 at a center-of-mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$) of ...

  8. Hadronic Event-Shape Variables at CMS

    OpenAIRE

    Dissertori, G.; Moortgat, F; Weber, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    In this note a study of hadronic event shapes in QCD events at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presented. Calorimetric jet momenta, determined by various jet clustering algorithms, are used as input for calculating various event-shape variables which probe the structure of the hadronic final state. It is shown that the normalized event-shape distributions are robust under variations of the jet energy scale and resolution effects, which makes them particularly suitable for early data analys...

  9. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1×1 cm2) silicon sensors

  10. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  11. High Energy Hadron Colliders - Report of the Snowmass 2013 Frontier Capabilities Hadron Collider Study Group

    OpenAIRE

    Barletta, William; Battaglia, Marco; Klute, Markus; Mangano, Michelangelo; Prestemon, Soren; Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been the tools for discovery at the highest mass scales of the energy frontier from the SppS, to the Tevatron and now the LHC. This report reviews future hadron collider projects from the high luminosity LHC upgrade to a 100 TeV hadron collider in a large tunnel, the underlying technology challenges and R&D directions and presents a series of recommendations for the future development of hadron collider research and technology.

  12. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e+e- annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed

  13. Hadronization measurements in cold nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupre, Raphael [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire (IPN), Orsay (France). et al.

    2015-05-01

    Hadronization is the non-perturbative process of QCD by which partons become hadrons. It has been studied at high energies through various processes, we focus here on the experiments of lepto-production of hadrons in cold nuclear matter. By studying the dependence of observables to the atomic number of the target, these experimentscan give information on the dynamic of the hadronization at the femtometer scale. In particular, we will present preliminary results from JLab Hall B (CLAS collaboration), which give unprecedented statistical precision. Then, we will present results of a phenomenological study showing how HERMES data can be described with pure energyloss models.

  14. Hadronization systematics and top mass reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corcella Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available I discuss a few issues related to the systematic error on the top mass mea- surement at hadron colliders, due to hadronization effects. Special care is taken about the impact of bottom-quark fragmentation in top decays, especially on the reconstruction relying on final states with leptons and J/Ψ in the dilepton channel. I also debate the relation between the measured mass and its theoretical definition, and report on work in progress, based on the Monte Carlo simulation of fictitious top-flavoured hadrons, which may shed light on this issue and on the hadronization systematics.

  15. Fast hadron production in parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of inclusive fast hadron production with small transverse momentum in the framework of the parton model is considered. It is shown that at the proper account for the parton momentum conservation law the fast hadron spectrum always reproduces valence quark distribution independently of a special choice for the recombination function. A recombination function, which takes into account quantum numbers of the produced hadron and short-range of partons in the rapidity space is proposed. There is no difference between functions for quark recombination of identical quark content. This fact is caused by neglecting the spin-spin interaction of quarks in hadrons

  16. Heavy flavor production from photons and hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusch, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present state of the production and observation of hadrons containing heavy quarks or antiquarks as valence constituents, in reactions initiated by real and (space-like) virtual photon or by hadron beams is discussed. Heavy flavor production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which is well covered in a number of recent review papers is not discussed, and similarly, neutrino production is omitted due to the different (flavor-changing) mechanisms that are involved in those reactions. Heavy flavors from spacelike photons, heavy flavors from real photons, and heavy flavors from hadron-hadron collisions are discussed. (WHK)

  17. 8th Workshop on Hadron Physics in China and Opportunities Worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Hadron Physics has drawn great interests from the Chinese nuclear and high-energy physics communities and has been one of the main research areas at major accelerator facilities in China. At the same time, the Chinese collaborations are playing increasingly important roles at international hadron physics facilities (Jefferson Lab, RHIC, COMPASS@CERN, J-PARC, …), in particular, at the recently upgraded 12 GeV-energy Jefferson Lab in US, which will provide a broad range of opportunities for frontier research in hadronic physics. Furthermore, the U.S. 2015 long range plan for nuclear science recommended Electron-Ion Colliders (EIC), as the highest priority for new facility construction after the completion of the FRIB as the next frontier for QCD physics. In China, an EIC@HIAF facility has been proposed by the Institute of Modern Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences to provide a powerful precision microscope for hadron physics study. In light of these new developments, the 8th workshop will be held at th...

  18. On the dependence between hadronization and nuclear fragmentation in hadron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from experiments on hadronic interactions with emulsion nuclei at different energies are compared with calculations from the Lund model for interactions between hadrons and nuclei. Special emphasis is put on the correlation between the hadronization and nuclear fragmentation. The model is able to describe many of the experimentally observed features, as shown by several examples. (authors)

  19. DS Mesons in Asymmetric Hot and Dense Hadronic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Pathak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-medium properties of DS mesons are investigated within the framework of an effective hadronic model, which is a generalization of a chiral SU(3 model, to SU(4, in order to study the interactions of the charmed hadrons. In the present work, the DS mesons are observed to experience net attractive interactions in a dense hadronic medium, hence reducing the masses of the DS+ and DS- mesons from the vacuum values. While this conclusion holds in both nuclear and hyperonic media, the magnitude of the mass drop is observed to intensify with the inclusion of strangeness in the medium. Additionally, in hyperonic medium, the mass degeneracy of the DS mesons is observed to be broken, due to opposite signs of the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction term in the Lagrangian density. Along with the magnitude of the mass drops, the mass splitting between DS+ and DS- mesons is also observed to grow with an increase in baryonic density and strangeness content of the medium. However, all medium effects analyzed are found to be weakly dependent on isospin asymmetry and temperature. We discuss the possible implications emanating from this analysis, which are all expected to make a significant difference to observables in heavy ion collision experiments, especially the upcoming Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM experiment at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, GSI, where matter at high baryonic densities is planned to be produced.

  20. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Albert De Roeck

    2012-10-01

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including top quarks. The results are based on data samples of up to 5.4 fb-1 for the Tevatron experiments and 1.1 fb−1 for the LHC experiments.