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Sample records for advanced gas reactor

  1. Advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the advanced gas-cooled reactor system, Hunterston ''B'' power station, which is a development of the earlier natural uranium Magnox type reactor. Data of construction, capital cost, operating performance, reactor safety and also the list of future developments are given

  2. Advanced gas cooled reactors - Designing for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Stations recently completed at Heysham in Lancashire, England, and Torness in East Lothian, Scotland represent the current stage of development of the commercial AGR. Each power station has two reactor turbo-generator units designed for a total station output of 2x660 MW(e) gross although powers in excess of this have been achieved and it is currently intended to uprate this as far as possible. The design of both stations has been based on the successful operating AGRs at Hinkley Point and Hunterston which have now been in-service for almost 15 years, although minor changes were made to meet new safety requirements and to make improvements suggested by operating experience. The construction of these new AGRs has been to programme and within budget. Full commercial load for the first reactor at Torness was achieved in August 1988 with the other three reactors following over the subsequent 15 months. This paper summarises the safety principles and guidelines for the design of the reactors and discusses how some of the main features of the safety case meet these safety requirements. The paper also summarises the design problems which arose during the construction period and explains how these problems were solved with the minimum delay to programme

  3. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  4. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  5. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300 C and 900 C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

  6. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  7. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of work performed from January 1, 1977 through March 31, 1977 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed

  8. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  9. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs

  10. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  11. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  12. Methods for studying fuel management in advanced gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods used for studying fuel and absorber management problems in AGRs are described. The basis of the method is the use of ARGOSY lattice data in reactor calculations performed at successive time steps. These reactor calculations may be quite crude but for advanced design calculations a detailed channel-by-channel representation of the whole core is required. The main emphasis of the paper is in describing such an advanced approach - the ODYSSEUS-6 code. This code evaluates reactor power distributions as a function of time and uses the information to select refuelling moves and determine controller positions. (author)

  13. PARs for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the progress being made in the United States to introduce passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) technology as a cost-effective alternative to electric recombiners for controlling combustible gas produced in postulated accidents in both future Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) and certain U. S. operating nuclear plants. PARs catalytically recombine hydrogen and oxygen, gradually producing heat and water vapor. They have no moving parts and are self-starting and self-feeding, even under relatively cold and wet containment conditions. Buoyancy of the hot gases they create sets up natural convective flow that promotes mixing of combustible gases in a containment. In a non-inerted ALWR containment, two approaches each employing a combination of PARs and igniters are being considered to control hydrogen in design basis and severe accidents. In pre-inerted ALWRs, PARs alone control radiolytic oxygen produced in either accident type. The paper also discusses regulatory feedback regarding these combustible gas control approaches and describes a test program being conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Electricite de France (EdF) to supplement the existing PAR test database with performance data under conditions of interest to U.S. plants. Preliminary findings from the EPRI/EdF PAR model test program are included. Successful completion of this test program and confirmatory tests being sponsored by the U. S. NRC are expected to pave the way for use of PARs in ALWRs and operating plants. (author)

  14. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10-9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  15. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  16. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation

  17. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  18. Gas carburization of Inconel 617. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the progress in the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program on efforts to produce uniformly carburized specimens of Inconel 617 with different carbon levels. This material will be used to determine the effect of carbon content on the mechanical properties and physical properties important for design and use of components in the primary circuit of an advanced HTGR system. The results of gas carburization and high temperature homogenization heat treatments are discussed. Also described are electron microprobe analysis methods for measuring the carbon gradients in the carburized and homogenized material. Recommendations are given for additional work needed to increase the homogeneity of carburized material and for producing material with uniform carbon concentration. Recommendations for improving the accuracy of the EPMA carbon gradient analyses also are included

  19. Gas Cooled Fast Reactors: Recent advances and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the current status of the Gas cooled Fast Reactor system development which is shared within the Generation IV International Forum including EURATOM through the 7th Framework Programme project GoFastR. The various areas considered will include suitable fuel compounds and high temperature resistant cladding materials options, core design optimisation, primary system boundary, energy conversion. The safety approach, mainly oriented on core cooling for the moment, will be recalled together with a discussion of the results obtained. Further potential improvements or simplification of the system safety, at the light of the Fukushima accident, including an indirect coupled cycle for the energy conversion and a self sustainable Decay Heat Removal loop will be mentioned. The main issues related to the necessary R&D programme accompanying the system development will be recalled (fuel and materials, helium coolant technology, components such as gas circulators, valves and heat exchangers, thermal barriers). (author)

  20. Reactor fault simulation at the closure of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor: analysis of reactor transient tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing of fault transient analysis methods by direct simulation of fault sequences on a commercial reactor is clearly excluded on safety and economic grounds. The closure of the Windscale prototype advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) therefore offered a unique opportunity to test fault study methods under extreme conditions relatively unfettered by economic constraints, although subject to appropriate safety regulations. One aspect of these important experiments was a series of reactor transient tests. The objective of these reactor transients was to increase confidence in the fault study computer models used for commercial AGR safety assessment by extending their range of validation to cover large amplitude and fast transients in temperature, power and flow, relevant to CAGR faults, and well beyond the conditions achievable experimentally on commercial reactors. A large number of tests have now been simulated with the fault study code KINAGRAX. Agreement with measurement is very good and sensitivity studies show that such discrepancies as exist may be due largely to input data errors. It is concluded that KINAGRAX is able to predict steady state conditions and transient amplitudes in both power and temperature to within a few percent. (author)

  1. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  2. Experience with the commissioning of helically coiled advanced gas cooled reactor boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes aspects of the experience gained during commissioning of the helically coiled pod boilers for an advanced gas-cooled reactor. The boiler geometry is shown to be a factor contributing to gas-side and water-side convection phenomena encountered during commissioning. Detailed information on thermal performance and vibrational response was obtained from commissioning tests on specially instrumented boiler units. (author)

  3. Advanced methods for nuclear reactor gas laser coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research is described that led to the discovery of three nuclear-pumped lasers (NPLs) using mixtures of Ne--N2, He--Hg, and He or Ne with CO or CO2. The Ne--N2 NPL was the first laser obtained with modest neutron fluxes from a TRIGA reactor (vs fast burst reactors used elsewhere in such work), the He--Hg NPL was the first visible nuclear-pumped laser, while the Ne--CO and He--CO2 lasers are the first to provide energy storage on a millisecond time scale. Important potential applications of NPLs include coupling and power transmission from remote power stations such as nuclear plants in satellites and neutron-feedback operation of inertial confinement fusion plants

  4. The US NRC Advanced Gas REactor Evaluator (AGREE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Prismatic Module Reactor (PMR) core fluids model has been developed in support of the US NRC Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) evaluation model. The PMR core fluids modeling relies on a subchannel approach in which the primary coolant flowpath through the core region and vertical in-core and ex-core gaps can be modeled as individual subchannels. These subchannels are connected together to represent a three dimensional reactor. An initial validation calculation has been performed using data available in literature for bypass flow. The predicted bypass flow was within 2.6% of the value reported in the literature. Further verification and validation is awaiting the completion of the coupling of the fluids model with a triangular solid heat conduction model. (author)

  5. Ambient Laboratory Coater for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duane D. Bruns; Robert M. Counce; Irma D. Lima Rojas

    2010-06-09

    this research is targeted at developing improved experimentally-based scaling relationships for the hydrodynamics of shallow, gas-spouted beds of dense particles. The work is motivated by the need to more effctively scale up shallow spouted beds used in processes such as in the coating of nuclear fuel particles where precise control of solids and gas circulation is critically important. Experimental results reported here are for a 50 mm diameter spouted bed containing two different types of bed solids (alumina and zirconia) at different static bed depths and fluidized by air and helium. Measurements of multiple local average pressures, inlet gas pressure fluctuations, and spout height were used to characterize the bed hydrodynamics for each operating condition. Follow-on studies are planned that include additional variations in bed size, particle properties, and fluidizing gas. The ultimate objective is to identify the most important non-dimensional hydrodynamic scaling groups and possible spouted-bed design correlations based on these groups.

  6. Ambient Laboratory Coater for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is targeted at developing improved experimentally-based scaling relationships for the hydrodynamics of shallow, gas-spouted beds of dense particles. The work is motivated by the need to more effctively scale up shallow spouted beds used in processes such as in the coating of nuclear fuel particles where precise control of solids and gas circulation is critically important. Experimental results reported here are for a 50 mm diameter spouted bed containing two different types of bed solids (alumina and zirconia) at different static bed depths and fluidized by air and helium. Measurements of multiple local average pressures, inlet gas pressure fluctuations, and spout height were used to characterize the bed hydrodynamics for each operating condition. Follow-on studies are planned that include additional variations in bed size, particle properties, and fluidizing gas. The ultimate objective is to identify the most important non-dimensional hydrodynamic scaling groups and possible spouted-bed design correlations based on these groups.

  7. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  8. Microscopical examination of carbon deposits formed in the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described of sampling and examining carbon deposits on fuel cladding in the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor. Deposition is observed on fuel cladding in both the reactor core and experimental loops in carbon dioxide coolants containing various amounts of carbon monoxide and methane. Deposit distribution over the cladding surface indicated that nucleation is dependent on local surface conditions. Microscopical examination showed that deposit thickness increases by carbon filament growth into the coolant gas stream and that the process can be markedly influenced by metallic impurities. There is evidence that nickel can play a particularly significant role in deposition in loop experiments but similar effects have not been observed in the reactor core. (author)

  9. Design features facilitating the decommissioning of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the advanced gas-cooled reactors is discussed as is the proposed decommissioning plan for delayed decommissioning. The special features which assist in decommissioning are presented. As a result of the study a catalogue of design features which will facilitate decommissioning is given. In addition to the catalogue of design features, the radioactive inventory 10 years after shutdown and 100 years after shutdown has been calculated. From this a provisional operator dose from activities associated with decommissioning has been assessed

  10. Genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks for loading pattern optimisation of advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-generational genetic algorithm (GA) has been developed for fuel management optimisation of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors, which are operated by British Energy and produce around 20% of the UK's electricity requirements. An evolutionary search is coded using the genetic operators; namely selection by tournament, two-point crossover, mutation and random assessment of population for multi-cycle loading pattern (LP) optimisation. A detailed description of the chromosomes in the genetic algorithm coded is presented. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) have been constructed and trained to accelerate the GA-based search during the optimisation process. The whole package, called GAOPT, is linked to the reactor analysis code PANTHER, which performs fresh fuel loading, burn-up and power shaping calculations for each reactor cycle by imposing station-specific safety and operational constraints. GAOPT has been verified by performing a number of tests, which are applied to the Hinkley Point B and Hartlepool reactors. The test results giving loading pattern (LP) scenarios obtained from single and multi-cycle optimisation calculations applied to realistic reactor states of the Hartlepool and Hinkley Point B reactors are discussed. The results have shown that the GA/ANN algorithms developed can help the fuel engineer to optimise loading patterns in an efficient and more profitable way than currently available for multi-cycle refuelling of AGRs. Research leading to parallel GAs applied to LP optimisation are outlined, which can be adapted to present day LWR fuel management problems

  11. Advanced reactor licensing issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1986 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a Policy Statement on the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this policy advanced reactor designers were encouraged to interact with NRC early in the design process to obtain feedback regarding licensing requirements for advanced reactors. Accordingly, the staff has been interacting with the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors on the review of three advanced reactor conceptual designs: one modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) and two Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). As a result of these interactions certain safety issues associated with these advanced reactor designs have been identified as key to the licensability of the designs as proposed by DOE. The major issues in this regard are: (1) selection and treatment of accident scenarios; (2) selection of siting source term; (3) performance and reliability of reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems; (4) need for conventional containment; (5) need for conventional emergency evacuation; (6) role of the operator; (7) treatment of balance of plant; and (8) modular approach. This paper provides a status of the NRC review effort, describes the above issues in more detail and provides the current status and approach to the development of licensing guidance on each

  12. Safety design features for current UK advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power stations planned for Heysham II and Torness will each have twin 660 MW(e) Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR) based on the design of those which have been operating at Hinkley Point 'B' and Hunterston 'B' since 1976. This paper has described the way in which the shutdown and cooling systems for the Heysham II and Torness AGRs have been selected in order to meet current UK safety requirements. Fault tree analyses have been used to identify the credible fault sequences, the probabilities of which have been calculated. By this means the relative importance of the various protective systems has been established and redundancy and reliability requirements identified. This systematic approach has led to a balanced design giving protection over the complete spectrum of fault sequences. Current safety requirements for thermal reactors in the UK and particular requirements in the design of the Heysham II and Torness reactors are discussed

  13. Development of a CVD silica coating for UK advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapour deposited silica coatings could extend the life of the 20% Cr/25% Ni niobium stabilised (20/25/Nb) stainless steel fuel cladding of the UK advanced gas cooled reactors. A CVD coating process developed originally to be undertaken at atmospheric pressure has now been adapted for operation at reduced pressure. Trials on the LP CVD process have been pursued to the production scale using commercial equipment. The effectiveness of the LP CVD silica coatings in providing protection to 20/25/Nb steel surfaces against oxidation and carbonaceous deposition has been evaluated. (author)

  14. A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle for advanced gas cooled fast and thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle concept has been proposed for gas cooled fast and thermal reactors. The fast reactor with the concept are evaluated to be a potential alternative option to liquid metal cooled fast reactors, providing comparable cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature, eliminating the safety problems, simplifying the heat transport system and making easier plant maintenance. The thermal reactor with the concept is expected to be an alternative solution to current high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas turbines, allowing comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate temperature of 650 C instead of 800 C in HTGRs. (author)

  15. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment

  16. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during

  17. Axisymmetric whole pin life modelling of advanced gas-cooled reactor nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermo-mechanical contributions to pellet–clad interaction (PCI) in advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) are modelled in the ABAQUS finite element (FE) code. User supplied sub-routines permit the modelling of the non-linear behaviour of AGR fuel through life. Through utilisation of ABAQUS’s well-developed pre- and post-processing ability, the behaviour of the axially constrained steel clad fuel was modelled. The 2D axisymmetric model includes thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel with time and condition dependent material properties. Pellet cladding gap dynamics and thermal behaviour are also modelled. The model treats heat up as a fully coupled temperature-displacement study. Dwell time and direct power cycling was applied to model the impact of online refuelling, a key feature of the AGR. The model includes the visco-plastic behaviour of the fuel under the stress and irradiation conditions within an AGR core and a non-linear heat transfer model. A multiscale fission gas release model is applied to compute pin pressure; this model is coupled to the PCI gap model through an explicit fission gas inventory code. Whole pin, whole life, models are able to show the impact of the fuel on all segments of cladding including weld end caps and cladding pellet locking mechanisms (unique to AGR fuel). The development of this model in a commercial FE package shows that the development of a potentially verified and future-proof fuel performance code can be created and used

  18. ORIGEN-ARP Cross-Section Libraries for Magnox, Advanced Gas-Cooled, and VVER Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, BD

    2004-03-10

    Cross-section libraries for the ORIGEN-ARP system were extended to include four non-U.S. reactor types: the Magnox reactor, the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor, the VVER-440, and the VVER-1000. Typical design and operational parameters for these four reactor types were determined by an examination of a variety of published information sources. Burnup simulation models of the reactors were then developed using the SAS2H sequence from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory SCALE code system. In turn, these models were used to prepare the burnup-dependent cross-section libraries suitable for use with ORIGEN-ARP. The reactor designs together with the development of the SAS2H models are described, and a small number of validation results using spent-fuel assay data are reported.

  19. Operator information displays for normal operation and fault management of an advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the design intent, organisation and implementation of operator displays for a 1300 MWe Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor employing a high level of automation, computer based displays and discrete devices incorporated into a structured information system. A description of the main plant and post-cooling system is given and the provisions for automatic initiation of the post-trip systems are related to claims made on operator action. A statement on control room staffing and task allocation is included in order to identify the roles of the various display systems. The structure of the Operator and Supervisor information system is described and the hierarchy of data and alarm displays is discussed. The role of discrete displays is discussed both in relation to the computer based displays and as a stand-alone set of essential information providing for safe operation in the rare event of total loss of computer based displays. The extent and organisation of the computer based displays is described with emphasis on the allocation of data to functional groups in order to aid fault diagnosis and management. The role and implementation of overview displays is described. An important part of the overall information system is the reactor post trip cooling system display. Taking the form of a functional mimic, the display provides a comprehensive summary of post trip reactivity, primary circuit integrity, reactor heat removal and cooling system status and security. The display is used to monitor the effectiveness and adequacy of the post-trip functions and provides an overview of plant abnormalities which are then investigated using the systems described above. The paper concludes with a review of areas of current and future development. (author)

  20. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  1. Progress in the development of tooling and dismantling methodologies for the Windscale advanced gas cooled reactor (WAGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) is a major UK reactor decommissioning project co-funded by the UK Government, the European Commission and Magnox Electric. WAGR was a CO2 cooled, graphite moderated reactor which served as a test bed for the development of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor technology in the UK. It operated from 1963 until shutdown in 1981. AEA Technology plc are currently the Managing Agents on behalf of UKAEA for the WAGR decommissioning project and are responsible for the co-ordination of the project up to the point when the contents of the reactor core and associated radioactive materials are removed and either disposed of or packaged for disposal at some time in the future. Decommissioning has progressed to the point where the reactor has been dismantled down to the level of the hot gas collection manifold with the removal of the top biological shield, the refuelling standpipes and the top section of the reactor pressure vessel. The 4 heat exchangers have also been removed and committed to shallow land burial. This paper describes the work carried out by AEA Technology under separate contracts of UKAEA in developing some of the equipment and deployment methods for the next phase of active operations required in preparation for the dismantling of the core structure. Most recent work has concentrated on the development of specialist tooling for removal of items of operational waste stored within the reactor core, equipment for cutting and removal of the highly radioactive stainless steel 'loop' pressure tubes, diamond wire cutting equipment for sectioning large diameter pipework, and equipment for dismantling the reactor neutron shield. The paper emphasises the process of adaptation and extension of existing technologies for cost-effective application in the decommissioning environment, the need for adequate forward planning of decommissioning methodologies together with large-scale 'mock-up' testing of equipment to

  2. The evaluation of occupational exposure on a commercial advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental principle governing the radiological design of Nuclear Power Stations in the United Kingdom is that radiation exposures to Station operators and to members of the public should be as low as reasonably practicable and consistent with any overriding legislative requirements. To ensure that any Station can be operated in compliance with this principle, the UK Generating Boards have specified design target dose limits for Station staff. This Paper considers the evaluation of operator exposure and its assessment against these design target dose limits for the latest Commercial Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (CAGR) to be built for the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) on the Heysham Site. The Paper begins by giving the design target dose limits, outlines the details of the dose budgeting procedure adopted at an early design stage by the Station Designers and by the Utilities, and defines the measures available and incorporated into the design with the aims of reducing exposure. The Paper includes the estimate of operator exposure for Heysham II, it considers those aspects of the design giving rise to greatest exposure and shows that the design target dose limits should be achieved. The Paper also gives current levels of operator exposure from Hinkley Point 'B' Power Station which is the CEGB's first operational CAGR. Where possible, the Heysham II estimates are evaluated against this operating experience. (author)

  3. Screening test results on potential alternate alloys for VHTGR applications. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Electric is working to define and develop the materials technology which will be required for advanced very High Temperature Gas Reactors operating at primary coolant temperatures up to 9500C. The most promising application which has been identified is providing process heat for the reforming of methane. Earlier work had identified Inconel 617 and Alloy 800H as the best of the commercially available alloys for the reformer components. Since these alloys were identified, additional alloys have been developed which may offer improved performance over the above reference reformer alloys. This report presents the results obtained to date on four possible alternate alloys, Nimonic 86, Sanicro 32X, SSS-113-MA, and X 8 NiCrMoNb 16 16, which are being evaluated by General Electric for thermal stability and compatibility with HTGR helium environments. The thermal stabilities of Nimonic 86, Sanicro 32X, and X 8 NiCrMoNb 16 16 have been shown to be good out to maximum exposure times and temperatures of 6000 hours and 9500C, respectively. The thermal stability, as measured by room temperature impact strength, and post exposure ductility of the Japanese developmental alloy SSS-113-MA have been shown to be poor. Measured impact strengths and ductilities below 15 ft-lbs and 10%, respectively, have been observed for this alloy. No conclusions regarding the helium compatibility of the alloys can be made at this time because of the limited data available

  4. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  5. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  6. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called 'AGR-1,' graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on fuel

  7. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, September 23, 1976--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This report presents the results of work performed from September 23, 1976 through December 31, 1976 on the Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the affect of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure Helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes progress to date on alloy selection for VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for DCHT applications. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and on designs for the testing and analysis facilities and equipment is discussed.

  8. Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State

  9. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  10. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO

  11. Analysis of the horizontal flow in the advanced gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); He, S., E-mail: s.he@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Ganesan, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Gotts, J. [EDF Energy, Barnwood, Gloucester GL4 3RS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • CFD is used to assess the effect of horizontal flows in AGRs. • The horizontal flows can reduce the graphite brick temperature significantly. • Such effects are not taken into consideration in current engineering calculations. • There might be flow instabilities when the fuel channel flow is very low but horizontal flows reduce its possibility. - Abstract: The purpose of the paper is to report a computational investigation of horizontal flows in the UK advanced-gas-cooled reactor (AGR) by using computational fluid dynamics with ANSYS FLUENT. The study is relevant to practical issues encountered in some AGR stations currently in operation in the UK. It is carried out using a comparative approach based on the results of two contrasting models: one simulating the full effect of the cross flow, the other simulating the simplified approach currently employed by the industry which neglects the momentum of the horizontal cross flow. The study reveals that the horizontal cross flow plays a significant role in the cooling of the moderator brick, while the axial variation of the brick geometry also significantly changes the distribution of the temperature within the brick. It is also found that under some circumstances the so-called horizontal inter-brick leakage (HIBL) flow could influence the cooling performance in the narrow gaps, resulting in a local hot spot. Furthermore, there may be flow instabilities in the flows in AGR fuel channels due to the interactions between the flow in the main arrowhead flow passages and that in some narrow passages connected to it, but the influence on the brick temperature is negligible. Horizontal cross flow has an effect of reducing such instabilities.

  12. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  13. Axisymmetric whole pin life modelling of advanced gas-cooled reactor nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella, R.; Wenman, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Thermo-mechanical contributions to pellet-clad interaction (PCI) in advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGRs) are modelled in the ABAQUS finite element (FE) code. User supplied sub-routines permit the modelling of the non-linear behaviour of AGR fuel through life. Through utilisation of ABAQUS's well-developed pre- and post-processing ability, the behaviour of the axially constrained steel clad fuel was modelled. The 2D axisymmetric model includes thermo-mechanical behaviour of the fuel with time and condition dependent material properties. Pellet cladding gap dynamics and thermal behaviour are also modelled. The model treats heat up as a fully coupled temperature-displacement study. Dwell time and direct power cycling was applied to model the impact of online refuelling, a key feature of the AGR. The model includes the visco-plastic behaviour of the fuel under the stress and irradiation conditions within an AGR core and a non-linear heat transfer model. A multiscale fission gas release model is applied to compute pin pressure; this model is coupled to the PCI gap model through an explicit fission gas inventory code. Whole pin, whole life, models are able to show the impact of the fuel on all segments of cladding including weld end caps and cladding pellet locking mechanisms (unique to AGR fuel). The development of this model in a commercial FE package shows that the development of a potentially verified and future-proof fuel performance code can be created and used. The usability of a FE based fuel performance code would be an enhancement over past codes. Pre- and post-processors have lowered the entry barrier for the development of a fuel performance model to permit the ability to model complicated systems. Typical runtimes for a 5 year axisymmetric model takes less than one hour on a single core workstation. The current model has implemented: Non-linear fuel thermal behaviour, including a complex description of heat flow in the fuel. Coupled with a variety of

  14. MOTHER MK II: An advanced direct cycle high temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MOTHER (MOdular Thermal HElium Reactor) power plant concepts employ high temperature gas reactors utilizing TRISO fuel, graphite moderator, and helium coolant, in combination with a direct Brayton cycle for electricity generation. The helium coolant from the reactor vessel passes through a Power Conversion Unit (PCU), which includes a turbine-generator, recuperator, precooler, intercooler and turbine-compressors, before being returned to the reactor vessel. The PCU substitutes for the reactor coolant system pumps and steam generators and most of the Balance Of Plant (BOP), including the steam turbines and condensers, employed by conventional nuclear power plants utilizing water cooled reactors. This provides a compact, efficient, and relatively simple plant configuration. The MOTHER MK I conceptual design, completed in the 1987 - 1989 time frame, was developed to economically meet the energy demands for extracting and processing heavy oil from the tar sands of western Canada. However, considerable effort was made to maximize the market potential beyond this application. Consistent with the remote and very high labour rate environment in the tar sands region, simplification of maintenance procedures and facilitation of 'change-out' in lieu of in situ repair was a design focus. MOTHER MK I had a thermal output of 288 MW and produced 120 MW electrical when operated in the electricity only production mode. An annular Prismatic reactor core was utilized, largely to minimize day-to-day operations activities. Key features of the power conversion system included two Power Conversion Units (144 MWth each), the horizontal orientation of all rotating machinery and major heat exchangers axes, high speed rotating machinery (17,030 rpm for the turbine-compressors and 10,200 rpm for the power turbine-generator), gas (helium) bearings for all rotating machinery, and solid state frequency conversion from 170 cps (at full power) to the grid frequency. Recognizing that the on

  15. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Selection of candidate alloys. Vol. 1. Advanced gas cooled reactor systems definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candidate alloys for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heal (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications in terms of the effect of the primary coolant exposure and thermal exposure were evaluated

  16. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Selection of candidate alloys. Vol. 1. Advanced gas cooled reactor systems definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marvin, M.D.

    1978-10-31

    Candidate alloys for a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heal (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications in terms of the effect of the primary coolant exposure and thermal exposure were evaluated. (FS)

  17. Gas Evolution Measurements on Reactor Irradiated Advanced Fusion Magnet Insulation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humer, K.; Seidl, E.; Weber, H. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Feucht, S. W.; Munshi, N. A.

    2006-03-01

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are used as insulation materials for the superconducting magnet coils of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The radiation environment present at the magnet location will lead to gas production, swelling and weight loss of the laminate, which may result in a pressure rise combined with undefined stresses on the magnet coil casing. Consequently, these effects are important parameters for the engineering and design criteria of superconducting magnet coil structures. In this study, newly developed epoxy and cyanate-ester (CE) based S2-glass fiber reinforced insulation systems were irradiated at ambient temperature in the TRIGA-Mark II reactor (Vienna) to a fast neutron fluence of 1 and 5×1021 m-2 (E>0.1 MeV) prior to measurements of gas evolution, swelling and weight loss. The CE based laminates show increased radiation resistance, i.e. less gas evolution. The highest radiation hardness up to the highest dose was observed in a pure CE system. In addition, the effects of swelling and weight loss are either negligible or less pronounced for all systems. The results prove that the newly developed CE based composites are serious candidate insulation systems for ITER.

  18. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH4. This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  19. Preparation for Future Defuelling and Decommissioning Works on EDF Energy's UK Fleet of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF Energy/Nuclear Generation is the owner and operator of 14 Advanced Gas cooled Reactors (AGR) and one Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR), on 8 nuclear stations in the UK. EDF Energy/Nuclear Generation is responsible for all the activities associated with the end of life of its nuclear installations: de-fuelling, decommissioning and waste management. As the first AGR is forecast to cease generation within 10 years, EDF Energy has started planning for the decommissioning. This paper covers: - broad outline of the technical strategy and arrangements for future de-fuelling and decommissioning works on the UK AGR fleet, - high level strategic drivers and alignment with wider UK nuclear policy, - overall programme of preparation and initial works, - technical approaches to be adopted during decommissioning. (authors)

  20. Estimating the occurrence of foreign material in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors: A Bayesian Monte Carlo approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The amount of a specific type of foreign material found in UK AGRs has been estimated. • The estimate is based on very few instances of detection in numerous inspections. • A Bayesian Monte Carlo approach was used. • The study supports safety case claims on coolant flow impairment. • The methodology is applicable to any inspection campaign on any plant system. - Abstract: The current occurrence of a particular sort of foreign material in eight UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors has been estimated by means of a parametric approach. The study includes both variability, treated in analytic fashion via the combination of standard probability distributions, and the uncertainty in the parameters of the model of choice, whose posterior distribution was inferred in Bayesian fashion by means of a Monte Carlo route consisting in the conditional acceptance of sets of model parameters drawn from a prior distribution based on engineering judgement. The model underlying the present study specifically refers to the re-loading and inspection routines of UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors. The approach to inference here presented, however, is of general validity and can be applied to the outcome of any inspection campaign on any plant system, and indeed to any situation in which the outcome of a stochastic process is more easily simulated than described by a probability density or mass function

  1. Boiler referruling on the Hartlepool and Heysham 1 advanced gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hartlepool and Heysham I reactors each use eight cylindrical boilers having nineteen rows of helical tubes. The advantages of this design are partially offset by the relatively poor radial gas mixing. Some rows of tubing may have an imbalance between heat input from the gas and the flow of feedwater. causing a temperature profile at the upper transition joints. The thermal/hydraulic behaviour meant that the metallurgical constraints limited output. Analysis of the behaviour of these boilers required a new two-dimensional mathematical model, known as PODMIX. This describes the thermal hydraulics in each of the rows of tubing and also in the gas between the rows. Not all of the parameters for the model can be determined from first principles. However, two out of the thirty two pods have thermocouples at some of the upper transition joints and these made back calculation possible. In order to translate this model to other boiler pods, a novel thermocouple rake system was designed for sampling superheated steam temperatures in selected tubes. A result of this analysis was to show that different, individual ferrule patterns were needed for each pod. The characteristics could, in general, best be met using twin orifice ferrules. Unfortunately, the installed system did not permit the replacement of orifices, so that a completely new system had to be developed. In the course of designing this, the opportunity was taken to over come susceptibilities to erosion/corrosion and crevice corrosion. Removal of the old ferrules and replacement with the new ones necessitated the development of high precision, programmable machines to operate under difficult site conditions. These carried out drilling, boring, grinding and polishing operations as well as making face welds and tube bore welds. Modifications have already achieved substantial improvements in performance and output, but an extended, iterative programme still lies ahead. (author)

  2. Qualification of metallic materials for application in advanced high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As in conventional high temperature technology, the qualification of metallic materials for high temperature reactor (HTR) applications is based on creep behavior, fatigue properties, corrosion resistance, and thermal stability. Of specific interest are the effects of the primary coolant helium, which contains trace impurities of hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and water vapor, on mechanical behavior. In addition, irradiation effects on the properties of absorber rod cladding and tritium permeation from the primary coolant into the process gas are important areas for investigation. The results show that, for test times of up to 20,000 h, the creep-rupture strength in air and in HTR helium lies in the same scatter band. The results of low cycle fatigue tests indicate a beneficial effect of HTR helium on the cycles of failure. Investigations of corrosion in HTR helium have shown that acceptable corrosion resistance can be achieved by strict control of the impurity content of the helium. Using the available creep-rupture data and the linear damage accumulation rule, the acceptable service lives of intermediate heat exchanger tubes were calculated for Inconel alloy 617 at 9500 C. The data that are being accumulated from the various test programs will form the basis of a design code for nuclear components operating at temperatures greater than or equal to 8000 C

  3. INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHENOMENA IN ADVANCED GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    INVESTIGATION OF FUNDAMENTAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC PHE

    2006-09-01

    INL LDRD funded research was conducted at MIT to experimentally characterize mixed convection heat transfer in gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) core channels in collaboration with INL personnel. The GFR for Generation IV has generated considerable interest and is under development in the U.S., France, and Japan. One of the key candidates is a block-core configuration first proposed by MIT, has the potential to operate in Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer (DTHT) regime or in the transition between the DTHT and normal forced or laminar convection regime during post-loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. This is contrary to most industrial applications where operation is in a well-defined and well-known turbulent forced convection regime. As a result, important new need emerged to develop heat transfer correlations that make possible rigorous and accurate predictions of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) during post LOCA in these regimes. Extensive literature review on these regimes was performed and a number of the available correlations was collected in: (1) forced laminar, (2) forced turbulent, (3) mixed convection laminar, (4) buoyancy driven DTHT and (5) acceleration driven DTHT regimes. Preliminary analysis on the GFR DHR system was performed and using the literature review results and GFR conditions. It confirmed that the GFR block type core has a potential to operate in the DTHT regime. Further, a newly proposed approach proved that gas, liquid and super critical fluids all behave differently in single channel under DTHT regime conditions, thus making it questionable to extrapolate liquid or supercritical fluid data to gas flow heat transfer. Experimental data were collected with three different gases (nitrogen, helium and carbon dioxide) in various heat transfer regimes. Each gas unveiled different physical phenomena. All data basically covered the forced turbulent heat transfer regime, nitrogen data covered the acceleration driven DTHT and buoyancy driven DTHT

  4. Modelling 3D crack propagation in ageing graphite bricks of Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, crack propagation in Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) graphite bricks with ageing properties is studied using the eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM). A parametric study for crack propagation, including the influence of different initial crack shapes and propagation criteria, is conducted. The results obtained in the benchmark study show that the crack paths from X-FEM are similar to the experimental ones. The accuracy of the strain energy release rate computation in a heterogeneous material is also evaluated using a finite difference approach. Planar and non-planar 3D crack growth simulations are presented to demonstrate the robustness and the versatility of the method utilized. Finally, this work contributes to the better understanding of crack propagation behaviour in AGR graphite bricks and so contributes to the extension of the AGR plant lifetimes in the UK by reducing uncertainties. (author)

  5. Methods of Control-Rod Calibration in the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different techniques were used to calibrate control rods and to measure individual rod worths during the commissioning of the WAGR. These methods are described and the results are presented. The methods described are: (a ) Air poisoning - Changes in air pressure allow axial movement of rods at the critical condition. Thus rod movement can be related to pressure variation which is equivalent to a reactivity change. Also, rod slope measurements can be made for different rod insertions. (b) Rod slopes - The rods are withdrawn to make the reactor supercritical; then later they are inserted to make the reactor subcritical. From a measurement of the doubling and halving times the change in reactivity between the super- and subcritical states can be determined.- (c ) Absorber addition and withdrawal - The number of fixed localized absorbers is varied to give a method similar to the use of uniform air poisoning. (d) Pulsatron - This technique is used to give subcritical measurements of rod worth. (e) Rod run-in - The reactor is initially critical, and then the rods are run into the core. Analysis of the flux response relates reactivity to rod movement. (author)

  6. A History of Dosimetry for the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Simon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the methods used in the first ∼40 years of AGR neutron dosimetry and nuclear heating calculations, and the influence of the earlier Magnox reactor dosimetry programme. While the current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo methods are extremely powerful they still require very careful consideration of the quality of the input data, nuclear data validation and variance reduction techniques; in particular, this paper examines the difficulties in assuring the adequate convergence of calculations when Monte Carlo acceleration is applied in the presence of significant streaming paths through attenuating or scattering media.

  7. The long term storage of advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach being taken by BNFL in managing the AGR lifetime spent fuel arisings from British Energy reactors is given. Interim storage for up to 80 years is envisaged for fuel delivered beyond the life of the Thorp reprocessing plant. Adopting a policy of using existing facilities, to comply with the principles of waste minimisation, has defined the development requirements to demonstrate that this approach can be undertaken safely and business issues can be addressed. The major safety issues are the long term integrity of both the fuel being stored and structure it is being stored in. Business related issues reflect long term interactions with the rest of the Sellafield site and storage optimisation. Examples of the development programme in each of these areas is given. (author)

  8. Evaluation of materials' corrosion and chemistry issues for advanced gas cooled reactor steam generators using full scale plant simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRS) employ once-through steam Generators of unique design to provide steam at approximately 530 degrees C and 155 bar to steam turbines of similar design to those of fossil plants. The steam generators are highly compact, and have either a serpentine or helical tube geometry. The tubes are heated on the outside by hot C02 gas, and steam is generated on the inside of the tubes. Each individual steam generator tube consists of a carbon steel feed and primary economiser section, a 9%Cr steel secondary economiser, evaporator and primary superheater, and a Type 316L austenitic stainless steel secondary superheater, all within a single tube pass. The multi-material nature of the individual tube passes, the need to maintain specific thermohydraulic conditions within the different material sections, and the difficulties of steam generator inspection and repair, have required extensive corrosion-chemistry test programmes to ensure waterside corrosion does not present a challenge to their integrity. A major part of these programmes has been the use of a full scale steam generator test facility capable of simulating all aspects of the waterside conditions which exist in the plant. This facility has been used to address a wide variety of possible plant drainage/degradation processes. These include; single- and two-phase flow accelerated corrosion of carbon steel, superheat margins requirements and the stress-corrosion behaviour of the austenitic superheaters, on-load corrosion of the evaporator materials, and iron transport and oxide deposition behaviour. The paper outlines a number of these, and indicates how they have been of value in helping to maintain reliable operation of the plant. (author)

  9. Use of oxygen dosing to prevent flow accelerated corrosion in British Energy's Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) was recognized as major threat to the carbon steel feed and economizer tubing of the once-through boilers of the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs) following the observation of FAC damage of the boiler inlet orifice assemblies at two plants in 1977, and subsequent review of the likelihood of further damage elsewhere within the boilers of all AGRs. In most cases, replacement of susceptible tubing was not feasible; due to the inaccessibility of the boiler components within the reactor concrete pressure vessel. Preventing further FAC damage within the boilers therefore had to rely largely on changes to the boiler feedwater chemistry. Following extensive research programs carried out in the late 1970s and early 1980s two main feedwater chemistry regimes were adopted to suppress FAC in different AGRs. The four units found to be at greatest risk of FAC damage adopted an oxygen dosed All Volatile Treatment (AVT) regime during commissioning, while four other units retained the original deoxygenated ammonia dosed AVT regime, but with an increased feedwater pH. The deoxygenated ammonia dosed chemistry regime was also adopted in four AGR units subsequently built, which used 1%Cr0.5%Mo feed and economizer tubing in their once-through boilers. The oxygen dosed AVT chemistry regime adopted in four units having helical once-through boilers has proved highly effective in preventing FAC, with no evidence of damage after around 150,000 hours of operation. However, FAC damage was eventually found in some of the other units operating with a deoxygenated feedwater chemistry regime, in spite of having adopted an elevated feedwater pH. These units have now successfully converted to an oxygen dosed AVT feedwater chemistry regime to prevent further FAC damage, with the result that all 14 AGR reactors now operate with variants of the original oxygen dosed feedwater chemistry regime developed during the 1980s. The paper outlines the development of

  10. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Gas Reactor-1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software

  11. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  12. Advanced fuels for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    fuels originates from goals for achieving high burnup, operating at higher temperature, and the incorporation of the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) into the fuels. High burn-ups will allow uninterrupted reactor operations over longer periods of time and consequently, reduction of spent fuel volumes, and eventually a significant fuel cycle reduction cost. High burn-ups are however associated with physical limitations which are primary due to the swelling of the fuel and oxidation of cladding inner surface as well as the dimensional stability of core materials such as cladding and subassembly duct due to high fast neutron dose. Higher temperature operation also challenges the performance of cladding materials and hence advanced cladding materials are needed for high temperature operation. The irradiation performance database for (U,Pu)N mixed nitride (MN) fuels is substantially smaller than that for metal carbide (MC) fuels, and these fuels can be considered to be at an early stage of development relative to oxide and metal fuels. Compared to MC fuels, MN fuels exhibit less fuel swelling, lower fission gas release, however, the problem of the production of biologically hazardous 14C in nitride fuels fabricated using natural nitrogen poses a considerable concern for the nitride spent fuel waste management. Interest remains in nitride fuels due to the combination of high thermal conductivity and high melting point. The paper also addresses the technology readiness level (TRL) concept as applied to various fuel options. (author)

  13. Effect of horizontal flow on the cooling of the moderator brick in the advanced gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports an investigation of the effect of the horizontal cross flow on the temperature of the moderator brick in UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a conjugate heat transfer model for the solid and fluid. The commercial software package of ANSYS Fluent is used for this purpose. The CFD model comprises the full axial length of one-half of a typical fuel channel (assuming symmetry) and part of neighbouring channels on either side. Two sets of simulations have been carried out, namely, one with cross flow and one without cross flow. The effect of cross flow has subsequently been derived by comparing the results from the two groups of simulations. The study shows that a small cross flow can have a significant effect on the cooling of the graphite brick, causing the peak temperature of the brick to reduce significantly. Two mechanisms are identified to be responsible for this. Firstly, the small cross flow causes a significant redistribution of the main axial downward flow and this leads to an enhancement of heat transfer in some of the small clearances, and an impairment in others although overall, the enhancement is dominant leading to a better cooling. Secondly, the cross flow makes effective use of the small clearances between the key/keyway connections which increases the effective heat transfer area, hence increasing the cooling. Under the conditions of no cross flow, these areas remain largely inactive in heat transfer. The study shows that the cooling of the moderator is significantly enhanced by the cross flow perpendicular to the main cooling flow. (author)

  14. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-31

    The objectives of the program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the affect of simulated reactor primary coolant (Helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in the report includes the activities associated with the procurement of the materials for the screening test program, information from vendor certification for the materials receiver, and preliminary information from the materials characterization tests performed by General Electric. The construction status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment are discussed. The status of the data management system is also reviewed.

  15. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines

  16. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase 1 effort was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) Reactor concept. Unlike...

  17. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) reactor to efficiently extract oxygen from lunar regolith. Unlike state-of-the-art carbothermal...

  18. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  19. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  20. Advanced Fission Reactor Program objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of an advanced fission reactor program should be to develop an economically attractive, safe, proliferation-resistant fission reactor. To achieve this objective, an aggressive and broad-based research and development program is needed. Preliminary work at Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that a reasonable goal for a research program would be a reactor combining as many as possible of the following features: (1) initial loading of uranium enriched to less than 15% uranium 235, (2) no handling of fuel for the full 30-year nominal core life, (3) inherent safety ensured by core physics, and (4) utilization of natural uranium at least 5 times as efficiently as light water reactors

  1. High temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a reflector block structure of a high temperature gas reactor in which graphite blocks are not failed even a containing cylinder loaded to a fuel exchanger collides against to secured reflectors upon loading and withdrawing fuel constitutional elements. Namely, a protection plate made of a metal material such as stainless steel is covered on the secured reflector blocks disposed to the upper most step among secured graphite reflector blocks constituting the reactor core. In addition, positioning guide grooves are formed on the protection plate for guiding the containing cylinder loaded to the fuel exchanger to the column of the reactor core constitutional elements. With such a constitution, even if the containing cylinder of fuel exchanger is hoisted down and collided against the inner circumferential edge of the secured reflector blocks due to deviation of the position and the direction upon exchange of fuels, the reflector blocks are not failed since the above-mentioned portion is covered with the metal protection plate. In addition, the positioning guide grooves lead the fuel exchanger to a predetermined column correctly. (I.S.)

  2. The Windscale Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (WAGR) Decommissioning Project A Close Out Report for WAGR Decommissioning Campaigns 1 to 10 - 12474

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliwell, Chris [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The reactor core of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) has been dismantled as part of an ongoing decommissioning project. The WAGR operated until 1981 as a development reactor for the British Commercial Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (CAGR) power programme. Decommissioning began in 1982 with the removal of fuel from the reactor core which was completed in 1983. Subsequently, a significant amount of engineering work was carried out, including removal of equipment external to the reactor and initial manual dismantling operations at the top of the reactor, in preparation for the removal of the reactor core itself. Modification of the facility structure and construction of the waste packaging plant served to provide a waste route for the reactor components. The reactor core was dismantled on a 'top-down' basis in a series of 'campaigns' related to discrete reactor components. This report describes the facility, the modifications undertaken to facilitate its decommissioning and the strategies employed to recognise the successful decommissioning of the reactor. Early decommissioning tasks at the top of the reactor were undertaken manually but the main of the decommissioning tasks were carried remotely, with deployment systems comprising of little more than crane like devices, intelligently interfaced into the existing structure. The tooling deployed from the 3 tonne capacity (3te) hoist consisted either purely mechanical devices or those being electrically controlled from a 'push-button' panel positioned at the operator control stations, there was no degree of autonomy in the 3te hoist or any of the tools deployed from it. Whilst the ATC was able to provide some tele-robotic capabilities these were very limited and required a good degree of driver input which due to the operating philosophy at WAGR was not utilised. The WAGR box proved a successful waste package, adaptable through the use of waste box furniture specific to the

  3. Advanced Reactor Development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States, three technologies are employed for the new generation of advanced reactors. These technologies are Advanced Light Water Reactors (A LWRs) for the 1990s and beyond, the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (M HTGR) for commercial use after the turn of the century, and Liquid Metal Reactors (LWRs) to provide energy production and to convert reactor fission waste to a more manageable waste product. Each technology contributes to the energy solution. Light Water Reactors For The 1990s And Beyond--The U. S. Program The economic and national security of the United States requires a diversified energy supply base built primarily upon adequate, domestic resources that are relatively free from international pressures. Nuclear energy is a vital component of this supply and is essential to meet current and future national energy demands. It is a safe, economically continues to contribute to national energy stability, and strength. The Light Water Reactor (LWR) has been a major and successful contributor to the electrical generating needs of many nations throughout the world. It is being counted upon in the United States as a key to revitalizing nuclear energy option in the 1990s. In recent years, DOE joined with the industry to ensure the availability and future viability of the LWR option. This national program has the participation of the Nation's utility industry, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and several of the major reactor manufacturers and architect-engineers. Separate but coordinated parts of this program are managed by EPRI and DOE

  4. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-18

    This report presents the results of work performed from October 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described. This includes: screening creep results, weight gain and post-exposure mechanical properties for materials thermally exposed at 750/sup 0/ and 850/sup 0/C (1382/sup 0/ and 1562/sup 0/F). In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  5. Novelties in design and construction of the advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced pressurized water reactors (APWR), advanced boiling water reactors (ABWR), advanced liquid metal reactors (ALMR), and modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGR), as well as heavy water reactors (AHWR), are analyzed taking into account those characteristics which make them less complex, but safer than their current homologous ones. This fact simplifies their construction which reduces completion periods and costs, increasing safety and protection of the plants. It is demonstrated how the accumulated operational experience allows to find more standardized designs with some enhancement in the material and component technology and thus achieve also a better use of computerized systems

  6. Advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) system, steam generated within the nuclear boiler is sent directly to the main turbine. This direct cycle steam delivery system enables the BWR to have a compact power generation building design. Another feature of the BWR is the inherent safety that results from the negative reactivity coefficient of the steam void in the core. Based on the significant construction and operation experience accumulated on the BWR throughout the world, the ABWR was developed to further improve the BWR characteristics and to achieve higher performance goals. The ABWR adopted 'First of a Kind' type technologies to achieve the desired performance improvements. The Reactor Internal Pump (RIP), Fine Motion Control Rod Drive (FMCRD), Reinforced Concrete Containment Vessel (RCCV), three full divisions of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), integrated digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C), and a high thermal efficiency main steam turbine system were developed and introduced into the ABWR. (author)

  7. Directions in advanced reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful nuclear power plant concepts must simultaneously performance in terms of both safety and economics. To be attractive to both electric utility companies and the public, such plants must produce economical electric energy consistent with a level of safety which is acceptable to both the public and the plant owner. Programs for reactor development worldwide can be classified according to whether the reactor concept pursues improved safety or improved economic performance as the primary objective. When improved safety is the primary goal, safety enters the solution of the design problem as a constraint which restricts the set of allowed solutions. Conversely, when improved economic performance is the primary goal, it is allowed to be pursued only to an extent which is compatible with stringent safety requirements. The three major reactor coolants under consideration for future advanced reactor use are water, helium and sodium. Reactor development programs focuses upon safety and upon economics using each coolant are being pursued worldwide. These programs are discussed

  8. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1980-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, 950 and 10500C. Initiation of controlled purity helium creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. In addition, the results of 1000-hour exposures at 750 and 8500C on several experimental alloys are discussed

  9. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors.

  10. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program. Interim report. Construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and operating experience of selected European Gas-Cooled Reactors is summarized along with technical descriptions of the plants. Included in the report are the AVR Experimental Pebble Bed Reactor, the Dragon Reactor, AGR Reactors, and the Thorium High Temperature Reactor (THTR). The study demonstrates that the European experience has been favorable and forms a good foundation for the development of Advanced High Temperature Reactors

  11. ICONE-4: Proceedings. Volume 2: Advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for this conference are contained in 5 volumes. This volume is divided into the following areas: advanced reactor requirements; advanced reactor design and analysis; arrangement and construction; specific reactor designs; demonstration testing; safety systems and analysis; component demonstration testing; advanced reactor containment design; licensing topics and updates; accelerator applications and spallation sources; and advanced reactor development. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  12. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  13. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas temperature of a hot gas loop in gas-cooled nuclear reactor plants shall be able to be modified without influencing the gas temperature of the other loops. If necessary, it should be possible to stop the loop. This is possible by means of a mixer which is places below the heat absorbing component in the hot channel and which is connected to a cold gas line. (orig.)

  14. Fuel for advanced CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor system has proven itself to be a world leader in terms of station availability and low total unit energy cost. In 1985 for example, four of the top ten reactor units in the world were CANDU reactors operating in South Korea and Canada. This excellent operating record requires an equivalent performance record of the low-cost, natural uranium fuel. Future CANDU reactors will be an evolution of the present design. Engineering work is under way to refine the existing CANDU 600 and to incorporate state-of-the-art technology, reducing the capital cost and construction schedule. In addition, a smaller CANDU 300 plant has been designed using proven CANDU 600 technology and components but with an innovative new plant layout that makes it cost competitive with coal fired plants. For the long term, work on advanced fuel cycles and major system improvements is underway ensuring that CANDU plants will stay competitive well into the next century

  15. Nondestructive testing of welds in steam generators for advanced gas cooled reactors at Heyshamm II and Torness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concerns non-destructive testing (NDT) of welds in advanced gas cooled steam generators for Heysham II and Torness nuclear power stations. A description is given of the steam generator. The selection of NDT techniques is also outlined, including the factors considered to ascertain the viability of a technique. Examples are given of applied NDT methods which match particular fabrication processes; these include: microfocus radiography, ultrasonic testing of austenitic tube butt welds, gamma-ray isotope projection system, surface crack detection, and automated radiography. Finally, future trends in this field of NDT are highlighted. (UK)

  16. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Neutronic of heterogenous gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, one of the main technical features of the advanced gas cooled reactor under development is its fuel element concept, which implies a neutronic homogeneous design, thus requiring higher enrichment compared with present commercial nuclear power plants.In this work a neutronic heterogeneous gas cooled reactor design is analyzed by studying the neutronic design of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a low enrichment, gas cooled and graphite moderated nuclear power plant.A search of merit figures (some neutronic parameter, characteristic dimension, or a mixture of both) which are important and have been optimized during the reactor design stage is been done, to aim to comprise how a gas heterogeneous reactor is been design, given that semi-infinity arrangement criteria of rods in LWRs and clusters in HWRs can t be applied for a solid moderator and a gas refrigerator.The WIMS code for neutronic cell calculations is been utilized to model the AGR fuel cell and to calculate neutronic parameters such as the multiplication factor and the pick factor, as function of the fuel burnup.Also calculation is been done for various nucleus characteristic dimensions values (fuel pin radius, fuel channel pitch) and neutronic parameters (such as fuel enrichment), around the design established parameters values.A fuel cycle cost analysis is carried out according to the reactor in study, and the enrichment effect over it is been studied.Finally, a thermal stability analysis is been done, in subcritical condition and at power level, to study this reactor characteristic reactivity coefficients.Present results shows (considering the approximation used) a first set of neutronic design figures of merit consistent with the AGR design.

  18. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  19. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  20. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1977--June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Process Heat and Direct Cycle helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effects of simulated reactor primary coolant (impure helium), high temperatures, and long time exposures on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in the report includes completion of alloy selection for the screening tests. The alloys selected for potential VHTR Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) applications and for potential DCHT applications are listed. The present status on the simulated reactor helium loop design and construction and the design and construction progress on the testing and analysis facilities and equipment are discussed.

  1. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  2. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-11-14

    Work covered includes an updated listing of the alloys selected for the screening tests, plus complete test specimen matrices for the screening program. The present design and construction status of the simulated reactor helium loops and testing and analysis facilities and equipment are discussed. Also covered are the loading matrices for the screening creep tests.

  3. Advanced gas cooled nuclear reactor materials evaluation and development program. Progress report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work covered includes an updated listing of the alloys selected for the screening tests, plus complete test specimen matrices for the screening program. The present design and construction status of the simulated reactor helium loops and testing and analysis facilities and equipment are discussed. Also covered are the loading matrices for the screening creep tests

  4. The Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program is a forward-looking program designed to produce viable nuclear generating system candidates to meet the very real, and perhaps imminent, need for new power generation capacity in the U. S. and around the world. The ALRR Program is an opportunity to move ahead with confidence, to confront problems today which must be confronted if the U. S. electrical utilities are to continue to meet their commitment to provide safe, reliable, economical electrical power to the nation in the years ahead. Light water reactor technology is today playing a vital role in the production of electricity to meet the world's needs. At present about 13% of the world's electricity is supplied by nuclear power plants, most of those light water reactors. Nevertheless, there is a clear need for expanded use of nuclear generation. Here in Korea and elsewhere in Asia, demand for electricity has continued to increase at a very high rate. In the United States demand growth has been more moderate, but a large number of existing stations will be ready for replacement in the next two decades, and all countries face the problem of dwindling fuel supplies and growing environmental impact of fossil-fired power plants. Despite the evident need for expanded nuclear generation capacity in the United States, there have been no new plants ordered in the past ten years and at present there are no immediate prospects for new plant orders. Concerns about safety, the high cost of recent nuclear stations, and the current excess of electrical generation capacity in the United States, have combined to interrupt completely the growth of this vital power supply system

  5. Effect of horizontal cross flow on the heat transfer form the moderator bricks in the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor: A CFD study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Small cross flow can have a significant effect on the cooling of the graphite brick of UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR). • Cross flow causes the peak temperature of the brick to reduce. • Cross flow causes a redistribution of the main axial downward flow. • Cross flow enhances the heat transfer in some of passages of small clearances of the key/keyway connections. -- Abstract: The paper reports an investigation of the effect of the horizontal cross flow on the temperature of the moderator brick in the UK Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with a conjugate heat transfer model for the solid and fluid. The commercial software package ANSYS Fluent is used to study the correlation between the flow structure and heat transfer which ultimately determine the temperature within the system. The CFD model comprises the full axial length of one-half of a typical fuel channel (assuming symmetry) and part of the neighbouring channels on either side. Two sets of simulations have been carried out, namely, one with cross flow and one without cross flow. The effect of cross flow has subsequently been derived by comparing the results from these two groups of simulations. The study shows that a small cross flow can have a significant effect on the cooling of the graphite brick, causing the peak temperature of the brick to reduce significantly. Two mechanisms are identified to be responsible for this. Firstly, the small cross flow causes a significant redistribution of the main axial downward flow and this leads to an enhancement of heat transfer in some of the small clearances, and an impairment in others although overall, the enhancement is dominant leading to a better cooling. Secondly, the cross flow makes effective use of the small clearances between the key/keyway connections which increases the effective heat transfer area, hence increasing the cooling. Under the conditions of no cross flow, these areas remain

  6. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  7. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  8. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply systems and testing equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described; this includes: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 7500, 8500, 9500, and 10500C (13820, 15620, 17420, and 19220F). The status of controlled purity helium and air creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. The results of metallographic studies of screening alloys exposed in controlled purity helium for 3000 hours at 7500C and 6000 hours at 8500C and for weldments exposed in controlled purity helium for 6000 hours at 8500 and 9500C are presented and discussed

  9. Characterizing the effects of elevated temperature on the air void pore structure of advanced gas-cooled reactor pressure vessel concrete using x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) has been applied to nondestructively characterise changes in the microstructure of a concrete used in the pressure vessel structure of Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR) in the UK. Concrete specimens were conditioned at temperatures of 105 C and 250 C, to simulate the maximum thermal load expected to occur during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Following thermal treatment, these specimens along with an unconditioned control sample were characterised using micro-focus X-ray CT with a spatial resolution of 14.6 microns. The results indicate that the air void pore structure of the specimens experienced significant volume changes as a result of the increasing temperature. The increase in the porous volume was more prevalent at 250 C. Alterations in air void size distributions were characterized with respect to the unconditioned control specimen. These findings appear to correlate with changes in the uni-axial compressive strength of the conditioned concrete. (authors)

  10. Physics of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with technical aspects of the gas-cooled reactors safety and design. It content five main parts: the new safety requirements for innovative reactors; the concept of a non-meltable nuclear reactor; the new concepts of decay heat removal from the reactor system; the behaviour of reactor system in case of extreme reactivity accidents; technical innovations in the reactor technology and necessary developments and proof tests. (A.L.B.)

  11. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  12. Design codes for gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants have been under development for about 30 years and experimental and prototype plants have been operated. The main line of development has been electricity generation based on the steam cycle. In addition the potential for high primary coolant temperature has resulted in research and development programmes for advanced applications including the direct cycle gas turbine and process heat applications. In order to compare results of the design techniques of various countries for high temperature reactor components, the IAEA established a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Design Codes for Gas-Cooled Reactor Components. The Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, Switzerland and the USSR participated in this Co-ordinated Research Programme. Within the frame of this CRP a benchmark problem was established for the design of the hot steam header of the steam generator of an HTGR for electricity generation. This report presents the results of that effort. The publication also contains 5 reports presented by the participants. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these reports. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Advanced Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) Reactor and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Hadley, Neal M.; Dahl, Roger W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Miller, Lee; Medlen, Amber

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of a second generation Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) reactor is currently underway as part of NASA's Atmosphere Revitalization Resource Recovery effort. By recovering up to 75% of the hydrogen currently lost as methane in the Sabatier reactor effluent, the PPA helps to minimize life support resupply costs for extended duration missions. To date, second generation PPA development has demonstrated significant technology advancements over the first generation device by doubling the methane processing rate while, at the same time, more than halving the required power. One development area of particular interest to NASA system engineers is fouling of the PPA reactor with carbonaceous products. As a mitigation plan, NASA MSFC has explored the feasibility of using an oxidative plasma based upon metabolic CO2 to regenerate the reactor window and gas inlet ports. The results and implications of this testing are addressed along with the advanced PPA reactor development.

  14. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication technology of the U3Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U3Si2 dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U3Si2 fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 ∼ 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The γ-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U3Si2. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano-plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49

  15. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    -plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49 compacts with a uranium density of 8 gU/cc consist of 7 different atomized uranium-molybdenum alloy powders. The tensile strength increased and the elongation decreased with increasing the volume fraction of U-10Mo powders in dispersion fuel. The tensile strength was lower and elongation was larger in dispersion fuel using atomized U-10Mo powders than that using comminuted fuel powders. The green strength of the comminuted powder compacts was about twice as large as that of the atomized powder compacts. It is suggested that the compacting condition required to fabricate the atomized powder compacts is over the 350MPa. The comminuted irregular shaped particles and smaller particle size of fuel powders showed improved homogeneity of powder mixture. The homogeneity of powder mixtures increased to a minimum at approximately 0.10 wt% moisture and then decreased with moisture content.

  16. Advances in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Project is an important part of the German reactor safety research programme. It works on problems concerning safety and environemental risks of LWR reactors and reprocessing plants and investigates accident consequences. At the 1978 annual meeting, the core behaviour on cooling and reactivity disturbances was discussed, as well as release, retention, and possible radiological effects of radioactive pollutants. Among other subjects, fission product retention in LWR reactors and reprocessing plants were reported on as well as hypothetic core meltdown. (orig.)

  17. Status of advanced technologies for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future development of the CANDU reactor is a continuation of a successful series of reactors, the most recent of which are nine CANDU 6 Mk 1* units and four Darlington units. There are three projects underway that continue the development of the CANDU reactor. These new design projects flow from the original reactor designs and are a natural progression of the CANDU 6 Mk 1, two units of which are operating successfully in Canada, one each in Argentina and Korea, with five more being built in Rumania. These new design projects are known as: CANDU 6 Mk 2, an improved version of CANDU 6 Mk 1; CANDU 3, a small, advanced version of the CANDU 6 Mk 1; CANDU 6 Mk 3, a series of advanced CANDU reactors. A short description of modified versions of CANDU reactors is given in this paper. 5 figs

  18. Thermal hydraulic R and D of Chinese advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese government sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced reactors, both small modular reactors and larger systems. These advanced reactors encompass innovative reactor concepts, such as CAP1400 - Chinese large advanced passive pressurized water reactor, Hualong one - Chinese large advanced active and passive pressurized water reactor, ACP100 - Chinese small modular reactor, SCWR- R and D of super critical water-cooled reactor in China, CLEAR - Chinese lead-cooled fast reactor, TMSR - Chinese Thorium molten-salt reactor. The thermal hydraulic R and D of those reactors are summarised. (J.P.N.)

  19. Dimethylamine as a replacement for ammonia dosing in the secondary circuit of an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Chris; Mitchell, Malcolm S. [EDF Energy, Hartlepool Power Station, Hartlepool (United Kingdom); Bull, Andrew E.A.; Quirk, Graham P.; Rudge, Andy [EDF Energy Nuclear Generation, Barnwood, Gloucester (United Kingdom). Central Technical Organisation; Woolsey, Ian S.

    2012-06-15

    Increasing flow resistance observed over recent years within the helical once-through boilers in the four advanced gas-cooled reactors at Hartlepool and Heysham 1 Power Stations have reduced boiler performance, resulting in reductions in feedwater flow, steam temperatures, and power output and in the need to carry out periodic chemical cleaning. The root cause is believed to be the development of magnetite deposits with high flow impedance in the 9Cr1Mo evaporator section of the boiler tubing. To prevent continued increases in boiler flow resistance, dimethylamine is being trialled, in one of the four affected units, as a replacement to the conventional ammonia dosing. Dimethylamine increases the pH at temperature around the secondary circuit and, based on full scale boiler rig simulations, is expected to reduce iron transport and prevent flow resistance increases within the evaporator section of the boiler. The dimethylamine plant trial commenced in January 2011 and is ongoing. The feedwater concentration of dimethylamine has been increased progressively towards a final target value of 900 {mu}g . kg{sup -1} and its effect on iron transport and boiler pressure loss is being closely monitored. The high steam temperature (> 500 C) of the secondary circuit leads to some decomposition of dimethylamine, which is being carefully monitored at various locations around the circuit. The decomposition products identified with dimethylamine dosing include ammonia, methylamine, formic acid, carbon dioxide and, as yet, unidentified neutral organic species. The effect of dimethylamine dosing on iron transport and boiler pressure drops and its decomposition behaviour around the secondary circuit during the plant trial will be presented in this paper. (orig.)

  20. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  1. High temperature gas-cooled reactors - perspective of thermal reactor concept with high thermal efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present HTR development is based worldwide on the extensive experience gained in the construction and operation of gas-cooled reactors of the Magnox type and on the successful operation of the experimental high temperature reactors Dragon, Peach Bottom and AVR. The advanced CO2-cooled reactors, as well as the HTR prototype power plants for St. Vrain and THTR, are all suffering considerable delays in construction and commissioning. The commercial HTR plants have not yet achieved the decisive breakthrough onto the market. Increasing interest is being shown in advanced HTR systems, i.e., HTR with gas turbine, HTR process heat reactors and gas-cooled fast breeders. The key problem in the coming years will be the closing of the fuel cycle. Development work in this connection has already started. (orig.)

  2. Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost all the R D works of gas-cooled fast breeder reactor in the world were terminated at the end of the year 1980. In order to show that the R D termination was not due to technical difficulties of the reactor itself, the present paper describes the reactor plant concept, reactor performances, safety, economics and fuel cycle characteristics of the reactor, and also describes the reactor technologies developed so far, technological problems remained to be solved and planned development schedules of the reactor. (author)

  3. Analytical chemistry requirements for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power industry has been developing and improving reactor technology for more than five decades. Newer advanced reactors now being built have simpler designs which reduce capital cost. The greatest departure from most designs now in operation is that many incorporate passive or inherent safety features which require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. India is developing the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) in its plan to utilise thorium in nuclear power program

  4. Fuel behavior in advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rod behavior of advanced pressurized water reactors under steady state conditions has been investigated in this study. System-80+ and Westinghouse Vantage-5 fuels have been considered as advanced pressurized water reactor fuels to be analyzed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the sensitivity of ditferent models and the effect of selected design parameters on the overall fuel behavior. FRAPCON-II computer code has been used for the analyses. Different modelling options of FRAPCON-II have also been considered in these analyses. Analyses have been performed in two main parts. In the first part, effects of operating conditions on fuel behavior have been investigated. First, fuel rod response under normal operating conditions has been analyzed. Then, fuel rod response to different fuel ratings has been calculated. In the second part, in order to estimate the effect of design parameters on fuel behavior, parametric analyses have been performed. In this part, the effects of initial gap thickness, as fabricated fuel density, and initial fill gas pressure on fuel behavior have been analyzed. The computations showed that both of the fuel rods used in this study operate within the safety limits. However, FRAPCON-II modelling options have been resulted in different behavior due to their modelling characteristics. Hence, with the absence of experimental data, it is difficult to make assesment for the best fuel parameters. It is also difficult to estimate error associated with the results. To improve the performance of the code, it is necessary to develop better experimental correlations for material properties in order to analyze the eftect ot considerably different design parameters rather than nominal rod parameters

  5. Advanced Multiphysics Modeling of Fast Reactor Fuel Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of fast reactor fuel thermo-mechanical performance using fuel performance codes is a key aspect of advanced fast reactors designs. Those fuel performance codes capture the multiphysics nature of fuel behavior during irradiation where different, mostly interdependent, phenomena are taking place. Existing fuel performance codes do not fully capture those interdependencies and present the different phenomena through de-coupled models. Recent developments in multiphysics simulation capabilities and availability of advanced computing platforms led to advancements in simulation of nuclear fuel behavior. This paper presents current experiences in applying different multiphysics simulation platforms to evaluation of fast reactors metallic fuel behavior. Full 3D finite element simulation platforms that include capabilities to fully couple key fuel behavior models are discussed. Issues associated with coupling metallic fuels phenomena, such as fission gas models and constituent distribution models, with thermo-mechanical finite element platforms, as well as different coupling schemes are also discussed. (author)

  6. NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilis Papavassiliou; Leo Bonnell; Dion Vlachos

    2004-12-01

    Praxair investigated an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from natural gas and oxygen This production process combined the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The program achieved all of the milestones contained in the development plan for Phase I. We were able to develop a reactor configuration that was able to operate at high pressures (up to 19atm). This new reactor technology was used as the basis for a new process for the conversion of natural gas to liquid products (Gas to Liquids or GTL). Economic analysis indicated that the new process could provide a 8-10% cost advantage over conventional technology. The economic prediction although favorable was not encouraging enough for a high risk program like this. Praxair decided to terminate development.

  7. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  8. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-01-12

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FETF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This revision reflects the 19 Oct 1999 baseline.

  9. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWEN, W.W.

    1999-11-08

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This document reflects the 1 Oct 1999 baseline.

  10. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Advanced reactor concepts and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for some consistency in the terms used to describe the evolution of methods for ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors has been identified by the IAEA. This is timely since there appears to be a danger that the precision of many valuable words is being diluted and that a new jargon may appear that will confuse rather than aid the communication of important but possibly diverse philosophies and concepts. Among the difficulties faced by the nuclear industry is promoting and gaining a widespread understanding of the risks actually posed by nuclear reactors. In view of the importance of communication to both the public and to the technical community generally, the starting point for the definition of terms must be with dictionary meanings and common technical usage. The nuclear engineering community should use such words in conformance with the whole technical world. This paper addresses many of the issues suggested in the invitation to meet and also poses some additional issues for consideration. Some examples are the role of the operator in either enhancing or degrading safety and how the meaning or interpretation of the word 'safety' can be expected to change during the next few decades. It is advantageous to use criteria against which technologies and ongoing operating performance can be judged provided that the criteria are generic and not specific to particular reactor concepts. Some thoughts are offered on the need to frame the criteria carefully so that innovative solutions and concepts are fostered, not stifled

  12. High temperature gas-cooled reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) with a direct cycle helium system has drawn attention as the next generation nuclear power plant that is closest to commercialization. Fuji Electric participated in the design, manufacture and construction of JAPCO's Tokai-1 plant, a 'Colder Hall' type reactor, which was the first commercial nuclear power plant in Japan, and JAERI's high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR), which was the first high temperature gas-cooled reactor in Japan. Fuji Electric, a pioneer of gas-cooled reactors, worked on the design, construction and development of these reactors. This paper provides brief descriptions of the air-cooled spent fuel storage system of the HTTR, material test facilities for the HTTR, and the development of an inherently safe and highly efficient commercial HTGR power plant as examples of Fuji Electric's recent activities in the HTGR field. (author)

  13. Preliminary evaluation of alternate-fueled gas cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary evaluation of various alternative fuel cycles for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) is presented. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous oxide-fueled GCFRs are considered. The scenario considered is the energy center/dispersed reactor concept in which proliferation-resistant denatured reactors are coupled to 233U production reactors operating in secure energy centers. Individual reactor performance characteristics and symbiotic system parameters are summarized for several possible alternative fuel concepts. Comparisons are made between the classical homogeneous GCFR and the advanced heterogeneous concept on the basis of breeding ratio, doubling time, and net fissile gain. In addition, comparisons are made between a three-dimensional reactor model and the R-Z heterogeneous configuration utilized for the depletion and fuel management calculations. Lastly, thirty-year mass balance data are given for the various GCFR fuel cycles studied

  14. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  15. Relative safeguards risks of advanced reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to develop a procedure to quantitatively assess the risk to diversion of the nuclear material in the fuel cycle for seven advanced reactor design concepts (LWR-Pu, LMFBR, HTGR, GCFR, MSBR, LWBR, HWR). Each stage in each of the seven reactor fuel cycles is evaluated and the result of the evaluation is a comparison among the various fuel cycles. This method of evaluation is used to determine the stages in a nuclear reactor fuel cycle that are most susceptible to diversion; it also gives an indication of what factors contribute to that susceptibility

  16. Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

  17. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration; Turbina de gas reactor modular con helio en cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon de los Santos, G. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: tesgleon@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  18. Advancement of light water reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japanese technology of light water reactors is based on the technology imported from abroad around 1970, and the experience has been accumulated by the construction, operation and repair of light water reactors as well as the countermeasures to various troubles, moreover, the improvement and standardization of light water reactors have been promoted. As the result, recently the high capacity ratio has been attained, and the LWR technology has firmly taken root in Japan. The Subcommittee for the Advancement of Light Water Reactor Technology of the Advisory Committee for Energy has examined the subjects of technical development and the way the development should be in order to decide the strategy to advance LWR technology, and drawn up the interim report. The change of situation around the LWRs in Japan and the necessity to advance the technology, the target of advancing LWR technology and the subjects of the technical development, the system for the technical development and the securement of fund, and international cooperation are reported. The subjects of development are the pursuit of higher reliability and economic efficiency, the extension of plant life, the improvement of repairability and the reduction of radiation exposure, the improvement of operational capability, the reduction of wastes, the techniques for reactor decommissioning and the diversified location. (Kako, I.)

  19. Reactor core design of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and existing fossil fired gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original design features of this system are the reactor core design based on a newly proposed refueling scheme named sandwich shuffling, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an innovative coolant flow scheme and a horizontally installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refueling for 2 years. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200,000 yen (1667 US$)/kW e, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 yen (3.3 US cents)/kW h. This paper describes the original design features focusing on the reactor core design and the in-core structure design, including the innovative coolant flow scheme for cooling the RPV. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

  20. Gas turbine modeling for NPP with helium cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance analyzes of closed helium cycle for NPPs with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was carried out. Air-turbine units and helium-turbine units were compared. Helium turbine features were particularized in comparison with conventional air turbines. Simulation results of gas turbine setting with helium as a working medium were presented. Problems concerning high economic efficiency advance of helium turbines were discussed

  1. Series lecture on advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems concerning fusion reactors are presented and discussed in this series lecture. At first, the D-T tokamak is explained. The breeding of tritium and the radioactive property of tritium are discussed. The hybrid reactor is explained as an example of the direct use of neutrons. Some advanced fuel reactions are proposed. It is necessary to make physics consideration for burning advanced fuel in reactors. The rate of energy production and the energy loss are important things. The bremsstrahlung radiation and impurity radiation are explained. The simple estimation of the synchrotron radiation was performed. The numerical results were compared with a more detailed calculation of Taimor, and the agreement was quite good. The calculation of ion and electron temperature was made. The idea to use the energy more efficiently is that one can take X-ray or neutrons, and pass them through a first wall of a reactor into a second region where they heat the material. A method to convert high temperature into useful energy is the third problem of this lecture. The device was invented by A. Hertzberg. The lifetime of the reactor depends on the efficiency of energy recovery. The idea of using spin polarized nuclei has come up. The spin polarization gives a chance to achieve a large multiplication factor. The advanced fuel which looks easiest to make go is D plus He-3. The idea of multipole is presented to reduce the magnetic field inside plasma, and discussed. Two other topics are explained. (Kato, T.)

  2. Development of demonstration advanced thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the advanced thermal demonstration reactor with 600 MWe output was started in 1975. In order to make the compact core, 648 fuel assemblies, each comprising 36 fuel rods, were used, and the mean channel output was increased by 20% as compared with the prototype reactor. The heavy water dumping mechanism for the calandria was abolished. Advanced thermal reactors are suitable to burn plutonium, since the control rod worth does not change, the void reactivity coefficient of coolant shifts to the negative side, and the harmful influence of high order plutonium is small. The void reactivity coefficient is nearly zero, the fluctuation of output in relation to pressure disturbance is small, and the local output change of fuel by the operation of control rods is small, therefore, the operation following load change is relatively easy. The coolant recirculation system is of independent loop construction dividing the core into two, and steam and water are separated in respective steam drums. At present, the rationalizing design is in progress by the leadership of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. The outline of the demonstration reactor, the reactor construction, the nuclear-thermal-hydraulic characteristics and the output control characteristics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  4. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  5. The gas turbine-modular helium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is an advanced gas-cooled reactor currently under development in a joint United States-Russian Federation program to provide capacity for disposition of surplus weapons plutonium. A uranium-fueled option for commercial deployment is also being scheduled, which would apply the R and D performed in Russia. The GT-MHR module couples a gas-cooled modular helium reactor (MHR) with a high efficiency modular Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) energy conversion system. The reactor and power conversion systems are located in a below grade concrete silo that provides protection against sabotage. The GT-MHR is designed to provide unparalleled safety, high thermal efficiency and environmental advantages at a competitive electricity generation cost. The overall level of safety is achieved through a combination of inherent safety characteristics and design selections consisting of: helium coolant, which is single phase, inert, and has no reactivity effects; graphite core, which provides high heat capacity and slow thermal response, and structural stability at very high temperatures; refractory coated particle fuel, which allows extremely high burnup and retains fission products at temperatures much higher than normal operation; negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, which inherently shuts down the core above normal operating temperatures; and an annular, 600 MWt low power density core in an uninsulated steel reactor vessel surrounded by a reactor cavity cooling system. Use of the Brayton cycle helium gas turbine in the GT-MHR provides electric generating capacity at a net plant efficiency of about 48%, a level that can be obtained by no other nuclear reactor technology. Relative to water reactor plants, the high plant efficiency reduces power generation costs, thermal discharge to the environment is reduced by 50%, and actinide production is reduced by about 60% per unit electricity produced. The MHR refractory

  6. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  7. Development of Korea advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear power plants should not only have the features of improved safety and economic competitiveness but also provide a means to resolve spent fuel storage problems by minimizing volume of high level wastes. It is widely believed that liquid metal reactors (LMRs) have the highest potential of meeting these requirements. In this context, the LMR development program was launched as a national long-term R and D program in 1992, with a target to introduce a commercial LMR around 2030. Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER), a 150 MWe pool-type sodium cooled prototype reactor, is currently under the conceptual design study with the target schedule to complete its construction by the mid-2010s. This paper summarizes the KALIMER development program and major technical features of the reactor system. (author)

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  9. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  10. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  11. Advanced fuel cycles for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current natural uranium-fuelled CANDU system is a world leader, both in terms of overall performance and uranium utilization. Moreover, the CANDU reactor is capable of using many different advanced fuel cycles, with improved uranium utilization relative to the natural uranium one-through cycle. This versatility would enable CANDU to maintain its competitive edge in uranium utilization as improvements are made by the competition. Several CANDU fuel cycles are symbiotic with LWRs, providing an economical vehicle for the recycle of uranium and/or plutonium from discharges LWR fuel. The slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel cycle is economically attractive now, and this economic benefit will increase with anticipated increases in the cost of natural uranium, and decreases in the cost of fuel enrichment. The CANFLEX fuel bundle, an advanced 43-element design, will ensure that the full benefits of SEU, and other advanced fuel cycles, can be achieved in the CANDU reactor. 25 refs

  12. Gas conduction in a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot gas is distributed and mixed by polygonal blocks in the reactor floor. Radial and an annular channel are used for this purpose. This annular channel also carried circular ducts distributed evenly over the circumference, which lead to a heat exchanger. Temperature differences across the crossection of the reactor floor are evened out by multiple deflection, combination and renewed splitting of the gas flows. (DG)

  13. Gas-cooled reactors and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the current status and recent progress made in the technology and design of gas-cooled reactors and their application for electricity generation, process steam and process heat production. The meeting was attended by more than 200 participants from 25 countries and International Organizations presenting 34 papers. The technical part of the meeting was subdivided into 7 sessions: A. Overview of the Status of Gas-Cooled Reactors and Their Prospects (2 papers); B. Experience with Gas-Cooled Reactors (5 papers); C. Description of Current GCR Plant Designs (10 papers); D. Safety Aspects (4 papers); E. Gas-Cooled Reactor Applications (3 papers); F. Gas-Cooled Reactor Technology (6 papers); G. User's Perspectives on Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers). At the end of the meeting a round table discussion was organized in order to summarize the meeting and to make recommendations for future activities. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 34 presentations of this meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. System-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Kori nuclear power plant unit 1, the first nuclear power plant unit ever dedicated in Korea, began commercial operations with a generating capacity of 587 MW in 1978, much research and development has been conducted in the nuclear industry. In the middle 1980s, the Korean standard nuclear power plant (KSNP) was first developed under the 'nuclear power promotion plan' promulgated by the government with reference to system 80 of ABBCE of the USA. Applying indigenously accumulated technologies and up-to-date design standards from both home and abroad, the initial KSNP project began with the construction of the Younggwang NPP units No. 3 and 4. In addition, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) designed and constructed a high performance multipurpose research reactor based on experience in the operation of previous reactors and accumulated nuclear technology. Timed with completion of construction in April 1995, the reactor was named HANARO (high-flux advanced neutron application reactor), which, in Korean means, 'uniqueness'. In the middle of the 1990s, research and development was launched related to small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) to promote the utilization of nuclear energy. SMRs are under development worldwide for various purposes such as district heating, seawater desalination, nuclear ship propulsion, as well as electricity production. Generally, modern SMRs for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production, and reduced capital costs. Many SMRs also have advantages of reactor safety and economics by implementing advanced design concepts and technology. Since 1997, KAERI has been developing the system-integrated modular advanced reactor (SMART), an advanced integral pressurized water reactor (PWR). The SMART is a promising, advanced SMR and has an integral type reactor with a rated thermal power of 330 MW. All major primary components, such as reactor core, steam generator (SG), main

  15. Engineering design of advanced marine reactor MRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    JAERI has studied the design of an advanced marine reactor (named as MRX), which meets requirements of the enhancement of economy and reliability, by reflecting results and knowledge obtained from the development of N.S. Mutsu. The MRX with a power of 100 MWt is intended to be used for ship propulsion such as an ice-breaker, container cargo ship and so on. After completion of the conceptual design, the engineering design was performed in four year plan from FY 1993 to 1996. (1) Compactness, light-weightiness and simplicity of the reactor system are realized by adopting an integral-type PWR, i.e. by installing the steam generator, the pressurizer, and the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) inside the pressure vessel. Because of elimination of the primary coolant circulation pipes in the MRX, possibility of large-scale pipe break accidents can be eliminated. This contributes to improve the safety of the reactor system and to simplify the engineered safety systems. (2) The in-vessel type CRDM contributes not only to eliminate possibilities of rod ejection accidents, but also to make the reactor system compact. (3) The concept of water-filled containment where the reactor pressure vessel is immersed in the water is adopted. It can be of use for emergency core cooling system which maintains core flooding passively in case of a loss-of-coolant accident. The water-filled containment system also contributes essentially light-weightness of the reactor system since the water inside containment acts as a radiation shield and in consequence the secondary radiation shield can be eliminated. (4) Adoption of passive decay heat removal systems has contributed in a greater deal to simplification of the engineered safety systems and to enhancement of reliability of the systems. (5) Operability has been improved by simplification of the whole reactor system, by adoption of the passive safety systems, advanced automatic operation systems, and so on. (J.P.N.)

  16. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  17. Advanced simulation for fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This talk broadly reviews recent research aimed at applying advanced simulation techniques specifically to fast neutron reactors. By advanced simulation we generally refer to attempts to do more science-based simulation - that is, to numerically solve the three-dimensional governing physical equations on fine scales and observe and study the holistic phenomena that emerge. In this way simulation is treated more akin to a traditional physical experiment, and can can be used both separately and in conjunction with physical experiments to develop more accurate predictive theories on reactor behavior. Many existing fast reactor modeling tools were developed for last generation's computational resources. They were built by engineers and physicists with deep physical insight - insight that both shaped and was informed by existing theory, and was underpinned by a vast repository of experimental data. Their general approach was to develop models that were tailored to varying degrees to the details of the reactor design, using free model parameters that were subsequently calibrated to match existing experimental data. The resulting codes were thus extremely useful for their specific purpose but highly limited in their predictive capability (neutronics to a lesser degree). They tended to represent more the state-of-the-art in our understanding rather than tools of exploration and innovation. Recently, a number of researchers have attempted to study the feasibility of solving more fundamental governing equations on realistic, three-dimensional geometries for different fast reactor sub-domains. This includes solving the Navier-Stokes equations for single-phase sodium flow (Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddie Simulation, and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Equations) in the core, upper plenum, primary and intermediate loop, etc.; the non-homogenized transport equations at very fine group, angle, and energy discretization, and thermo-mechanical feedback based on

  18. French activities on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas cooled reactor programme in France originally consisted of eight Natural Uranium Graphite Gas Cooled Reactors (UNGG). These eight units, which are now permanently shutdown, represented a combined net electrical power of 2,375 MW and a total operational history of 163 years. Studies related to these reactors concern monitoring and dismantling of decommissioned facilities, including the development of methods for dismantling. France has been monitoring the development of HTRs throughout the world since 1979, when it halted its own HTR R and D programme. France actively participates in three CRPs set up by the IAEA. (author). 1 tab

  19. Advanced Fast Reactor - 100 - Design Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Fast Reactor-100 (AFR-100) is a small modular sodium-cooled fast reactor with an electrical power output of 100MWe. The AFR-100 has a long-lived core that does not require refueling for 30 years. The concept contains various innovations such as a small compact modular core (both vented and non-vented fuel pins), advanced core shielding materials, a compact fuel handling system, advanced electromagnetic pumps, compact intermediate heat exchangers, and a direct reactor auxiliary cooling system. These advanced systems and components were adopted in order to reduce the overall size of the primary heat transport system (and therefore the overall commodities and cost), enhance safety, and to improve overall plant performance. This paper presents the summary results of a year-long study that culminated in the design of two primary heat transport configurations for the AFR-100. The paper describes those innovations and shows how they are integrated into the overall AFR-100 primary heat transport system design. (author)

  20. Role of advanced reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Availability of energy is an important prerequisite for socio-economic development in all parts of the world. Nuclear energy is an essentially unlimited energy resource with the potential to provide energy in the form of electricity, district heat and process heat under environmentally acceptable conditions. However, this potential will be realized only if nuclear power plants can meet the challenges of national safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide a tremendous amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction and operation of nuclear power plants. This experience forms a sound basis for further improvements. Nuclear programmes in Member States are addressing the development of advanced reactors which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability and improved safety. The IAEA, as a global international governmental organization dealing with nuclear power, promotes international information exchange and international co-operation between all countries with their own advanced nuclear power programmes and offers assistance to countries with an interest in exploratory or research programmes. The paper gives an overview about trends in advanced reactor development programmes in Member States and the possible application of advanced reactors for electricity generation and heat production. (author)

  1. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  2. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  3. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design

  4. Advanced methods in teaching reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for (nuclear power plant) operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software.

  5. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  6. Development of advanced nuclear reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several advanced reactor designs have been so far developed in Russia. The AES-91 and AES-92 plants with the VVER-1000 reactors have been developed at the beginning of 1990. However, the former design has been built in China and the latest which is certified meeting European Utility Requirements is being built in India. Moreover, the model VVER-1500 reactor with 50-60 MWd/t burn-up and an enhanced safety was being developed by Gidropress about 2005, excepting to be completed in 2007. But, this schedule has slipped in favor of development of the AES-2006 power plant incorporating a third-generation standardized VVER-1200 reactor of 1170 MWe. This is an evolutionary development of the well-proven VVER-1000 reactor in the AES-92 plant, with longer life, greater power and efficiency and its lead units are being built at Novovoronezh II, to start operation in 2012-13. Based on Atomenergoproekt declaration, the AES-2006 conforms to both Russian standards and European Utility Requirements. The most important features of the AES-2006 design are mentioned as: a design based on the passive safety systems, double containment, longer plant service life of 50 years with a capacity factor of 92%, longer irreplaceable components service life of 60 years, a 28.6% lower amount of concrete and metal, shorter construction time of 54 months, a Core Damage Frequency of 1x10-7/ year and lower liquid and solid wastes by 70% and 80% respectively. The presented paper includes a comparative analysis of technological and safety features, economic parameters and environmental impact of the AES-2006 design versus the other western advanced reactors. Since the Bushehr phase II NPP and several other NPPs are planning in Iran, such analysis would be of a great importance

  7. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  8. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  9. Advanced nuclear reactor systems - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilisation as its mainstay for its sustainable growth. The current levels of deployment of nuclear energy in India need to be multiplied nearly hundred fold to reach levels of electricity generation that would facilitate the country to achieve energy independence as well as a developed status. The Indian thorium based nuclear energy systems are being developed to achieve sustainability in respect of fuel resource along with enhanced safety and reduced waste generation. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and its variants have been designed to meet these objectives. The Indian High Temperature Reactor programme also envisages use of thorium-based fuel with advanced levels of passive safety features. (author)

  10. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  11. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    1998-12-22

    Advanced, coal-based power plants will require durable and reliable hot gas filtration systems to remove particulate contaminants from the gas streams to protect downstream components such as turbine blades from erosion damage. It is expected that the filter elements in these systems will have to be made of ceramic materials to withstand goal service temperatures of 1600 F or higher. Recent demonstration projects and pilot plant tests have indicated that the current generation of ceramic hot gas filters (cross-flow and candle configurations) are failing prematurely. Two of the most promising materials that have been extensively evaluated are clay-bonded silicon carbide and alumina-mullite porous monoliths. These candidates, however, have been found to suffer progressive thermal shock fatigue damage, as a result of rapid cooling/heating cycles. Such temperature changes occur when the hot filters are back-pulsed with cooler gas to clean them, or in process upset conditions, where even larger gas temperature changes may occur quickly and unpredictably. In addition, the clay-bonded silicon carbide materials are susceptible to chemical attack of the glassy binder phase that holds the SiC particles together, resulting in softening, strength loss, creep, and eventual failure.

  12. Advanced Recycling Reactor with Minor Actinide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) with minor actinide fuel has been studied. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR proposed by the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) for FOA study sponsored by DOE of the United States of America (U.S.). Although the basic reactor concept is technically mature, it is not suitable for commercial use due to the need to reduce capital costs. As a result of INRA's extensive experience, it is anticipated that a non-commercial ARR1 will be viable and meet U.S. requirements by 2025. Commercial Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) operations are expected to be feasible in competition with LWRs by 2050, based on construction of ARR2 in 2035. The ARR based on the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel that is selected because of much experience of SFRs in the world. Major features of key technology enhancements incorporated into the ARR are the following: Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop system and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The reactor core of the ARR1 is 70 cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is 31.6%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.65 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. According to survey of more effective TRU burning core, the oxide fuel core containing high TRU (MA 15%, Pu 35% average) with moderate pins of 12% arranged driver fuel assemblies can decrease TRU conversion ratio to 0.33 and improve TRU burning capability to 67 kg/TWeh. The moderator can enhance TRU burning, while increasing the Doppler effect and reducing the positive sodium void effect. High TRU fraction promotes TRU burning by curbing plutonium production. High Am fraction and Am blanket promote Am transmutation. The ARR1 consists of a reactor building (including

  13. Fast reactors and advanced light water reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: The importance of nuclear energy, as a realistic option to solve the issues of the depletion of energy resources and the global environment, has been re-acknowledged worldwide. In response to this international movement, the papers compiling the most recent findings in the fields of fast reactors (FR) and advanced light water reactors (LWR) were gathered and published in this special issue. This special issue compiles six articles, most of which are very meticulously performed studies of the multi year development of design and assessment methods for large sodium-cooled FRs (SFRs), and two are related to the fuel cycle options that are leading to a greater understanding on the efficient utilization of energy resources. The Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is addressed in two manuscripts. H. Yamano et al. reviewed the current design which adopts a number of innovative technologies in order to achieve economic competitiveness, enhanced reliability, and safety. Their safety assessments of both design basis accidents and severe accidents indicate that the devised JSFR satisfies well their risk target. T. Takeda et al. discussed the improvement of the modeling accuracy for the detailed calculation of JSFR's features in three areas: neutronics, fuel materials, and thermal hydraulics. The verification studies which partly use the measured data from the prototype FBR Monju are also described. Two of these manuscripts deal with those aspects of advanced design of SFR that have hitherto not been explored in great depth. The paper by G. Palmiotti et al. explored the possibility of using the sensitivity methodologies in the reactor physics field. A review of the methods used is provided, and several examples illustrate the success of the methodology in reactor physics. A new application as the improvement of nuclear basic parameters using integral experiments is also described. F. Baque et al. reviewed the evolution of the in

  14. Advanced gas turbine systems program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeh, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a program to develop fuel-efficient gas turbine-based power systems with low emissions. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE) have initiated an 8-year program to develop high-efficiency, natural gas-fired advanced gas turbine power systems. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will support full-scale prototype demonstration of both industrial- and utility-scale systems that will provide commercial marketplace entries by the year 2000. When the program targets are met, power system emissions will be lower than from the best technology in use today. Efficiency of the utility-scale units will be greater than 60 percent on a lower heating value basis, and emissions of carbon dioxide will be reduced inversely with this increase. Industrial systems will also see an improvement of at least 15 percent in efficiency. Nitrogen oxides will be reduced by at least 10 percent, and carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions will each be kept below 20 parts per million, for both utility and industrial systems.

  15. ACR-1000TM - advanced Candu reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM- 1000 (ACR-1000TM) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6TM reactor. This evolutionary advancement is based on AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU structures, systems, components and materials, gained during 50 years of continuous construction, engineering and commissioning, as well as on the experience and feedback received from operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. These innovations improve economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The Canadian nuclear reactor design evolution that has reached today's stage represented by the ACR-1000, has a long history dating back to the early 1950's. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few other countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. The ACR design has been reviewed by domestic and international regulatory bodies, and has been given a positive regulatory opinion about its licensability. The Canadian regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) completed the Phase 1 and Phase 2 pre-project design reviews in December 2008 and August 2009, respectively, and concluded that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the ACR-1000 design in Canada. The final stage of the ACR-1000 design is currently underway and will be completed by fall of 2011, along with the final elements of the safety analyses and probabilistic safety analyses supporting the finalized design. The generic Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the ACR-1000 was completed in September 2009. The PSAR demonstrates ACR-1000 safety case and compliance with Canadian and international regulatory requirements and expectations. (authors)

  16. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the technical and fuel cycle aspects of advanced (non-light water reactor [LWR]) reactors with the market and production aspects of SMRs. This requires the collection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple unrelated and potentially high-uncertainty data sets from a wide range of data sources. Further, the nature of both economic and nuclear technology analysis requires at least a minor attempt at prediction and prognostication, and the far-term horizon for deployment of advanced nuclear systems introduces more uncertainty. Energy market uncertainty, especially the electricity market, is the result of the integration of commodity prices, demand fluctuation, and generation competition, as easily seen in deregulated markets. Depending on current or projected values for any of these factors, the economic attractiveness of any power plant construction project can change yearly or quarterly. For long-lead construction projects such as nuclear power plants, this uncertainty generates an implied and inherent risk for potential nuclear power plant owners and operators. The uncertainty in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle costs is in some respects better understood and quantified than the energy market uncertainty. The LWR-based fuel cycle has a long commercial history to use as its basis for cost estimation, and the current activities in LWR construction provide a reliable baseline for estimates for similar efforts. However, for advanced systems, the estimates and their associated uncertainties are based on forward-looking assumptions for performance after the system has been built and has achieved commercial operation

  17. Development and application of an advanced fuel model for the safety analysis of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until about the year 2030, current-day nuclear power plants (NPPs) will be replaced by so-called Gen-III or Gen-III+ units, which are mainly based on light water reactor technology. The principal new features are increased safety and improved economical effectiveness. However, these systems use the same fuel forms and are based on the same fuel cycle. Beyond 2030, the interest is likely to shift towards fourth generation NPPs, which offer the possibility of complete fuel cycle closure. Generation-IV reactor concepts include both thermal and fast systems, and involve a wide range of fuel forms and compositions. The present research has been focused on the development of a thermo-mechanical model for the innovative fuel design of the Generation-IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). The principal distinctive feature of the fuel is that the fuel pellets are arranged within plates which enclose an inner honeycomb structure. Apart from the geometry, the usage of new materials is foreseen. Thus, the fuel pellets are of mixed uranium-plutonium carbide, and the cladding is bulk or fiber-reinforced SiC. The setting up of an appropriate materials database was thus the very first task which had to be carried out in the current work. The main purpose of the currently developed model is to provide reliable data, in the context of transient analysis, for the calculation of the principal neutronic feedbacks in the GFR core, viz. the fuel temperature for the Doppler effect and the fuel plate deformation for the axial core expansion effect. None of the available fuel modeling codes is suitable for a realistic simulation of the GFR fuel, as the inner honeycomb structure cannot be explicitly taken into account. The development work has been carried out largely in the context of PSI’s generic code system for fast reactor safety analysis, FAST. Thereby, it has mainly involved extension of the thermo-mechanical code FRED, developed originally for the modeling of traditional rodded fuel

  18. Advanced CANDU reactor, evolution and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the ACRTM (Advanced CANDU(1) ReactorTM) to meet today's market challenges. It is a light water tube type pressurized water reactor and is the latest evolution of CANDU technology. The design was launched to be cost-competitive with other generating sources, while building on the unique safety and operational advantages of the CANDU design. The ACR is an evolutionary design that retains the proven CANDU features delivered at Qinshan Phase III, while incorporating a set of innovative features and proven state-of-the-art technologies that have emerged from AECL's ongoing Research, Development and Demonstration programs. This approach ensures that key design parameters are well supported by existing reactor experience and R and D. The result is a design that delivers a new threshold in safety, performance and economics while retaining ample design margin. AECL has developed the enabling technologies and components for the ACR design, and has applied them to two plant sizes, ACR-700 and ACR-1000. The ACR integrates hallmark characteristics of traditional CANDU plants (e.g. horizontal pressure tubes, on power fuelling, automated reactor control systems, and dual independent shutdown systems), new innovations (e.g. state-of-the- art control room, extensive use of modular construction techniques, smaller reactor core, enriched uranium fuel), and certain PWR features (e.g. light water coolant, negative void reactivity). The ACR is designed for a high capacity factor and low operation and maintenance costs. It fully exploits the construction techniques that contributed to the impressive schedule accomplishments at Qinshan Phase III and therefore features a very short construction schedule, 40 months construction schedule (First Concrete to Fuel Loading ) for the first unit with improvements to 36 months for later units. The ACR is a true Gen-III plus product with a broad application. It has been proven to be an ideal

  19. Heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France has based its main effort for the production of nuclear energy on natural Uranium Graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors, and has a long term programme for fast reactors, but this country is also engaged in the development of heavy water moderated gas-cooled reactors which appear to present the best middle term prospects. The economy of these reactors, as in the case of Graphite, arises from the use of natural or very slightly enriched Uranium; heavy water can take the best advantages of this fuel cycle and moreover offers considerable development potential because of better reactor performances. A prototype plant EL 4 (70 MW) is under construction and is described in detail in another paper. The present one deals with the programme devoted to the development of this reactor type in France. Reasons for selecting this reactor type are given in the first part: advantages and difficulties are underlined. After reviewing the main technological problems and the Research and Development carried out, results already obtained and points still to be confirmed are reported. The construction of EL 4 is an important step of this programme: it will be a significant demonstration of reactor performances and will afford many experimentation opportunities. Now the design of large power reactors is to be considered. Extension and improvements of the mechanical structures used for EL 4 are under study, as well as alternative concepts. The paper gives some data for a large reactor in the present state of technology, as a result from optimization studies. Technical improvements, especially in the field of materials could lead to even more interesting performances. Some prospects are mentioned for the long run. Investment costs and fuel cycles are discussed in the last part. (authors)

  20. Advanced integral reactor (SMART) for nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, severe fresh water shortages are occurring in some regional areas of the Republic of Korea and the problem is expected to spread throughout the country within a decade unless appropriate and timely countermeasures are taken. Of these, nuclear sea water desalination is receiving much attention because the Republic of Korea has a firmly established nuclear environment and abundant sea water resources. In addition, nuclear plants provide cleaner energy than fossil plants, which is another important beneficial factor for countries as crowded as ours. With a view to applying nuclear desalination, development of SMART (system integrated modular advanced reactor) was initiated and is currently in progress. SMART is being developed as a 330 MW(th) integral reactor with passive safety features. The design of SMART is aimed at combining the firmly established commercial reactor design with new advanced technologies. This has led to the use of industry proven Korea optimized fuel assembly (KOFA) based fuels, while radically new technologies such as a self-pressurizing pressurizer, helical once-through steam generators and a new control concept are being developed. The current development status of SMART and its application to nuclear desalination are presented. (author)

  1. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  2. General description of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a boiling light water cooled, heavy water moderated and vertical pressure tube type reactor with its design optimised for utilisation of thorium for power generation. The core consists of (Th-U233 )O2 and (Th-Pu)O2 fuel with a discharge burn up of 20,000 MWd/Te. This reactor incorporates several features to simplify the design, which eliminate certain systems and components. AHWR design is also optimised for easy replaceability of coolant channels, facilitation of in-service inspection and maintenance and ease of erection. The AHWR design also incorporates several passive systems for performing safety-related functions in the event of an accident. In case of LOCA, emergency coolant is injected through 4 accumulators of 260 m3 capacity directly into the core. Gravity driven water pool of capacity 6000 m3 serves to cool the core for 3 days without operator's intervention. Core submergence, passive containment isolation and passive containment cooling are the added features in AHWR. The paper describes the various process systems, core and fuel design, primary components and safety concepts of AHWR. Plant layout and technical data are also presented. The conceptual design of the reactor has been completed, and the detailed design and development is scheduled for completion in the year 2002. (author)

  3. Goals and requirements for advanced reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic problems and public concerns about safety have lead to a reassessment of current nuclear power plant designs and the development of improved designs or new reactor concepts to better meet the needs of United States utilities. This paper presents a set of goals and requirements, developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), to provide a means for evaluating the relative merits of alternate advanced reactor concepts. This set of requirements and goals is intended to be independent of any particular reactor concept, and is predicated on the assumption that nuclear power cannot become viable option until the public is favorable to the use of nuclear power for electric power generation in the United States. Under this assumption, the top level requirements defined for new reactor concepts are (1) public acceptability, (2) acceptable investment risk, (3) competitive life cycle costs, and (4) early deployment. Each of these requirements is supported by several related lower level requirements and design goals that are necessary or desirable to meet the top level requirements

  4. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  5. Advanced test reactor. Testing capabilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plants for the NSUF. (author)

  6. Supercritical CO2 direct cycle Gas Fast Reactor (SC-GFR) concept.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma (Computational Engineering Analysis, Albuquerque, NM); Al Rashdan, Ahmad (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Tsvetkov, Pavel Valeryevich (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Vernon, Milton E.; Fleming, Darryn D.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) direct cycle gas fast reactor (SC-GFR) concept. The SC-GFR reactor concept was developed to determine the feasibility of a right size reactor (RSR) type concept using S-CO{sub 2} as the working fluid in a direct cycle fast reactor. Scoping analyses were performed for a 200 to 400 MWth reactor and an S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle. Although a significant amount of work is still required, this type of reactor concept maintains some potentially significant advantages over ideal gas-cooled systems and liquid metal-cooled systems. The analyses presented in this report show that a relatively small long-life reactor core could be developed that maintains decay heat removal by natural circulation. The concept is based largely on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) commercial power plants operated in the United Kingdom and other GFR concepts.

  7. Design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) has been conducted. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR that is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel. International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) takes advantage of international experience and uses the design based on Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) as reference for FOA studies of US DOE, because Japan has conducted R and Ds for the JSFR incorporating thirteen technology enhancements expected to improve safety, enhance economics, and increase reactor reliability. The targets of the ARR are to generate electricity while consuming fuel containing transuranics and to attain cost competitiveness with the similar sized LWRs. INRA proposes 3 evolutions of the ARR; ARR1, a 500 MWe demonstration plant, online in 2025; ARR2, a 1,000 MWe commercial plant, online in 2035; ARR3, a 1,500 MWe full-scale commercial plant, online in 2050. INRA believes the scale-up factor of two is acceptable increase from manufacturing and licensing points of view. Major features of the ARR1 are the following: The reactor core is 70cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is approximately 32%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.6 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh.Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop arrangement and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The ARR1 is co-located with a recycling facility. The overall plant facility arrangement is planned assuming to be constructed and installed in an inland area. The plant consists of a reactor building (including reactor auxiliary facilities and electrical/control systems), a turbine building, and a recycling building. The volume of the reactor building will be approximately 180,000 m3. The capital cost for the ARR1 and the ARR2 are

  8. Advanced reactors: the case for metric design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author argues that DOE should insist that all design specifications for advanced reactors be in the International System of Units (SI) in accordance with the Metric Conversion Act of 1975. Despite a lack of leadership from the federal government, industry has had to move toward conversion in order to compete on world markets. The US is the only major country without a scheduled conversion program. SI avoids the disadvantages of ambiguous names, non-coherent units, multiple units for the same quantity, multiple definitions, as well as barriers to international exchange and marketing and problems in comparing safety and code parameters. With a first step by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission should add the same requirements to reactor licensing guidelines. 4 references

  9. Advanced energy system with nuclear reactors as an energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    recovery system is also applicable to a fast reactor (FR) with a supercritical CO2 gas turbine that achieves higher cycle efficiency than conventional sodium cooled FRs with steam turbines. The FR will eliminate problems of conventional FRs related to safety, plant maintenance, and construction costs. The FR consumes efficiently trans-uranium elements (TRU) produced in light water reactors as fuel and reduce long-lived radioactive wastes or environmental loads of long term geological disposal. An Advanced Energy System (AES) with nuclear reactors as an energy source has been proposed which supply electricity and heat to cities. The AES has three objectives: 1. Save energy resources and reduce green house gas emissions, attaining total energy utilization efficiency higher than 85% through waste heat recovery and utilization. 2. Foster a recycling society that produces methane and methanol for fuel cells from waste products of cities and farms. 3. Consume TRU produced in LWRs as fuel for FRs, and reduce long-lived radioactive wastes or environmental loads of long term geological disposal. References 1. Y. Kato, T. Nitawaki and K. Fujima, 'Zero Waste Heat Release Nuclear Cogeneration System, 'Proc. 2003 Intl. Congress on Advanced Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP'03), Cordoba, Spain, May 4-7, 2003, Paper 3313. 2. Y. Kato, T. Nitawaki and Y. Muto, 'Medium Temperature Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine Reactor, 'Nucl. Eng. Design, 230, pp. 195-207 (2004). 3. H. N. Tran and Y. Kato, 'New 237Np Burning Strategy in a Supercritical CO2 Cooled Fast Reactor Core Attaining Zero Burnup Reactivity Loss,' Proc. American Nuclear Society's Topical Meeting on Reactor Physics (PHYSOR 2006), Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 10-14, 2006

  10. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors issue, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2009-09-15

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Technologies of national importance, by Tsutomu Ohkubo, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan; Modeling and simulation advances brighten future nuclear power, by Hussein Khalil, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy and desalination projects, by Ratan Kumar Sinha, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India; A plant with simplified design, by John Higgins, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; A forward thinking design, by Ray Ganthner, AREVA; A passively safe design, by Ed Cummins, Westinghouse Electric Company; A market-ready design, by Ken Petrunik, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Canada; Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, by Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France, and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory; Innovative reactor designs, a report by IAEA, Vienna, Austria; Guidance for new vendors, by John Nakoski, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Road map for future energy, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria; and, Vermont's largest source of electricity, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Intelligent monitoring technology, by Chris Demars, Exelon Nuclear.

  11. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. Pebble bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, compare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  12. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  13. Design Study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) has been conducted. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR that is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel. International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) takes advantage of international experience and uses the design based on Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) as reference for FOA studies of DOE in the U.S., because Japan has conducted R and Ds for the JSFR incorporating thirteen technology enhancements expected to improve safety, enhance economics, and increase reactor reliability. ARR's goal is to generate electricity while consuming fuel containing transuranics and to be cost-competitive with LWRs of similar size. INRA proposes 3 evolutions of the ARR; ARR1, a 500 MWe demonstration plant, online in 2025; ARR2, a 1,000 MWe commercial plant, online in 2035; ARR3, a 1,500 MWe full-scale commercial plant, online in 2050. INRA believes the scale-up factor of two is acceptable increase from manufacturing and licensing points of view. Major features of the ARR1 are the following: The reactor core of 70 cm high is working for a burner of TRU. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.6 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop arrangement and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight doublewalled tube is used to improve reliability. The capital cost, the construction schedule and regulatory and licensing schedule are estimated. Furthermore, the technology readiness level and the technology development roadmap are studied and identified to be ready for commercial deployment. (author)

  14. Removal heat extraction systems in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two main problems generally attributed to the electricity generation by nuclear power are the security of the facility and the radioactivity of the nuclear wastes, in a way that the only tasks of the European Commission on this matter are to make sure a high level of security in the facilities, as well as an adequate fuel and waste management. In this paper we discuss about the main lines in which the CIEMAT and the Polytechnic University of Valencia are working relative to the study of the passive working systems of the advanced designs reactors. (Author) 24 refs

  15. Outline of advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ABWR (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) is based on construction and operational experience in Japan, USA and Europe. It was developed jointly by the BWR supplieres, General Electric, Hitachi, and Toshiba, as the next generation BWR for Japan. The Tokyo Electric Power Co. provided leadership and guidance in developing the ABWR, and in combination with five other Japanese electric power companies. The major objectives in developing the ABWR are: 1. Enhanced plant operability, maneuverability and daily load-following capability; 2. Increased plant safety and operating margins; 3. Improved plant availability and capacity factor; 4. Reduced occupational radiation exposure; 5. Reduced radwaste volume, and 6. Reduced plant capital and operating costs. (Liu)

  16. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  17. ASME Material Challenges for Advanced Reactor Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the material Challenges associated with Advanced Reactor Concept (ARC) such as the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). ACR are the next generation concepts focusing on power production and providing thermal energy for industrial applications. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The heat exchanger required for AHTR is subjected to a unique set of conditions that bring with them several design challenges not encountered in standard heat exchangers. The corrosive molten salts, especially at higher temperatures, require materials throughout the system to avoid corrosion, and adverse high-temperature effects such as creep. Given the very high steam generator pressure of the supercritical steam cycle, it is anticipated that water tube and molten salt shell steam generators heat exchanger will be used. In this paper, the ASME Section III and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section VIII requirements (acceptance criteria) are discussed. Also, the ASME material acceptance criteria (ASME Section II, Part D) for high temperature environment are presented. Finally, lack of ASME acceptance criteria for thermal design and analysis are discussed.

  18. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  19. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  20. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Cahalan, J. E.; Deitrich, L. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Grandy, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-15

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  1. Advanced power reactors with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of nuclear safety is the protection of individuals, society and environment against radiological hazards from accidental releases of radioactive materials contained in nuclear reactors. Hereto, these materials are enclosed by several successive barriers and the barriers protected against mishaps and accidents by a multi-level system of safety precautions. The evolution of reactor technology continuously improves this concept and its implementation. At a world-wide scale, several advanced reactor concepts are currently being considered, some of them already at a design stage. Essential safety objectives include both further strengthening the prevention of accidents and improving the containment of fission products should an accident occur. The proposed solutions differ considerably with regard to technical principles, plant size and time scales considered for industrial application. Two typical approaches can be distinguished: The first approach basically aims at an evolution of power reactors currently in use, taking into account the findings from safety research and from operation of current plants. This approach makes maximum use of proven technology and operating experience but may nevertheless include new safety features. The corresponding designs are often termed 'large evolutionary'. The second approach consists in more fundamental changes compared to present designs, often with strong emphasis on specific passive features protecting the fuel and fuel cladding barriers. Owing to the nature and capability of those passive features such 'innovative designs' are mostly smaller in power output. The paper describes the basic objectives of such developments and illustrates important technical concepts focusing on next generation plants, i.e. designs to be available for industrial application until the end of this decade. 1 tab. (author)

  2. Gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR-300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) has some characters without previously set reactors such as capability of taking out heat with high temperature, high specific safety, and so on. The gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR) activating such characters has some advantages such as high power generation efficiency, feasibility on simplification of safety apparatus, and so on, and that has excellent economical efficiency. Recently, this GTHTR system is positively promoted on its investigation in South Africa, U.S.A., Russia, Holland, China, France, and so on. In JAERI, on a base of the feasibility study on GTHTR carried out fiscal year 1996 to 2000 as an entrusted research by the Science and Technology Agency, a design investigation on an actual use GTHTR (GTHTR-300) with excellent safety economical efficiency and operation feature and about 300 MW in electric output by using Japanese own technology has been progressed. The GTHTR-300 is an excellent system adopted Japanese initiative also for GTHTR as well as activated some reactor related technologies accumulated on HTGR R and D in Japan at a center of HTTR (high temperature engineering test reactor). Here were described on developing target, design concept, and a route to actual use of GTHTR. (G.K.)

  3. Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction, testing, and preliminary operating experience of the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station are described. This station utilizes the advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) concept and is the first nuclear reactor system in the United States to use a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Helium is used as the primary coolant, and a nitrogen system provides refrigeration for the low temperature equipment of the helium purification system and for the moisture monitors in the primary coolant system. Design, construction and testing to date at this station have made a significant contribution to the HTGR concept for central station electric generating plants to supply the increasing demands for electrical energy. (U.S.)

  4. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA and is owned and regulated by the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE). The ATR is operated for the US DOE by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies. In recent years, prime irradiation space in the ATR has been made available for use by customers having irradiation service needs in addition to the reactor's principal user, the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program. To enhance the reactor's capabilities, the US DOE has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and temperature control for up to 28 experiments. The ATR-ITV will have the flexibility to simultaneously support a variety of experiments requiring fast, thermal or mixed spectrum neutron environments. Temperature control is accomplished by varying the thermal conductivity across a gas gap established between the experiment specimen capsule wall and the experiment 'in-pile tube (IPT)' inside diameter. Thermal conductivity is adjusted by alternating the control gas mixture ratio of two gases with different thermal conductivities

  5. Fuel performance and fission product behaviour in gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Validation of Predictive Methods for Fuel and Fission Product Behaviour was organized within the frame of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors. This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs), and supports the conduct of these activities. The objectives of this CRP were to review and document the status of the experimental data base and of the predictive methods for GCR fuel performance and fission product behaviour; and to verify and validate methodologies for the prediction of fuel performance and fission product transport

  6. Decay heat removal in GEN IV gas cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  7. CEA programme on gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear energy systems studies conducted by the CEA aim at investigating and developing promising technologies for future reactors, fuels and fuel cycles, for nuclear power to play a major part in sustainable energy policies. Reactors and fuel cycles are considered as integral parts of a nuclear system to be optimised as a whole. Major goals assigned to future nuclear energy systems are the following: reinforced economic competitiveness with other electricity generation means, with a special emphasis on reducing the investment cost; enhanced reliability and safety, through an improved management of reactor operation in normal and abnormal plant conditions; minimum production of long lived radioactive waste; resource saving through an effective and flexible use of the available resources of fissile and fertile materials; enhanced resistance to proliferation risks. The three latter goals are essential for the sustainability of nuclear energy in the long term. Additional considerations such as the potentialities for other applications than electricity generation (co-generation, production of hydrogen, sea water desalination) take on an increasing importance. Sustainability goals call for fast neutron spectra (to transmute nuclear waste and to breed fertile fuel) and for recycling actinides from the spent fuel (plutonium and minor actinides). New applications and economic competitiveness call for high temperature technologies (850 deg C), that afford high conversion efficiencies and hence less radioactive waste production and discharged heat. These orientations call for breakthroughs beyond light water reactors. Therefore, as a result of a screening review of candidate technologies, the CEA has selected an innovative concept of high temperature gas cooled reactor with a fast neutron spectrum, robust refractory fuel, direct conversion with a gas turbine, and integrated on-site fuel cycle as a promising system for a sustainable energy development. This objective

  8. Advances in Process Intensification through Multifunctional Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Evans, Lindsay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Sciences and Engineering Center; Miller, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Sciences and Engineering Center; Cooper, Marcia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetic Components Realization Center; Torczynski, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pena, Donovan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walt [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center

    2011-02-01

    This project was designed to advance the art of process intensification leading to a new generation of multifunctional chemical reactors utilizing pulse flow. Experimental testing was performed in order to fully characterize the hydrodynamic operating regimes associated with pulse flow for implementation in commercial applications. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operated a pilot-scale multifunctional reactor experiment for operation with and investigation of pulse flow operation. Validation-quality data sets of the fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics were acquired and shared with Chemical Research and Licensing (CR&L). Experiments in a two-phase air-water system examined the effects of bead diameter in the packing, and viscosity. Pressure signals were used to detect pulsing. Three-phase experiments used immiscible organic and aqueous liquids, and air or nitrogen as the gas phase. Hydrodynamic studies of flow regimes and holdup were performed for different types of packing, and mass transfer measurements were performed for a woven packing. These studies substantiated the improvements in mass transfer anticipated for pulse flow in multifunctional reactors for the acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation process. CR&L developed packings for this alkylation process, utilizing their alkylation process pilot facilities in Pasadena, TX. These packings were evaluated in the pilot-scale multifunctional reactor experiments established by Sandia to develop a more fundamental understanding of their role in process intensification. Lummus utilized the alkylation technology developed by CR&L to design and optimize the full commercial process utilizing multifunctional reactors containing the packings developed by CR&L and evaluated by Sandia. This hydrodynamic information has been developed for multifunctional chemical reactors utilizing pulse flow, for the acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation process, and is now accessible for use in

  9. Systemization of Design and Analysis Technology for Advanced Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study is performed to establish the base for the license application of the original technology by systemization and enhancement of the technology that is indispensable for the design and analysis of the advanced reactors including integral reactors. Technical reports and topical reports are prepared for this purpose on some important design/analysis methodology; design and analysis computer programs, structural integrity evaluation of main components and structures, digital I and C systems and man-machine interface design. PPS design concept is complemented reflecting typical safety analysis results. And test plans and requirements are developed for the verification of the advanced reactor technology. Moreover, studies are performed to draw up plans to apply to current or advanced power reactors the original technologies or base technologies such as patents, computer programs, test results, design concepts of the systems and components of the advanced reactors. Finally, pending issues are studied of the advanced reactors to improve the economics and technology realization

  10. Fuel rod bundles proposed for advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper aims to be a general presentation for fuel bundles to be used in Advanced Pressure Tube Nuclear Reactors (APTNR). The characteristics of such a nuclear reactor resemble those of known advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors like: Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACRTM-1000, pertaining to AECL) and Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). We have also developed a fuel bundle proposal which will be referred as ASEU-43 (Advanced Slightly Enriched Uranium with 43 rods). The ASEU-43 main design along with a few neutronic and thermalhydraulic characteristics are presented in the paper versus similar ones from INR Pitesti SEU-43 and CANDU-37 standard fuel bundles. General remarks regarding the advantages of each fuel bundle and their suitability to be burned in an APTNR reactor are also revealed. (authors)

  11. Coolant chemistry of the advanced carbon dioxide cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large scale production of electricity by uranium fission has been achieved in the United Kingdom exclusively by reactors which are gas cooled and moderated by graphite. In this way the use of uranium with close to the natural isotopic content was possible. Once the choice of graphite as moderator had been made then the selection of a suitable gas to transport heat from the core to the steam generating equipment was limited and, in fact, only two have been identified as having suitable chemical and nuclear properties, namely helium and carbon dioxide. The first of these has the disadvantage of being expensive but has a high heat transfer capability and is fundamentally inert, its reactivity being controlled entirely by the level of impurities such as hydrogen and water. With the closure of the OECD Dragon High Temperature Reactor Project interest in helium cooling for nuclear plant has faded in the UK. The alternative coolant, carbon dioxide, which is cheap but chemically reactive is used in the first generation Magnox power stations and in the Commercial Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (CAGR) design. In the more highly rated CAGR design the fuel consists of enriched uranium in the form of dioxide encased in stainless steel; the gas outlet temperature of the core is increased to around 6000C. The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight into the current thinking about the nature of the complex chemistry associated with the CAGR coolant and how this chemistry influences the rate of deposition onto the fuel pin surfaces and the rate of graphite moderator oxidation. The application of these ideas to the prediction of the behaviour of a CAGR core with particular reference to the calculation of coolant composition within the porous moderator structure at points remote from the surface, is outlined and the use of all this information to define a satisfactory range of coolant composition is also described

  12. The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor: A Promising Option for Near Term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is an advanced nuclear power system that offers unparalleled safety, high thermal efficiency, environmental advantages, and competitive electricity generation costs. The GT-MHR module couples a gas-cooled modular helium reactor (MHR) with a high efficiency modular Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) energy conversion system. The reactor and power conversion systems are located in a below grade concrete silo that provides protection against sabotage. The GT-MHR safety is achieved through a combination of inherent safety characteristics and design selections that take maximum advantage of the gas-cooled reactor coated particle fuel, helium coolant and graphite moderator. The GT-MHR is projected to be economically competitive with alternative electricity generation technologies due to the high operating temperature of the gas-cooled reactor, high thermal efficiency of the Brayton cycle power conversion system, high fuel burnup (>100,000 MWd/MT), and low operation and maintenance requirements. (author)

  13. Modelling containment passive safety systems in advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most designs of advanced passive reactors incorporate Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS) relying on steam condensation to cope with possible pressure increase that would result in the case of a postulated accident. As a consequence, experimental and analytical research programmes have been launched worldwide to investigate new configurations and conditions involved in these new scenarios. This paper summarises the major outcomes of the joint research of CIEMAT, UPV, and UW in developing predictive models to address anticipated conditions in the Simplified Boiling Water Reactors (CIEMAT-UPV) and in the AP600 (CIEMAT-UW). Even though both models share some of their fundamental characteristics (such as being mass/heat transfer analogy based), samples of their validation against independent databases illustrate their intrinsic differences in formulation according to the scenarios addressed by each one. Relative importance of condensate film or gas mixture velocity are discussed, and the effect of key factors such as noncondensable gas presence and pressure are stated. Experimental data from University of Berkeley (UCB) and from University of Wisconsin - Madison (UW) will be used to support comparisons and discussions held in the paper. In short, this work demonstrates that heat/mass transfer analogy-based models, particularly those relying on diffusion film modelling to account for noncondensable gas presence, are extremely useful in test interpretation and result in good agreement with reliable databases. (author)

  14. Detonating gas in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation in the core region of Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) decomposes a small fraction of the coolant into hydrogen and oxygen, a phenomenon termed radiolysis. The radiolysis gas partitions to the steam during boiling. A 1000 MWe BWR produces around 1.5 tons of steam, containing 25 grams of radiolysis gas, per second. Practically all of the radiolysis gas is carried to the condenser and is taken care of by the condenser evacuation system and the off-gas system. The operation of these systems has been largely trouble-free. Radiolysis gas may also accumulate when stagnant steam condenses in pressurized pipes and components as a result of heat loss. Under certain circumstances a burnable mixture of hydrogen, oxygen and steam may form. Occasionally, the accumulated radiolysis gas has ignited. These incidents typically result in deformation of the components involved, but overpressure bursts have also occurred. Radiolysis gas accumulation in steam systems was largely overlooked by BWR designers (a likely technical reason for this is given in the report) and the problem had to be addressed by utilities. Even though the problem was recognized two decades ago, the counter-measures of today seem not always to be sufficient. Pipe-burst incidents in a German and a Japanese BWR recently attracted attention. Also, damage to a pilot valve in the steam relief system of a Swedish BWR forced a reactor shut-down during 2002. The recent incidents indicate that counter-measures against radiolysis gas accumulation in BWRs should be reviewed, perhaps also improved. The present report provides a short compilation of basic information related to radiolysis gas accumulation in BWRs. It is hoped that the compilation may prove useful to utilities and regulators reviewing the problem

  15. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  16. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions

  17. Applications of the advanced neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the technique of neutron scattering was pioneered at the X-10 graphite reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory about 50 years ago, it was used to study certain important, but fairly esoteric, properties of crystals. From this modest beginning, neutron scattering has become a major tool in every branch of science, from the astrophysics of the early universe to human biology, and in many important industrial and engineering applications. In a typical modern research reactor it is not unusual to find one instrument studying new polymeric materials, while its neighbor is measuring residual stress in a jet turbine, sometimes with the jet operating. Most of this development has taken place outside of the United States, primarily in Western Europe, Japan and Russia, and it is generally recognized that we are a decade behind our competitors in this important field. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), planned to become operational as a user-facility at Oak Ridge at the end of this decade, will regain our leadership in neutron-based research and will be a major center for attracting new students into science. This paper discusses some of the research and development applications of the ANS, with an emphasis on applied materials science and engineering

  18. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  19. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  20. Recycled uranium: An advanced fuel for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of recycled uranium (RU) fuel offers significant benefits to CANDU reactor operators particularly if used in conjunction with advanced fuel bundle designs that have enhanced performance characteristics. Furthermore, these benefits can be realised using existing fuel production technologies and practices and with almost negligible change to fuel receipt and handling procedures at the reactor. The paper will demonstrate that the supply of RU as a ceramic-grade UO2 powder will increasingly become available as a secure option to virgin natural uranium and slightly enriched uranium(SEU). In the context of RU use in Canadian CANDU reactors, existing national and international transport regulations and arrangements adequately allow all material movements between the reprocessor, RU powder supplier, Canadian CANDU fuel manufacturer and Canadian CANDU reactor operator. Studies have been undertaken of the impact on personnel dose during fuel manufacturing operations from the increased specific activity of the RU compared to natural uranium. These studies have shown that this impact can be readily minimised without significant cost penalty to the acceptable levels recognised in modem standards for fuel manufacturing operations. The successful and extensive use of RU, arising from spent Magnox fuel, in British Energy's Advanced Gas-Cooled reactors is cited as relevant practical commercial scale experience. The CANFLEX fuel bundle design has been developed by AECL (Canada) and KAERI (Korea) to facilitate the achievement of higher bum-ups and greater fuel performance margins necessary if the full economic potential of advanced CANDU fuel cycles are to be achieved. The manufacture of a CANFLEX fuel bundle containing RU pellets derived from irradiated PWR fuel reprocessed in the THORP plant of BNFL is described. This provided a very practical verification of dose modelling calculations and also demonstrated that the increase of external activity is unlikely to require any

  1. Development Program of the Advanced HANARO Reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development program of an advanced HANARO (AHR) reactor started in Korea to keep abreast of the increasing future demand, from both home and abroad, for research activities. This paper provides a review of the status of research reactors in Korea, the operating experience of the HANARO, the design principles and preliminary features of an advanced HANARO reactor, and the specific strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program. The design principles were established in order to design a new multi-purpose research reactor that is safe, economically competitive and technically feasible. These include the adaptation of the HANARO design concept, its operating experience, a high ratio of flux to power, a high degree of safety, improved economic efficiency, improved operability and maintainability, increased space and expandability, and ALARA design optimization. The strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program considers items such as providing a digital advanced HANARO reactor in cyber space, a method for the improving the design quality and economy of research reactors by using Computer Integrated Engineering, and more effective advertising using diverse virtual reality. This development program will be useful for promoting the understanding of and interest in the operating HANARO as well as an advanced HANARO reactor under development in Korea. It will provide very useful information to a country that may need a research reactor in the near future for the promotion of public health, bio-technology, drug design, pharmacology, material processing, and the development of new materials. (author)

  2. Advanced robotic remote handling system for reactor dismantlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced robotic remote handling system equipped with a multi-functional amphibious manipulator has been developed and used to dismantle a portion of radioactive reactor internals of an experimental boiling water reactor in the program of reactor decommissioning technology development carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. (author)

  3. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Connolly; G.D. Forsythe

    2000-09-30

    DuPont Lanxide Composites, Inc. undertook a sixty-month program, under DOE Contract DEAC21-94MC31214, in order to develop hot gas candle filters from a patented material technology know as PRD-66. The goal of this program was to extend the development of this material as a filter element and fully assess the capability of this technology to meet the needs of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems at commercial scale. The principal objective of Task 3 was to build on the initial PRD-66 filter development, optimize its structure, and evaluate basic material properties relevant to the hot gas filter application. Initially, this consisted of an evaluation of an advanced filament-wound core structure that had been designed to produce an effective bulk filter underneath the barrier filter formed by the outer membrane. The basic material properties to be evaluated (as established by the DOE/METC materials working group) would include mechanical, thermal, and fracture toughness parameters for both new and used material, for the purpose of building a material database consistent with what is being done for the alternative candle filter systems. Task 3 was later expanded to include analysis of PRD-66 candle filters, which had been exposed to actual PFBC conditions, development of an improved membrane, and installation of equipment necessary for the processing of a modified composition. Task 4 would address essential technical issues involving the scale-up of PRD-66 candle filter manufacturing from prototype production to commercial scale manufacturing. The focus would be on capacity (as it affects the ability to deliver commercial order quantities), process specification (as it affects yields, quality, and costs), and manufacturing systems (e.g. QA/QC, materials handling, parts flow, and cost data acquisition). Any filters fabricated during this task would be used for product qualification tests

  4. LBB application in the US operating and advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichman, K.; Tsao, J.; Mayfield, M.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory application of leak before break (LBB) for operating and advanced reactors in the U.S. is described. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the application of LBB for six piping systems in operating reactors: reactor coolant system primary loop piping, pressurizer surge, safety injection accumulator, residual heat removal, safety injection, and reactor coolant loop bypass. The LBB concept has also been applied in the design of advanced light water reactors. LBB applications, and regulatory considerations, for pressurized water reactors and advanced light water reactors are summarized in this paper. Technology development for LBB performed by the NRC and the International Piping Integrity Research Group is also briefly summarized.

  5. PROTEUS investigations for advanced thermal, fast, and intermediate-spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zero-power reactor, PROTEUS, has been used over the years for physics investigations concerning various types of advanced systems, namely gas-cooled fast reactors (GCFRs) in the seventies, light water high-conversion reactors (LWHCR) in the eighties and, currently, low-enriched-uranium high-temperature reactors (LEU-HTRs). The wide range of test neutron spectra cover underlines the versatility of the facility, the safety and operational limits for which have largely remained unaltered during the different experimental programs. This paper reviews the scope of the various PROTEUS investigations and includes evaluations of some of the most recent experiments

  6. Role of advanced reactors in further nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the national long-term nuclear R and D program launched in 1992, an endeavor has been made in Korea to develop advanced nuclear reactor systems with significantly enhanced safety and economics from those of the current generation nuclear power plants. The advanced PWR nuclear reactor systems under development in Korea include 1300 MWe Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), 330 MWt Integral Type System Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART) for nuclear cogeneration, and 330 MWe Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (KALIMER) in addition to the evolutionary enhancement of the 1000 MWt KSNPP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant). Three point design philosophy has been adopted for the development of the advanced reactors in Korea : enhancements on safety, economics and public acceptance of nuclear power. To enhance the safety of the advanced reactor systems, a strategy has been adopted to employ advanced design features as well as the passive safety design features. Economically viable design concepts also have been implemented in the evolutionary KSNPP, KNGR, and the SMART development. Economic competitiveness against the fossil plants also has been set as a major objective of the ALWR development program in Korea. These safer and more economical advanced reactors will better promote the public acceptance of the commercial use of the nuclear power and thus could be utilized to meet the forecasted national energy need in the early 21st century. International cooperation in the areas of ALWR development as well as improving public acceptance of the nuclear power is required. (author)

  7. A Joint Report on PSA for New and Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to new and advanced nuclear reactors. As far as advanced reactors are concerned, the objectives were to characterize the ability of current PSA technology to address key questions regarding the development, acceptance and licensing of advanced reactor designs, to characterize the potential value of advanced PSA methods and tools for application to advanced reactors, and to develop recommendations for any needed developments regarding PSA for these reactors. As far as the design and commissioning of new nuclear power plants is concerned, the objectives were to identify and characterize current practices regarding the role of PSA, to identify key technical issues regarding PSA, lessons learned and issues requiring further work; to develop recommendations regarding the use of PSA, and to identify future international cooperative work on the identified issues. In order to reach these objectives, questionnaires had been sent to participating countries and organisations

  8. Five years operational experience of a mini-computer based auto-control system on the windscale advanced gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the two 600 psi experimental loop facilities it was decided to use an auto-control system based on a mini-computer. In order to ease the job of re-programming for each new set of calculations that part of the software was implemented in BASIC. The scanning routines and other routines controlling the interfaces to the actuators were written in assembler language and were not designed to be modified between experiments. Data from the two experimental loop facilities is also fed into a separate minicomputer based data logging and alarm system which serves the whole reactor system. For ultimate safety protection the loops are also connected into the completely independent analogue reactor trip system. (orig./HP)

  9. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Reich, W.J.

    1991-09-01

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs.

  10. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive ''box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs

  11. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study engineering overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) was the first comprehensive conceptual design of a commercial tandem mirror reactor with thermal barriers. The design exploited the inherent attractive features of a tandem mirror: steady state operation, linear central cell, simple high performance blankets, low first wall heat fluxes, natural impurity diversion by the halo plasma, no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, and direct conversion of the charged particle power lost out the ends. The study introduced new design concepts in high field magnets, neutral beams, ECRH systems, drift pumping, direct conversion, lithium-lead blankets and plant safety. The MARS design would produce 1200 MWsub(e) net and more than 1500 MWsub(e) gross from only 2600 MW of fusion power. This high efficiency is achieved through a combination of blanket design and direct conversion. Special emphasis was placed on fusion's potential for inherent safety, lower activation and simpler disposal of radioactive waste as compared with fission. The blanket has a very low tritium inventory, cannot melt in loss-of-coolant and/or loss-of-flow accidents and can be disposed of as low level waste subject to near-surface burial. MARS would produce busbar electricity at about 7 cents per kilowatthour (constant 1983 dollars). This value is near the upper end of the cost range for new generation capability being installed in the late 1980's. Significant cost reductions can be gained by further improvements in the engineering designs combined with a simplified end cell. The largest cost reductions from engineering can be attained through redesigned magnets, heat transport system and electrical system. The combination of engineering and physics improvements are projected to lower the cost of electricity by about 40% without sacrificing the environmental, safety and maintainability attributes of MARS. This work is now being pursued in the MINIMARS study. (orig.)

  12. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  13. Thorium fueled high temperature gas cooled reactors. An assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of thorium as a fertile fuel for the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) instead of uranium has been reviewed. It has been concluded that the use of thorium might be beneficial to reduce the actinide waste production. To achieve a real advancement, the uranium of the spent fuel has to be recycled and the requested make-up fissile material for the fresh fuel has to be used in the form of highly-enriched uranium. A self-sustaining fuel cycle may be possible in the HTR of large core size, but this could reduce the inherent safety features of the design. (orig.)

  14. Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Emily Catherine

    2009-04-01

    With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

  15. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs

  16. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs.

  17. Advanced light and heavy water reactors for improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26-29 November 1984 the Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna the Technical Committee and Workshop on Advanced Light and Heavy Water Reactor Technology in order to provide an opportunity to review and discuss the current status and recent development in the lay-out and design of advanced water reactor and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from 16 nations and 2 international organizations presenting 25 papers. The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Advanced light water reactor programmes (6 papers); Advanced light water design, technology and physics (12 papers); Advanced heavy water reactors (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  18. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  19. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience with

  20. Preliminary design concept of an advanced integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor on the basis of PWR technology is being conceptually developed at KAERI. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts of the reactor to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway for confirming the technical adoption of those concepts to the reactor design. The power output of the reactor will be in the range of 100MWe to 600MWe which is relatively small compared to the existing loop type reactors. The detailed analysis to assure the design concepts is in progress. (author)

  1. Study of advanced fission power reactor development for the United States. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a multi-phase research study which had as its objective the comparative study of various advanced fission reactors and evaluation of alternate strategies for their development in the USA through the year 2020. By direction from NSF, ''advanced'' reactors were defined as those which met the dual requirements of (1) offering a significant improvement in fissile fuel utilization as compared to light-water reactors and (2) currently receiving U.S. Government funding. (A detailed study of the LMFBR was specifically excluded, but cursory baseline data were obtained from ERDA sources.) Included initially were the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Light-Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Subsequently, the CANDU Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) was included for comparison due to increased interest in its potential. This volume presents the reasoning process and analytical methods utilized to arrive at the conclusions for the overall study

  2. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO2) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  3. Advanced designs of VVER reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of VVER reactors, current challenges and approaches to the challenges are highlighted. The VVER-1200 reactor of 3+ generation for AES-2006 units are under construction at the Leningrad 2 nuclear power plant (LNPP-2). The main parameters are listed and details are presented of the vessel, steam generator, and improved fuel. The issue of the NPP safety is discussed. Additional topics include the MIR-1200 reactor unit, VVER-600, and VVER-SCP (Generation 4). (P.A.)

  4. Status of and prospects for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR) (see Annex I), which was established in 1978, recommended to the Agency that a report be prepared in order to provide an up-to-date summary of gas-cooled reactor technology. The present Technical Report is based mainly on submissions of Member Countries of the IWGGCR and consists of four main sections. Beside some general information about the gas-cooled reactor line, section 1 contains a description of the incentives for the development and deployment of gas-cooled reactors in various Agency Member States. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production for various branches of industry. The historical development of gas-cooled reactors is reviewed in section 2. In this section information is provided on how, when and why gas-cooled reactors have been developed in various Agency Member States and, in addition, a detailed description of the different gas-cooled reactor lines is presented. Section 3 contains information about the technical status of gas-cooled reactors and their applications. Gas-cooled reactors that are under design or construction or in operation are listed and shortly described, together with an outlook for future reactor designs. In this section the various applications for gas-cooled reactors are described in detail. These include both electricity generation and process steam and process heat production. The last section (section 4) is entitled ''Special features of gas-cooled reactors'' and contains information about the technical performance, fuel utilization, safety characteristics and environmental impact, such as radiation exposure and heat rejection

  5. Relevant thermal hydraulic aspects of advanced reactors design: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This status report provides an overview on the relevant thermalhydraulic aspects of advanced reactor designs (e.g. ABWR, AP600, SBWR, EPR, ABB 80+, PIUS, etc.). Since all of the advanced reactor concepts are at the design stage, the information and data available in the open literature are still very limited. Some characteristics of advanced reactor designs are provided together with selected phenomena identification and ranking tables. Specific needs for thermalhydraulic codes together with the list of relevant and important thermalhydraulic phenomena for advanced reactor designs are summarized with the purpose of providing some guidance in development of research plans for considering further code development and assessment needs and for the planning of experimental programs

  6. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) Project finished the B stage commissioning and resolved the relative technical problems. Meanwhile, the acceptance items and the cold neutron source were carrying out.

  7. Thermohydraulic and constructional boundary conditions of an advanced PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages and special features of an advanced PWR reactor (FDWR) have been systematically investigated for several years by the Department of Space Flight and Reactor Technology of the University of Brunswick (LRR-TUBS). The FDWR will have a homogeneous core, i.e. the fuel elements will consist of fuel rods of the same size and enrichment. (orig./GL)

  8. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  9. Advanced tokamak concepts and reactor designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described, some examples

  10. Potential applications of robotics in advanced liquid-metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) design includes a range of robots and automation devices. They extend from stationary robots that are a part of the current design to more exotic concepts with mobile, autonomous units, which may become part of the design. Development of robotic application requirements is enhanced by using computer models of work spaces in three dimensions. The primary goals of the more autonomous machines are to: (1) extent and/or enhance one's capabilities in a hazardous environment; some tasks could encounter high temperatures (up to 800 degree F), high radiation (fields up to several hundred thousand roentgens per hour), rooms filled with inert gas and/or sodium aerosol, or combinations of these; (2) reduce operating and maintenance cost through inservice inspection (ISI) of various parts of the reactor, through consideration of as-low-as-reasonably achievable radiation levels, and through automation of some maintenance/processing operations. This paper discusses some applications in the fuel cycle, in refueling operations, and in inspection

  11. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    given to methods appropriate to low-income countries, where strategies are needed for getting robust data with extremely limited resources in order to support national mitigation planning within widely accepted standards and thus provide access to essential international support, including climate funding. Managing agricultural emissions needs to occur in tandem with managing for agricultural productivity, resilience to climate change, and ecosystem impacts. Management decisions and priorities will require measures and information that identify GHG efficiencies in production and reduce inputs without reducing yields, while addressing climate resilience and maintaining other essential environmental services, such as water quality and support for pollinators. Another set of papers in this issue considers the critical synergies and tradeoffs possible between these multiple objectives of mitigation, resilience, and production efficiency to help us understand how we need to tackle these in our quantification systems. Significant capacity to quantify greenhouse gases is already built, and with some near-term strategic investment, could become an increasingly robust and useful tool for planning and development in the agricultural sector around the world. Acknowledgments The Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security Program of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, the Technical Working Group on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases (T-AGG) at Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) have come together to guide the development of this focus issue and associated activities and papers, given their common desire to improve our understanding of the state of agricultural greenhouse gas (GHG) quantification and to advance ideas for building data and methods that will help mitigation policy and programs move forward around the world. We thank the David and Lucile Packard

  12. Heat transport and afterheat removal for gas cooled reactors under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Heat Transport and Afterheat Removal for Gas Cooled Reactors Under Accident Conditions was organized within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This International Working Group serves as a forum for exchange of information on national programmes, provides advice to the IAEA on international co-operative activities in advanced technologies of gas cooled reactors (GCRs) and supports the conduct of these activities. Advanced GCR designs currently being developed are predicted to achieve a high degree of safety through reliance on inherent safety features. Such design features should permit the technical demonstration of exceptional public protection with significantly reduced emergency planning requirements. For advanced GCRs, this predicted high degree of safety largely derives from the ability of the ceramic coated fuel particles to retain the fission products under normal and accident conditions, the safe neutron physics behaviour of the core, the chemical stability of the core and the ability of the design to dissipate decay heat by natural heat transport mechanisms without reaching excessive temperatures. Prior to licensing and commercial deployment of advanced GCRs, these features must first be demonstrated under experimental conditions representing realistic reactor conditions, and the methods used to predict the performance of the fuel and reactor must be validated against these experimental data. Within this CRP, the participants addressed the inherent mechanisms for removal of decay heat from GCRs under accident conditions. The objective of this CRP was to establish sufficient experimental data at realistic conditions and validated analytical tools to confirm the predicted safe thermal response of advance gas cooled reactors during accidents. The scope includes experimental and analytical investigations of heat transport by natural convection conduction and thermal

  13. Production of Depleted UO2Kernels for the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor Program for Use in TRISO Coating Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, J.L.

    2004-12-02

    The main objective of the Depleted UO{sub 2} Kernels Production Task at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was to conduct two small-scale production campaigns to produce 2 kg of UO{sub 2} kernels with diameters of 500 {+-} 20 {micro}m and 3.5 kg of UO{sub 2} kernels with diameters of 350 {+-} 10 {micro}m for the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Program. The final acceptance requirements for the UO{sub 2} kernels are provided in the first section of this report. The kernels were prepared for use by the ORNL Metals and Ceramics Division in a development study to perfect the triisotropic (TRISO) coating process. It was important that the kernels be strong and near theoretical density, with excellent sphericity, minimal surface roughness, and no cracking. This report gives a detailed description of the production efforts and results as well as an in-depth description of the internal gelation process and its chemistry. It describes the laboratory-scale gel-forming apparatus, optimum broth formulation and operating conditions, preparation of the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate stock solution, the system used to provide uniform broth droplet formation and control, and the process of calcining and sintering UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O microspheres to form dense UO{sub 2} kernels. The report also describes improvements and best past practices for uranium kernel formation via the internal gelation process, which utilizes hexamethylenetetramine and urea. Improvements were made in broth formulation and broth droplet formation and control that made it possible in many of the runs in the campaign to produce the desired 350 {+-} 10-{micro}m-diameter kernels, and to obtain very high yields.

  14. Conceptual design of the advanced marine reactor MRX

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Design studies on the advanced marine reactors have been done continuously since 1983 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in order to develop attractive marine reactors for the next generation. At present, two marine reactor concepts are being formulated. One is 100 MWt MRX (Marine Reactor X) for an icebreaker and the other is 300 kWe DRX (Deep-sea Reactor X) for a deep-sea research vessel. They are characterized by an integral type pressurized water reactor (PWR) built-in type control rod drive mechanisms, a water-filled container and a passive decay heat removal system, which realize highly passive safe and compact reactors. This paper is a detailed report including all major results of the MRX design study.

  15. Advances in gas utilization technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of industrial technologies and their impact on gas consumption was presented. The issue of whether the increased use of these technologies will have a positive impact on emissions was also discussed. Natural gas is regarded as the preferred fuel with regards to the reduction of greenhouse gases because of lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per unit of energy compared to oil, coal or wood fuels. The other way to improve efficiency and to reduce CO2 emissions is to optimize combustion system technologies and to improve heat transfer mechanisms. Some examples of alternative industrial burner technologies which allow a reduction in pollutant emissions were listed and described. These included infrared burners, preheating combustion air, and oxy-fuel combustion. Some of the technologies that increase the useful heat output from hot combustion products are infra-red heat transfer, direct contact water heating and condensing boilers. The substitution of gas for electricity in the use of gas fired scrap metal preheaters was demonstrated. Co-generation systems are also potential contributors to efficiency improvements and CO2 reduction. 1 tab., 8 figs

  16. Advanced reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities: safety and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R N; Nutt, W M; Laidler, J J

    2011-01-01

    The safety and environmental impacts of new technology and fuel cycle approaches being considered in current U.S. nuclear research programs are contrasted to conventional technology options in this paper. Two advanced reactor technologies, the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), are being developed. In general, the new reactor technologies exploit inherent features for enhanced safety performance. A key distinction of advanced fuel cycles is spent fuel recycle facilities and new waste forms. In this paper, the performance of existing fuel cycle facilities and applicable regulatory limits are reviewed. Technology options to improve recycle efficiency, restrict emissions, and/or improve safety are identified. For a closed fuel cycle, potential benefits in waste management are significant, and key waste form technology alternatives are described. PMID:21399407

  17. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  18. Preliminary design concepts of an advanced integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor on the basis of PWR technology is being conceptually developed at KAERI. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts of the reactor to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway for confirming the technical adoption of those concepts to the rector design. The power output of the reactor will be in the range of 100MWe to 600MWe which is relatively small compared to the existing loop type reactors. The detailed analysis to assure the design concepts is in progress. (author). 3 figs, 1 tab

  19. Advanced sodium fast reactor unit concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents status of development for 1200 MW power unit with sodium fast reactor for commercial construction in the Russian Federation. General characteristics of the reactor plant (RP) and power unit as well as goals that shall be achieved because of design development are described. The power unit design is based on technical decisions, which have been partially proven during sodium reactor operation in Russia and partially have been validated by R and D work for BN-800 RP. At the same time, new technical decisions are applied that improve safety and technical-and-economic indices. To validate them, the corresponding R and D work shall be performed. It is planned to construct the pilot power unit in 2020 and to put into operation the next commercial power units of this type using plutonium generated in the thermal reactors. (author)

  20. An advanced method of heterogeneous reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent approaches to heterogeneous reactor theory for numerical applications were presented in the course of 8 lectures given in JAERI. The limitations of initial theory known after the First Conference on Peacefull Uses of Atomic Energy held in Geneva in 1955 as Galanine-Feinberg heterogeneous theory:-matrix from of equations, -lack of consistent theory for heterogeneous parameters for reactor cell, -were overcome by a transformation of heterogeneous reactor equations to a difference form and by a development of a consistent theory for the characteristics of a reactor cell based on detailed space-energy calculations. General few group (G-number of groups) heterogeneous reactor equations in dipole approximation are formulated with the extension of two-dimensional problem to three-dimensions by finite Furie expansion of axial dependence of neutron fluxes. A transformation of initial matrix reactor equations to a difference form is presented. The methods for calculation of heterogeneous reactor cell characteristics giving the relation between vector-flux and vector-current on a cell boundary are based on a set of detailed space-energy neutron flux distribution calculations with zero current across cell boundary and G calculations with linearly independent currents across the cell boundary. The equations for reaction rate matrices are formulated. Specific methods were developed for description of neutron migration in axial and radial directions. The methods for resonance level's approach for numerous high-energy resonances. On the basis of these approaches the theory, methods and computer codes were developed for 3D space-time react or problems including simulation of slow processes with fuel burn-up, control rod movements, Xe poisoning and fast transients depending on prompt and delayed neutrons. As a result reactors with several thousands of channels having non-uniform axial structure can be feasibly treated. (author)

  1. Loss of feed water analyses of advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. Passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power level with no primary coolant pumps. The case analysed in this paper is the loss of feedwater to steam drum which results in decrease in heat removal from core. This also causes increase in reactor pressure. Further consequences depend upon various protective and engineered safeguard systems like relief system, reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator. Analysis has been done using code RELAP5/MOD3.2. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, qualities and flow in different part of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. (author)

  2. Gas-liquid reactor/separator: dynamics and operability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranade, V.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed to simulate gas¿liquid reactor in which both, reactants as well as products enter or leave the reactor in gas phase while the reactions take place in liquid phase. A case of first-order reaction (isothermal) was investigated in detail using the dynamic

  3. Gas-liquid reactor/separator : dynamics and operability characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranade, V.V.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive mathematical model is developed to simulate gas-liquid reactor in which both, reactants as well as products enter or leave the reactor in gas phase while the reactions take place in liquid phase. A case of first-order reaction (isothermal) was investigated in detail using the dynamic

  4. Status of national gas cooled reactor programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been compiled as a central source of summary-level information on the present status of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) programmes in the world and on future plans for the continued development and deployment of HTGRs. Most of the information concerns the programmes in the United States, Germany, Japan and the Soviet Union, countries that have had large programmes related to HTGR technology for several years. Summary-level information is also provided in the report on HTGR-related activities in several other countries who either have an increasing interest in the technology and/or who are performing some development efforts related to HTGR technology. The report contains a summary-level update on the MAGNOX and AGR programmes. This is the twelfth issue of the document, the first of which was issued in March, 1979. The report has been prepared in the IAEA Nuclear Power Technology Development Section. Figs and tabs

  5. Trends in advanced reactor development and the role of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses advanced reactors are being developed for all principal reactor types, i.e. the light and heavy water-cooled reactors, the liquid-metal-cooled reactors and the gas-cooled reactors. Some of these developments are primarily of an evolutionary nature, i.e. they represent improvements in component and system technology, and in construction and operating practices as a result of experience gained with presently operating plants. Other developments are also evolutionary but with some incorporation of innovative features such as providing passive systems for assuring continuous cooling for removal of decay heat from the reactor core. If there is a revival of nuclear power, which may be dictated by ecological and economical factors, advanced reactors now being developed could help to meet the large demand for new plants in developed and developing countries, not only for electricity generation, but also for district heating, desalination and for process heat. The IAEA, as the only global international governmental organization dealing with nuclear power, has promoted international information exchange and international cooperation between all countries with their own advanced nuclear power programmes and has offered assistance to countries with an interest in exploratory or research programmes. In the future the IAEA could play an even more-important role

  6. Gas-liquid separation mechanism and reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A space above the reactor core mounted in a pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor is surrounded with a cylindrical shroud. Since vortex and stagnation of coolants are liable to be formed over the entire periphery at the upper portion of the shroud, inlets through which steam bubbles enter are opened to the entire circumference along the upper portion of the shroud. This can attain the gas-liquid separation effect from the entire periphery thereof. Further, since the coolant flowing vector changes abruptly at a portion where the coolant flow turns from the upward to the downward direction, steam bubbles are swirled or stagnated on the side of the downward flow channel in that portion. In view of the above, a coolant inlet submerged in the coolant is disposed to that portion, so that the steam bubbles are captured, involved in the subsequently flowing coolants and urged upwardly into the space above the coolant surface, thereby maintaining extremely high spontaneous recycling force and recycling amount. (T.M.)

  7. Seismic behaviour of gas cooled reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On invitation of the French Government the Specialists' Meeting on the Seismic Behaviour of Gas-Cooled Reactor Components was held at Gif-sur-Yvette, 14-16 November 1989. This was the second Specialists' Meeting on the general subject of gas-cooled reactor seismic design. There were 27 participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Israel, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, the United States, the CEC and IAEA took the opportunity to present and discuss a total of 16 papers reflecting the state of the art of gained experiences in the field of their seismic qualification approach, seismic analysis methods and of the capabilities of various facilities used to qualify components and verify analytical methods. Since the first meeting, the sophistication and expanded capabilities of both the seismic analytical methods and the test facilities are apparent. The two main methods for seismic analysis, the impedance method and the finite element method, have been computer-programmed in several countries with the capability of each of the codes dependent on the computer capability. The correlations between calculation and tests are dependent on input assumptions such as boundary conditions, soil parameters and various interactions between the soil, the buildings and the contained equipment. The ability to adjust these parameters and match experimental results with calculations was displayed in several of the papers. The expanded capability of some of the new test facilities was graphically displayed by the description of the SAMSON vibration test facility at Juelich, FRG, capable of dynamically testing specimens weighing up to 25 tonnes, and the TAMARIS facility at the CEA laboratories in Gif-sur-Yvette where the largest table is capable of testing specimens weighing up to 100 tonnes. The proceedings of this meeting contain all 16 presented papers. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  9. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  10. Advanced reactor design and safety objectives - The heavy water reactor perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a summary of the major requirements for future nuclear reactors from CANDU operating station owners based on the various studies and plans prepared. Most of the specific technical requirements for Advanced Heavy Water reactor Systems are based on systematic reviews of current operating CANDU stations to identify opportunities for generic improvements in reliability, operability, maintainability and to address emerging licensing or safety issues. Hence these requirements represent those for the evolutionary development of the Advanced Heavy Water Reactor systems factoring in the considerable operating experience of the CANDU stations. This evolutionary approach to the development of advanced heavy water reactors will be consistent with a philosophy of minimizing the risk to future reactor owners whose requirements are for a reliable, low cost unit

  11. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  12. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  13. Conceptual design of the advanced marine reactor MRX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies on the advanced marine reactors have been done continuously since 1983 at JAERI in order to develop attractive marine reactors for the next generation. At present, two marine reactor concepts are being formulated. One is 100 MWt MRX (Marine Reactor X) for an icebreaker and the other is 300 kWe DRX (Deep-sea Reactor X) for a deep-sea research vessel. They are characterized by an integral type PWR, built-in type control rod drive mechanisms, a water-filled container and a passive decay heat removal system, which realize highly passive safe and compact reactors. This paper is a detailed report including all major results of the MRX design study. (author)

  14. Considerations in the development of safety requirements for innovative reactors: Application to modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Member States of the IAEA have frequently requested this organization to assess, at the conceptual stage, the safety of the design of nuclear reactors that rely on a variety of technologies and are of a high degree of innovation. However, to date, for advanced and innovative reactors and for reactors with characteristics that are different from those of existing light water reactors, widely accepted design standards and rules do not exist. This TECDOC is an outcome of the efforts deployed by the IAEA to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of advanced and innovative reactors, and of all reactors in general including research reactors, with characteristics that differ from those of light water reactors. This publication puts forward a method for safety assessment that is based on the well established and accepted principle of defence in depth. The need to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of reactors that applies to all kinds of advanced reactors was emphasized by the request to the IAEA by South Africa to review the safety of the South African pebble bed modular reactor. This reactor, as other modular high temperature gas cooled reactors (MHTGRs), adopts very specific design features such as the use of coated particle fuel. The characteristics of the fuel deeply affect the design and the safety of the plant, thereby posing several challenges to traditional safety assessment methods and to the application of existing safety requirements that have been developed primarily for water reactors. In this TECDOC, the MHTGR has been selected as a case study to demonstrate the viability of the method proposed. The approach presented is based on an extended interpretation of the concept of defence in depth and its link with the general safety objectives and fundamental safety functions as set out in 'Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design', IAEA Safety Standards No. NS-R.1, issued by the IAEA in 2000. The objective

  15. Development of essential system technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hwang, Y. D.; Cho, B. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    Basic design of SMART adopts the new advanced technologies which were not applied in the existing 1000MWe PWR. However, the R and D experience on these advanced essential technologies is lacking in domestic nuclear industry. Recently, a research on these advanced technologies has been performed as a part of the mid-and-long term nuclear R and D program, but the research was limited only for the small scale fundamental study. The research on these essential technologies such as helically coiled tube steam generator, self pressurizer, core cooling by natural circulation required for the development of integral reactor SMART have not been conducted in full scale. This project, therefore, was performed for the development of analysis models and methodologies, system analysis and thermal hydraulic experiments on the essential technologies to be applied to the 300MWe capacity of integral reactor SMART and the advanced passive reactor expected to be developed in near future with the emphasis on experimental investigation. (author)

  16. Development of essential system technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic design of SMART adopts the new advanced technologies which were not applied in the existing 1000MWe PWR. However, the R and D experience on these advanced essential technologies is lacking in domestic nuclear industry. Recently, a research on these advanced technologies has been performed as a part of the mid-and-long term nuclear R and D program, but the research was limited only for the small scale fundamental study. The research on these essential technologies such as helically coiled tube steam generator, self pressurizer, core cooling by natural circulation required for the development of integral reactor SMART have not been conducted in full scale. This project, therefore, was performed for the development of analysis models and methodologies, system analysis and thermal hydraulic experiments on the essential technologies to be applied to the 300MWe capacity of integral reactor SMART and the advanced passive reactor expected to be developed in near future with the emphasis on experimental investigation. (author)

  17. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-07-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  18. Axial and Radial Gas Holdup in Bubble Column Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Sameer M.; Ansari, Mohashin E Alan; Kene, Pragati T. [RTMNU Nagpur, Nagpur (India)

    2014-06-15

    Bubble column reactors are considered the reactor of choice for numerous applications including oxidation, hydrogenation, waste water treatment, and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. They are widely used in a variety of industrial applications for carrying out gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid reactions. In this paper, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is used for predicting the gas holdup and its distribution along radial and axial direction are presented. Gas holdup increases linearly with increase in gas velocity. Gas bubbles tends to concentrate more towards the center of the column and follows a wavy path.

  19. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, William [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hughes, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Berry, Jonathan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Russell, Tamara [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lau, Y. C. [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Liu, Shan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Arnett, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Peck, Arthur [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Tralshawala, Nilesh [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Weber, Joseph [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Benjamin, Marc [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Iduate, Michelle [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Kittleson, Jacob [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Garcia-Crespo, Andres [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Delvaux, John [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Casanova, Fernando [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lacy, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Brzek, Brian [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Wolfe, Chris [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Palafox, Pepe [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Ding, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Badding, Bruce [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); McDuffie, Dwayne [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Zemsky, Christine [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2015-07-30

    The objective of this program was to develop the technologies required for a fuel flexible (coal derived hydrogen or syngas) gas turbine for IGCC that met DOE turbine performance goals. The overall DOE Advanced Power System goal was to conduct the research and development (R&D) necessary to produce coal-based IGCC power systems with high efficiency, near-zero emissions, and competitive capital cost. To meet this goal, the DOE Fossil Energy Turbine Program had as an interim objective of 2 to 3 percentage points improvement in combined cycle (CC) efficiency. The final goal is 3 to 5 percentage points improvement in CC efficiency above the state of the art for CC turbines in IGCC applications at the time the program started. The efficiency goals were for NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm NOx (@15 % O2). As a result of the technologies developed under this program, the DOE goals were exceeded with a projected 8 point efficiency improvement. In addition, a new combustion technology was conceived of and developed to overcome the challenges of burning hydrogen and achieving the DOE’s NOx goal. This report also covers the developments under the ARRA-funded portion of the program that include gas turbine technology advancements for improvement in the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of gas turbines for industrial applications with carbon capture and sequestration. Example applications could be cement plants, chemical plants, refineries, steel and aluminum plants, manufacturing facilities, etc. The DOE’s goal for more than 5 percentage point improvement in efficiency was met with cycle analyses performed for representative IGCC Steel Mill and IGCC Refinery applications. Technologies were developed in this program under the following areas: combustion, larger latter stage buckets, CMC and EBC, advanced materials and coatings, advanced configurations to reduce cooling, sealing and rotor purge flows, turbine aerodynamics, advanced sensors, advancements in first

  20. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  1. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Recent progress of Gas Fast Reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    considered as an alternative design. Part of the safety architecture, the Decay Heat Removal (DHR) safety function is based on the control of gas circulation and gas inventory: the primary circuit, the core in particular, were designed to ease the gas circulation and enhance the natural convection capabilities; a close containment concept - functionally, a gas tight envelope enclosing the primary circuit - was considered in order to limit the loss of pressure in case of depressurization (a 'backup' pressure results from the equilibrium between the close containment and primary volumes). The adequacy of the provisions retained in the design can be judged using a variety of deterministic and probabilistic methods. In general terms, the plant is deterministically designed against the identified list of the operating conditions and a probabilistic assessment is also currently performed to verify that there are no vulnerable areas. The preliminary acceptance criteria retained for the assessment of the Design Basis Accidents (DBA) will be explicited in the full paper as well as the selection of the reference situations that result from the combination of the initial state of the reactor (full power), of an initiating event (IE) and of the single aggravating failure inducing the most adverse effect on the consequence of the transient. All the plant transients (about 30 cases) have been simulated using the CATHARE 2 computer code. The main results will be given and analysed. To a lesser extend, preliminary consideration on severe accidents will be presented : several families of severe accident scenarios leading to severe plant conditions have been preliminarily identified. An approach was proposed to distinguish those families depending on the integrity of the safety barriers, the magnitude and the dynamics of the phenomena induced by the accidents and the possible associated threshold effects

  3. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  4. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-10-14

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to development of an advanced hot-gas process that can eliminate the problematic SO{sub 2} tail gas and yield elemental sulfur

  5. Hiberarchy of requirement analysis of reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the security and the margin of safety of nuclear power plant, the research on requirement analysis of digital reactor protection system for advanced pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant was developed. Based on the known technology, a requirement analysis report was performed. A kind of three-levels pyramidal hierarchy was adopted in the requirement analysis, and the design characteristics of the requirement analysis were described in the analysis report. This hiberarchy can directly illuminate the design characters and logical achievement of the requirement analysis for advanced pressurized water reactor digital protection system. (authors)

  6. Reactor scram events in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor concept developed by Asea Brown Boveri. A unique feature of PIUS is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. Los Alamos supported the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's preapplication review of the PIUS reactor. Baseline calculations of the PIUS design were performed for active and passive reactor scrams using TRAC-PF1/MOD2. Additional sensitivity studies examined flow blockage and boron dilution events to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept for low-probability combination events following active-system scrams

  7. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Models for transient analyses in advanced test reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielli, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    Several strategies are developed worldwide to respond to the world’s increasing demand for electricity. Modern nuclear facilities are under construction or in the planning phase. In parallel, advanced nuclear reactor concepts are being developed to achieve sustainability, minimize waste, and ensure uranium resources. To optimize the performance of components (fuels and structures) of these systems, significant efforts are under way to design new Material Test Reactors facilities in Europe whi...

  9. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  10. Using Advanced Fuel Bundles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the exit fuel burnup in CANDU reactors was a long-time challenge for both bundle designers and performance analysts. Therefore, the 43-element design together with several fuel compositions was studied, in the aim of assessing new reliable, economic and proliferation-resistant solutions. Recovered Uranium (RU) fuel is intended to be used in CANDU reactors, given the important amount of slightly enriched Uranium (~0.96% w/o U235) that might be provided by the spent LWR fuel recovery plants. Though this fuel has a far too small U235 enrichment to be used in LWR's, it can be still used to fuel CANDU reactors. Plutonium based mixtures are also considered, with both natural and depleted Uranium, either for peacefully using the military grade dispositioned Plutonium or for better using Plutonium from LWR reprocessing plants. The proposed Thorium-LEU mixtures are intended to reduce the Uranium consumption per produced MW. The positive void reactivity is a major concern of any CANDU safety assessment, therefore reducing it was also a task for the present analysis. Using the 43-element bundle with a certain amount of burnable poison (e.g. Dysprosium) dissolved in the 8 innermost elements may lead to significantly reducing the void reactivity. The expected outcomes of these design improvements are: higher exit burnup, smooth/uniform radial bundle power distribution and reduced void reactivity. Since the improved fuel bundles are intended to be loaded in existing CANDU reactors, we found interesting to estimate the local reactivity effects of a mechanical control absorber (MCA) on the surrounding fuel cells. Cell parameters and neutron flux distributions, as well as macroscopic cross-sections were estimated using the transport code DRAGON and a 172-group updated nuclear data library. (author)

  11. Actinide transmutation in the advanced liquid metal reactor (ALMR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored fast reactor design based on the Power Reactor, Innovative Small Module (PRISM) concept originated by General Electric. The current reference design is a 471 MWt modular reactor loaded with ternary metal fuel. This paper discusses actinide transmutation core designs that fit the design envelope of the ALMR and utilize spent LWR fuel as startup material and makeup. Actinide transmutation may be accomplished in the ALMR by using either a breeding or burning configuration. Lifetime actinide mass consumption is calculated as well as changes in consumption behaviour throughout the lifetime of the reactor. Impacts on system operational and safety performance are evaluated in a preliminary fashion. (author). 3 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  12. Perspective of nuclear energy and advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future nuclear energy growth will be the result of the contributions of every single plant being constructed or projected at present as it is connected to the grid. As per IAEA, there exists presently 34 nuclear power plants under construction 81 with the necessary permits and funding and 223 proposed, which are plants seriously pursuing permits and financing. This means that in a few decades the number of nuclear power plants in operation will have doubled. This growth rate is characterised by the incorporation of new countries to the nuclear club and the gradually increasing importance of Asian countries. During this expansive phase, generation III and III+designs are or will be used. These designs incorporate the experience from operating plants, and introduce innovations on rationalization design efficiency and safety, with emphasis on passive safety features. In a posterior phase, generation IV designs, presently under development, will be employed. Generation IV consists of several types of reactors (fast reactors, very high temperature reactors, etc), which will improve further sustain ability, economy, safety and reliability concepts. The described situation seems to lead to a renaissance of the nuclear energy to levels hardly thinkable several years ago. (Author)

  13. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  14. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  15. Fusion reactor design towards radwaste minimum with advanced shield material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed to minimize the radioactive waste of the reactor. The main point of the concept is to clear massive structural components located outside the neutron shield from regulatory control. The concept requires some reinforcement of shielding with an advanced shield material such as a metal hydride, detriation, and tailoring of a detrimental element from the superconductor. Our assessment confirmed a large impact of the concept on radwaste reduction, in that it reduces the radwaste fraction of a fusion reactor A-SSTR2 from 92 wt.% to 17 wt.%. (author)

  16. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    1. Introduction Better information on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is necessary to manage these emissions and identify responses that are consistent with the food security and economic development priorities of countries. Critical activity data (what crops or livestock are managed in what way) are poor or lacking for many agricultural systems, especially in developing countries. In addition, the currently available methods for quantifying emissions and mitigation are often too expensive or complex or not sufficiently user friendly for widespread use. The purpose of this focus issue is to capture the state of the art in quantifying greenhouse gases from agricultural systems, with the goal of better understanding our current capabilities and near-term potential for improvement, with particular attention to quantification issues relevant to smallholders in developing countries. This work is timely in light of international discussions and negotiations around how agriculture should be included in efforts to reduce and adapt to climate change impacts, and considering that significant climate financing to developing countries in post-2012 agreements may be linked to their increased ability to identify and report GHG emissions (Murphy et al 2010, CCAFS 2011, FAO 2011). 2. Agriculture and climate change mitigation The main agricultural GHGs—methane and nitrous oxide—account for 10%-12% of anthropogenic emissions globally (Smith et al 2008), or around 50% and 60% of total anthropogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions, respectively, in 2005. Net carbon dioxide fluxes between agricultural land and the atmosphere linked to food production are relatively small, although significant carbon emissions are associated with degradation of organic soils for plantations in tropical regions (Smith et al 2007, FAO 2012). Population growth and shifts in dietary patterns toward more meat and dairy consumption will lead to

  17. Formation Rate of Natural Gas Hydrate - Reactor Experiments and Models

    OpenAIRE

    Mork, Marit

    2002-01-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 °C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted...

  18. Spectrophotometric Procedure for Fast Reactor Advanced Coolant Manufacture Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, O. S.; Egorov, N. B.; Zherin, I. I.; Indyk, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a spectrophotometric procedure for fast reactor advanced coolant manufacture control. The molar absorption coefficient of dimethyllead dibromide with dithizone was defined as equal to 68864 ± 795 l·mole-1·cm-1, limit of detection as equal to 0.583 · 10-6 g/ml. The spectrophotometric procedure application range was found to be equal to 37.88 - 196.3 g. of dimethyllead dibromide in the sample. The procedure was used within the framework of the development of the method of synthesis of the advanced coolant for fast reactors.

  19. Testing stand for cosmic gas-cooling fast reactor's sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For carrying out of technical decision and nuclear, radiation and technological safety of gas-cooling space nuclear power plants is elaborating gas-cooling fast reactor's testing stand. In the base of its draft is taken conception of the reactor with filling up type reactor core on the base of ball fuel elements and radial coolant flowing. On the testing stand would suggested carrying out testing for study neutron and physical parameters of gas-cooling reactor, its behaviour under accident simulation. In the reactor core will suggest use carbon nitrides fuel elements with tungsten cover, provides under nominal regime relatively low fission products yield to first contour of device. Construction of fuel element was carrying out on reactor and non reactor testing and its calculated on working resource about 3000 hours. Constructive materials of reactor core have lower melting temperature, that provides organized in good time remove fuel element to containers placed under reactor in case connected with hypothetical accident. In the construction of reactor for seen tree-contours system of heat transfer and its provides multistage system of barriers against fission products yield to environment. tabs.1

  20. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  1. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  2. Neutronic challenges of advanced boiling water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of Boiling Water Reactor technology has been under investigation at the Center for Advance Nuclear Energy Systems at MIT. The advanced concepts under study provide economic incentives through enabling further power uprates (i.e. increasing vessel power density) or better fuel cycle uranium utilization. The challenges in modeling of three advanced concepts with focus on neutronics are presented. First, the Helical Cruciform Fuel rod has been used in some Russian reactors, and studied at MIT for uprating the power in LWRs through increased heat transfer area per unit core volume. The HCF design requires high fidelity 3D tools to assess its reactor physics behavior as well as thermal and fuel performance. Second, an advanced core design, the BWR-HD, was found to promise 65% higher power density over existing BWRs, while using current licensing tools and existing technology. Its larger assembly size requires stronger coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics compared to the current practice. Third is the reduced moderation BWRs, which had been proposed in Japan to enable breeding and burning of fuel as an alternative to sodium fast reactors. Such technology suffers from stronger sensitivity of its neutronics to the void fraction than the traditional BWRs, thus requiring exact modeling of the core conditions such as bypass voiding, to correctly characterize its performance. (author)

  3. A general description of AARE [Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering]: A modular system for advanced analysis of reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AARE [Advanced Analysis for Reactor Engineering] modular code system for physics analysis of a wide range of reactor systems, including fusion blankets and shielding, is being developed jointly between PSI [Paul Scherrer Institute] and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In the present work, a general description of the system, its philosophy and capabilities, together with a brief summary of its modules and data libraries, is given. The cross-section shielding and reformatting code, TRAMIX, is described in more detail

  4. Advanced fuel cycles in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper re-examines the rationale for advanced nuclear fuel cycles in general, and for CANDU advanced fuel cycles in particular. The traditional resource-related arguments for more uranium nuclear fuel cycles are currently clouded by record-low prices for uranium. However, the total known conventional uranium resources can support projected uranium requirements for only another 50 years or so, less if a major revival of the nuclear option occurs as part of the solution to the world's environmental problems. While the extent of the uranium resource in the earth's crust and oceans is very large, uncertainty in the availability and price of uranium is the prime resource-related motivation for advanced fuel cycles. There are other important reasons for pursuing advanced fuel cycles. The three R's of the environmental movement, reduce, recycle, reuse, can be achieved in nuclear energy production through the employment of advanced fuel cycles. The adoption of more uranium-conserving fuel cycles would reduce the amount of uranium which needs to be mined, and the environmental impact of that mining. Environmental concerns over the back end of the fuel cycle can be mitigated as well. Higher fuel burnup reduces the volume of spent fuels which needs to be disposed of. The transmutation of actinides and long-lived fission products into short-lived fission products would reduce the radiological hazard of the waste from thousands to hundreds of years. Recycling of uranium and/or plutonium in spent fuel reuses valuable fissile material, leaving only true waste to be disposed of. Advanced fuel cycles have an economical benefit as well, enabling a ceiling to be put on fuel cycle costs, which are

  5. Advanced fuel cycles of WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper considers characteristics of fuel cycles for the WWER-1000 reactor satisfying the following conditions: duration of the campaign at the nominal power is extended from 250 EFPD up to 470 and more ones; fuel enrichment does not exceed 5 wt.%; fuel assemblies maximum burnup does not exceed 55 MWd/kgHM. Along with uranium fuel, the use of mixed Uranium-Plutonium fuel is considered. Calculations were conducted by codes TVS-M, BIPR-7A and PERMAK-A developed in the RRC Kurchatov Institute, verified for the calculations of uranium fuel and certified by GAN RF

  6. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    2000-04-17

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3 % of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to testing the FHR-32 sorbent. FHR-32 sorbent was tested for 50 cycles of sulfidation in a laboratory scale reactor.

  7. Seismic stability of VGM type high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main principles of the design provision of high temperature gas cooled VGM reactors seismic stability and the results of calculations, performed by linear-spectral method are presented. (author). 1 ref., 10 figs

  8. Main gas circulator for VG-400 reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle parameters and operating conditions of the main gas circulator (MGC) in VG-400 reactor plant are presented. Brief MGC design description and experimental work scope are given. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  9. Multiphysics methods development for high temperature gas reactor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Volkan

    Multiphysics computational methods were developed to perform design and safety analysis of the next generation Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors. A suite of code modules was developed to solve the coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics field equations. The thermal-hydraulics module is based on the three dimensional solution of the mass, momentum and energy equations in cylindrical coordinates within the framework of the porous media method. The neutronics module is a part of the PARCS (Purdue Advanced Reactor Core Simulator) code and provides a fine mesh finite difference solution of the neutron diffusion equation in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates. Coupling of the two modules was performed by mapping the solution variables from one module to the other. Mapping is performed automatically in the code system by the use of a common material mesh in both modules. The standalone validation of the thermal-hydraulics module was performed with several cases of the SANA experiment and the standalone thermal-hydraulics exercise of the PBMR-400 benchmark problem. The standalone neutronics module was validated by performing the relevant exercises of the PBMR-268 and PBMR-400 benchmark problems. Additionally, the validation of the coupled code system was performed by analyzing several steady state and transient cases of the OECD/NEA PBMR-400 benchmark problem.

  10. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1978 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  11. Gas hold-up in stirred tank reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yawalkar, A.A.; Pangarkar, V.G.; Beenackers, A.A C M

    2002-01-01

    Based on a study of the gas hold-up data for stirred tank reactor generated in the present work and the data available in the literature for large stirred tank reactors (T = 0.57 m to 2.7 m) equipped with disc turbines and pitched blade downflow turbines a correlation is presented which reliably pre

  12. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1979 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  13. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1978 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  14. Report of Nuclear Fusion Reactor Engineering Research Meeting. 6. Advanced reactor engineering technology for nuclear fusion demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research meeting has been held every year, and the 6th meeting was held on January 17, 1995 at University of Tokyo. As the type of a demonstration reactor, tokamak type and helical type were set up, and the topics on the various subjects of their reactor engineering technology were presented, and active discussion was carried out. At the meeting, lectures were given on the reactor engineering technology required for a prototype reactor, the material technology supposed for a demonstration reactor, thermal-electric conversion and the direct electricity generation using Nernst effect, the advanced manufacturing technology of functional, structural materials, the application of high temperature superconductors to nuclear fusion reactors, the reactor engineering technology required for a helical type demonstration reactor, and tokamak demonstration reactor and the common technology of fission and fusion. This report is the summary of these lecture materials. The useful knowledges were obtained for considering the development of nuclear fusion reactor technology hereafter in this meeting. (K.I.)

  15. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  16. Pin-Type Gas Cooled Reactor for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a point design for a pin-type Gas-Cooled Reactor concept that uses a fuel pin design similar to the SP100 fuel pin. The Gas-Cooled Reactor is designed to operate at 100 kWe for 7 years plus have a reduced power mode of 20% power for a duration of 5 years. The power system uses a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor to heat He/Xe gas that flows directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity. Heat is rejected to space via a thermal radiator that unfolds in space. The reactor contains approximately 154 kg of 93.15 % enriched UN in 313 fuel pins. The fuel is clad with rhenium-lined Nb-1Zr. The pressures vessel and ducting are cooled by the 900 K He/Xe gas inlet flow or by thermal radiation. This permits all pressure boundaries to be made of superalloy metals rather than refractory metals, which greatly reduces the cost and development schedule required by the project. The reactor contains sufficient rhenium (a neutron poison) to make the reactor subcritical under water immersion accidents without the use of internal shutdown rods. The mass of the reactor and reflectors is about 750 kg.

  17. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  18. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  19. Development of advanced hot-gas desulfurization processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothimurugesan, K.

    1999-04-26

    Advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants nearing completion, such as Sierra-Pacific, employ a circulating fluidized-bed (transport) reactor hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) process that uses 70-180 {micro}m average particle size (aps) zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbent for removing H{sub 2}S from coal gas down to less than 20 ppmv. The sorbent undergoes cycles of absorption (sulfidation) and air regeneration. The key barrier issues associated with a fluidized-bed HGD process are chemical degradation, physical attrition, high regeneration light-off (initiation) temperature, and high cost of the sorbent. Another inherent complication in all air-regeneration-based HGD processes is the disposal of the problematic dilute SO{sub 2} containing regeneration tail-gas. Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading first generation technology, efficiently reduces this SO{sub 2} to desirable elemental sulfur, but requires the use of 1-3% of the coal gas, thus resulting in an energy penalty to the plant. Advanced second-generation processes are under development that can reduce this energy penalty by modifying the sorbent so that it could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur. The objective of this research is to support the near and long term DOE efforts to commercialize the IGCC-HGD process technology. Specifically we aim to develop: optimized low-cost sorbent materials with 70-80 {micro}m average aps meeting all Sierra specs; attrition resistant sorbents with 170 {micro}m aps that allow greater flexibility in the choice of the type of fluidized-bed reactor e.g. they allow increased throughput in a bubbling-bed reactor; and modified fluidizable sorbent materials that can be regenerated to produce elemental sulfur directly with minimal or no use of coal gas. The effort during the reporting period has been devoted to development of optimized low-cost zinc-oxide-based sorbents for Sierra-Pacific. The sorbent surface were modified to prevent

  20. Astronaut Kevin Chilton works with advanced cell reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Kevin P. Chilton, pilot, works with an advanced cell reactor, which incorporated the first ever videomicroscope, on the Space Tissue Loss (STL-B) experiment on the Space Shuttle Endeavour's middeck. This experiment studied cell growth during the STS-59 mission.

  1. Qualification issues for advanced light-water reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying the I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light-water reactor. The template was then used to suggest a methodology for the qualification of microprocessor-based protection systems. The methodology identifies standards/regulatory guides (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems. This approach addresses in part issues raised in NRC policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards. as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  2. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Tie-jun

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, all the commissioning for the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) had been finished and the diffraction pattern had been successfully obtained on the neutron scattering spectrometer. Meanwhile, the cold neutron source project and the acceptance items of CARR project had been carrying out.

  3. Advanced monitoring and control systems for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the important aspects of nuclear power station (NPS) improvement with fast reactors is provision of safety. The safety conception of advanced fast power reactors is directed on elaborating such solutions where as much as possible properties of reactor self-protection and natural laws are used in which the self-protection of the nuclear reactor is realized. To these solutions we may refer the usage of hydraulically weighted rods of alarm protection, negative temperature and power coefficients, negative sodium empty effect, natural circulation without power sources, natural convection and other measures. Additionally special technological systems are envisaged, which start functioning with the coming of the initial event of the accident. 1 ref., 7 figs, 1 tab

  4. Advanced Neutron Source Reactor thermal analysis of fuel plate defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor designed to provide the highest continuous neutron beam intensity of any reactor in the world. The present technology for determining safe operations were developed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These techniques are conservative and provide confidence in the safe operation of HFIR. However, the more intense requirements of ANSR necessitate the development of more accurate, but still conservative, techniques. This report details the development of a Local Analysis Technique (LAT) that provides an appropriate approach. Application of the LAT to two ANSR core designs are presented. New theories of the thermal and nuclear behavior of the U3Si2 fuel are utilized. The implications of lower fuel enrichment and of modifying the inspection procedures are also discussed. Development of the computer codes that enable the automate execution of the LAT is included

  5. Advances in sodium technology, testing and diagnostics of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains a selection of 29 papers from three international specialists' meetings: the CMEA conference ''Control and measuring instruments and diagnostic systems of fast reactors'' held in the GDR in April 1983; the IAEA conference on nuclear power experience held in Austria in September 1982; and the conference ''Problems of technology and corrosion in sodium coolant and protective gas'' held in the GDR in April 1977. Three papers on operating experience with Soviet fast reactors and their safety have a general character; they are followed up by three papers on sodium technology. Five papers deal with the diagnostics of fast sodium cooled reactors and nine papers are devoted to the diagnostics of steam generators. Eight papers relate to detectors for the diagnostics of fast reactors. Safety regulations for work with alkali metals are added. (A.K.)

  6. Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program: German Pebble Bed Reactor Technology review update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a review of the German pebble bed reactor technology, and updates the information provided in the Gas Reactor International Cooperative Program Interim Report COO-4057-6, German Pebble Bed Reactor Design and Technology Review, dated September 1978. Most of the updated information is for the PNP-500 and the HHT-Prototype plants. The PNP-500 is a 500 MW(t) multi-purpose demonstration plant for coal conversion applications. The HHT-Prototype is a 1640 MWt reactor designed to produce 675 MWe of electricity using a direct cycle gas turbine. The report provides a description and evaluation of the overall plant and the nuclear reactor for both the PNP-500 and HHT-Prototype. A description and evaluation of the primary system components is presented for the process heat and gas turbine applications

  7. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected. (author)

  8. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected

  9. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  10. Metal fire implications for advanced reactors. Part 1, literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public safety and acceptance is extremely important for the nuclear power renaissance to get started. The Advanced Burner Reactor and other potential designs utilize liquid sodium as a primary coolant which provides distinct challenges to the nuclear power industry. Fire is a dominant contributor to total nuclear plant risk events for current generation nuclear power plants. Utilizing past experience to develop suitable safety systems and procedures will minimize the chance of sodium leaks and the associated consequences in the next generation. An advanced understanding of metal fire behavior in regards to the new designs will benefit both science and industry. This report presents an extensive literature review that captures past experiences, new advanced reactor designs, and the current state-of-knowledge related to liquid sodium combustion behavior

  11. Metal fire implications for advanced reactors. Part 1, literature review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Radel, Ross F.; Hewson, John C.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-10-01

    Public safety and acceptance is extremely important for the nuclear power renaissance to get started. The Advanced Burner Reactor and other potential designs utilize liquid sodium as a primary coolant which provides distinct challenges to the nuclear power industry. Fire is a dominant contributor to total nuclear plant risk events for current generation nuclear power plants. Utilizing past experience to develop suitable safety systems and procedures will minimize the chance of sodium leaks and the associated consequences in the next generation. An advanced understanding of metal fire behavior in regards to the new designs will benefit both science and industry. This report presents an extensive literature review that captures past experiences, new advanced reactor designs, and the current state-of-knowledge related to liquid sodium combustion behavior.

  12. Identification of improvements of advanced light water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this report is to identify the improvement of reactor developments with respect to reactor safety. This includes the collection of non-proprietary information on the description of the advanced design characteristics, especially summary design descriptions and general publications. This documentation is not intended to include a safety evaluation of the advanced concepts; however, it is structured in such a way that it can serve as a basis for a future safety evaluation. This is taken into account in the structure of the information regarding the distinction of the various concepts with respect to their 'advancement' and the classification of design characteristics according to some basic safety aspects. The overall description concentrates on those features which are relevant to safety. Other aspects, such as economy, operational features, maintenance, the construction period, etc...are not considered explicitly in this report

  13. The core design of the advanced power reactor plus (APR+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advance Power Reactor Plus (APR+), a pressurized water reactor and an improved nuclear power reactor based on the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) in Korea, has been developed with 18-month cycle operation strategy from its initial core. The APR+ core power is 4290 MWth which corresponds to a 1500 MWe class nuclear power plant. The reactor core consists of 257 fuel assemblies. Comparing with APR1400 core design, 16 fuel assemblies are added. Its cycle length is expected about 450 EFPD directly from initial core, although most of previous other plants had been started according to their annual or 15-month cycle operation schedule at their initial core and gone to 18-month after third - fourth cycle. In order to reduce the peaking power, fuel pin configurations of the assembly, are optimized by using some low enriched fuel pins and gadolinia bearings. APR+ core has been met the requirements as well as the above cycle length requirement; 1) peaking factor, 2) Negative MTC(Moderator Temperature Coefficient), 3) sufficient shutdown margin, 4) convergent Xenon stability Index. The maximum rod burnup and the discharge fuel assembly burnup are also satisfied those of the limit. It is expected to acquire the standard design approval by the end of 2012 by the Korean nuclear regulatory. (authors)

  14. 20% inlet header break analysis of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 750 MWt vertical pressure tube type boiling light water cooled and heavy water moderated reactor. A passive design feature of this reactor is that the heat removal is achieved through natural circulation of primary coolant at all power levels, with no primary coolant pumps. Loss of coolant due to failure of inlet header results in depressurization of primary heat transport (PHT) system and containment pressure rise. Depressurization activates various protective and engineered safety systems like reactor trip, isolation condenser and advanced accumulator, limiting the consequences of the event. This paper discusses the thermal hydraulic transient analysis for evaluating the safety of the reactor, following 20% inlet header break using RELAP5/MOD3.2. For the analysis, the system is discretized appropriately to simulate possible flow reversal in one of the core paths during the transient. Various modeling aspects are discussed in this paper and predictions are made for different parameters like pressure, temperature, steam quality and flow in different parts of the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system. Flow and energy discharges into the containment are also estimated for use in containment analysis. (author)

  15. Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, C.L.,Jr.; Roberts, M.; Bull, N.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Wood, R.T.

    2012-09-15

    Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor’s physical condition. In and near the core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of the current ORNL-led project, conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced SMR Research and Development (R&D) program, is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

  16. Mitigation of gas entrainment in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argon cover gas may entrain into sodium in the hot pool and in the surge tank of liquid Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) due to various mechanisms. The entrained cover gas may hinder the normal reactor operation in many ways such as reduction in heat transfer in the heat exchanger, causing neutronic perturbation inside the core etc. The recirculating gas bubbles also enhance chances of cavitation in the pumps. Therefore, it is required to mitigate gas entrainment in reactor. High free surface velocity and turbulence level are the causes of gas entrainment from free surface. Hence, gas entrainment can be avoided by reducing these factors at free surface. This is achieved by employing gas entrainment mitigation devices which essentially alters the flow pattern and reduces velocity and turbulence level at the free surface. A combined experimental and computational approach is proposed to develop such devices. The computational model which is used for parametric studies is first validated against experiments carried out in scale down water model of reactor primary circuit and surge tank. The effect of different gas entrainment mitigating devices for reduction in free surface velocity and turbulence level has been analyzed using this validated CFD model. Based on the CFD analyses, the final geometry of the gas entrainment mitigating devices has been selected and optimized. Finally the selected devices have been tested to confirm its performance for mitigation of gas entrainment in large scale models of reactor primary circuit and surge tank. This paper presents the studies carried out towards development of suitable gas entrainment mitigation devices for hot pool and surge tank of SFR. (author)

  17. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  18. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  19. Reflector modeling in advanced nodal analysis of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress in the modeling of the reflector regions of pressurized water reactors within the framework of advanced nodal diffusion analysis methods is reviewed. Attention is focused on the modeling of the radial reflector of a PWR which is most problematic because of its irregular and heterogeneous structure. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the high accuracy of the methods which are now available for generating nodal reflector parameters and it is shown that errors due to reflector modeling in multi-dimensional nodal reactor analysis can be practically eliminated. (author). 23 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) final report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in an overview of a first-generation tandem mirror reactor. The central cell fusion plasma is self-sustained by alpha heating (ignition), while electron-cyclotron resonance heating and negative ion beams maintain the electrostatic confining potentials in the end plugs. Plug injection power is reduced by the use of high-field choke coils and thermal barriers, concepts to be tested in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) and Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  1. Economics of advanced light water reactors - Recent update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes recently updated analyses of the economic prospects of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) during the decade of the 1990s. United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) has performed engineering economic analyses related to ALWRs over the last 5 yr using both target economics and detailed cost-estimating methodologies. It has been found through such cost comparisons that properly designed and constructed ALWRs should cost less than the target cost figures listed above and significantly less than the pressurized water reactor better experience reference LWR plant cost

  2. Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research summary of advanced reactors activities, June 4, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pre-application interactions with potential licensee applicants will help NRC prepare for future submittals, through the development of the infrastructure necessary for licensing application reviews. RES has the lead for non-LWR advanced reactor pre-application initiatives and longer-range new technology initiatives. An advanced reactor group has been formed in REAHFB, and is currently performing a pre-application review of Exelon's Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. Recent industry requests for future pre application interaction include General Atomics' Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) and Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) design. RES advanced reactors activities also include participation as an observer in DOE's Generation IV initiative. Pre-Application review objectives include the development of regulatory guidance, licensing approach, and technology-basis expectations for licensing advanced designs, including identifying significant technology, design, safety, licensing and policy issues that would need to be addressed in the licensing process. The presentation described the pre-application process for the Exelon PBMR. NRC first identifies additional information following topical meetings with Exelon, and Exelon formally documents and submits required topical Information. The staff then develops a preliminary assessment and drafts a response which is followed by stakeholder input and comments at a public workshop. Preliminary assessments are discussed with ACRS and ACNW, and Commission papers are written which provide staff positions and recommendations on proposed policy decisions. Some of the significant areas for the PBMR include: Process Issues, Legal and Financial Issues; Regulatory Framework; Fuel Performance and Qualification; Traditional Engineering Design (e.g, Nuclear, Thermal-Fluid, Materials); Fuel Cycle Safety Areas; PRA, SSC Safety Classification; PBMR Prototype Testing

  3. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Gordon, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (<10 W/cm/sup 2/), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (1000/sup 0/C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter.

  4. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (2), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li17Pb83) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (10000C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter

  5. Thermal reactor. [liquid silicon production from silane gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Ford, L. B. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A thermal reactor apparatus and method of pyrolyticaly decomposing silane gas into liquid silicon product and hydrogen by-product gas is disclosed. The thermal reactor has a reaction chamber which is heated well above the decomposition temperature of silane. An injector probe introduces the silane gas tangentially into the reaction chamber to form a first, outer, forwardly moving vortex containing the liquid silicon product and a second, inner, rewardly moving vortex containing the by-product hydrogen gas. The liquid silicon in the first outer vortex deposits onto the interior walls of the reaction chamber to form an equilibrium skull layer which flows to the forward or bottom end of the reaction chamber where it is removed. The by-product hydrogen gas in the second inner vortex is removed from the top or rear of the reaction chamber by a vortex finder. The injector probe which introduces the silane gas into the reaction chamber is continually cooled by a cooling jacket.

  6. Natural gas turbine topping for the iris reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plant designs are typically characterized by high capital and low fuel costs, while the opposite is true for fossil power generation including the natural gas-fired gas turbine combined cycle currently favored by many utilities worldwide. This paper examines potential advantages of combining nuclear and fossil (natural gas) generation options in a single plant. Technical and economic feasibility and attractiveness of a gas turbine - nuclear reactor combined cycle where gas turbine exhaust is used to superheat saturated steam produced by a low power light water reactor are examined. It is shown that in a certain range of fuel and capital costs of nuclear and fossil options, the proposed cycle offers an immediate economic advantage over stand-alone plants resulting from higher efficiency of the nuclear plant. Additionally, the gas turbine topping will result in higher fuel flexibility without the economic penalty typically associated with nuclear power. (author)

  7. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design... the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis...

  8. Gas-Cooled Reactors: the importance of their development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-Cooled Reactors are considered to have a significant future impact on the application of fission energy. The specific types are the steam-cycle High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor, the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor, the gas-turbine HTGR, and the Very High-Temperature Process Heat Reactor. The importance of developing the above systems is discussed relative to alternative fission power systems involving Light Water Reactors, Heavy Water Reactors, Spectral Shift Controlled Reactors, and Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors. A primary advantage of developing GCRs as a class lies in the technology and cost interrelations, permitting cost-effective development of systems having diverse applications. Further, HTGR-type systems have highly proliferation-resistant characteristics and very attractive safety features. Finally, such systems and GCFRs are mutally complementary. Overall, GCRs provide interrelated systems that serve different purposes and needs; their development can proceed in stages that provide early benefits while contributing to future needs. It is concluded that the long-term importance of the various GCRs is as follows: HTGR, providing a technology for economic GCFRs and HTGR-GTs, while providing a proliferation-resistant reactor system having early economic and fuel utilization benefits; GCFR, providing relatively low cost fissile fuel and reducing overall separative work needs at capital costs lower than those for LMFBRs; HTGR-GT (in combination with a bottoming cycle), providing a very high thermal efficiency system having low capital costs and improved fuel utilization and technology pertinent to VHTRs; HTGR-GT, providing a power system well suited for dry cooling conditions for low-temperature process heat needs; and VHTR, providing a high-temperature heat source for hydrogen production processes

  9. Solar coal gasification reactor with pyrolysis gas recycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiman, William R.; Gregg, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Coal (or other carbonaceous matter, such as biomass) is converted into a duct gas that is substantially free from hydrocarbons. The coal is fed into a solar reactor (10), and solar energy (20) is directed into the reactor onto coal char, creating a gasification front (16) and a pyrolysis front (12). A gasification zone (32) is produced well above the coal level within the reactor. A pyrolysis zone (34) is produced immediately above the coal level. Steam (18), injected into the reactor adjacent to the gasification zone (32), reacts with char to generate product gases. Solar energy supplies the energy for the endothermic steam-char reaction. The hot product gases (38) flow from the gasification zone (32) to the pyrolysis zone (34) to generate hot char. Gases (38) are withdrawn from the pyrolysis zone (34) and reinjected into the region of the reactor adjacent the gasification zone (32). This eliminates hydrocarbons in the gas by steam reformation on the hot char. The product gas (14) is withdrawn from a region of the reactor between the gasification zone (32) and the pyrolysis zone (34). The product gas will be free of tar and other hydrocarbons, and thus be suitable for use in many processes.

  10. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the third annual meeting of the technical working group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna, in 2004, it was suggested 'to develop manuals/handbooks and best practice documents for use in training and education in coated particle fuel technology' in the IAEA's Programme for the year 2006-2007. In the context of supporting interested Member States, the activity to develop a handbook for use in the 'education and training' of a new generation of scientists and engineers on coated particle fuel technology was undertaken. To make aware of the role of nuclear science education and training in all Member States to enhance their capacity to develop innovative technologies for sustainable nuclear energy is of paramount importance to the IAEA Significant efforts are underway in several Member States to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) based on either pebble bed or prismatic designs. All these reactors are primarily fuelled by TRISO (tri iso-structural) coated particles. The aim however is to build future nuclear fuel cycles in concert with the aim of the Generation IV International Forum and includes nuclear reactor applications for process heat, hydrogen production and electricity generation. Moreover, developmental work is ongoing and focuses on the burning of weapon-grade plutonium including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept' or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in HTGR systems in the form of coated particle fuels. The document will serve as the primary resource materials for 'education and training' in the area of advanced fuels forming the building blocks for future development in the interested Member States. This document broadly covers several aspects of coated particle fuel technology, namely: manufacture of coated particles, compacts and elements; design-basis; quality assurance/quality control and characterization techniques; fuel irradiations; fuel

  11. Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams

  12. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided.

  13. Advanced pebble bed high temperature reactor with central graphite column for future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design evaluations of the advanced pebble bed high temperature reactor, AHTR, with central graphite column are given. This reactor, as a nuclear heat source, is suitable for coal refinement as well as for electricity generation with closed gas turbine primary helium circuit. With this design of the central graphite column, it is possible to limit the core temperatures under the required value of about 1600deg C in case of accident conditions, even with higher thermal power and higher core inlet and outlet temperatures. The designs of core internals are described. The after heat removal system is integrated in the prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessel, which is based on the principals of natural convection. Research work is being carried out, whereby the sphencal fuel elements are coated with a layer of silicon carbide, to improve the corrosion resistance as well as the effectiveness of the fission products barrier. (orig.)

  14. TRAC-PF1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light water reactors. The TRAC-PF1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. The code features either a one-dimensional or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals; a two-phase, two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field; flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment; optional reflood tracking capability for both bottom flood and falling-film quench fronts; and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. This report describes the thermal-hydraulic models and the numerical solution methods used in the code. Detailed programming and user information also are provided

  15. Station blackout core damage frequency in an advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though nuclear reactors are provided with protection systems so that they can be automatically shut down in the event of a station blackout, the consequences of this event can be severe. This is because many safety systems that are needed for removing residual heat from the core and for maintaining containment integrity, in the majority of the nuclear power plants, are AC dependent. In order to minimize core damage frequency, advanced reactor concepts are being developed with safety systems that use natural forces. This work shows an improvement in the safety of a small nuclear power reactor provided by a passive core residual heat removal system. Station blackout core melt frequencies, with and without this system, are both calculated. The results are also compared with available data in the literature. (author)

  16. Advanced heavy water reactor pressure tube-easy replaceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a 300 MWe vertical pressure tube type reactor. A coolant channel consists of pressure tube, made of Zr-2.5 % Nb, which is separated from cold calandria tube using garter spring spacers. The principal function of pressure tube is to support and locate the fuel assembly and allows light water coolant through fuel assembly by natural circulation. Since AHWR is designed for life of 100 years, it necessitates the replacement of pressure tubes during service life. Easy replaceability of pressure tube, along with surveillance requirements, has major bearing on the design of coolant channel assembly. The several systems and tools have been conceptualised to cater the needs for easy and quick replacement of a pressure tube during reactor shut down. This paper gives the highlights of the innovative design features of coolant channel, preliminary design and pre-requisites for replacement, and experimental programme for demonstration of easy replaceability. (author)

  17. Incorporating outage management principles into the advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States there are 110 light water reactor (LWR) plants currently in operation, with a total generating capacity of 102 580 MW(electric). These plants include 37 boiling water reactor (BWR) and 73 pressurized water reactor (PWR) units. Since 1980, more than 40 nuclear power plants have entered service in the United States. However, no new plants have been ordered by utilities and owners groups since 1978. There will come a time in the not-too-distant future that new, large electricity generating units will be needed to supply expected increases in base-load capacity. Will the new advanced LWR (ALWR) designs be able to pass muster and be chosen to help meet that need? With outage management at operating plants improving every year, what can the ALWR designs offer that has not already been incorporated?

  18. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a ''critical path'' for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain ''minimum'' levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial ''first step'' in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by

  19. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne Leland [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  20. Advances in process intensification through multifunctional reactor engineering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Miller, James Edward; O' Hern, Timothy John; Gill, Walter; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2011-02-01

    A multifunctional reactor is a chemical engineering device that exploits enhanced heat and mass transfer to promote production of a desired chemical, combining more than one unit operation in a single system. The main component of the reactor system under study here is a vertical column containing packing material through which liquid(s) and gas flow cocurrently downward. Under certain conditions, a range of hydrodynamic regimes can be achieved within the column that can either enhance or inhibit a desired chemical reaction. To study such reactors in a controlled laboratory environment, two experimental facilities were constructed at Sandia National Laboratories. One experiment, referred to as the Two-Phase Experiment, operates with two phases (air and water). The second experiment, referred to as the Three-Phase Experiment, operates with three phases (immiscible organic liquid and aqueous liquid, and nitrogen). This report describes the motivation, design, construction, operational hazards, and operation of the both of these experiments. Data and conclusions are included.

  1. Water chemistry features of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) being designed in India proposes to use Plutonium and Thorium as fuel. The objective is to extract energy from the uranium-233 formed from Thorium. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a heavy water moderated and light water cooled tube type boiling water reactor. It is a natural circulation reactor. Thus, it has got several advanced passive safety features built into the system. The various water coolant systems are listed below. i) Main Heat transport System ii) Feed water system iii) Condenser cooling system iv) Process water system and safety systems. As it is a tube type reactor, the radiolysis control differs from the normal boiling water reactor. The coolant enters the bottom of the coolant channel, boiling takes place and then the entire steam water mixture exits the core through the long tail pipes and reaches the moisture separator. Thus, there is a need to devise methods to protect the tail pipes from oxidizing water chemistry condition. Similarly, the moderator heavy water coolant chemistry differs from that of moderator system chemistry of PHWR. The reactivity worth per ppm of gadolinium and boron are low in comparison to PHWR. As a result, much higher concentration of neutron poison has to be added for planned shutdown, start up and for actuating SDS-2. The addition of higher concentration of neutron poison result in higher radiolytic production of deuterium and oxygen. Their recombination back to heavy water has to take into account the higher production of these gases. This paper also discusses the chemistry features of safety systems of AHWR. In addition, the presentation will cover the chemistry monitoring methodology to be implemented in AHWR. (author)

  2. Advanced-fuel reversed-field pinch reactor (RFPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utilization of deuterium-based fuels offers the potential advantages of greater flexibility in blanket design, significantly reduced tritium inventory, potential reduction in radioactivity level, and utilization of an inexhaustible fuel supply. The conventional DT-fueled Reversed-Field Pinch Reactor (RFPR) designs are reviewed, and the recent extension of these devices to advanced-fuel (catalyzed-DD) operation is presented. Attractive and economically competitive DD/RFPR systems are identified having power densities and plasma parameters comparable to the DT systems. Converting an RFP reactor from DT to DD primarily requires increasing the magnetic field levels a factor of two, still requiring only modest magnet coil fields (less than or equal to 4 T). When compared to the mainline tokamak, the unique advantages of the RFP (e.g., high beta, low fields at the coils, high ohmic-heating power densities, unrestricted aspect ratio) are particularly apparent for the utilization of advanced fuels

  3. Training reactor deployment. Advanced experimental course on designing new reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU) operating its training nuclear reactor VR1, in cooperation with the North West University of South Africa (NWU), is applying for accreditation of the experimental training course ''Advanced experimental course on designing the new reactor core'' that will guide the students, young nuclear engineering professionals, through designing, calculating, approval, and assembling a new nuclear reactor core. Students, young professionals from the South African nuclear industry, face the situation when a new nuclear reactor core is to be build from scratch. Several reactor core design options are pre-calculated. The selected design is re-calculated by the students, the result is then scrutinized by the regulator and, once all the analysis is approved, physical dismantling of the current core and assembling of the new core is done by the students, under a close supervision of the CTU staff. Finally the reactor is made critical with the new core. The presentation focuses on practical issues of such a course, desired reactor features and namely pedagogical and safety aspects. (orig.)

  4. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  5. Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Bull, Nora D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor s physical condition. In and near core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small, Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

  6. Halden Reactor Project Workshop: Understanding Advanced Instrumentation and Controls Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Halden Reactor Project Workshop on 'Understanding Advanced Instrumentation and Controls Issues' was held in Halden, Norway, during June 17-18, 1991. The objectives of the workshop were to (1) identify and prioritize the types of technical information that the Halden Project can produce to facilitate the development of man-machine interface guidelines and (2) to identify methods to effectively integrate and disseminate this information to signatory organizations. As a member of the Halden Reactor Project, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested the workshop. This request resulted from the NRC's need for human factors guidelines for the evaluation of advanced instrumentation and controls. The Halden Reactor Project is a cooperative agreement among several countries belonging to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The US began its association with the Halden Project in 1958 through the Atomic Energy Commission. The project's activities are centered at the Halden heavy-water reactor and its associated man-machine laboratory in Halden, Norway. The research program conducted at Halden consists of studies on fuel performance and computer-based man-machine interfaces

  7. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  8. Optimizing advanced liquid metal reactors for burning actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the process to design an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) for burning the transuranic part of nuclear waste is discussed. The influence of design parameters on ALMR burner performance is studied and the results are incorporated in a design schedule for optimizing ALMRs for burning transuranics. This schedule is used to design a metallic and an oxide fueled ALMR burner to burn as much as possible transurancis. The two designs burn equally well. (orig.)

  9. Formulation of a possible advanced reactor legislative strategy and proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of initiatives have been taken to date regarding the formulation of legislation to support in various ways the DOE advanced nuclear reactor program. Among the more prominent of these are bills that have been introduced by Sen. Johnston (D-La) and Rep. Udall (D-Az) as well as a draft bill put together by the nuclear industry and that could be introduced by Rep. Stallings (D-Id). These legislative initiatives are presented in this paper

  10. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was attended by 20 participants from 12 countries who reviewed and discussed the status and progress of national programmes on advanced water-cooled reactors and recommended to the Scientific Secretary a comprehensive programme for 1991/1992 which would support technology development programmes in IWGATWR Member States. This summary report outlines the activities of IWGATWR since its Second Meeting in June 1988 and main results of the Third Meeting

  11. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status of national programmes, the progress achieved since the last meeting held in June 1988 in the field of advanced technologies and design trends for existing and future water cooled reactors. 24 specialists from 14 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting and 12 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  13. International working group on gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-15

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information on safety and licensing aspects for gas-cooled reactors in order to provide comprehensive review of the present status and of directions for future applications and development. Contributions were made concerning the operating experience of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR Power Plant in the United States of America, the experimental power station Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany, and the CO/sub 2/-cooled reactors in the United Kingdom such as Hunterson B and Hinkley Point B. The experience gained at each of these reactors has proved the high safety potential of Gas-cooled Reactor Power Plants.

  14. The case for the gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although gas-cooling for fast reactors had been the subject of consideration since the early days of nuclear power, it was when the concept of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel turned into practical fact, that convincing arguments could be made to overcome safety objections. In terms of hardware, the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor can rely on existing and available technologies; as far as fuel is concerned, valuable information will be derived from the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor programme. The GCFR can be made very flexible; its capital cost will not exceed by more than 20% the one for reactor built at present on commercial scale; the overall economy of its fuel cycle is good. It could play an important role in the future breeder family

  15. Design and layout decisions for refuelling system of advanced fast neutron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience in operation of BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 power units, as well as development of refuelling systems for BN-800 power unit, allows developing of refuelling system for BN-1200 advanced reactor of new generation. The refuelling system was developed on the basis of possible technical decisions aimed at improvement of safety and technical-and-economic indices. Structural layout of BN-1200 reactor refuelling system is given. Main differences in BN-1200 reactor refuelling system as compared with BN-800 reactor are given. Design features of refuelling equipment are: - BN-1200 reactor has a split large rotating plug to allow transporting of its components by railway with subsequent assembling at site; - the refuelling box is fabricated in the form of sectional parallelepiped to allow transporting of its components by railway with subsequent assembling at site; - one 'direct' refuelling mechanism and one cantilever' refuelling mechanism are used to refuel rarely replaced protection assemblies that allows reducing of overall dimensions of rotating plugs; - the vertical elevator is arranged on the oval plug installed on the reactor cover. The upper structure with elevator drive rotates together with the elevator plug under rotary drive located on the oval plug. The vertical elevator allows sufficient reduction of refuelling box; - the refuelling machine runs on straight-line rails. The vertical elevator, gas gate valve on reactor refuelling channel, non-use of spent FA drum and enhanced radiation protection on the column of refuelling box machine allows reduction of specific materials consumption of BN-1200 reactor refuelling system by more than 10 times as compared with BN-800 reactor. To verify refuelling equipment operability the following experiments are planned: - mastering of gripper design for 'direct' refuelling mechanism and refuelling machine; - mastering of 'cantilever' for refuelling mechanism; - mastering of fresh FA conveyor design. As for the

  16. Fast reactor cover gas purification - The UK position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cover gas in the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) provides an inert gas blanket for both primary and secondary sodium circuits, ensures inert gas padding exists between the upper seals associated with penetrations through the reactor roof and provides argon to items of plant such as the control rods and the rotating shield and also to on line instruments such as the secondary circuit Katharometers. In order to meet these and other requirements purification of the argon cover gas is important to ensure: gas fed to purge gaps in the area of the magnetic hold device in the control rod mechanisms is not laden with sodium aerosols and reactive impurities (O2, H2) which could cause blocking both within the gaps and pipelines; gas phase detection systems which provide early warning of steam generator failures or oil ingress into the sodium are not affected by the presence of gaseous impurities such as H2, CO/CO2 and CH4; mass transfer processes involving both corrosion products and interstitial atoms cannot be sustained in the cover gas environment due to the presence of high levels of O2, N2 and carburising gases; background levels of radioactivity (eg Xe 133) are sufficiently low to enable gas phase detection of failed fuel pins, and the primary circuit gas blanket activity is sufficiently reduced so that discharges to the atmosphere are minimised. This paper describes how the PFR cover gas purification system is coping with these various items and how current thinking regarding the design of cover gas purification systems for a Civil Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR), where larger gas volumes and higher levels of radioactivity may be involved, is being guided by current experience on PFR. The paper also briefly review the experimental work planned to study aerosol and caesium behaviour in cove gas environments and discusses the behaviour of those impurities such as Zn, oil and N2 which are potentially damaging if certain levels are exceeded in operating plant

  17. ASME proceedings of the 32nd national heat transfer conference (HTD-Vol. 350). Volume 12: Fundamental experiment techniques in heat transfer; Thermal hydraulics of advanced nuclear reactors; Heat and mass transfer in supercritical liquid systems; Heat transfer in energy conversion; Heat transfer equipment; Heat transfer in gas turbine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains a portion of the over 240 ASME papers which were presented at the conference. For over 40 years, the National Heat Transfer Conference has been the premiere forum for the presentation and dissemination of the latest advances in heat transfer. The work contained in these volumes range from studies of fundamental phenomena to applications in the latest heat transfer equipment. Topics covered in this volume are: Fundamental experiment techniques in heat transfer; thermal hydraulics of advanced nuclear reactors; heat and mass transfer in supercritical fluid systems; heat transfer in energy conversion; heat transfer equipment; and heat transfer in gas turbine systems. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  18. Advancing the CANDU reactor: From generation to generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emphasizing safety, reliability and economics, the CANDU reactor development strategy is one of continuous improvement, offering value and assured support to customers worldwide. The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-1000) generation, designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), meets the new economic expectation for low-cost power generation with high capacity factors. The ACR is designed to meet customer needs for reduced capital cost, shorter construction schedule, high plant capacity factor, low operating cost, increased operating life, simple component replacement, enhanced safety features, and low environmental impact. The ACR-1000 design evolved from the internationally successful medium-sized pressure tube reactor (PTR) CANDU 6 and incorporates operational feedback from eight utilities that operate 31 CANDU units. This technical paper provides a brief description of the main features of the ACR-1000, and its major role in the development path of the generations of the pressure tube reactor concept. The motivation, philosophy and design approach being taken for future generation of CANDU pressure tube reactors are described

  19. The status of facilities at China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60 MW research reactor, so called China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR,) was built in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), located in the southwest of Beijing and about 37 kilometers away from the central city. CARR is a tank-in-pool inverse neutron trap type reactor using D2O reflector, the designed optimal undisturbed thermal neutron flux is 8×1014 n⋅cm-2⋅s-1. A liquid D2 cold source will be equipped and the installation will be finished at the end of 2015. As a multipurpose research reactor, its main applications include neutron scattering, neutron activation analysis, isotope production, silicon doping, fuel element test, fundamental nuclear physics and so on. On March 13rd, 2012 CARR realized the 72 h stable operation with the full power. And the official operation license is expected to be issued at the beginning of next year. Cooperating with the internal and international users in the first phase ten instruments complete construction and are under commissioning, which are High Resolution Powder Diffractometer, High Intensity Powder Diffractometer, Residual Stress Diffractometer, Texture Diffractometer, Four Circle Diffractometer, Reflectometer, Small Angle Neutron Scattering, two Thermal Triple Axis Spectrometers and Isotope Separator On-Line instrument . In the second phase 7 instruments were approved and are under construction now. Although the operation license was not issued, the reactor was permitted to do the testing run several times and some results were obtained during the instrument commissioning.

  20. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  1. Design Requirements of an Advanced HANARO Reactor Core Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced HANARO Reactor (AHR) is an open-tank-type and generates thermal power of 20 MW and is under conceptual design phase for developing it. The thermal power is including a core fission heat, a temporary stored fuel heat in the pool, a pump heat and a neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor. In order to remove the heat load, the reactor core cooling system is composed of a primary cooling system, a primary cooling water purification system and a reflector cooling system. The primary cooling system must remove the heat load including the core fission heat, the temporary stored fuel heat in the pool and the pump heat. The purification system must maintain the quality of the primary cooling water. And the reflector cooling system must remove the neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor and maintain the quality of the reflector. In this study, the design requirement of each system has been carried out using a design methodology of the HANARO within a permissible range of safety. And those requirements are written by english intend to use design data for exporting the research reactor

  2. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  3. FLUIDDYNAMIC ASPECTS OF GAS-PHASE ETHYLENE POLYMERIZATION REACTOR DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    R. Guardani; A.C.S.C. Teixeira; E.L. Casella

    1998-01-01

    The relative importance of design variables affecting the fluiddynamic behavior of a fluidized bed reactor for the gas-phase ethylene polymerization is discussed, based on mathematical modeling. The three-phase bubbling fluidized bed model is based on axially distributed properties for the bubble, cloud and emulsion phases, combined with correlations for population balance and entrainment. Under the operating conditions adopted in most industrial processes, the reactor performance is affected...

  4. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  5. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  6. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in

  7. Coupled CFD - system-code simulation of a gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yizhou; Rizwan-uddin, E-mail: yizhou.yan@shawgrp.com, E-mail: rizwan@illinois.edu [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL(United States)

    2011-07-01

    A generic coupled CFD - system-code thermal hydraulic simulation approach was developed based on FLUENT and RELAP-3D, and applied to LWRs. The flexibility of the coupling methodology enables its application to advanced nuclear energy systems. Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is a Gen IV reactor design which can benefit from this innovative coupled simulation approach. Mixing in the lower plenum of the GT-MHR is investigated here using the CFD - system-code coupled simulation tool. Results of coupled simulations are presented and discussed. The potential of the coupled CFD - system-code approach for next generation of nuclear power plants is demonstrated. (author)

  8. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR): long term program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FY 1980 effort was to investigate four technology options identified by program participants as potentially viable candidates for near-term demonstration: the Gas Turbine system (HTGR-GT), reflecting its perceived compatibility with the dry-cooling market, two systems addressing the process heat market, the Reforming (HTGR-R) and Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC) systems, and a more developmental reactor system, The Nuclear Heat Source Demonstration Reactor (NHSDR), which was to serve as a basis for both the HTGR-GT and HTGR-R systems as well as the further potential for developing advanced applications such as steam-coal gasification and water splitting

  9. Capital cost: gas cooled fast reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The results of an investment cost study for a 900 MW(e) GCFR central station power plant are presented. The capital cost estimate arrived at is based on 1976 prices and a conceptual design only, not a mature reactor design.

  10. Capital cost: gas cooled fast reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an investment cost study for a 900 MW(e) GCFR central station power plant are presented. The capital cost estimate arrived at is based on 1976 prices and a conceptual design only, not a mature reactor design

  11. Design requirements, operation and maintenance of gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the invitation of the Government of the USA the Technical Committee Meeting on Design Requirements, Operation and Maintenance of Gas-Cooled Reactors, was held in San Diego on September 21-23, 1988, in tandem with the GCRA Conference. Both meetings attracted a large contingent of foreign participants. Approximately 100 delegates from 18 different countries participated in the Technical Committee meeting. The meeting was divided into three sessions: Gas-cooled reactor user requirement (8 papers); Gas-cooled reactor improvements to facilitate operation and maintenance (10 papers) and Safety, environmental impacts and waste disposal (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 23 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Design study on gas turbine high temperature reactor (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been conducting the design study of an original design concept of gas turbine high temperature reactor, the GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The GTHTR300 is a greatly simplified HTGR-GT plant that leads to substantially reduced technical and cost requirements for earlier technology deployment. Also, it is expected to be an efficient and economically competitive reactor in 2010s due to newly proposed design features such as core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design. In addition, a preliminary cost evaluation proved that the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  14. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  15. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP) and the

  16. Technology of steam generators for gas-cooled reactors. Proceedings of a specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of the IAEA in the field of the technology of gas-cooled reactors was formalized by formation of an International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (IWGCR). The gas cooled reactor program considered by the IWGCR includes carbon-dioxide-cooled thermal reactors, helium cooled thermal high temperature reactors for power generation and for process heat applications and gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report covers the papers dealing with operating experience, steam generators for next generation of gas-cooled reactors, material development and corrosion problems, and thermohydraulics

  17. Achievements and prospects for advanced reactor design and fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The future of Nuclear Energy relies on the complementary optimization of reactors for NPPs and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. This is an apparent contradiction if we look in the so large effort made worldwide for developing advance reactors for power plants alone. The vision that focus the optimization effort in reactors and in the other side and separated in the associated fuel cycle jeopardizes the final results of an optimized nuclear system. The control of the primary source of energy is a key question and the technology involved and its control the main issue to be considered when the evaluation of advanced nuclear systems are under consideration. However the main reason of this situation is that reactors for NPP is still been costly, inefficient compared with other energy converters and increasingly complex to accomplish safety requirements. The maturity of nuclear technology and the present NPP are the background for the evolutionary concepts of reactors while the response to economy, safety, waste generation and management and proliferation resistance are the drivers for innovative concepts. Most traditional technology holders and NPP vendors have evolutionary LWR and HWR systems and participate directly or indirectly in innovative projects for future applications including fast reactors. EPR, AP 1000, KSNP, ABWR, WWER-600, ACR-700 and AHWR are examples of this fact. Example of continuous effort in fast reactors development are MONJU reactor, CEFR, FBTR and the emblematic Superphenix. Both reactors and nuclear fuel cycles should evolve throughout a breakthrough process if the energy demand mainly becomes large in developing countries. This may require a different approach that the one that drives the past 50 years mainly because the modules should be optimized for quite different electricity markets. Small and Medium Power Reactors like SMART, CAREM, IRIS, PBMR and HTGRs, enrichment processes optimized to be economics for small capacity production

  18. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  19. Gas-cooled reactor safety and accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Specialists' Meeting on Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety and Accident Analysis was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Oak Ridge on the invitation of the Department of Energy in Washington, USA. The meeting was hosted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an opportunity to compare and discuss results of safety and accident analysis of gas-cooled reactors under development, construction or in operation, to review their lay-out, design, and their operational performance, and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting emphasized the high safety margins of gas-cooled reactors and gave particular attention to the inherent safety features of small reactor units. The meeting was subdivided into four technical sessions: Safety and Related Experience with Operating Gas-Cooled Reactors (4 papers); Risk and Safety Analysis (11 papers); Accident Analysis (9 papers); Miscellaneous Related Topics (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  20. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  1. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  2. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-09-01

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850ºC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

  3. Application of Hastelloy X in Gas-Cooled Reactor Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkman, C. R.; Rittenhouse, P. L.; Corwin, W.R.;

    1976-01-01

    Hastelloy X, an Ni--Cr--Fe--Mo alloy, may be an important structural alloy for components of gas-cooled reactor systems. Expected applications of this alloy in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) are discussed, and the development of interim mechanical properties and supporting data...... extensive amount of information has been generated on this material at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and elsewhere concerning behavior in air, which is reviewed. However, only limited data are available from tests conducted in helium. Comparisons of the fatigue and subcritical growth behavior in air between...... Hastelloy X and a number of other structural alloys are given....

  4. Advanced reactor design and safety objectives. The heavy water reactor perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development objectives of advanced heavy water reactors (AHWRs) should be guided by the requirements of the operating utilities. The paper provides a summary of the major requirements for future nuclear reactors from CANDU operating station owners based on the various studies and plans prepared. Most of the specific technical requirements for AHWR systems are based on systematic reviews of current operating CANDU stations. Hence these requirements represent those for the evolutionary development of AHWR systems, factoring in the considerable operating experiences of the CANDU stations. The requirements for the new HWR designs can be summarized under economic objectives, safety objectives, operational objectives and other utility requirements. 2 refs

  5. Qualification of the reactor physics toolset for the design and analysis of the advanced CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualification of reactor physics toolset for Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) applications is described in this paper. The qualification process follows AECL standard code validation methodology. The ACR nuclear design incorporates certain features that challenge the physics code-suite capabilities. The physics codes were first assessed, and development work required to meet these challenges was undertaken. A Validation Matrix Document was prepared to identify the physics phenomena that could arise during postulated accident events, and specify the experimental data required for code validation. Key issues related to physics modelling and code validation are also discussed. (author)

  6. Present status of research and development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors has very important significance for the energy policy of Japan to diversify energy sources and stably ensure energy. The development has been advanced since 1969 by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, but in the 'Long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization' of June, 1987, as high temperature engineering test and research, it was decided to construct a High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). According to this policy, JAERI carried out the detailed design and safety analysis of the HTTR with 30 MWt output and reactor exit coolant temperature of 950degC. The application for the permission to construct the HTTR in Oarai Research Establishment was made in February, 1989, and it is expected to begin the construction in 1990. The period of the construction requires about 5 years, and the criticality is scheduled in 1995. In JAERI, the high temperature engineering test and research including the utilization of the HTTR and the heightening of temperature in high temperature gas-cooled reactors are promoted. The trend of development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors in foreign countries and the research activities in JAERI are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Edward

    2014-03-31

    The objective of the Cummins ARES program, in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE), is to develop advanced natural gas engine technologies that increase engine system efficiency at lower emissions levels while attaining lower cost of ownership. The goals of the project are to demonstrate engine system achieving 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTE) in three phases, 44%, 47% and 50% (starting baseline efficiency at 36% BTE) and 0.1 g/bhp-hr NOx system out emissions (starting baseline NOx emissions at 2 – 4 g/bhp-hr NOx). Primary path towards above goals include high Brake Mean Effective Pressure (BMEP), improved closed cycle efficiency, increased air handling efficiency and optimized engine subsystems. Cummins has successfully demonstrated each of the phases of this program. All targets have been achieved through application of a combined set of advanced base engine technologies and Waste Heat Recovery from Charge Air and Exhaust streams, optimized and validated on the demonstration engine and other large engines. The following architectures were selected for each Phase: Phase 1: Lean Burn Spark Ignited (SI) Key Technologies: High Efficiency Turbocharging, Higher Efficiency Combustion System. In production on the 60/91L engines. Over 500MW of ARES Phase 1 technology has been sold. Phase 2: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) System Key Technologies: Advanced Ignition System, Combustion Improvement, Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Base engine technologies intended for production within 2 to 3 years Phase 3: Lean Burn Technology with Exhaust and Charge Air Waste Heat Recovery System Key Technologies: Lower Friction, New Cylinder Head Designs, Improved Integrated Waste Heat Recovery System. Intended for production within 5 to 6 years Cummins is committed to the launch of next generation of large advanced NG engines based on ARES technology to be commercialized worldwide.

  8. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  9. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors

  10. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer’s physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user’s technical needs. The current NSUF partners are

  11. Advanced High-Temperature Reactor for Production of Electricity and Hydrogen: Molten-Salt-Coolant, Graphite-Coated-Particle-Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is to provide the very high temperatures necessary to enable low-cost (1) efficient thermochemical production of hydrogen and (2) efficient production of electricity. The proposed AHTR uses coated-particle graphite fuel similar to the fuel used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs), such as the General Atomics gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR). However, unlike the MHTGRs, the AHTR uses a molten salt coolant with a pool configuration, similar to that of the PRISM liquid metal reactor. A multi-reheat helium Brayton (gas-turbine) cycle, with efficiencies >50%, is used to produce electricity. This approach (1) minimizes requirements for new technology development and (2) results in an advanced reactor concept that operates at essentially ambient pressures and at very high temperatures. The low-pressure molten-salt coolant, with its high heat capacity and natural circulation heat transfer capability, creates the potential for (1) exceptionally robust safety (including passive decay-heat removal) and (2) allows scaling to large reactor sizes [∼1000 Mw(e)] with passive safety systems to provide the potential for improved economics

  12. Numerical study on seismic response of the reactor coolant pump in Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • An artificial accelerogram of the specified SSE is generated. • A dynamic FE model of the RCP in AP1000 (with gyroscopic and FSI effects) is developed. • The displacement, force, moment and stress in the RCP during the earthquake are summarized. - Abstract: The reactor coolant pump in the Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor is a kind of nuclear canned-motor pump. The pump is classified as Seismic Category I, which must function normally during the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. When the nuclear power plant is located in seismically active region, the seismic response of the reactor coolant pump may become very important for the safety assessment of the whole nuclear power plant. In this article, an artificial accelerogram is generated. The response spectrum of the artificial accelerogram fits well with the design acceleration spectrum of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. By applying the finite element modeling method, the dynamic finite element models of the rotor and stator in the reactor coolant pump are created separately. The rotor and stator are coupled by the journal bearings and the annular flow between the rotor and stator. Then the whole dynamic model of the reactor coolant pump is developed. Time domain analysis which uses the improved state-space Newmark method of a direct time integration scheme is carried out to investigate the response of the reactor coolant pump under the horizontal seismic load. The results show that the reactor coolant pump responds differently in the direction of the seismic load and in the perpendicular direction. During the Safe Shutdown Earthquake, the displacement response, the shear force, the moment and the journal bearing reaction forces in the reactor coolant pump are analyzed

  13. Numerical study on seismic response of the reactor coolant pump in Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Cheng, E-mail: 0100209064@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhen-Qiang, Yao, E-mail: zqyaosjtu@gmail.com; Ya-bo, Xue; Hong, Shen

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • An artificial accelerogram of the specified SSE is generated. • A dynamic FE model of the RCP in AP1000 (with gyroscopic and FSI effects) is developed. • The displacement, force, moment and stress in the RCP during the earthquake are summarized. - Abstract: The reactor coolant pump in the Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor is a kind of nuclear canned-motor pump. The pump is classified as Seismic Category I, which must function normally during the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. When the nuclear power plant is located in seismically active region, the seismic response of the reactor coolant pump may become very important for the safety assessment of the whole nuclear power plant. In this article, an artificial accelerogram is generated. The response spectrum of the artificial accelerogram fits well with the design acceleration spectrum of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. By applying the finite element modeling method, the dynamic finite element models of the rotor and stator in the reactor coolant pump are created separately. The rotor and stator are coupled by the journal bearings and the annular flow between the rotor and stator. Then the whole dynamic model of the reactor coolant pump is developed. Time domain analysis which uses the improved state-space Newmark method of a direct time integration scheme is carried out to investigate the response of the reactor coolant pump under the horizontal seismic load. The results show that the reactor coolant pump responds differently in the direction of the seismic load and in the perpendicular direction. During the Safe Shutdown Earthquake, the displacement response, the shear force, the moment and the journal bearing reaction forces in the reactor coolant pump are analyzed.

  14. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  15. Feasibility study of advanced fuel burning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been conducted to determine both physics, engineering and economic aspects of fusion power reactors based on magnetic confinement and on burning advanced fuels (AFs). DT burning Tokamaks are taken as reference concept. We show that the attractive features of advanced fuels, in particular of neutronlean proton-based AFs, can be combined, in appropriately designed AF reactors (high beta), with power densities comparable to or even higher than those achievable in DT Tokamaks. Moreover we identify physical requirements which would assure Q values well above unity. As an example a semi-open confinement scheme is analyzed based on a self-consistent plasma calculation. We find that a mirror, even if only ''semi-open'' as a result of strong diamagnetism, can barely be expected to achieve high Q values. Therefore confinement schemes such as compact tori, multipole surmacs etc. may be required to burn AFs. We conclude that the economics of AF reactors, as determined by the nuclear boiler power density, may be superior to that of DT-rectors if low recirculating power fractions can be obtained by appropriate plasma tayloring (high fractional transfer of fusion power to ions required). A more detailed investigation is suggested for proton-based fuel cycles. (orig.)

  16. Cermet-fueled reactors for advanced space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermet-fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high-performance advanced space power systems. The cermet consists of a hexagonal matrix of a refractory metal and a ceramic fuel, with multiple tubular flow channels. The high performance characteristics of the fuel matrix come from its high strength at elevated temperatures and its high thermal conductivity. The cermet fuel concept evolved in the 1960s with the objective of developing a reactor design that could be used for a wide range of mobile power generating sytems, including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests for the cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric as part of the 710 Project (General Electric 1966), and by Argonne National Laboratory in the Direct Nuclear Rocket Program (1965). Development programs for cermet fuel are currently under way at Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The high temperature qualification tests from the 1960s have provided a base for the incorporation of cermet fuel in advanced space applications. The status of the cermet fuel development activities and descriptions of the key features of the cermet-fueled reactor design are summarized in this paper

  17. Enhanced in-pile instrumentation at the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and realtime flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted. (authors)

  18. Enhanced In-Pile Instrumentation at the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and real-time flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted.

  19. Core configuration of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device is examined, assuming the compound LiAlO2 as the tritium-producing material. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300 MWe nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations are carried out. To load sufficient Li into the core, LiAlO2 is loaded into the removable reflectors that surround the ring-shaped fuel blocks in addition to the burnable poison insertion holes. It is shown that module high-temperature gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW can produce almost 8 kg of tritium in a year

  20. Specialists' meeting on fast reactor cover gas purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tentative agenda was adopted by the participants without comment and was followed throughout the meeting. The following topics were discussed at the subsequent sessions of the meeting on 'Fast Reactor Cover Gas Purification': National Position Papers; Impurities: Sources and Measurement; Cover Gas Purification Techniques; Sodium Aerosol Trapping; Radiological Considerations. Based on the papers presented and the discussions following, session summaries and conclusions were prepared and are included in this report

  1. Role of fission gas release in reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of fission gases from oxide pellets to the fuel rod internal voidage (gap) is reviewed with regard to the required safety analysis in reactor licensing. Significant analyzed effects are described, prominent gas release models are reviewed, and various methods used in the licensing process are summarized. The report thus serves as a guide to a large body of literature including company reports and government documents. A discussion of the state of the art of gas release analysis is presented

  2. Development and Application of Subchannel Analysis Code Technology for Advanced Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been performed for the development and assessment of a subchannel analysis code which is purposed to be used for the analysis of advanced reactor conditions with various configurations of reactor core and several kinds of reactor coolant fluids. The subchannel analysis code was developed on the basis of MATRA code which is being developed at KAERI. A GUI (Graphic User Interface) system was adopted in order to reduce input error and to enhance user convenience. The subchannel code was complemented in the property calculation modules by including various fluids such as heavy liquid metal, gas, refrigerant,and supercritical water. The subchannel code was applied to calculate the local thermal hydraulic conditions inside the non-square test bundles which was employed for the analysis of CHF. The applicability of the subchannel code was evaluated for a high temperature gas cooled reactor condition and supercritical pressure conditions with water and Freon. A subchannel analysis has been conducted for European ADS(Accelerator-Driven subcritical System) with Pb-Bi coolant through the international cooperation work between KAERI and FZK, Germany. In addition, the prediction capability of the subchannel code was evaluated for the subchannel void distribution data by participating an international code benchmark program which was organized by OECD/NRC

  3. Development and Application of Subchannel Analysis Code Technology for Advanced Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, K. W

    2006-01-15

    A study has been performed for the development and assessment of a subchannel analysis code which is purposed to be used for the analysis of advanced reactor conditions with various configurations of reactor core and several kinds of reactor coolant fluids. The subchannel analysis code was developed on the basis of MATRA code which is being developed at KAERI. A GUI (Graphic User Interface) system was adopted in order to reduce input error and to enhance user convenience. The subchannel code was complemented in the property calculation modules by including various fluids such as heavy liquid metal, gas, refrigerant,and supercritical water. The subchannel code was applied to calculate the local thermal hydraulic conditions inside the non-square test bundles which was employed for the analysis of CHF. The applicability of the subchannel code was evaluated for a high temperature gas cooled reactor condition and supercritical pressure conditions with water and Freon. A subchannel analysis has been conducted for European ADS(Accelerator-Driven subcritical System) with Pb-Bi coolant through the international cooperation work between KAERI and FZK, Germany. In addition, the prediction capability of the subchannel code was evaluated for the subchannel void distribution data by participating an international code benchmark program which was organized by OECD/NRC.

  4. Thermal hydraulic studies for passive heat transport systems relevant to advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear is the only non-green house gas generating power source that can replace fossil fuels and can be commercially deployed in large scale. However, the enormous developmental efforts and safety upgrades during the past six decades have somewhat eroded the economic competitiveness of water-cooled reactors which form the mainstay of the current nuclear power programme. Further, the introduction of the supercritical Rankine cycle and the gas turbine based advanced fuel cycles have enhanced the efficiency of fossil fired power plants (FPP) thereby reducing its greenhouse gas emissions. The ongoing development of ultra-supercritical and advanced ultra-supercritical turbines aims to further reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and economic competitiveness of FPPs. In the backdrop of these developments, the nuclear industry also initiated development of advanced nuclear power plants (NPP) with improved efficiency, sustainability and enhanced safety as the main goals. A review of the advanced reactor concepts being investigated currently reveals that excepting the SCWR, all other concepts use coolants other than water. The coolants used are lead, lead bismuth eutectic, liquid sodium, molten salts, helium and supercritical water. Besides, some of these are employing passive systems to transport heat from the core under normal operating conditions. In view of this, a study is in progress at BARC to examine the performance of simple passive systems using SC CO2, SCW, LBE and molten salts as the coolant. This paper deals with some of the recent results of these studies. The study focuses on the steady state, transient and stability behaviour of the passive systems with these coolants. (author)

  5. Development and assessment of advanced reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced core protection system for a pressurized water reactor, Reactor Core Protection System (RCOPS), was developed by adopting a high performance hardware platform and optimal system configuration. The functional algorithms of the core protection system were also improved to enhance the plant availability by reducing unnecessary reactor trips and increasing operational margin. The RCOPS consists of four independent safety channels providing a two-out-of-four trip logic. The reliability analysis using the reliability block diagram method showed the unavailability of the RCOPS to be lower than the conventional system. The failure mode and effects analysis demonstrated that the RCOPS does not lose its intended safety functions for most failures. New algorithms for the RCOPS functional design were implemented in order to avoid unnecessary reactor trips by providing auxiliary pre-trip alarms and signal validation logic for the control rod position. The new algorithms in the RCOPS were verified by comparing the RCOPS calculations with reference results. The new thermal margin algorithm for the RCOPS was expected to increase the operational margin to the limit for Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) by approximately 1%. (author)

  6. The advanced liquid metal reactor actinide recycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current U.S. National Energy Strategy includes four key goals for nuclear policy: enhance safety and design standards, reduce economic risk, reduce regulatory risk, and establish an effective high-level nuclear waste program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Actinide Recycle System is consistent with these objectives. The system has the ability to fulfill multiple missions with the same basic design concept. In addition to providing an option for long-term energy security, the system can be effectively utilized for recycling of actinides in light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel, provide waste management flexibility, including the reduction in the waste quantity and storage time and utilization of the available energy potential of LWR spent fuel. The actinide recycle system is comprised of (1) a compact liquid metal (sodium) cooled reactor system with optimized passive safety characteristics, and (2) pyrometallurgical metal fuel cycle presently under development of Argonne National Laboratory. The waste reduction of LWR spent fuel is accomplished by transmutation or fissioning of the longer-lived transuranic isotopes to shorter-lived fission products in the reactor. In this presentation the economical and environmental incentive of the actinide recycle system is addressed and the status of development including licensing aspects is described. 3 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  7. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  8. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellarators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transport behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  9. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellerators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transort behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  10. The search for advanced remote technology in fast reactor reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development in fast reactor reprocessing has been under way ∼ 20 yr in several countries. During the past decade, France and the United Kingdom have developed active programs in breeder reprocessing. Actual fuels from their demonstration reactors have been reprocessed in small-scale facilities. Early US work in breeder reprocessing was carried out at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) facilities with the early metal fuels, and interest has renewed recently in metal fuels. A major, comprehensive program, focused on oxide fuels, has been carried out in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1974. The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and Japan have also carried out development programs in breeder reprocessing, and Japan appears committed to major demonstration of breeder reactors and their fuel cycles. While much of the effort in these programs addressed process chemistry and process hardware, a significant element of many of these programs, particularly the CFRP, has been on advancements in facility concepts and remote maintenance features. This paper focuses on the search for improved facility concepts and better maintenance systems in the CFRP, and, in turn, on how developments at ORNL have influenced the technology elsewhere

  11. Balanced Design of Safety Systems of CAREM Advanced Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Plants must meet the performance that the market and the population demand in order to be part of the electricity supply industry.It is related mainly with the results of reactor's economy and safety.New advances in the methodology developed for reactor economic optimization analyzing its safety at an early engineering stage, aiming at balancing these important features of the design, are presented in this work.In particular, the coupling that appears when dimensioning the Emergency Injection System, the Residual Heat Removal System and the containment height of CAREM reactor is described.The new models appended to the computer code that embodies the methodology to balance de designs are shown.Finally the results obtained with the optimizations when applying it are presented.Furthermore, a criterion to establish the maximal diameter for acceptable breaks in RPV's penetrations arises from this work.The application of the methodology and the computer code developed turns out to prove the advantages they provide to reactor design so that the plants are properly balanced and optimized

  12. Advances in the ACR-1000 reactor regulating system and reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the control of the ACR-1000 reactor are presented. The ACR-1000 Reactor Regulating System's (RRS) capability to maintain reactor power at its set point, counteract zonal power deviations, initiate setback as required, and effectively control operational maneuvers including power load-cycling is demonstrated. Three fast core transients and a long Load Cycling transient are presented. For simulations of the fast transients a dynamic RRS Simulation Package (RRS-SP) was developed, where the core neutron kinetics calculations (*CERBERUS module of RFSP) were coupled to a thermal hydraulic code (CATHENA) at every time step. A quasi-static approach was used to demonstrate the RRS performance in the Load Cycling transient that covers five consecutive daily cycles followed by a 2-day weekend cycle. (author)

  13. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft(trademark) Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway

  14. Advances in safety engineering for LWR type reactors (retrofitting, re-engineering, EPR, SWR 1000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper summarizes the activities of the Siemens company in the field of advanced LWR type reactor engineering and the company's commitments in international projects for the retrofitting and engineered safety improvements of reactor stations in countries of the former Soviet Union. The advances in reactor engineering and the novel design concepts are explained. (orig./CB)

  15. Replacement of the Advanced Test Reactor control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control room for the Advanced Test Reactor has been replaced to provide modern equipment utilizing current standards and meeting the current human factors requirements. The control room was designed in the early 1960 era and had not been significantly upgraded since the initial installation. The replacement did not change any of the safety circuits or equipment but did result in replacement of some of the recorders that display information from the safety systems. The replacement was completed in concert with the replacement of the control room simulator which provided important feedback on the design. The design successfully incorporates computer-based systems into the display of the plant variables. This improved design provides the operator with more information in a more usable form than was provided by the original design. The replacement was successfully completed within the scheduled time thereby minimizing the down time for the reactor

  16. ALWR - VTT's technology programme on advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1998, VTT Energy launched a four year research programme 'Advanced Light Water Reactors' (ALWR). The research programme strives to intensify co operation between different Finnish organisations as well as to make better use of international R and D efforts on ALWR concepts. Some projects of the programme focus on use of new computational tools for the design and safety analysis of ALWRs. Improved computer simulation methods and models are necessary for the analysis of passive safety systems. Some projects address development and assessment of new technical solutions in ALWR. The projects are carried out in close co operation with the Finnish power companies and are often part of reactor vendors international development programmes. Another key element of the programme is training of new nuclear experts and providing possibilities for continuing education of the current staff. (author)

  17. Advanced Space Nuclear Reactors from Fiction to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    The advanced nuclear power sources are used in a large variety of science fiction movies and novels, but their practical development is, still, in its early conceptual stages, some of the ideas being confirmed by collateral experiments. The novel reactor concept uses the direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, has electronic control of reactivity, being surrounded by a transmutation blanket and very thin shielding being small and light that at its very limit may be suitable to power an autonomously flying car. It also provides an improved fuel cycle producing minimal negative impact to environment. The key elements started to lose the fiction attributes, becoming viable actual concepts and goals for the developments to come, and on the possibility to achieve these objectives started to become more real because the theory shows that using the novel nano-technologies this novel reactor might be achievable in less than a century.

  18. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Kim, H. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, J. S.; Ryu, J. S

    2004-12-01

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system.

  19. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system

  20. Reactor core of a gas-cooled high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to increase the outlet temperature of the coolant (helium) leaving the reactor core of a gas-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor and thereby to improve its thermal efficiency there is proposed to design the geometry of the fuel elements or the fuel element units and/or their main dimensions non-uniformly. Those fuel elements whose geometry causes a larger pressure drop of the coolant gas are to be arranged towards the outlet side of the hot coolant. (GL) 891 GL/GL 892 MKO

  1. Method of suppressing burnable gas connection in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reduce the burnable gas concentration and improve the safety by suppressing the amount of evolved gaseous hydrogen and oxygen with no requirement for complicate and large-scaled devices. Method: Suppression burnable gas concentration in nuclear reactor has usually been conducted by an indirect method of recombining gaseous hydrogen and oxygen evolved, not by suppressing the amount of evolved gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen as burnable gases. Accordingly, there has been a problem, in view of the safety, such as passage of gaseous hydrogen and gaseous oxygen once in the reactor containers, etc. and there has been also a trend that the reactor system of the device is complicated in the structure and increased in the size. In view of the above, material combining iodine ions are charged into coolants to reduce iodine ion concentration therein and suppress the generation of burnable gases due to radiolysis of the coolants in this method. (T.M.)

  2. Gas-phase photocatalysis in μ-reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Chorkendorff, Ib; Hansen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase photocatalysis experiments may benefit from the high sensitivity and good time response in product detection offered by μ-reactors. We demonstrate this by carrying out CO oxidation and methanol oxidation over commercial TiO2 photocatalysts in our recently developed high...

  3. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark and...

  4. Control rod drive for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DengJun-Xian; XuJi-Ming; 等

    1998-01-01

    This control rod drive is developed for HTR-10 high temperature gas cooled test reactor.The stepmotor is prefered to improve positioning of the control rod and the scram behavior.The preliminary test in 1600170 ambient temperature shows that the selected stepmotor and transmission system can meet the main operation function requirements of HTR-10.

  5. IAEA activities in Gas-cooled Reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the charter to ''foster the exchange of scientific and technical information'', and ''encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world''. This paper describes the Agency's activities in Gas-cooled Reactor (GCR) technology development

  6. IAEA activities in gas-cooled reactor technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the charter to ''foster the exchange of scientific and technical information'', and ''encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world''. This paper describes the Agency's activities in Gas-cooled Reactor (GCR) technology development

  7. Design of the reactor vessel inspection robot for the advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in an advanced nuclear reactor. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a mock non-hostile environment and shown to perform as expected, as detailed in this report

  8. Engineered Materials for Advanced Gas Turbine Engine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop innovative composite powders and composites that will surpass the properties of currently identified materials for advanced gas turbine...

  9. Evolutionary/advanced light water reactor data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition is examining options for placing fissile materials that were produced for fabrication of weapons, and now are deemed to be surplus, into a condition that is substantially irreversible and makes its use in weapons inherently more difficult. The principal fissile materials subject to this disposition activity are plutonium and uranium containing substantial fractions of plutonium-239 uranium-235. The data in this report, prepared as technical input to the fissile material disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) deal only with the disposition of plutonium that contains well over 80% plutonium-239. In fact, the data were developed on the basis of weapon-grade plutonium which contains, typically, 93.6% plutonium-239 and 5.9% plutonium-240 as the principal isotopes. One of the options for disposition of weapon-grade plutonium being considered is the power reactor alternative. Plutonium would be fabricated into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and fissioned (''burned'') in a reactor to produce electric power. The MOX fuel will contain dioxides of uranium and plutonium with less than 7% weapon-grade plutonium and uranium that has about 0.2% uranium-235. The disposition mission could, for example, be carried out in existing power reactors, of which there are over 100 in the United States. Alternatively, new LWRs could be constructed especially for disposition of plutonium. These would be of the latest US design(s) incorporating numerous design simplifications and safety enhancements. These ''evolutionary'' or ''advanced'' designs would offer not only technological advances, but also flexibility in siting and the option of either government or private (e.g., utility) ownership. The new reactor designs can accommodate somewhat higher plutonium throughputs. This data report deals solely with the ''evolutionary'' LWR alternative

  10. Potential for new societal contributions from the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is to study the effects of intense radiation on materials and fuels and to produce radioisotopes for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for government and commercial applications. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential benefits to society from these available neutrons. The ATR is a 250-MW(thermal) light water reactor highly enriched uranium in plate-type fuel. The ATR uses a combination of hafnium control drums and shim rods to adjust power and hold flux distortion to a minimum. The different quadrants of the ATR can be operated at different power levels to meet a variety of mission requirements. Irradiation positions are available at various locations throughout the core and beryllium reflector. A summary of the flux levels at various ATR reflector and loop positions. is given. These fluxes are maintained with a relatively constant axial flux profile throughout cycles that last 35 to 42 days. These neutrons can be used for testing and irradiation programs that support commercial reactor license extension, advanced fuel development, materials effects studies, failure cause/effect studies, coolant chemistry evaluations, prototype testing programs, isotope production, and basic research. Radioisotope production falls into three categories: medical, industrial, and research. In summary, the ATR is a unique, high-power test reactor capable of supporting the current DOE mission and producing radioisotopes. Space available for radioisotope production and fuels or materials testing will increase by 44% in 1994, improving DOE's ability to support national needs in health care, industry, and research

  11. Fast reactor primary cover gas system proposals for CDFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary sodium gas cover has been designed for CDFR, it comprises plant to maintain and control; cover gas pressure for all reactor operating at fault conditions, cover gas purity by both blowdown and by a special clean-up facility and the clean argon supply for the failed fuel detection system and the primary pump seal purge. The design philosophy is to devise a cover gas system that can be specified for any LMFBR where only features like vessel and pipework size need to be altered to suit different design and operating conditions. The choice of full power and shutdown operating pressures is derived and the method chosen to control these values is described. A part active/part passive system is proposed for this duty, a surge volume of 250 m3 gives passive control between full power and hot shutdown. Pressure control operation criteria is presented for various reactor operating conditions. A design for a sodium aerosol filter, based on that used on PFR is presented, it is specifically designed so that it can be fitted with an etched disc type particulate filter and maintenance is minimised. Two methods that maintain cover gas purity are described. The first, used during normal reactor operation with a small impurities ingress, utilises the continuous blowdown associated with the inevitable clean argon purge through the various reactor component seals. The second method physically removes the impurities xenon and krypton from the cover gas by their adsorption, at cryogenic temperature, onto a bed of activated carbon. The equipment required for these two duties and their mode of operation is described with the aid of a system flow diagram. The primary pump seals requires a gas purge to suppress aerosol migration. A system where the argon used for this task is recirculated and partially purified is described. (author)

  12. Pre-licensing of the Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) developed the Advanced CANDU Reactor-700 (ACR-700) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. As further advancement of the ACR design, AECL is currently developing the ACR-1000 for the Canadian and international market. The ACR-1000 is aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current generation of operating nuclear plants, while achieving shorter construction schedule, high plant capacity factor, improved operations and maintenance, increased operating life, and enhanced safety features. The reference ACR-1000 plant design is based on an integrated two-unit plant, using enriched fuel and light-water coolant, with each unit having a nominal gross electrical output of 1165 MWe. The ACR-1000 design has evolved from AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the experience and feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The CANDU system is ideally suited to this evolutionary approach since the modular fuel channel reactor design can be modified, through a series of incremental changes in the reactor core design, to increase the power output and improve the overall safety, economics, and performance. The safety enhancements made in ACR-1000 encompass improved safety margins, performance and reliability of safety related systems. In particular, the use of the CANFLEX-ACR fuel bundle, with lower linear rating and higher critical heat flux, provides increased operating and safety margins. Safety features draw from those of the existing CANDU plants (e.g., the two

  13. Metal fires and their implications for advanced reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Figueroa, Victor G.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Hewson, John C.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-10-01

    This report details the primary results of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project (LDRD 08-0857) Metal Fires and Their Implications for Advance Reactors. Advanced reactors may employ liquid metal coolants, typically sodium, because of their many desirable qualities. This project addressed some of the significant challenges associated with the use of liquid metal coolants, primary among these being the extremely rapid oxidation (combustion) that occurs at the high operating temperatures in reactors. The project has identified a number of areas for which gaps existed in knowledge pertinent to reactor safety analyses. Experimental and analysis capabilities were developed in these areas to varying degrees. In conjunction with team participation in a DOE gap analysis panel, focus was on the oxidation of spilled sodium on thermally massive surfaces. These are spills onto surfaces that substantially cool the sodium during the oxidation process, and they are relevant because standard risk mitigation procedures seek to move spill environments into this regime through rapid draining of spilled sodium. While the spilled sodium is not quenched, the burning mode is different in that there is a transition to a smoldering mode that has not been comprehensively described previously. Prior work has described spilled sodium as a pool fire, but there is a crucial, experimentally-observed transition to a smoldering mode of oxidation. A series of experimental measurements have comprehensively described the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. A new physics-based model has been developed that also predicts the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. The model introduces smoldering oxidation through porous oxide layers to go beyond traditional pool fire analyses that have been carried out previously in order to predict experimentally observed trends. Combined, these developments add significantly to the safety

  14. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  15. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  16. Carbide and nitride fuels for advanced burner reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Under the U.S. fast reactor program, reference and alternative 1000 MWth Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts were developed using ternary metallic (U-TRU-Zr) and mixed oxide (UO2+TRUO2) fuels. Recently, mixed carbide and nitride fuels have been considered as fast reactor fuels on the basis of their high density, compatibility with coolant, high melting temperature, and excellent thermal conductivity although they are ceramic fuel like a mixed oxide fuel. Thus, the performance of the ABR core loaded with carbide and nitride fuels was evaluated in this study with an expectation that the carbide and nitride fuels can mitigate disadvantages of both metallic and oxide fuels in the ABR: favorable passive safety features in a severe accident compared to the oxide core, a higher discharge burnup compared to the metallic core, and a potential to increase thermal efficiency. All calculations performed in this study were focused on the neutronics characteristics, although the fabrication and irradiation experiences for carbide and nitride fuels are limited and some problems were observed in the reprocessing and irradiation of these fuels. The mixed monocarbide and mixed mononitride fuels were selected as the alternative fuel forms and the ABR core concepts with these fuels were developed based on the reference 1000 MWth ABR core concepts. For consistency, the potential design goals used in the reference ABR core concepts were also employed in this study: a 1000 MWth power rating, medium TRU conversion ratio of ∼0.75, a compact core, one-year operational cycle length at least with a capacity factor of 90%, sufficient shutdown margin with a limited maximum single control assembly fault, and possible use of either metallic or any ceramic fuels in the same core layout. The core layout and outer assembly dimensions of the reference 1000 MWth ABR core were kept, but the intra assembly design parameters were varied to maximize the discharge burnup within the

  17. Digital control application for the advanced boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is a 1300 MWe class Nuclear Power Plant whose design studies and demonstration tests are being performed by the three manufacturers, General Electric, Toshiba and Hitachi, under requirement specifications from the Tokyo Electric Power Company. The goals are to apply new technology to the BWR in order to achieve enhanced operational efficiencies, improved safety measures and cost reductions. In the plant instrumentation and control areas, traditional analog control equipment and wire cables will be replaced by distributed digital microprocessor based control units communicating with each other and the control room over fiber optic multiplexed data buses

  18. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h)-1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  19. Novel Engineered Refractory Materials for Advanced Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, Steven [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Eapen, Jacob [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Maria, Jon-Paul [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Weber, William [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of DOE-NEUP grant 10-853 titled “Novel engineered refractory materials for advanced reactor applications”. The project spanned 48 months (36 months under the original grant plus a 12 month no cost extension). The overarching goal of this work was to fabricate and characterize refractory materials engineered at the atomic scale with emphasis on their tolerance to accumulated radiation damage. With an emphasis on nano-scale structure, this work included atomic scale simulation to study the underlying mechanisms for modified radiation tolerance at these atomic scales.

  20. The evolution of gasification processes and reactors and the utilization of the coal gas. A proposition for the implementation of the gasification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermochemical treatment of coal by gasification, considered as a non-polluting technology to turn the coal highly-profitably is one of the alternative ways to produce gas with a high effective caloric capacity. Due to its advantages, the gasification has made through the last few decades significant advances from the point of view of the process efficiency (chemical, thermal), of motor outputs (in m3 producer gas / m2 reactor cross section x hour), of the solutions of supplying energy to support the endothermic reactions implied by the process, and especially of the reactors. Reactors have been developed from gas generators. Starting from gas generators various advanced reactors (of 1 st to 3 rd generation) have been developed to produce air gas, water gas or mixed gas. Applications of the producer gas were developed using it either as fuel or as synthesis gas in chemical industry or else as a substitute to the natural gas in combined cycle gas turbines where the gasification plant was integrated. In Romania there are projects in the field of coal gasification, namely at ICPET-RESEARCH, that can offer advanced technologies. One of these projects deals with the construction of the first demonstrative gasification plant based on a highly efficient process and equipped with a 10 G cal/h reactor. (author). 1 tab., 12 refs

  1. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor---the nuclear light bulb concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (>1800 s) and thrust (>445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (∼4000 K). The following paper describes analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented here include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRR. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRR for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept

  2. Development history of the gas turbine modular high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) as an environmentally agreeable and efficient power source to support the generation of electricity and achieve a broad range of high temperature industrial applications has been an evolutionary process spanning over four decades. This process has included ongoing major development in both the HTGR as a nuclear energy source and associated power conversion systems from the steam cycle to the gas turbine. This paper follows the development process progressively through individual plant designs from early research of the 1950s to the present focus on the gas turbine modular HTGR. (author)

  3. The advanced light water reactor program approach for gaining acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric utilities in the US face several obstacles and disincentives to building new nuclear power plants. A reformed licensing process that permits true one-step licensing is a prerequisite, as is timely implementation of the technical and political solutions of the high-level waste issue by the federal government and low-level waste storage by state governments. In addition, a more tangible acceptance of the need, benefits, and residual risk of nuclear power by all concerned institutions is an essential impetus for the return of the nuclear option. An improved version of the light water reactor (LWR) is expected to be the preferred choice for the next increment of nuclear capacity ordered in the US. The paper discusses the need for research and advanced LWR development. The advanced LWR program, sponsored jointly by the utility industry and the US Department of Energy (DOE), offers the most promising approach to developing the next generation of nuclear power plants

  4. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas...

  5. Optimum Reactor Outlet Temperatures for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Integrated with Industrial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a temperature sensitivity study conducted to identify the optimum reactor operating temperatures for producing the heat and hydrogen required for industrial processes associated with the proposed new high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This study assumed that primary steam outputs of the reactor were delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and the helium coolant was delivered at 7 MPa at 625-925 C. The secondary outputs of were electricity and hydrogen. For the power generation analysis, it was assumed that the power cycle efficiency was 66% of the maximum theoretical efficiency of the Carnot thermodynamic cycle. Hydrogen was generated via the high temperature steam electrolysis or the steam methane reforming process. The study indicates that optimum or a range of reactor outlet temperatures could be identified to further refine the process evaluations that were developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactor-integrated production of synthetic transportation fuels, ammonia, and ammonia derivatives, oil from unconventional sources, and substitute natural gas from coal.

  6. Optimum Reactor Outlet Temperatures for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Integrated with Industrial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee O. Nelson

    2011-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a temperature sensitivity study conducted to identify the optimum reactor operating temperatures for producing the heat and hydrogen required for industrial processes associated with the proposed new high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This study assumed that primary steam outputs of the reactor were delivered at 17 MPa and 540°C and the helium coolant was delivered at 7 MPa at 625–925°C. The secondary outputs of were electricity and hydrogen. For the power generation analysis, it was assumed that the power cycle efficiency was 66% of the maximum theoretical efficiency of the Carnot thermodynamic cycle. Hydrogen was generated via the hightemperature steam electrolysis or the steam methane reforming process. The study indicates that optimum or a range of reactor outlet temperatures could be identified to further refine the process evaluations that were developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactor-integrated production of synthetic transportation fuels, ammonia, and ammonia derivatives, oil from unconventional sources, and substitute natural gas from coal.

  7. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  8. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  9. Gas entrainment issues in sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Main sources of gas and related issues in SFR are presented. • Various approaches of gas transport are briefly described. • Previous experimental studies to reduce gas entrainment are reported. • Present evaluation of free surface gas entrainment is presented. - Abstract: Sodium cooled fast reactors have been developed in France for nearly 50 years. The so-called Astrid technology demonstrator is currently designed in the frame of Generation IV deployment. Gas entrainment in the primary sodium circuit is a key issue as it can lead to safety problems in case of accumulation and transport of large quantity of gas through the core. The paper first introduces the main problems caused by the presence of gas in the primary sodium circuit, the various sources of gas and the main issues on gas transport. As sodium–argon free surface is potentially an important source of gas entrainment in the primary circuit, we present the main results obtained in past experimental studies on vortex type gas entrainment at free surface. Water tests were performed in a simple flow condition to study the physical process of vortex occurrence and gas entrainment. Other water tests were performed in representative hot pool models at different scales to analyze similarity criteria. Moreover, design improvements and local devices were tested to avoid gas entrainment at the free surface. Nowadays, numerical tools are progressively used to estimate the risk of gas entrainment at the free surface. We present the methodology in progress to define local criteria on vortex occurrence and gas entrainment, and to apply these criteria to global calculations of the whole pool. A Front-Tracking method coupled to a Large Eddy Simulation approach is implemented in TRIOU code to compute free surface instabilities and vortex occurrence. Experimental data from the literature are used to validate the numerical approach and a new test facility called BANGA is in progress at CEA to

  10. Summary of the Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) Phase 2 Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark Raymond [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an end-of-year summary reflecting the progress and status of proposed regulatory design criteria for advanced non-LWR designs in accordance with the Level 3 milestone in M3AT-15IN2001017 in work package AT-15IN200101. These criteria have been designated as ARDC, and they provide guidance to future applicants for addressing the GDC that are currently applied specifically to LWR designs. The report provides a summary of Phase 2 activities related to the various tasks associated with ARDC development and the subsequent development of example adaptations of ARDC for Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) and modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs.

  11. Coolant radiologic gas production in SP-100 class reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolant radiologic helium gas production rates were calculated for an SP-100 type reactor using the discrete ordinates code TWODANT. Neutron cross sections were developed from ENDF/B-V data via the MATXS6s master cross section library. Calculations were performed using an S4/P1 approximation and 80 neutron energy groups. Results indicate that the primary helium production reactions in a reactor utilizing 0.1 at. pct Li-6 coolant are (Li-7)(n, n-prime t) (82 percent) followed by (Li-6)(n,t) (16 percent), and (Li-7)(n,gamma) (1 percent). A reactor operating at 2.5 MWt for 7.3 years using 0.1 at. pct Li-6 coolant is predicted to produce approximately 0.16 moles of helium gas in the coolant. For a reactor using natural lithium coolant, gas production is increased to 1.4 moles. A parametric study was conducted which enabled the development of an empirical correlation to predict helium production as a function of coolant Li-6 at. pct and void fraction. 9 refs

  12. Design approach to the development of an advanced HANARO research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the experiences of the HANARO construction and operation, a project to design an advanced research reactor was launched in 2003 to prepare for the future needs of a research reactor. Many improvements identified during the HANARO operation and utilization will be incorporated into the design of the advanced research reactor. This paper deals with the basic principles of the design approach and the preliminary design features of the reactor under study

  13. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  14. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, W. A.; Hassan, K. H.; Cullen, J. D.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Shaw, A.; Wylie, S. R.

    2011-08-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  15. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wali, W A; Hassan, K H; Cullen, J D; Al-Shamma' a, A I; Shaw, A; Wylie, S R, E-mail: w.wali@2009.ljmu.ac.uk [Built Environment and Sustainable Technologies Institute (BEST), School of the Built Environment, Faculty of Technology and Environment Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-17

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  16. Economics of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited natural uranium resources together with their low utilization in current lightwater reactors (LWR) on the one hand and the high capital investments for a LWR and fast breeder reactor system resulting in a high fuel utilization are the most important reasons for research and development (R+D) work related to a high converting APWR system. It is the main task of this analysis to study the economic behaviour of an APWR combining its technical and physical parameters with an economic data base. After introductional remarks chapter II presents the potential improvements of the uranium utilization and their importance for a whole national economy. Chapter III shows the micro-economic aspects for an electricity producing utility using such an APWR plant. The chapter is restricted to the fuel cycle costs and their dependence on various parameters. The corresponding costs of other nuclear power plants are described in chapter IV and compared to those of the APWR in chapter V. Finally a cost comparison on the basis of the electricity generating costs will complete the economic picture of an advanced pressurized water reactor. (orig./UA)

  17. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  18. Analysis of calculated neutron flux response at detectors of G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor (RSG-GAS Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi Purpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS) reactor core possesses 4 fission-chamber detectors to measure intermediate power level of RSG-GAS reactor. Another detector, also fission-chamber detector, is intended to measure power level of RSG-GAS reactor. To investigate influence of space to the neutron flux values for each detector measuring intermediate and power levels has been carried out. The calculation was carried out using combination of WIMS/D4 and CITATION-3D code and focused on calculation of neutron flux at different detector location of RSG-GAS typical working core various scenarios. For different scenarios, all calculation results showed that each detector, located at different location in the RSG-GAS reactor core, causes different neutron flux occurred in the reactor core due to spatial time effect

  19. Design and development of gas cooled reactors with closed cycle gas turbines. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological advances over the past fifteen years in the design of turbomachinery, recuperators and magnetic bearings provide the potential for a quantum improvement in nuclear power generation economics through the use of the HTGR with a closed cycle gas turbine. Enhanced international co-operation among national gas cooled reactor programmes in these common technology areas could facilitate the development of this nuclear power concept thereby achieving safety, environmental and economic benefits with overall reduced development costs. This TCM and Workshop was convened to provide the opportunity to review and examine the status of design activities and technology development in national HTGR programmes with specific emphasis on the closed cycle gas turbine, and to identify pathways which take advantage of the opportunity for international co-operation in the development of this concept. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  1. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap-Yan Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  2. Gas core reactor power plants designed for low proliferation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of gas core nuclear power plants to provide adequate power while maintaining a low inventory and low divertability of fissile material is studied. Four concepts were examined. Two used a mixture of UF6 and helium in the reactor cavities, and two used a uranium-argon plasma, held away from the walls by vortex buffer confinement. Power levels varied from 200 to 2500 MWth. Power plant subsystems were sized to determine their fissile material inventories. All reactors ran, with a breeding ratio of unity, on 233U born from thorium. Fission product removal was continuous. Newly born 233U was removed continuously from the breeding blanket and returned to the reactor cavities. The 2500-MWth power plant contained a total of 191 kg of 233U. Less than 4 kg could be diverted before the reactor shut down. The plasma reactor power plants had smaller inventories. In general, inventories were about a factor of 10 less than those in current U.S. power reactors

  3. FFTF and Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-10-31

    This Resource Load Schedule (RLS) addresses two missions. The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) mission, funded by DOE-EM, is to transition assigned, surplus facilities to a safe and compliant, low-cost, stable, deactivated condition (requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance) pending eventual reuse or D&D. Facilities to be transitioned include the 309 Building Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) and Nuclear Energy Legacy facilities. This mission is funded through the Environmental Management (EM) Project Baseline Summary (PBS) RL-TP11, ''Advanced Reactors Transition.'' The second mission, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Project, is funded through budget requests submitted to the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (DOE-NE). The FFTF Project mission is maintaining the FFTF, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and affiliated 400 Area buildings in a safe and compliant standby condition. This mission is to preserve the condition of the plant hardware, software, and personnel in a manner not to preclude a plant restart. This revision of the Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) is based upon the technical scope in the latest revision of the following project and management plans: Fast Flux Test Facility Standby Plan (Reference 1); Hanford Site Sodium Management Plan (Reference 2); and 309 Building Transition Plan (Reference 4). The technical scope, cost, and schedule baseline is also in agreement with the concurrent revision to the ART Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP), which is available in an electronic version (only) on the Hanford Local Area Network, within the ''Hanford Data Integrator (HANDI)'' application.

  4. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  5. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) liquid-metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) presents the final results of a preapplication design review for the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) liquid metal reactor (Project 673). The SAFR conceptual design was submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ''Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (51 FR 24643 which provides for the early Commission review and interaction). The standard SAFR plant design consists of four identical reactor modules, referred to as ''paks,'' each with a thermal output rating of 900 MWt, coupled with four steam turbine-generator sets. The total electrical output was held to be 1400 MWe. This SER represents the NRC staff's preliminary technical evaluation of the safety features in the SAFR design. It must be recognized that final conclusions in all matters discussed in this SER require approval by the Commission. During the NRC staff review of the SAFR conceptual design, DOE terminated work on this design in September 1988. This SER documents the work done to that date and no additional work is planned for the SAFR

  6. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  7. Advanced Neutron Source reactor control and plant protection systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the reactor control and plant protection systems' conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). The Plant Instrumentation, Control, and Data Systems and the Reactor Instrumentation and Control System of the ANS are planned as an integrated digital system with a hierarchical, distributed control structure of qualified redundant subsystems and a hybrid digital/analog protection system to achieve the necessary fast response for critical parameters. Data networks transfer information between systems for control, display, and recording. Protection is accomplished by the rapid insertion of negative reactivity with control rods or other reactivity mechanisms to shut down the fission process and reduce heat generation in the fuel. The shutdown system is designed for high functional reliability by use of conservative design features and a high degree of redundance and independence to guard against single failures. Two independent reactivity control systems of different design principles are provided, and each system has multiple independent rods or subsystems to provide appropriate margin for malfunctions such as stuck rods or other single failures. Each system is capable of maintaining the reactor in a cold shutdown condition independently of the functioning of the other system. A highly reliable, redundant channel control system is used not only to achieve high availability of the reactor, but also to reduce challenges to the protection system by maintaining important plant parameters within appropriate limits. The control system has a number of contingency features to maintain acceptable, off-normal conditions in spite of limited control or plant component failures thereby further reducing protection system challenges

  8. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  9. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  10. Parametric Evaluation of Large-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Using Different Advanced Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 C to 950 C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered

  11. Parametric evaluation of large-scale high-temperature electrolysis hydrogen production using different advanced nuclear reactor heat sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800-950 oC, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an intermediate heat exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the sweep gas loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed with the objective of evaluating the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency of the integrated plant design for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycles producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  12. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft(trademark) Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process the information and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway. During this quarter, we have presented our project and discussed the software to numerous Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) workshops located in various regions of the United States

  13. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R and D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. This paper presents current R and D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs

  14. Thermal hydraulics of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R and D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: · High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior · High temperature materials qualification · Design methods development and validation · Hydrogen production technologies · Energy conversion. This paper presents current R and D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. (author)

  15. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; Davie Petti

    2009-10-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  16. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nation’s energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nation’s future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillar’s DIGN program under the ARES program. This work

  17. CFD analysis of multiphase coolant flow through fuel rod bundles in advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The key component of a pressure tube nuclear reactor core is pressure tube filled with a stream of fuel bundles. This feature makes them suitable for CFD thermal-hydraulic analysis. A methodology for CFD analysis applied to pressure tube nuclear reactors is presented in this paper, which is focused on advanced pressure tube nuclear reactors. The complex flow conditions inside pressure tube are analysed by using the Eulerian multiphase model implemented in FLUENT CFD computer code. Fuel rods in these channels are superheated but the liquid is under high pressure, so it is sub-cooled in normal operating conditions on most of pressure tube length. In the second half of pressure tube length, the onset of boiling occurs, so the flow consists of a gas liquid mixture, with the volume of gas increasing along the length of the channel in the direction of the flow. Limited computer resources enforced us to use CFD analysis for segments of pressure tube. Significant local geometries (junctions, spacers) were simulated. Main results of this work are: prediction of main thermal-hydraulic parameters along pressure tube including CHF evaluation through fuel assemblies. (authors)

  18. Experimental Investigation of Gas-Lift Use in Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work briefly describes the selection of type of a two-phase flow, suitable for intensifying of a natural flow of nuclear reactors with liquid fuel – cooling mixture molten salts and the description of a „Two-phase flow demonstrator“ (TFD) used for experimental study of the „gas-lift“ system, and its influence on the support of natural convection. The experimental device works with water and the air is used as a gas. The used perspex limits the temperature to 60°C. There are stated relations for the description of a natural flow in model device and relations for determination of suitable liquid/gas ratio of the gas-lift in the study. There is described the measuring device and the application of the TFD sensor. The flow rate of water is measured by the induction flow meter that gives a voltage signal, which is brought into a computer for processing. Measuring of the velocity distribution and the size of the bubbles is performed by using the PIV method (Particle Image Velocimetry). There was created a model of dispersive bubble flow for application in nuclear reactors. The basic calculation is performed by using the homogeneous flow, where is considered, that the velocity of the fluid and the gas is equal and there is measured the relative share of the gas in homogeneous mixture with the fluid for this case. There are considered the temperature, pressure and flow rate velocity changes of the fluid and gas in the gas-lift cylinder and their influence on the size and velocity of the bubbles for the heat and mass transport of this mixture by the gas-lift cylinder. (author)

  19. Membrane contactor/separator for an advanced ozone membrane reactor for treatment of recalcitrant organic pollutants in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced ozone membrane reactor that synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone gas, membrane contactor for pollutant adsorption and reaction, and membrane separator for clean water production is described. The membrane reactor represents an order of magnitude improvement over traditional semibatch reactor design and is capable of complete conversion of recalcitrant endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in water at less than three minutes residence time. Coating the membrane contactor with alumina and hydrotalcite (Mg/Al=3) adsorbs and traps the organics in the reaction zone resulting in 30% increase of total organic carbon (TOC) removal. Large surface area coating that diffuses surface charges from adsorbed polar organic molecules is preferred as it reduces membrane polarization that is detrimental to separation. - Graphical abstract: Advanced ozone membrane reactor synergistically combines membrane distributor for ozone, membrane contactor for sorption and reaction and membrane separator for clean water production to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement in treatment performance compared to traditional ozone reactor. Highlights: ► Novel reactor using membranes for ozone distributor, reaction contactor and water separator. ► Designed to achieve an order of magnitude enhancement over traditional reactor. ► Al2O3 and hydrotalcite coatings capture and trap pollutants giving additional 30% TOC removal. ► High surface area coating prevents polarization and improves membrane separation and life.

  20. Preliminary study or RSG-GAS reactor fuel element integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After 8 years of operation, RSG-GAS was able to reach 15 cycles of reactor operation with 116 irradiated fuels, whereas 49 fuels were produced by NUKEM; and the other 67 were produced by PEBN-BATAN. At the 15Th cycles, it have been used 40 standard fuels and 8 control fuels (Forty standard fuels and eight control fuels have been used in the 15th core cycles). Several activities have been performed in the reactor, to investigate the fuel integrity, among of them are: .fuel visual test with under water camera, which the results were recorder in the video cassette, primary water quality test during, reactor operation, fuel failure detector system examination and compared the PIE results in the Radiometallurgy Installation (RMI). The results showed that the fuel integrity, before and after irradiation, have still good performance and the fission products have not been released yet